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Sample records for primary amoebic meningoencephalitis

  1. Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ritu; Parashar, M K; Kale, Aditya

    2015-04-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis due to free living amoeba, also called 'brain eating amoeba', Naegleria fowleri, was detected in retroviral disease patient of 40 years who has history of using well water. Patient was admitted with severe headache, fever intermittent, nausea, vomiting and slurring of speech. CT scan and MRI scan findings were normal. CSF examination showed increased protein, low sugar and predominant lymphocytes. CSF was negative for cryptococcal antigen but wet mount preparation showed highly motile free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri. Patient was put on Amphotericin B, Metronidazole, Rifampicin in addition to ART and ATT and other supportive medications. His headache was relieved and patient improved and was discharged on request. Earlier eight cases have been reported from India of which four cases survived the acute episode. PMID:26591176

  2. Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in Britain.

    PubMed

    Symmers, W C

    1969-11-22

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis is caused by amoebae of the genera Naegleria and Hartmannella (Acanthamoeba), which ordinarily are free-living saprophytes. The infection may be acquired from fresh water-for example, while bathing-the amoebae invading the nasal mucosa and reaching the meninges and brain along the olfactory nerve filaments. The disease is designated "primary" to distinguish it from meningocerebral infection caused by the parasitic amoebae, particularly Entamoeba histolytica, which invade the central nervous system only as a result of dissemination in the blood stream from lesions in other parts of the body.During histological reappraisal of old specimens in a medical museum in London an instance of amoebic meningoencephalitis histologically indistinguishable from the published cases has been found. The specimen dates from 1909. The patient was said to be from Essex. What may have been another case, seen in Northern Ireland in 1937, is also described briefly. These observations may indicate that this disease occurs in the British Isles.Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of every case of acute meningitis. PMID:5354833

  3. Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis: Neurochemotaxis and Neurotropic Preferences of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Baig, Abdul Mannan

    2016-08-17

    Naegleria fowleri causes one of the most devastating necrotic meningoencephalitis in humans. The infection caused by this free-living amoeba is universally fatal within a week of onset of the signs and symptoms of the disease called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). In all the affected patients, there is always a history of entry of water into the nose. Even though the diagnostic and treatment protocols have been revised and improved, the obstinate nature of the disease can be gauged by the fact that the mortality rate has persisted around ∼95% over the past 60 years. Some of the unanswered questions regarding PAM are is there a neurochemical basis of the chemotaxis of N. fowleri to the brain? What immune evasion means occurs preceding the neurotropic invasion? What is the contribution of the acute inflammatory response in the fatal cases? Can a combination of anti-amoebic drugs with antagonism of the acute inflammation help save the patient's life? As prevention remains the most valuable safeguard against N. fowleri, a quicker diagnosis, better understanding of the pathogenesis of PAM coupled with testing of newer and safer drugs could improve the chances of survival in patients affected with PAM. PMID:27447543

  4. Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri: an old enemy presenting new challenges.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-08-01

    First discovered in 1899, Naegleria fowleri is a protist pathogen, known to infect the central nervous system and produce primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. The most distressing aspect is that the fatality rate has remained more than 95%, despite our advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Although rare worldwide, most cases have been reported in the United States, Australia, and Europe (France). A large number of cases in developing countries go unnoticed. In particular, religious, recreational, and cultural practices such as ritual ablution and/or purifications, Ayurveda, and the use of neti pots for nasal irrigation can contribute to this devastating infection. With increasing water scarcity and public reliance on water storage, here we debate the need for increased awareness of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis and the associated risk factors, particularly in developing countries. PMID:25121759

  5. Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis Caused by Naegleria fowleri: An Old Enemy Presenting New Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    First discovered in 1899, Naegleria fowleri is a protist pathogen, known to infect the central nervous system and produce primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. The most distressing aspect is that the fatality rate has remained more than 95%, despite our advances in antimicrobial chemotherapy and supportive care. Although rare worldwide, most cases have been reported in the United States, Australia, and Europe (France). A large number of cases in developing countries go unnoticed. In particular, religious, recreational, and cultural practices such as ritual ablution and/or purifications, Ayurveda, and the use of neti pots for nasal irrigation can contribute to this devastating infection. With increasing water scarcity and public reliance on water storage, here we debate the need for increased awareness of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis and the associated risk factors, particularly in developing countries. PMID:25121759

  6. [Molecular diagnosis of a fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in Guadeloupe (French West Indies)].

    PubMed

    Nicolas, M; De Jonckheere, J F; Pernin, P; Bataille, H; Le Bris, V; Herrmann-Storck, C

    2010-02-01

    We report the first case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in a 9-year-old boy in Guadeloupe. The outcome was rapidly fatal in 7 days. The patient presumably acquired the infection by swimming and diving in a basin supplied by natural thermal water 1 week before onset of the disease. The possibility of a free-living amoeba infection was suspected both on the negativity of all bacterial and viral initial tests and on the observation of peculiar cells in stained cerebrospinal fluid samples. Although the amoeba was not isolated, Naegleria fowleri could be identified by polymerase chain reaction with specific primers on DNA extracted from frozen cerebrospinal fluid samples. Furthermore, as the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1) region of DNA is variable in length between the different strains of N. fowleri, sequencing of the amplified ITS1 demonstrated that the responsible N. fowleri strain belongs to a common genotype present in the American and European continent. PMID:20099054

  7. Assessing the risk of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis from swimming in the presence of environmental Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Cabanes, P A; Wallet, F; Pringuez, E; Pernin, P

    2001-07-01

    Free-living Naegleria fowleri amoebae cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Because of the apparent conflict between their ubiquity and the rarity of cases observed, we sought to develop a model characterizing the risk of PAM after swimming as a function of the concentration of N. fowleri. The probability of death from PAM as a function of the number of amoebae inhaled is modeled according to results obtained from animals infected with amoeba strains. The calculation of the probability of inhaling one or more amoebae while swimming is based on a double hypothesis: that the distribution of amoebae in the water follows a Poisson distribution and that the mean quantity of water inhaled while swimming is 10 ml. The risk of PAM for a given concentration of amoebae is then obtained by summing the following products: the probability of inhaling n amoebae x the probability of PAM associated with inhaling these n amoebae. We chose the lognormal model to assess the risk of PAM because it yielded the best analysis of the studentized residuals. Nonetheless, the levels of risk thereby obtained cannot be applied to humans without correction, because they are substantially greater than those indicated by available epidemiologic data. The curve was thus adjusted by a factor calculated with the least-squares method. This provides the PAM risk in humans as a function of the N. fowleri concentration in the river. For example, the risk is 8.5 x 10(-8) at a concentration of 10 N. fowleri amoebae per liter. PMID:11425704

  8. Assessing the Risk of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis from Swimming in the Presence of Environmental Naegleria fowleri

    PubMed Central

    Cabanes, Pierre-André; Wallet, France; Pringuez, Emmanuelle; Pernin, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Free-living Naegleria fowleri amoebae cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Because of the apparent conflict between their ubiquity and the rarity of cases observed, we sought to develop a model characterizing the risk of PAM after swimming as a function of the concentration of N. fowleri. The probability of death from PAM as a function of the number of amoebae inhaled is modeled according to results obtained from animals infected with amoeba strains. The calculation of the probability of inhaling one or more amoebae while swimming is based on a double hypothesis: that the distribution of amoebae in the water follows a Poisson distribution and that the mean quantity of water inhaled while swimming is 10 ml. The risk of PAM for a given concentration of amoebae is then obtained by summing the following products: the probability of inhaling n amoebae × the probability of PAM associated with inhaling these n amoebae. We chose the lognormal model to assess the risk of PAM because it yielded the best analysis of the studentized residuals. Nonetheless, the levels of risk thereby obtained cannot be applied to humans without correction, because they are substantially greater than those indicated by available epidemiologic data. The curve was thus adjusted by a factor calculated with the least-squares method. This provides the PAM risk in humans as a function of the N. fowleri concentration in the river. For example, the risk is 8.5 × 10−8 at a concentration of 10 N. fowleri amoebae per liter. PMID:11425704

  9. Naegleria fowleri That Induces Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis: Rapid Diagnosis and Rare Case of Survival in a 12-Year-Old Caucasian Girl.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Andrew L; Reed, Tameika; Stewart, Charlotte; Levy, Rebecca A

    2016-05-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare and almost always fatal disease that is caused by Naegleria fowleri, a freshwater thermophilic amoeba. Our case involves an adolescent female who presented with fever of unknown origin. A lumbar puncture was performed, and the Wright-Giemsa and Gram stained cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytospin slides showed numerous organisms. Experienced medical technologists in the microbiology and hematology laboratories identified the organisms as morphologically consistent with Naegleria species. The laboratory made a rapid diagnosis and alerted emergency department care providers within 75 minutes. The patient was treated for PAM with amphotericin, rifampin, azithromycin, fluconazole and aggressive supportive therapy including dexamethasone. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) was contacted, and miltefosine, an investigational medication, was started. Additional treatment included an intraventricular shunt and controlled hypothermia in order to mitigate potential cerebral edema. Our patient is a rare success story, as she was diagnosed swiftly, successfully treated, and survived PAM. PMID:26984830

  10. Fatal primary meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Shariq, Ali; Afridi, Faisal Iqbal; Farooqi, Badar Jahan; Ahmed, Sumaira; Hussain, Arif

    2014-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a free living parasite which habitats in fresh water reservoirs. It causes a fatal nervous system infection known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis by invading through cribriform plate of nose and gaining entry into brain. We report a case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri in Karachi, Pakistan, in a 42 years old male poultry farm worker having no history of swimming. Clinical course was fulminant and death occurred within one week of hospital admission. Naegleria fowleri was detected by wet mount technique in the sample of cerebrospinal fluid collected by lumbar puncture of patient. This is a serious problem and requires immediate steps to prevent general population to get affected by this lethal neurological infection. PMID:25052979

  11. Amoebic meningoencephalitis and disseminated infection caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris in a Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Gjeltema, Jenessa L; Troan, Brigid; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Liu, Lindy; Da Silva, Alexandre J; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Tobias, Jeremy R; Loomis, Michael R; De Voe, Ryan S

    2016-02-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 22-year-old male gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) housed in a zoo was evaluated for signs of lethargy, head-holding, and cervical stiffness followed by development of neurologic abnormalities including signs of depression, lip droop, and tremors. CLINICAL FINDINGS Physical examination under general anesthesia revealed a tooth root abscess and suboptimal body condition. A CBC and serum biochemical analysis revealed mild anemia, neutrophilia and eosinopenia consistent with a stress leukogram, and signs consistent with dehydration. Subsequent CSF analysis revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and markedly increased total protein concentration. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME Despite treatment with antimicrobials, steroids, and additional supportive care measures, the gorilla's condition progressed to an obtunded mentation with grand mal seizures over the course of 10 days. Therefore, the animal was euthanized and necropsy was performed. Multifocal areas of malacia and hemorrhage were scattered throughout the brain; on histologic examination, these areas consisted of necrosis and hemorrhage associated with mixed inflammation, vascular necrosis, and intralesional amoebic trophozoites. Tan foci were also present in the kidneys and pancreas. Immunohistochemical testing positively labeled free-living amoebae within the brain, kidneys, eyes, pancreas, heart, and pulmonary capillaries. Subsequent PCR assay of CSF and frozen kidney samples identified the organism as Balamuthia mandrillaris, confirming a diagnosis of amoebic meningoencephalitis. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Infection with B mandrillaris has been reported to account for 2.8% of captive gorilla deaths in North America over the past 19 years. Clinicians working with gorillas should have a high index of suspicion for this diagnosis when evaluating and treating animals with signs of centrally localized neurologic disease. PMID:26799111

  12. Identification and significance of Naegleria fowleri isolated from the hot spring which related to the first primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) patient in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tung, Min-Che; Hsu, Bing-Mu; Tao, Chi-Wei; Lin, Wei-Chen; Tsai, Hsiu-Feng; Ji, Dar-Der; Shen, Shu-Min; Chen, Jung-Sheng; Shih, Feng-Cheng; Huang, Yu-Li

    2013-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri can cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a rapidly developing and highly lethal infectious disease. The first confirmed case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in Taiwan was reported in November 2011, in which the patient visited a thermal spring recreational area 1 week prior to hospitalisation. Water sampling was performed to verify the presence of Naegleria at the facility. According to our results, 32% and 20% of recreational water samples were contaminated with Naegleria spp. and Acanthamoeba spp., respectively. The genotypes of Naegleria identified at the hot spring included N. fowleri, Naegleria australiensis and Naegleria lovaniensis. Using PCR, it was determined that the strain of N. fowleri in one sample possessed the same genotype 2 as the clinical isolate. Thus, the thermal spring was suggested to be the likely source of infection. This is the first known instance of simultaneously isolating N. fowleri from both a patient as well as from a hot spring in Taiwan. Following this initial study, the pools at the thermal spring recreational area were drained, scrubbed and disinfected, and a follow-up study was performed 1 month later. Naegleria fowleri was not detected in follow-up testing; however, other Naegleria spp. were identified. We postulate that the biofilm in the waterlines may have provided a reservoir for free-living amoebae. The presence/absence of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria spp. did not differ significantly with any measured parameters related to water quality; however, a high percentage of the thermal water pool samples were contaminated with Naegleria or Acanthamoeba. Thus, amoebic contamination may present a serious threat to the health of humans who engage in leisure activities at thermal springs. PMID:23665128

  13. Successful Treatment of an Adolescent with Naegleria fowleri Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linam, W. Matthew; Ahmed, Mubbasheer; Cope, Jennifer R.; Chu, Craig; Visvesvara, Govinda S.; da Silva, Alexandre J.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Green, Jerril

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a thermophilic free-living ameba that causes primary amebic meningoencephalitis. Infections are nearly always fatal. We present the third well-documented survivor of this infection in North America. Survival most likely resulted from a combination of early identification and treatment, use of a combination of antimicrobials including miltefosine and management of elevated intracranial pressure based on traumatic brain injury principles. PMID:25667249

  14. Successful treatment of an adolescent with Naegleria fowleri primary amebic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Linam, W Matthew; Ahmed, Mubbasheer; Cope, Jennifer R; Chu, Craig; Visvesvara, Govinda S; da Silva, Alexandre J; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Green, Jerril

    2015-03-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a thermophilic, free-living ameba that causes primary amebic meningoencephalitis. The infections are nearly always fatal. We present the third well-documented survivor of this infection in North America. The patient's survival most likely resulted from a variety of factors: early identification and treatment, use of a combination of antimicrobial agents (including miltefosine), and management of elevated intracranial pressure based on the principles of traumatic brain injury. PMID:25667249

  15. Amoebic dysentery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Amoebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. It is transmitted in areas where poor sanitation allows contamination of drinking water and food with faeces. In these areas, up to 40% of people with diarrhoea may have amoebic dysentery. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of drug treatments for amoebic dysentery in endemic areas? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 6 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: diiodohydroxyquinoline (iodoquinol), diloxanide, emetine, metronidazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, and tinidazole. PMID:21477391

  16. Amoebic dysentery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Amoebic dysentery is caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. It is transmitted in areas where poor sanitation allows contamination of drinking water and food with faeces. In these areas, up to 40% of people with diarrhoea may have amoebic dysentery. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of drug treatments for amoebic dysentery in endemic areas? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 6 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: diiodohydroxyquinoline (iodoquinol), diloxanide, emetine, metronidazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, and tinidazole. PMID:23991750

  17. Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis: What Have We Learned in the Last 5 Years?

    PubMed

    Cope, Jennifer R; Ali, Ibne K

    2016-09-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a devastating infection of the brain caused by the thermophilic free-living ameba, Naegleria fowleri. Infection can occur when water containing the ameba enters the body through the nose, usually during recreational water activities such as swimming or diving. Historically, in the USA, cases were mostly reported from the warmer southern-tier states. In the last 5 years, several notable changes have been documented in PAM epidemiology including a northward expansion of infections and new types of water exposures. The recent reports of two PAM survivors provide hope for improved outcomes with early diagnosis and aggressive treatment. Advanced molecular laboratory tools such as genome sequencing might provide more insight into the pathogenicity of N. fowleri. Clinicians treating patients with meningitis and warm freshwater exposure are encouraged to consider PAM in their differential diagnoses. PMID:27614893

  18. Use of the Novel Therapeutic Agent Miltefosine for the Treatment of Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis: Report of 1 Fatal and 1 Surviving Case.

    PubMed

    Cope, Jennifer R; Conrad, Dennis A; Cohen, Naiomi; Cotilla, Manuel; DaSilva, Alexandre; Jackson, Jonathan; Visvesvara, Govinda S

    2016-03-15

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fulminant central nervous system infection caused by the thermophilic free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. Few survivals have been documented and adequate treatment is lacking. We report 2 PAM cases, 1 fatal and 1 surviving, treated with the novel antiparasitic agent miltefosine. PMID:26679626

  19. Notes from the Field: Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Associated with Exposure to Swimming Pool Water Supplied by an Overland Pipe - Inyo County, California, 2015.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Richard O; Cope, Jennifer R; Moskowitz, Marvin; Kahler, Amy; Hill, Vincent; Behrendt, Kaleigh; Molina, Louis; Fullerton, Kathleen E; Beach, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    On June 17, 2015, a previously healthy woman aged 21 years went to an emergency department after onset of headache, nausea, and vomiting during the preceding 24 hours. Upon evaluation, she was vomiting profusely and had photophobia and nuchal rigidity. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid was consistent with meningitis.* She was empirically treated for bacterial and viral meningoencephalitis. Her condition continued to decline, and she was transferred to a higher level of care in another facility on June 19, but died shortly thereafter. Cultures of cerebrospinal fluid and multiple blood specimens were negative, and tests for West Nile, herpes simplex, and influenza viruses were negative. No organisms were seen in the cerebrospinal fluid; however, real-time polymerase chain reaction testing by CDC was positive for Naegleria fowleri, a free-living thermophilic ameba found in warm freshwater that causes primary amebic meningoencephalitis, an almost universally fatal infection. PMID:27123690

  20. Tuberculous meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Muçaj, Sefedin; Dreshaj, Shemsedin; Kabashi, Serbeze; Hundozi, Hajrije; Gashi, Sanije; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Shala, Nexhmedin; Kryeziu, Manushaqe

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is an infection of the the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord (meninges). Tuberculous meningitis is a major global health problem and is the most severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, with high rate mortality. Last years in Kosovo incidence of TB was decreased in less than 1000 cases per year and 10-20 cases per year of TB meningoencephalitis. Still Kosovo has limited numbers of TB. TBM is diagnosed on the basis of clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies, and radiological findings. Clinical picture, neurological status, anamnestic data, suspect (but not specific) lab tests, and imaging new methods, together can give very valuable help to clinicians for early adequate and successful treatment. PMID:20645518

  1. Meningoencephalitis due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri in ruminants in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Benterki, Mohamed Seghir; Ayachi, Ammar; Bennoune, Omar; Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal infection in most cases, caused by the amoeba flagellate Naegleria fowleri. This report describes the first cases of PAM in Algeria, in a cow and a ewe from Batna, north-eastern Algeria. The death of both ruminants occurred a week after the first clinical manifestations. The cerebrospinal fluid, after staining with May-Grünwald-Giemsa, showed the presence of amoebae cells. Histological sections revealed numerous amoebae in all parts of the brain. The presence of N. fowleri was confirmed using a species-specific real-time PCR in histological tissue sections. The two PAM cases were reported during the hot season, and the source of infection is very likely the water where the cattle came to drink. Particular attention should be focused on this type of infection in aquatic environments when the temperature is high and preventive measures must be taken to avoid the proliferation of N. fowleri. PMID:26979770

  2. Meningoencephalitis due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri in ruminants in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Benterki, Mohamed Seghir; Ayachi, Ammar; Bennoune, Omar; Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal infection in most cases, caused by the amoeba flagellate Naegleria fowleri. This report describes the first cases of PAM in Algeria, in a cow and a ewe from Batna, north-eastern Algeria. The death of both ruminants occurred a week after the first clinical manifestations. The cerebrospinal fluid, after staining with May-Grünwald-Giemsa, showed the presence of amoebae cells. Histological sections revealed numerous amoebae in all parts of the brain. The presence of N. fowleri was confirmed using a species-specific real-time PCR in histological tissue sections. The two PAM cases were reported during the hot season, and the source of infection is very likely the water where the cattle came to drink. Particular attention should be focused on this type of infection in aquatic environments when the temperature is high and preventive measures must be taken to avoid the proliferation of N. fowleri. PMID:26979770

  3. Greyhound meningoencephalitis: PCR-based detection methods highlight an absence of the most likely primary inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Daly, P; Drudy, D; Chalmers, W S K; Baxendale, W; Fanning, S; Callanan, J J

    2006-12-20

    Greyhound meningoencephalitis is currently classified as a breed-associated idiopathic central nervous system inflammatory disorder. The non-suppurative inflammatory response can be distinguished from the other breed-associated disorders based on histopathology and lesion topography, however the nature of the response primarily suggests a viral infection. In the present study PCR and RT-PCR technologies were employed on frozen cerebral tissue from confirmed cases of meningoencephalitis to target specific viruses and protozoa likely to be implicated and to exclude the presence of bacterial 16SrRNA. Secondly, degenerate primers were used to detect viruses of the herpesvirus and flavivirus families. In addition cerebral tissues were probed for West Nile Virus. Viral nucleic acid sequences to Borna disease virus, to louping ill, tick borne encephalitis, West Nile and other flaviviruses were not detected. Canine distemper virus was detected in one animal with 97% homology to strain A75/15. Degenerate PCR for herpesviruses detected viral amplification products in one animal with 90% homology to canine herpesvirus DNA polymerase gene. Protozoal amplification products were only detected in a single dog with pathological confirmation of a combination of lesions of greyhound meningoencephalitis and a protozoal encephalomyelitis. Neospora was confirmed with sequence homology to Austrian strain 1. Bacterial 16SrRNA was not detected. The present study supports previous observations that many of the known microbial causes of canine meningoencephalitis are not involved. Findings could reflect that the causal agent was not specifically targeted for detection, or that the agent is at undetectable levels or has been eliminated from brain tissue. The potential roles of genetics and of molecular mimicry also cannot be discounted. PMID:16962261

  4. The First Association of a Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Death with Culturable Naegleria fowleri in Tap Water from a U.S. Treated Public Drinking Water System

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Jennifer R.; Ratard, Raoult C.; Hill, Vincent R.; Sokol, Theresa; Causey, Jonathan Jake; Yoder, Jonathan S.; Mirani, Gayatri; Mull, Bonnie; Mukerjee, Kimberly A.; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Doucet, Meggie; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Poole, Charla N.; Akingbola, Olugbenga A.; Ritter, Jana; Xiong, Zhenggang; da Silva, Alexandre; Roellig, Dawn; Van Dyke, Russell; Stern, Harlan; Xiao, Lihua; Beach, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Naegleria fowleri is a climate-sensitive, thermophilic ameba found in warm, freshwater lakes and rivers. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is almost universally fatal, occurs when N. fowleri–containing water enters the nose, typically during swimming, and N. fowleri migrates to the brain via the olfactory nerve. In August 2013, a 4-year-old child died of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology in a Louisiana hospital. Methods Clinical and environmental testing and a case investigation were initiated to determine the cause of death and to identify potential exposures. Results Based on testing of CSF and brain specimens, the child was diagnosed with PAM. His only reported water exposure was tap water; in particular, tap water that was used to supply water to a lawn water slide on which the child had played extensively prior to becoming ill. Water samples were collected from both the home and the water distribution system that supplied the home and tested; N. fowleri were identified in water samples from both the home and the water distribution system. Conclusions This case is the first reported PAM death associated with culturable N. fowleri in tap water from a U.S. treated drinking water system. This case occurred in the context of an expanding geographic range for PAM beyond southern tier states with recent case reports from Minnesota, Kansas, and Indiana. This case also highlights the role of adequate disinfection throughout drinking water distribution systems and the importance of maintaining vigilance when operating drinking water systems using source waters with elevated temperatures. PMID:25595746

  5. Notes from the field: primary amebic meningoencephalitis associated with ritual nasal rinsing--St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin islands, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-11-15

    On November 21, 2012, the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) Department of Health documented the first case and death from primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in the territory. PAM, a rare and almost universally fatal condition, results when Naegleria fowleri, a free-living thermophilic ameba found in warm freshwater, enters the nose and migrates to the brain. The patient was a man aged 47 years whose only reported freshwater exposures were the use of tap water for daily household activities and for ablution, a ritual cleansing that he practiced several times a day in preparation for Islamic prayer. Ablution can include nasal rinsing. On November 16, 2012, the patient had visited the emergency department with a headache; he was treated symptomatically and released. The following day, the patient returned to the emergency department by ambulance with fever, confusion, agitation, and a severe headache, for which he was admitted. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies were consistent with bacterial meningitis, and antibiotics were started. On November 18, neurologic findings included fixed nonresponsive pupils, no response in the upper or lower extremities, muted plantar responses, and no response to verbal commands. Microscopic examination of the CSF obtained from a second lumbar puncture revealed motile amebic trophozoites. CSF specimens sent to CDC for confirmatory testing were positive for N. fowleri by real-time polymerase chain reaction testing. On the morning of November 21, the patient was pronounced brain dead based on neurologic criteria. PMID:24226628

  6. Bacterial Alkaloids Prevent Amoebal Predation.

    PubMed

    Klapper, Martin; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Willing, Karsten; Stallforth, Pierre

    2016-07-25

    Bacterial defense mechanisms have evolved to protect bacteria against predation by nematodes, predatory bacteria, or amoebae. We identified novel bacterial alkaloids (pyreudiones A-D) that protect the producer, Pseudomonas fluorescens HKI0770, against amoebal predation. Isolation, structure elucidation, total synthesis, and a proposed biosynthetic pathway for these structures are presented. The generation of P. fluorescens gene-deletion mutants unable to produce pyreudiones rendered the bacterium edible to a variety of soil-dwelling amoebae. PMID:27294402

  7. Left lobe amoebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Rasaretnam, Rudra; Wijetilaka, Shelton E.

    1976-01-01

    For reasons which are not quite clear amoebic liver abscesses in the left lobe are relatively uncommon. On account of the lesser bulk of the left lobe, and the potentially greater space under the left hemidiaphragm, expansive lesions within it remain less obtrusive than corresponding lesions in the right. Sixteen such cases are analysed and five distinct modes of clinical presentation have been found. Eight of the patients presented late with perforation into either the peritoneal or pleural cavities. In seven of eight remaining cases, an abdominal mass suggestive of a left lobe lesion was present. Anaemia, leucocytosis and a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate were usually present, and in the five cases seen in the last year a positive reaction was obtained to the indirect fluorescent antibody test. Confirmatory radiological features were present only in advanced cases. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:959101

  8. Pathogenesis of amoebic encephalitis: Are the amoebae being credited to an 'inside job' done by the host immune response?

    PubMed

    Baig, Abdul Mannan

    2015-08-01

    Pathogenic free living amoeba like Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Balamuthia mandrillaris are known to cause fatal "amoebic meningoencephalitis" by acquiring different route of entries to the brain. The host immune response to these protist pathogens differs from each another, as evidenced by the postmortem gross and microscopic findings from the brains of the affected patients. Cited with the expression of 'brain eating amoeba' when the infection is caused by N. fowleri, this expression is making its way into parasitology journals and books. The impression that it imparts is, as if the brain damage is substantially due to the enzymes and toxins produced by this amoeba. A detailed review of the literature, analysis of archived specimens and with our experimental assays, here we establish that with N. fowleri, Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia spp., the infections result in an extensive brain damage that in fact is substantially caused by the host immune response rather than the amoeba. Due to the comparatively larger sizes of these pathogens and the prior exposure of the amoebal antigen to the human body, the host immune system launches an amplified response that not only breaches the blood brain barrier (BBB), but also becomes the major cause of brain damage in Amoebic meningoencephalitis. It is our understanding that for N. fowleri the host immune response is dominated by acute inflammatory cytokines and that, in cases of Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia spp., it is the type IV hypersensitivity reaction that fundamentally not only contributes to disruption and leakiness of the blood brain barrier (BBB) but also causes the neuronal damage. The further intensification of brain damage is done by toxins and enzymes secreted by the amoeba, which causes the irreversible brain damage. PMID:25930186

  9. [Mechanism of Cryptococcus Meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Miyazato, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii are fungal pathogens that cause diseases in humans. Cryptococcal species mainly enter the body by inhalation and in most cases are eliminated by host defense mechanisms. Some cases, however, progress to pneumonia and subsequent dissemination of the infection to the central nervous system (CNS), leading to meningoencephalitis. Cryptococcus can cross the blood-brain barrier transcellularly, paracellularly and through infected phagocytes (the Trojan horse mechanism). The reason for the tropism of Cryptococcus to the CNS could be partially explained by the abundance of inositol in the brain, which causes the hyaluronic acid in fungal cells to bind to host CD44 receptors. There are differences in the clinical characteristics of C. neoformans and C. gattii. HIV infection is the most common risk factor for cryptococcosis due to C. neoformans, whereas C. gattii infection with CNS involvement is frequently found in otherwise healthy individuals exposed to plant propagules found in tropical and subtropical regions. As the virulence traits of C. neoformans contributing to CNS disease, high macrophage uptake and laccase activity are associated with the fungal burden and the rate of clearance of the infection from the brain. Recent reports suggested that the C. gattii VGII strain suppresses host immune responses in the lung and causes more lung infections than CNS diseases. Furthermore, the anti-GM-CSF autoantibodies are a risk factor for CNS infection by the C. gattii VGI strain. To understand the mechanism by which Cryptococcus causes CNS disease, it is important to consider the specific characteristics of the species and the molecular types. PMID:26936349

  10. Discovery of New Intracellular Pathogens by Amoebal Coculture and Amoebal Enrichment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Jacquier, Nicolas; Aeby, Sébastien; Lienard, Julia; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens such as legionella, mycobacteria and Chlamydia-like organisms are difficult to isolate because they often grow poorly or not at all on selective media that are usually used to cultivate bacteria. For this reason, many of these pathogens were discovered only recently or following important outbreaks. These pathogens are often associated with amoebae, which serve as host-cell and allow the survival and growth of the bacteria. We intend here to provide a demonstration of two techniques that allow isolation and characterization of intracellular pathogens present in clinical or environmental samples: the amoebal coculture and the amoebal enrichment. Amoebal coculture allows recovery of intracellular bacteria by inoculating the investigated sample onto an amoebal lawn that can be infected and lysed by the intracellular bacteria present in the sample. Amoebal enrichment allows recovery of amoebae present in a clinical or environmental sample. This can lead to discovery of new amoebal species but also of new intracellular bacteria growing specifically in these amoebae. Together, these two techniques help to discover new intracellular bacteria able to grow in amoebae. Because of their ability to infect amoebae and resist phagocytosis, these intracellular bacteria might also escape phagocytosis by macrophages and thus, be pathogenic for higher eukaryotes. PMID:24192667

  11. Management of Cryptococcus gattii meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Womack, Tanea; Bohlmeyer, Teri; Sellers, Brenda; Hays, Allison; Patel, Kalpesh; Lizarazo, Jairo; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Siddiqui, Wajid; Marr, Kieren A.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. By inhalation and subsequent pulmonary infection, it may disseminate to the CNS and cause meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Most cases occur in immunosuppressed hosts, including patients with HIV/AIDS, patients receiving immunosuppressing drugs, and solid organ transplant recipients. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in individuals with apparently healthy immune systems. A growing number of cases are caused by C. gattii, with infections occurring in both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent individuals. In the majority of documented cases, treatment of C. gattii infection of the CNS requires aggressive management of raised intracranial pressure along with standard antifungal therapy. Early cerebrospinal fluid evacuation is often needed through placement of a percutaneous lumbar drain or ventriculostomy. Furthermore, pharmacological immunosuppression with a high dose of dexamethasone is sometimes needed to ameliorate a persistently increased inflammatory response and to reduce intracranial pressure. In this Grand Round, we present the case of an otherwise healthy adolescent female patient, who, despite aggressive management, succumbed to C. gattii meningoencephalitis. We also present a review of the existing literature and discuss optimum clinical management of meningoencephalitis caused by C. gattii. PMID:25467646

  12. Management of Cryptococcus gattii meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Womack, Tanea; Bohlmeyer, Teri; Sellers, Brenda; Hays, Allison; Patel, Kalpesh; Lizarazo, Jairo; Lockhart, Shawn R; Siddiqui, Wajid; Marr, Kieren A

    2015-03-01

    Cryptococcosis is a fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. By inhalation and subsequent pulmonary infection, it may disseminate to the CNS and cause meningitis or meningoencephalitis. Most cases occur in immunosuppressed hosts, including patients with HIV/AIDS, patients receiving immunosuppressing drugs, and solid organ transplant recipients. However, cryptococcosis also occurs in individuals with apparently healthy immune systems. A growing number of cases are caused by C gattii, with infections occurring in both immunosuppressed and immunocompetent individuals. In the majority of documented cases, treatment of C gattii infection of the CNS requires aggressive management of raised intracranial pressure along with standard antifungal therapy. Early cerebrospinal fluid evacuation is often needed through placement of a percutaneous lumbar drain or ventriculostomy. Furthermore, pharmacological immunosuppression with a high dose of dexamethasone is sometimes needed to ameliorate a persistently increased inflammatory response and to reduce intracranial pressure. In this Grand Round, we present the case of an otherwise healthy adolescent female patient, who, despite aggressive management, succumbed to C gattii meningoencephalitis. We also present a review of the existing literature and discuss optimum clinical management of meningoencephalitis caused by C gattii. PMID:25467646

  13. Balamuthia mandrillaris Encephalitis: Survival of a Child With Severe Meningoencephalitis and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Paul; Burke, Christopher; McCrossin, David; Campbell, Robert; Cherian, Sarah; Shahab, Mohammad Shekeeb; Visvesvara, Govinda S; Nourse, Clare

    2014-03-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris causes granulomatous amoebic encephalitis, which is frequently fatal. There are few reports of survival in children. A 4-year-old child developed severe meningoencephalitis with multiple intracranial ring-enhancing lesions. Empiric therapy was commenced after a biopsy was performed, and the patient had a good clinical response. Molecular testing and indirect immunofluorescence later confirmed the diagnosis of Balamuthia encephalitis. Diagnosis of Balamuthia encephalitis is often delayed. The literature is reviewed with particular reference to reported survival. Prompt tissue diagnosis and initiation of therapy are common features among survivors. In previous reports, miltefosine was not used to treat children, but it was well tolerated in this case and should be considered as a therapeutic option. PMID:26624913

  14. [Amoebic liver abscess--case report].

    PubMed

    Marsík, L; Ferko, A; Vacek, Z

    2005-07-01

    The authors present a case of a young male, who suffered with extraintestinal form of amoebiasis-amoebic liver abscesses. The patient traveled to India two month before symptoms onset. The diagnosis based on ultrasonography and computed tomography was definetely confirmed by serological examination. Metronidazol treatment was given initially, followed by percutaneous drainage. Open surgical tretment was indicated due to failure of percutaneous treatment. Patient was discharged home in a good condition one month after surgery. At this time patient is doing well eight months after surgery. PMID:16164088

  15. [Meningoencephalitis caused by Pseudomonas cepacia].

    PubMed

    Pérez Monrás, Miriam Fina; Batlle Almodóvar, María del Carmen; González, Cernero; Tamargo Martínez, Isis; Meneses, Félix Dickinson

    2006-01-01

    A case of meningoencephalitis of bacterial etiology caused by Pseudomonas cepacia was described. The strain was received at the Reference Laboratory of Bacterial Acute Respiratory Infections of "Pedro Kouri" Institute of Tropical Medicine, where its microbiological identification was confirmed. This isolation was a finding in an adult immunocompetent patient. The evolution was favourable with no sequelae for his future life. Pseudomona cepacia has been associated with respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Patients with Pseudomonas cepacia may be asymptomatic or present fatal acute and fulminant infection. PMID:23427437

  16. Neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Nisha; Knorr, Aimee; Muldrew, Kenneth L

    2008-09-01

    The classic organisms associated with central nervous system infection in the neonate are herpes simplex, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus agalactiae; we describe an unusual case of neonatal meningoencephalitis caused by Bacillus cereus. PMID:18679155

  17. Risk of fatal amebic meningoencephalitis from waterborne Naegleria fowleri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, William H.; Brenniman, Gary R.

    1989-03-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal disease of the central nervous system caused primarily by the free-living ameba, Naegleria fowleri. PAM is primarily associated with swimming in various types of fresh water. World literature was reviewed in order to derive a risk analysis model that would be helpful in the management of PAM. The management of PAM risk is difficult, and the prevention of PAM is almost impossible. However, it is reassuring that the cases and risks estimated by the risk model are usually small, with individual annual risk on the order of 10-6.

  18. A fatal case of Naegleria fowleri meningoencephalitis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Su, Mei-Yu; Lee, Ming-Shih; Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Lin, Wei-Chen; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Wang, Chi-Ping; Ji, Dar-Der; Chen, Ke-Min; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2013-04-01

    After bathing at a hot spring resort, a 75-year-old man presented to the emergency department because of seizure-like attack with loss of conscious. This is the first case of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) caused by Naegleria fowleri in Taiwan. PAM was diagnosed based on detection of actively motile trophozoites in cerebrospinal fluid using a wet-mount smear and the Liu's stain. The amoebae were further confirmed by PCR and gene sequencing. In spite of administering amphotericin B treatment, the patient died 25 days later. PMID:23710088

  19. A Fatal Case of Naegleria fowleri Meningoencephalitis in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mei-Yu; Lee, Ming-Shih; Shyu, Ling-Yuh; Lin, Wei-Chen; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Wang, Chi-Ping; Ji, Dar-Der; Chen, Ke-Min

    2013-01-01

    After bathing at a hot spring resort, a 75-year-old man presented to the emergency department because of seizure-like attack with loss of conscious. This is the first case of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) caused by Naegleria fowleri in Taiwan. PAM was diagnosed based on detection of actively motile trophozoites in cerebrospinal fluid using a wet-mount smear and the Liu's stain. The amoebae were further confirmed by PCR and gene sequencing. In spite of administering amphotericin B treatment, the patient died 25 days later. PMID:23710088

  20. Sarcocystis-associated meningoencephalitis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is rare in raptors. An adult female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) with progressive neurological signs was euthanized after several months of treatment. The predominant histological lesion was lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis involving the ...

  1. Unexpected postmortem diagnosis of acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent child

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Karimi, Mehran; Navabii, Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis caused by Acanthamoeba spp. is a rare opportunistic infection, difficult to diagnose and treat, which causes death in almost all cases. Here, the authors report a 5-year-old Iranian immunocompetent girl who died of fulminant acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of acanthamoeba meningoencephalitis in Iran. PMID:22679147

  2. Unique topographic distribution of greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Terzo, Eloisa; McConnell, J Fraser; Shiel, Robert E; McAllister, Hester; Behr, Sebastien; Priestnall, Simon L; Smith, Ken C; Nolan, Catherine M; Callanan, John J

    2012-01-01

    Greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis is an idiopathic breed-associated fatal meningoencephalitis with lesions usually occurring within the rostral cerebrum. This disorder can only be confirmed by postmortem examination, with a diagnosis based upon the unique topography of inflammatory lesions. Our purpose was to describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of this disease. Four Greyhounds with confirmed Greyhound nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis were evaluated by MR imaging. Lesions predominantly affected the olfactory lobes and bulbs, frontal, and frontotemporal cortical gray matter, and caudate nuclei bilaterally. Fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2 weighted spin-echo (T2W) sequences were most useful to assess the nature, severity, extension, and topographic pattern of lesions. Lesions were predominantly T2-hyperintense and T1-isointense with minimal or absent contrast enhancement. PMID:22742427

  3. Fulminant amoebic enteritis that developed in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Goto, Mayako; Mizushima, Yasuaki; Matsuoka, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 30-year-old postpartum woman who delivered by caesarean section at 34 weeks. On postoperative day 9, she was admitted to our hospital in shock. Emergency abdominal surgery was performed. Massive purulent ascites collected in the abdominal cavity and was associated with intestinal necrosis, which extended from the ascending colon to one-third of the descending colon. The necrotic lesion was excised, and an artificial anus was constructed at the ileum end. A histological finding on the 15th day indicated the possibility of amoebic enteritis, and the patient was started on metronidazole therapy. The diarrhoea improved dramatically after metronidazole treatment was started. The patient was able to walk unassisted on the 45th day and was subsequently discharged. Amoebic enteritis has been thought to be epidemic in developing countries, but today, the incidence of amoebic enteritis as a sexually transmitted disease is increasing in developed countries. PMID:26113583

  4. Powassan Meningoencephalitis, New York, New York, USA

    PubMed Central

    Wurcel, Alysse G.; Whittier, Susan; Kulas, Karen; Kramer, Laura D.; Flam, Robin; Roberts, James Kirkland; Tsiouris, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Disease caused by Powassan virus (POWV), a tick-borne flavivirus, ranges from asymptomatic to severe neurologic compromise and death. Two cases of POWV meningoencephalitis in New York, USA, highlight diagnostic techniques, neurologic outcomes, and the effect of POWV on communities to which it is endemic. PMID:23969017

  5. First report of Entamoeba histolytica infection from Timor-Leste--acute amoebic colitis and concurrent late development of amoebic liver abscess in returned travellers to Australia.

    PubMed

    Nourse, Clare B; Robson, Jennifer M; Whitby, Michael R; Francis, Josh R

    2016-02-01

    This communication reports invasive amoebic colitis and late onset amoebic liver abscess in three members of a group of 12 Australian travellers to Timor-Leste (TL). This is the first report of Entamoeba histolytica infection from TL. Clinicians in Australia need to consider amoebiasis in the differential diagnosis in travellers returning with colitis, abdominal pain and fever. Presentation with amoebic liver abscess months after exposure is rare but should be suspected in symptomatic individuals with a relevant history of travel. PMID:26858275

  6. Entamoeba histolytica antigenic protein detected in pus aspirates from patients with amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Othman, Nurulhasanah; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Yahya, Maya Mazuwin; Leow, Voon Meng; Lim, Boon Huat; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a causative agent of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and is endemic in many underdeveloped countries. We investigated antigenic E. histolytica proteins in liver abscess aspirates using proteomics approach. Pus samples were first tested by real-time PCR to confirm the presence of E. histolytica DNA and the corresponding serum samples tested for E. histolytica-specific IgG by a commercial ELISA. Proteins were extracted from three and one pool(s) of pus samples from ALA and PLA (pyogenic liver abscess) patients respectively, followed by analysis using isoelectric focussing, SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Unpurified pooled serum samples from infected hamsters and pooled human amoebic-specific IgG were used as primary antibodies. The antigenic protein band was excised from the gel, digested and analysed by MALDI-TOF/TOF and LC-MS/MS. The results using both primary antibodies showed an antigenic protein band of ∼14kDa. Based on the mass spectrum analysis, putative tyrosine kinase is the most probable identification of the antigenic band. PMID:23680184

  7. Prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Aguilar, Martín; Morán-Mendoza, Onofre; Herrera-Hernández, Miguel F; Hernández-Sierra, Juan Francisco; Mandeville, Peter B; Tapia-Pérez, J Humberto; Sánchez-Reyna, Martín; Sánchez-Rodríguez, José Juan; Gordillo-Moscoso, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify the variables that predict the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses. Methods We prospectively carried out a case–control study on a cohort of patients who had been diagnosed with amoebic liver abscesses using clinical, ultrasonic, and serologic methods. Patients with pyogenic abscesses, negative ELISA tests for amoebiasis, immunosuppression status, or previous abdominal surgery were excluded. All patients received metronidazole, and those who demonstrated 4 days of unfavorable clinical responses received percutaneous or surgical draining of the abscess. Demographic, laboratory, and ultrasonographic characteristics were assessed as prognostic indications of failure. Results Of 40 patients with amoebic liver abscess, 24 (mean age: 36.7±11.2 years) responded to medical treatment and 16 (41.8±11.6 years) required drainage, including 14 patients who underwent percutaneous drainage and two patients who required surgery. The albumin level, abscess volume, abscess diameter, and alkaline phosphatase level were all statistically significant (P<0.05) on the bivariate analysis. The highest (>99%) sensitivity and negative predictive value were observed for an abscess volume >500 ml and diameter >10 cm, while the best specificity and positive predictive value were achieved with the combination of low serum albumin level, high alkaline phosphatase level, and large abscess volume or diameter. Conclusions The prognostic indications of the failure to treat amoebic liver abscesses include low albumin, high alkaline phosphatase, and large abscess volume or diameter. The combination of these variables is a useful and easy tool for determining appropriate therapy. PMID:23265424

  8. Listeria meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent person.

    PubMed

    Drnda, Alija; Koluder, Nada; Hadzic, Amir; Bajramovic, Nermina; Baljic, Rusmir; Mulabdic, Velida

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a small, aerobic or facultative anaerobic, non-sporulating gram positive bacillus that can be isolated from soil, vegetation or animal reservoirs. There are six species of Listeria, and only L. monocytogenes is pathogenic for humans. Human disease occurs mainly in immunocompromised people, neonates and in pregnancy, while the cases in immunocompetent people are rare. CNS manifestations of the disease can be in form of meningitis, encephalitis, and also cerebritis and abscess since L. monocytogenes shows tropism for brain and brain stem as well for the meninges. In this case we presented 55 year old male patient with etiologically confirmed listerial meningoencephalitis, transferred from regional hospital tothe Clinic for Infectious Diseases with diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis. Disease started 4 days before the admission. Prior to this the patient was completely healthy. In his history he denied any preexisting disease. At admittance he was febrile, with altered consciousness, disoriented, showing ocular deviation, dystaxia, and with completely positive meningeal signs. Neurologist diagnosis was rhombencephalitis. CSF analysis showed mildly opalescent liquor with pleocytosis 546/mm3 and polymorphonuclear cell predominance >70%. CSF culture showed positive isolate of L. monocytogenes. Initial therapy was: Penicillin G and Chloramphenicol, together with all other supportive and symptomatic therapy. After initial therapy and based on antibiogram, ampicillin was administered for4 weeks, followed by imipenemum for 10 days. Control CSF analysis showed pleocytosis and increased protein level and the patient was discharged as recovered with diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis PMID:19537672

  9. Contribution of Amoebic Coculture to Recovery of Legionella Isolates from Respiratory Samples: Prospective Analysis over a Period of 32 Months

    PubMed Central

    Suet, A.; Ginevra, C.; Campese, C.; Slimani, S.; Ader, F.; Che, D.; Lina, G.; Jarraud, S.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the contribution of amoebic coculture to the recovery of Legionella spp. from 379 respiratory samples. The sensitivity of axenic culture was 42.1%. The combination of axenic culture with amoebic coculture increased the Legionella isolation rate to 47.1%. Amoebic coculture was particularly efficient in isolating Legionella spp. from respiratory samples contaminated with oropharyngeal flora. PMID:22322354

  10. Meningoencephalitis due to Acanthamoeba SP. Pathogenesis and clinico-pathological study.

    PubMed

    Martínez, A J; Sotelo-Avila, C; Garcia-Tamayo, J; Morón, J T; Willaert, E; Stamm, W P

    1977-03-31

    Amebic Meningoencephalitis (AM) and Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) are infectious diseases essentially confined to the Central Nervous System (CNS) and caused by free-living amebas of the genus Acanthamoeba (A.) and Naegleria (N.) respectively. AM due to A. sp. (Acanthamoeba castellanii and Acanthamoeba culbertsoni) have been reported in chronically ill debilitated individuals, some of them under immunosuppressive therapy, or in immunologically impaired patients without a history of recent swimming in contrast to cases due to N. sp. which usually occurs in healthy, young individuals with a recent history of swimming in man-made lakes or heated swimming pools. AM due to A.sp. is characterized by a subacute or chronic granulomatous meningoencephalitis involving mainly the midbrain, basal areas of the temporal and occipital lobes and posterior fossa structures. CNS lesions in AM are perhaps secondary and the portal of entry in humans is probably from the lower respiratory tract, genitourinary system or skin reaching the CNS by hematogenous spread. The predominant host reaction is usually composed of lymphocytes, plasma cells, monocytes and multinucleated foreign body giant cells. Necrosis is moderate and hemorrhage scant or absent. Cysts as well as trophozoites may be seen within the CNS lesions. PAM is due to Naegleria fowleri and is characterized by an hemorrhagic necrotizing meningoencephalities with an acute inflammatory response. Only trophozoites are found in lesions. The portal of entry is through the olfactory neuroepithelium. CNS tissues fixed in formalin may be used for further identification and taxonomical classification of the causative protoza using immunofluorescent antibody techniques (IFAT) and electron microscopic methods. PMID:857580

  11. Pan-Genome Analysis of Brazilian Lineage A Amoebal Mimiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Felipe L.; Bajrai, Leena; Abrahao, Jonatas S.; Kroon, Erna G.; Dornas, Fabio P.; Andrade, Kétyllen R.; Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Pilotto, Mariana R.; Robert, Catherine; Benamar, Samia; La Scola, Bernard; Colson, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Since the recent discovery of Samba virus, the first representative of the family Mimiviridae from Brazil, prospecting for mimiviruses has been conducted in different environmental conditions in Brazil. Recently, we isolated using Acanthamoeba sp. three new mimiviruses, all of lineage A of amoebal mimiviruses: Kroon virus from urban lake water; Amazonia virus from the Brazilian Amazon river; and Oyster virus from farmed oysters. The aims of this work were to sequence and analyze the genome of these new Brazilian mimiviruses (mimi-BR) and update the analysis of the Samba virus genome. The genomes of Samba virus, Amazonia virus and Oyster virus were 97%–99% similar, whereas Kroon virus had a low similarity (90%–91%) with other mimi-BR. A total of 3877 proteins encoded by mimi-BR were grouped into 974 orthologous clusters. In addition, we identified three new ORFans in the Kroon virus genome. Additional work is needed to expand our knowledge of the diversity of mimiviruses from Brazil, including if and why among amoebal mimiviruses those of lineage A predominate in the Brazilian environment. PMID:26131958

  12. Pan-Genome Analysis of Brazilian Lineage A Amoebal Mimiviruses.

    PubMed

    Assis, Felipe L; Bajrai, Leena; Abrahao, Jonatas S; Kroon, Erna G; Dornas, Fabio P; Andrade, Kétyllen R; Boratto, Paulo V M; Pilotto, Mariana R; Robert, Catherine; Benamar, Samia; Scola, Bernard La; Colson, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Since the recent discovery of Samba virus, the first representative of the family Mimiviridae from Brazil, prospecting for mimiviruses has been conducted in different environmental conditions in Brazil. Recently, we isolated using Acanthamoeba sp. three new mimiviruses, all of lineage A of amoebal mimiviruses: Kroon virus from urban lake water; Amazonia virus from the Brazilian Amazon river; and Oyster virus from farmed oysters. The aims of this work were to sequence and analyze the genome of these new Brazilian mimiviruses (mimi-BR) and update the analysis of the Samba virus genome. The genomes of Samba virus, Amazonia virus and Oyster virus were 97%-99% similar, whereas Kroon virus had a low similarity (90%-91%) with other mimi-BR. A total of 3877 proteins encoded by mimi-BR were grouped into 974 orthologous clusters. In addition, we identified three new ORFans in the Kroon virus genome. Additional work is needed to expand our knowledge of the diversity of mimiviruses from Brazil, including if and why among amoebal mimiviruses those of lineage A predominate in the Brazilian environment. PMID:26131958

  13. Multiple Medium Amoebic Liver Abscesses Successfully Treated with Medication and Comprehensive Percutaneous Catheter Drainage.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Yu; Shirano, Michinori; Iida, Ko; Shimizu, Sadatoshi; Goto, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Solitary small (<5 cm) amoebic liver abscesses in the right lobe are generally treated using medication alone, while large abscesses are typically treated via a combination of medication and drainage. However, the therapeutic indications for multiple medium (5-10 cm) amoebic liver abscesses remain unclear. We herein report the findings of a 53-year-old woman who was receiving lenalidomide for multiple myeloma and subsequently developed multiple amoebic abscesses. Metronidazole alone was unsuccessful, although metronidazole and repeated percutaneous catheter drainage of the right lobe, left lobe, and thorax proved to ultimately be successful. Therefore, the successful use of medication alone may be associated with the total combined abscess volume. PMID:27523014

  14. Impact of Human Enterovirus 71 Genotypes in Meningoencephalitis in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Roohandeh, Akram; Sohrabi, Amir; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Bahram Ali, Golnaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Since the importance of poliovirus has diminished, as a result of its elimination in the majority of countries, non-polioviruses are emerging as causative agents of severe central nervous system (CNS) involvement. Outbreaks of enterovirus 71 (EV71)-associated CNS infections have recently been reported in Asia, Australia, and Europe. Objectives: This is the first study on genotyping of EV71 in children with meningoencephalitis to be carried out in Iran, and it was conducted in order to obtain an improved understanding of the disease burden of this virus, particularly with regard to CNS involvement. Patients and Methods: Viral RNA was extracted from 170 cerebrospinal fluid samples obtained from children aged under 8 years with a primary diagnosis of aseptic meningitis. Specific EV71 PCR was conducted to identify the genotype of the detected EV71 viruses. Results: Human enteroviruses (HEVs) were detected in 89 patients (52.3%). EV71 infection was detected in 19 (21.3%) of the 89 EV71-positive patients, and the C genotype was identified in 15 isolates. Conclusions: The C genotype should be considered as the prevalent EV71 circulating genotype in Iran, particularly in cases of aseptic meningitis. PMID:26865943

  15. A field study of ovine bacterial meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Scott, P R; Sargison, N D; Penny, C D; Pirie, R S

    1994-08-13

    Bacterial meningoencephalitis most commonly affected lambs two to four weeks old (median three weeks, range three days to six months) with clinical signs of episcleral congestion, lack of suck reflex, weakness, altered gait and depression extending to stupor, but hyperaesthesia to auditory and tactile stimuli. Opisthotonos was observed during the agonal stages of the disease. Analysis of lumbosacral cerebrospinal fluid revealed a highly significant increase in protein concentration (P < 0.01) with a neutrophilic pleocytosis, but bacteriological culture yielded organisms in only a few cases. A response was achieved with high doses of dexamethasone and chloramphenicol in only one of 20 cases. Polyarthritis and liver abscesses in a number of lambs provided evidence of a previous bacteraemic or septicaemic episode but no definite source of the central nervous system infection was identified. In common with other infectious bacterial conditions which are prevalent during the early life of sheep, control measures should ensure an adequate transfer of passive antibody, repeated treatments of the navel, and hygienic conditions in the lambing and rearing environments. PMID:7985344

  16. Pathological and immunological features of canine necrotising meningoencephalitis and granulomatous meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kazuyuki; Park, Eunsil; Tsuboi, Masaya; Chambers, James K; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Necrotising meningoencephalitis (NME) and granulomatous meningoencephalitis (GME) are idiopathic inflammatory diseases of the canine central nervous system (CNS). Typical NME occurs predominantly in small breeds of dogs, such as Pug, Maltese and Yorkshire terriers. Although there is no specific breed predisposition to GME, toy and terrier breeds appear to be overrepresented. Recent molecular investigations have identified genetic risk factors for NME in Pug, Maltese and other toy breed dogs; however, details of the pathogenesis of this disease remain to be clarified. NME is characterised pathologically by necrotic lesions with mononuclear cell infiltration in the meninges and perivascular spaces. On the basis of the distribution pattern of major necrotic foci, NME can be divided into cortex dominant and white matter dominant types; the latter is designated necrotising leucoencephalitis (NLE). Lesions in GME are characterised by the accumulation of lymphocytes and macrophages with epithelioid morphology, forming granulomas around blood vessels. Some common genetic factors and/or some additional triggers, such as infection or vaccination, may play a role in the pathogenesis of NME, NLE and GME; however, the host immune responses may define the pathological phenotypes. Different cytokine and chemokine responses are seen in NME, NLE and GME, whilst autoantibodies against astrocytes are detected predominantly in NME. This review focuses on the pathological and immunological characteristics of these canine idiopathic inflammatory CNS disorders. PMID:27240919

  17. Amoebal Endosymbiont Protochlamydia Induces Apoptosis to Human Immortal HEp-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Atsushi; Matsuo, Junji; Nakamura, Shinji; Yoshida, Asahi; Okude, Miho; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Sakai, Haruna; Yoshida, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Protochlamydia, an environmental chlamydia and obligate amoebal endosymbiotic bacterium, evolved to survive within protist hosts, such as Acanthamobae, 700 million years ago. However, these bacteria do not live in vertebrates, including humans. This raises the possibility that interactions between Protochlamydia and human cells could induce a novel cytopathic effect, leading to new insights into host-parasite relationships. Therefore, we studied the effect of Protochlamydia on the survival of human immortal cell line, HEp-2 cells and primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Using mainly 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining, fluorescent in situ hybridization, transmission electron microscopy, and also TUNEL and Transwell assays, we demonstrated that the Protochlamydia induced apoptosis in HEp-2 cells. The attachment of viable bacterial cells, but not an increase of bacterial infectious progenies within the cells, was required for the apoptosis. Other chlamydiae [Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Chlamydia trachomatis (serovars D and L2)] did not induce the same phenomena, indicating that the observed apoptosis may be specific to the Protochlamydia. Furthermore, the bacteria had no effect on the survival of primary PBMCs collected from five volunteers, regardless of activation. We concluded that Protochlamydia induces apoptosis in human-immortal HEp-2 cells and that this endosymbiont could potentially be used as a biological tool for the elucidation of novel host-parasite relationships. PMID:22276171

  18. The Rapid Effectiveness of Minocycline against Scrub Typhus Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Naoi, Tameto; Shimazaki, Haruo; Sawada, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is associated with various clinical symptoms. However, the pathogenesis of scrub typhus infection remains to be elucidated. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with consciousness disturbance and suspected meningoencephalitis. The patient's laboratory data showed deterioration and were indicative of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). A whole body examination to detect the trigger disease revealed an eschar, which is a characteristic of scrub typhus, on his back. His symptoms showed dramatic improvement after the administration of minocycline (MINO). This case report highlights that the clinical course of a case of scrub typhus meningoencephalitis that was cured with MINO. PMID:27041169

  19. Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability with Dystonia after Pneumococcal Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Safadieh, Layal; Sharara-Chami, Rana; Dabbagh, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, frequently resulting in severe neurological impairment. A seven-month-old child presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis developed right basal ganglia and hypothalamic infarctions. Daily episodes of agitation, hypertension, tachycardia, diaphoresis, hyperthermia, and decerebrate posturing were observed. The diagnosis of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia was established. The patient responded to clonidine, baclofen, and benzodiazepines. Although this entity has been reported in association with traumatic brain injury, and as a sequel to some nervous system infections, this is the first case, to our knowledge, associated with pneumococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:23093976

  20. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia after pneumococcal meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Safadieh, Layal; Sharara-Chami, Rana; Dabbagh, Omar

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, frequently resulting in severe neurological impairment. A seven-month-old child presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis developed right basal ganglia and hypothalamic infarctions. Daily episodes of agitation, hypertension, tachycardia, diaphoresis, hyperthermia, and decerebrate posturing were observed. The diagnosis of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia was established. The patient responded to clonidine, baclofen, and benzodiazepines. Although this entity has been reported in association with traumatic brain injury, and as a sequel to some nervous system infections, this is the first case, to our knowledge, associated with pneumococcal meningoencephalitis. PMID:23093976

  1. Listeria meningoencephalitis and anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vergori, A; Masi, G; Donati, D; Ginanneschi, F; Annunziata, P; Cerase, A; Mencarelli, M; Rossetti, B; De Luca, A; Zanelli, G

    2016-08-01

    We report the first case of Listeria monocytogenes meningoencephalitis associated with anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome in an immunocompetent adult. A prompt diagnosis, made thanks to the multidisciplinary contribution, allowed a combined therapeutic approach leading to final favourable outcome, despite several intercurrent complications. PMID:26825308

  2. MENINGOENCEPHALITIS DUE TO VARICELLA ZOSTER VIRUS IN AIDS PATIENTS. REPORT OF ELEVEN CASES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    CORTI, Marcelo; VILLAFAÑE, María F.; VITTAR, Natalia; BANCO, María C.; PRIARONE, Maia; MAMMANA, Lilia; GILARDI, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Neurological complications of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) are infrequent and include various clinical pictures. The reactivation of VZV in patients with AIDS is generally associated with an acute and severe meningoencephalitis. We report the epidemiological, clinical and virological data from 11 consecutive patients with diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and central nervous system (CNS) involvement due to VZV. All patients were male and seropositive for HIV. The primary risk factor for HIV infection was unprotected sexual contact. The median of CD4 T cell count was 142 cells/µL. All of them presented signs and symptoms of meningoencephalitis. Six patients (54.5%) presented pleocytosis; they all showed high CSF protein concentrations with a median of 2.1 g/dL. Polymerase chain reaction of cerebrospinal fluid specimen was positive for VZV in all of them and they were treated with intravenous acyclovir at doses of 30/mg/kg/day for 21 days. Overall survival was 63% (7 of 11 patients). The four dead patients had low cellular counts in CSF, below the median of this parameter. VZV should be included among the opportunistic pathogens that can involve CNS with a diffuse and severe meningoencephalitis in patients with advanced HIV/AIDS disease. PMID:27049704

  3. Meningoencephalitis Caused by Halicephalobus gingivalis in a Thoroughbred Gelding

    PubMed Central

    JUNG, Ji-Youl; LEE, Kyung-Hyun; RHYOO, Moon-Young; BYUN, Jae-Won; BAE, You-Chan; CHOI, Eunsang; KIM, Changsig; JEAN, Young-Hwa; LEE, Myoung-Heon; YOON, Soon-Seek

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A 6-year-old Thoroughbred gelding was euthanized after a 2-month period of abnormal neurological signs, such as circling left in his pen and hitting his head and body against the wall. After the horse was euthanized on the farm, a half of the brain and whole blood were submitted for diagnostic tests. Histopathological examination of the brain revealed granulomatous and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis with numerous intralesional nematodes, predominantly affecting the cerebrum. Multifocal malacic foci were scattered in the brain parenchyma. The intralesional parasites were identified as Halicephalobus gingivalis by morphological features and PCR testing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of meningoencephalitis caused by H. gingivalis in the horse in Korea. PMID:24107465

  4. Coxsackievirus B4 myocarditis and meningoencephalitis in newborn twins

    PubMed Central

    DelTondo, Joseph; Wang, Guoji; Williams, Karl; Wiley, Clayton A.

    2014-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B4 (CB4) is a picornavirus associated with a variety of human diseases, including neonatal meningoencephalitis, myocarditis and type 1 diabetes. We report the pathological findings in twin newborns who died during an acute infection. The twins were born 1 month premature but were well and neurologically intact at birth. After a week they developed acute lethal neonatal sepsis and seizures. Histopathology demonstrated meningoencephalitis and severe myocarditis, as well as pancreatitis, adrenal medullitis and nephritis. Abundant CB4 sequences were identified in nucleic acid extracted from the brain and heart. In situ hybridization with probes to CB4 demonstrated infection of neurons, myocardiocytes, endocrine pancreas and adrenal medulla. The distribution of infected cells and immune response is consistent with reported clinical symptomatology where systemic and neurological diseases are the result of CB4 infection of select target cells. PMID:24702280

  5. First Human Case of Fatal Halicephalobus gingivalis Meningoencephalitis in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, April; Moore, Casey V.; Gasser, Robin B.; Nelson, Renjy; Koehler, Anson V.; Bradbury, Richard S.; Speare, Rick; Dhatrak, Deepak; Weldhagen, Gerhard F.

    2015-01-01

    Halicephalobus gingivalis (previously Micronema deletrix) is a free-living nematode known to cause opportunistic infections, mainly in horses. Human infections are very rare, but all cases described to date involved fatal meningoencephalitis. Here we report the first case of H. gingivalis infection in an Australian human patient, confirmed by nematode morphology and sequencing of ribosomal DNA. The implications of this case are discussed, particularly, the need to evaluate real-time PCR as a diagnostic tool. PMID:25694532

  6. Clostridium chauvoei-associated meningoencephalitis in a calf.

    PubMed

    2016-01-16

    ·Meningoencephalitis in a calf associated with Clostridium chauvoei infection. ·Bovine papular stomatitis in calves. ·Otitis media due to Mycoplasma bovis in calves. ·Sporadic porcine abortion due to Nocardia species. ·Spotty liver disease in hens. These are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for September 2015 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). PMID:26769810

  7. Nuclease Activity of Legionella pneumophila Cas2 Promotes Intracellular Infection of Amoebal Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Felizza F.; Mallama, Celeste A.; Fairbairn, Stephanie G.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the primary agent of Legionnaires' disease, flourishes in both natural and man-made environments by growing in a wide variety of aquatic amoebae. Recently, we determined that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila promotes intracellular infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, the two amoebae most commonly linked to cases of disease. The Cas2 family of proteins is best known for its role in the bacterial and archeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)–CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system that constitutes a form of adaptive immunity against phage and plasmid. However, the infection event mediated by L. pneumophila Cas2 appeared to be distinct from this function, because cas2 mutants exhibited infectivity defects in the absence of added phage or plasmid and since mutants lacking the CRISPR array or any one of the other cas genes were not impaired in infection ability. We now report that the Cas2 protein of L. pneumophila has both RNase and DNase activities, with the RNase activity being more pronounced. By characterizing a catalytically deficient version of Cas2, we determined that nuclease activity is critical for promoting infection of amoebae. Also, introduction of Cas2, but not its catalytic mutant form, into a strain of L. pneumophila that naturally lacks a CRISPR-Cas locus caused that strain to be 40- to 80-fold more infective for amoebae, unequivocally demonstrating that Cas2 facilitates the infection process independently of any other component encoded within the CRISPR-Cas locus. Finally, a cas2 mutant was impaired for infection of Willaertia magna but not Naegleria lovaniensis, suggesting that Cas2 promotes infection of most but not all amoebal hosts. PMID:25547789

  8. Cerebral Ventriculitis Associated with Otogenic Meningoencephalitis in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chih-Ching; Chang, Ya-Pei

    2015-01-01

    A dog was evaluated for rapidly progressive mentation change, ataxia, and tetraparesis. The dog's neurological status deteriorated drastically. It became comatose with bilateral mydriasis, and the pupillary light reflex was absent. An anti-inflammatory dose of methylprednisolone was administered, and temporary stabilization of neurological status was achieved. MRI findings were suggestive of ventriculitis and meningoencephalitis originating from the left tympanic cavity. A gadolinium leakage phenomenon was noted, likely resulting from severe damage to the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier during the inflammatory process. Analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid and materials in the left tympanic cavity further confirmed the diagnosis. Following surgical and antibiotic treatment, the dog recovered well with only a mild residual head tilt. Seven months after surgery, the dog had a recurrent infection of the left tympanic cavity without intracranial involvement. A second surgery led to an uneventful recovery, and the dog was clinically normal except for a mild head tilt 3 yr after the initial presentation. This is the first report describing ventriculitis associated with otogenic meningoencephalitis in dogs and a gadolinium leakage phenomenon displayed on MRI. The long-term outcome of ventriculitis-complicated otogenic meningoencephalitis in dogs could be satisfied with prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26083434

  9. Fever of unknown origin in a patient with confirmed west nile virus meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Sabre, Alexander; Farricielli, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV), an RNA arbovirus and member of the Japanese encephalitis virus antigenic complex, causes a wide range of clinical symptoms, from asymptomatic to encephalitis and meningitis. Nearly all human infections of WNV are due to mosquito bites with birds being the primary amplifying hosts. Advanced age is the most important risk factor for neurological disease leading most often to poor prognosis in those afflicted. We report a case of WNV meningoencephalitis in a 93-year-old Caucasian male who presented with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and nuchal rigidity that rapidly decompensated within 24 h to a persistent altered mental state during inpatient stay. The patient's ELISA antibody titers confirmed pathogenesis of disease by WNV; he given supportive measures and advanced to an excellent recovery. In regard to the approach of FUO, it is important to remain impartial yet insightful to all elements when determining pathogenesis in atypical presentation. PMID:25580318

  10. Fever of Unknown Origin in a Patient with Confirmed West Nile Virus Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Sabre, Alexander; Farricielli, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV), an RNA arbovirus and member of the Japanese encephalitis virus antigenic complex, causes a wide range of clinical symptoms, from asymptomatic to encephalitis and meningitis. Nearly all human infections of WNV are due to mosquito bites with birds being the primary amplifying hosts. Advanced age is the most important risk factor for neurological disease leading most often to poor prognosis in those afflicted. We report a case of WNV meningoencephalitis in a 93-year-old Caucasian male who presented with fever of unknown origin (FUO) and nuchal rigidity that rapidly decompensated within 24 h to a persistent altered mental state during inpatient stay. The patient's ELISA antibody titers confirmed pathogenesis of disease by WNV; he given supportive measures and advanced to an excellent recovery. In regard to the approach of FUO, it is important to remain impartial yet insightful to all elements when determining pathogenesis in atypical presentation. PMID:25580318

  11. Counter immunoelectrophoresis as a rapid screening test for amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Tosswill, J H; Ridley, D S; Warhurst, D C

    1980-01-01

    Counter immunoelectrophoresis using cellulose acetate as the supporting medium was used as a rapid screening test for amoebic abscess. All the sera from 40 cases gave positive results. No false positives were obtained, but the results in intestinal amoebiasis were less reliable. An attempt was made to account for discrepancies in previous reports. PMID:6987273

  12. Fatal Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis Caused by Acanthamoeba in a Patient With Kidney Transplant: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Salameh, Ahmad; Bello, Nancy; Becker, Jennifer; Zangeneh, Tirdad

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE) due to Acanthamoeba is almost a uniformly fatal infection in immune-compromised hosts despite multidrug combination therapy. We report a case of GAE in a female who received a deceased donor kidney graft. She was treated with a combination of miltefosine, pentamidine, sulfadiazine, fluconazole, flucytosine, and azithromycin. PMID:26280011

  13. Successful Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor Treatment of Relapsing Candida albicans Meningoencephalitis Caused by CARD9 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Celmeli, Fatih; Oztoprak, Nefise; Turkkahraman, Doga; Seyman, Derya; Mutlu, Esvet; Frede, Natalie; Köksoy, Sadi; Grimbacher, Bodo

    2016-04-01

    Caspase-associated recruitment domain-9 (CARD9) deficiency is an autosomal-recessive primary immunodeficiency with genetic defects in Th17 immunity marked by susceptibility to recurrent and invasive Candida infections. We present a case of relapsing Candida albicans meningoencephalitis over 1-year period despite appropriate antifungal therapy. We detected a homozygous p.Q295X mutation in CARD9 as well as a defective interleukin-17 and interferon gamma synthesis in Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot tests. We achieved complete clinical remission, and improvement of interleukin-17 secretion with subcutaneous granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) treatment. PMID:26658378

  14. Chew on this: Amoebic trogocytosis and host cell killing by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Katherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica was named “histolytica” (histo-: tissue; lytic-: dissolving) for its ability to destroy host tissues. Direct killing of host cells by the amoebae is likely to be the driving factor that underlies tissue destruction, but the mechanism was unclear. We recently showed that after attaching to host cells, amoebae bite off and ingest distinct host cell fragments, and that this contributes to cell killing. Here we review this process, termed “amoebic trogocytosis” (trogo-: nibble), and how this process interplays with phagocytosis, or whole cell ingestion, in this organism. “Nibbling” processes have been described in other microbes and in multicellular organisms. The discovery of amoebic trogocytosis in E. histolytica may also shed light on an evolutionarily conserved process for intercellular exchange. PMID:26070402

  15. A proposed cascade of vascular events leading to granulomatous amoebic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis due to Acanthamoeba is a chronic disease that almost always results in death. Hematogenous spread is a pre-requisite followed by amoebae invasion of the blood-brain barrier to enter the central nervous system. Given the systemic nature of this infection, a significant latent period of several months before the appearance of clinical manifestations is puzzling. Based on reported cases, here we propose pathogenetic mechanisms that explain the above described latency of the disease. PMID:26276705

  16. Leptomyxid ameba, a new agent of amebic meningoencephalitis in humans and animals.

    PubMed Central

    Visvesvara, G S; Martinez, A J; Schuster, F L; Leitch, G J; Wallace, S V; Sawyer, T K; Anderson, M

    1990-01-01

    Amebae belonging to the order Leptomyxida are regarded as innocuous soil organisms incapable of infecting mammals. We report here the isolation of a leptomyxid ameba from the brain of a pregnant baboon (Papio sphinx) that died of meningoencephalitis at the San Diego Zoo Wild Animal Park. By using rabbit anti-leptomyxid serum in the immunofluorescence assay, we have identified the leptomyxid ameba in the brain sections of a number of human encephalitic cases from around the world as well as a few cases of meningoencephalitis in animals in the United States, which suggests that the leptomyxid amebae are potential etiologic agents of fatal meningoencephalitis in humans and animals. Images PMID:2280005

  17. Ibuprofen-induced aseptic meningoencephalitis confirmed by drug challenge.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ancillo, A; Gil-Adrados, A C; Jurado-Palomo, J

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is a diagnostic challenge. The major causative agents are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (particularly ibuprofen), antibiotics, intravenous immunoglobulin, and OKT3 monoclonal antibodies. DIAM is more frequently observed in patients with autoimmune diseases. A 36-year-old woman was attended in our department 3 months after being diagnosed with aseptic meningoencephalitis. She had had 2 episodes in 9 months. Neurological symptoms were associated with ibuprofen. A challenge with acetylsalicylic acid was negative, whereas a drug challenge with ibuprofen was positive. Thirty minutes after ingesting 50 mg of ibuprofen, she experienced general malaise and progressively developed chills, fever (39.5 degrees C), headache, and nuchal rigidity. Lumbar puncture showed normal glucose and high protein levels. Neutrophilic pleocytosis was observed at the first admission; lymphocytosis was predominant in the second and third episodes. DIAM is a rare and severe hypersensitivity reaction. Drug challenge enabled us to make an accurate diagnosis. PMID:21995183

  18. [Anthrax meningoencephalitis: a case report and review of Turkish literature].

    PubMed

    Metan, Gökhan; Uysal, Burcu; Coşkun, Ramazan; Perçin, Duygu; Doğanay, Mehmet

    2009-10-01

    The incidence of anthrax is decreasing in Turkey, however, it is still endemic in some regions of the country. Although central nervous system involvement is rare in cases with anthrax, high mortality rates are significant. Here, we report a 46-years old woman who was anthrax meningoencephalitis. The patient was from Yozgat located in Central Anatolia, Turkey. Her history revealed that following peeling the skin of sheeps and consuming their meat a week ago, a lesion developed in her left forearm and she had been treated with penicilin G with the diagnosis of cutaneous anthrax in a local health center. The patient was admitted to the emergency room of our hospital due to increased headache and loss of conciousness and diagnosed as anthrax meningitis. Crytallized penicilin G (24 MU/day IV) and vancomycin (2 g/day IV) were initiated. The macroscopy of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample was haemorrhagic, white blood cell count was 40/mm3 (80% of neutrophil) and Gram staining of CSF yielded abundant gram-positive bacilli. The diagnosis was confirmed by the isolation of Bacillus anthracis from CSF culture. Although the isolate was susceptible to penicillin and dexamethasone was added to the treatment, the patient died. Review of the Turkish literature revealed seven cases of anthrax with central nervous system involvement between 1980-2008. One of the patients was an 11-years old boy and the others were adults aged between 19 and 64 years. The source of the infection was skin in four patients and inhalation in one patient. The most common findings in all of the patients were inhabitance in rural area, haemorrhagic CSF and loss of all patients despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, anthrax meningitis and meningoencephalitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of haemorrhagic meningitis in areas where anthrax is endemic and high rate of mortality despite appropriate therapy should always be kept in mind. PMID:20084923

  19. Meningoencephalitis caused by Plesiomonas shigelloides in a Chinese neonate: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fang-Qin; Liu, Pei-Ning; Zhou, Yong-Hai

    2015-01-01

    The most usual presentation of Plesiomonas shigelloides infection is an acute gastroenteritis, and extraintestinal manifestations are extremely rare. We reported the first neonate with P. shigelloides meningoencephalitis in China and reviewed the twelve cases previously reported. Our report adds further awareness on Plesiomonas shigelloides meningoencephalitis in neonate and points out the importance of an early diagnosis and the use of sensitive antibiotics treatment to this fatal infection. PMID:25599746

  20. An outbreak of caprine meningoencephalitis due to Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Filioussis, George; Petridou, Evanthia; Karavanis, Emmanouel; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Xexaki, Anna; Govaris, Alexandros; Kritas, Spyridon K

    2013-11-01

    Five 1-month-old kid goats from a local herd in Kozani (northwest Greece) developed neurological disorders characterized by decreased appetite, ataxia, and head pressing. The animals received a 3-day course of treatment with intramuscular administration of enrofloxacin and ketoprofen. However, no significant clinical improvement was achieved, and 2 kids died. The remaining 3 animals were euthanized, and a necropsy was performed within 1 hr. Macroscopic lesions were confined to the central nervous system, with congestion and petechiae in the meninges. Microscopic lesions in all 3 animals revealed multifocal acute meningoencephalitis characterized by infiltrations composed of mononuclear inflammatory cells, lesser numbers of lymphocytes, and occasionally neutrophils and eosinophils. Additionally, in the kidney, there was multifocal expansion of the glomerular tufts by eosinophilic amorphous material, multifocal interstitial hemorrhages, and multifocal glomerular hypercellularity. The above noted lesions are consisted with an acute ongoing nephropathy indicative of a septicemic-toxemic procedure at its primary stages. Small, gray bacterial colonies, 3-4 mm in diameter, were obtained in pure culture from the brain of all 3 necropsied animals and were confirmed as Escherichia coli O157:H7 by use of phenotypic and genotypic methods. The isolates were sensitive to cefuroxime, ceftazidime, and gentamicin. In contrast, resistance to enrofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline was displayed. Additionally the bacterial isolates were found to carry a plasmid that harbored qnrS, sulII, and tetB genes that contribute to high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones, co-trimoxazole, and tetracycline, respectively. PMID:24153034

  1. Interactions of Bacterial and Amoebal Populations in Soil Microcosms with Fluctuating Moisture Content

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, R. J.; Woods, L. E.; Coleman, D. C.; Fairbanks, B. C.; McClellan, J. F.; Cole, C. V.

    1982-01-01

    Sterilized soil samples (20 g of soil per 50-ml flask), amended with 600 μg of glucose-carbon and 60 μg of NH4-N · g of dry soil−1, were inoculated with bacteria (Pseudomonas paucimobilis) alone or with bacteria and amoebae (Acanthamoeba polyphaga). We used wet-dry treatments, which involved air drying the samples to a moisture content of approximately 2% and remoistening the samples three times during the 83-day experiment. Control treatments were kept moist. In the absence of amoebae, bacterial populations were reduced by the first drying to about 60% of the moist control populations, but the third drying had no such effect. With amoebae present, bacterial numbers were not significantly affected by the dryings. Amoebal grazing reduced bacterial populations to 20 to 25% of the ungrazed bacterial populations in both moisture treatments. Encystment was an efficient survival mechanism for amoebae subjected to wet-dry cycles. The amoebal population was entirely encysted in dry soil, but the total number of amoebae was not affected by the three dryings. Growth efficiencies for amoebae feeding on bacteria were 0.33 and 0.39 for wet-dry and constantly moist treatments, respectively, results that compared well with those previously reported for Acanthamoeba spp. PMID:16345984

  2. A case of enteroviral meningoencephalitis presenting as rapidly progressive dementia

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor; Haman, Aissa; Cornes, Susannah; Lawall, Carson; Parsa, Andrew T; Glaser, Carol; Yagi, Shigeo; Tihan, Tarik; Bhatnagar, Julu; Geschwind, Michael

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Background A 70-year-old immunocompetent male presented to a memory disorders clinic with a 7-month illness that had begun with somatic complaints including transient right temporal head pain, left buttock pain, and right conjunctival injection. About 3 months after the first signs of illness, the patient had begun to develop insidious cognitive and behavioral decline, which progressed most rapidly in the 2 months before presentation. An assessment completed during hospitalization for intermittent fevers and confusion had not revealed an infectious etiology, although mild pleocytosis in the cerebrospinal fluid had been noted. Upon presentation to the memory disorders clinic, the patient was disoriented, distractible, laughed at inappropriate moments, and followed only one-step commands. He had hypophonic speech and had mildly increased axial tone. He scored 5 out of 30 on the Mini Mental State Examination and was admitted for expedited evaluation. Investigations Physical examination, brain MRI, electroencephalogram, lumbar puncture, autoimmune and paraneoplastic testing, cerebral angiogram, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, enterovirus group-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay, and RNA sequencing in brain biopsy samples. Diagnosis Enteroviral meningoencephalitis. Management Intravenous steroids with oral taper and intravenous immunoglobulin. PMID:18477991

  3. Update on Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis and Its Clinical Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos; da Silva, Ana Cristina Arámburu; Yoshimura, Kentaro

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis is caused by a variety of helminthic infections. These worm-specific infections are named after the causative worm genera, the most common being angiostrongyliasis, gnathostomiasis, toxocariasis, cysticercosis, schistosomiasis, baylisascariasis, and paragonimiasis. Worm parasites enter an organism through ingestion of contaminated water or an intermediate host and can eventually affect the central nervous system (CNS). These infections are potentially serious events leading to sequelae or death, and diagnosis depends on currently limited molecular methods. Identification of parasites in fluids and tissues is rarely possible, while images and clinical examinations do not lead to a definitive diagnosis. Treatment usually requires the concomitant administration of corticoids and anthelminthic drugs, yet new compounds and their extensive and detailed clinical evaluation are much needed. Eosinophilia in fluids may be detected in other infectious and noninfectious conditions, such as neoplastic disease, drug use, and prosthesis reactions. Thus, distinctive identification of eosinophils in fluids is a necessary component in the etiologic diagnosis of CNS infections. PMID:19366917

  4. Isolation and genotyping of Acanthamoeba strains (T4, T9, and T11) from amoebic keratitis patients in Iran.

    PubMed

    Hajialilo, Elham; Behnia, Massoud; Tarighi, Fatemeh; Niyyati, Maryam; Rezaeian, Mostafa

    2016-08-01

    The continuous increase in Acanthamoeba keratitis, a severe corneal infection, worldwide is mainly due to the increase in the number of soft contact lens users. In the present study, which involves a 5-year study, a total of 138 corneal scraps and contact lenses together with their paraphernalias were obtained from suspected amoebic keratitis patients. All samples were cultured using culture-enrichment method. Pathogenic assay, using thermotolerance and osmotolerance tests were also performed on the positive strains. Sequencing of the isolated strains was done by targeting the DF3 region of 18s rRNA gene. The results revealed that 18 (13 %) of patients were infected with Acanthamoeba spp. As expected, T4 genotype was the most common genotype among the clinical samples; however, in three cases, Acanthamoeba belonging to T11 and T9 were detected. Interestingly, T9 genotype, commonly classified as non-pathogenic amoebae, was identified as a causal agent of a patient with amoebic keratitis. From the pathogenic assay, four strains belonging to T4 genotypes were highly pathogenic. This is the first report of Acanthamoeba T9 genotypes isolated in Iran and the first report of T9 type occurring in amoebic keratitis patients worldwide. Due to the increasing trend of amoebic keratitis (AK) and the identification of new genotypes, such as T9 as the causative agent of AK, more researches in this field are necessary in the region and the world at large. PMID:27102637

  5. Major histocompatibility complex class II alleles and haplotypes associated with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis in greyhounds.

    PubMed

    Shiel, R E; Kennedy, L J; Nolan, C M; Mooney, C T; Callanan, J J

    2014-09-01

    Non-suppurative meningoencephalitis is a breed-restricted canine neuroinflammatory disorder affecting young greyhounds in Ireland. A genetic risk factor is suspected because of the development of disease in multiple siblings and an inability to identify a causative infectious agent. The aim of this study was to examine potential associations between dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II haplotype and the presence of the disease. DLA three locus haplotypes were determined in 31 dogs with non-suppurative meningoencephalitis and in 115 healthy control dogs using sequence-based typing (SBT) methods. All dogs were unrelated at the parental level. Two haplotypes (DRB1*01802/DQA1*00101/DQB1*00802 and DRB1*01501/DQA1*00601/DQB1*02201) were significantly (P = 0.0099 and 0.037) associated with the presence of meningoencephalitis, with odds ratios (95% confidence interval) of 5.531 (1.168-26.19) and 3.736 (1.446-9.652), respectively. These results confirm that there is an association between DLA class II haplotype and greyhound meningoencephalitis, suggesting an immunogenetic risk factor for the development of the disease. Greyhound meningoencephalitis may be a suitable model for human neuroinflammatory diseases with an immunogenetic component. PMID:24851745

  6. Retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following progressive outer retinal necrosis due to CMV in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Bang, J H; Park, W B; Kim, H B; Kim, N J; Ahn, J K; Chang, K H; Oh, M D; Choe, K W

    2008-10-01

    We report on a 34-year-old male patient with AIDS who developed retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV). This case documents the presumed association of PORN with retrobulbar optic neuritis, and CMV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient. PMID:18574556

  7. Protozoal Meningoencephalitis in Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris): a Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Study of Naturally Occuring Cases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.J.; Dubey, J.P.; Lindsay, D.S.; Cole, R.A.; Meteyer, C.U.

    2007-01-01

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is considered to be an important cause of mortality in the California sea otter (Enhydra lutris). Thirty nine of 344 (11.3%) California (CA) and Washington state (WA) sea otters examined from 1985 to 2004 had histopathological evidence of significant protozoal meningoencephalitis. The aetiological agents and histopathological changes associated with these protozoal infections are described. The morphology of the actively multiplicative life stages of the organisms (tachyzoites for Toxoplasma gondii and merozoites for Sarcocystis neurona) and immunohistochemical labelling were used to identify infection with S. neurona (n=22, 56.4%), T. gondii (n=5, 12.8%) or dual infection with both organisms (n=12, 30.8%). Active S. neurona was present in all dual infections, while most had only the latent form of T. gondii. In S. neurona meningoencephalitis, multifocal to diffuse gliosis was widespread in grey matter and consistently present in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. In T. gondii meningoencephalitis, discrete foci of gliosis and malacia were more widely separated, sometimes incorporated pigment-laden macrophages and mineral, and were found predominantly in the cerebral cortex. Quiescent tissue cysts of T. gondii were considered to be incidental and not a cause of clinical disease and mortality. Protozoal meningoencephalitis was diagnosed more frequently in the expanding population of WA sea otters (10 of 31, 32.3%) than in the declining CA population (29 of 313, 9.3%). Among sea otters with protozoal meningoencephalitis, those that had displayed neurological signs prior to death had active S. neurona encephalitis, supporting the conclusion that S. neurona is the most significant protozoal pathogen in the central nervous system of sea otters.

  8. First case of scrub typhus with meningoencephalitis from Kerala: An emerging infectious threat

    PubMed Central

    Saifudheen, K.; Kumar, K. G. Sajeeth; Jose, James; Veena, V.; Gafoor, V. Abdul

    2012-01-01

    Scrub typhus is a rickettsial disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi, one of the most common infectious diseases in the Asia-Pacific region. It has been reported from northern, eastern, and southern India, and its presence has been documented in at least 11 Indian states. However, scrub typhus meningoencephalitis has not been well documented in Kerala. We report two cases of scrub typhus meningoencephalitis from northern Kerala. The diagnosis was made based on the clinical pictures, presence of eschar, and a positive Weil–Felix test with a titer of > 1:320. The first patient succumbed to illness due to respiratory failure and the second patient improved well. PMID:22566732

  9. Acute fulminant necrotizing amoebic colitis: a rare and fatal complication of amoebiasis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Onkar; Shukla, Sumit; Raj, Mathur K

    2009-01-01

    Acute Fulminant Necrotizing Amoebic Colitis is a rare complication of amoebiasis that is associated with high mortality. Only one to four such cases are seen per year in large hospitals of India, and only few such cases have been reported in the literature. The condition requires early diagnosis and surgical intervention. We recently cared for a patient who presented with acute abdomen with history of intermittent abdominal pain and diarrhea. Before presenting to our institution he was misdiagnosed as a case of inflammatory bowel disease and had been treated with steroids. On emergency exploration, extensive necrosis and multiple perforations in retroperitoneum involving entire colon were seen. Total colectomy with ileostomy was performed. Postoperative course was marked by septicaemia and multi-organ failure followed by death. This case report emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and treatment of acute FAC, and associated high mortality. PMID:19918532

  10. Mutations in Novel Lipopolysaccharide Biogenesis Genes Confer Resistance to Amoebal Grazing in Synechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Simkovsky, Ryan; Effner, Emily E; Iglesias-Sánchez, Maria José; Golden, Susan S

    2016-05-01

    In natural and artificial aquatic environments, population structures and dynamics of photosynthetic microbes are heavily influenced by the grazing activity of protistan predators. Understanding the molecular factors that affect predation is critical for controlling toxic cyanobacterial blooms and maintaining cyanobacterial biomass production ponds for generating biofuels and other bioproducts. We previously demonstrated that impairment of the synthesis or transport of the O-antigen component of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enables resistance to amoebal grazing in the model predator-prey system consisting of the heterolobosean amoeba HGG1 and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongates PCC 7942 (R. S. Simkovsky et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109:16678-16683, 2012,http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1214904109). In this study, we used this model system to identify additional gene products involved in the synthesis of O antigen, the ligation of O antigen to the lipid A-core conjugated molecule (including a novel ligase gene), the generation of GDP-fucose, and the incorporation of sugars into the lipid A core oligosaccharide ofS. elongatus Knockout of any of these genes enables resistance to HGG1, and of these, only disruption of the genes involved in synthesis or incorporation of GDP-fucose into the lipid A-core molecule impairs growth. Because these LPS synthesis genes are well conserved across the diverse range of cyanobacteria, they enable a broader understanding of the structure and synthesis of cyanobacterial LPS and represent mutational targets for generating resistance to amoebal grazers in novel biomass production strains. PMID:26921432

  11. Investigation of Legionella Contamination in Bath Water Samples by Culture, Amoebic Co-Culture, and Real-Time Quantitative PCR Methods

    PubMed Central

    Edagawa, Akiko; Kimura, Akio; Kawabuchi-Kurata, Takako; Adachi, Shinichi; Furuhata, Katsunori; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated Legionella contamination in bath water samples, collected from 68 bathing facilities in Japan, by culture, culture with amoebic co-culture, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), and real-time qPCR with amoebic co-culture. Using the conventional culture method, Legionella pneumophila was detected in 11 samples (11/68, 16.2%). Contrary to our expectation, the culture method with the amoebic co-culture technique did not increase the detection rate of Legionella (4/68, 5.9%). In contrast, a combination of the amoebic co-culture technique followed by qPCR successfully increased the detection rate (57/68, 83.8%) compared with real-time qPCR alone (46/68, 67.6%). Using real-time qPCR after culture with amoebic co-culture, more than 10-fold higher bacterial numbers were observed in 30 samples (30/68, 44.1%) compared with the same samples without co-culture. On the other hand, higher bacterial numbers were not observed after propagation by amoebae in 32 samples (32/68, 47.1%). Legionella was not detected in the remaining six samples (6/68, 8.8%), irrespective of the method. These results suggest that application of the amoebic co-culture technique prior to real-time qPCR may be useful for the sensitive detection of Legionella from bath water samples. Furthermore, a combination of amoebic co-culture and real-time qPCR might be useful to detect viable and virulent Legionella because their ability to invade and multiply within free-living amoebae is considered to correlate with their pathogenicity for humans. This is the first report evaluating the efficacy of the amoebic co-culture technique for detecting Legionella in bath water samples. PMID:26492259

  12. Fatal Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis associated to Mycobacterium Mucogenicum-like Microorganism: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    SARIOL, CARLOS A.; GALIB, YUSSEF; PANTOJA, PETRALEIGH; COLÓN, LILLIAN; GONZÁLEZ, ANARDA; TORMOS, LEE MARIE; SANTANA, JORGE; LUCIANO, CARLOS A.; GONZÁLEZ-MARTÍNEZ, JANIS; KRAISELBURD, EDMUNDO N.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium mucogenicum is rarely associated to human infections. However, in the last year, a few reports of sepsis and fatal cases of central nervous systems have been documented. Here we report a fatal case of granulomatous meningoencephalitis of three weeks of evolution where DNA from a M. mucogenicum-like microorganism was identified post-mortem in samples of brain tissue. PMID:19715122

  13. Meningoencephalitis with Subdural Empyema Caused by Toxigenic Clostridium perfringens Type A

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Kovari, Helen; Dent, Wolfgang; Hombach, Michael; Bloemberg, Guido

    2012-01-01

    We report a clinical case of meningoencephalitis with subdural empyema in an immunocompromised farmer caused by toxigenic Clostridium perfringens type A, which was identified by 16S RNA gene analysis of cerebrospinal fluid and subdural empyema. In immunocompromised patients, C. perfringens should be considered a potential pathogen of sepsis. PMID:22895036

  14. Baylisascaris procyonis–Associated Meningoencephalitis in a Previously Healthy Adult, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michael J.; Halabi, Cathra; Wietek, Natalie; LaRiviere, Alejandro; Shah, Maulik; Wilson, Michael R.; Chin-Hong, Peter; Douglas, Vanja; Kazacos, Kevin R.; Babik, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    After severe neurocognitive decline developed in an otherwise healthy 63-year-old man, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and enhancing lesions. The patient tested positive for antibodies to Baylisascaris spp. roundworms, was treated with albendazole and dexamethasone, and showed improvement after 3 months. Baylisascariasis should be considered for all patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:27434260

  15. Baylisascaris procyonis-Associated Meningoencephalitis in a Previously Healthy Adult, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Langelier, Charles; Reid, Michael J; Halabi, Cathra; Wietek, Natalie; LaRiviere, Alejandro; Shah, Maulik; Wilson, Michael R; Chin-Hong, Peter; Douglas, Vanja; Kazacos, Kevin R; Babik, Jennifer M

    2016-08-01

    After severe neurocognitive decline developed in an otherwise healthy 63-year-old man, brain magnetic resonance imaging showed eosinophilic meningoencephalitis and enhancing lesions. The patient tested positive for antibodies to Baylisascaris spp. roundworms, was treated with albendazole and dexamethasone, and showed improvement after 3 months. Baylisascariasis should be considered for all patients with eosinophilic meningitis. PMID:27434260

  16. Pituitary apoplexy can mimic acute meningoencephalitis or subarachnoid haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Ahmed-Ramadan; Gregory, Stephen; Jaiganesh, Thiagarajan

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary apoplexy is an uncommon but life-threatening condition that is often overlooked and underdiagnosed. We report a 45-year-old man who presented to our emergency department with a sudden onset headache, acute confusion, signs of meningeal irritation and ophthalmoplegia. An initial diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis was made, which was amended to pituitary apoplexy following thorough investigation within the emergency department.A 45-year-old man was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with a history of sudden onset of frontal headache and acute confusion. His wife provided the history. There was no significant past medical history of diabetes, hypertension, recent travel abroad, exposure to sick contacts, involvement in outdoor pursuits such as hiking/cave diving, or trauma. He worked in a bank and had been well until 24 h prior to the onset of sudden headache, which was gradually worsening in nature and associated with increasing confusion. The patient's wife reported that he had neither experienced any fevers, night sweats, or coryzal symptoms nor received any recent vaccinations. He was not on any regular medications. He was a non-smoker and occasionally consumed alcohol. There was no significant family history. On examination in the ED, his temperature was 37.6°C, his pulse was 110/min, and he was normotensive and normoglycaemic. A macular blanching rash was noted over the patient's trunk. The patient was disoriented to time and place. Neurological examination revealed reduced GCS (11/15-E3, M6, V2), marked neck stiffness, a positive Kernig's sign and a right sixth nerve palsy.A provisional diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis was made and the patient was started on a course of intravenous antibiotics with benzyl penicillin 1.2 g, cefotaxime 2 g and acyclovir 750 mg. Baseline blood investigations revealed hyponatraemia (122 mmol/l), a white-cell count of 11 × 109/l and a C-reactive protein > 250. Due to the sudden onset of the

  17. Amoebal Endosymbiont Neochlamydia Genome Sequence Illuminates the Bacterial Role in the Defense of the Host Amoebae against Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kasumi; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Hayashida, Kyoko; Matsuo, Junji; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinji; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Mitsutaka; Takahashi, Kaori; Nagai, Hiroki; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the obligate intracellular amoebal endosymbiont Neochlamydia S13, an environmental chlamydia strain, has an amoebal infection rate of 100%, but does not cause amoebal lysis and lacks transferability to other host amoebae. The underlying mechanism for these observations remains unknown. In this study, we found that the host amoeba could completely evade Legionella infection. The draft genome sequence of Neochlamydia S13 revealed several defects in essential metabolic pathways, as well as unique molecules with leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and ankyrin domains, responsible for protein-protein interaction. Neochlamydia S13 lacked an intact tricarboxylic acid cycle and had an incomplete respiratory chain. ADP/ATP translocases, ATP-binding cassette transporters, and secretion systems (types II and III) were well conserved, but no type IV secretion system was found. The number of outer membrane proteins (OmcB, PomS, 76-kDa protein, and OmpW) was limited. Interestingly, genes predicting unique proteins with LRRs (30 genes) or ankyrin domains (one gene) were identified. Furthermore, 33 transposases were found, possibly explaining the drastic genome modification. Taken together, the genomic features of Neochlamydia S13 explain the intimate interaction with the host amoeba to compensate for bacterial metabolic defects, and illuminate the role of the endosymbiont in the defense of the host amoebae against Legionella infection. PMID:24747986

  18. PATHOGENIC 'NAEGLERIA': DISTRIBUTION IN NATURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Infection in man with pathogenic Naegleria, a free-living soil amoeba, results in a usually fatal disease entity known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Epidemiological data usually included exposure to freshwater lakes or streams within the week prior to onset. However, no...

  19. Acanthamoeba genotypes T3 and T4 as causative agents of amoebic keratitis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Vanzzini-Zago, Virginia; Hernandez-Martinez, Dolores; Gonzalez-Robles, Arturo; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Ramirez-Flores, Elizabeth; Oregon-Miranda, Eric; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Martinez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2016-02-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are widely distributed worldwide. Some genera included in this group act as opportunistic pathogens causing fatal encephalitis and Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a sight-threatening infection of the cornea associated with the use of soft contact lenses that could even end in blindness if an early diagnosis and treatment are not achieved. Furthermore, the numbers of AK cases keep rising worldwide mainly due to an increase of contact lens wearers and lack of hygiene in the maintenance of lenses and their cases. In Mexico, no cases of AK have been described so far although the isolation of other pathogenic FLA such as Naegleria fowleri and Balamuthia mandrillaris from both clinical and environmental sources has been reported. The present study reports two cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis diagnosed in two patients admitted to the Hospital "Luis Sánchez Bulnes" for Blindness Prevention in Mexico City, Mexico. Corneal scrapes and contact lenses were checked for the presence of Acanthamoeba strains in both patients. Strains were axenized after initial isolation to classify at the genotype level. After sequencing the diagnostic fragment 3 (DF3) region located on the 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene of Acanthamoeba, genotype T3 and genotype T4 were identified in clinical case 1 and 2, respectively. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of AK in Mexico in the literature and the first description of Acanthamoeba genotypes T3 and T4 as causative agents of amoebic infection. PMID:26581373

  20. Anti-amoebic activity of plant compounds from Virgilia oroboides and Chlorophora excelsa.

    PubMed

    Padayachee, T; Odhav, B

    2001-11-01

    The anti-amoebic activity of four plant extracts: maackiain and formononetin from Virgilia oroboides and chlorophorin and Iroko from Chlorophora excelsa, were evaluated. Anti-protozoal tests conducted on trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica established that all four compounds had an affect on the trophozoites to some degree. Chlorophorin showed the highest anti-protozoal activity with an MIC of 0.25 microg/ml followed by maackiain and Iroko with MICs of 1 microg/ml. Chlorophorin and Iroko induced the release of acid phosphatase. Chlorophorin reduced alpha amylase levels by 89%. Formononetin and maackiain had a minimal effect on the enzyme levels. Ultrastructural changes occurred in trophozoites treated with plant compounds. The degree of destruction of the trophozoites increased with an increase in compound concentration. Trophozoite destruction was initiated by the disintegration of the nucleus and culminated with the rupture of the cytoplasmic membrane. Maackiain was the only compound that showed some level of mutagenicity. Formononetin and Iroko were very slightly mutagenic, while chlorophorin was non-mutagenic. In addition, none of the compounds tested showed cytopathic effects on any of the cell lines tested. Chlorophorin and Iroko exhibit the potential to be exploited as natural multi-functional safe control agents in the treatment of bacterial, fungal and protozoal infections. PMID:11585689

  1. Intracranial fusariosis: a novel cause of fungal meningoencephalitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Evans, J; Levesque, D; de Lahunta, A; Jensen, H E

    2004-09-01

    The Fusarium species are a group of saprophytic fungal organisms that are occasionally the cause of opportunistic infections in humans and animals. Central nervous system disease associated with a Fusarium species is most commonly described in horse, resulting in equine leukoencephalomalacia. This report describes a 2-year-old, spayed, female German Shepherd Dog with meningoencephalitis secondary to infection with Fusarium spp. Meningoencephalitis in dogs secondary to a species of Fusarium has not been previously reported. The diagnosis was made based on the histopathologic examination of brain tissues postmortem and special immunohistochemical stains specific for Fusarium solani. The clinical signs in this dog were indicative of multifocal brain disease and included seizures and a paradoxical vestibular syndrome. The clinical findings, diagnostic and histopathologic test results, and the comparative characterizations of other disseminated fungal diseases, especially aspergillosis, are described. PMID:15347824

  2. Sarcocystis sp.-associated meningoencephalitis in a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Olson, Erik J; Wünschmann, Arno; Dubey, J P

    2007-09-01

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is uncommon in raptors. An adult female bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) was euthanized after several months of treatment for progressive neurologic signs. The predominant histologic lesion was lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis involving the cerebrum and cerebellum. There was a marked segmental loss of granular cells and Purkinje cells, as well as segmental atrophy of the molecular layer in the cerebellum. Protozoal merozoites and schizonts were observed in the gray matter of the cerebellum. Ultrastructurally, the merozoites were classified as a species of Sarcocystis due to the lack of rhoptries. Immunohistochemistry of the agent revealed a positive reaction for Sarcocystis neurona, while sections were negative for Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Sarcocystis sp. infection should be considered as a differential diagnosis in bald eagles with chronic neurologic disease. PMID:17823405

  3. Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii isolates in meningo-encephalitis affected striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Guardo, Giovanni; Di Cesare, Angela; Otranto, Domenico; Casalone, Cristina; Iulini, Barbara; Mignone, Walter; Tittarelli, Cristiana; Meloni, Silvana; Castagna, Giuseppe; Forster, Fiona; Kennedy, Seamus; Traversa, Donato

    2011-12-29

    This study reports the occurrence of Toxoplasma gondii in the brain of three striped dolphins (Stenella ceoruleoalba) found stranded on the Ligurian Sea coast of Italy between 2007 and 2008. These animals showed a severe, subacute to chronic, non-purulent, multifocal meningo-encephalitis, with the cerebral parenchyma of two dolphins harbouring protozoan cysts and zoites immunohistochemically linked to T. gondii. Molecular, phylogenetic and mutation scanning analyses showed the occurrence of Type II and of an atypical Type II T. gondii isolates in one and two dolphins, respectively. In spite of the different molecular patterns characterizing the above T. gondii genotypes, the brain lesions observed in the three animals showed common microscopic features, with no remarkable differences among them. The role of T. gondii in causing the meningo-encephalitis is herein discussed. PMID:21802209

  4. Tuberculous meningoencephalitis in a pregnant woman presenting 7 years after removal of a cerebral granuloma.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Christie, L J; Neely, J; Gandhi, M; Jacobs, R A; Bollen, A; Glaser, C A

    2008-03-01

    We describe the unusual case of a young woman with a history of seizures and a granulomatous, likely tuberculous brain lesion that was surgically removed. She had an uneventful recovery without any additional therapy other than anti-epileptics. Seven years later, she presented during pregnancy with culture-confirmed tuberculous meningoencephalitis. This case highlights the spectrum of tuberculous central nervous system disease and the challenges in diagnosis. PMID:18034270

  5. [Case of Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis leading to discovery of early gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Ijyuuin, Toshiro; Umehara, Fujio

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year old man was brought to our hospital because of acute onset of fever and consciousness disturbance. He had been hemodialyzed three times a week because of chronic renal failure since 13 years ago. Neurological examination revealed deteriorated consciousness and neck stiffness. A lumbar puncture yielded clouded fluid with a WBC 7,912/mm³ (polymorphonuclear cells 88%, mononuclear cells 12%), 786 mg/dl of protein and 4 mg/dl of glucose (blood glucose 118 mg/dl). Brain CT and MRI were unremarkable. He was treated with ceftriaxone and ampicillin. Streptococcus salivarius was isolated from the blood sample, but not from cerebrospinal fluid. The patient responded promptly to antibiotics therapy (ampicillin 3g/day, ceftriaxone 1g/day), and within several days he became lucid and afebrile. Isolated S. salivarius was sensitive for ampicillin and ceftriaxone. We diagnosed this case as S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis. A gastrointestinal diagnostic workup revealed an asymptomatic gastric adenocarcinoma. S. salivarius is a common inhabitant of the oral mucosa that has been associated with infection in different sites. Meningeal infection by S. salivarius generally related to neoplasia of colon or iatrogenia, has been described on few occasions. This is the first report of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis associated with gastric neoplasm. Neurologist should be aware of the association of S. salivarius bacteremia/meningoencephalitis and gastrointestinal disease. PMID:22688117

  6. Meningoencephalitis and Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. coinfection in a dolphin in Italy.

    PubMed

    Grattarola, Carla; Giorda, Federica; Iulini, Barbara; Pintore, Maria Domenica; Pautasso, Alessandra; Zoppi, Simona; Goria, Maria; Romano, Angelo; Peletto, Simone; Varello, Katia; Garibaldi, Fulvio; Garofolo, Giuliano; Di Francesco, Cristina Esmeralda; Marsili, Letizia; Bozzetta, Elena; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Dondo, Alessandro; Mignone, Walter; Casalone, Cristina

    2016-02-25

    Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii and Brucella spp. can infect a wide range of species, including humans. In cetaceans, meningoencephalitis has been associated with T. gondii and Brucella spp. infection, whereas to our knowledge, L. monocytogenes infection has not previously been reported. Meningoencephalitis and L. monocytogenes, T. gondii and Brucella spp. were identified by means of both direct and indirect laboratory techniques in an adult female striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba found stranded in January 2015 on the Ligurian Sea coast, northwestern Italy. The animal was emaciated, and histopathology disclosed severe meningoencephalitis. The nature of the inflammatory response and intra-lesional protozoa were consistent with a mixed infection by L. monocytogenes, T. gondii and Brucella spp. We believe this is an unprecedented case of infection by 3 zoonotic pathogens and also the first bacteriologically confirmed case report of neurolisteriosis in cetaceans. Cerebral toxoplasmosis and neurobrucellosis may have led to the animal's disorientation and stranding, with L. monocytogenes having likely exacerbated the coinfection leading to the demise of this dolphin. PMID:26912047

  7. Organ donation from a patient with bacterial meningoencephalitis -- the first case in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Gopcević, Aleksandar; Gavranović, Zeljka; Pavlović, Milan

    2011-06-01

    The growing number of patients with terminal organ failure waiting for transplantation and the limited number of available organs demand that explantation teams see brain-dead patients with infectious diseases such as bacterial meningoencephalitis as potential donors, although until recently organ explantation from such donors has been contraindicated. This paper presents the first case of successful organ explantation from a donor with confirmed bacterial meningoencephalitis in our country. In this previously healthy patient (only with mild arterial hypertension in personal history), bacterial meningoencephalitis caused fulminant worsening and he deteriorated from mild disorder of consciousness (GCS 12) to brain death within only 24 hours. After the transplantation of organs was performed (heart, kidneys, liver and corneas were explanted), antibiotic therapy was continued in all organ recipients and two days after the transplantation none of the recipients showed any signs of infectious complications. This paper proves that this type of patients should also be treated as potential donors, under condition of appropriate microbiological diagnosis, antibiotic therapy and sustained hemodynamic stability, which should enlarge the number of organs available for transplantation. PMID:22263393

  8. Reevaluation of an Acanthamoeba Molecular Diagnostic Algorithm following an Atypical Case of Amoebic Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Rachel; Cunanan, Marlou; Jackson, Jonathan; Ali, Ibne Karim M.; Chong-Kit, Ann; Gasgas, Jason; Tian, Jinfang; Ralevski, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Amoebic keratitis (AK) is a potentially blinding infection, the prompt diagnosis of which is essential for limiting ocular morbidity. We undertook a quality improvement initiative with respect to the molecular detection of acanthamoebae in our laboratory because of an unusual case of discordance. Nine ATCC strains of Acanthamoeba and 40 delinked, biobanked, surplus corneal scraping specimens were analyzed for the presence of acanthamoebae with four separate real-time PCR assays. The assay used by the Free-Living and Intestinal Amebas Laboratory of the CDC was considered the reference standard, and the performance characteristics of each individual assay and pairs of assays were calculated. Outcome measures were sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV). Of 49 included specimens, 14 (28.6%) were positive by the gold standard assay, and 35 (71.4%) were negative. The sensitivities of the individual assays ranged from 64.3% to 92.9%, compared to the gold standard, while the specificities ranged from 88.6% to 91.4%. The PPVs and NPVs ranged from 69.2% to 78.6% and from 86.1% to 96.9%, respectively. Combinations of assay pairs led to improved performance, with sensitivities ranging from 92.9% to 100% and specificities ranging from 97.1% to 100%. ATCC and clinical strains of Acanthamoeba that failed to be detected by certain individual assays included Acanthamoeba castellanii, Acanthamoeba culbertsoni, and Acanthamoeba lenticulata. For three clinical specimens, false negativity of the gold standard assay could not be excluded. Molecular diagnostic approaches, especially combinations of highly sensitive and specific assays, offer a reasonably performing, operator-independent, rapid strategy for the detection of acanthamoebae in clinical specimens and are likely to be more practical than either culture or direct microscopic detection. PMID:26202123

  9. Long-term survival and virulence of Mycobacterium leprae in amoebal cysts.

    PubMed

    Wheat, William H; Casali, Amy L; Thomas, Vincent; Spencer, John S; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Williams, Diana L; McDonnell, Gerald E; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Brennan, Patrick J; Jackson, Mary

    2014-12-01

    Leprosy is a curable neglected disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and peripheral nerves and manifests clinically in various forms ranging from self-resolving, tuberculoid leprosy to lepromatous leprosy having significant pathology with ensuing disfiguration disability and social stigma. Despite the global success of multi-drug therapy (MDT), incidences of clinical leprosy have been observed in individuals with no apparent exposure to other cases, suggestive of possible non-human sources of the bacteria. In this study we show that common free-living amoebae (FLA) can phagocytose M. leprae, and allow the bacillus to remain viable for up to 8 months within amoebic cysts. Viable bacilli were extracted from separate encysted cocultures comprising three common Acanthamoeba spp.: A. lenticulata, A. castellanii, and A. polyphaga and two strains of Hartmannella vermiformis. Trophozoites of these common FLA take up M. leprae by phagocytosis. M. leprae from infected trophozoites induced to encyst for long-term storage of the bacilli emerged viable by assessment of membrane integrity. The majority (80%) of mice that were injected with bacilli extracted from 35 day cocultures of encysted/excysted A. castellanii and A. polyphaga showed lesion development that was similar to mice challenged with fresh M. leprae from passage mice albeit at a slower initial rate. Mice challenged with coculture-extracted bacilli showed evidence of acid-fast bacteria and positive PCR signal for M. leprae. These data support the conclusion that M. leprae can remain viable long-term in environmentally ubiquitous FLA and retain virulence as assessed in the nu/nu mouse model. Additionally, this work supports the idea that M. leprae might be sustained in the environment between hosts in FLA and such residence in FLA may provide a macrophage-like niche contributing to the higher-than-expected rate of leprosy transmission despite a significant decrease in human reservoirs

  10. Long-term Survival and Virulence of Mycobacterium leprae in Amoebal Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, William H.; Casali, Amy L.; Thomas, Vincent; Spencer, John S.; Lahiri, Ramanuj; Williams, Diana L.; McDonnell, Gerald E.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Brennan, Patrick J.; Jackson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a curable neglected disease of humans caused by Mycobacterium leprae that affects the skin and peripheral nerves and manifests clinically in various forms ranging from self-resolving, tuberculoid leprosy to lepromatous leprosy having significant pathology with ensuing disfiguration disability and social stigma. Despite the global success of multi-drug therapy (MDT), incidences of clinical leprosy have been observed in individuals with no apparent exposure to other cases, suggestive of possible non-human sources of the bacteria. In this study we show that common free-living amoebae (FLA) can phagocytose M. leprae, and allow the bacillus to remain viable for up to 8 months within amoebic cysts. Viable bacilli were extracted from separate encysted cocultures comprising three common Acanthamoeba spp.: A. lenticulata, A. castellanii, and A. polyphaga and two strains of Hartmannella vermiformis. Trophozoites of these common FLA take up M. leprae by phagocytosis. M. leprae from infected trophozoites induced to encyst for long-term storage of the bacilli emerged viable by assessment of membrane integrity. The majority (80%) of mice that were injected with bacilli extracted from 35 day cocultures of encysted/excysted A. castellanii and A. polyphaga showed lesion development that was similar to mice challenged with fresh M. leprae from passage mice albeit at a slower initial rate. Mice challenged with coculture-extracted bacilli showed evidence of acid-fast bacteria and positive PCR signal for M. leprae. These data support the conclusion that M. leprae can remain viable long-term in environmentally ubiquitous FLA and retain virulence as assessed in the nu/nu mouse model. Additionally, this work supports the idea that M. leprae might be sustained in the environment between hosts in FLA and such residence in FLA may provide a macrophage-like niche contributing to the higher-than-expected rate of leprosy transmission despite a significant decrease in human reservoirs

  11. The Trend in Distribution of Q223R Mutation of Leptin Receptor Gene in Amoebic Liver Abscess Patients from North India: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2014-01-01

    Host genetic susceptibility is an important risk factor in infectious diseases. We explored the distribution of Q223R mutation in leptin receptor gene of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) patients of North India. A total of 55 ALA samples along with 102 controls were subjected to PCR-RFLP analysis. The frequency of allele “G” (coding for arginine) was in general high in Indian population irrespective of the disease. Our results of Fisher exact test shows that heterozygous mutant (QQ versus QR, P = 0.049) and homozygous mutant (QQ versus RR, P = 0.004) were significantly associated with amoebic liver abscess when compared with homozygous wild (QQ). PMID:25114924

  12. Detection of Free-Living Amoebae Using Amoebal Enrichment in a Wastewater Treatment Plant of Gauteng Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Muchesa, P.; Mwamba, O.; Barnard, T. G.; Bartie, C.

    2014-01-01

    Free-living amoebae pose a potential health risk in water systems as they may be pathogenic and harbor potential pathogenic bacteria known as amoebae resistant bacteria. Free-living amoebae were observed in 150 (87.2%) of the environmental water samples. In particular, Acanthamoeba sp. was identified in 22 (12.8%) using amoebal enrichment and confirmed by molecular analysis. FLA were isolated in all 8 stages of the wastewater treatment plant using the amoebal enrichment technique. A total of 16 (9.3%) samples were positive for FLA from influent, 20 (11.6%) from bioreactor feed, 16 (9.3%) from anaerobic zone, 16 (9.3%) from anoxic zone, 32 (18.6%) from aerators, 16 (9.3%) from bioreactor effluent, 11 (6.4%) from bioreactor final effluent, and 45 (26.2%) from maturation pond. This study provides baseline information on the occurrence of amoebae in wastewater treatment plant. This has health implications on receiving water bodies as some FLA are pathogenic and are also involved in the transmission and dissemination of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25530964

  13. Detection of Entamoeba histolytica DNA in the Saliva of Amoebic Liver Abscess Patients Who Received Prior Treatment with Metronidazole

    PubMed Central

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2008-01-01

    Saliva is an easily-accessible and a non-invasive clinical specimen alternate to blood and liver pus. An attempt was made to detect Entamoeba histolytica DNA released in the saliva of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) patients by applying 16S-like rRNA gene-based nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NM-PCR). The NM-PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of eight (28.6%) of 28 ALA patients. The NM-PCR result was negative for E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of all the eight ALA patients who were tested prior to treatment with metronidazole but was positive in the saliva of eight (40%) of 20 ALA patient who were tested after therapy with metronidazole. The NM-PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in liver abscess pus of all 28 (100%) patients with ALA. The TechLab E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive for E. histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin antigen in the liver abscess pus of 13 (46.4%) of the 28 ALA patients. The indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test was positive for anti-amoebic antibodies in the serum of 22 (78.6%) of the 28 ALA patients and 2 (5.7%) of 35 healthy controls. The present study, for the first time, demonstrates the release of E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of ALA patients by applying NM-PCR. PMID:19069620

  14. Detection of Entamoeba histolytica DNA in the saliva of amoebic liver abscess patients who received prior treatment with metronidazole.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2008-12-01

    Saliva is an easily-accessible and a non-invasive clinical specimen alternate to blood and liver pus. An attempt was made to detect Entamoeba histolytica DNA released in the saliva of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) patients by applying 16S-like rRNA gene-based nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NM-PCR). The NM-PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of eight (28.6%) of 28 ALA patients. The NM-PCR result was negative for E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of all the eight ALA patients who were tested prior to treatment with metronidazole but was positive in the saliva of eight (40%) of 20 ALA patient who were tested after therapy with metronidazole. The NM-PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in liver abscess pus of all 28 (100%) patients with ALA. The TechLab E. histolytica II enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive for E. histolytica Gal/GalNAc lectin antigen in the liver abscess pus of 13 (46.4%) of the 28 ALA patients. The indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test was positive for anti-amoebic antibodies in the serum of 22 (78.6%) of the 28 ALA patients and 2 (5.7%) of 35 healthy controls. The present study, for the first time, demonstrates the release of E. histolytica DNA in the saliva of ALA patients by applying NM-PCR. PMID:19069620

  15. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Marc E.; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G.; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  16. Cryptococcus gattii meningoencephalitis in an HIV-negative patient from the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Ericson L; Valqui, Willi; Vilchez, Luis; Evangelista, Lourdes; Crispin, Sarita; Tello, Mercedes; Navincopa, Marcos; Béjar, Vilma; Gonzáles, José; Ortega-Loayza, Alex G

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent Peruvian patient from the Andes with a one-month history of meningoencephalitis. Cryptococcus gattii was identified from a cerebrospinal fluid culture through assimilation of D-proline and D-tryptophan as the single nitrogen source. Initially, the patient received intravenous antifungal therapy with amphotericin B. The patient was discharged 29 days after hospitalization and continued with oral fluconazole treatment for ten weeks. During this period, the patient showed clinical improvement with slight right-side residual weakness. Through this case report, we confirm the existence of this microorganism as an infectious agent in Peru. PMID:20802955

  17. Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis relapse after an eight-year delay: an interplay of infection and immune reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Katchanov, Juri; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nielsen, Kirsten; Branding, Gordian; Arastéh, Keikawus; Tintelnot, Kathrin; Meintjes, Graeme; Boulware, David R; Stocker, Hartmut

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of a symptomatic relapse of HIV-related cryptococcal meningoencephalitis eight years after the first diagnosis on the background of immune reconstitution. The findings as well as the clinical course suggests a combination of smouldering localised infection and enhanced inflammatory reaction related to immune restoration due to antiretroviral therapy. A combination of antifungal and anti-inflammatory therapy resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Our case challenges the concept that immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and microbiological relapse are dichotomous entities. PMID:25505049

  18. Spinal cord involvement in a child with raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Teresa G; Madhavan, Vandana L; Peters, Jurriaan M; Kazacos, Kevin R; Silvera, V Michelle

    2012-03-01

    A 14-month-old previously healthy boy developed progressively worsening neurological symptoms secondary to eosinophilic meningoencephalitis with myelitis caused by raccoon roundworm (Baylisascaris procyonis) infection. MRI demonstrated T2 hyperintensity and enhancement of the cerebral white matter, cerebellum and spinal cord. Prior case reports have described signal abnormality within the brains of patients with raccoon roundworm neural larva migrans (NLM). This is a unique case in which spinal cord involvement was established by imaging. Knowledge of this combination of imaging findings expands the known imaging phenotype of this noteworthy infection. PMID:21629989

  19. Intracranial Hypertension as an Acute Complication of Aseptic Meningoencephalitis with Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement on FLAIR MRI.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Marc E; Eisele, Philipp; Schweizer, Yvonne; Alonso, Angelika; Gass, Achim; Hennerici, Michael G; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 19-year-old woman who developed intracranial hypertension as an unusual clinical complication of severe aseptic meningoencephalitis probably due to a diminished cerebrospinal fluid reabsorption capacity or leptomeningeal transudation as a consequence of blood-brain barrier dysfunction. These severe inflammatory changes were accompanied by prominent leptomeningeal contrast enhancement best visualized on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging. In such a prolonged course, a continuous lumbar drainage might be a temporary option to provide rapid symptom relief to the patient. PMID:26889150

  20. [Varicella zoster virus-induced meningoencephalitis complicated with orbital apex syndrome: a case report].

    PubMed

    Wakida, Kenji; Sakurai, Takeo; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    A 69-year-old male was admitted to hospital with clouded consciousness and abnormal behavior. His body temperature was 38.2 degree Celsius upon admission and he was somnolent. Herpes zoster was observed along the first division of the trigeminal nerve on the right side of the face. The right palpebra was severely swollen, and the right eye showed a dilated pupil, loss of light reflex, and total ophthalmoplegia. A spinal tap revealed pleocytosis and increased proteins, and a DNA-PCR test for varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was positive. Optic neuritis was diagnosed based on fundoscopy. Following acyclovir administration, the patient regained full consciousness and the rash was alleviated; however, visual acuity did not recover. VZV-induced meningoencephalitis complicated with orbital apex syndrome is rarely observed. We suspect that VZV initially infected the nasociliary nerve at the distal end of the first division of trigeminal nerve and spread to the adjacent optic, oculomotor, trochlear, and abducens nerves, resulting in VZV-induced meningoencephalitis complicated with orbital apex syndrome. PMID:25200582

  1. Orbital apex syndrome and meningoencephalitis: a rare complication of herpes zoster

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zheman; Lu, Zuneng; Pan, Songqing; Liang, Jingjing; Liu, Zhongchun

    2015-01-01

    Orbital apex syndrome is a rare manifestation of Herpes Zoster (HZ). HZ Mmeningoencephalitis are also rare in immunocompetent persons. We report a rare case that was considered to be HZ meningoencephalitis with orbital apex syndrome in an immunocompetent female. The patient initially manifested with HZ skin lesions and lose of her left sight, diplopia, ptosis, followed by headache, neck pain, and fever, dizziness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed elevation of lymphocytes and protein. A MRI abnormality was remarkable for the presence of a left cerebellum, occipital lobe as well as dura lesion. Head computed tomography and Magnetic resonance venography was normal. Corticosteroid therapy and antiviral therapy was effective to decrease the headache and skin pain. Symptoms were markedly improved after corticosteroid therapy. Three months later, we called the patient to follow up. Her meningoencephalitis symptom recovered. Her follow up brain MRI was normal. But left blindness and external ophthalmoplegia was persistent. This case suggested HZ could affect central nervous system and peripheral nervous system at the same time. PMID:26550408

  2. Sudden psychotic episode probably due to meningoencephalitis and Chlamydia pneumoniae acute infection

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Since 9% to 20% of all cases of acute psychosis presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) are due to a general medical condition, cautious medical workup should be mandatory in such patients. Differential diagnosis must consider conditions as diverse as renal failure or CNS infection. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae infection usually causes a self-limited respiratory syndrome. Rarely, acute neurological complications occur, with acute meningoencephalitis most frequently reported. Diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion and is difficult to confirm. Case report We describe a 22 year-old female Caucasian who, three days after a mild pharingitis, developed an acute psychosis with exuberant symptoms interspersed with periods of lucidity, in a background of normal consciousness and orientation. Initial medical and imagiological workup were inconclusive. After 20 days of unsuccessful treatment with antipsychotics she developed a high fever and was re-evaluated medically. Lumbar puncture revealed an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid. MRI showed irregular thickening and nodularity of the lateral ventricles' lining. An anti-Chlamydia pneumoniae IgM antibody titter of 85 IU/ml was detected. All symptoms cleared after treatment with antibiotics and corticosteroids. Conclusion This is, to our knowledge, the first reported case of acute CP-associated meningoencephalitis manifesting as an acute psychotic episode. It illustrates the principle that non-organic psychiatric syndromes must remain a diagnosis of exclusion in first-time acute psychosis. PMID:16164756

  3. PROTOZOAL MENINGOENCEPHALITIS IN SEA OTTERS (ENHYDRA LUTRIS): A HISTOPATHOLOGICAL AND IMMUNEHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING CASES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protozoal meningoencephalitis is considered to be an important mortality factor in the California sea otter (Enhydra lutris) population. Of 344 California (CA) and Washington state (WA) sea otters examined from 1985-2004 39 (11.3%) had histopathological evidence of significant protozoal meningoencep...

  4. Acute phenytoin intoxication in a 4-year-old mimicking viral meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Amlin; Sankar, Jhuma; Verma, Ankit; Dubey, Nandkishore

    2013-01-01

    We report here the case of a 4-year-old female preschooler who presented to the emergency department with generalised tonic-clonic convulsions and history of vomiting, irritability and dysarthria of short duration. On examination she was found to be responsive only to painful stimulus, had terminal neck stiffness and bilateral extensor plantars. In view of her clinical presentation, an initial diagnosis of viral meningoencephalitis was made in the emergency room and the child treated accordingly. On subsequent transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU), the parents revealed additional history of an elder sibling taking phenytoin for seizures. Therefore, a suspicion of acute phenytoin toxicity was made and phenytoin levels sent for confirmation. Her serum phenytoin level was 80 μgm/mL (normal: 10–20). The child was managed conservatively and discharged after 5 days of hospitalisation. We chose to report this case to highlight the unusual presentation of this rare intoxication. PMID:23814089

  5. Birds of a feather: an uncommon cause of pneumonia and meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Anne-Marie; Khare, Divya; Kavi, Jay

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted with a 1-week history of influenza-like symptoms during a period of increased influenza virus activity. He soon developed type 2 respiratory failure and became increasingly drowsy. He later suffered a convulsive episode in the intensive care unit (ICU) which self-terminated. Initial clinical findings suggested community-acquired pneumonia and meningoencephalitis. However, a detailed history revealed that he was a pet bird-keeper, which raised a suspicion of ornithosis. Chlamydia psittaci DNA was detected in sputum by PCR. He was started on appropriate antibiotics and made a full recovery. We present this uncommon cause of pneumonia as an example of the importance of accurate history-taking to ensure a correct diagnosis for optimal management. PMID:27620382

  6. [Influenza A pH1N1 meningoencephalitis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Melonari, Pablo; Rodríguez Saá, Carolina; Abate, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    The influenza virus causes epidemics and pandemics with high morbidity and mortality. According to the World Health Organization, this virus causes 3-5 million cases of severe illness and 250,000 to 500,000 deaths each year. The disease is mainly respiratory and the most common complications are pneumonia, exacerbation of underlying diseases and less frequently respiratory complications. We report a 6-year-old patient with meningoencephalitis due to a new influenza A (IA), strain pH1N1, with viral documentation in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We provide detailed clinical, laboratory and imaging of the case, which responded favorably to sequels. Knowledge of this form of presentation is of great clinical and epidemiological significance due to the limited scientific evidence published internationally. PMID:23381709

  7. Long-term survival in a dog with meningoencephalitis and epidural abscessation due to Actinomyces species.

    PubMed

    Song, Rachel B; Vitullo, Carina A; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Daniels, Joshua B

    2015-07-01

    A 2-year-old, female spayed Golden Retriever dog was presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for evaluation of ataxia, cervical pain, 1 episode of acute collapse, dull mentation, and inappetence. Physical examination revealed an elevated temperature of 39.7°C and severe cervical pain. Blood work revealed a mature neutrophilia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed nondegenerative neutrophilic pleocytosis with no infectious agents. A presumptive diagnosis of steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis was made, and corticosteroid therapy was started. The patient improved initially but experienced a vestibular episode characterized by falling and vertical nystagmus. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed an epidural abscess in the cervical vertebral canal and diffuse meningeal enhancement in the brain and cranial cervical spine. Abscess drainage revealed degenerate neutrophils and several filamentous, branching organisms. Culture of the initial CSF using an enrichment broth revealed growth of a Gram-positive organism 5 days after fluid collection. The isolate was identified by partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Actinomyces spp. The patient was successfully treated with long-term antibiotics. Our study reports the long-term survival after medical treatment of bacterial meningoencephalitis and epidural abscessation due to Actinomyces sp. infection in a dog. Bacterial meningoencephalitis should be included as a differential diagnosis in patients with cervical pain and fever, even when a nondegenerative neutrophilic pleocytosis is found on CSF analysis. Culture of the CSF with use of an enrichment broth should be considered in all cases of neutrophilic pleocytosis to rule out infections of the central nervous system. PMID:26069224

  8. [Successful treatment for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis complicated by cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A clinical case].

    PubMed

    Potapenko, V G; Konovalenko, I B; Oksema, E V; Filippova, L N; Dulaeva, E N; Derevyannykh, N A; Krasnoruzhsky, A I; Klimovich, A V; Klimko, N N; Medvedeva, N V

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a common agent of fungal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. Cerebral salt-wasting syndrome is one of the rare causes of severe hyponatremia in patients with CNS diseases. The paper describes the first clinical case of a patient, whose onset of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was complicated by cryptococcal meningoencephalitis presenting with mental disorders and severe electrolytic imbalance. Antifungal treatment with amphotericin B and fluconazole could alleviate an infectious process and metabolic disturbances. PMID:26821425

  9. Mucosal delivery of ACNPV baculovirus driving expression of the Gal-lectin LC3 fragment confers protection against amoebic liver abscess in hamster.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Ruiz, D M; Laclette, J P; Aguilar-Díaz, H; Hernández-Ruiz, J; Luz-Madrigal, A; Sampieri, A; Vaca, L; Carrero, J C

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination against amoebiasis using the Gal-lectin of E. histolytica has been proposed as one of the leading strategies for controlling this human disease. However, most mucosal adjuvants used are toxic and the identification of safe delivery systems is necessary. Here, we evaluate the potential of a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the LC3 fragment of the Gal-lectin to confer protection against amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in hamsters following oral or nasal immunization. Hamsters immunized by oral route showed complete absence (57.9%) or partial development (21%) of ALA, resulting in some protection in 78.9% of animals when compared with the wild type baculovirus and sham control groups. In contrast, nasal immunization conferred only 21% of protection efficacy. Levels of ALA protection showed lineal correlation with the development of an anti-amoebic cellular immune response evaluated in spleens, but not with the induction of seric IgG anti-amoeba antibodies. These results suggest that baculovirus driving the expression of E. histolytica vaccine candidate antigens is useful for inducing protective cellular and humoral immune responses following oral immunization, and therefore it could be used as a system for mucosal delivery of an anti-amoebic vaccine. PMID:22110386

  10. Mucosal Delivery of ACNPV Baculovirus Driving Expression of the Gal-Lectin LC3 Fragment Confers Protection against Amoebic Liver Abscess in Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Meneses-Ruiz, DM; Laclette, JP; Aguilar-Díaz, H; Hernández-Ruiz, J; Luz-Madrigal, A; Sampieri, A; Vaca, L; Carrero, JC

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination against amoebiasis using the Gal-lectin of E. histolytica has been proposed as one of the leading strategies for controlling this human disease. However, most mucosal adjuvants used are toxic and the identification of safe delivery systems is necessary. Here, we evaluate the potential of a recombinant Autographa californica baculovirus driving the expression of the LC3 fragment of the Gal-lectin to confer protection against amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in hamsters following oral or nasal immunization. Hamsters immunized by oral route showed complete absence (57.9%) or partial development (21%) of ALA, resulting in some protection in 78.9% of animals when compared with the wild type baculovirus and sham control groups. In contrast, nasal immunization conferred only 21% of protection efficacy. Levels of ALA protection showed lineal correlation with the development of an anti-amoebic cellular immune response evaluated in spleens, but not with the induction of seric IgG anti-amoeba antibodies. These results suggest that baculovirus driving the expression of E. histolytica vaccine candidate antigens is useful for inducing protective cellular and humoral immune responses following oral immunization, and therefore it could be used as a system for mucosal delivery of an anti-amoebic vaccine. PMID:22110386

  11. Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Captive Black and White Ruffed Lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) Caused by Acanthamoeba T4 Genotype.

    PubMed

    Gaide, N; Pelandakis, M; Robveille, C; Albaric, O; Jouvion, G; Souchon, M; Risler, A; Abadie, J

    2015-11-01

    A mature male, black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata variegata) died in a zoological garden after a 4-day history of lethargy and non-responsive convulsions. Necropsy and histopathological examinations revealed acute necrotizing and haemorrhagic meningoencephalitis with intralesional amoebas confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Acanthamoeba T4 genotype was identified as the causative agent of the brain lesion, based on amplification and sequencing of 18S ribosomal RNA genes. The presence of free-living amoebas in water and mud from the lemur's environment was investigated by morphological and molecular analyses. The two predominant genera, representing 80% of isolated amoebas, were Naegleria spp. and Acanthamoeba spp. All Acanthamoeba isolates belonged to the T4 genotype. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of a meningoencephalitis due to Acanthamoeba T4 genotype in Lemuridae with concurrent analysis of pathological tissues and environment. PMID:26297109

  12. Fatal human eosinophilic meningo-encephalitis caused by CNS co-infection with Halicephalobus gingivalis and West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Anwar, M A; Gokozan, H N; Ball, M K; Otero, J; McGwire, B S

    2015-10-01

    The saprophytic nematode Halicephalobus is a rare cause of fatal human meningo-encephalitis, and West Nile virus is neurotropic flavivirus implicated in a variety of clinical neurologic syndromes. Here we report a case of rapidly progressive CNS encephalopathy and death. Serologic, immuno-histochemical, histopathologic and nucleic acid studies demonstrate the presence of active Halicephalobus and West Nile virus in the CNS tissue. This is the first reported case of co-infection with these neurotropic pathogens. PMID:26050925

  13. Amoebicidal Activity of Essential Oil of Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants in an Amoebic Liver Abscess Hamster Model

    PubMed Central

    Ávila-Blanco, Manuel Enrique; Rodríguez, Martín Gerardo; Moreno Duque, José Luis; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Amebiasis is a parasitic disease that extends worldwide and is a public health problem in developing countries. Metronidazole is the drug recommended in the treatment of amebiasis, but its contralateral effects and lack of continuity of treatment induce low efficiency, coupled with the appearance of resistant amoebic strains. Therefore, the search of new compounds with amoebicidal activity is urgent and important. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antiamoebic activity of the essential oil Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants. It exhibited an IC50 = 0.7 mg/mL against trophozoites. The oral administration of essential oil (8 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg) to hamster infected with Entamoeba histolytica reverted the infection. Ascaridole was identified as the main component of essential oil of D. ambrosioides. The identification of amoebicidal activity of Ascaridole gives support to the traditional use. Further studies with Ascaridole will be carried out to understand the mechanism involved. PMID:24757495

  14. Amoebicidal Activity of Essential Oil of Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants in an Amoebic Liver Abscess Hamster Model.

    PubMed

    Avila-Blanco, Manuel Enrique; Rodríguez, Martín Gerardo; Moreno Duque, José Luis; Muñoz-Ortega, Martin; Ventura-Juárez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Amebiasis is a parasitic disease that extends worldwide and is a public health problem in developing countries. Metronidazole is the drug recommended in the treatment of amebiasis, but its contralateral effects and lack of continuity of treatment induce low efficiency, coupled with the appearance of resistant amoebic strains. Therefore, the search of new compounds with amoebicidal activity is urgent and important. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antiamoebic activity of the essential oil Dysphania ambrosioides (L.) Mosyakin & Clemants. It exhibited an IC50 = 0.7 mg/mL against trophozoites. The oral administration of essential oil (8 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg) to hamster infected with Entamoeba histolytica reverted the infection. Ascaridole was identified as the main component of essential oil of D. ambrosioides. The identification of amoebicidal activity of Ascaridole gives support to the traditional use. Further studies with Ascaridole will be carried out to understand the mechanism involved. PMID:24757495

  15. Characterization of a New Pathogenic Acanthamoeba Species, A. byersi n. sp., Isolated from a Human with Fatal Amoebic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Nerad, Thomas A.; Visvesvara, Govinda S.

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba spp. are free-living amoebae that are ubiquitous in natural environments. They can cause cutaneous, nasopharyngeal and disseminated infection, leading to granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) in immunocompromised individuals. In addition, they can cause amoebic keratitis in contact lens wearers. Acanthamoeba GAE is almost always fatal because of difficulty and delay in diagnosis and lack of optimal antimicrobial therapy. Here we report the description of an unusual strain isolated from skin and brain of a GAE patient. The amoebae displayed large trophozoites and star-shaped cysts, characteristics for acanthamoebas belonging to morphology Group 1. However, its unique morphology and growth characteristics differentiated this new strain from other Group 1 species. DNA sequence analysis, secondary structure prediction and phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene confirmed that this new strain belonged to Group 1 but that it was distinct from the other sequence types within that group. Thus, we hereby propose the establishment of a new species, Acanthamoeba byersi n. sp. as well as a new sequence type, T18, for this new strain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a Group 1 Acanthamoeba that is indisputably pathogenic in humans. PMID:23879685

  16. Modulation of the reaction rate of regulating protein induces large morphological and motional change of amoebic cell.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Shin I; Sasai, Masaki

    2007-03-21

    Morphologies of moving amoebae are categorized into two types. One is the "neutrophil" type in which the long axis of cell roughly coincides with its moving direction. This type of cell extends a leading edge at the front and retracts a narrow tail at the rear, whose shape has been often drawn as a typical amoeba in textbooks. The other one is the "keratocyte" type with widespread lamellipodia along the front side arc. Short axis of cell in this type roughly coincides with its moving direction. In order to understand what kind of molecular feature causes conversion between two types of morphologies, and how two typical morphologies are maintained, a mathematical model of amoebic cells is developed. This model describes movement of cell and intracellular reactions of activator, inhibitor and actin filaments in a unified way. It is found that the producing rate of activator is a key factor of conversion between two types. This model also explains the observed data that the keratocyte type cells tend to rapidly move along a straight line. The neutrophil type cells move along a straight line when the moving velocity is small, but they show fluctuated motions deviating from a line when they move as fast as the keratocyte type cells. Efficient energy consumption in the neutrophil type cells is predicted. PMID:17113108

  17. Evaluation of intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Inés; Richter, Henning; Beckmann, Katrin; Meier, Dieter; Dennler, Matthias; Kircher, Patrick R

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate metabolite concentrations of the brains of dogs with intracranial neoplasia or noninfectious meningoencephalitis by use of short echo time, single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 3.0 T. ANIMALS 29 dogs with intracranial lesions (14 with neoplasia [3 oligodendromas, 3 glioblastomas multiformes, 3 astrocytomas, 2 lymphomas, and 3 meningiomas] and 15 is with noninfectious meningoencephalitis) and 10 healthy control dogs. PROCEDURES Short echo time, single voxel (1)H-MRS at 3.0 T was performed on neoplastic and noninfectious inflammatory intracranial lesions identified with conventional MRI. Metabolites of interest included N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total choline, creatine, myoinositol, the glutamine-glutamate complex (Glx), glutathione, taurine, lactate, and lipids. Data were analyzed with postprocessing fitting algorithm software. Metabolite concentrations relative to brain water content were calculated and compared with results for the healthy control dogs, which had been previously evaluated with the same (1)H MRS technique. RESULTS NAA, creatine, and Glx concentrations were reduced in the brains of dogs with neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis, whereas choline concentration was increased. Concentrations of these metabolites differed significantly between dogs with neoplasia and dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. Concentrations of NAA, creatine, and Glx were significantly lower in dogs with neoplasia, whereas the concentration of choline was significantly higher in dogs with neoplasia. Lipids were predominantly found in dogs with high-grade intra-axial neoplasia, meningioma, and necrotizing meningoencephalitis. A high concentration of taurine was found in 10 of 15 dogs with noninfectious meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE (1)H MRS provided additional metabolic information about intracranial neoplasia and noninfectious meningoencephalitis in dogs. PMID:27111012

  18. [Meningoencephalitis caused by West Nile virus in a renal transplant recipient].

    PubMed

    Ertilav, Muhittin; Ozkul, Aykut; Zeytinoğlu, Ayşın; Sen, Sait; Sipahi, Savaş; Töz, Hüseyin; Kitiş, Omer; Eraslan, Cenk

    2014-10-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection which is asymptomatic or mild in normal population, it may cause serious clinical conditions leading to death in eldery and immunosupressed patients. The virus is mainly transmitted by mosquito bites, however transfusion, transplantation, transplasental and nosocomial ways have also been reported to be responsible for viral transmission. It is known that WNV may cause life-threatining conditions such as central nervous system (CNS) infections especially in bone marrow and solid organ transplant recipients. In this report, the first case of WNV encephalitis in an immunosuppressed patient with renal transplant in Turkey was presented. A 25-year-old male patient admitted to our hospital with the complaints of generalized myalgia, nausea and vomiting, after the 24. day of renal transplantation from a live donor. Since he developed diffuse tonic clonic seizures during his follow up, he was diagnosed as meningoencephalitis with the results of cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MR) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemistry. Bacterial and fungal cultures of blood and CSF yielded negative results. CMV antigenemia test and CMV IgM in blood, and nucleic acid tests for CMV, EBV, HSV-1/2, VZV, HHV-6, enterovirus and parvovirus in CSF were also negative. However, WNV RNA was detected in CSF by an in-house reverse transcriptase (RT) nested PCR method. The sequence analysis (GenBank BLAST) of the virus showed that it had 99% similarity with Lineage-1 WNV strains. To define the transmission way of the virus to the recipient, WNV-RNA was searched in the renal biopsy sample and found negative by RT nested PCR. The clinical condition of the patient was improved with supportive therapy and by the de-escalation of immunosuppressive drugs [Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF; 1 g/day), cyclosporin (1 mg/kg/day)]. However WNV meningoencephalitis recurred one month later. The patient presented with fever, myalgia, confusions, leukocytosis, anemia, and repeating WNV

  19. Tackling infection owing to brain-eating amoeba.

    PubMed

    Baig, Abdul Mannan; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-02-01

    In view of the devastating nature of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis caused by Naegleria fowleri and the problems associated with diagnostic delays and chemotherapeutic failures, here we propose a noninvasive diagnostic method using the 'reverse transcribrial route device', a novel strategy in the management of this life-threatening infection with a case fatality rate of more than 90%. The proposed rationale should stimulate interest in this emerging infection that almost always proves fatal. PMID:25445746

  20. Retrospective Study of Etiologic Agents Associated with Nonsuppurative Meningoencephalitis in Stranded Cetaceans in the Canary Islands

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Susan; Saliki, Jeremiah T.; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Arbelo, Manuel; Zucca, Daniele; Fernández, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Nineteen natural cases of etiologically undetermined encephalitides in free-ranging cetaceans were studied retrospectively. Histological examination of the brains revealed variable degrees of nonsuppurative encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, characterized predominantly by perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates. A PCR assay was used on brain and other available tissues to detect the presence of morbillivirus, herpesvirus, West Nile virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and Brucella spp. In addition, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed on selected tissues to determine the presence of morbilliviral antigens. Six animals (5 striped dolphins and 1 common dolphin) showed IHC and/or molecular evidence of morbilliviral antigens and/or genomes, mainly in brain tissue. Conventional nested PCR detected herpesviral DNA in brain tissue samples from two striped dolphins. There was no evidence of West Nile virus, T. gondii, or Brucella spp. in any of the brain tissue samples examined. The information presented here increases the number of confirmed morbillivirus-positive cases within the Canarian archipelago from two previously reported cases to eight. Furthermore, a new nested-PCR method for the detection of morbillivirus is described here. Regarding herpesvirus, the phylogenetic analysis performed in the current study provides valuable information about a possible pathogenic branch of cetacean alphaherpesviruses that might be responsible for some fatal cases worldwide. PMID:24759718

  1. Intrathecal synthesis of IgE in children with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Docal, Barbara; Dorta-Contreras, Alberto J; Bu-Coifiu-Fanego, Raisa; Hernández, Hermes Fundora; Barroso, Jesús Callol; Sanchez-Martinez, Consuelo

    2008-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis caused by the helminth Angiostrongylus cantonensis, is an emerging infectious disease in America. The objective of this paper was to determine if the intrathecal synthesis of immunoglobulin E is produced during the acute phase of the disease. Methods Thirteen patients, mean age 4.5 years were studied; a diagnostic lumbar puncture was performed and serum samples taken. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was quantified by nephelometry. Control patients had other infections or other neurological diseases. Results The mean cell count in the CSF was 500 × 10-6 cells/L and of these 23% were eosinophils. In blood the eosinophils were 13%. The chief symptoms of the patients were migraine, vomiting and fever and 50% presented some meningeal signs. IgE intrathecal synthesis analyzed by the corresponding quotient diagram (Reibergram) was observed in all patients. No intrathecal IgE synthesis was seen in control patients. Conclusion Intrathecal synthesis of IgE demonstrates the participation of this immunoglobulin in the destruction of the third stage larvae of the parasite in the CSF. The test should be considered in our environment as a tool to aid diagnosis. PMID:19032790

  2. Bovine viral diarrhea virus type 2-induced meningoencephalitis in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Blas-Machado, U; Saliki, J T; Duffy, J C; Caseltine, S L

    2004-03-01

    The brain from a 15-month-old, black female Angus, with a 48-hour history of central nervous system disease, was submitted to the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. Microscopic findings consisted of acute, multifocal meningoencephalitis, with neuronal degeneration and necrosis and gliosis. Viral isolation yielded noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Virus genotyping classified the virus as BVDV type 2. Immunohistochemical labeling for BVDV antigens with BVD MAb 3.12F1 clone was prominent in the cytoplasm of neurons, glial cells, ependymal epithelium, perivascular macrophages and spindle cells, smooth muscle cells, and intravascular monocytes of the cerebrum and brain stem. Laboratory results support that tissue alterations occurred as a result of BVDV type 2 infection. In the absence of other clinical signs related to BVDV infection and using the microscopic and laboratory evidence presented, we propose that the BVDV type 2 isolated from this case may represent a neurovirulent strain of the virus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of brain lesions and neuronal viral antigen localization in BVDV genotype 2 viral infection, acquired either congenitally or postnatally. PMID:15017036

  3. Isolation of Vibrio cholerae from the brain of a feedlot heifer with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bush, Jamie M; Hyatt, Doreene R; Bolte, Denise; Pandher, Karamjeet

    2006-11-01

    A 700-pound, 9-month-old Angus heifer from a feedlot presented with acute neurologic signs, characterized by circling, posterior weakness, and nonresponsiveness, followed by death. Histologically, the frontal lobe and the thalamus contained multiple foci of liquefaction that contained numerous degenerative neutrophils and foamy macrophages. Some of these foci were centered on blood vessels that contained fibrin thrombi and exhibited varying degrees of fibrinoid necrosis of the vessel wall. There was adjacent axonal degeneration and neuronal necrosis characterized by pronounced cytoplasmic eosinophilia, peripheralization of the nuclei, and loss of Nissl substance. Aerobic culture of the brain yielded moderate growth of Vibrio species, which was determined to be Vibrio cholerae by polymerase chain reaction analysis of a 438-base pair fragment of the 16 S ribosomal RNA gene. V. cholerae are motile, gram-negative, curved rod-shaped bacteria. Some strains of V. cholerae are important food- and water-borne bacterial pathogens that produce an often fatal diarrhea in humans. This is the first known case report of V. cholerae meningoencephalitis and cerebral abscessation in a bovine. PMID:17121090

  4. Retrospective study of etiologic agents associated with nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis in stranded cetaceans in the canary islands.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Eva; Sánchez, Susan; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Blas-Machado, Uriel; Arbelo, Manuel; Zucca, Daniele; Fernández, Antonio

    2014-07-01

    Nineteen natural cases of etiologically undetermined encephalitides in free-ranging cetaceans were studied retrospectively. Histological examination of the brains revealed variable degrees of nonsuppurative encephalitis or meningoencephalitis, characterized predominantly by perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates. A PCR assay was used on brain and other available tissues to detect the presence of morbillivirus, herpesvirus, West Nile virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and Brucella spp. In addition, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining was performed on selected tissues to determine the presence of morbilliviral antigens. Six animals (5 striped dolphins and 1 common dolphin) showed IHC and/or molecular evidence of morbilliviral antigens and/or genomes, mainly in brain tissue. Conventional nested PCR detected herpesviral DNA in brain tissue samples from two striped dolphins. There was no evidence of West Nile virus, T. gondii, or Brucella spp. in any of the brain tissue samples examined. The information presented here increases the number of confirmed morbillivirus-positive cases within the Canarian archipelago from two previously reported cases to eight. Furthermore, a new nested-PCR method for the detection of morbillivirus is described here. Regarding herpesvirus, the phylogenetic analysis performed in the current study provides valuable information about a possible pathogenic branch of cetacean alphaherpesviruses that might be responsible for some fatal cases worldwide. PMID:24759718

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles in children with enterovirus 71-associated meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Huajun; Li, Shuxian; Zheng, Jianfeng; Cai, Chunyan; Ye, Bin; Yang, Jun; Chen, Zhimin

    2015-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection can cause severe neurological complications including meningoencephalitis (ME) in some patients with hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). However, to date no studies have reported changes in cytokine concentrations and their correlations with clinical variables in patients with ME following EV71 infection. In this study, responses of Th1/Th2 cytokine, including IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IFN-γ, in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with EV71-related HFMD with ME and patients with febrile convulsions (FC) were analyzed using cytometric bead array technology. It was found that CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations were significantly higher in patients with EV71-related ME than in those with FC. Additionally, both CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations were correlated with CSF cytology, fever duration and duration of hospital stay. More interestingly, a positive correlation between CSF IL-6 and IFN-γ concentrations was observed. Finally, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that when a cutoff value of 9.40 pg/mL was set for IL-6, the sensitivity and specificity were 84.5% and 85.5%, respectively, for discriminating EV71-related ME from FC. In conclusion, IL-6 and IFN-γ may be associated with EV71-induced neuropathology. PMID:25611005

  6. Prognostic factors for 1-week survival in dogs diagnosed with meningoencephalitis of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, I; Volk, H A; Van Ham, L; De Decker, S

    2016-08-01

    Although long-term outcomes of meningoencephalitis of unknown aetiology (MUA) in dogs have been evaluated, little is known about short-term survival and initial response to therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible prognostic factors for 7-day survival after diagnosis of MUA in dogs. Medical records were reviewed for dogs diagnosed with MUA between 2006 and 2015. Previously described inclusion criteria were used, as well as 7-day survival data for all dogs. A poor outcome was defined as death within 1 week. Of 116 dogs that met inclusion criteria, 30 (26%) died within 7 days of diagnosis. Assessed variables included age, sex, bodyweight, duration of clinical signs and treatment prior to diagnosis, venous blood glucose and lactate levels, white blood cell count on complete blood count, total nucleated cell count/total protein concentration/white blood cell differentiation on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis, presence of seizures and cluster seizures, mentation at presentation, neuroanatomical localisation, imaging findings and treatment after diagnosis. Multivariate analysis identified three variables significantly associated with poor outcome; decreased mentation at presentation, presence of seizures, and increased percentage of neutrophils on CSF analysis. Despite initiation of appropriate treatment, more than a quarter of dogs died within 1 week of diagnosis of MUA, emphasising the need for evaluation of short-term prognostic factors. Information from this study could aid clinical staff to provide owners of affected dogs with prognostic information. PMID:27387733

  7. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit. PMID:25861890

  8. Long-Term Neuropsychological Sequelae in HIV-Seronegative Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis Patients with and without Ventriculoperitoneal Shunts: A Cine MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Wang, Hung-Chen; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Hsu, Nai-Wen; Lin, Wei-Ming; Kung, Chia-Te; Lin, Wei-Che

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hydrocephalus in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is most commonly managed with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. This study applied cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate initial disease severity on long-term cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow dynamics and associated neuropsychological sequelae in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts. Methods. Eighteen human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients (10 with shunts versus 8 without shunts) were compared with 32 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. All subjects underwent complete neurologic examination and neuropsychological testing. Cine MRI was conducted to evaluate CSF flow parameters. Initial CSF laboratory analysis and imaging findings were correlated with present CSF flow parameters and neuropsychological scores. Results. Patients without shunts had higher average flow than controls, suggesting chronic hydrocephalus. Initial Evans ratios and CSF glucose levels were associated with CSF peak velocity and flow. Worsening CSF flow parameters correlated with decreased neuropsychological performance. Conclusions. CSF flow parameter differences between the cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients both with and without ventriculoperitoneal shunts could be detected by cine MRI and correlated with acute stage disease severity and chronic stage neuropsychological results. Cine MRI is useful for assessing the chronic hydrocephalus that may lead to neuropsychological deficits in cryptococcal meningoencephalitis patients. PMID:25948879

  9. Naeglaeria infection of the central nervous system, CT scan findings: a case series.

    PubMed

    Naqi, Rohana; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-03-01

    The imaging findings in four cases of a rare infection of the central nervous system caused by amoebae, Naeglaeria fowleri are presented. Naeglaeria fowleri are pathogenic free-living amoebae. They cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system. The computed tomography brain findings in 3 (75%) of our cases of pan amoebic meningoencephalitis showed non-specific brain oedema; 2 (66%) of these cases also had moderate hydrocephalus and among that 1 (50%) case showed an old lacunar infarction in peri-ventricular region. In the remaining 1 (25%) case the scan was normal with no evidence of oedema or abnormal lesion. Out of three cases with diffuse brain oedema, postcontrast images showed abnormal meningeal enhancement throughout the brain parenchyma in 1 (33%) case. However, no definite focal enhancing lesion was noted. In the rest of the cases, no abnormal parenchymal or meningeal enhancement was seen on post-contrast images. PMID:23914650

  10. Scrub typhus meningoencephalitis, a diagnostic challenge for clinicians: A hospital based study from North-East India

    PubMed Central

    Jamil, M. D.; Hussain, Masaraf; Lyngdoh, Monaliza; Sharma, Shriram; Barman, Bhupen; Bhattacharya, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is a known complication of scrub typhus which range from mild meningitis to frank meninigoencephalitis. Aims and objectives: To study the clinical feature, laboratory parameters and response to treatment of scrub typhus meningitis/meningoencephalitis. Methods and Materials: This is a hospital based prospective observational study from North Eastern India. Diagnosis was based on clinical features and positive serological test (Weil's Felix test and IgM antibody card test). Results: 13 patients of scrub typhus with features of meningitis/meningoencephalitis were included. The mean duration of fever before presentation was 5.61±3.08 days and 4 (30.76 %) patients had eschar. Altered sensorium, headache, seizure and meningeal sign were present in 13 (100%), 13 (100%), 6 (46.15%) and 10 (76.92%) patients respectively. Mean CSF protein, glucose and Adenosine deaminase was 152.16±16.88mg/dl, 55.23±21.7mg/dl, and 16.98±7.37U/L respectively. Mean total count of CSF leukocyte and lymphocyte percentage was 46.07±131 cell/cumm and 98.66±3.09% respectively. Tablet doxycycline with or without injection azithromycin was used and that shows good response 15.38% of patients died and all of them had multi organ dysfunction. Conclusion: Meningoencephalitis is a common manifestation of scrub typhus and diagnosis requires high degree of clinical suspicion which if diagnosed early and specific treatment started, patients usually recover completely with few complications. PMID:26752890

  11. A Retrospective Cohort Study of Lesion Distribution of HIV-1 Infection Patients With Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis on MRI

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shuang; Li, Xueqin; Shi, Yanbin; Liu, Jinxin; Zhang, Mengjie; Gu, Tenghui; Pan, Shinong; Song, Liucun; Xu, Jinsheng; Sun, Yan; Zhao, Qingxia; Lu, Zhiyan; Lu, Puxuan; Li, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this paper is to correlate the MRI distribution of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in HIV-1 infection patients with CD4 T cell count and immune reconstitution effect. A large retrospective cohort study of HIV patients from multi-HIV centers in China was studied to demonstrate the MRI distribution of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis and its correlation with the different immune status. The consecutive clinical and neuroimaging data of 55 HIV-1-infected patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis collected at multi-HIV centers in China during the years of 2011 to 2014 was retrospectively analyzed. The enrolled patients were divided into 2 groups based on the distribution of lesions. One group of patients had their lesions at the central brain (group 1, n = 34) and the other group of patients had their lesions at the superficial brain (group 2, n = 21). We explored their MRI characterization of brain. In addition, we also compared their CD4 T cell counts and immune reconstitution effects between the 2 groups based on the imaging findings. No statistical difference was found in terms of age and gender between the 2 groups. The medians of CD4 T cell counts were 11.67 cells/mm3 (3.00–52.00 cells/mm3) in group 1 and 42.00 cells/mm3 (10.00–252.00 cells/mm3) in group 2. Statistical difference of CD4 T cell count was found between the 2 groups (P = 0.023). Thirteen patients in group 1 (13/34) and 12 patients in group 2 (12/21) received highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Patients of group 2 received HAART therapy more frequently than patients of group 1 (P = 0.021). Central and superficial brain lesions detected by MR imaging in HIV-1-infected patients with cryptococcal meningoencephalitis are in correlation with the host immunity and HAART therapy. PMID:26871791

  12. First report of Brucella ceti-associated meningoencephalitis in a long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas.

    PubMed

    Davison, Nicholas J; Brownlow, Andrew; McGovern, Barry; Dagleish, Mark P; Perrett, Lorraine L; Dale, Emma-Jane; Koylass, Mark; Foster, Geoffrey

    2015-10-27

    Fatal Brucella ceti infection with histological lesions specific to the central nervous system has been described in only 3 species of cetaceans: striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba, Atlantic white-sided dolphins Lagenorhynchus acutus and short-beaked common dolphins Delphinus delphis. This paper describes the first report of a B. ceti-associated meningoencephalitis in a long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas, showing the increasing range of species susceptibility. Brucella was recovered in larger numbers from cerebrospinal fluid than from brain tissue and is the sample of choice for isolation. PMID:26503778

  13. Severe West Nile virus meningoencephalitis in a pediatric renal transplant recipient: successful recovery and long-term neuropsychological outcome.

    PubMed

    Lambert, S L; Aviles, D; Vehaskari, V M; Ashoor, I F

    2016-09-01

    West Nile Virus is an arbovirus that has rapidly spread throughout the United States since the first case was described in Queens, New York in 1999. There has been increasing reports of both community-acquired and organ-derived infections in renal transplant recipients. In immunocompromised individuals, WNV infection is a life-threatening disease with significant neurological morbidity. We report the only pediatric case of community-acquired WNV disease in a renal transplant recipient to undergo detailed long-term neuropsychological assessment. Increased surveillance and prompt treatment of WNV meningoencephalitis is critical, and our report highlights the effectiveness of immunosuppression reduction without compromising allograft outcomes. PMID:27470315

  14. Acute lead poisoning with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in calves on a farm receiving land application of sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, C.R.; Tuomari, D.; Reddy, C.; Logan, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    A total of 3 cases of acute lead poisoning in calves was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrophotometric analysis of biological samples, presence of an acute lead exposure source, clinical signs of impaired vision in one case and eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in another case. One of two other calves which died approximately 2 months earlier had nervous signs and it is likely that they also had lead poisoning. Dams of two of the cases did not have elevated lead levels. Municipal sewage sludge had been applied to most fields on the farm during the preceding 5 year period. There had been approximately a doubling of the lead content in the soil; however, the foodstuffs produced on the farm had low lead concentrations. The extremely high lead levels in the abomasal contents and feces of calves eliminated sludge as the source of the lead in this acute poisoning episode. The contents of oil filters, accessible to calves but not to adult cattle, had lead levels as high as 26,922 micrograms/g and was the most likely lead source responsible for this lead intoxication. It appears that the manifestation of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in lead poisoning cases may occur in young calves as well as in cows and in acute as well as in chronic intoxications.

  15. Endogenous amoebic endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Notohara, K; Shiraga, F; Yumiyama, S

    2001-01-01

    A 42-year-old man experienced abrupt reduction of vision in the left eye and had vitreous opacity and hypopyon on initial examination. He underwent an emergency vitrectomy and phacoemulsification with posterior capsulectomy, followed by a 2-week course of intravenous fluconazole and antibiotics. The final visual acuity was 20/20 OS. Amoebas, together with polymorphonuclear cells, were observed on examination of specimens of the aqueous humor and vitreous fluid obtained during the surgery. Staphylococcus epidermidis was also cultured from the vitreous fluid. The amoebas had a crescent-shaped periphery of the cytoplasm and ambiguous nuclei. Ultrastructurally, the cytoplasm was surrounded by a thick electron-dense coating. The early vitrectomy and combined use of antibiotics and antifungals might have led to the good visual outcome in this patient. PMID:11146738

  16. Inherited CARD9 deficiency in otherwise healthy children and adults with meningo-encephalitis and/or colitis caused by Candida

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Mahdaviani, Seyed Alireza; Barbati, Elisa; Chaussade, Hélène; Koumar, Yatrika; Levy, Romain; Denis, Blandine; Brunel, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Sophie; Loop, Michèle; Peeters, Julie; de Selys, Ariel; Vanclaire, Jean; Vermylen, Christiane; Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Chatzis, Olga; Liu, Luyan; Migaud, Mélanie; Pedergnana, Vincent; Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Jouvion, Gregory; Chretien, Fabrice; Darazam, Ilad Alavi; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Netea, Mihai G.; De Bruycker, Jean-Jacques; Bernard, Louis; Reynes, Jacques; Amazrine, Noureddine; Abel, Laurent; Van der Linden, Dimitri; Harrison, Tom; Picard, Capucine; Lortholary, Olivier; Mansouri, Davood; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Invasive infections of the central nervous system or digestive tract caused by commensal fungi of the genus Candida are rare and life-threatening. The known risk factors include acquired and inherited immunodeficiencies, with patients often displaying a history of multiple infections. Cases of meningo-encephalitis and/or colitis caused by Candida remain unexplained. We studied five previously healthy children and adults with unexplained invasive disease of the central nervous system, or the digestive tract, or both, caused by Candida spp. The patients were aged 39, 7, 17 37, and 26 years at the time of infection and were unrelated but each born to consanguineous parents of Turkish (two patients), Iranian, Moroccan or Pakistani origin. Meningo-encephalitis was isolated in three patients, associated with colitis in a fourth patient, and the fifth patient suffered from isolated colitis. Inherited CARD9 deficiency was recently reported in otherwise healthy patients with other forms of severe disease caused by Candida, Trichophyton, Phialophora, and Exophiala, including meningo-encephalitis, but not colitis, caused by Candida and Exophiala. We therefore sequenced CARD9 in the five patients. All were found to be homozygous for rare and deleterious mutant CARD9 alleles: R70W and Q289* for the three patients with isolated C. albicans meningo-encephalitis, R35Q for the patient with meningo-encephalitis and colitis caused by C. glabrata, and Q295* for the patient with C. albicans colitis. Regardless of their levels of mutant CARD9 protein, the patients’ monocyte-derived dendritic cells responded poorly to CARD9-dependent fungal agonists (curdlan, heat-killed C. albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Exophiala dermatitidis). Invasive infections of the CNS or digestive tract caused by Candida in previously healthy children and even adults may be caused by inherited CARD9 deficiency. PMID:25702837

  17. Effects of gill abrasion and experimental infection with Tenacibaculum maritimum on the respiratory physiology of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar affected by amoebic gill disease.

    PubMed

    Powell, Mark D; Harris, James O; Carson, Jeremy; Hill, Jonathan V

    2005-02-28

    The effects of gill abrasion and experimental infection with Tenacibaculum maritimum were assessed in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar with underlying amoebic gill disease. The respiratory and acid-base parameters arterial oxygen tension (P(a)O2), arterial whole blood oxygen content (C(a)O2), arterial pH (pHa), haematocrit and haemoglobin concentrations were measured at intervals over a 48 h recovery period following surgical cannulation of the dorsal aorta. Mortality rates over the recovery period were variable, with gill abrasion and inoculation with T. maritimum causing the highest initial mortality rate and unabraded, uninoculated controls showing the lowest overall mortality rate. Fish with abraded gills tended to show reduced P(a)O2 and lower C(a)O2 compared with unabraded fish. Infection with T. maritimum had no effect on P(a)O2 or C(a)O2. All fish showed an initial alkalosis at 24 h post-surgery/inoculation which was more pronounced in fish inoculated with T. maritimum. There were no significant effects of gill abrasion or infection upon the ratio of oxygen specifically bound to haemoglobin or mean cellular haemoglobin concentration. Histologically, 48 h following surgery, abraded gills showed multifocal hyperplastic lesions with pronounced branchial congestion and telangiectasis, and those inoculated with T. maritimum exhibited focal areas of branchial necrosis and erosion associated with filamentous bacterial mats. All fish examined showed signs of amoebic gill disease with multifocal hyperplastic and spongious lesions with parasome-containing amoeba associated with the gill epithelium. The results suggest that respiratory compromise occurred as a consequence of gill abrasion rather than infection with T. maritimum. PMID:15819432

  18. CHAGASIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS IN AN HIV INFECTED PATIENT WITH MODERATE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION: PROLONGED SURVIVAL AND CHALLENGES IN THE HAART ERA

    PubMed Central

    BUCCHERI, Renata; KASSAB, Maria José; de FREITAS, Vera Lucia Teixeira; da SILVA, Sheila Cristina Vicente; BEZERRA, Rita C.; KHOURY, Zarifa; SHIKANAI-YASUDA, Maria Aparecida; VIDAL, José E.

    2015-01-01

    The reactivation of Chagas disease in HIV infected patients presents high mortality and morbidity. We present the case of a female patient with confirmed Chagasic meningoencephalitis as AIDS-defining illness. Interestingly, her TCD4+ lymphocyte cell count was 318 cells/mm3. After two months of induction therapy, one year of maintenance with benznidazol, and early introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the patient had good clinical, parasitological and radiological evolution. We used a qualitative polymerase chain reaction for the monitoring of T. cruzi parasitemia during and after the treatment. We emphasize the potential value of molecular techniques along with clinical and radiological parameters in the follow-up of patients with Chagas disease and HIV infection. Early introduction of HAART, prolonged induction and maintenance of antiparasitic therapy, and its discontinuation are feasible, in the current management of reactivation of Chagas disease. PMID:27049711

  19. CHAGASIC MENINGOENCEPHALITIS IN AN HIV INFECTED PATIENT WITH MODERATE IMMUNOSUPPRESSION: PROLONGED SURVIVAL AND CHALLENGES IN THE HAART ERA.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Renata; Kassab, Maria José; Freitas, Vera Lucia Teixeira de; Silva, Sheila Cristina Vicente da; Bezerra, Rita C; Khoury, Zarifa; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Vidal, José E

    2015-12-01

    The reactivation of Chagas disease in HIV infected patients presents high mortality and morbidity. We present the case of a female patient with confirmed Chagasic meningoencephalitis as AIDS-defining illness. Interestingly, her TCD4+ lymphocyte cell count was 318 cells/mm3. After two months of induction therapy, one year of maintenance with benznidazol, and early introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the patient had good clinical, parasitological and radiological evolution. We used a qualitative polymerase chain reaction for the monitoring of T. cruzi parasitemia during and after the treatment. We emphasize the potential value of molecular techniques along with clinical and radiological parameters in the follow-up of patients with Chagas disease and HIV infection. Early introduction of HAART, prolonged induction and maintenance of antiparasitic therapy, and its discontinuation are feasible, in the current management of reactivation of Chagas disease. PMID:27049711

  20. Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and CREBBP c.201 202delTA mutation: a case presenting with varicella meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Çaksen, H; Bartsch, O; Okur, M; Temel, H; Açikgoz, M; Yilmaz, C

    2009-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is a rare syndrome with a frequency of approximately 1 in 125,000 affected newborns, which is characterized by mental retardation, growth retardation, a particular dysmorphology and, in a subset of cases, immunodeficiency. RTS is typically caused by CREBBP deficiency, and heterozygous mutation or deletion of the CREBBP gene has been identified in 60-70% of patients. The inheritance is autosomal dominant but reports of vertical transmission are exceedingly rare; near-all cases are caused by de novo mutations. Here we present an 8-month-old boy with varicella meningoencephalitis, RTS, and a de novo deletion of the CREBBP gene of two base pairs at position 201-202 in exon 2, c. 201 202delT. The mutation has not been described previously but it predicts a protein truncation, and truncating CREBBP mutations are typical causes of RTS. PMID:19852432

  1. Meningoencephalitis with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus caused by probable coccidioides species in a buff-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae).

    PubMed

    Goe, Alexandra; Swenson, Julie; West, Gary; Evans, Jason

    2013-09-01

    An 8-yr-old male buff-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus gabriellae) acutely developed abnormal behavior, decreased appetite, and dull mentation. Mild generalized muscle wasting and weight loss were the only other abnormalities noted on examination. Routine immunodiffusion serology for Coccidioides spp. were IgG and IgM positive. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was suggestive of an infectious meningoencephalitis with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed in standard fashion to reduce the imminent risk of mortality from increased intracranial pressure. Postoperative treatment included oral fluconazole, a tapered course of prednisolone, and physical therapy. Clinical signs improved steadily and the gibbon was fit to return to exhibit 8 wk post-shunt placement. This case of coccidioidomycosis demonstrates the complications that can occur with dissemination to the central nervous system and its management. It is the first published report describing the use of ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement in this species. PMID:24063114

  2. Cryptococcal Neuroradiological Lesions Correlate with Severity during Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in HIV-Positive Patients in the HAART Era

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Caroline; Dromer, Françoise; Lévêque, Christophe; Chartier, Loïc; Cordoliani, Yves-Sébastien; Fontanet, Arnaud; Launay, Odile; Lortholary, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis has an overall global mortality rate of 20% in AIDS patients despite antifungals. There is a need for additional means of precise assessment of disease severity. We thus studied the radiological brain images available from 62 HIV-positive patients with cryptococcocal meningoencephalitis to analyse the brain lesions associated with cryptococcosis in relationship with disease severity, and the respective diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) versus computed tomography (CT). In this retrospective multicenter analysis, two neuroradiologists blindly reviewed the brain imaging. Prospectively acquired clinical and mycological data were available at baseline and during follow-up. Baseline images were abnormal on 92% of the MR scans contrasting with 53% of the CT scans. MR/CT cryptococcosis-related lesions included mass(es) (21%/9%), dilated perivascular spaces (46%/5%) and pseudocysts (8%/4%). The presence compared to absence of cryptococcosis-related lesions was significantly associated with high serum (78% vs. 42%, p = 0.008) and CSF (81% vs. 50%, p = 0.024) antigen titers, independently of neurological abnormalities. MR detected significantly more cryptococcosis-related lesions than CT for 17 patients who had had both investigations (76% vs. 24%, p = 0.005). In conclusion, MR appears more effective than CT for the evaluation of AIDS-associated cerebral cryptococcosis. Furthermore, brain imaging is an effective tool to assess the initial disease severity in this setting. Given this, we suggest that investigation for cryptococcosis-related lesions is merited, even in the absence of neurological abnormality, if a high fungal burden is suspected on the basis of high serum and/or CSF antigen titers. PMID:18414656

  3. Suppurative otitis and ascending meningoencephalitis associated with Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae in a captive Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) with toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Giannitti, Federico; Schapira, Andrea; Anderson, Mark; Clothier, Kristin

    2014-09-01

    A 6-year-old female Parma wallaby (Macropus parma) at a zoo in California developed acute ataxia and left-sided circling. Despite intensive care, clinical signs progressed to incoordination and prostration, and the animal was euthanized. At necropsy, the left tympanic cavity was filled with homogeneous suppurative exudate that extended into the cranium expanding the meninges and neuroparenchyma in the lateral and ventral aspect of the caudal ipsilateral brainstem and medulla oblongata. Microscopically, the brainstem showed regional severe suppurative meningoencephalitis with large numbers of neutrophils, fewer macrophages, and lymphocytes admixed with fibrin, necrotic cellular debris, hemorrhage, and mineralization, with numerous intralesional Gram-negative bacilli. Bacteroides spp. and Porphyromonas spp. were isolated on anaerobic culture from the meninges, and the bacteria were further characterized by partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing as Bacteroides tectus and Porphyromonas gulae. Bacterial aerobic culture from the meninges yielded very low numbers of mixed flora and Proteus spp., which were considered contaminants. Culture of Mycoplasma spp. from middle ear and meninges was negative. Additionally, Toxoplasma gondii cysts were detected by immunohistochemistry in the heart and brain, and anti-Toxoplasma antibodies were detected in serum. The genera Bacteroides and Porphyromonas have been associated with oral disease in marsupials; but not with otitis and meningoencephalitis. The results of the present work highlight the importance of performing anaerobic cultures in the diagnostic investigation of cases of suppurative otitis and meningoencephalitis in macropods. PMID:25057163

  4. Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar Calreticulin: Inhibition of Classical Complement Pathway and Differences in the Level of Expression in Amoebic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Ximénez, Cecilia; González, Enrique; Nieves, Miriam E.; Silva-Olivares, Angélica; Shibayama, Mineko; Galindo-Gómez, Silvia; Escobar-Herrera, Jaime; García de León, Ma del Carmen; Morán, Patricia; Valadez, Alicia; Rojas, Liliana; Hernández, Eric G.; Partida, Oswaldo; Cerritos, René

    2014-01-01

    The role of calreticulin (CRT) in host-parasite interactions has recently become an important area of research. Information about the functions of calreticulin and its relevance to the physiology of Entamoeba parasites is limited. The present work demonstrates that CRT of both pathogenic E. histolytica and nonpathogenic E. dispar species specifically interacted with human C1q inhibiting the activation of the classical complement pathway. Using recombinant EhCRT protein, we demonstrate that CRT interaction site and human C1q is located at the N-terminal region of EhCRT. The immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy experiments show that CRT and human C1q colocalize in the cytoplasmic vesicles and near to the surface membrane of previously permeabilized trophozoites or are incubated with normal human serum which is known to destroy trophozoites. In the presence of peripheral mononuclear blood cells, the distribution of EhCRT and C1q is clearly over the surface membrane of trophozoites. Nevertheless, the level of expression of CRT in situ in lesions of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) in the hamster model is different in both Entamoeba species; this molecule is expressed in higher levels in E. histolytica than in E. dispar. This result suggests that EhCRT may modulate some functions during the early moments of the host-parasite relationship. PMID:24860808

  5. Impact of rituximab-associated B-cell defects on West Nile virus meningoencephalitis in solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Marilyn E.; Quan, Dianna; Ho, Joseph T.; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B. K.; Tyler, Kenneth L.; Grazia, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence suggests that West Nile virus (WNV) neuroinvasive disease occurs more frequently in both solid organ and human stem cell transplant recipients. The effect of concomitant anti-B-cell therapy with rituximab, a CD20+ monoclonal antibody, on WNV infection in this population, however, has not been reported. We describe a case of a patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency who underwent single lung transplantation in 2005 and was maintained on tacrolimus, cytoxan and prednisone. More recently, she had received two courses of rituximab for recurrent A2–A3 grade rejection with concomitant capillaritis and presented six months later with rapid, fulminant WNV meningoencephalitis. Her diagnosis was made by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) PCR but serum and CSF WNV IgM and IgG remained negative. She received WNV-specific hyperimmune globulin (Omr-Ig-Am®) through a compassionate protocol. She experienced a rapidly progressive and devastating neurological course despite treatment and died three wk after onset of her symptoms. Autopsy revealed extensive meningoencephalomyelitis. PMID:19659514

  6. Lymphadenopathy and non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis in calves experimentally infected with bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (FL112).

    PubMed

    Munro, R; Lysons, R; Venables, C; Horigan, M; Jeffrey, M; Dawson, M

    1998-08-01

    In an experiment on bovine immunodeficiency-like virus (BIV), the virological and serological aspects of which were reported in an earlier paper, three groups (A, B and C) of three calves were inoculated subcutaneously with a recently isolated strain (FL112). For group B and group C, the virus was suspended in milk, and for group C (controls) the viral suspension was subjected to pasteurization before inoculation. The calves were killed for necropsy 12 months later. Clinical assessment revealed subtle ataxia in two group A calves, which took the form of an intermittent "shifting" (from one leg to another) lameness, and palpable enlargement of the pre-scapular lymph nodes in one group B animal. At necropsy, haemal lymph nodes (0.1 to 0.5 cm in diameter), occurring singly, were observed in all animals. However, in groups A and B (but not C), enlarged haemal lymph nodes (< or = 2 cm in diameter) were also seen, occurring singly and in chains; and in one group A animal they occurred in grape-like clusters. In groups A and B (but not C), histopathological examination revealed generalized hyperplastic changes in lymph nodes, especially the haemal lymph nodes. This finding was particularly striking in the two clinically ataxic animals from group A, which also showed a non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis; the latter was possibly the cause of the subtle clinical signs. This study supports previous findings on lymphadenopathy resulting from experimental infection with BIV. PMID:9749357

  7. A multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction panel for detecting neurologic pathogens in dogs with meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Ik; Chang, Dong-Woo; Na, Ki-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis (ME) is a common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system in dogs. Clinically, ME has both infectious and non-infectious causes. In the present study, a multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (mqPCR) panel was optimized for the detection of eight canine neurologic pathogens (Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus spp., Neospora caninum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bartonella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Ehrlichia canis, and canine distemper virus [CDV]). The mqPCR panel was subsequently applied to 53 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from dogs with ME. The analytic sensitivity (i.e., limit of detection, expressed as molecules per 1 mL of recombinant vector) was 3.8 for CDV, 3.7 for Ehrlichia canis, 3.7 for Bartonella spp., 3.8 for Borrelia burgdorferi, 3.7 for Blastomyces dermatitidis, 3.7 for Cryptococcus spp., 38 for Neospora caninum, and 3.7 for Toxoplasma gondii. Among the tested CSF samples, seven (15%) were positive for the following pathogens in decreasing order of frequency: Cryptococcus spp. (3/7), Blastomyces dermatitidis (2/7), and Borrelia burgdorferi (2/7). In summary, use of an mqPCR panel with high analytic sensitivity as an initial screen for infectious agents in dogs with ME could facilitate the selection of early treatment strategies and improve outcomes. PMID:26040611

  8. A multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction panel for detecting neurologic pathogens in dogs with meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-Ik; Chang, Dong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Meningoencephalitis (ME) is a common inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system in dogs. Clinically, ME has both infectious and non-infectious causes. In the present study, a multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (mqPCR) panel was optimized for the detection of eight canine neurologic pathogens (Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus spp., Neospora caninum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Bartonella spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Ehrlichia canis, and canine distemper virus [CDV]). The mqPCR panel was subsequently applied to 53 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from dogs with ME. The analytic sensitivity (i.e., limit of detection, expressed as molecules per 1 µL of recombinant vector) was 3.8 for CDV, 3.7 for Ehrlichia canis, 3.7 for Bartonella spp., 3.8 for Borrelia burgdorferi, 3.7 for Blastomyces dermatitidis, 3.7 for Cryptococcus spp., 38 for Neospora caninum, and 3.7 for Toxoplasma gondii. Among the tested CSF samples, seven (15%) were positive for the following pathogens in decreasing order of frequency: Cryptococcus spp. (3/7), Blastomyces dermatitidis (2/7), and Borrelia burgdorferi (2/7). In summary, use of an mqPCR panel with high analytic sensitivity as an initial screen for infectious agents in dogs with ME could facilitate the selection of early treatment strategies and improve outcomes. PMID:26040611

  9. The presence of Brucella ceti ST26 in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) with meningoencephalitis from the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Alba, Patricia; Terracciano, Giuliana; Franco, Alessia; Lorenzetti, Serena; Cocumelli, Cristiano; Fichi, Gianluca; Eleni, Claudia; Zygmunt, Michel S; Cloeckaert, Axel; Battisti, Antonio

    2013-05-31

    Brucella spp. was isolated from brain, lung and intestinal lymph nodes of a dead adult male striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) found stranded on the Tyrrhenian coast (Tuscany, Italy) of the Mediterranean Sea in February 2012. Brucella spp. was associated with moderate to severe lesions of meningoencephalitis. A co-infection by Toxoplasma gondii was also demonstrated at brain level by means of molecular and histopathologic methods. The Brucella isolate was further characterized based on a fragment-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach, consisting of a set of five specific PCRs, targeting specific chromosomal IS711 locations for marine mammal Brucellae, as described previously. The isolate was thus classified as Brucella ceti I; V fragment-positive (or B. ceti dolphin type), according to previous studies. Multi Locus Sequence Analysis demonstrated that the isolate belongs to Sequence Type 26, while omp2 (omp2a and omp2b genes) sequence analysis further confirmed the isolate belonged to this group of strains. This is the first report of Brucella spp. from marine mammals in the Mediterranean Sea, and represents a further observation that this strain group is associated with hosts of the Family Delphinidae, and particularly with the striped dolphins, also in the Mediterranean area, thus constituting a further biological hazard of concern for this vulnerable subpopulation. PMID:23419820

  10. Clinical presentation, diagnostic findings and long-term survival in large breed dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown aetiology.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, I; Volk, H A; De Decker, S

    2016-08-01

    Although several studies indicate that meningoencephalitis of unknown aetiology (MUA) might affect every dog breed at every age, little is known about clinical presentation, diagnostic findings and long-term survival in large breed dogs. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the clinical presentation, diagnostic findings and long-term survival between large and small/medium breed dogs diagnosed with MUA. One hundred and eleven dogs met the inclusion criteria. 28 (25 per cent) dogs were considered large breed dogs compared with 83 (75 per cent) small/medium breed dogs. Large breed dogs presented significantly more often with a decreased mentation. Age, gender, duration of clinical signs prior to diagnosis, presence of seizures or cluster seizures, variables on complete blood count and cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and all variables on MRI were not significantly different between small/medium and large breed dogs. Median survival time was 281 and 106 days for the large and small/medium breed dogs, respectively, with no significant difference in survival curves for both groups. Although considered not typically affected by MUA, 25 per cent of dogs included in this study were considered large breed dogs. Therefore, MUA should be included in the differential diagnosis for large breed dogs presenting with intracranial neurological signs. If diagnosed with MUA, large breed dogs also carried a guarded prognosis. PMID:27165997

  11. Primary varicella infection presenting with headache and elevated intracranial pressure.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Oded; Shefer-Averbuch, Noa; Garty, Ben Zion

    2015-05-01

    Primary varicella infection may be associated with neurologic complications, such as cerebritis and meningoencephalitis. Several cases of varicella infection with elevated intracranial pressure have been reported. We describe a 13-year-old immunocompetent girl who presented with a clinical picture of headaches and elevated intracranial pressure as the only manifestation of primary varicella zoster infection. The working diagnosis at first was pseudotumor cerebri based on complaints of headache of 2 weeks' duration, in addition to vomiting and papilledema, without fever or skin eruption. On lumbar puncture, opening pressure was 420 mmH2O, but mild pleocytosis and mildly elevated protein level ruled out the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. Our patient had no history of previous varicella infection, and she did not receive the varicella zoster vaccine. Serology tests, done on admission and repeated 2 months later, suggested primary varicella infection. The literature on varicella infection associated with pseudotumor cerebri or elevated intracranial pressure is reviewed. PMID:24846901

  12. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-01-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1–A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1–B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. “Non-pathogenicity” included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while “pathogenicity” comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica. PMID:27575775

  13. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against a highly immunogenic fraction of Entamoeba histolytica (NIH:200) and their application in the detection of current amoebic infection.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, K; Das, P; Johnson, T M; Chaudhuri, P P; Das, D; Nair, G B

    1993-01-01

    Six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against a highly immunogenic fraction derived by the chromatographic separation of the soluble preparation of axenic Entamoeba histolytica (strain NIH:200) trophozoites. Isotype characterization of the six MAbs revealed that four belonged to the IgM class and one each to the IgG1 and the IgG2a subclasses. The immunoreactivity patterns and the specificity of the MAbs with homologous and heterologous antigens were analyzed by the enzyme-linked immunotransfer blot technique and by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The MAbs reacted intensely with isolates of E. histolytica (strain NIH:200 as well as a local isolate MX1) but showed no reactivity with Entamoeba coli, Iodamoeba butschlii, Endolimax nana, Entamoeba hartmanni, free-living amoeba (Acanthamoeba harticolus) and other enteric parasites. Using the IgG1 MAb as a detecting antibody, a polyclonal-monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for the detection of E. histolytica antigens in stool samples of infected patients. The detection limit of the assay was 8 ng of amoebic antigen. This test was found to be specific and sensitive and yielded 100% positive results in cases with amoebiasis but did not react with controls included in the evaluation. The MAb-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay developed in this study will be an important test for the diagnosis of E. histolytica in the feces of infected humans; however, the limitation of the test is the inability to discriminate the pathogenic status of the amoeba detected in the stool. PMID:8292992

  14. Reduced total hardness of fresh water enhances the efficacy of bathing as a treatment for amoebic gill disease in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S D; Powell, M D

    2003-10-01

    The current treatment for amoebic gill disease (AGD)-affected Atlantic salmon involves bathing sea-caged fish in fresh water, often sourced from local dams, for 3-4 h. In both a small-scale laboratory and an on-farm field experiment, the effects of water hardness on the efficacy of freshwater bathing were assessed. Results showed that soft fresh water (19.3-37.4 mg L(-1) CaCO3), whether it be naturally soft city mains water or artificially softened dam water, was more efficacious at alleviating AGD in affected fish than hard fresh water (173-236.3 mg L(-1) CaCO3). Soft freshwater bathing significantly reduced viable gill amoebae numbers (from 73.9 to 40.9% of total count) and significantly alleviated gill pathology, both gross and histological. Following bathing, gross gill pathological scores of soft freshwater bathed fish lagged 2 weeks behind hard freshwater bathed fish. Significant gill lesion fragmentation, and shedding of lesion-associated hyperplastic tissue, was accompanied by a significant reduction in AGD-affected gill filaments in soft freshwater bathed fish. Furthermore, soft freshwater bathing alleviated the blood plasma electrolyte imbalance seen in control (sea water) and hard freshwater bathed fish. This study showed that the use of soft fresh water for bathing AGD-affected Atlantic salmon could be an improvement to the current method of treatment. Not only does it reduce gill amoeba numbers, but also, it is of a therapeutic advantage with the potential to reduce bathing frequency. PMID:14653317

  15. Overexpression of Differentially Expressed Genes Identified in Non-pathogenic and Pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica Clones Allow Identification of New Pathogenicity Factors Involved in Amoebic Liver Abscess Formation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin; Fehling, Helena; Matthiesen, Jenny; Lorenzen, Stephan; Schuldt, Kathrin; Bernin, Hannah; Zaruba, Mareen; Lender, Corinna; Ernst, Thomas; Ittrich, Harald; Roeder, Thomas; Tannich, Egbert; Lotter, Hannelore; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2016-08-01

    We here compared pathogenic (p) and non-pathogenic (np) isolates of Entamoeba histolytica to identify molecules involved in the ability of this parasite to induce amoebic liver abscess (ALA)-like lesions in two rodent models for the disease. We performed a comprehensive analysis of 12 clones (A1-A12) derived from a non-pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-A and 12 clones (B1-B12) derived from a pathogenic isolate HM-1:IMSS-B. "Non-pathogenicity" included the induction of small and quickly resolved lesions while "pathogenicity" comprised larger abscess development that overstayed day 7 post infection. All A-clones were designated as non-pathogenic, whereas 4 out of 12 B-clones lost their ability to induce ALAs in gerbils. No correlation between ALA formation and cysteine peptidase (CP) activity, haemolytic activity, erythrophagocytosis, motility or cytopathic activity was found. To identify the molecular framework underlying different pathogenic phenotypes, three clones were selected for in-depth transcriptome analyses. Comparison of a non-pathogenic clone A1np with pathogenic clone B2p revealed 76 differentially expressed genes, whereas comparison of a non-pathogenic clone B8np with B2p revealed only 19 differentially expressed genes. Only six genes were found to be similarly regulated in the two non-pathogenic clones A1np and B8np in comparison with the pathogenic clone B2p. Based on these analyses, we chose 20 candidate genes and evaluated their roles in ALA formation using the respective gene-overexpressing transfectants. We conclude that different mechanisms lead to loss of pathogenicity. In total, we identified eight proteins, comprising a metallopeptidase, C2 domain proteins, alcohol dehydrogenases and hypothetical proteins, that affect the pathogenicity of E. histolytica. PMID:27575775

  16. Genetic and pathological characteristics of Cryptococcus gattii and Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans from meningoencephalitis in autochthonous goats and mouflons, Sardinia, Italy.

    PubMed

    Maestrale, Caterina; Masia, Mariangela; Pintus, Davide; Lollai, Stefano; Kozel, Thomas R; Gates-Hollingsworth, Marcellene A; Cancedda, Maria Giovanna; Cabras, Pierangela; Pirino, Salvatore; D'Ascenzo, Vittoria; Ligios, Ciriaco

    2015-06-12

    In this study, we examined in Sardinia the brain of 555 autochthonous sheep, 50 goats, and 4 mouflons which were found affected by neurological signs. We found 6 goats and one mouflon with meningoencephalitis caused by Cryptococcus sp. There was no evidence of cryptococcal infections in any of the examined sheep. MLST genotyping on Cryptococcus sp. isolates identified Cryptococcus gatti genotype AFLP4/VGI and Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans genotype AFLP2/VNIV. Phylogenetically, all Cryptococcus gattii isolates fell within the autochthonous animal, human and environmental Mediterranean isolate cluster, forming a distinct branch along with environmental strains from Alicante, in the southern Mediterranean coast of Spain. PMID:25840469

  17. Detection of Israel turkey meningo-encephalitis virus from mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) and Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) species and its survival in Culex pipiens and Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Phlebotomidae).

    PubMed

    Braverman, Y; Davidson, I; Chizov-Ginzburg, A; Chastel, C

    2003-07-01

    Israel turkey meningo-encephalitis (ITME) virus was detected in pools of Ochlerotatus caspius Pallas and Culicoides imicola Kieffer trapped at a turkey run at Nir David during an outbreak in August 1995. Experimental membrane feeding on a blood ITME suspension showed that Culex pipiens L. became harbored virus for at least 14 d. When Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli were fed on an infected turkey, they became infected and harbored the virus for at least 7 d. Because Phlebotomines are trapped frequently at turkey runs in Israel, they should be suspected as potential vectors of ITME. PMID:14680120

  18. Effect of a constant rate infusion of cytosine arabinoside on mortality in dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Lowrie, M; Thomson, S; Smith, P; Garosi, L

    2016-07-01

    Administration of cytosine arabinoside (CA) by continuous rate infusion (CRI) has pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic advantages over traditional intermittent dosing. Whether these advantages translate into clinical efficacy remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of CRI of CA in dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown origin (MUO) and to compare outcomes with a group of historical control dogs treated with conventional intermittent subcutaneous (SC) administration of CA; both groups received adjunctive prednisolone. It was hypothesised that a CRI of CA for 24 h at 100 mg/m(2) would improve survival and lesion resolution compared with conventional SC delivery of 50 mg/m(2) every 12 h for 48 h. Eighty dogs with suspected MUO were recruited from consecutive dogs presenting with suspected MUO from 2006 to 2015. All dogs underwent routine clinical evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. There were 39 dogs in the SC group and 41 dogs in the CRI group; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Survival at 3 months was 22/39 (44%) with SC delivery versus 37/41 (90%) with CRI. No dose-limiting toxicities were noted for either group. The resolution rate of magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities at the 3 month re-examination were substantially improved in the CRI group versus the SC group. The CRI regimen produced a survival advantage over the SC route of administration without clinically significant toxicity. These data supports the routine use of CRI at first presentation for the treatment of MUO in dogs. PMID:27240905

  19. Computational identification of putative miRNAs and their target genes in pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Padmashree, Dyavegowda; Swamy, Narayanaswamy Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a parasitic unicellular free living eukaryotic amoeba. The parasite spreads through contaminated water and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Therefore, it is of interest to understand its molecular pathogenesis. Hence, we analyzed the parasite genome for miRNAs (microRNAs) that are non-coding, single stranded RNA molecules. We identified 245 miRNAs using computational methods in N. fowleri, of which five miRNAs are conserved. The predicted miRNA targets were analyzed by using miRanda (software) and further studied the functions by subsequently annotating using AmiGo (a gene ontology web tool). PMID:26770029

  20. Computational identification of putative miRNAs and their target genes in pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri

    PubMed Central

    Padmashree, Dyavegowda; Swamy, Narayanaswamy Ramachandra

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a parasitic unicellular free living eukaryotic amoeba. The parasite spreads through contaminated water and causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Therefore, it is of interest to understand its molecular pathogenesis. Hence, we analyzed the parasite genome for miRNAs (microRNAs) that are non-coding, single stranded RNA molecules. We identified 245 miRNAs using computational methods in N. fowleri, of which five miRNAs are conserved. The predicted miRNA targets were analyzed by using miRanda (software) and further studied the functions by subsequently annotating using AmiGo (a gene ontology web tool). PMID:26770029

  1. Fatal equine meningoencephalitis in the United Kingdom caused by the panagrolaimid nematode Halicephalobus gingivalis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, C; Coumbe, K M; Habershon-Butcher, J; Schöniger, S

    2011-11-01

    A fatal case of eosinophilic and granulomatous meningoencephalitis caused by the free-living panagrolaimid nematode Halicephalobus gingivalis is reported in a 10-year-old Welsh gelding in the United Kingdom. Clinical examination first revealed behavioural abnormalities which rapidly progressed to severe ataxia, reduced mentation status and cranial nerve signs. Despite symptomatic treatment no amelioration of neurological signs was achieved and the horse was subjected to euthanasia. A complete post mortem examination revealed eosinophilic and granulomatous meningoencephalitis mainly affecting the cerebellum and brain stem with intralesional adult nematodes, larvae and eggs. There was also eosinophilic meningitis of the cervical spinal cord. The intralesional nematodes were morphologically consistent with the panagrolaimid nematode H. gingivalis. Although infection by this facultative neurotropic parasite is extremely rare, it needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of central nervous signs in horses and, in particular, other equine helminthic infection of the central nervous system. This fatal case is unusual since lesions were locally very extensive and the nematodes did not colonise haematogenously to other organs as seen often in equine halicephalobosis. As the taxonomy of H. gingivalis has changed and some recent reports in the literature still refer to this species as Micronema deletrix or Halicephalobus deletrix, we here provide a short update of the species and some insights on the order Tylenchida, which contains free-living nematodes with parasitic tendencies. PMID:21496093

  2. Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Leads to Claudin-5 Degradation via the NF-κB Pathway in BALB/c Mice with Eosinophilic Meningoencephalitis Caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ping-Sung; Lai, Shih-Chan

    2013-01-01

    The epithelial barrier regulates the movement of ions, macromolecules, immune cells and pathogens. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in the degradation of tight junction protein during infection with rat nematode lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. The results showed that phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB was increased in mice with eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. Treatment with MG132 reduced the phosphorylation of NF-κB and the activity of MMP-9, indicating upregulation of MMP-9 through the NF-κB signaling pathway. Claudin-5 was reduced in the brain but elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), implying that A. cantonensis infection caused tight junction breakdown and led to claudin-5 release into the CSF. Degradation of claudin-5 coincided with alteration of the blood-CSF barrier permeability and treatment with the MMP inhibitor GM6001 attenuated the degradation of claudin-5. These results suggested that degradation of claudin-5 was caused by MMP-9 in angiostrongyliasis meningoencephalitis. Claudin-5 could be used for the pathophysiologic evaluation of the blood-CSF barrier breakdown and tight junction disruption after infection with A. cantonensis. PMID:23505411

  3. Comparison of nested-multiplex, Taqman & SYBR Green real-time PCR in diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess in a tertiary health care institute in India

    PubMed Central

    Dinoop, K.P.; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Mandal, Jharna; Swaminathan, R.P.; Narayanan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Amoebiasis is a common parasitic infection caused by Entamoeba histolytica and amoebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of amoebiasis. The aim of this study was to standardise real-time PCR assays (Taqman and SYBR Green) to detect E. histolytica from liver abscess pus and stool samples and compare its results with nested-multiplex PCR. Methods: Liver abscess pus specimens were subjected to DNA extraction. The extracted DNA samples were subjected to amplification by nested-multiplex PCR, Taqman (18S rRNA) and SYBR Green real-time PCR (16S-like rRNA assays to detect E. histolytica/E. dispar/E. moshkovskii). The amplification products were further confirmed by DNA sequence analysis. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was done for nested-multiplex and SYBR Green real-time PCR and the area under the curve was calculated for evaluating the accuracy of the tests to dignose ALA. Results: In all, 17, 19 and 25 liver abscess samples were positive for E. histolytica by nested-multiplex PCR, SYBR Green and Taqman real-time PCR assays, respectively. Significant differences in detection of E. histolytica were noted in the real-time PCR assays evaluated (P<0.0001). The nested-multiplex PCR, SYBR Green real-time PCR and Taqman real-time PCR evaluated showed a positivity rate of 34, 38 and 50 per cent, respectively. Based on ROC curve analysis (considering Taqman real-time PCR as the gold standard), it was observed that SYBR Green real-time PCR was better than conventional nested-multiplex PCR for the diagnosis of ALA. Interpretation & conclusions: Taqman real-time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA had the highest positivity rate evaluated in this study. Both nested multiplex and SYBR Green real-time PCR assays utilized were evaluated to give accurate results. Real-time PCR assays can be used as the gold standard in rapid and reliable diagnosis, and appropriate management of amoebiasis, replacing the

  4. Meningoencephalitis-like onset of post-infectious AQP4-IgG-positive optic neuritis complicated by GM1-IgG-positive acute polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Luana; Franciotta, Diego; Beronio, Alessandro; Delucchi, Stefano; Capellini, Cesare; Del Sette, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Fifteen days after a respiratory infection, a 45-year-old woman presented with paresthesias in the hands and feet, bilateral loss of vision, fever, headache, and impairment of consciousness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed predominant lesions in the optic tracts, optic chiasm, and hypothalamus. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed elevated protein level, and lymphocytic pleocytosis. Neurophysiological studies disclosed a demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Serum anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae immunoglobulin (Ig)M, anti-GM1 IgG, and anti-AQP4 IgG were positive. This case, which is remarkable for post-infectious meningoencephalitis-like onset, MRI picture, and dysimmunity to central and peripheral nervous system autoantigens, underpins the pivotal diagnostic role of anti-AQP4-IgG, and expands the list of clinico-pathological findings that can associate with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders. PMID:24557856

  5. [A case in which the subject was affected by Listeia meningoencephalitis during administration of infliximab for steroid-dependent adult onset Still's disease].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Motohisa; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Chie; Ohara, Mikiko; Suzuki, Chisako; Naishiro, Yasuyoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa; Nonaka, Michio; Imai, Kohzoh

    2006-06-01

    The subject was a 22-year-old woman who developed high fever and arthralgias and eruptions in the extremities around June 2005. She sought medical advice at a nearby dermatology clinic, where hepatic dysfunction was noted on blood testing. The patient was thus hospitalized the next day. Although CRP levels were significantly high, no sign of infection was observed and bone marrow cell differentiation was normal. Adult onset Still's disease was diagnosed based on the observation of persistent high fever >39 degrees C, eruptions, increased leukocytes, pharyngeal pain, splenomegaly, hepatic dysfunction, negative autoantibody results from blood testing, and high serum ferritin levels. Administration of prednisolone 30 mg/day was initiated, but proved ineffective. Steroid pulse therapy was conducted, and the subject was transferred to our medical facility for continued treatment. Attempts were made to control the disease using combined steroid and cyclosporine administration; but exacerbation of high serum ferritin levels and hepatic dysfunctions were observed, so a second course of steroid pulse therapy was conducted. Symptoms improved temporarily, but steroid levels were difficult to reduce. Cyclosporine was therefore replaced by methotrexate, and administration of infliximab was initiated. In the course of treatment, administration of a sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim combination was initiated, but was discontinued due to suspicion of drug-induced hepatic injury. A second administration of infliximab was conducted in late August, and rapid improvements in clinical symptoms and abnormal test values was observed. However, high fever and headache developed suddenly in early September. Based on the results of spinal fluid testing, blood and spinal fluid cultures and MRI of the head, Listeria meningoencephalitis was diagnosed. Diplopia and impaired consciousness occurred during the disease course, and formation of a brain abscess was observed on imaging. However, symptoms

  6. Detection of excretory Entamoeba histolytica DNA in the urine, and detection of E. histolytica DNA and lectin antigen in the liver abscess pus for the diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Parija, Subhash C; Khairnar, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    Background Amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and pyogenic liver abscesses (PLA) appear identical by ultrasound and other imaging techniques. Collection of blood or liver abscess pus for diagnosis of liver abscesses is an invasive procedure, and the procedure requires technical expertise and disposable syringes. Collection of urine is a noninvasive procedure. Therefore, there has been much interest shown towards the use of urine as an alternative clinical specimen for the diagnosis of some parasitic infections. Here, we report for the first time the detection of E. histolytica DNA excreted in the urine for diagnosis of the cases of ALA. Results E. histolytica DNA was detected in liver abscess pus specimen of 80.4% of ALA patients by a nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 16S-like r RNA gene. The nested PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in all 37 (100%) liver abscess pus specimens collected prior to metronidazole treatment, but were detected in only 53 of 75 (70.6%) pus specimens collected after therapy with metronidazole. Similarly, the PCR detected E. histolytica DNA in 21 of 53 (39.6%) urine specimens of ALA patients. The test detected E. histolytica DNA in only 4 of 23 (17.4%) urine specimens collected prior to metronidazole treatment, but were detected in 17 of 30 (56.7%) urine specimens collected after treatment with metronidazole. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of lectin E. histolytica antigen in the liver abscess pus showed a sensitivity of 50% and the indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test for detection of amoebic antibodies in the serum showed a sensitivity of 76.8% for the diagnosis of the ALA. Conclusion The present study for the first time shows that the kidney barrier in ALA patients is permeable to E. histolytica DNA molecule resulting in excretion of E. histolytica DNA in urine which can be detected by PCR. The study also shows that the PCR for detection of E. histolytica DNA in urine of patients with ALA

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis in a Venezuelan HIV+-AIDS Patient: Pathological Diagnosis Confirmed by PCR Using Formalin-Fixed- and Paraffin-Embedded-Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rossi Spadafora, Marcello Salvatore; Céspedes, Ghislaine; Romero, Sandra; Fuentes, Isabel; Boada-Sucre, Alpidio A.; Cañavate, Carmen; Flores-Chávez, María

    2014-01-01

    Coinfections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and infectious agents have been recognized since the early 90s. In the central nervous system (CNS) of HIV+ patients, parasitic protozoans like Toxoplasma gondii have been described as responsible for the space occupying lesions (SOL) developed. However, the involvement of Trypanosoma cruzi is also described but appears to be less frequent in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and transplant recipients, associated with necrotizing myocarditis and neurological symptoms related to the occurrence of necrotizing pseudotumoral encephalitis (NPE) and meningoencephalitis (NME). The present work aims to present a Venezuelan case of NME associated with the coinfection of HIV and a T. cruzi-like trypanosomatid as well as its evolution and diagnosis by histopathological techniques, electron microscopy, and PCR methods using formalin-fixed- (FF-) and paraffin-embedded- (PE-) tissues. Postmortem cytological studies of leptomeninges imprints reveal the presence of trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma sp. Histopathological and electron microscopy studies allowed us to identify an amastigote stage and to reject the involvement of other opportunistic microorganisms as the etiological agent of the SOL. The definitive confirmation of T. cruzi as the etiological agent was achieved by PCR suggesting that the NME by T. cruzi was due to a reactivation of Chagas' disease. PMID:25763312

  8. Results of a Multinational Study Suggest the Need for Rapid Diagnosis and Early Antiviral Treatment at the Onset of Herpetic Meningoencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Cag, Yasemin; Ozturk-Engin, Derya; Defres, Sylviane; Kaya, Selcuk; Larsen, Lykke; Poljak, Mario; Barsic, Bruno; Argemi, Xavier; Sørensen, Signe Maj; Bohr, Anne Lisbeth; Tattevin, Pierre; Gunst, Jesper Damsgaard; Baštáková, Lenka; Jereb, Matjaž; Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Karabay, Oguz; Pekok, Abdullah Umut; Sipahi, Oguz Resat; Chehri, Mahtab; Beraud, Guillaume; Shehata, Ghaydaa; Del Vecchio, Rosa Fontana; Maresca, Mauro; Karsen, Hasan; Sengoz, Gonul; Sunbul, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Gulden; Yilmaz, Hava; Sharif-Yakan, Ahmad; Kanj, Souha Shararah; Parlak, Emine; Pehlivanoglu, Filiz; Korkmaz, Fatime; Komur, Suheyla; Kose, Sukran; Ulug, Mehmet; Bolukcu, Sibel; Coskuner, Seher Ayten; Ince, Nevin; Akkoyunlu, Yasemin; Halac, Gulistan; Sahin-Horasan, Elif; Tireli, Hulya; Kilicoglu, Gamze; Al-Mahdawi, Akram; Nemli, Salih Atakan; Inan, Asuman; Senbayrak, Seniha; Stahl, Jean Paul; Vahaboglu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Data in the literature regarding the factors that predict unfavorable outcomes in adult herpetic meningoencephalitis (HME) cases are scarce. We conducted a multicenter study in order to provide insights into the predictors of HME outcomes, with special emphasis on the use and timing of antiviral treatment. Samples from 501 patients with molecular confirmation from cerebrospinal fluid were included from 35 referral centers in 10 countries. Four hundred thirty-eight patients were found to be eligible for the analysis. Overall, 232 (52.9%) patients experienced unfavorable outcomes, 44 died, and 188 survived, with sequelae. Age (odds ratio [OR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.05), Glasgow Coma Scale score (OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.93), and symptomatic periods of 2 to 7 days (OR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.16 to 2.79) and >7 days (OR, 3.75; 95% CI, 1.72 to 8.15) until the commencement of treatment predicted unfavorable outcomes. The outcome in HME patients is related to a combination of therapeutic and host factors. This study suggests that rapid diagnosis and early administration of antiviral treatment in HME patients are keys to a favorable outcome. PMID:25779579

  9. Role of the suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2) during meningoencephalitis caused by Bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5).

    PubMed

    Aparecida Silva Barbosa, Aline; Freitas Versiani, Alice; Fonseca da Cunha Sousa, Larissa; Silva de Miranda, Aline; Gasparini, Marcela Ribeiro; Brant, Fátima; Silva, Daniele Gonçalves; Luisa Quintino-de-Carvalho, Iracema; Marianetti Soriani, Frederico; Guimarães da Fonseca, Flávio; César Vasconcelos, Anilton; da Silva Barcelos, Lucíola; Martins Teixeira, Mauro; Lúcio Teixeira, Antônio; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Barbosa-Stancioli, Edel Figueiredo; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga

    2016-08-01

    The role of suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) in meningoencephalitis caused by Bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5) was evaluated by intracranial infection in C57BL/6 wild-type mice (WT) and SOCS2 deficient mice (SOCS2(-/-)). Both infected groups presented weight loss, ruffled fur and hunched posture. Additionally, infected SOCS2(-/-) mice showed swollen chamfer and progressive depression. Infected WT animals developed mild meningitis, characterized by infiltration of mononuclear cells. Moreover, viral DNA was detected in liver and lung from infected WT group. This group also showed elevated brain levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, CXCL1 and CCL5, when compared with non-infected WT animals. Brain inflammation was exacerbated in infected SOCS2(-/-) mice with widespread distribution of the virus and increased brain levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-12, CXCL1 and CCL5, when compared with WT infected mice. Moreover, infected SOCS2 deficient mice exhibited reduced brain mRNA expression of IFNα and IFNβ and increased expression of mRNA of SOCS1, compared with infected WT mice. Taken together, our study provides an insight into the role of SOCS2 in modulating the immune response to BoHV-5 infection. PMID:27477504

  10. Development of a reliable dual-gene amplification RT-PCR assay for the detection of Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus in Turkey brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Irit; Raibstein, Israel; Al-Tori, Amira; Khinich, Yevgeny; Simanov, Michael; Yuval, Chanoch; Perk, Shimon; Lublin, Avishai

    2012-11-01

    The Turkey Meningoencephalitis virus (TMEV) causes neuroparalytic signs, paresis, in-coordination, morbidity and mortality in turkeys. In parallel to the increased worldwide scientific interest in veterinary avian flaviviruses, including the Bagaza, Tembusu and Tembusu-related BYD virus, TMEV-caused disease also reemergence in commercial turkeys during late summer of 2010. While initially TMEV was detected by NS5-gene RT-PCR, subsequently, the env-gene RT-PCR was employed. As lately several inconsistencies were observed between the clinical, serological and molecular detection of the TMEV env gene, this study evaluated whether genetic changes occurred in the recently isolated viruses, and sought to optimize and improve the direct TMEV amplification from brain tissues of affected turkeys. The main findings indicated that no changes occurred during the years in the TMEV genome, but the PCR detection sensitivities of the env and NS5 genes differed. The RT-PCR and RNA purification were optimized for direct amplification from brain tissues without pre-replication of clinical samples in tissue cultures or in embryonated eggs. The amplification sensitivity of the NS5-gene was 10-100 times more than the env-gene when separate. The new dual-gene amplification RT-PCR was similar to that of the NS5 gene, therefore the assay can be considered as a reliable diagnostic assay. Cases where one of the two amplicons would be RT-PCR negative would alert and warn on the virus identity, and possible genetic changes. In addition, the biochemical environment of the dual-gene amplification reaction seemed to contribute in deleting non-specific byproducts that occasionally appeared in the singular RT-PCR assays on RNA purified from brain tissues. PMID:22705084

  11. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-06-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  12. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  13. Syphilis - primary

    MedlinePlus

    Primary syphilis; Secondary syphilis; Late syphilis; Tertiary syphilis ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted, infectious disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum . This bacterium causes ...

  14. Identification of novel genetic risk loci in Maltese dogs with necrotizing meningoencephalitis and evidence of a shared genetic risk across toy dog breeds.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Barber, Renee M; Schatzberg, Scott J; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Porter, Brian F; Vernau, Karen M; Keesler, Rebekah I; Matiasek, Kaspar; Flegel, Thomas; Miller, Andrew D; Southard, Teresa; Mariani, Christopher L; Johnson, Gayle C; Huentelman, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) affects toy and small breed dogs causing progressive, often fatal, inflammation and necrosis in the brain. Genetic risk loci for NME previously were identified in pug dogs, particularly associated with the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex on chromosome 12, but have not been investigated in other susceptible breeds. We sought to evaluate Maltese and Chihuahua dogs, in addition to pug dogs, to identify novel or shared genetic risk factors for NME development. Genome-wide association testing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Maltese dogs with NME identified 2 regions of genome-wide significance on chromosomes 4 (chr4:74522353T>A, p = 8.1×10-7) and 15 (chr15:53338796A>G, p = 1.5×10-7). Haplotype analysis and fine-mapping suggests that ILR7 and FBXW7, respectively, both important for regulation of immune system function, could be the underlying associated genes. Further evaluation of these regions and the previously identified DLA II locus across all three breeds, revealed an enrichment of nominal significant SNPs associated with chromosome 15 in pug dogs and DLA II in Maltese and Chihuahua dogs. Meta-analysis confirmed effect sizes the same direction in all three breeds for both the chromosome 15 and DLA II loci (p = 8.6×10-11 and p = 2.5×10-7, respectively). This suggests a shared genetic background exists between all breeds and confers susceptibility to NME, but effect sizes might be different among breeds. In conclusion, we identified the first genetic risk factors for NME development in the Maltese, chromosome 4 and chromosome 15, and provide evidence for a shared genetic risk between breeds associated with chromosome 15 and DLA II. Last, DLA II and IL7R both have been implicated in human inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, suggesting that similar pharmacotherapeutic targets across species should be investigated. PMID:25393235

  15. Identification of Novel Genetic Risk Loci in Maltese Dogs with Necrotizing Meningoencephalitis and Evidence of a Shared Genetic Risk across Toy Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Schatzberg, Scott J.; Siniard, Ashley L.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Porter, Brian F.; Vernau, Karen M.; Keesler, Rebekah I.; Matiasek, Kaspar; Flegel, Thomas; Miller, Andrew D.; Southard, Teresa; Mariani, Christopher L.; Johnson, Gayle C.; Huentelman, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing meningoencephalitis (NME) affects toy and small breed dogs causing progressive, often fatal, inflammation and necrosis in the brain. Genetic risk loci for NME previously were identified in pug dogs, particularly associated with the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class II complex on chromosome 12, but have not been investigated in other susceptible breeds. We sought to evaluate Maltese and Chihuahua dogs, in addition to pug dogs, to identify novel or shared genetic risk factors for NME development. Genome-wide association testing of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Maltese dogs with NME identified 2 regions of genome-wide significance on chromosomes 4 (chr4:74522353T>A, p = 8.1×10−7) and 15 (chr15:53338796A>G, p = 1.5×10−7). Haplotype analysis and fine-mapping suggests that ILR7 and FBXW7, respectively, both important for regulation of immune system function, could be the underlying associated genes. Further evaluation of these regions and the previously identified DLA II locus across all three breeds, revealed an enrichment of nominal significant SNPs associated with chromosome 15 in pug dogs and DLA II in Maltese and Chihuahua dogs. Meta-analysis confirmed effect sizes the same direction in all three breeds for both the chromosome 15 and DLA II loci (p = 8.6×10–11 and p = 2.5×10−7, respectively). This suggests a shared genetic background exists between all breeds and confers susceptibility to NME, but effect sizes might be different among breeds. In conclusion, we identified the first genetic risk factors for NME development in the Maltese, chromosome 4 and chromosome 15, and provide evidence for a shared genetic risk between breeds associated with chromosome 15 and DLA II. Last, DLA II and IL7R both have been implicated in human inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, suggesting that similar pharmacotherapeutic targets across species should be investigated. PMID:25393235

  16. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the identification of Naegleria fowleri in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Reveiller, Fabienne L; Varenne, Marie-Pierre; Pougnard, Claire; Cabanes, Pierre-Andre; Pringuez, Emmanuelle; Pourima, Benedicte; Legastelois, Stephane; Pernin, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a free-living amoeba, is the causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a fatal human disease of the central nervous system often contracted after swimming in fresh water. Identifying sites contaminated by N. fowleri is important in order to prevent the disease. An Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) has been developed for the specific identification of N. fawleri in primary cultures of environmental water samples. Of 939 samples isolated from artificially heated river water and screened by ELISA, 283 were positive. These results were subsequently confirmed by isoelectric focusing, the established reference method. A sensitivity of 97.4% and a specificity of 97% were obtained. These results indicate that this ELISA method is reliable and can be considered as a powerful tool for the detection of N. fowleri in environmental water samples. PMID:12744523

  17. Primary thrombocythemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... in which the bone marrow produces too many platelets. Platelets are a part of the blood that aids ... Primary thrombocythemia is caused by the overproduction of platelets. If untreated, this condition gets worse over time. ...

  18. Amebic meningoencephalitis in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Fuentealba, I C; Wikse, S E; Read, W K; Edwards, J F; Visvesvara, G S

    1992-02-01

    A 1.5-year-old Suffolk ewe with acute onset of incoordination and blindness unresponsive to antibiotic treatment was examined at necropsy. The meninges were congested, opaque, and thick. Microscopically, focal areas of hypercellularity in the left cortical gray matter and the meninges were observed. The inflammatory response consisted of gliosis and perivascular cuffing (lymphocytes, plasma cells, and variable numbers of eosinophils). An amebic organism in 2 life stages was found in the cerebral parenchyma. Numerous large (15 to 35 microns in diameter) organisms, interpreted as trophozoites, were characterized by vacuolated cytoplasm and small nuclei with a prominent eosinophilic nucleolus (karyosome). The smaller (10 to 17 microns in diameter) encysted stage was surrounded by a capsule-like membrane, and contained a large central body sometimes surrounded by a clear halo. Immunofluorescence studies for amebic antigens were strongly positive for an ameba recently isolated in human beings and baboons (Leptomyxid sp). PMID:1548173

  19. Primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Madkhali, Tarıq; Alhefdhi, Amal; Chen, Herbert; Elfenbein, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder caused by overactivation of parathyroid glands resulting in excessive release of parathyroid hormone. The resultant hypercalcemia leads to a myriad of symptoms. Primary hyperparathyroidism may increase a patient’s morbidity and even mortality if left untreated. During the last few decades, disease presentation has shifted from the classic presentation of severe bone and kidney manifestations to most patients now being diagnosed on routine labs. Although surgery is the only curative therapy, many advances have been made over the past decades in the diagnosis and the surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism. The aim of this review is to summarize the characteristics of the disease, the work up, and the treatment options. PMID:26985167

  20. Occurrence and pathogenicity of Naegleria fowleri in artificially heated waters

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, J.L.; Keleti, G.; Martinez, A.J.

    1983-03-01

    The occurrence of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in thermal discharges, recipient waters, and cooling towers of eight power plants located in western Pennsylvania was investigated for 2 years in conjunction with several environmental measurements. Pathogenic N. fowleri was detected in one cooling tower and in the discharge, receiving waters, or both of five of eight localities. The occurrence of this organism was related to elevated temperatures, but no significant correlation was found for other biological and chemical parameters. Laboratory experiments on the effect of pH on pathogenic N. fowleri documented 100% survival at a range from 2.1 to 8.15. Higher pH reduced or killed the amoebae. No case of human primary amoebic meningoencephalitis occurred during the study.

  1. Detection of the free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri by using conventional and real-time PCR based on a single copy DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Régoudis, Estelle; Pélandakis, Michel

    2016-02-01

    The amoeba-flagellate Naegleria fowleri is a causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). This thermophilic species occurs worldwide and tends to proliferate in warm aquatic environment. The PAM cases remain rare but this infection is mostly fatal. Here, we describe a single copy region which has been cloned and sequenced, and was used for both conventional and real-time PCR. Targeting a single-copy DNA sequence allows to directly quantify the N. fowleri cells. The real-time PCR results give a detection limit of 1 copy per reaction with high reproducibility without the need of a Taqman probe. This procedure is of interest as compared to other procedures which are mostly based on the detection of multi-copy DNA associated with a Taqman probe. PMID:26688582

  2. What do we know by now about the genus Naegleria?

    PubMed

    De Jonckheere, Johan F

    2014-11-01

    In this short overview of the genus Naegleria a brief historical sketch is given since the discovery of this amoeboflagellate in 1899 and the finding in 1970 that one species, Naegleria fowleri causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in man. Eight different types of this pathogen are known which have an uneven distribution over the world. Until now 47 different Naegleria spp. are described, of which two other species cause disease in experimental animals, and their geographical dispersal is indicated. The presence of group I introns in the SSU and in the LSU rDNA in the genus is discussed, as well as the possibility of sex or mating. It is also mentioned that the genome of N. fowleri should not be compared to that of Naegleria gruberi, to know why the former is pathogenic, but to the genome of its closest relative Naegleria lovaniensis. PMID:25108159

  3. Characterization of a Drinking Water Distribution Pipeline Terminally Colonized by Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Matthew J; Halstrom, Samuel; Wylie, Jason T; Walsh, Tom; Kaksonen, Anna H; Sutton, David; Braun, Kalan; Puzon, Geoffrey J

    2016-03-15

    Free-living amoebae, such as Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Vermamoeba spp., have been identified as organisms of concern due to their role as hosts for pathogenic bacteria and as agents of human disease. In particular, N. fowleri is known to cause the disease primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) and can be found in drinking water systems in many countries. Understanding the temporal dynamics in relation to environmental and biological factors is vital for developing management tools for mitigating the risks of PAM. Characterizing drinking water systems in Western Australia with a combination of physical, chemical and biological measurements over the course of a year showed a close association of N. fowleri with free chlorine and distance from treatment over the course of a year. This information can be used to help design optimal management strategies for the control of N. fowleri in drinking-water-distribution systems. PMID:26853055

  4. The effect of thermal pollution on the distribution of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed Central

    De Jonckheere, J.; Van Dijck, P.; Van de Voorde, H.

    1975-01-01

    The distribution in the environment of Naegleria fowleri, the causal agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis has been investigated in this study. N. fowleri was isolated only from a thermally polluted canal. These amoebaflagellates were not isolated from another thermally polluted canal in the neighbourhood indicating that, apart from high temperature, other factors are involved in the selective proliferation of N. fowleri. This species was absent in all other samples originating from two canals, a stream, two lakes, several reservoirs and slow sandfilters of a water supply service and also a water distribution network. Many other amoebae able to grow at 42 degrees C. were found in different places. Most of the N. fowleri strains isolated were not virulent for mice, although they showed all the characteristics of the pathogenic strains. PMID:1097497

  5. Innate resistance of mice to experimental infection with Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, R M; John, D T

    1978-01-01

    The mouse system provides an excellent model for studying host resistance to Naegleria fowleri, the agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. Innate resistance to infection with N. fowleri was examined with respect to infecting dose and the age, sex, and strain of mice. Intravenous inoculation with 10(7) amoebae per mouse produced 100% mortality in 9 days, whereas inoculation with fewer amoebae reduced the cumulative mortality. Male and female DUB/ICR mice of varying ages were inoculated intravenously with 2.5 X 10(5) N. fowleri per g of body weight. The youngest mice died first, with 100% mortality for both males and females, and mortality decreased with increasing age. Female mice were significantly more resistant to infection than males. Five strains of mice weighing approximately 20 g were inoculated intravenously with weight-adjusted doses; mortality ranged from 10% in C57BL/6 mice to 95% in A/HeCr mice. PMID:669800

  6. Concentration of Naegleria fowleri in natural waters used for recreational purposes in Sonora, Mexico (November 2007-October 2008).

    PubMed

    Lares-Villa, Fernando; Hernández-Peña, Claudia

    2010-09-01

    A survey was designed to know the concentration of Naegleria fowleri in recreational areas in Hornos, Sonora, during a year. Samples were taken monthly at La Isleta and Las Palmas and the total amoeba counts were obtained by the most probable number method (MPN). The identification of N. fowleri was made by PCR. The maximum concentration of total thermophilic amoebae was 9175 MPN/L for La Isleta and 3477 MPN/L for Las Palmas. Thermophilic Naegleria were present mainly during summer and fall. October's concentrations were up to 201 MPN/L, at both places. The maximum concentrations of N. fowleri were 201 MPN/L and 18 MPN/L for La Isleta and Las Palmas respectively, and were isolated from August to October. The presence of N. fowleri in these particular natural bodies of water reinforces the need for adaptation of preventive measures to avoid cases of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. PMID:20417204

  7. Primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Pallan, Shelley; Khan, Aliya

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss the presentation, diagnosis, and management of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in family medicine. Quality of evidence MEDLINE was searched from 2002 to 2009 using the terms presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of PHPT. Proceedings and guidelines from the Third International Workshop on Primary Hyperparathyroidism in May 2008 were reviewed in detail. Most studies offered level II and III evidence, although there were a number of single randomized controlled trials on PHPT (level I evidence). References from pertinent papers were also searched for relevant articles. Articles most relevant to family medicine and primary care practitioners are presented. Main message Primary hyperparathyroidism is the most common cause of hypercalcemia in outpatients. In the Western world, most patients with PHPT present with nonspecific symptoms such as fatigue, mood disturbances, and cognitive impairments. Diagnosis is established when intact parathyroid hormone levels are elevated or at the high end of the normal range in the setting of elevated total or ionized calcium levels (following exclusion of conditions that can mimic PHPT). Criteria for surgery have recently been modified. Surgery is always a suitable option in those with symptomatic PHPT and no contraindications. Those with contraindications or with asymptomatic PHPT not meeting the criteria for surgery can generally be safely monitored and considered for medical management. This might include treatment with bisphosphonates, hormone replacement therapy, raloxifene, or calcimimetic agents; however, there are currently no fracture data for any of these options. Conclusion The definitive therapy for symptomatic and asymptomatic PHPT is parathyroidectomy. In patients with asymptomatic PHPT not meeting the criteria for surgery, monitoring is safe and medical management designed to target skeletal protection or lower serum calcium is a suitable option. PMID:21321169

  8. Primary Cutaneous Cryptococcosis Treated with Debridement and Fluconazole Monotherapy in an Immunosuppressed Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jennifer; Bartelt, Luther; Yu, Deborah; Joshi, Anjali; Weinbaum, Bradley; Pierson, Tiffany; Patrizio, Michael; Warren, Cirle A.; Hughes, Molly A.; Donowitz, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic yeast present in the environment. Practitioners are familiar with the presentation and management of the most common manifestation of cryptococcal infection, meningoencephalitis, in patients with AIDS or other conditions of immunocompromise. There is less awareness, however, of uncommon presentations where experience rather than evidence guides therapy. We report a case of primary cutaneous cryptococcosis (PCC) in a patient who had been immunosuppressed by chronic high-dose corticosteroid for the treatment of severe asthma. This case highlights the importance of early recognition of aggressive cellulitis that fails standard empiric antibiotic treatment in an immunocompromised patient. It also demonstrates successful treatment of PCC with a multispecialty approach including local debridement and fluconazole monotherapy. PMID:25722900

  9. Effective PCR-based detection of Naegleria fowleri from cultured sample and PAM-developed mouse.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heekyoung; Seong, Gi-Sang; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, Mi Yeoun; Lee, Won-Ja; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2015-10-01

    Increasing numbers of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) cases due to Naegleria fowleri are becoming a serious issue in subtropical and tropical countries as a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD). To establish a rapid and effective diagnostic tool, a PCR-based detection technique was developed based on previous PCR methods. Four kinds of primer pairs, Nfa1, Nae3, Nf-ITS, and Naegl, were employed in the cultured amoebic trophozoites and a mouse with PAM experimentally developed by N. fowleri inoculation (PAM-mouse). For the extraction of genomic DNA from N. fowleri trophozoites (1×10(6)), simple boiling with 10μl of PBS (pH 7.4) at 100°C for 30min was found to be the most rapid and efficient procedure, allowing amplification of 2.5×10(2) trophozoites using the Nfa-1 primer. The primers Nfa1 and Nae3 amplified only N. fowleri DNA, whereas the ITS primer detected N. fowleri and N. gruberi DNA. Using the PAM-mouse brain tissue, the Nfa1 primer was able to amplify the N. fowleri DNA 4 days post infection with 1ng/μl of genomic DNA being detectable. Using the PAM-mouse CSF, amplification of the N. fowleri DNA with the Nae3 primer was possible 5 days post infection showing a better performance than the Nfa1 primer at day 6. PMID:26322498

  10. Primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bilezikian, John P; Cusano, Natalie E; Khan, Aliya A; Liu, Jian-Min; Marcocci, Claudio; Bandeira, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common disorder in which parathyroid hormone (PTH) is excessively secreted from one or more of the four parathyroid glands. A single benign parathyroid adenoma is the cause in most people. However, multiglandular disease is not rare and is typically seen in familial PHPT syndromes. The genetics of PHPT is usually monoclonal when a single gland is involved and polyclonal when multiglandular disease is present. The genes that have been implicated in PHPT include proto-oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes. Hypercalcaemia is the biochemical hallmark of PHPT. Usually, the concentration of PTH is frankly increased but can remain within the normal range, which is abnormal in the setting of hypercalcaemia. Normocalcaemic PHPT, a variant in which the serum calcium level is persistently normal but PTH levels are increased in the absence of an obvious inciting stimulus, is now recognized. The clinical presentation of PHPT varies from asymptomatic disease (seen in countries where biochemical screening is routine) to classic symptomatic disease in which renal and/or skeletal complications are observed. Management guidelines have recently been revised to help the clinician to decide on the merits of a parathyroidectomy or a non-surgical course. This Primer covers these areas with particular attention to the epidemiology, clinical presentations, genetics, evaluation and guidelines for the management of PHPT. PMID:27194212

  11. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Leonardo; Bilezikian, John

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several generations, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHTP) has undergone a change in its clinical presentation in many countries from a symptomatic disease to an asymptomatic one. The reasons for this change in clinical presentation are related to the widespread use of biochemical screening tests, to the measurement of PTH more routinely in the evaluation of metabolic bone disease and to the status of vitamin D sufficiency in the population. Along with recognition of a broader clinical spectrum of disease, including a more recently recognized normocalcemic variant, has come an appreciation that the evaluation of classic target organs that can be affected in PHPT, such as the skeleton and the kidneys, require more advanced imaging technology for complete evaluation. It is clear that even in asymptomatic patients, evidence for microstructural disease in the skeleton and calcifications in the kidneys can be demonstrated often. Potential non-classical manifestations of PHPT related to neurocognition and the cardiovascular system continue to be of interest. As a result of these advances, revised guidelines for the management of asymptomatic PHPT have been recently published to help the clinician determine whether surgery is appropriate or whether a more conservative approach is acceptable.

  12. Primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorder (PID) refers to a heterogeneous group of over 130 disorders that result from defects in immune system development and/or function. PIDs are broadly classified as disorders of adaptive immunity (i.e., T-cell, B-cell or combined immunodeficiencies) or of innate immunity (e.g., phagocyte and complement disorders). Although the clinical manifestations of PIDs are highly variable, most disorders involve at least an increased susceptibility to infection. Early diagnosis and treatment are imperative for preventing significant disease-associated morbidity and, therefore, consultation with a clinical immunologist is essential. PIDs should be suspected in patients with: recurrent sinus or ear infections or pneumonias within a 1 year period; failure to thrive; poor response to prolonged use of antibiotics; persistent thrush or skin abscesses; or a family history of PID. Patients with multiple autoimmune diseases should also be evaluated. Diagnostic testing often involves lymphocyte proliferation assays, flow cytometry, measurement of serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels, assessment of serum specific antibody titers in response to vaccine antigens, neutrophil function assays, stimulation assays for cytokine responses, and complement studies. The treatment of PIDs is complex and generally requires both supportive and definitive strategies. Ig replacement therapy is the mainstay of therapy for B-cell disorders, and is also an important supportive treatment for many patients with combined immunodeficiency disorders. The heterogeneous group of disorders involving the T-cell arm of the adaptive system, such as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), require immune reconstitution as soon as possible. The treatment of innate immunodeficiency disorders varies depending on the type of defect, but may involve antifungal and antibiotic prophylaxis, cytokine replacement, vaccinations and bone marrow transplantation. This article provides a detailed overview

  13. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the bile ducts of the liver. This blocks the flow ... ducts in the liver is not known. However, primary biliary cirrhosis is an autoimmune disorder. That means your body's ...

  14. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  15. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  16. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  17. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  18. Primary Hyperparathyroidism: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie-Feder, Jessica; Sirrs, Sandra; Anderson, Donald; Sharif, Jibran; Khan, Aneal

    2011-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common condition that affects 0.3% of the general population. Primary and tertiary care specialists can encounter patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, and prompt recognition and treatment can greatly reduce morbidity and mortality from this disease. In this paper we will review the basic physiology of calcium homeostasis and then consider genetic associations as well as common etiologies and presentations of primary hyperparathyroidism. We will consider emerging trends in detection and measurement of parathyroid hormone as well as available imaging modalities for the parathyroid glands. Surgical indications and approach will be reviewed as well as medical management of primary hyperparathyroidism with bisphosphonates and calcimimetics. PMID:21747852

  19. Virus meningo-encephalitis in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, J. D.; van Tongeren, H. A. E.; Pattyn, S. R.; Rosenzweig, A.

    1955-01-01

    Two virus strains were isolated from the central nervous systems of two fatal human cases during an epidemic of encephalomyelitis in Austria. Monkeys, mice, and chick embryos proved susceptible; rabbits and guinea-pigs were refractory. The experimental disease in monkeys was characterized by acute meningo-encephalomyelitis, which was localized particularly in the grey matter of the brain stem, the cerebellum, the medulla, and the anterior horns of the spinal cord. The virus produced discrete lesions on the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. In monkeys, viraemia was demonstrated for a period of at least 6-8 days before the development of the clinical illness. The virus was shown to be closely related to that of Russian spring-summer encephalitis. Neutralizing and complement-fixing antibodies could be demonstrated in patients' sera. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12 PMID:14378999

  20. [Cerebral venous thrombosis during tuberculous meningoencephalitis].

    PubMed

    Guenifi, W; Boukhrissa, H; Gasmi, A; Rais, M; Ouyahia, A; Hachani, A; Diab, N; Mechakra, S; Lacheheb, A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare disease characterized by its clinical polymorphism and multiplicity of risk factors. Infections represent less than 10% of etiologies. Tuberculosis is not a common etiology, only a few observations are published in the literature. Between January 2005 and March 2015, 61 patients were hospitalized for neuro-meningeal tuberculosis. Among them, three young women had presented one or more cerebral venous sinus thromboses. No clinical feature was observed in these patients; vascular localizations were varied: sagittal sinus (2 cases), lateral sinus (2 cases) and transverse sinus (1 case). With anticoagulant and antituberculosis drugs, the outcome was favorable in all cases. During neuro-meningeal tuberculosis, the existence of consciousness disorders or neurological focal signs is not always the translation of encephalitis, hydrocephalus, tuberculoma or ischemic stroke; cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be the cause and therefore should be sought. PMID:27090100

  1. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Venkatachalam, Jonathen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Leiomyoma is a smooth muscle neoplasm that commonly occurs in the genitourinary system and the gastrointestinal tract of the body. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma is rarely reported in literature. We report a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyoma of a 55‐year‐old male patient presenting with symptoms of cough for six months. PMID:27516882

  2. Primary Science Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Liz Lawrence has recently finished her term as Chair of Primary Science Committee (PSC). She is one of the 41 hub leaders who have led and mentored 192 schools across England and British Forces' schools in Germany, to achieve the first ever nationally recognised awards to celebrate excellence in primary science. In this article, the author writes…

  3. Multiple primary bronchogenic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Ji, H; Paljarvi, L; Soimakallio, S

    1996-07-01

    Multiple primary bronchogenic carcinomas (MPBCa) are extremely rare. The differentiation of a MPBCa from a pulmonary metastasis due to an extrathoracic neoplasm is sometimes difficult. We reviewed 324 pathologically proved primary pulmonary carcinomas and found six cases of MPBCa (1.9%). We herewith present the series and discuss the diagnosis of MPBCa. PMID:21594435

  4. Transforming Primary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Mike

    2011-01-01

    What is good mathematics teaching? What is mathematics teaching good for? Who is mathematics teaching for? These are just some of the questions addressed in "Transforming Primary Mathematics", a highly timely new resource for teachers which accessibly sets out the key theories and latest research in primary maths today. Under-pinned by findings…

  5. Medics in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Some time ago a flyer on "Medics in Primary School" came the author's way. It described a programme for making placements in primary schools available to medical students. The benefits of the program to medical students and participating schools were highlighted, including opportunities to develop communication skills and demystify medicine. It…

  6. Using Primary Source Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Explores the use of primary sources when teaching about U.S. slavery. Includes primary sources from the Gilder Lehrman Documents Collection (New York Historical Society) to teach about the role of slaves in the Revolutionary War, such as a proclamation from Lord Dunmore offering freedom to slaves who joined his army. (CMK)

  7. Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffer, Sandra, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This report contains 13 articles and book/film reviews on various topics related to the diffusion of health care information in developing countries; beginning with two articles which define primary health care, and suggest principles related to the community, communication, and the health practitioner upon which primary health care should be…

  8. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Venkatachalam, Jonathen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min; Tan, Sze Khen

    2016-05-01

    Leiomyoma is a smooth muscle neoplasm that commonly occurs in the genitourinary system and the gastrointestinal tract of the body. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma is rarely reported in literature. We report a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyoma of a 55-year-old male patient presenting with symptoms of cough for six months. PMID:27516882

  9. [The primary healthcare centres].

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature. PMID:24770539

  10. Developing primary health care.

    PubMed Central

    Jarman, B; Cumberlege, J

    1987-01-01

    Primary health care is best provided by a primary health care team of general practitioners, community nurses, and other staff working together from good premises and looking after the population registered with the practice. It encourages personal and continuing care of patients and good communication among the members of the team. Efforts should be made to foster this model of primary care where possible and also to evaluate its effectiveness. Community services that are not provided by primary care teams should be organised on a defined geographical basis, and the boundaries of these services should coincide as much as possible. Such arrangements would facilitate effective community care and health promotion and can be organised to work well with primary care teams. The patient's right to freedom of choice of a doctor, however, should be retained, as it adds flexibility to the rigidity of fixed geographically based services. PMID:3119003

  11. Protective immunity against Naegleria fowleri infection on mice immunized with the rNfa1 protein using mucosal adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyoung; Yoo, Jong-Kyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kang, Hee-kyoung; Kim, Daesik; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-04-01

    The free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes a fatal disease called primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals. Of the pathogenic mechanism of N. fowleri concerning host tissue invasion, the adherence of amoeba to hose cells is the most important. We previously cloned the nfa1 gene from N. fowleri. The protein displayed immunolocalization in the pseudopodia, especially the food-cups structure, and was related to the contact-dependent mechanism of the amoebic pathogenicity in N. fowleri infection. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit (LTB) have been used as potent mucosal adjuvants via the parenteral route of immunization in most cases. In this study, to examine the effect of protective immunity of the Nfa1 protein for N. fowleri infection with enhancement by CTB or LTB adjuvants, intranasally immunized BALB/c mice were infected with N. fowleri trophozoites for the development of PAM. The mean time to death of mice immunized with the Nfa1 protein using LTB or CTB adjuvant was prolonged by 5 or 8 days in comparison with that of the control mice. In particular, the survival rate of mice immunized with Nfa1 plus CTB was 100% during the experimental period. The serum IgG levels were significantly increased in mice immunized with Nfa1 protein plus CTB or LTB adjuvants. These results suggest that the Nfa1 protein, with CTB or LTB adjuvants, induces strong protective immunity in mice with PAM due to N. fowleri infection. PMID:25604672

  12. Genetics of primary hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ravi Kumar; Söderkvist, Peter; Gimm, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension is a common medical condition and affects approximately 20% of the population in developed countries. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension and affects 8-13% of patients with hypertension. The two most common causes of primary aldosteronism are aldosterone-producing adenoma and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Familial hyperaldosteronism types I, II and III are the known genetic syndromes, in which both adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of aldosterone. However, only a minority of patients with primary aldosteronism have one of these syndromes. Several novel susceptibility genes have been found to be mutated in aldosterone-producing adenomas: KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, CTNNB1, CACNA1D, CACNA1H and ARMC5 This review describes the genes currently known to be responsible for primary aldosteronism, discusses the origin of aldosterone-producing adenomas and considers the future clinical implications based on these novel insights. PMID:27485459

  13. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  14. [Results of primary healthcare].

    PubMed

    Duponchel, J L

    2004-01-01

    The concept of primary healthcare was formulated at the international conference held in Alma-Ata (USSR) on September 6 to 12, 1978. Over the past quarter-century, the term "primary healthcare" has been widely used as a basis for implementing healthcare policies in various nations, especially those considered as developing countries. However many programs initiated in the name of the primary healthcare concept have only partially complied with the spirit of the final declaration of Alma-Ata. Analysis of the healthcare in Mali shows that the system followed that evolution. Although considerable time and energy were regrettably wasted in implementing the village health agent strategy, this phase may have been a necessary step in the political development of the state at that time. Recent changes in the country's healthcare system in compliance with the original principles of primary healthcare show that the 1978 declaration is sound and remains pertinent as democracy makes further gains in the world. PMID:15816127

  15. Staging Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... large vein near the heart. Having a weakened immune system may increase the risk of developing primary CNS ... immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other disorders of the immune system or who have had a kidney transplant . For ...

  16. Inside the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

  17. Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... synthesizers, and wheelchairs ma help some people retain independence.. Speech therapy may be useful for those with ... prevent, and ultimately cure these devastating diseases. NIH Patient Recruitment for Primary Lateral Sclerosis Clinical Trials At ...

  18. Primary infertility (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  19. Treatment of primary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, W C

    1976-12-01

    Reports in the English language of the treatment of primary syphilis are reviewed. Except for benzathine penicillin, the efficacy of the currently recommended dosage schedules are documented only by Schroeter et al. Although these investigators reported generally acceptable failure rates, further study is necessary to determine: (1) if differences in efficacy exist among regimes; (2) if the current schedules are equally effective in both primary and secondary syphilis; and (3) if increased dosages reduce failure rates. PMID:1010777

  20. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  1. Other primary headaches

    PubMed Central

    Bahra, Anish

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Other Primary Headaches’ include eight recognised benign headache disorders. Primary stabbing headache is a generally benign disorder which often co-exists with other primary headache disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. Primary cough headache is headache precipitated by valsalva; secondary cough has been reported particularly in association with posterior fossa pathology. Primary exertional headache can occur with sudden or gradual onset during, or immediately after, exercise. Similarly headache associated with sexual activity can occur with gradual evolution or sudden onset. Secondary headache is more likely with both exertional and sexual headache of sudden onset. Sudden onset headache, with maximum intensity reached within a minute, is termed thunderclap headache. A benign form of thunderclap headache exists. However, isolated primary and secondary thunderclap headache cannot be clinically differentiated. Therefore all headache of thunderclap onset should be investigated. The primary forms of the aforementioned paroxysmal headaches appear to be Indomethacin sensitive disorders. Hypnic headache is a rare disorder which is termed ‘alarm clock headache’, exclusively waking patients from sleep. The disorder can be Indomethacin responsive, but can also respond to Lithium and caffeine. New daily persistent headache is a rare and often intractable headache which starts one day and persists daily thereafter for at least 3 months. The clinical syndrome more often has migrainous features or is otherwise has a chronic tension-type headache phenotype. Management is that of the clinical syndrome. Hemicrania continua straddles the disorders of migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and is not dealt with in this review. PMID:23024566

  2. Minimum-Risk Path Finding by an Adaptive Amoebal Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Iima, Makoto; Ueda, Tetsuo; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Saigusa, Tetsu; Tero, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Ryo; Showalter, Kenneth

    2007-08-01

    When two food sources are presented to the slime mold Physarum in the dark, a thick tube for absorbing nutrients is formed that connects the food sources through the shortest route. When the light-avoiding organism is partially illuminated, however, the tube connecting the food sources follows a different route. Defining risk as the experimentally measurable rate of light-avoiding movement, the minimum-risk path is exhibited by the organism, determined by integrating along the path. A model for an adaptive-tube network is presented that is in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  3. [Atorvastatin in primary prevention].

    PubMed

    Kültürsay, Hakan

    2009-03-01

    Statins are one of the most widely used drugs in medical treatment and have been shown to prevent cardiovascular disease or reduce risk in a large number of studies. Although there is a general class effect, there are differences with regard to structure and efficacy between these agents. Among these agents, atorvastatin is a potent statin whose efficacy has been demonstrated in many clinical trials. Despite the presence of numerous clinical studies, data on atorvastatin related to primary prevention are limited compared to secondary prevention. In this article, clinical results of primary prevention trials with atorvastatin and data on its cost-effectiveness are reviewed. It is concluded that atorvastatin has a role in primary prevention and the cost of its use seems to be lower than commonly accepted cost-effectiveness thresholds. PMID:19404046

  4. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. Patients who have a weakened immune system are at high risk of primary lymphoma of the ...

  5. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  6. Psychiatry and primary care.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, David

    2003-10-01

    There is now almost universal recognition that primary care is the place where most mentally distressed people first present for help. However, the pace at which the health system has adapted to this reality varies greatly from country to country, depending on the amount of resource devoted to mental illness services, the way in which primary care physicians have organized their practice, and the inertia of the system. Here we present several models from developed and developing countries and address briefly the issue of training of health workers. PMID:16946921

  7. Primary Intracranial Leptomeningeal Melanomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Lee, Chae-Heuck; Joo, Mee

    2015-01-01

    Primary intracranial malignant melanoma is a very rare and highly aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. A 66-year-old female patient presented a headache that had been slowly progressing for several months. A large benign pigmented skin lesion was found on her back. A brain MRI showed multiple linear signal changes with branching pattern and strong enhancement in the temporal lobe. The cytological and immunohiostochemical cerebrospinal fluid examination confirmed malignant melanoma. A biopsy confirmed that the pigmented skin lesion on the back and the conjunctiva were benign nevi. We report a case of primary intracranial malignant melanoma and review relevant literatures. PMID:26819692

  8. Sleep and primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Aguggia, Marco; Cavallini, M; Divito, N; Ferrero, M; Lentini, A; Montano, V; Tinebra, M C; Saracco, M G; Valfrè, W

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between sleep and primary headaches has been known for over a century, particularly for headaches occurring during the night or early morning. Migraine, tension-tyre headache, and cluster headache may cause sleep fragmentation, insomnia, and hypersomnia, causing considerable social and economical costs and several familial problems. By contrast, sleep disorders may themselves trigger headache attacks. Finally, headaches and sleep disorders can also be symptoms of other underlying pathologies. Despite this background, there is still no clarity about the mechanism that links these two entities and their interdependence remains to be defined. Patients with primary headache should undergo a careful assessment of sleep habits. PMID:21533713

  9. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Jiang, Guan; Lei, Tie-Chi

    2014-11-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare human infection due to ubiquitous soil born gram-positive, filametous aerobic bacteria. First signs are frequently cutaneous either as part of systemic infection disseminated to the skin, or as primary cutaneous inoculation. An 88 years old man presented with a 3-day history of red papules and pustules with pain on his forehead. The combination of the unusual clinical presentation, laboratory examinations, and a favorable response to co-trimoxazole therapy were consistent with a diagnosis of primary cuteneous nocardiosis. Early recognition and treatment of the disease will improve the cure rate. PMID:25518763

  10. Primary Premier for Belfast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author talks about the Association for Science Education (ASE) Primary Science Committee's (PSC) March 2009 meeting which was held in Belfast as guests of ASE Northern Ireland. To mark the auspicious occasion of a body that usually meets four times a year in the Hatfield HQ crossing the Irish Sea to be hosted by its Celtic cousins, a Lord…

  11. Primary Art Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton Unified School District 373, KS.

    GRADES OR AGES: Primary Grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Art. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide begins with a list of topics for art expression. The main body of the guide contains 15 color-coded sections on the following subjects: 1) mobiles and folded paper; 2) collage and photo montage; 3) square paper and mosaics; 4) wax paper and…

  12. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Cancer.gov

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  13. Primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Porcayo, Luis Alberto; Ponce-Gómez, Juan Antonio; Martínez-Moreno, Mauricio; Portocarrero-Ortíz, Lesly; Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas have only rarely been reported. Craniopharyngiomas involve usually the sellar and suprasellar region, but can be originated from cell remnants of the obliterated craniopharyngeal duct or metaplastic change of andenohypophyseal cells. We present the first case of a primary ectopic frontotemporal craniopharyngioma. Presentation of case A 35-year old woman presented with a one-year history of headache and diplopia. MRI showed a large frontotemporal cystic lesion. Tumor resection was performed with a keyhole endoscopic frontal lateral approach. The pathological features showed an adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma with a cholesterol granuloma reaction. Discussion There have been reported different localizations for primary ectopic craniopharyngioma. Our case presented a lobulated frontotemporal cystic mass formed by a dense eosinophilic proteinaceous material dystrophic calcifications and cholesterol crystals, with epithelial remnants. No tumor regrowth was observed in the magnetic resonance image 27 months postoperatively. Conclusion Primary ectopic craniopharyngioma is a rare entity with a pathogenesis that remains uncertain. This is an unusual anatomic location associated with unique clinical findings. PMID:25725331

  14. Primary Keyboarding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valery; And Others

    Beginning with a rationale for implementing a primary grade keyboarding course, this paper describes the implementation of such a course at the Bernardsville (New Jersey) Elementary School. The methods and procedures discussed include the essential concepts to consider when teaching keyboarding and the materials necessary to implement the program.…

  15. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  16. Primary: A Simulation Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelly, Ann

    A game designed to introduce elementary and middle school students to the primary election process and its operational elements through simulation and role playing activities is presented in this document. A hypothetical town of Notae which has been controlled by one political party for years without resulting change is described. Issues in the…

  17. Primary Guidance Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauck, Ruth, Comp.

    Designed for the primary grades, the guidance activities in this document cover thirty-three topical areas: capabilities, changes, cooperation, criticism, differences, family, feelings, free time, friends, following directions, handicaps, honesty, improving environment, kindness, patience, paying attention, problem solving, rejection,…

  18. Primary Neonatal Diaphragmatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Zouari, Mohamed; Jallouli, Mohamed; Ben Thabet, Afef; Ben Dhaou, Mahdi; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Mhiri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diaphragmatic abscesses are extremely rare and they usually develop by direct extension from a liver abscess. The first case of primary diaphragmatic abscess in a neonate is reported and the difficulties of diagnosing this rare entity are discussed. PMID:26023529

  19. Primary hepatic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, P; Bhadana, U; Singh, R A K; Ahuja, A

    2015-09-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare, aggressive tumor; composed of spindle or pleomorphic cells that line, or grow into, the lumina of pre-existing vascular spaces like sinusoids and terminal hepatic venules; with only about 200 cases diagnosed annually worldwide but it is the most common primary malignant mesenchymal tumor of the liver in adults and accounts for 2% of all primary hepatic malignancies. HAS occurs in association with known chemical carcinogens, but 75% of the tumors have no known etiology. Patients present with vague symptoms like abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue or an abdominal mass. Hepatic angiosarcoma is usually multicentric and involves both lobes, entire liver may also found to be involved. CD31 is the most reliable marker. These tumors lack specific features on imaging, so, pathological diagnosis is necessary. There are no established treatment guidelines because of low frequency and aggressive nature of tumor, chemotherapy is only palliative, liver resection is indicated for solitary mass and liver transplant is contraindicated. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review all the available literature and to present detailed information and an update on primary hepatic angiosarcoma. PMID:26008857

  20. Writing for Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Tara, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, two short pieces are presented to show educators just what a good article and a good review could have in them. This article has been written for the purpose of illustrating a good example, but is also representative of the type of content the editors encourage in "Primary Science": practical and active, with images. They also…

  1. Healthcare is primary.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation. PMID:26985402

  2. Primary Lymphoma of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Hahn, Jee Sook; Suh, Chang Ok; Yang, Woo Ick

    2002-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There is yet no systematical evaluation of primary lymphoma of bone in Korea. Here we report our experience of sixteen cases with primary lymphoma of bone focusing on the survival. Methods: Sixteen cases, collected for 13 years, were evaluated on the clinical presentation, histologic subtype, stage and treatment outcomes of the primary bone lymphoma. Results: The most common presenting complaint was bone pain. Malignant lymphoma of bone involved a wide variety of sites, the most prevalent site of which in this study was the spine. Most of the cases were in the diffuse large B-cell category. The clinical stage of lymphoma was IEA in two cases, IIEA in three cases, IVEA in five cases and IVEB in three cases. All treated cases received systemic chemotherapy and ten cases among them were treated with combined modality therapy. Median overall survival was not reached after median follow-up period of 28 months and five-year overall survival rate was 54%. Conclusion: More promising therapeutic strategies are needed for survival improvement on more accumulated cases. PMID:12298430

  3. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver cancer every 6 to 12 months. Health care providers use blood tests, ultrasound, or both to check for signs of ... the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis. A health care provider uses the test selectively when he or she is concerned that ...

  4. Primary publication in microprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Davis, D.E.

    1964-01-01

    This is a progress report on an experiment to demonstrate practicality of such publication. Based on a study conducted since 1959 through the publication of 'Wildlife Disease', the co-authors review the original aims, accomplishments, and future of primary publication in microprint. Space and cost savings, as well as author and reader reactions, portend further developments and use of this medium.

  5. Philosophy in Primary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John

    2012-01-01

    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education" Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on "Philosophy for Children in Transition", so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just mentioned. The result…

  6. Primary Standards Laboratory report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) for the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL). This report summarizes metrology activities that received emphasis in the first half of 1990 and provides information pertinent to the operation of the DOE/AL system-wide Standards and Calibration Program.

  7. Discover Primary Science: Developing Primary Science in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Margaret; Palmer, Marion

    2007-01-01

    "Discover Primary Science" is a major project in primary science education in Ireland. In 2006-2007 it involves 2400 primary schools, 45 host centres, and two government departments. However, it started out as a local initiative taken by one state agency in 2002 involving four Institutes of Technology and 40 primary schools. The aim of the…

  8. [Primary pulmonary sarcomas].

    PubMed

    Jakubcová, T; Jakubec, P

    2009-01-01

    Primary pulmonary sarcomas are rare diseases unlike lung carcinomas. The occurence of these sarcomas is between 0.013-0.40% of all malignant lung tumours. There are malignant mesenchymal tumours. They are flowing from the soft tissue of lung. The pulmonary sarcomas are heterogenic group with various biological behaviour. Their morfologic structure does not digger from the sarcomas of soft tissue. The primary pulmonary sarcomas occur more often in childhood and in young people unlike lung carcinomas. Radiation and some toxic substances are noted risk factors. Some gene mutations, infectious pathoghens and contraception have a possible impact on the origin of some types of the sarcomas. The current hypothesis is, that most of the sarcomas, if not all sarcomas, stem from primitive multipotent mesenchymal cell by malignant transformation in one or more lines. The diagnostic standard is biopsy from tumour with histologic and immunohistochemistry examination of a sample. The basic diagnostic problem is exclusion of a secondary origin of sarcomatic cells in the lung, because pulmonary metastasis of extrapulmonary sarcomas are more often than the primary pulmonary involvement.The optimal treatment is a resection of the tumour.The other therapeutic modalities are radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but results of these modalities are unsatisfactory. There are various chemotherapeutic regimes, monotherapy or combination regimes. The basic cytostatics are doxorubicine, iphosphamide, dacarbazine. Problems of the chemotherapy are high toxicity and relatively low curative effect about 20%.The first studies with biological treatment of the sarcomas of soft tissue have been published recently.This types of drugs could be a part of the complex management of these primary pulmonary tumours in the future. The primary pulmonary sarcomas have mostly aggresive course and often recur. Their prognosis is usually not very good. The survival median is 48 months and 5-years survival ranges

  9. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen. PMID:12412967

  10. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  11. Primary Pulmonary Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Liang, Qi-Lian; Jiang, Liang; Liu, Qiu-Long; Ou, Wen-Ting; Li, Da-Heng; Zhang, Hui-Jie; Yuan, Gao-Le

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary pulmonary paraganglioma is a rare disease. We report a case of a 37-year old female patient with space-occupying lesions in the right lower pulmonary lobe during a routine examination without any symptoms. The patient underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) resection of the right middle lobe and dissection of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes under general anesthesia. She recovered without recrudescence. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult. Accurate diagnosis requires pathological examination, and immunohistochemical test is particularly important. Complete resection is the first treatment option for solitary primary pulmonary paraganglioma; however, VATS is a better technique. Given the high local control rates and few complications of radiotherapy, it is considered as a standard treatment. PMID:26252294

  12. Primary hyperparathyroidism and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Calcifications in the kidneys may occur in the parenchyma (nephrocalcinosis), pelvis renis (nephrolithiasis) or ureters (ureterolithiasis). Several factors may protect against stone formation or promote precipitation of stones. Most stones contain calcium, and the hypercalciuria seen in primary hyperparathyroidism is a contributing factor to stone formation in the kidneys and urinary tract. In early case series, renal stone formation was frequent, whereas the proportion of patients with symptomatic renal stones has declined in recent years. However, a substantial proportion of patients presents with asymptomatic nephrocalcinosis or nephrolithiasis. Before diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism, renal stone events are more frequent than in the general population. However, even after surgical cure, an increased rate of renal stone events may be seen. This may to some extent be the result of stones or calcifications already present at the time of diagnosis or sequelae to prior stones such as infections or ureter strictures. PMID:25911000

  13. Primary Retroperitoneal Mucinous Cystadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weon Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Mucinous cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinomas of the ovary are clinically and histopathologically well-established common tumors. However, primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystic tumors are extremely rare, and although their histopathogenesis is still uncertain, several theories have been proposed. Most authors suggest that they develop through mucinous metaplasia in a preexisting mesothelium-lined cyst. An accurate preoperative diagnosis of these tumors is difficult because no effective diagnostic measures have been established. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of this tumor may be fatal for the patient because of complications such as rupture, infection, and malignant transformation. We describe the case of a 31-year-old woman with abdominal pain and a palpable mass. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a retroperitoneal cystic mass, which was resected successfully through laparoscopy. Histopathological examination of the resected mass confirmed the diagnosis of a primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 without any complications. PMID:26962534

  14. Primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed Central

    Le Mauviel, L.

    1991-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia represents a group of heritable disorders of cilia and sperm affecting between 1 in 15,000 and 1 in 30,000 persons. Those affected lack measurable mucociliary clearance and suffer the constant misery of rhinorrhea and chronic productive cough. Because mucociliary clearance constitutes one of the respiratory system's major lines of defense, these patients are vulnerable to chronic sinusitis, bronchitis, pneumonia, and otitis media. Left untreated, these problems may progress to bronchiectasis, found frequently in adult patients, or pulmonary hypertension with eventual cor pulmonale. Screening for this disorder includes some simple and inexpensive methods as well as more exotic techniques requiring special camera equipment and an electron microscope to make a definitive diagnosis. Physiotherapy techniques can be taught to patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia and go a long way toward making up for the lack of mucociliary clearance. Vigorous bronchopulmonary toilet and palliative measures may enable these patients to enjoy relatively normal lives. PMID:1949776

  15. Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Mee; Kim, David J.

    2001-12-01

    There is no proven medical therapy for primary sclerosing cholangitis. The goal of management should be treatment of symptoms and complications of cholestasis, as well as attempts at treating the underlying disease process. In addition, efforts should be made to recognize and treat or prevent the known complications of primary sclerosing cholangitis, such as fat-soluble vitamin deficiency, osteopenia, dominant biliary strictures, and cholangiocarcinoma. Although some medical therapy has been shown to improve serum liver test or histology results, there has been no effect on survival or time to liver transplantation. However, preliminary data on high-dosage ursodeoxycholic acid have been encouraging. Liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment and is recommended for patients with end-stage liver disease and symptomatic portal hypertension, liver failure, and recurrent or intractable bacterial cholangitis. PMID:11696273

  16. [Basics of primary immunodeficiencies].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Claudia; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva; Hernández-Martínez, Ana Rosa; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies (PID) are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, the etiology are the defects in the development or function of the immune system. The principal PID manifestations are the infections in early age, malignancy and diseases of immune dysregulation as autoimmunity and allergy. PIDs are genetics disorders and most of them are inherited as autosomal recessive, also this group of diseases is more prevalent in males and in childhood. The antibody immunodeficiency is the PID more common in adults. The more frequent disorders are the infections in the respiratory tract, abscesses, candidiasis, diarrhea, BCGosis etc. Initial approach included a complete blood count and quantification of immunoglobulins. The delay in diagnosis could be explained due to a perception that the recurrent infections are normal process or think that they are exclusively of childhood. The early diagnosis of PID by primary care physicians is important to opportune treatment and better prognosis. PMID:27174761

  17. [Primary liposarcoma of bone].

    PubMed

    Tatić, V; Cerović, S; Skaro-Milić, A; Jovanović, Z

    2001-01-01

    A case of 75-year-old man with extremely rare primary liposarcoma of the bone was presented. Stains for lipid, Sudan III, Sudan IV, and Oil Red "O", demonstrated the presence of intracellular lipid in the lipoblasts. Similarly, the S-100 immunoreactivity and electron microscopic findings of tumor cells confirmed the diagnosis of liposarcoma. Histochemical stains for PAS, Alcian-blue, mucikarmin, Toluidin-blue and Coloidal Iron were negative. PMID:11419292

  18. Primary periungual leiyomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Rachadi, Hanane; Derrabi, Nora; Marnissi, Farida; Chiheb, Soumaya

    2016-01-01

    Primary superficial leiomyosarcoma is a very uncommon malignant tumor which occurs most commonly the lower limbs. We report one case of unusual topography of this tumor. An 81-year-old female patient presented with a 2 year history of a periungual tumor of the left index finger. The histopathological and immunohistochemical examination of a biopsy specimen was compatible with the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma. There was no evidence of metastatic disease. An amputation of the index was performed. PMID:27617944

  19. [Surgery of primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Horányi, János; Szlávik, Rezso; Duffek, László; Darvas, Katalin; Györke, Tamás; Lakatos, Péter; Miklós, Tóth

    2006-12-10

    Surgery of primary hyperparathyroidism. Primary hyperparathyroidism is usually caused by a single parathyroid adenoma, rarely by multiple adenomas or hyperplasia and in 1-2% of cases by carcinoma. The definitive cure of the disease can be achieved only by surgical means. Unfortunately, only 10% of expected cases based on the number of population are diagnosed in Hungary. The main reason is that the disease has no specific symptoms and it causes only a few cases present with clinical entities such as nephrolithiasis, osteoporosis-osteopenia, pancreatitis, hypertension, peptic ulcer disease, depression, etc. The clue to the diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism is usually the laboratory result of hypercalcemia and in order to this aim the measurement of serum Ca would be an obligatory part of routine laboratory investigation in Hungary. The diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism rests on the laboratory confirmation of increased serum calcium and inappropriately elevated intact parathyroid hormone concentrations. If surgical intervention is planned, cervical ultrasonography and parathyroid-scintigraphy are indicated for the exact localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid gland(s). CT and/or MRI are usually not necessary, except in cases of previous neck operation. The operation must be performed by surgeon skilled in parathyroid surgery. The surgical success can be assessed intraoperatively by the use of a gamma probe or by intraoperative measurement of parathyroid hormone concentrations in the serum or in the removed tissue(s). Support of these procedures is recommended. Although many recent publications deal with the minimal invasive methods of parathyroidectomy, the cost-effectiveness of these newer techniques are controversial. PMID:17228513

  20. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. PMID:26304179

  1. Primary Retroperitoneal Myxoid Liposarcomas.

    PubMed

    Setsu, Nokitaka; Miyake, Mototaka; Wakai, Susumu; Nakatani, Fumihiko; Kobayashi, Eisuke; Chuman, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Kawai, Akira; Yoshida, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas (MLSs) are genetically defined by the presence of DDIT3 gene fusions and most commonly arise in the extremities of young adults. Whether MLSs develop primarily in the retroperitoneum is controversial, and a recent retrospective study found no molecularly confirmed examples. Because MLSs tend to metastasize to deep soft tissues, purported examples of primary retroperitoneal lesions might represent distant metastasis, most commonly from extremities. In addition, well-differentiated or dedifferentiated liposarcomas, which are characterized by MDM2 amplifications, may exhibit prominent myxoid changes and mimic MLSs. Here, we document 5 cases of MLSs that originated in the retroperitoneum that were identified through critical clinicopathologic reevaluation. These cases accounted for 2.3% of 214 primary retroperitoneal liposarcomas and 3.2% of 156 MLSs in our database. They occurred in 3 men and 2 women with a median age of 32 years. All tumors were localized to the retroperitoneum at presentation, and no patient developed extra-abdominal recurrences during the clinical course (median, 50 mo). All 5 cases exhibited at least focal classic histologic findings. All harbored DDIT3 gene rearrangements, and none harbored MDM2 amplifications according to fluorescence in situ hybridization. This study demonstrates that primary MLSs can occur in the retroperitoneum, albeit rarely, and can be accurately diagnosed through combined clinicopathologic and molecular analysis. PMID:27158758

  2. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  3. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  4. Primary prevention of asthma.

    PubMed

    Becker, Allan B; Chan-Yeung, Moira

    2002-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the prevalence of asthma over the last quarter century, particularly in the industrialized world. Although our understanding of asthma continues to improve, there is no cure for the disease. Primary prevention of asthma is the focus of this review. Asthma is a disease with multiple gene-environment interactions. Candidate genes for asthma are considered, and potential interaction between one of those genes, CD14, and an environmental factor, endotoxin, is reviewed as it relates to the hygiene hypothesis. Environmental risk factors for asthma including allergens, pollutants, infectious factors, and dietary modifications are considered, particularly their potential for primary prevention of asthma. Ongoing cohort studies including the Canadian Allergy and Asthma Prevention Study, the Manchester Allergy and Asthma Study, the Children's Asthma Prevention Study from Australia, and the Prevention and Incidence of Asthma and Mite Allergy Study from the Netherlands are briefly reviewed. A more definitive understanding of genetic background and environmental triggers and their interactions is required before any specific approach to the primary prevention of asthma can be championed aggressively. PMID:11753119

  5. [Primary care in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first European Union countries that saw the opportunity in the free movement of professionals. First offers for jobs were managed in 2000. Since then, a large number of professionals have taken the opportunity of a decent job and have moved from Spain to Sweden. The Swedish health care model belongs to the group of national health systems. The right to health care is linked to legal citizenship. Health is financed through regional taxes, but there is a compulsory co-payment regardless of the financial situation of the patient. The provision of health care is decentralised at a regional level, and there is a mixture of private and public medical centres. Primary care is similar to that in Spain. Health professionals work as a team with a division of tasks. Like in Spain, waiting lists and coordination between primary and specialised care are a great problem. Patients may register with any public or private primary care centre and hospital provider within their region. Access to diagnostic tests and specialists are restricted to those selected by specialists. Doctors are salaried and their job and salary depend on their experience, professional abilities and regional needs. Medicine is curative. General practitioners are the gateway to the system, but they do not act as gatekeeper. Hospitals offer a number of training post, and the access is through an interview. Continuing medical education is encouraged and financed by the health centre in order to increase its revenues. PMID:26613624

  6. Prompt diagnosis and extraordinary survival from Naegleria fowleri meningitis: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Sood, A; Chauhan, S; Chandel, L; Jaryal, S C

    2014-01-01

    Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis is a rare fatal meningitis caused by free living amoeba Naegleria fowleri, found in freshwater ponds and lakes. It infects children and young adults with exposure due to swimming or diving. We report a case of N. fowleri meningitis in a 6-year-old boy who presented with signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis. No history of travelling or swimming was present. However, the boy frequently played with water stored from a "kuhl" (diversion channels of water). Wet mount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) revealed amoeboid and actively motile flagellate forms of trophozoites. CSF culture done on 1.5% non-nutrient agar plates with a lawn culture of Escherichia coli kept at 37°C for 15 days did not reveal any growth. The test of flagellation on passing CSF in distilled water was however positive in 3 h. Water of the "kuhl" from the stored tank also showed actively motile trophozoites similar to the forms obtained from the CSF. Based on our reports, the boy was immediately treated with amphotericin B, rifampicin and fluconazole for 21 days. Repeat CSF examination after 14 days did not reveal any trophozoites in wet mount and patient was discharged after 3 weeks of successful treatment. PMID:24713915

  7. Naegleria fowleri: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  8. Detection of biomarkers of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri through mass spectrometry and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Moura, Hercules; Izquierdo, Fernando; Woolfitt, Adrian R; Wagner, Glauber; Pinto, Tatiana; del Aguila, Carmen; Barr, John R

    2015-01-01

    Emerging methods based on mass spectrometry (MS) can be used in the rapid identification of microorganisms. Thus far, these practical and rapidly evolving methods have mainly been applied to characterize prokaryotes. We applied matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF MS in the analysis of whole cells of 18 N. fowleri isolates belonging to three genotypes. Fourteen originated from the cerebrospinal fluid or brain tissue of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis patients and four originated from water samples of hot springs, rivers, lakes or municipal water supplies. Whole Naegleria trophozoites grown in axenic cultures were washed and mixed with MALDI matrix. Mass spectra were acquired with a 4700 TOF-TOF instrument. MALDI-TOF MS yielded consistent patterns for all isolates examined. Using a combination of novel data processing methods for visual peak comparison, statistical analysis and proteomics database searching we were able to detect several biomarkers that can differentiate all species and isolates studied, along with common biomarkers for all N. fowleri isolates. Naegleria fowleri could be easily separated from other species within the genus Naegleria. A number of peaks detected were tentatively identified. MALDI-TOF MS fingerprinting is a rapid, reproducible, high-throughput alternative method for identifying Naegleria isolates. This method has potential for studying eukaryotic agents. PMID:25231600

  9. Infections Acquired via Fresh Water: From Lakes to Hot Tubs.

    PubMed

    Ayi, Bertha

    2015-12-01

    This chapter is unique in its focus on infections that are acquired in water. For those who like to swim and spend time in water parks and pools, the exposure to water and therefore the risk of infection is higher. Recreational water illnesses are illnesses related to recreation in water. Of these recreational water illnesses, infections are the most common because water laden with microorganisms or contaminated by human activity gains access to healthy tissue through the skin and body orifices. Infection occurs by inhalation, ingestion, or direct invasion of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common. This chapter discusses skin and soft tissue infections, ocular infections, urinary tract infections, pulmonary infections, central nervous system infections, and disseminated infections that can occur as people come into contact with natural nonmarine water bodies as well as manmade aquatic environments. Most of these infections are mild but can occasionally be life threatening. There is a focus on the latest methods to treat these infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a very common pathogen in water. The chapter discusses P. aeruginosa dermatitis at length and also looks at keratitis and pneumonia caused by this organism. The chapter also discusses the latest treatments for primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a severe life-threatening illness with a high mortality, caused by Naegleria fowleri. Finally, there is an in-depth discussion of the notorious gastrointestinal illnesses such as norovirus and Cryptosporidium parvum that can affect large numbers of people at a time. PMID:27337285

  10. Iron-Binding Protein Degradation by Cysteine Proteases of Naegleria fowleri

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Rico, Gerardo; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Shibayama, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes acute and fulminant primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. This microorganism invades its host by penetrating the olfactory mucosa and then traveling up the mesaxonal spaces and crossing the cribriform plate; finally, the trophozoites invade the olfactory bulbs. During its invasion, the protozoan obtains nutrients such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and cationic ions (e.g., iron, calcium, and sodium) from the host. However, the mechanism by which these ions are obtained, particularly iron, is poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of N. fowleri to degrade iron-binding proteins, including hololactoferrin, transferrin, ferritin, and hemoglobin. Zymography assays were performed for each substrate under physiological conditions (pH 7 at 37°C) employing conditioned medium (CM) and total crude extracts (TCEs) of N. fowleri. Different degradation patterns with CM were observed for hololactoferrin, transferrin, and hemoglobin; however, CM did not cause ferritin degradation. In contrast, the TCEs degraded only hololactoferrin and transferrin. Inhibition assays revealed that cysteine proteases were involved in this process. Based on these results, we suggest that CM and TCEs of N. fowleri degrade iron-binding proteins by employing cysteine proteases, which enables the parasite to obtain iron to survive while invading the central nervous system. PMID:26090408

  11. NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in THP-1 Target Cells Triggered by Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Yoo, Jong-Kyun; Kang, Heekyoung; Seong, Gi-Sang; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2016-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri, known as the brain-eating amoeba, causes acute primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. During swimming and other recreational water activities, N. fowleri trophozoites penetrate the nasal mucosa and invade the olfactory bulbs, resulting in intense inflammatory reactions in the forebrain tissue. To investigate what kinds of inflammasome molecules are expressed in target cells due to N. fowleri infection, human macrophage cells (THP-1 cells) were cocultured with N. fowleri trophozoites in a noncontact system, and consequently, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production was estimated. Caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production from THP-1 cells by Western blotting and the culture supernatant by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis were observed at 3 h after cocultivation. In addition, the increased expression of ASC and NLRP3, which make up an inflammasome complex, was also observed at 3 h after cocultivation. To confirm the caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production via the NLRP3 inflammasome in THP-1 cells triggered by N. fowleri trophozoites, THP-1 cells were pretreated with several inhibitors. The inhibition assay showed that CA-074 (a cathepsin B inhibitor), glybenclamide (an NLRP3 molecule inhibitor), and N-benzyloxycarbony-Val-Ala-Asp(O-methyl)-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK; a caspase-1 inhibitor) reduced the levels of caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production from THP-1 cells. This study suggests that N. fowleri infection induces the NLRP3 inflammasome, which activates caspase-1 and subsequently produces IL-1β, thus resulting in inflammation. PMID:27297387

  12. Bis-benzimidazole hits against Naegleria fowleri discovered with new high-throughput screens.

    PubMed

    Rice, Christopher A; Colon, Beatrice L; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W; Kyle, Dennis E

    2015-04-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of <1 μM, with many of these having reasonable selectivity indices. The most potent hits were >500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri. PMID:25605363

  13. Prevalence of Naegleria fowleri in Environmental Samples from Northern Part of India

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ashutosh; Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Singh, Yogita; Kaushik, Samander

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri the causative agent of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, is ubiquitously distributed worldwide in various warm aquatic environments and soil habitats. The present study reports on the presence of Naegleria spp. in various water bodies present in Rohtak and Jhajjar district, of state Haryana, India. A total of 107 water reservoirs were screened from summer till autumn (2012 and 2013). In order to isolate Naegleria spp. from the collected water samples, the water samples were filtered and the trapped debris after processing were transferred to non-nutrient agar plates already seeded with lawn culture of Escherichia coli. Out of total 107 water samples, 43 (40%) samples were positive by culture for free living amoeba after incubation for 14 days at 37°C. To identify the isolates, the ITS1, 5.8SrDNA and ITS2 regions were targeted for PCR assay. Out of total 43 positive samples, 37 isolates were positive for Naegleria spp. using genus specific primers and the most frequently isolated species was Naegleria australiensis. Out of 37 Naegleria spp. positive isolates, 1 isolate was positive for Naegleria fowleri. The sequence analysis revealed that the Naegleria fowleri strain belonged to Type 2. PMID:26484533

  14. Bis-Benzimidazole Hits against Naegleria fowleri Discovered with New High-Throughput Screens

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Christopher A.; Colon, Beatrice L.; Alp, Mehmet; Göker, Hakan; Boykin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri is a pathogenic free-living amoeba (FLA) that causes an acute fatal disease known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). The major problem for infections with any pathogenic FLA is a lack of effective therapeutics, since PAM has a case mortality rate approaching 99%. Clearly, new drugs that are potent and have rapid onset of action are needed to enhance the treatment regimens for PAM. Diamidines have demonstrated potency against multiple pathogens, including FLA, and are known to cross the blood-brain barrier to cure other protozoan diseases of the central nervous system. Therefore, amidino derivatives serve as an important chemotype for discovery of new drugs. In this study, we validated two new in vitro assays suitable for medium- or high-throughput drug discovery and used these for N. fowleri. We next screened over 150 amidino derivatives of multiple structural classes and identified two hit series with nM potency that are suitable for further lead optimization as new drugs for this neglected disease. These include both mono- and diamidino derivatives, with the most potent compound (DB173) having a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 177 nM. Similarly, we identified 10 additional analogues with IC50s of <1 μM, with many of these having reasonable selectivity indices. The most potent hits were >500 times more potent than pentamidine. In summary, the mono- and diamidino derivatives offer potential for lead optimization to develop new drugs to treat central nervous system infections with N. fowleri. PMID:25605363

  15. Naegleria fowleri: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Grace, Eddie; Asbill, Scott; Virga, Kris

    2015-11-01

    Naegleria fowleri has generated tremendous media attention over the last 5 years due to several high-profile cases. Several of these cases were followed very closely by the general public. N. fowleri is a eukaryotic, free-living amoeba belonging to the phylum Percolozoa. Naegleria amoebae are ubiquitous in the environment, being found in soil and bodies of freshwater, and feed on bacteria found in those locations. While N. fowleri infection appears to be quite rare compared to other diseases, the clinical manifestations of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis are devastating and nearly always fatal. Due to the rarity of N. fowleri infections in humans, there are no clinical trials to date that assess the efficacy of one treatment regimen over another. Most of the information regarding medication efficacy is based on either case reports or in vitro studies. This review will discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, and prevention of N. fowleri infections in humans, including a brief review of all survivor cases in North America. PMID:26259797

  16. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    PubMed

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri. PMID:27189133

  17. Iron-Binding Protein Degradation by Cysteine Proteases of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Castillo, Moisés; Ramírez-Rico, Gerardo; Serrano-Luna, Jesús; Shibayama, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes acute and fulminant primary amoebic meningoencephalitis. This microorganism invades its host by penetrating the olfactory mucosa and then traveling up the mesaxonal spaces and crossing the cribriform plate; finally, the trophozoites invade the olfactory bulbs. During its invasion, the protozoan obtains nutrients such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and cationic ions (e.g., iron, calcium, and sodium) from the host. However, the mechanism by which these ions are obtained, particularly iron, is poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of N. fowleri to degrade iron-binding proteins, including hololactoferrin, transferrin, ferritin, and hemoglobin. Zymography assays were performed for each substrate under physiological conditions (pH 7 at 37°C) employing conditioned medium (CM) and total crude extracts (TCEs) of N. fowleri. Different degradation patterns with CM were observed for hololactoferrin, transferrin, and hemoglobin; however, CM did not cause ferritin degradation. In contrast, the TCEs degraded only hololactoferrin and transferrin. Inhibition assays revealed that cysteine proteases were involved in this process. Based on these results, we suggest that CM and TCEs of N. fowleri degrade iron-binding proteins by employing cysteine proteases, which enables the parasite to obtain iron to survive while invading the central nervous system. PMID:26090408

  18. Prevalence of Naegleria fowleri in Environmental Samples from Northern Part of India.

    PubMed

    Panda, Ashutosh; Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Singh, Yogita; Kaushik, Samander

    2015-01-01

    Naegleria fowleri the causative agent of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, is ubiquitously distributed worldwide in various warm aquatic environments and soil habitats. The present study reports on the presence of Naegleria spp. in various water bodies present in Rohtak and Jhajjar district, of state Haryana, India. A total of 107 water reservoirs were screened from summer till autumn (2012 and 2013). In order to isolate Naegleria spp. from the collected water samples, the water samples were filtered and the trapped debris after processing were transferred to non-nutrient agar plates already seeded with lawn culture of Escherichia coli. Out of total 107 water samples, 43 (40%) samples were positive by culture for free living amoeba after incubation for 14 days at 37°C. To identify the isolates, the ITS1, 5.8SrDNA and ITS2 regions were targeted for PCR assay. Out of total 43 positive samples, 37 isolates were positive for Naegleria spp. using genus specific primers and the most frequently isolated species was Naegleria australiensis. Out of 37 Naegleria spp. positive isolates, 1 isolate was positive for Naegleria fowleri. The sequence analysis revealed that the Naegleria fowleri strain belonged to Type 2. PMID:26484533

  19. Identification of Naegleria fowleri in domestic water sources by nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Marciano-Cabral, Francine; MacLean, Rebecca; Mensah, Alex; LaPat-Polasko, Laurie

    2003-10-01

    The free-living amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri is the causative agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system. In the United States, the disease is generally acquired while swimming and diving in freshwater lakes and ponds. In addition to swimming, exposure to N. fowleri and the associated disease can occur by total submersion in bathwater or small backyard wading pools. In the present study, swipe samples and residual pipe water from homes in Arizona were examined for N. fowleri by nested PCR due to the death of two previously healthy children from PAM. Since neither child had a history of swimming in a freshwater lake or pond prior to the onset of disease symptoms, the domestic water supply was the suspected source of infection. Of 19 samples collected from bathroom and kitchen pipes and sink traps, 17 samples were positive for N. fowleri by PCR. A sample from a Micro-Wynd II filter was obtained by passing water from bathtubs through the filter. Organisms attached to the filter also tested positive by PCR. The two samples that tested negative for N. fowleri were one that was obtained from a kitchen sink trap and a swipe sample from the garbage disposal of one home. PMID:14532037

  20. Comparative Recoveries of Naegleria fowleri Amoebae from Seeded River Water by Filtration and Centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Pernin, P.; Pélandakis, M.; Rouby, Y.; Faure, A.; Siclet, F.

    1998-01-01

    Detection of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in environmental water samples, which is necessary for the prevention of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, generally requires concentrating the samples. Two concentration techniques, filtration and centrifugation, were used to study the recovery of N. fowleri, in vegetative or cystic form, that had been mixed with the two other thermotolerant Naegleria species, N. lovaniensis and N. australiensis. Counting of amoebae was performed by the most probable number method on 10 water replicates of 100 ml and 10 ml each. With both concentration methods, recovery was better for cysts than for trophozoites (53% ± 21% versus 5% ± 5% by filtration and 57% ± 25% versus 22% ± 5% by centrifugation). The recovery of Naegleria trophozoites by filtration was very low, and centrifugation was significantly better than filtration in recovery of Naegleria trophozoites (22% ± 5% versus 5% ± 5%; P < 0.001). For cysts, however, filtration appeared as efficient as centrifugation, with equivalent values for recovery (53% ± 21% versus 57% ± 25%; P > 0.7). Although the recovery of cysts of N. fowleri obtained by filtration (51% ± 24%) appeared higher than that by centrifugation (36% ± 23%), the difference was not significant (P > 0.1). Both concentration methods have highly variable recovery rates, making accurate quantification of low concentrations (<100/liter) of N. fowleri in the environment difficult. PMID:9501435

  1. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona; Leigh, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia with chronic otosinopulmonary disease and organ laterality defects in ∼50% of cases. The prevalence of PCD is difficult to determine. Recent diagnostic advances through measurement of nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing has allowed rigorous diagnoses and determination of a robust clinical phenotype, which includes neonatal respiratory distress, daily nasal congestion, and wet cough starting early in life, along with organ laterality defects. There is early onset of lung disease in PCD with abnormal airflow mechanics and radiographic abnormalities detected in infancy and early childhood. PMID:27514592

  2. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A; Al Kharusi, Suad S; Al Bahrani, Bassim J; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-09-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  3. Primary Gastric Chorioadenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baraka, Bahaaeldin A.; Al Kharusi, Suad S.; Al Bahrani, Bassim J.; Bhathagar, Gunmala

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastric chorioadenocarcinoma (PGC) is a rare and rapidly invasive tumor. Choriocarcinoma is usually known to be of endometrial origin and gestational; however, it has been reported in other extragenital organs, such as the gall bladder, prostate, lung, liver, and the gastrointestinal tract. Human chorionic gonadotropin related neoplasms of the stomach are seldom discussed in the literature. We report a case of PGC in a 56-year-old man treated with a standard non-gestational choriocarcinoma chemotherapy regimen, EMA/CO (etoposide, methotrexate, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, vincristine), with a complete response and good tolerability. PMID:27602194

  4. [Primary cutaneous plasmacytoma].

    PubMed

    Dhouib Sellami, Rym; Sassi, Samia; Mrad, Karima; Abess, Imen; Driss, Maha; Ben Romdhane, Khaled

    2007-04-01

    Primary cutaneous plasmacytoma (PCP) is a rare cutaneous B cell lymphoma. We report a case of PCP in a 64 year old woman presenting with a nodular lesion of the left cheek. Histologically, the lesion was composed predominately of variably maturated plasma cells with monotypic expression of lambda chain. Extracutaneous localizations of the disease had been excluded. The prognosis of PCP is better than that of the metastatic cutaneous lesion of myeloma. The main prognosis factors are the size tumor and clinical presentation (solitary, versus multiple lesions). Solitary lesions of the PCP are treated by surgical excision and sometimes local radiotherapy. PMID:17909472

  5. Primary Musculoskeletal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Primary lymphoma of bone and soft tissue is rare and almost invariably of B-cell origin. Osseous lymphoma usually reveals aggressive bone destruction and associated soft tissue extension. Soft tissue involvement is optimally depicted by MR imaging. Cortical destruction allowing communication between the intraosseous and soft tissue components may be subtle with small striations of extension. Lymphoma of the deep soft tissues usually reveals long cones of intramuscular or intermuscular tumor again best depicted by MR imaging. Cutaneous or subcutaneous lymphoma demonstrates multiple nodules and plaquelike thickening. PMID:27265608

  6. Primary Epiploic Appendagitis.

    PubMed

    Matos, Hugo; Costa, Isidoro

    2015-12-01

    Primary epiploic appendagitis is an inflammation of the epiploic appendages occurring due to ischemic infarction as a result of appendage torsion or spontaneous thrombosis usually affecting patients from second to fifth decades, being more common in women and obese patients. It is a self-limiting entity with clinical features similar to other inflammatory abdominal processes and sometimes not remembered at clinical examinations. The awareness of this entity and its correct identification on imaging examinations could prevent unnecessary surgery. The authors present a clinical case complemented with ultrasound and CT images of this entity. PMID:27011574

  7. [Thyreopathy in primary care].

    PubMed

    Vlcek, P

    2011-09-01

    Thyroid gland disorders, as the core of all endocrinopathies, affect 5-7% of the population of the Czech Republic, with women being affected 6-8 times more often than men. Clinically, thyreopathies are divided into hormonal production disorders and morphology disorders. Thyroid hormones fT3, fT4 and TSH serum levels determine the diagnosis of a thyroid gland disorder. Primary hypothyreosis is characterized by reduced fT4 and increased TSH. Low T3 syndrome is a protective reaction of the organism and is associated with conversion of T4 into hormonally inactive triiodothyronine (rT3). Primary hyperthyreosis is characterized by higher fT4 and low TSH levels. Acute thyreoiditis: Inflammatory signs and normal thyroid function, anti-TPO as well as anti-TG are not elevated. Subacute thyreoiditis is manifested as an inflammation, normal anti-TPO and anti-TG, sometimes also hyperthyreosis. Chronic thyreoiditis, Hashimoto's struma is among the most frequent causes ofhypothyreosis in the Czech Republic and it is diagnosed through high anti-TPO and anti-TG levels and higher TSH. Thyreoidal adenomas and carcinomas are clinically usually euthyroid. Determination of tumour markers - thyreoglobulines in papillary and follicular carcinomas and calcitonin in medullar carcinoma that requires genetic assessment (determination of germinal mutations, usually with PCR)--is essential. PMID:21957775

  8. Primary antibody deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wood, P

    2009-03-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a group of rare disorders characterized by an inability to produce clinically effective immunoglobulin responses. Some of these disorders result from genetic mutations in genes involved in B cell development, whereas others appear to be complex polygenic disorders. They most commonly present with recurrent infections due to encapsulated bacteria, although in the most common antibody deficiency, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity can be a presenting feature. Diagnostic delay in this group of disorders remains a problem, and the laboratory has a vital role in the detection of abnormalities in immunoglobulin concentration and function. It is critical to distinguish this group of disorders from secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinaemia, in particular lymphoid malignancy, and appropriate laboratory investigations are of critical importance. Treatment of primary antibody deficiencies involves immunoglobulin replacement therapy, either via the intravenous or subcutaneous route. Patients remain at risk of a wide variety of complications, not all linked to diagnostic delay and inadequate therapy. In common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in particular, patients remain at significantly increased risk of lymphoid malignancy, and regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is required. This review aims to give an overview of these conditions for the general reader, covering pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigation, therapy and clinical management. PMID:19151170

  9. Primary-Progressive MS (PPMS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... MS? Types of MS Primary progressive MS (PPMS) Primary progressive MS (PPMS) Share Smaller Text Larger Text Print In this article Overview PPMS is characterized by worsening neurologic function ( ...

  10. Primary Care: Medicine's Gordian Knot.

    PubMed

    Oddone, Eugene Z; Boulware, L Ebony

    2016-01-01

    Primary care is the cornerstone of effective and efficient healthcare systems. Patients prefer a trusted primary care provider to serve as the first contact for all of their healthcare questions, to help them make important health decisions, to help guide them through an expanding amount of medical information and to help coordinate their care with all other providers. Patients also prefer to establish an ongoing, continuous relationship with their primary care provider. However, fewer and fewer physicians are choosing primary care as a career, threatening the foundation of the health system. We explore the central challenges of primary care defined by work-force controversies about who can best deliver primary care. We also explore the current challenging reimbursement model for primary care that often results in fragmenting care for patients and providers. Finally, we explore new models of primary care health delivery that may serve as partial solutions to the current challenges. PMID:26802754

  11. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  12. Primary Teacher Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Chin Phoi; Yee, Chin Peng

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia the training of primary school teachers is solely carried out by teacher training institutes which offer the Bachelor of Teaching with Honors (Primary education) program and was first launched in 2007. This program prepares primary school teachers specializing in various subjects or major and is carried out in 27 teacher training…

  13. Professional Issues for Primary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Ann, Ed.; Haylock, Derek, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book is intended to be a contribution to raising the awareness of primary teachers and trainee teachers as to what is involved in all the different professional dimensions of their work in schools. The book deals with the key professional issues in primary teaching that are addressed in primary teacher training courses. The book aims to…

  14. [Pathophysiology of primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Kaji, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disease with increased cell proliferation and enhanced PTH secretion due to the escape from negative feedback by calcium ion in parathyroid cells for their tumorization. Involvements of several gene abnormalities have been demonstrated in the pathogenesis of parathyroid tumor. First, an activation of cyclin D1 gene by the translocation of 11 chromosome was found as one of the cause of parathyroid tumorigenesis. Moreover, mutation of multiple endocrine type 1 gene is the most frequent as a genetic cause of sporadic parathyroid tumor. Its related tumor is developed by an inactivation mutation of tumor suppressor gene. Parafibromin, calcium-sensing receptor, vitamin D receptor, Klotho and RET might be related to the tumorigeneis of parathyroid tumor. PMID:27230836

  15. Primary cardiac tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, N A

    1980-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are a rare, but potentially curably form of heart disease. A high index of clinical suspicion is necessary for diagnosis as these tumors have protean manifestations that mimic a variety of other cardiac and noncardiac diseases. Presently, M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography are utilized as safe, reliable, and noninvasive imaging modalities. Seventy-five per cent of these tumors are benign, with myxoma accounting for 50% and rhabodomyoma comprising 20% of lesions. Various histologic types of sarcoma are the predominant malignant cardiac neoplasms. With strict attention to avoiding perioperative tumor embolization, surgical resection of these lesions can be accomplished with minimal morbidity and mortality. Sixteen consecutive primary tumors of the heart have been surgically treated at Duke University Medical Center since 1966 with no perioperative deaths and no late recurrences. Images Figs. 2A and B. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Figs. 5A and B Fig. 6. PMID:7362282

  16. Lithium peroxide primary element

    SciTech Connect

    Winsel, A.

    1982-05-04

    In a galvanic primary element of the system Li/H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, the aqueous cathode depolarizer H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is fixated as a polyurethane gel. It can thereby be controlled and caused to react with the anode metal in accordance with the current drain requirements. This is accomplished using a ram to press the gel toward a conductor which covers the lithium anode, which may take the form of a metal grid and/or a gas diffusion electrode. The oxygen which forms in the working layer through catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide creates a gas bubble when the current is interrupted or the ram is stopped, thereby interrupting the further supply of hydrogen peroxide to the catalyst.

  17. Primary scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Stamatios, Gregoriou; Ioannides, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Scarring alopecia or cicatricial alopecia results from follicular damage that is sufficient to cause the destruction and replacement of pilosebaceous structures by scar tissue. Primary scarring alopecias represent a group of disorders that primarily affect the hair follicles, as opposed to secondary scarring alopecias, which affect the dermis and secondarily cause follicular destruction. Inflammation may predominantly involve lymphocytes or neutrophils. Cicatricial alopecias that mainly involve lymphocytic inflammation include discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia, central centrifugal alopecia, and pseudopelade (Brocq). Cicatricial alopecias that are due to predominantly neutrophilic inflammation include folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Folliculitis keloidalis is a cicatricial alopecia with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. PMID:26370646

  18. Accountability and primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  19. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Juran, Brian D; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N

    2010-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an idiopathic chronic autoimmune liver disease that primarily affects women. It is believed that the aetiology for PBC is a combination between environmental triggers in genetically vulnerable persons. The diagnosis for PBC is made when two of the three criteria are fulfilled and they are: (1) biochemical evidence of cholestatic liver disease for at least 6 month's duration; (2) anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) positivity; and (3) histologic features of PBC on liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved medical treatment for PBC and should be administered at a recommended dose of 13-15 mg/kg/day. Unfortunately despite adequate dosing of UDCA, approximately one-third of patients does not respond adequately and may require liver transplantation. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the role of environmental exposures and overall genetic impact not only in the development of PBC, but on disease progression and variable clinical response to therapy. PMID:20955967

  20. Accountability and Primary Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  1. Primary thrombocytosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Kucine, Nicole; Chastain, Katherine M.; Mahler, Michelle B.; Bussel, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are uncommon disorders in children, for which we have limited understanding of the pathogenesis and optimal management. JAK2 and MPL mutations, while common drivers of myeloproliferative neoplasms in adult patients, are not clearly linked to pediatric disease. Management and clinical outcomes in adults have been well delineated with defined recommendations for risk stratification and treatment. This is not the case for pediatric patients, for whom there is neither a standard approach to workup nor any consensus regarding management. This review will discuss thrombocytosis in children, including causes of thrombocytosis in children, the limited knowledge we have regarding pediatric primary thrombocytosis, and our thoughts on potential risk stratification and management, and future questions to be answered by laboratory research and collaborative clinical study. PMID:24688110

  2. The Primary Headteacher's Handbook: The Essential Guide for Primary Heads. Primary Essentials Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Roger

    Although the setting is British, the primary head's problems are similar to those faced by U.S. elementary principals. This is a guidebook for managing primary schools. It shows the day-to-day running of a primary school and the organizational structures in which staff and pupils can be inspired. Chapter 1 considers the creation of a positive…

  3. Primary total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh; Mahanta, Sunayan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Primary total elbow arthroplasty (TEA) is a challenging procedure for orthopedic surgeons. It is not performed as frequently as compared to hip or knee arthroplasty. The elbow is a nonweight-bearing joint; however, static loading can create forces up to three times the body weight and dynamic loading up to six times. For elderly patients with deformity and ankylosis of the elbow due to posttraumatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis or comminuted fracture distal humerus, arthroplasty is one of the option. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of primary total elbow arthroplasty in cases of crippling deformity of elbow. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 11 cases of TEA, between December 2002 and September 2012. There were 8 females and 3 males. The average age was 40 years (range 30-69 years). The indications for TEA were rheumatoid arthritis, comminuted fracture distal humerus with intraarticular extension, and posttraumatic bony ankylosis of elbow joint. The Baksi sloppy (semi constrained) hinge elbow prosthesis was used. Clinico-radiological followup was done at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and then yearly basis. Results: In the present study, average supination was 70° (range 60-80°) and average pronation was 70° (range 60-80°). Average flexion was 135° (range 130-135°). However, in 5 cases, there was loss of 15 to 35° (average 25°) of extension (45°) out of 11 cases. The mean Mayo elbow performance score was 95.4 points (range 70-100). Arm length discrepancy was only in four patients which was 36% out of 11 cases. Clinico-radiologically all the elbows were stable except in one case and no immediate postoperative complication was noted. Radiolucency or loosening of ulnar stem was seen in 2 cases (18%) out of 11 cases, in 1 case it was noted after 5 years and in another after 10 years. In second case, revision arthroplasty was done, in which only ulnar hinge section, hinge screw and lock screw with hexagonal head were replaced

  4. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Jason; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Noone, Peadar G

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cilia structure, function, and biogenesis leading to chronic infections of the respiratory tract, fertility problems and disorders of organ laterality. The diagnosis can be challenging, using traditional tools such as characteristic clinical features, ciliary functional and ultra-structural defects; newer screening tools such as nasal nitric oxide levels and genetic testing add to the diagnostic algorithm. There are thirty-two known PCD causing genes, and in the future, comprehensive genetic testing may screen young infants prior to developing symptoms thus improving survival. Therapies include surveillance of pulmonary function and microbiology, in addition to airway clearance, antibiotics and ideally, early referral to bronchiectasis centers. As with CF, standardized care at specialized centers using a multidisciplinary approach likely improves outcomes. In conjunction with the CF foundation, the PCD foundation, and with lead investigators and clinicians, is developing a network of PCD clinical centers to coordinate the effort in North America and Europe. As the network grows, care and knowledge will improve. PMID:25826585

  5. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Laven, Joop S E

    2016-07-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), also known as premature ovarian failure or premature menopause, is defined as cessation of menstruation before the expected age of menopause. Potential etiologies for POI can be divided into genetic, autoimmune, and iatrogenic categories. This review will try to summarize the genetic basis of POI focusing on recent data that are available using newer genetic techniques such as genome-wide association studies, whole-exome sequencing (WES), or next-generation sequencing techniques. By using these techniques, many genes have arisen that play some role in the pathophysiology of POI. Some of them have been replicated in other studies; however, the majority has not been proven yet to be unequivocally causative through functional validation studies. Elucidating the genetic and molecular basis of POI is of paramount importance not only in understanding ovarian physiology but also in providing genetic counseling and fertility guidance. Once additional variants are detected, it might become possible to predict the age of (premature) menopause in women at risk for POI. Women having certain perturbations of POI can be offered the option of oocyte cryopreservation, with later thawing and use in assisted reproductive technology at an appropriate age. PMID:27513024

  6. [Primary and secondary hypocholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-xian; Ren, Jing-yi; Chen, Hong

    2010-10-18

    Hypocholesterolemia is characterized by serum total cholesterol that is lower than the 5th percentile for age and sex, or the cut-off value which predicts the adverse prognosis by epidemiological study. Unlike hypercholesterolemia, physicians pay less attention to the morbidity, causes and consequences of hypocholesterolemia in clinical practice. In fact, hypocholesterolemia is a common dislipidemia, and mainly results from secondary factors. The causes of primary hypocholesterolemia are some disorders owing to genetic mutation in the pathway of cholesterol absorption, biosynthesis or metabolism, including abetalipoproteinemia, hypobetalipoproteinemia, Tangier disease, chylomicron retention disease and inherited disorders of cholesterol biosynthesis. The causes of secondary hypocholesterolemia comprise anemia, hyperthyroidism, malignancy, live disease, critical illness, serious stress, malabsorption or malnutrition, acute or chronic infection, chronic inflammation, and use of some drugs. In addition, what's more important is that hypocholesterolemia can result in some adverse events, such as increased mortality, intracerebral hemorrhage, cancer, infection, adrenal failure, suicide and mental disorder. Therefore, with the practice of intensive lipid-lowering treatment and the tendency to the increased indications of statins, it's high time that physicians attached more importance to hypocholesterolemia. PMID:20957025

  7. Neutropenia in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sokolic, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Neutropenia is a feature of several primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDDs). Because of the diverse pathophysiologies of the PIDDs and the rarity of each disorder, data are often lacking, leading to the necessity of empiric treatment. Recent developments in the understanding of neutropenia in several of the PIDDs make a review of the data timely. Recent findings The category of severe congenital neutropenia continues to expand. Mutations in G6PC3 have been identified as the cause of neutropenia in a minority of previously molecularly undefined cases. Recent advances have broadened our understanding of the pathophysiology and the clinical expression of this disorder. A possible function of the C16orf57 gene has been hypothesized that may explain the clinical overlap between Clerucuzio-type poikiloderma with neutropenia and other marrow diseases. Plerixafor has been shown to be a potentially useful treatment in the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infection, and myelokathexis syndrome. Investigations of patients with adenosine deaminase deficient severe combined immunodeficiency have identified neutropenia, and particularly susceptibility to myelotoxins, as a feature of this disorder. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor is the treatment of choice for neutropenia in PIDD, whereas hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only curative option. Summary The number of PIDDs associated with neutropenia has increased, as has our understanding of the range of phenotypes. Additional data and hypotheses have been generated helping to explain the diversity of presentations of neutropenia in PIDDs. PMID:23196894

  8. Primary chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jani, L; Remagen, W

    1983-01-01

    Plasma-cell osteomyelitis is a histological diagnosis and, in the opinion of some authors, is a disease entity which can be differentiated from the sclerosing osteomyelitis of Garré and Brodie's abscess. Our investigation of 12 patients with plasma-cell osteomyelitis leads us to a different conclusion. The radiological appearances are not specific and do not allow a definitive diagnosis of the type of osteomyelitis or the exclusion of other bone disorders. Although there were always an increased number of plasma cells in the specimens from our patients, there were frequently transitional appearances varying from sclerosing osteomyelitis to Brodie's abscess. For this reason, we suggest that the term "primary chronic osteomyelitis" should be used. This makes it possible to distinguish the condition from acute and secondary osteomyelitis as well as from other diseases, such as bone tumours. All our patients were treated by local resection of the osteomyelitis lesion and they all recovered uneventfully; there were no local recurrences. PMID:6543824

  9. Primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Joy; Chapman, Roger

    2006-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease of unknown aetiology characterised by inflammation and fibrosis of the biliary tree. The mean age at diagnosis is 40 years and men are affected twice as often as women. There is a reported annual incidence of PSC of 0.9–1.31/100,000 and point prevalence of 8.5–13.6/100,000. The onset of PSC is usually insidious and many patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis or have mild symptoms only such as fatigue, abdominal discomfort and pruritus In late stages, splenomegaly and jaundice may be a feature. In most, the disease progresses to cirrhosis and liver failure. Cholangiocarcinoma develops in 8–30% of patients. PSC is thought to be immune mediated and is often associated with inflammatory bowel disease, especially ulcerative colitis. The disease is diagnosed on typical cholangiographic and histological findings and after exclusion of secondary sclerosing cholangitis. Median survival has been estimated to be 12 years from diagnosis in symptomatic patients. Patients who are asymptomatic at diagnosis, the majority of whom will develop progressive disease, have a survival rate greater than 70% at 16 years after diagnosis. Liver transplantation remains the only effective therapeutic option for patients with end-stage liver disease from PSC, although high dose ursodeoxycholic acid may have a beneficial effect. PMID:17062136

  10. Primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Marina G; Lindor, Keith D

    2008-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts, resulting in end-stage liver disease and reduced life expectancy. PSC primarily affects young and middle-aged men, often in association with underlying inflammatory bowel disease. The etiology of PSC includes immune-mediated components and elements of undefined nature. A cholestatic picture of liver biochemistries with elevations in serum alkaline phosphatase, nonspecific autoantibodies such as perinuclear antineutrophilic antibody, antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and diffuse multifocal biliary strictures, resulting in a ‘beaded’ appearance on radiographic studies, are the hallmarks of the disease. No effective medical therapy is currently available, although clinical studies are in progress. Ursodeoxycholic acid at high doses (28 mg/kg/day to 30 mg/kg/day) is the most promising agent but is unproven so far. Liver transplantation is currently the only life-extending therapy for patients with end-stage disease, although recurrent disease can be observed in the transplanted liver. The multiple complications of PSC include pruritus, fatigue, vitamin deficiencies, metabolic bone disease, peristomal varices, bacterial cholangitis, dominant biliary strictures, gallbladder stones and polyps, and malignancy, particularly cholangiocarcinoma, which is the most lethal complication of PSC. PMID:18701947

  11. Primary hyperoxaluria in infants.

    PubMed

    Jellouli, Manel; Ferjani, Mariem; Abidi, Kamel; Zarrouk, Chokri; Naija, Ouns; Abdelmoula, J; Gargah, Tahar

    2016-05-01

    The infantile form of primary hyperoxaluria type-1 (PH-1) is characterized by a rapid progression to the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to both increased oxalate load and reduced glomerular filtration rate. In the literature, data on this form are limited. The purpose of this study is to analyze retrospectively the clinical, biological, and radiological features of children who were diagnosed with PH-1 during the 1(st) year of life. We reviewed the records of all children with PH-1 diagnosed and followed-up at our department between January 1995 and December 2013. Among them, only infants younger than 12 months of age were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Fourteen infants with the median age of two months were enrolled in the study. At diagnosis, 11 patients had ESRD. All patients had nephrocalcinosis and two of them had calculi. The diagnosis was established in nine patients on the basis of the positive family history of PH-1, bilateral nephrocalcinosis, and quantitative crystalluria. In four patients, the diagnosis was made with molecular analysis of DNA. Kidney biopsy contributed to the diagnosis in one patient. During follow-up, two patients were pyridoxine sensitive and preserved renal function. Seven among 11 patients who had ESRD died, four patients are currently undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Children with infantile PH and ESRD are at high risk of early death. Peritoneal dialysis is not a treatment of choice. Combined liver-kidney transplantation is mandatory. PMID:27215245

  12. Reoperation for primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    McGarity, W C; Goldman, A L

    1981-01-01

    Between 1960 and April, 1980, 302 patients were explored for primary hyperparathyroidism at Emory University Hospital. Seventeen of these 302 patients had undergone initial surgical exploration elsewhere, and were referred for persistent hypercalcemia. Of the 285 patients who were operated on at our institution, 14 subsequently had persistent hypercalcemia, and two had recurrent hypercalcemia. Twenty-eight of these 33 patients had had re-exploration, and 23 (82%) are now normocalcemic. Twenty-eight abnormal glands were found; 22 (79%) were retrievable via the neck and six (21%) required sternotomy. Of those glands removed via the neck, nine were in a near normal location and 13 in a subnormal or abnormal location. The causes of initial surgical failures were abnormally located glands, in ten patients, insufficient explorations of the neck in eight patients, hyperfunctioning parathyroid remnants in three patients, inadequate plans for hyperplasia in two patients, and carcinoma in one patient. In 57% of our patients who underwent successful re-exploration, the glands were correctly localized before operation by angiographic examination or selective venous sampling for parathormone. Thorough exploration and obtainment of biopsy specimens of all parathyroid glands are recommended in order to keep initial failures to a minimum. If reoperation is required, localization using CT scan, angiography and selective venous sampling are recommended. PMID:7259338

  13. Primary duodenal carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Adedeji, O. A.; Trescoli-Serrano, C.; Garcia-Zarco, M.

    1995-01-01

    Eight cases of primary duodenal carcinoma in a district general hospital are presented. The cases highlight the advanced state of the disease at presentation, the difficulty in diagnosis, and its poor prognosis. Duodenal carcinoma occurs in both sexes worldwide with no predisposing factors in the majority of cases. There is an increased risk in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and adenomas of the duodenum. Duodenal carcinoma occurs about 22 years from the diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis in about 2% of patients, forming over 50% of upper gastrointestinal cancers occurring in these patients. Carcinomatous changes occur in 30 to 60% of duodenal villous adenomas and much less in tubulo-villous and tubular adenomas. These categories of patients should be screened and adequately followed up. Aggressive and radical surgery, even in the presence of locally advanced disease and lymph node involvement, gives a better outcome. When curative surgery is not possible, chemotherapy must accompany palliation with or without radiotherapy. Pre-operative chemotherapy may facilitate a curative radical resection. The general five-year survival is 17-33% but some centres have achieved a five-year survival of 40-60% with aggressive management of these patients. PMID:7644397

  14. Primary hepatic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Padhan, Rajesh Kumar; Das, Prasenjit; Shalimar

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder confined to the liver without evidence of involvement of spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow or other lymphoid structures. This is in contrast to Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) that often involves the liver as a secondary manifestation. PHL is a rare disease and constitutes 0.016% of all cases of NHL. PHL typically occurs in middle aged men, and usually the chief presenting symptoms are non specific which includes right upper quadrant pain, B symptoms like fever and weight loss and constitutional symptoms. Most frequent physical finding is hepatomegaly which occurs in 75% of patients. Jaundice is rare and present only in less than 5% of patients. Majority of PHL originates from B cells. The blood investigations and imaging findings are nonspecific. Histopathology is essential and confirms the diagnosis. Treatment modalities include combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The prognosis without therapy is grim. The prognosis and management of PHL is different from hepatocellular carcinoma or metastatic disease, hence it is essential to differentiate it from these diseases. The purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis before implementing therapeutic plan for any hepatic space occupying lesion in liver. PMID:26591949

  15. Sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, C; Mirallié, E; Mathonnet, M

    2010-10-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT1) is a common endocrine disorder, which is asymptomatic in 80% of cases. The diagnosis is ordinarily easily made, based on an inappropriately elevated parathormone level (PTH) in the face of hypercalcemia. In 85% of cases, HPT1 is due to hormone secretion from a single parathyroid gland (uniglandular disease) and the remaining patients have multiglandular disease. The best localization study is MIBI scintigraphy (methoxy isobutyl isonitrile) coupled with the results of a neck ultrasound exam (sensitivity >95%). Other investigations are reserved for patients with persistent or recurrent HPT1 post-surgery. Surgery is the only cure. The surgical approach may include a bilateral cervical exploration, a unilateral approach under local anesthesia, or focused minimally invasive (video-assisted or totally endoscopic) approaches. A decrease in PTH level measured intraoperatively of greater than 50% is predictive of cure in more than 97% of cases. Surgery is recommended even for moderate HPT1 and for very elderly patients because improvement in both the quality of life and bone density have been proven in these situations. The role of medical treatment is limited. Persistent or recurrent HPT1 requires a meticulous diagnostic approach and management in surgical centers with expertise. Persistent elevation of PTH postoperatively without hypercalcemia does not mandate further exploration. The prognosis of normocalcemic patients with elevated postoperative PTH levels remains uncertain. PMID:20888315

  16. Primary hyperparathyroidism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Soto, Gonzalo; Linglart, Agnès; Sénat, Marie-Victoire; Kamenicky, Peter; Chanson, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is rarely diagnosed during pregnancy but is associated with significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Information on appropriate management is limited. We reviewed the medical literature through December 2012 for key articles on PHPT during pregnancy, focusing on large series. Clinical knowledge in this area is restricted to isolated case reports and a few retrospective studies. Diagnosis can be difficult, owing to the non-specific nature of signs and symptoms of hypercalcemia during pregnancy. Pregnant women with a calcium level over 2.85 mmol/L (11.4 mg/dL) and prior pregnancy loss are at a particularly high risk of maternal complications (hypercalcemic crisis, nephrolithiasis, pancreatitis, etc.) and fetal loss. Around one-half of neonates born to mothers with untreated PHPT have hypocalcemia and tetany. Algorithms proposed for the management of the pregnant woman with PHPT are not evidence based, reflecting the paucity of data. Treatment should thus be individually tailored. Gestational age and the severity of hypercalcemia should be taken into account when assessing the risk-benefit balance of a conservative approach (hyperhydration and vitamin D supplementation) versus parathyroid surgery. Current evidence supports parathyroidectomy as the main treatment, performed preferably during the second trimester, when the serum calcium is above 2.75 mmol/L (11 mg/dL). In the patients with mild forms of PHPT, which are nowadays the most frequent, a conservative management is generally preferred. PMID:23670708

  17. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Landau, Ester; Amar, Laurence

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension (HT) is a complication of 8% of all pregnancies and 10% of HT cases are due to primary aldosteronism (PA). There is very little data on PA and pregnancy. Given the changes in the renin angiotensin system during pregnancy, the diagnosis of PA is difficult to establish during gestation. It may be suspected in hypertensive patients with hypokalemia. A comprehensive literature review identified reports covering 40 pregnancies in patients suffering from PA. Analysis of these cases shows them to be high-risk pregnancies leading to maternal and fetal complications. Pregnancy must be programmed, and if the patient has a unilateral form of PA, adrenalectomy should be performed prior to conception. It is customary to stop spironolactone prior to conception and introduce antihypertensive drugs that present no risk of teratogenicity. When conventional antihypertensive drugs used during pregnancy fail to control high blood pressure, diuretics, including potassium-sparing diuretics may be prescribed. Adrenalectomy can be considered during the second trimester of pregnancy exclusively in cases of refractory hypertension. A European retrospective study is currently underway to collect a larger number of cases. PMID:27156905

  18. Primary Graft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason D

    2014-01-01

    Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a syndrome encompassing a spectrum of mild to severe lung injury that occurs within the first 72 hours after lung transplantation. PGD is characterized by pulmonary edema with diffuse alveolar damage that manifests clinically as progressive hypoxemia with radiographic pulmonary infiltrates. In recent years, new knowledge has been generated on risks and mechanisms of PGD. Following ischemia and reperfusion, inflammatory and immunological injury-repair responses appear to be key controlling mechanisms. In addition, PGD has significant impact on short- and long-term outcomes; therefore, the choice of donor organ is impacted by this potential adverse consequence. Improved methods of reducing PGD risk and efforts to safely expand the pool are being developed. Ex-vivo lung perfusion is a strategy which may improve risk assessment and become a promising platform to implement treatment interventions to prevent PGD. This review will detail recent updates in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular and genetic biomarkers and state-of-the-art technical developments affecting PGD. (158 words) PMID:23821506

  19. Primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Jason; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Noone, Peadar G

    2015-04-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cilia structure, function, and biogenesis leading to chronic infections of the respiratory tract, fertility problems, and disorders of organ laterality. The diagnosis can be challenging, using traditional tools such as characteristic clinical features, ciliary function, and ultrastructural defects and newer screening tools such as nasal nitric oxide levels and genetic testing add to the diagnostic algorithm. There are 32 known PCD-causing genes, and in the future, comprehensive genetic testing may screen young infants before developing symptoms, thus improving survival. Therapies include surveillance of pulmonary function and microbiology, in addition to airway clearance, antibiotics, and early referral to bronchiectasis centers. As with cystic fibrosis (CF), standardized care at specialized centers using a multidisciplinary approach likely improves outcomes. In conjunction with the CF foundation, the PCD foundation, with experienced investigators and clinicians, is developing a network of PCD clinical centers to coordinate the effort in North America and Europe. As the network grows, clinical care and knowledge will improve. PMID:25826585

  20. Primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Esber, E J; Ferguson, D R

    1994-06-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains a disease of unknown etiology. The close association of PSC and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially ulcerative colitis (UC), has been reconfirmed in numerous studies. Much has been learned about the pathogenesis, although the specific cause remains unknown. Copper overload and chronic hepatic bacterial infection have virtually been excluded as causes of PSC. Cytomegalovirus and reovirus remain under investigation. Familial clustering and HLA subtype similarities are seen in PSC with and without IBD. The finding of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with PSC and those with UC suggests immunological features in the pathogenesis of PSC. Collected series of patients have better characterized clinical features of PSC. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) have provided both diagnostic features and means of therapeutic intervention. Treatment of PSC is symptomatic (pruritus control and vitamin deficiency correction); or experimental (D-penicillamine, ursodeoxycholic acid [UDCA], methotrexate, or corticosteroids). Liver transplantation remains the ultimate treatment for end-stage PSC. Statistical analyses of clinical and laboratory variables in PSC help to determine prognosis and proposed timing for transplantation to achieve maximal longevity and quality of life. PSC affects middle-aged people and is expensive to treat over the natural course of the disease, making it an economically and medically important disease. PMID:8055238

  1. Primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Marina G; Lindor, Keith D

    2008-08-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts, resulting in end-stage liver disease and reduced life expectancy. PSC primarily affects young and middle-aged men, often in association with underlying inflammatory bowel disease. The etiology of PSC includes immune-mediated components and elements of undefined nature. A cholestatic picture of liver biochemistries with elevations in serum alkaline phosphatase, nonspecific autoantibodies such as perinuclear antineutrophilic antibody, antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and diffuse multifocal biliary strictures, resulting in a 'beaded' appearance on radiographic studies, are the hallmarks of the disease. No effective medical therapy is currently available, although clinical studies are in progress. Ursodeoxycholic acid at high doses (28 mg/kg/day to 30 mg/kg/day) is the most promising agent but is unproven so far. Liver transplantation is currently the only life-extending therapy for patients with end-stage disease, although recurrent disease can be observed in the transplanted liver. The multiple complications of PSC include pruritus, fatigue, vitamin deficiencies, metabolic bone disease, peristomal varices, bacterial cholangitis, dominant biliary strictures, gallbladder stones and polyps, and malignancy, particularly cholangiocarcinoma, which is the most lethal complication of PSC. PMID:18701947

  2. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Douglas L.; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is an idiopathic chronic autoimmune liver disease that primarily affects women. It is believed that the etiology for PBC is a combination between environmental triggers in genetically vulnerable persons. The diagnosis for PBC is made when two of the three criteria are fulfilled and they are: (1) biochemical evidence of cholestatic liver disease for at least 6 month’s duration; (2) anti-mitochondrial antibody (AMA) positivity; and (3) histologic features of PBC on liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only FDA-approved medical treatment for PBC and should be administered at a recommended dose of 13-15mg/kg/day. Unfortunately despite adequate dosing of UDCA, approximately one-third of patients does not respond adequately and may require liver transplantation. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the role of environmental exposures and overall genetic impact not only in the development of PBC, but on disease progression and variable clinical response to therapy. PMID:20955967

  3. Primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Mesulam, Marsel

    2014-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical syndrome diagnosed when three core criteria are met. First, there should be a language impairment (i.e., aphasia) that interferes with the usage or comprehension of words. Second, the neurological work-up should determine that the disease is neurodegenerative, and therefore progressive. Third, the aphasia should arise in relative isolation, without equivalent deficits of comportment or episodic memory. The language impairment can be fluent or non-fluent and may or may not interfere with word comprehension. Memory for recent events is preserved although memory scores obtained in verbally mediated tests may be abnormal. Minor changes in personality and behavior may be present but are not the leading factors that bring the patient to medical attention or that limit daily living activities. This distinctive clinical pattern is most conspicuous in the initial stages of the disease, and reflects a relatively selective atrophy of the language network, usually located in the left hemisphere. There are different clinical variants of PPA, each with a characteristic pattern of atrophy. The underlying neuropathological diseases are heterogeneous and can include Alzheimer’s disease as well as frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The clinician’s task is to recognize PPA and differentiate it from other neurodegenerative phenotypes, use biomarkers to surmise the nature of the underlying neuropathology, and institute the most fitting multimodal interventions. PMID:24707349

  4. Study of Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Parmar; Lala, M.; Chadha, M.; Shah, N. F.; Chauhan, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical spectrum of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) has undergone a striking change with asymptomatic form predominant in developed countries, whereas symptomatic form predominant in developing countries. In this study, we have analyzed clinical presentation, investigations, management, operative findings in patients with PHPT at our center. Materials and Method: A retrospective, review of medical records of all patients with PHPT between 2000 and July 2012 at our institute was undertaken. A total of 96 patients were included in this study. Results: The mean age of patients was 50.8 years. Of the 96 patients, 63 were females (65.6%) and 33 were males (34.4%). Among them, 17.7% were asymptomatic and 82.3% were symptomatic. Bone pain was the most common complaint (52%) followed by renal stones (27%). Nearly 10.4% were part of familial PHPT, whereas others were sporadic adenomas. All patients had hypercalcemia (range 10.5–19.4 mg/dl) with elevated parathyroid (PTH) levels (range 32–3820 pg/ml). 25(OH) VitD levels were available in 86 patients (89.6%). There was no correlation between VitaminD levels and symptomatology. Sestamibi scan was true positive in 95.6%, false negative 2.2%, and inconclusive in 2.2%. Ultrasonography (USG) results were true positive in 84.2%, false positive in 6.3%, and false negative in 9.5%. Intraoperative PTH levels were measured in 83.3% patients. Postoperative complications were reported in 20.8% patients. Conclusions: Clinical spectrum of PHPT varies but bones and stones are still the predominant manifestations even in affluent society. Asymptomatic form also exists and can be detected by routine measurement of serum calcium. There was no correlation seen between the 25 VitD levels and clinical symptoms. PMID:23565449

  5. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  6. Gross Primary Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's new Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) allows scientists to gauge our planet's metabolism on an almost daily basis. GPP, gross primary production, is the technical term for plant photosynthesis. This composite image over the continental United States, acquired during the period March 26-April 10, 2000, shows regions where plants were more or less productive-i.e., where they 'inhaled' carbon dioxide and then used the carbon from photosynthesis to build new plant structures. This false-color image provides a map of how much carbon was absorbed out of the atmosphere and fixed within land vegetation. Areas colored blue show where plants used as much as 60 grams of carbon per square meter. Areas colored green and yellow indicate a range of anywhere from 40 to 20 grams of carbon absorbed per square meter. Red pixels show an absorption of less than 10 grams of carbon per square meter and white pixels (often areas covered by snow or masked as urban) show little or no absorption. This is one of a number of new measurements that MODIS provides to help scientists understand how the Earth's landscapes are changing over time. Scientists' goal is use of these GPP measurements to refine computer models to simulate how the land biosphere influences the natural cycles of water, carbon, and energy throughout the Earth system. The GPP will be an integral part of global carbon cycle source and sink analysis, an important aspect of Kyoto Protocol assessments. This image is the first of its kind from the MODIS instrument, which launched in December 1999 aboard the Terra spacecraft. MODIS began acquiring scientific data on February 24, 2000, when it first opened its aperture door. The MODIS instrument and Terra spacecraft are both managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Image courtesy Steven Running, MODIS Land Group Member, University of Montana

  7. [Primary prevention: physical activity].

    PubMed

    Schuler, G

    2004-01-01

    Traditional risk factors such as smoking, hypertension and being overweight have received considerable attention in recent years, whereas physical activity as a preventive strategy does not enjoy the same public attention. In recent years the level of physical activity has decreased dramatically in children and adolescents in favor of time spent on the internet and in front of the TV. If this trend is allowed to develop along the same direction, a sharp increase in cardiovascular disease can be anticipated. The protective action of physical activity on the cardiovascular system has been well documented in large numbers of patients, and the basic physiological mechanisms have been elucidated. Metabolic changes comprise loss of weight, reduction in triglyceride and LDL levels, as well as an increase in HDL. Insulin sensitivity is enhanced in all tissues postponing the manifestation of diabetes mellitus. Shear forces created by physical activity induce ecNOS within the endothelial lining of the arteries. This enzyme is responsible for controlling vasomotion through the elaboration of NO which causes vasodilation in the smooth muscle within the vessel wall. Utilization of preformed collateral vessels has been postulated repeatedly; so far, however, it only could be documented in animals, not in humans. Nearly all studies concerned with primary prevention have shown a significant negative correlation between energy expenditure during exercise and cardiovascular mortality, even light and moderate exercise will result in a lower incidence. In order to eliminate a sedentary life style in children and adolescents, adequate programs should be initiated in all schools; they should aim for 60 min of physical activity on a daily basis. PMID:15021990

  8. Politics and the Primary Teacher. Understanding Primary Education Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Politics and the Primary Teacher" is an accessible introduction to some of the thorniest aspects of a primary teacher's role. It aims to support your understanding of the constant changes in education policy, give you confidence to engage critically with current political debates, and consider how you might shape your response accordingly.…

  9. [Primary vesicoureteral reflux].

    PubMed

    Stein, R; Ziesel, C; Rubenwolf, P; Beetz, R

    2013-01-01

    The never ending discussion about the diagnostics and treatment of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) now includes arguments for diagnostic nihilism as well as invasive diagnostics and therapy, which is reminiscent of the debate on prostate cancer in adulthood. The common goal of all currently competing diagnostic strategies and approaches is the prevention of renal scars by the most effective and least burdensome approach. There is a difference between acquired pyelonephritic scars with VUR (acquired reflux nephropathy) and congenital reflux nephropathy (primary dysplasia) which cannot be influenced by any therapy.The VUR can be verified by conventional radiological voiding cystourethrography (VCUG), by urosonography, radionuclide cystography or even by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The guidelines of the European Association of Urology/European Society for Paediatric Urology (EAU/ESPU) recommend radiological screening for VUR after the first febrile urinary tract infection. Significant risk factors in patients with VUR are recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) and parenchymal scarring and the patients should undergo patient and risk-adapted therapy. Infants with dilating reflux have a higher risk of renal scarring than those without dilatation of the renal pelvis. Bladder dysfunction or dysfunctional elimination syndrome represents a well-known but previously neglected risk factor in combination with VUR and should be treated prior to any surgical intervention as far as is possible.Certainly not every patient with VUR needs therapy. The current treatment strategies take into account age and gender, the presence of dysplastic or pyelonephritic renal scars, the clinical symptoms, bladder dysfunction and frequency and severity of recurrent UTI as criteria for the therapy decision. The use of an antibacterial prophylaxis as well as the duration is controversially discussed. Endoscopic therapy can be a good alternative to antibacterial prophylaxis or a surveillance

  10. Organizational Learning in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Ali

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to make suggestions for primary schools to become organizational learning environments, by searching the relationship between the characteristics and behaviors of school administrators and the formation of an organizational learning environment in primary schools. The author used a survey model in this research and…

  11. Learning outside the Primary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedgwick, Fred

    2012-01-01

    In "Learning Outside the Primary Classroom," the educationalist and writer Fred Sedgwick explores in a practical way the many opportunities for intense learning that children and teachers can find outside the confines of the usual learning environment, the classroom. This original work is based on tried and tested methods from UK primary schools.…

  12. Storytelling across the Primary Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Alastair K.

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the question "what is a story?" "Storytelling Across the Primary Curriculum" leads the reader through the theory and practise of storytelling as an educational method--a method taught by the author over the last ten years through Primary English teaching programmes. This practical book gives teachers the skills and confidence to use…

  13. Primary ectopic frontotemporal extradural craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Pourkhalili, Reza; Shekarchizadeh, Ahmad; Seif, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of primary ectopic frontotemporal extradural craniopharyngioma. Primary ectopic craniopharyngiomas are very rare and have been reported involving the fourth ventricle, infrasellar region, lateral ventricle, temporal area, cerebellopontine angle, clivus, corpus callosum, and prepontine cistern. There was just 1 case of craniopharyngioma previously presented in the literature, with nearly same location as the presenting case. PMID:27195250

  14. Supplemental tooth in primary dentition

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2014-01-01

    An extra tooth causing numerical excess in dentition is described as supernumerary tooth, and the resultant condition is termed as hyperdontia. Hyperdontia is more commonly seen in the permanent dentition than primary one. Supernumerary tooth which resembles tooth shape and supplements for occlusion is called as supplemental tooth. We present a case with supplemental tooth in primary dentition. PMID:24913075

  15. Familial occurrence of primary fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, M J; Waylonis, G W; Sommer, A

    1989-01-01

    Seventeen families of patients with primary fibromyalgia were studied for evidence of inherited primary fibromyalgia. Fifty parents and siblings were included in the analysis. Twenty-six (52%, mean age 33.5 years) had characteristic symptoms and findings of primary fibromyalgia. Eleven (22%, mean age 28 years) were asymptomatic but had clinical evidence of abnormal muscle consistency to palpation without tender or trigger points. One person had clinical evidence of lupus. Thirteen (26%) had no evidence of fibromyalgia or abnormal muscle consistency. The mode of inheritance was autosomal dominant. Identical twins are described who developed symptoms of primary fibromyalgia within six months of each other, as are two brothers who developed abnormal palpable muscle consistency years before acquiring the characteristic findings of the fibromyalgia syndrome. Primary fibromyalgia may be an inherited condition with a variable latent stage before clinical expression of the disease. PMID:2916922

  16. African Primary Care Research: Qualitative interviewing in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on African Primary Care Research and focuses on the topic of qualitative interviewing in primary care. In particular it looks at issues of study design, sample size, sampling and interviewing in relation to individual and focus group interviews. There is a particular focus on helping postgraduate students at a Masters level to write their research proposals. PMID:26245436

  17. Primary structure -- An important concept to distinguish primary stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Mingwan |; Li Jianguo

    1996-12-01

    A new Chinese design code JB 4732-95, Steel Pressure Vessels -- Design by Analysis, was issued in March 1995. In this paper the authors discuss some concepts and ideas which formed in the introduction and application of the design by analysis approach in China. They are: multi-possibility of stress decomposition, self-limiting stress, classification of constraints, and finally an important concept to distinguish primary stress -- primary structures.

  18. Primary Mediastinal Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piña-Oviedo, Sergio; Moran, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Primary mediastinal Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) is rare. Nodular sclerosis CHL (NS-CHL) is the most common subtype involving the anterior mediastinum and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. Primary thymic CHL is exceedingly rare. The disease typically affects young women and is asymptomatic in 30% to 50% of patients. Common symptoms include fatigue, chest pain, dyspnea and cough, but vary depending on the location and size of the tumor. B-symptoms develop in 30% of cases. By imaging, primary mediastinal CHL presents as mediastinal widening/mediastinal mass that does not invade adjacent organs but may compress vital structures as bulky disease. Histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. Primary mediastinal NS-CHL consists of nodules of polymorphous inflammatory cells surrounded by broad fibrous bands extending from a thickened lymph node capsule. The cellular nodules contain variable numbers of large Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells, required for diagnosis. Primary thymic CHL may exhibit prominent cystic changes. The histopathologic recognition of NS-CHL can be challenging in cases with prominent fibrosis, scant cellularity, artifactual cell distortion, or an exuberant granulomatous reaction. The differential diagnosis includes primary mediastinal non-HLs, mediastinal germ cell tumors, thymoma, and metastatic carcinoma or melanoma to the mediastinum. Distinction from primary mediastinal non-HLs is crucial for adequate therapeutic decisions. Approximately 95% of patients with primary mediastinal CHL will be alive and free of disease at 10 years after treatment with short courses of combined chemoradiotherapy. In this review, we discuss the history, classification, epidemiology, clinicoradiologic features, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, differential diagnosis, and treatment of primary mediastinal CHL. PMID:27441757

  19. Anxiety Disorders in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Danielle H; Mahoney, David; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Investigation for a possible anxiety disorder should be considered in patients with multiple or persistent anxiety symptoms or multiple somatic complaints without a clear somatic etiology. The ideal treatment for anxiety disorders is a combination of pharmacologic and behavioral strategies. As primary care health care evolves, it is expected that the management of mental health disorders (including anxiety disorders) will largely occur in the context of collaborative care models in which patients and primary care clinicians are assisted by trained case managers who help facilitate a more comprehensive, holistic treatment plan between primary care and mental health providers. PMID:27262005

  20. JWST Primary Mirror Installation Complete

    NASA Video Gallery

    Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of desi...

  1. Dilemma of the Primary Colors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Artists use red, yellow, and blue as primary colors, whereas physicists use red, green, and blue. Explains the reason using the spectra of mixtures of red, green, blue, and yellow tempera obtained with a Carey spectrophotometer. (GA)

  2. Problems of Primary Education Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubova, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Primary education in Russia has failed to adapt to the needs of post-Soviet society, and is still based on rote learning and memorization instead of learning through discovery and learning to use and apply what is learned.

  3. Primary-Graders Study Nutrition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred C.; Moncrief, Michael H.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the content of an instructional unit on nutrition prepared by the Dairy Council of California for primary-level school children and the results of its large-scale tryout in 30 California schools. (SDH)

  4. Esthetic restoration of primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Carranza, F; García-Godoy, F

    1999-04-01

    A simple and esthetic technique for restoring cariously involved primary maxillary incisors is described. The technique includes mini-pins, a preformed celluloid crown and resin-based composite. PMID:10477982

  5. Primary intrahepatic malignant epithelioid mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Perysinakis, Iraklis; Nixon, Alexander M.; Spyridakis, Ioannis; Kakiopoulos, George; Zorzos, Charalampos; Margaris, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Primary malignant hepatic mesotheliomas are extremely rare. We report the case of a patient with primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma who was treated in our department. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 66-year old male patient was admitted to our department for the evaluation of anemia. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a large space occupying lesion in the right liver lobe. DISCUSSION The tumor was subsequently resected and a diagnosis of primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma was made after pathologic examination. The patient did not receive adjuvant therapy and is currently alive and free of disease, 36 months after the resection. CONCLUSION To our knowledge this is the eighth adult case of primary intrahepatic malignant mesothelioma reported in the literature. These tumors are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Absence of previous asbestos exposure does not exclude malignant mesothelioma from the differential diagnosis. Proper surgical treatment may offer prolonged survival to the patient, without adjuvant therapy. PMID:25460485

  6. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... can give you a trusting, ongoing relationship with one medical professional over time. You can choose from ...

  7. Primary care. The odd couple.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Nick

    2004-06-24

    Acute and primary care trust relationships can be fraught with baggage, vagueness and stereotypes. Changing that is about overt behaviours as well as structural and strategic issues. Payment by results and attitudes to commissioning pose significant challenges. PMID:15270356

  8. Primary care. More than words.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Keith; Ion, Vince; Merry, Marilyn; Sinfield, Paul

    2003-01-16

    There are few models for involving patients in primary care. Research in one primary care group, involving 92 patients from nine general practices, established a list of 20 standards most important to patients. When asked to assess themselves against these standards, practices rated their services higher than patients did. The research found considerable resistance to patient involvement from GPs, which needs to be addressed if the government's aims are to be achieved. PMID:12561491

  9. Rainbows: a primary health care initiative for primary schools.

    PubMed

    Munns, Ailsa; Forde, Karen A; Krouzecky, Miriam; Shields, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Within the current Australian health system is the understanding of a need to change from the predominate biomedical model to incorporate a comprehensive primary health care centred approach, embracing the social contexts of health and wellbeing. Recent research investigated the benefits of the primary health care philosophy and strategies in relation to the Rainbows programme which addresses grief and loss in primary school aged students in Western Australia. A multidisciplinary collaboration between the Western Australian Departments of Health and Education enabled community school health nurse coordinators to train teacher facilitators in the implementation of Rainbows, enabling support for students and their parents. The results of this qualitative study indicate that all participants regard Rainbows as effective, with many perceived benefits to students and their families. PMID:26281402

  10. [Cytogenetic studies in primary amenorrhea].

    PubMed

    Baron, J; Warenik-Szymankiewicz, A

    1975-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis in 125 women with primary amenorrhea consisting of determinations of sex chromatin and karyotype, and in some cases of autoradiography were performed. On the basis of clinical, endocrinologic and cytogenetic criteria, the women were divided into ten clinical groups. In Turner's syndrome 45,X monosomie was observed only in 9 patients and in the remaining 12 cases varies types of mosaicism or of structural aberrations of the X chromosome. In pure gonadal dysgenesis, the patients exhibited 46,XY karyotype have the tendency to malign tumors of the gonads. In all cases with male pseudohermaphroditism the karyotypes 46,XY were observed. The remaining patients with primary amenorrhea exhibited 46,XX karyotype and belonged to the cases with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kustner syndrome, with adrenogenital syndrome, with hypoplasia of the ovaries, with primary amenorrhea of uterine or pituitary origin or at last with pubertas tarda. PMID:1189755

  11. Telescope mount with azimuth-only primary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, W. H.

    1968-01-01

    In large aperture telescope primary reflectors, the primary mirror is fixed with respect to the gravity vector to avoid varying gravity deflection problems. The primary reflector does not become distorted in various positions nor in changing positions.

  12. Microbial production of primary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demain, Arnold L.

    1980-12-01

    Microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon sources can produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids, and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavor or increase its nutritive value. The contribution of microorganisms will go well beyond the food industry with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum-derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. The role of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance.

  13. Primary lymphoma of the gallbladder.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E. P.; Lazda, E.; Grant, D.; Davis, J.

    1993-01-01

    A case of primary lymphoma of the gallbladder is described which is rare in the medical literature. A 76 year old man presented with acute cholecystitis and septicaemia. Investigation showed a lung abscess and a gallbladder mass. The mass was thought to be an empyema and cholecystostomy was performed. Biopsy of the gallbladder wall showed high-grade B cell lymphoma. The patient unfortunately succumbed to overwhelming septicaemia in the postoperative period. Postmortem examination confirmed primary lymphoma of the gallbladder without dissemination. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8415351

  14. Primary ovarian insufficiency: an update

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Leticia; Liu, James H

    2014-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency is a condition that represents impaired ovarian function on a continuum with intermittent ovulation. This condition commonly leads to premature menopause, defined as cessation of ovulation prior to the age of 40 years. Because there are potential immediate and long-term consequences of hypoestrogenism, a timely diagnosis is invaluable. This comprehensive review will discuss identifiable causes for primary ovarian insufficiency, including genetic disorders and metabolic abnormalities, as well as review current strategies for diagnosis, evaluation, and management of women with this condition. PMID:24591848

  15. Capnocytophaga sputigena primary iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper F W; Wong, Samson S Y; Leung, Sally S M; Li, Iris W S; To, Kelvin K W; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2010-11-01

    Iliopsoas abscess is usually secondary to the spread of infection from a contiguous focus. Primary disease is uncommon, except in children where Staphylococcus aureus is the main pathogen. We report a 60-year-old woman who developed a primary iliopsoas abscess as a result of haematogenous spread of Capnocytophaga sputigena from a palatal fistula and chronic sinusitis due to previous treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Pyomyositis due to unusual and fastidious Gram-negative bacilli should be considered in patients with head and neck tumours who have previously received radiotherapy. PMID:20634330

  16. Shoulder arthropathy in primary hyperparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, A.J.; Doppman, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    An erosive arthropathy of the hands and wrists has been recognized in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, intra-articular erosions of the humeral head were described in six patients who had been on chronic long-term hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We would like to present the finding of shoulder erosions in four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and one patient with renal osteodystrophy and suggest that the humeral erosion can occur in both an intra-articular and peri-articular location.

  17. Primary Teachers Opinion about Homework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matei, Stefania; Ciasca, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Homework assignments trigger various perceptions and attitudes in students, parents or teachers: some overestimate them, others reject them, some do it with pleasure and to others they cause tears. Literature indicates both benefits and disadvantages of homework. In Romania, at primary level, homework is a systematic practice. The explanation is…

  18. Primary Journal Literature of Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marianne; Thayer, Candace W.

    Four hundred and ninety one primary journals covered by "Physics Abstracts" in 1965 have been studied and their basic characteristics analyzed in terms of sponsorship, distribution by country, language, frequency, and coverage by secondary services other than "Physics Abstracts," and the number of libraries holding each journal. (Author)

  19. Primary Prevention of Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shisslak, Catherine M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes current understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia (clinical symptoms and outcome, prevalence and risk factors), offering suggestions for the primary prevention of these disorders at the individual, family, and community levels, and emphasizing prevention in the schools. (Author/KS)

  20. ASE and Primary School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlen, Wynne

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of the Association for Science Education (ASE) in supporting and developing policy and practice in primary school science. It first sets the events after the formation of ASE in 1963 in the context of what went before. It then takes a mainly chronological view of some, but by no means all, of ASE's activities…

  1. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  2. Music Handbook for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Doris; And Others

    GRADES OR AGES: Primary grades (1, 2, and 3). SUBJECT MATTER: Music. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: This guide contains a detailed outline of the basic music concepts for elementary grades with suggestions for activities which may develop understanding of the concepts. The pages of activities are color coded by grade level. There are three…

  3. Number Program for Primary Schoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, James M.

    The arithmetic portion of the Developing Mathematical Processes (DMP) program, as it applies to children of ages 5 to 8, is described in some detail. The terminal objective of the number program of the primary segment of DMP is the ability of the child to correctly write, read and validate mathematical sentences of the form A = B plus or minus X.…

  4. Primary Science Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pook, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    Consider the extent to which primary science teaching has evolved since it became a core subject in England with the introduction of the National Curriculum in 1988, and the pace at which theory-driven classroom practice has advanced. It is no wonder that, given the recent economic restructuring and boom in technological development in China,…

  5. Primary Schooling in West Bengal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Amartya

    2010-01-01

    With his Nobel Prize award money, Amartya Sen set up the Pratichi Trust which carries out research, advocacy and experimental projects in basic education, primary health care, and women's development in West Bengal and Bangladesh. Professor Sen himself took active interest in this work--helping set the agenda, looking at the evidence from…

  6. Primary immunodeficiencies underlying fungal infections

    PubMed Central

    Lanternier, Fanny; Cypowyj, Sophie; Picard, Capucine; Bustamante, Jacinta; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review We review the primary immunodeficiencies underlying an increasing variety of superficial and invasive fungal infections. We also stress that the occurrence of such fungal infections should lead physicians to search for the corresponding single-gene inborn errors of immunity. Finally, we suggest that other fungal infections may also result from hitherto unknown inborn errors of immunity, at least in some patients with no known risk factors. Recent findings An increasing number of primary immunodeficiencies are being shown to underlie fungal infectious diseases in children and young adults. Inborn errors of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase complex (chronic granulomatous disease), severe congenital neutropenia and leukocyte adhesion deficiency type I confer a predisposition to invasive aspergillosis and candidiasis. More rarely, inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity underlie endemic mycoses. Inborn errors of IL-17 immunity have recently been shown to underlie chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, whereas inborn errors of CARD9 immunity underlie deep dermatophytosis and invasive candidiasis. Summary Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, deep dermatophytosis, pneumocystosis, and endemic mycoses can all be caused by primary immunodeficiencies. Each type of infection is highly suggestive of a specific type of primary immunodeficiency. In the absence of overt risk factors, single-gene inborn errors of immunity should be sought in children and young adults with these and other fungal diseases. PMID:24240293

  7. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePlus

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  8. Lead-free primary explosives

    DOEpatents

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  9. Resident Rounds: Primary Cutaneous Mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mariah; Fathi, Ramin; Alkousakis, Theodore

    2015-08-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old neutropenic man with acute myelogenous leukemia who presented for evaluation of a rapidly expanding necrotic eschar after adhesive placement. Histopathology revealed infection with primary cutaneous mucormycosis. Our case reviews the presentation and management of this condition as well highlights an uncommon cause in the hospital that can lead to this dangerous infection. PMID:27120566

  10. Coastal Studies for Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Venetia R.; Roach, Ellen M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a set of field trips for participants of the Coastal Environmental Education for Primary Grades program in Georgia. Includes a sample of the activities used by first- and second-grade students. Discusses follow-up activities and the need for more educational programs dealing with sand dunes and saltwater marshes. (TW)

  11. Primary Childhood School Success Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seagraves, Margaret C.

    The purpose of this research study was to build and pilot a psychometric instrument, the Primary Childhood School Success Scale (PCSSS), to identify behaviors needed for children to be successful in first grade. Fifty-two teacher responses were collected. The instrument had a reliability coefficient (Alpha) of 0.95, a mean of 13.26, and a variance…

  12. Economics across the Primary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCorkle, Sarapage, Ed.

    1991-01-01

    Outlines lesson plans for teaching economics in the primary grades, designed to complement the video series, "Econ and Me." Suggests activities incorporate mathematics, language arts, geography, and science. Targets the following specific economic concepts in individual lesson plans: scarcity, choice, production, goods, opportunity cost,…

  13. Conditional Logic and Primary Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robert H.

    Conditional logic, as interpreted in this paper, means deductive logic characterized by "if-then" statements. This study sought to investigate the knowledge of conditional logic possessed by primary children and to test their readiness to learn such concepts. Ninety students were designated the experimental group and participated in a 15-week…

  14. Primary Sources and Inquiry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses inquiry learning and primary sources. Inquiry learning puts students in the active role of investigators. Questioning, authentic and active learning, and interactivity are a few of the characteristics of inquiry learning that put the teacher and library media specialist in the role of coaches while students…

  15. Civil Engineering in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Martin; Strong, Alan

    2010-01-01

    For many children of primary school age, an engineer is the man who comes to service the central heating system or who fixes the family car when it breaks down. Most have never met a "real" professional engineer, and have no idea of what is involved in the exciting world of engineering. Most assume that engineers are men. To try to remove these…

  16. Career Education Activities: Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Constance, Comp.; And Others

    Different aspects of life can be experienced by a child in a learning environment offered by a teacher. Such experiences will better prepare the student for the future in his dealings with other people and situations. The book offers detailed suggestions for various ways in which the teacher can introduce to the student in the primary grades…

  17. Metric Units in Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lighthill, M. J.; And Others

    Although this pamphlet is intended as background material for teachers in English primary schools changing to the System International d'Unites (SI units), the form of the metric system being adopted by the United Kingdom, the educational implications of the change and the lists of apparatus suitable for use with children up to 14 years of age are…

  18. Autosomal recessive primary microcephalies (MCPH).

    PubMed

    Kaindl, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by a pronounced reduction in volume of otherwise architectonical normal brains and intellectual deficit. Here, we summarize the genetic causes of MCPH types 1-12 known to date. PMID:24780602

  19. Reading in the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    This paper urges primary grade teachers to be certain that pupils are off to a good start in reading. A fundamental goal of beginning reading instruction should be to move each child toward the understanding that readers reconstruct texts by using multiple strategies to interpret the language encoded in print and, at the same time, to make it…

  20. Primary Sources Enliven Civil War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2011-01-01

    Today, a growing number of teachers are moving beyond the textbook in teaching about the war, and U.S. history more broadly. Teachers are digging directly into primary sources and harnessing technology, all in an attempt to help students better understand the past and bring it to life. Doing so may be especially important with the Civil War,…

  1. User Fees in Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kattan, Raja Bentaouet; Burnett, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    There are a large number of different "fees" that private households sometimes have to pay for publicly provided primary education, including tuition fees, textbook fees or costs and/or rental payments, compulsory uniforms, PTA dues, and various special fees such as exam fees, contributions to district education boards, and the like. In many…

  2. Phytotherapy in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanele; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  3. Children's Health in Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayall, Berry; And Others

    Positing the relevance of well-being and social support to educational achievement, this book explores the status of children's health and its importance to the education of young children. A mail questionnaire survey of 1031 of approximately 20,000 Primary Education Schools in England and Wales in the fall of 1993 yielded 620 replies; a response…

  4. Primary prevention of adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schinke, S P; Blythe, B J; Gilchrist, L D; Burt, G A

    1981-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is associated with many health, emotional and socioeconomic problems including higher rates of anemia, labor complications, mortality, legal and social struggles and hhigher divorce rates. Professional social workers need strategies to help teenagers avoid early, unwanted pregnancy. This paper offers promising experential and research backing for a primary prevention group work strategy for all adolescents. Social and health programs overlook educational, cognitive anc interpersonal factors biasing youths' ability to comprehend and regulate contraception. Primary prevention to assist adolescents in thinking analytically about their sexual behavior must stress problem solving and decision-making as well as facts about human reproduction and birth control. To implement decisions, youths also need interpersonal communication skills. Small groups are ideal for delivering cognitive-behavioral primary prevention. This approach is based on the premise that youths become pregnant not because of a lack of relevant information, but because they lack cognitive and behavioral skills necessary to use information. Group work involving role-playing helps develop communication skills. Results from 2 field studies describe short-term and longitudinal benefits of the prevention strategy. Professionals can reach significant numbers of youth in this way. By treating sexual issues and the risk of pregnancy as normal in adolescence, social workers can introduce information and pertinent skills to all teenagers. No one is singled out as deviant and the group format enables young people to discuss taboo topics, discovering what the norms are and gradually learning how to deal with peers, family members, techers and others. Adolescents in primary prevention groups gained knowledge, cognitive skills and communication acumen. Improved attitudes toward family planning, increased regular contraception and less unsafe sex resulted from this cognitive-behavioral approach

  5. Cognitive Flexibility in Primary Dystonia.

    PubMed

    Lange, Florian; Seer, Caroline; Dengler, Reinhard; Dressler, Dirk; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Although primary dystonia is typically characterized as a movement disorder, it is also associated with cognitive alterations in the domain of executive functioning which may arise from changes in cortico-basal ganglia circuits. Specifically, in comparison to healthy controls, patients with dystonia show deficits in neuropsychological tests of cognitive flexibility. However, it is unclear whether cognitive inflexibility is caused by the pathomechanisms underlying primary dystonia or by confounding factors such as depression or symptom-related distraction.Methods The present study aimed to eliminate these confounds by examining cognitive flexibility in dystonia patients and in patients with similar motor symptoms but without a comparable central pathophysiology. Eighteen patients with primary blepharospasm, a common form of dystonia affecting the muscles around the eyes, and 19 patients with hemifacial spasm, a facial nerve disorder causing similar eyelid spasms, completed a computerized version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (cWCST). The two groups were further compared on tests of global cognitive functioning, psychiatric symptoms, health status, and impulsiveness. Results Blepharospasm patients committed significantly more errors on the cWCST than patients with hemifacial spasm. Group differences were most pronounced with regard to integration errors, a measure of rule-inference processes on the cWCST. Integration errors were also associated with impulsiveness in patients with blepharospasm. Conclusions Primary blepharospasm is related to deficits in cognitive flexibility, even when blepharospasm patients are compared with patients who suffer from motor symptoms of non-dystonic origin. Our results support the possibility that cognitive inflexibility results from the specific pathophysiological processes underlying primary dystonia. (JINS, 2016, 22, 662-670). PMID:27333537

  6. 11 CFR 9032.7 - Primary election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Primary election. 9032.7 Section 9032.7 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.7 Primary election. (a) Primary election means an election held by a State or...

  7. 11 CFR 9032.7 - Primary election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Primary election. 9032.7 Section 9032.7 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.7 Primary election. (a) Primary election means an election held by a State or...

  8. 11 CFR 9032.7 - Primary election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Primary election. 9032.7 Section 9032.7 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.7 Primary election. (a) Primary election means an election held by a State or...

  9. 11 CFR 9032.7 - Primary election.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Primary election. 9032.7 Section 9032.7 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.7 Primary election. (a) Primary election means an election held by a State or...

  10. Primary Sternal Osteomyelitis Caused by Actinomyces israelii

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Ho; Jeon, Seok Chol; Jang, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Hyuck; Kim, Young Hak; Chung, Won-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Primary sternal osteomyelitis is a rare disease. Common infectious organisms causing primary sternal osteomyelitis include Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Actinomyces species are common saprophytes of the oral cavity, but there have been few reports in the literature of primary sternal osteomyelitis caused by Actinomyces species. We describe a case of primary sternal osteomyelitis caused by Actinomyces israelii without pulmonary involvement. PMID:25705607

  11. [Addison's disease : Primary adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pulzer, A; Burger-Stritt, S; Hahner, S

    2016-05-01

    Adrenal insufficiency, a rare disorder which is characterized by the inadequate production or absence of adrenal hormones, may be classified as primary adrenal insufficiency in case of direct affection of the adrenal glands or secondary adrenal insufficiency, which is mostly due to pituitary or hypothalamic disease. Primary adrenal insufficiency affects 11 of 100,000 individuals. Clinical symptoms are mainly nonspecific and include fatigue, weight loss, and hypotension. The diagnostic test of choice is dynamic testing with synthetic ACTH. Patients suffering from chronic adrenal insufficiency require lifelong hormone supplementation. Education in dose adaption during physical and mental stress or emergency situations is essential to prevent life-threatening adrenal crises. Patients with adrenal insufficiency should carry an emergency card and emergency kit with them. PMID:27129928

  12. Primary bone marrow oedema syndromes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    MRI scanning in patients with rheumatological conditions often shows bone marrow oedema, which can be secondary to inflammatory, degenerative, infective or malignant conditions but can also be primary. The latter condition is of uncertain aetiology and it is also uncertain whether it represents a stage in the progression to osteonecrosis in some patients. Patients with primary bone marrow oedema usually have lower limb pain, commonly the hip, knee, ankle or feet. The diagnosis is one of exclusion with the presence of typical MRI findings. Treatment is usually conservative and includes analgesics and staying off the affected limb. The natural history is that of gradual resolution of symptoms over a number of months. Evidence for medical treatment is limited, but open-label studies suggest bisphosphonates may help in the resolution of pain and improve radiological findings. Surgical decompression is usually used as a last resort. PMID:24080251

  13. Primary tracheobronchial tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Varela, Patricio; Pio, Luca; Torre, Michele

    2016-06-01

    Primary tracheobronchial tumors are rare lesions that can be benign or malignant, with different location along the airway tree. Symptoms may include wheezing, chronic pneumonia, asthma, chest pain, recurrent cough, atelectasis, haemoptysis, and weight loss. Due to the heterogeneity of symptoms, diagnosis can be difficult and the airway involvement can lead progressively to a bronchial or tracheal obstruction. Due to the rarity of primary tracheobronchial tumors in children, there are not any oncological guidelines on pre-operative work-up, treatment, and follow-up. Only few reports and multicentric studies are reported. In most cases, surgical resection seems to be the treatment of choice. Brachytherapy, endoscopic treatment, and chemotherapy are rarely described. In this article we present an overview on these rare tumors, including pathological aspects, clinical presentation, imaging assessment, and endoscopic or open surgical treatments. We discuss different surgical approaches, according with tumor location. PMID:27301601

  14. Turner syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungmee; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Beom Hee; Yoon, Jong Ho; Jeong, Woon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome has multiple comorbidities such as osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes, hypothyroidism, and hypertension. As they are treatable conditions in Turner syndrome, early recognition and proper treatment should be needed. We report on a 23-year-old woman with Turner syndrome who presented with severe osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. Laboratory tests showed elevated levels of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry showed severe osteopo-rosis (z score, -3.5). Ultrasound and 99mTc scintigraphy of parathyroid glands showed an adenoma in the right inferior gland. She was diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism due to an adenoma of the parathyroid gland. After excision of the adenoma, the patient's serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels returned to normal. Although only a few cases of Turners syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism have been reported, hyperparathyroidism should be considered in cases of Turner syndrome with severe osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. PMID:24904858

  15. Primary-care physician compensation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Arik

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews existing models of physician compensation and presents information about current compensation patterns for primary-care physicians in the United States. Theories of work motivation are reviewed where they have relevance to the desired outcome of satisfied, productive physicians whose skills and expertise are retained in the workforce. Healthcare reforms that purport to bring accountability for healthcare quality and value-rather than simply volume-bring opportunities to redesign primary-care physician compensation and may allow for new compensation methodologies that increase job satisfaction. Physicians are increasingly shunning the responsibility of private practice and choosing to work as employees of a larger organization, often a hospital. Employers of physicians are seeking compensation models that reward both productivity and value. PMID:22786738

  16. [Purpura: primary systemic amyloidosis manifestation].

    PubMed

    Lestre, Sara; Gonçalves, Andreia; João, Alexandre; Ferreira, Ana; Apetato, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    Primary Systemic Amyloidosis (AL) is the most frequent form of systemic amyloidosis and its morbilility is associated with immunoglobulin light chains deposition in vital organs. The mucocutaneous manifestations occur in about 30-40% of the cases and are important in diagnostic suspicion, once they appear in early stages of disease. We report a 71-years-old female patient, with disseminated purpura and cutaneous fragility with 6 months of evolution, accompanied by recent complaints of dysphagy. The first laboratory evaluation didn't show any alterations. The histological and immunohistochemical study of subcutaneous abdominal fat and skin biopsy showed lambda type amyloid protein. In the systemic work-up, we highlight a proteinúria > 1g/24h with Bence Jones proteins and the presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain (lambda type) in serum immunoelectrophoresis. With the diagnosis of primary systemic amyloidosis, treatment with prednisolone and melphalan was started. PMID:19686633

  17. Compensation for primary reflector wavefront error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, Aden B. (Inventor); Meinel, Marjorie P. (Inventor); Stacy, John E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a telescope having primary and secondary reflectors, wherein the actual primary reflector surface deviates from an ideal primary reflector surface, such deviation is compensated for. At least one intermediate element forms an image of the primary surface onto the secondary surface, so each point on the secondary surface corresponds to a point on the primary surface. The secondary surface is formed with a deviation from an ideal secondary surface, with the piston distance of each point on the actual secondary surface equal to the piston distance of a corresponding point on the actual primary surface from the ideal primary surface. It is found that this results in electromagnetic (e.g., light) rays which strike a deviating area of the actual primary surface being brought to the same focus as if the actual primary surface did not have a deviation from an ideal primary surface.

  18. Primary productivity in the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in primary productivity is discussed in the book based on 27 symposia texts and 19 poster abstracts. Most papers deal with particular cellular processes in pelagic phytoplankton and their relationship to whole plant photosynthesis and growth. In addition, presentations on the productivity of the seaweed, Laminaria, zooxanthellae and whole corals are included. Other articles discuss predictive modeling, new developments in remote sensing, nutrient regeneration within the sea, grazing effects, and carbon cycling. (JMT)

  19. Novel Therapy for Primary Canaliculitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianjiang; Liu, Zuguo; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sun, Xinghuai; Lu, Yi; Li, Yimin; Wu, Dan; Yang, Yujing; Wei, Anji; Zhao, Yujin; Lu, Chun; Hong, Jiaxu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In patients with primary canaliculitis, conservative medical therapy is associated with a high recurrence rate. Surgical treatments carry a great resolution rate but sometimes can result in the lacrimal pump dysfunction and canalicular scarring. The aim of this study is to introduce a minimally invasive approach, intracanalicular ophthalmic corticosteroid/antibiotic combination ointment infiltration (IOI, intracanalicular ointment infiltration), and to report our preliminary results for treating primary canaliculitis. In this retrospective, interventional case series, 68 consecutive patients with newly developed primary canaliculitis at a major tertiary eye center between January 2012 and January 2015. Thirty-six patients received conservative medical treatment alone (group 1; 36 eyes). Twenty-two patients and 10 medically uncontrolled patients from group 1 underwent IOI therapy (group 2; 32 eyes). Ten patients and 26 recurrent patients from group 1 and group 2 underwent surgery (group 3; 36 eyes). Patients were followed-up for at least 8 weeks. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were analyzed and compared. In this study, patients’ age, sex, onset location, and durations of disease among 3 groups showed no significant difference. The resolution rate in group 2 was 72.7% (16/22) for new patients and 68.8% (22/32) for gross patients, respectively, both of which are higher than that of group 1 (22.2%, 10/36) but lower than that of group 3 (100%, 36/36). Of group 3, 2 patients received 2 surgical interventions and resolved finally. Microbiological workup was available in 51 patients. The most common isolates were staphylococcus species (27.9%) and streptococcus species (20%). Canalicular laceration developed in 1 patient during the IOI procedure and 1 patient undergoing surgery. Only 2 had postoperative lacrimal pump dysfunction and 1 had canalicular scarring in group 3. The IOI may be an effective and minimally invasive technique for treating primary

  20. Viking orbiter system primary mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudy, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of Viking Orbiter (VO) system and subsystem performances during the primary mission (the time period from VO-1 launch on August 20, 1975, through November 15, 1976) is presented. Brief descriptions, key design requirements, pertinent historical information, unique applications or situations, and predicted versus actual performances are included for all VO-1 and VO-2 subsystems, both individually and as an integrated system.

  1. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  2. Primary hyperoxalurias: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shalom, Efrat; Frishberg, Yaacov

    2015-10-01

    Primary hyperoxalurias (PH) comprise a group of three distinct metabolic diseases caused by derangement of glyoxylate metabolism in the liver. Recent years have seen advances in several aspects of PH research. This paper reviews current knowledge of the genetic and biochemical basis of PH, the specific epidemiology and clinical presentation of each type, and therapeutic approaches in different disease stages. Potential future specific therapies are discussed. PMID:25519509

  3. [Malocclusion in the primary dentition].

    PubMed

    Cadena Galdós, A; Hinojosa, A

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the type and frequency of malocclusions in a group of 100 health children with complete primary dentition. Bjork's method for epidemiological registration was taken as a basis. Of the examined children, 78% had some malocclusion type. The most frequent was the increased horizontal overbite. In vertical overbite relation we find anterior open bite, increased overbite, anterior open bite, increased overbite. PMID:2222753

  4. Cavity lining in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravi

    2016-03-01

    Data sourcesEmbase, Medline, Cochrane Central, Biomed Central and Open Grey databases and bibliographies of identified studies.Study selectionRandomised controlled trials investigating humans with primary caries lesions receiving operative treatment involving caries removal and restoration, with minimum two treatment groups comparing different cavity treatments before restoration (no lining versus lining) were included.Data extraction and synthesisData were extracted independently by two reviewers and study quality assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Random effect meta-analysis was carried out.ResultsThree studies involving a total of 89 patients were included. All the studies involved primary teeth and were conducted in Brazil. Follow-up periods ranged from 26-53 months. All the studies were considered to be at high risk of bias. Restoring the cavity without lining did not significantly affect the risk of failure. The quality of the evidence was low.ConclusionsCurrent evidence does not support strong recommendations to use or not to use liners after caries removal and before restoring cavities. Our findings are restricted to primary teeth after selective excavation, with only one liner (calcium hydroxide) being used for comparison. PMID:27012571

  5. Primary prevention of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Bethea, L

    1999-03-15

    In 1993, the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect declared a child protection emergency. Between 1985 and 1993, there was a 50 percent increase in reported cases of child abuse. Three million cases of child abuse are reported in the United States each year. Treatment of the abuser has had only limited success and child protection agencies are overwhelmed. Recently, efforts have begun to focus on the primary prevention of child abuse. Primary prevention of child abuse is defined as any intervention that prevents child abuse before it occurs. Primary prevention must be implemented on many levels before it can be successful. Strategies on the societal level include increasing the "value" of children, increasing the economic self-sufficiency of families, discouraging corporal punishment and other forms of violence, making health care more accessible and affordable, expanding and improving coordination of social services, improving the identification and treatment of psychologic problems, and alcohol and drug abuse, providing more affordable child care and preventing the birth of unwanted children. Strategies on the familial level include helping parents meet their basic needs, identifying problems of substance abuse and spouse abuse, and educating parents about child behavior, discipline, safety and development. PMID:10193598

  6. Primary Prevention of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Andrew T.; Giovannucci, Edward L.

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has been strongly associated with a Western lifestyle. In the past several decades, much has been learned about the dietary, lifestyle, and medication risk factors for this malignancy. Although there is controversy about the role of specific nutritional factors, consideration of the dietary pattern as a whole appears useful for formulating recommendations. For example, several studies have shown that high intake of red and processed meats, highly refined grains and starches, and sugars is related to increased risk of colorectal cancer. Replacing these factors with poultry, fish, and plant sources as the primary source of protein; unsaturated fats as the primary source of fat; and unrefined grains, legumes and fruits as the primary source of carbohydrates is likely to lower risk of colorectal cancer. Although a role for supplements, including vitamin D, folate, and vitamin B6, remains uncertain, calcium supplementation is likely to be at least modestly beneficial. With respect to lifestyle, compelling evidence indicates that avoidance of smoking and heavy alcohol use, prevention of weight gain, and the maintenance of a reasonable level of physical activity are associated with markedly lower risks of colorectal cancer. Medications such as aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and post-menopausal hormones for women are associated with significant reductions in colorectal cancer risk, though their utility is affected by associated risks. Taken together, modifications in diet and lifestyle should substantially reduce the risk of colorectal cancer and could complement screening in reducing colorectal cancer incidence. PMID:20420944

  7. Primary cilia and forebrain development.

    PubMed

    Willaredt, Marc August; Tasouri, Evangelia; Tucker, Kerry L

    2013-01-01

    With a microtubule-based axoneme supporting its plasma membrane-ensheathed projection from the basal body of almost all cell types in the human body, and present in only one copy per cell, the primary cilium can be considered an organelle sui generis. Although it was first observed and recorded in histological studies from the late 19th century, the tiny structure was essentially forgotten for many decades. In the past ten years, however, scientists have turned their eyes once again upon primary cilia and realized that they are very important for the development of almost all organs in the mammalian body, especially those dependent upon the signaling from members Hedgehog family, such as Indian and Sonic hedgehog. In this review, we outline the roles that primary cilia play in forebrain development, not just in the crucial transduction of Sonic hedgehog signaling, but also new results showing that cilia are important for cell cycle progression in proliferating neural precursors. We will focus upon cerebral cortex development but will also discuss the importance of cilia for the embryonic hippocampus, olfactory bulb, and diencephalon. PMID:23085524

  8. Etiology of primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Lyra, Roberto de Menezes

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of HRCT, primary spontaneous pneumothorax has come to be better understood and managed, because its etiology can now be identified in most cases. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is mainly caused by the rupture of a small subpleural emphysematous vesicle (designated a bleb) or of a subpleural paraseptal emphysematous lesion (designated a bulla). The aim of this pictorial essay was to improve the understanding of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and to propose a description of the major anatomical lesions found during surgery. RESUMO Com o advento da TCAR, o pneumotórax espontâneo primário passou a ser mais bem entendido e conduzido, pois sua etiologia pode ser atualmente identificada na maioria dos casos. O pneumotórax espontâneo primário tem como principal causa a rotura de uma pequena vesícula enfisematosa subpleural, denominada bleb ou de uma lesão enfisematosa parasseptal subpleural, denominada bulla. O objetivo deste ensaio pictórico foi melhorar o entendimento do pneumotórax espontâneo primário e propor uma descrição das principais lesões anatômicas encontradas durante a cirurgia. PMID:27383937

  9. Invasive aspergillosis in primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Almyroudis, N G; Holland, S M; Segal, B H

    2005-05-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are rare and usually first manifest during childhood. Invasive aspergillosis is the leading cause of mortality in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), reflecting the key role of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase in host defense against opportunistic fungi. Despite interferon-gamma prophylaxis, invasive filamentous fungal infections are a persistent problem in CGD. Key principles of management of fungal infections involve early recognition and aggressive treatment and appropriate surgical debridement of localized disease. Because CGD is a disorder of phagocyte stem cells in which the gene defects are well defined, it is a model disease to evaluate immune reconstitution through stem cell transplantation and gene therapy. Patients with the hyper-IgE syndrome with recurrent infections (Job syndrome) are prone to colonization of lung cavities (pneumatoceles) by Aspergillus species leading to local invasion and rarely disseminated infection. Other primary phagocytic disorders, T-cell disorders, and mitochondrial disorders are uncommonly associated with invasive aspergillosis. Taken together, these rare primary immunodeficiencies highlight the complex coordination of both innate and acquired pathways mediating host defense against Aspergillus infection. PMID:16110817

  10. Current Concepts in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Sclair, Seth N; Little, Ester; Levy, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are chronic, cholestatic diseases of the liver with common clinical manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of PBC slows progression and decreases the need for transplant. However, one-third of patients will progress regardless of treatment. Bilirubin <1.0 and alkaline phosphatase <2.0 x the upper limit of normal at 1 year after treatment appear to predict 10-year survival. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the recommended treatment for PBC, and recent studies with obeticholic acid showed promising results for UDCA non-responders. Unlike PBC, no therapy has been shown to alter the natural history of PSC. The recommended initial diagnostic test for PSC is magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, typically showing bile duct wall thickening, focal bile duct dilatation, and saccular dilatation of the intra- and/or extrahepatic bile ducts. Immunoglobulin 4-associated cholangitis must be excluded when considering the diagnosis of PSC, to allow for proper treatment, and monitoring of disease progression. In addition to the lack of therapy, PSC is a pre-malignant condition and close surveillance is indicated. PMID:26312413

  11. Primary angiosarcoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Daniele; Bolletta, Elisa; Falco, Giuseppe; Cadenelli, Pierfrancesco; Rocco, Nicola; Tessone, Ariel; Guarino, Stefania; Accurso, Antonello; Amato, Bruno; Magalotti, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Primary angiosarcoma (AS) of the breast is a rare neoplasia that is not related to radiation exposure. It represents less than 0.05% of all malignant breast tumors. This lesion is characterized by aggressive patterns and poor prognosis and by the absence of typical features at radiologic examination. Currently there are not evidence-based guidelines regarding surgical and adjuvant treatment for this tumor even though wide surgical resection followed by chemo- radiotherapy appears to improve both disease free survival and overall survival. The aim of this study was to analyze the available series of AS patients suggesting the most reliable treatment options for this rare neoplasia. PMID:26867719

  12. A Primary Retroperitoneal Mucinous Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Heelan Gladden, Alicia A.; Wohlauer, Max; McManus, Martine C.; Gajdos, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    A twenty-five-year-old female presented with a large retroperitoneal mass. Workup included history and physical exam, imaging, biopsy, colonoscopy, and gynecologic exam. After surgical resection, the mass was determined to be a primary retroperitoneal mucinous tumor (PRMT). Clinically and histologically, these tumors are similar pancreatic and ovarian mucinous neoplasms. PRMTs are rare and few case reports have been published. PRMTs are divided into mucinous cystadenomas, mucinous borderline tumors of low malignant potential, and mucinous carcinoma. These tumors have malignant potential so resection is indicated and in some cases adjuvant chemotherapy and/or surveillance imaging. PMID:25874152

  13. Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Kathleen S; Hay, Jennifer L; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2016-06-01

    Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical practice, offering suggestions for physicians. PMID:26832335

  14. JWST Primary Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to achieve the Level 1 science goals. A never before demonstrated space telescope capability was required: 6 to 8 meter class pri mary mirror, diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operates at temperatures below 50K. Launch vehicle constraints placed significant architectural constraints: deployed/segmented primary mirror (4.5 meter fairing diameter) 20 kg/m2 areal density (PM 1000 kg mass) Such mirror technology had never been demonstrated - and did not exist

  15. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia*

    PubMed Central

    Olm, Mary Anne Kowal; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Mauad, Thais

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disorder of ciliary structure or function. It results in mucus accumulation and bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract which leads to chronic upper and lower airway infections, organ laterality defects, and fertility problems. We review the respiratory signs and symptoms of PCD, as well as the screening tests for and diagnostic investigation of the disease, together with details related to ciliary function, ciliary ultrastructure, and genetic studies. In addition, we describe the difficulties in diagnosing PCD by means of transmission electron microscopy, as well as describing patient follow-up procedures. PMID:26176524

  16. Psychopharmacology in Primary Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Benich, Joseph J; Bragg, Scott W; Freedy, John R

    2016-06-01

    Psychopharmacology requires clinicians to stay current on the latest guidelines and to use dynamic treatment strategies. Psychiatric conditions are prevalent in the primary care population. Choice of treatment with psychopharmacology should be based on controlling the patient's predominant symptoms while taking into consideration patient age, treatment compliance, patient past response to treatments, dosing frequency, patient preference, medication side effects, potential medication interactions, drug precautions/warnings, and cost. Response to therapy, as well as side effects, needs to be evaluated at regular intervals. The goal is to minimize symptoms and return patients to their maximal level of functioning. PMID:27262011

  17. Multimuons events and primary composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acharya, B. S.; Capdevielle, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Nucleon decay detectors at large depths offers now a total area larger than 1000 sq m to registrate muons of energy exceeding 1 TeV. Near complete high energy muon families are detected in those arrays. An extensive 3D Monte-Carlo simulation was conducted in view to understand the spatial distribution of those events and the possible link with elementary act or primary composition. As pion or kaon parents have a very small decay probability at so high energy, multimuon phenomena occurs at high altitude where the atmospheric density is small after the most energetic collisions.

  18. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n = 201) and the interventional period (n = 193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P < 0.01). When discharge counseling was performed (n = 78), this rate rose to 79.7% (P < 0.001). The multivariate regression performed on data from both periods showed that age of at least 78 years old, and 3 or less new medications on discharge order were predictive factors of adherence. New medications ordered at discharge represented 42.0% (n = 1018/2426) of all medications on discharge order. The rate of unfilled new medications decreased from 50.2% in the observational period to 32.5% in the interventional period (P < 10−7). However, patients included in the observational period were not significantly more often readmitted or visited the emergency department than the patients who experienced discharge counseling during the interventional period (45.3% vs. 46.2%; P = 0.89). This study highlights that discharge counseling sessions are

  19. Primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Jawad A; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2014-12-01

    Gastroesophageal varices are present in almost half of patients with cirrhosis at the time of initial diagnosis. Variceal bleeding occurs in 25% to 35% of patients with cirrhosis. Effective and timely care can prevent variceal bleeding (primary prophylaxis). For example, clinical studies demonstrate that both beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation are effective in preventing a first episode of variceal bleeding. The major challenge is to screen patients in a timely manner and institute a form of therapy that has the highest chance of success in terms of patient compliance and effectiveness. PMID:25440925

  20. Primary malignant myelomatous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Mangla, Ankit; Agarwal, Nikki; Kim, George J; Catchatourian, Rosalind

    2016-08-01

    Primary malignant myelomatous pleural effusion (PMMPE) occurs in less than 1% of patients with multiple myeloma and is diagnosed either by visualization of plasma cells on cytology or by positive flow cytometry. The presence of immature plasma cells characterized by high nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, visible nucleolus and presence of Mott cells and Russell bodies are independent poor prognostic factors. The clinician should differentiate PMMPE from secondary pleural effusion as it is associated with a significantly worse prognosis and poor overall survival. PMID:27525090

  1. Novel cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like cysteine protease of Naegleria fowleri excretory-secretory proteins and their biochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Yang, Hee-Jong; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2014-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes a lethal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals, which leads to death within 7-14 days. Cysteine proteases of parasites play key roles in nutrient uptake, excystment/encystment, host tissue invasion, and immune evasion. In this study, we cloned N. fowleri cathepsin B (nfcpb) and cathepsin B-like (nfcpb-L) genes from our cDNA library of N. fowleri. The full-length sequences of genes were 1,038 and 939 bp (encoded 345 and 313 amino acids), and molecular weights were 38.4 and 34 kDa, respectively. Also, nfcpb and nfcpb-L showed a 56 and 46 % identity to Naegleria gruberi cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like enzyme, respectively. Recombinant NfCPB (rNfCPB) and NfCPB-L (rNfCPB-L) proteins were expressed by the pEX5-NT/TOPO vector that was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21, and they showed 38.4 and 34 kDa bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis using their respective antibodies. Proteolytic activity of refolded rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L was maximum at a pH of 4.5, and the most effective substrate was Z-LR-MCA. rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L showed proteolytic activity for several proteins such as IgA, IgG, IgM, collagen, fibronectin, hemoglobin, and albumin. These results suggested that NfCPB and NfCPB-L cysteine protease are important components of the N. fowleri ESP, and they may play important roles in host tissue invasion and immune evasion as pathogens that cause N. fowleri PAM. PMID:24832815

  2. Vaccination with lentiviral vector expressing the nfa1 gene confers a protective immune response to mice infected with Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Yang, Hee-Jong; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2013-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a pathogenic free-living amoeba, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and animals. The nfa1 gene (360 bp), cloned from a cDNA library of N. fowleri, produces a 13.1-kDa recombinant protein which is located on pseudopodia, particularly the food cup structure. The nfa1 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri infection. To examine the effect of nfa1 DNA vaccination against N. fowleri infection, we constructed a lentiviral vector (pCDH) expressing the nfa1 gene. For the in vivo mouse study, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of a viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene. To evaluate the effect of vaccination and immune responses of mice, we analyzed the IgG levels (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), cytokine induction (interleukin-4 [IL-4] and gamma interferon [IFN-γ]), and survival rates of mice that developed PAM. The levels of both IgG and IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in vaccinated mice were significantly increased. The cytokine analysis showed that vaccinated mice exhibited greater IL-4 and IFN-γ production than the other control groups, suggesting a Th1/Th2 mixed-type immune response. In vaccinated mice, high levels of Nfa1-specific IgG antibodies continued until 12 weeks postvaccination. The mice vaccinated with viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene also exhibited significantly higher survival rates (90%) after challenge with N. fowleri trophozoites. Finally, the nfa1 vaccination effectively induced protective immunity by humoral and cellular immune responses in N. fowleri-infected mice. These results suggest that DNA vaccination using a viral vector may be a potential tool against N. fowleri infection. PMID:23677321

  3. NAEGLARIA FOWLERI: THE BRAIN EATING AMOEBA OR AN ENIGMA?

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Fatima; Wazir, Mohammad Salim

    2015-01-01

    Naeglaria fowleri (N. fowleri), popularly known as the brain eating amoeba is the causative agent of the fulminant disease, primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Although a rare disease, it is a threat to human health with a case fatality rate ranging from 95-99%. PAM cases have been reported from the United States of America, Australia, Europe and Asia. From 1962 to 2014, 133 people have been infected by N. fowleri in the USA, out of which only three have survived. None of the PAM cases reported in Pakistan so far has survived. This underscores the importance to identify factors, which have led to the failure in decreasing case fatality associated with N. fowleri despite major advances in medical technology, health care; and prevention and control strategies since the first reported case in 1965. We need to focus on eliciting risk factors of the disease prevalent in our part of the world, which are at variance with the developed world. A predominant number. of PAM cases in the West are reported in young males who had participated in recreational activities. However, majority of cases reported in Pakistan are also among young males but they were linked with the religious practice of ablution. What is required to better understand and hence manage this enigma is further research. Further research is to be conducted to discover potent antimicrobials, to test the effectiveness of the new transcribial device in managing PAM, and to identify host factors, which make an individual susceptible to N. fowleri. Investigation of environmental factors related to N. fowleri also needs to be done. Doing so is of paramount importance, as it will help identify the preventive strategies to be employed against N. fowleri. PMID:26721056

  4. The occurrence of Naegleria fowleri in recreational waters in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Sifuentes, Laura Y; Choate, Brittany L; Gerba, Charles P; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-09-19

    Naegleria fowleri is a free-living amoeba found in waters in warmer regions that causes primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, a rare but almost universally fatal disease. The goal of this project was to assess the occurrence of N. fowleri and other thermophilic amoebae in 33 recreational surface waters across Arizona to determine if their presence could be correlated with seasonal or other environmental factors. First, 1-L grab samples were collected over two years and analyzed using polymerase chain reaction and amoebae viability. Seasonality was observed, with N. fowleri and thermophilic amoebae (20% and 30%, respectively) being detected more often in the winter and spring combined than in the summer and fall combined (7.9% and 9.5%, respectively). The spring and fall both had an average temperature of 18°C, yet had different occurrence data (18.2% versus 5.9% for N. fowleri, respectively; 27.3% versus 0% for viable amoebae, respectively). These results are in stark contrast to previous studies in which N. fowleri has been found almost exclusively during warmer months. Over the two-year study, N. fowleri was detected in six and thermophilic amoebae in eight of the 33 recreational water bodies. Five of these were lakes near Phoenix that tested positive for N. fowleri and thermophilic amoebae over multiple seasons. These lakes differed significantly (P ≤ 0.05) from the other 28 surface waters, with a lower average temperature in the spring, a higher temperature in the fall, a higher pH and turbidity in the summer, and a lower electro-conductivity in the spring. They also had lower Escherichia coli and heterotrophic bacteria levels during colder months. Future N. fowleri monitoring in Arizona should focus on these five lakes to further elucidate the factors that contribute to the low occurrence of this amoeba in the summer or which might explain why these lakes appear to be reservoirs for the organism. PMID:24967566

  5. Survey of Naegleria fowleri in Geothermal Recreational Waters of Guadeloupe (French West Indies)

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Mirna; De Jonckheere, Johan F.; Guerlotté, Jérôme; Richard, Vincent; Bastaraud, Alexandra; Romana, Marc; Talarmin, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 a fatal case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, due to the amoeboflagellate Naegleria fowleri, occurred in Guadeloupe, French West Indies, after a child swam in a bath fed with geothermal water. In order to improve the knowledge on free-living amoebae in this tropical part of France, we investigated on a monthly basis, the presence of Naegleria spp. in the recreational baths, and stream waters which feed them. A total of 73 water samples, 48 sediments and 54 swabs samples were collected from 6 sampling points between June 2011 and July 2012. The water samples were filtered and the filters transferred to non-nutrient agar plates seeded with a heat-killed suspension of Escherichia coli while sediment and swab samples were placed directly on these plates. The plates were incubated at 44°C for the selective isolation of thermophilic Naegleria. To identify the Naegleria isolates the internal transcribed spacers, including the 5.8S rDNA, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and the sequence of the PCR products was determined. Thermophilic amoebae were present at nearly all collection sites. The pathogenic N. fowleri was the most frequently encountered thermophilic species followed by N. lovaniensis. The concentration of N. fowleri was rather low in most water samples, ranging from 0 to 22 per liter. Sequencing revealed that all N. fowleri isolates belonged to a common Euro-American genotype, the same as detected in the human case in Guadeloupe. These investigations need to be continued in order to counsel the health authorities about prevention measures, because these recreational thermal baths are used daily by local people and tourists. PMID:23349880

  6. Primary Aspergillosis of the Larynx.

    PubMed

    Law, Richard H; Reyes, Samuel A

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal aspergillosis is most commonly seen as a result of secondary invasion from the lungs and tracheobronchial tree in immunocompromised hosts. Primary aspergillosis of the larynx is, however, rare with few cases documented over the past fifty years. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with persistent hoarseness. She is a nonsmoker with a history of asthma and chronic bronchiectasis treated with bronchodilators, inhaled and oral corticosteroids, and nebulized tobramycin. Direct laryngoscopy with vocal cord stripping confirmed the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis with no manifestations elsewhere. The patient was successfully treated with oral voriconazole with no signs of recurrence. Although several major risk factors contributing to the development of primary aspergillosis of the larynx have been discussed in the literature, there has been no mention of inhaled antibiotics causing this rare presentation to the best of our knowledge. We, therefore, highlight the use of inhaled tobramycin as a unique catalyst leading to the rapid onset of this rare presentation. PMID:26955494

  7. Primary Aspergillosis of the Larynx

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Laryngeal aspergillosis is most commonly seen as a result of secondary invasion from the lungs and tracheobronchial tree in immunocompromised hosts. Primary aspergillosis of the larynx is, however, rare with few cases documented over the past fifty years. We report a case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with persistent hoarseness. She is a nonsmoker with a history of asthma and chronic bronchiectasis treated with bronchodilators, inhaled and oral corticosteroids, and nebulized tobramycin. Direct laryngoscopy with vocal cord stripping confirmed the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis with no manifestations elsewhere. The patient was successfully treated with oral voriconazole with no signs of recurrence. Although several major risk factors contributing to the development of primary aspergillosis of the larynx have been discussed in the literature, there has been no mention of inhaled antibiotics causing this rare presentation to the best of our knowledge. We, therefore, highlight the use of inhaled tobramycin as a unique catalyst leading to the rapid onset of this rare presentation. PMID:26955494

  8. Primary reactions of sensory rhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, I.; Sieg, A.; Wegener, A. A.; Engelhard, M.; Boche, I.; Otsuka, M.; Oesterhelt, D.; Wachtveitl, J.; Zinth, W.

    2001-01-01

    The first steps in the photocycles of the archaeal photoreceptor proteins sensory rhodopsin (SR) I and II from Halobacterium salinarum and SRII from Natronobacterium pharaonis have been studied by ultrafast pump/probe spectroscopy and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The data for both species of the blue-light receptor SRII suggests that their primary reactions are nearly analogous with a fast decay of the excited electronic state in 300–400 fs and a transition between two red-shifted product states in 4–5 ps. Thus SRII behaves similarly to bacteriorhodopsin. In contrast for SRI at pH 6.0, which absorbs in the orange part of the spectrum, a strongly increased fluorescence quantum yield and a drastically slower and biexponential decay of the excited electronic state occurring on the picosecond time scale (5 ps and 33 ps) is observed. The results suggest that the primary reactions are controlled by the charge distribution in the vicinity of the Schiff base and demonstrate that there is no direct connection between absorption properties and reaction dynamics for the retinal protein family. PMID:11158578

  9. Unusually located primary hydatid cysts

    PubMed Central

    Aksakal, Nihat; Kement, Metin; Okkabaz, Nuri; Altuntaş, Yunus Emre; Öncel, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The hydatid disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus is an endemic parasitic disease affecting several Mediterranean countries. Echinococcal cysts are mostly located in the liver and the lung, but the disease can be detected anywhere in the body. In this study, we present uncommon extrahepatic localizations of primary hydatid disease. Patients who were operated on for hydatid disease or cystic lesions, which were later diagnosed as hydatid disease, between 2004 and 2010 were retrieved retrospectively. Patients with lesions localized outside the liver and the lung were enrolled in the study. Eight patients with extrahepatic primary hydatid disease were treated surgically at our clinic. The cysts were located in the scapular region, spleen, pancreas, lumbosacral region and gluteal muscle. Surgical techniques were partial or total cystectomy with or without tube drainage. Splenectomy was performed for splenic hydatid disease and partial pericystectomy, Roux-en-Y cystojejunostomy, cholecystectomy and T-tube drainage for pancreatic hydatid disease. There were no complications or mortality in the postoperative period. Hydatid cyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions, especially in endemic areas. Surgical technique should be planned according to the location of the cyst. PMID:27436938

  10. Mechanical Properties of Primary Cilia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battle, Christopher; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the primary cilium, long thought to be a vestigial cellular appendage with no function, is involved in a multitude of sensory functions. One example, interesting from both a biophysical and medical standpoint, is the primary cilium of kidney epithelial cells, which acts as a mechanosensitive flow sensor. Genetic defects in ciliary function can cause, e.g., polycystic kidney disease (PKD). The material properties of these non-motile, microtubule-based 9 +0 cilia, and the way they are anchored to the cell cytoskeleton, are important to know if one wants to understand the mechano-electrochemical response of these cells, which is mediated by their cilia. We have probed the mechanical properties, boundary conditions, and dynamics of the cilia of MDCK cells using optical traps and DIC/fluorescence microscopy. We found evidence for both elastic relaxation of the cilia themselves after bending and for compliance in the intracellular anchoring structures. Angular and positional fluctuations of the cilia reflect both thermal excitations and cellular driving forces.

  11. Primary dystonia: molecules and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Lauren M.; Kim, Connie E.; Alagem, Noga; Dauer, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Primary dystonia is characterized by abnormal, involuntary twisting and turning movements that reflect impaired motor system function. The dystonic brain seems normal, in that it contains no overt lesions or evidence of neurodegeneration, but functional brain imaging has uncovered abnormalities involving the cortex, striatum and cerebellum, and diffusion tensor imaging suggests the presence of microstructural defects in white matter tracts of the cerebellothalamocortical circuit. Clinical electrophysiological studies show that the dystonic CNS exhibits hyperactive plasticity—perhaps related to deficient inhibitory neurotransmission—in a range of brain structures, as well as the spinal cord. Dystonia is, therefore, best conceptualized as a motor circuit disorder, rather than an abnormalcy of a particular brain structure. None of the aforementioned abnormalities can be strictly causal, as they are not limited to regions of the CNS subserving clinically affected body parts, and are found in seemingly healthy patients with dystonia-related mutations. The study of dystonia-related genes will, hopefully, help researchers to unravel the chain of events from molecular to cellular to system abnormalities. DYT1 mutations, for example, cause abnormalities within the endoplasmic reticulum–nuclear envelope endomembrane system. Other dystonia-related gene products traffic through the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting a potential cell biological theme underlying primary dystonia. PMID:19826400

  12. Primary care and health reform.

    PubMed

    Calman, Neil S; Golub, Maxine; Shuman, Saskia

    2012-01-01

    Skyrocketing health care costs are burdening our people and our economy, yet health care indicators show how little we are achieving with the money we spend. Federal and state governments, along with public-health experts and policymakers, are proposing a host of new initiatives to find solutions. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is designed to address both the quality and accessibility of health care, while reducing its cost. This article provides an overview of models supported by the Affordable Care Act that address one or more goals of the "Triple Aim": better health care for individuals, better health outcomes in the community, and lower health care costs. The models described below rely on the core principles of primary care: comprehensive, coordinated and continuous primary care; preventive care; and the sophisticated implementation of health information technology designed to promote communication between health care providers, enhance coordination of care, minimize duplication of services, and permit reporting on quality. These models will support better health care and reduced costs for people who access health care services but will not address health outcomes in the community at large. Health care professionals, working in concert with community-based organizations and advocates, must also address conditions that influence health in the broadest sense to truly improve the health of our communities and reduce health care costs. PMID:22976358

  13. Primary hypoadrenocorticism in ten cats.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M E; Greco, D S; Orth, D N

    1989-01-01

    Primary hypoadrenocorticism was diagnosed in ten young to middle-aged cats of mixed breeding. Five of the cats were male, and five were female. Historic signs included lethargy (n = 10), anorexia (n = 10), weight loss (n = 9), vomiting (n = 4), and polyuria (n = 3). Dehydration (n = 9), hypothermia (n = 8), prolonged capillary refill time (n = 5), weak pulse (n = 5), collapse (n = 3), and sinus bradycardia (n = 2) were found on physical examination. Results of initial laboratory tests revealed anemia (n = 3), absolute lymphocytosis (n = 2), absolute eosinophilia (n = 1), and azotemia and hyperphosphatemia (n = 10). Serum electrolyte changes included hyponatremia (n = 10), hyperkalemia (n = 9), hypochloremia (n = 9), and hypercalcemia (n = 1). The diagnosis of primary adrenocortical insufficiency was established on the basis of results of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation tests (n = 10) and endogenous plasma ACTH determinations (n = 7). Initial therapy for hypoadrenocorticism included intravenous administration of 0.9% saline and dexamethasone and intramuscular administration of desoxycorticosterone acetate in oil. Three cats were euthanatized shortly after diagnosis because of poor clinical response. Results of necropsy examination were unremarkable except for complete destruction of both adrenal cortices. Seven cats were treated chronically with oral prednisone or intramuscular methylprednisolone acetate for glucocorticoid supplementation and with oral fludrocortisone acetate or intramuscular injections of repository desoxycorticosterone pivalate for mineralocorticoid replacement. One cat died after 47 days of therapy from unknown causes; the other six cats are still alive and well after 3 to 70 months of treatment. PMID:2469793

  14. How Is Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia Treated? Unfortunately, no treatment is available yet to ... line the airways.) Thus, treatment for primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) focuses on which symptoms and complications you ...

  15. General Information about Adult Primary Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Liver Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Primary Liver Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. 50 CFR 14.161 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transported in a primary enclosure. However, a mother and her nursing young may be shipped in the same primary... are stored and transported so they are visually separated. A female with young being transported...

  17. 50 CFR 14.131 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... sea otter or polar bear has sufficient space to turn about freely with all four feet on the floor and..., Sea Otters, Pinnipeds, and Polar Bears) § 14.131 Primary enclosures. (a) A primary enclosure that...

  18. 50 CFR 14.131 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... sea otter or polar bear has sufficient space to turn about freely with all four feet on the floor and..., Sea Otters, Pinnipeds, and Polar Bears) § 14.131 Primary enclosures. (a) A primary enclosure that...

  19. 50 CFR 14.131 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sea otter or polar bear has sufficient space to turn about freely with all four feet on the floor and..., Sea Otters, Pinnipeds, and Polar Bears) § 14.131 Primary enclosures. (a) A primary enclosure that...

  20. 50 CFR 14.131 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sea otter or polar bear has sufficient space to turn about freely with all four feet on the floor and..., Sea Otters, Pinnipeds, and Polar Bears) § 14.131 Primary enclosures. (a) A primary enclosure that...

  1. Screening and Identification in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonian, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews issues related to behavioral screening in pediatric primary care settings. Structural-organizational issues affecting the use of pediatric primary care screening are discussed. This study also reviewed selected screening instruments that have utility for use in the primary care setting. Clinical and research issues related to…

  2. 30 CFR 816.151 - Primary roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Primary roads. 816.151 Section 816.151 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.151 Primary roads. Primary roads shall meet...

  3. 30 CFR 817.151 - Primary roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Primary roads. 817.151 Section 817.151 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS PERMANENT PROGRAM PERFORMANCE STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.151 Primary roads. Primary roads shall...

  4. CHEMICAL PRIMARY SLUDGE THICKENING AND DEWATERING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of a ten month study of the thickening and dewatering characteristics of chemical-primary sludges. Alum-primary and ferric-primary sludges were produced in parallel trains of a pilot plant operated using a municipal wastewater. Each chemical treat...

  5. Primary care NPs: Leaders in population health.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Kathryn D

    2016-08-18

    A 2012 Institute of Medicine report calls primary and public healthcare workers to action, tasking them with working together to improve population health outcomes. A Practical Playbook released in 2014 enables this public health/primary care integration. Primary care NPs are in an excellent position to lead the charge and make this integration happen. PMID:27434390

  6. Primary Education: The Excluded. Statistical Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gajraj, Suren; Schoemann, Klaus

    Worldwide enrollment in primary education has grown from 332 million in 1960 to 593 million in 1988. Despite this increase, a sizable proportion of primary school-age children in developing countries are not enrolled in school. In Sub-Saharan Africa, 56 million students are enrolled in primary education, but 38 million (49%) of the region's…

  7. The State of Primary Science in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters-Adams, Steve; Barron, Pete

    2012-01-01

    In this article, Steve Waters-Adams and Pete Barron respond to Alan Peacock's Viewpoint article, "The art of nose blowing", in the last issue of "Primary Science" (n123, pages 34-36), in which he questioned why primary science in English primary schools seemed not to be improving in spite of the resources put into it. Waters-Adams shares that…

  8. 9 CFR 3.28 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.28 Primary enclosures. All primary enclosures for guinea pigs and hamsters shall conform to the following requirements: (a) General. (1) Primary enclosures shall be structurally sound and maintained in good repair to protect the guinea pigs and...

  9. 9 CFR 3.28 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.28 Primary enclosures. All primary enclosures for guinea pigs and hamsters shall conform to the following requirements: (a) General. (1) Primary enclosures shall be structurally sound and maintained in good repair to protect the guinea pigs and...

  10. 9 CFR 3.28 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Pigs and Hamsters Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.28 Primary enclosures. All primary enclosures for guinea pigs and hamsters shall conform to the following requirements: (a) General. (1) Primary enclosures shall be structurally sound and maintained in good repair to protect the guinea pigs and...

  11. Leading Curriculum Innovation in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundrett, Mark; Duncan, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on a study of 40 primary school leaders from ten very successful primary schools who were interviewed in order to find out the skills, processes and practices that are required for the leadership of successful curriculum innovation in primary schools. Findings suggest that school leaders need to create an "ethos for change" if…

  12. Primary and secondary neoplasms of the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Azar, S.; Al-Hawary, M.M.; Francis, I.R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract With the exception of lymphoma involving the spleen, other primary and secondary neoplasms are rare and infrequently encountered. Primary malignant neoplasms involving the spleen are lymphoma and angiosarcoma. Primary benign neoplasms involving the spleen include hemangioma, lymphangioma, littoral cell angioma and splenic cyst and solid lesions such as hamartoma and inflammatory pseudotumor. PMID:20713317

  13. 30 CFR 817.151 - Primary roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Primary roads. 817.151 Section 817.151 Mineral... roads. Primary roads shall meet the requirements of § 817.150 and the additional requirements of this section. (a) Certification. The construction or reconstruction of primary roads shall be certified in...

  14. 30 CFR 816.151 - Primary roads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Primary roads. 816.151 Section 816.151 Mineral... roads. Primary roads shall meet the requirements of section 816.150 and the additional requirements of this section. (a) Certification. The construction or reconstruction of primary roads shall be...

  15. Uncommon Caring: Primary Males and Implicit Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, James R.

    The caring and nurturing of children, which characterize primary education culture, have tended to shape a public perception of primary teaching as "women's work." Several social factors influence men's underrepresentation in the profession of primary education, such as parents not wanting their children exposed to "soft" males. Male primary…

  16. 45 CFR 96.125 - Primary prevention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Primary prevention. 96.125 Section 96.125 Public... Prevention and Treatment Block Grant § 96.125 Primary prevention. (a) For purposes of § 96.124, each State... comprehensive primary prevention program shall include activities and services provided in a variety of...

  17. Primary reflector for solar energy collection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor); Stephens, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector is disclosed which has an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material. The device reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus of the reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well-known freeway paving machinery.

  18. Primary omental yolk sac tumor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seon Hwa; Kim, Yon Hee; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Sunghoon

    2013-11-01

    Extra-ovarian yolk sac tumor arising in the omentum is extremely rare. As yolk sac tumor originated from the omentum has been rarely reported, its clinical information is very limited. The authors encountered a case of yolk sac tumor originated from the omentum, and reported the case herein. A 32-year-old woman was presented with developed low abdominal distension for a month. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were suggestive of ovarian malignancy with ascites and peritoneal seeding nodules. Explorative laparotomy was performed and then the findings from frozen biopsy of omentum were suggestive of poorly differentiated tumor though whether it was primary or metastatic was uncertain. Thus, staging laparotomy were performed. Histopathology confirmed that the tumor was a yolk sac tumor of omentum origin. Then, 6 cycles of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy at intervals of 3 weeks were performed using bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin regimen. Four-year outpatient follow-up thereafter showed no relapse. PMID:24396822

  19. [Primary central nervous system vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Schuster, S; Magnus, T

    2015-12-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS) is a rare disorder. However, it is often considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular or inflammatory CNS diseases. Diagnosis is challenging, as specific biomarkers are lacking and the clinical presentation can be variable. A definitive diagnosis can only be established by biopsy of the inflammatory changes in the vascular wall. Alternatively, the diagnosis of PACNS can also be based on the synopsis of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Different subtypes of PACNS have been described in recent years, depending on the size of the affected vessels or histopathological patterns. Based on selective literature research in the database PubMed on the subject of CNS vasculitis, this article reviews the diagnostic characteristics and differential diagnosis of the condition. We suggest a diagnostic algorithm customized to the size of the affected vessels. Lastly, therapeutic options and the outcome of PACNS are briefly outlined. PMID:26589203

  20. Primary Carnitine Deficiency and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lijun; Huang, Meirong

    2013-01-01

    Carnitine is essential for the transfer of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol into mitochondria for subsequent β-oxidation. A lack of carnitine results in impaired energy production from long-chain fatty acids, especially during periods of fasting or stress. Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of mitochondrial β-oxidation resulting from defective carnitine transport and is one of the rare treatable etiologies of metabolic cardiomyopathies. Patients affected with the disease may present with acute metabolic decompensation during infancy or with severe cardiomyopathy in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and treatment with L-carnitine may be life-saving. In this review article, the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of PCD are discussed, with a focus on cardiac involvements. PMID:24385988

  1. Management of primary blast injury.

    PubMed

    Argyros, G J

    1997-07-25

    Blast waves are produced following the detonation of munitions, the firing of large caliber guns, or from any type of explosion. These blast waves can be powerful enough to injure the individuals exposed to them. This type of injury is called primary blast injury (PBI) and the organs most vulnerable to PBI are the gas-filled organs, namely the ear, the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. The approach to the casualty with PBI is the same as it would be for any trauma victim, i.e. the initiation of life support measures. Attention should be directed to the common life-threatening manifestation of thoracic and abdominal PBI. Pulmonary manifestations would include hemorrhage, barotrauma and arterial air embolism, while abdominal manifestations would include hemorrhage and hollow organ rupture. Therapy is directed at the specific manifestations as well as avoiding additional iatrogenic injury. PMID:9217319

  2. Primary renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Goel, V; Talwar, V; Dodagoudar, C; Singh, S; Sharma, A; Patnaik, N

    2015-01-01

    Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the kidney is a rare entity. Very few cases of primary renal PNET have been reported to date. Most literature about rPNET is isolated case reports. We report a case of rPNET in a 39-year-old male with a pre-operative diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma with renal vein thrombosis. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy with thrombolectomy, and histopathological examination revealed a highly aggressive tumor composed of monotonous sheets of round cells. Tumor cells were positive for CD 99 and FLI-1, hence confirming the diagnosis of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor. Post-surgery, patient was given VAC/IE-based adjuvant chemotherapy. In view of highly aggressive nature of this tumor, prompt diagnosis and imparting effective chemotherapy regimen to the patient is required, and it is important to differentiate PNET from other small round-cell tumors because of different therapeutic approach. PMID:25766349

  3. [Primary hyperparathyroidism: ultrasonography and scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Richard, B

    2009-03-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is nowadays frequently diagnosed from screening biological work-up: it is due to a single parathyroid adenoma in nearly 90% of cases. There is increasing interest in the minimally invasive surgical approach with unilateral neck exploration. For such approaches preoperative localizing studies are mandatory. Ultrasound and radionuclide imaging are the most widely used procedures for this purpose. Ultrasound offers detailed anatomic imaging of the adenoma but may not be not able to detect some ectopic glands. Sonographic imaging features, as well as pitfalls and diagnostic difficulties are described. Radionuclide scanning using Tc-99m-Sestamibi is able to localize parathyroid adenomas even in the case of ectopic localization with the help of SPECT-CT. PMID:19421130

  4. Metastases of unknown primary site.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C; Thomas, L C

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that effective therapy does not currently exist for the majority of patients presenting with metastases of unknown primary site, the last decade has witnessed significant advances in the approach to this heterogeneous disease. The use of modern pathologic techniques that frequently provide better diagnostic precision and the recognition of specific subgroups with a favorable prognosis and responsiveness to treatment has improved the outcome for some patients. Currently the diagnostic strategy should emphasize the rapid identification of patients likely to benefit from available therapy, whereas clinical research should focus on the development of more effective treatments for those patients with unresponsive tumors. In the future, continued improvements in the molecular characterization of these tumors will likely enhance understanding of the metastatic process, allow for more specific definitions of cell lineage, and provide insights for better therapy. PMID:8569295

  5. Musculoskeletal ageing and primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Nedergaard, Anders; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A; Christiansen, Claus

    2013-10-01

    Loss of musculoskeletal mass and function is a natural ageing trait, reinforced by an unhealthy life style. Loss of bone (osteoporosis) and muscle (sarcopaenia) are conditions whose prevalence are increasing because of the change in population distribution in the western world towards an older mean age. Improvements in lifestyle factors, such as diet, smoking and exercise, are the most powerful tools to combat this decline efficiently; however, public health interventions aimed at tackling these problems have shown abysmal success at the population level, mostly due to failure in compliance. With these issues in mind, we believe that the primary prevention modality in coming decades will be pharmacological. We review the basic biology of musculoskeletal ageing and what measures can be taken to prevent ageing-associated loss of musculoskeletal mass and function, with particular emphasis on pharmacological means. PMID:23891483

  6. Primary encopresis: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, S; Ross, L V; Christophersen, E R

    1986-01-01

    Cathartic and behavioral treatment procedures for eliminating diurnal and nocturnal primary encopresis were investigated using a multiple-baseline design across four children. The dependent and independent variables measured were appropriate bowel movements, soiling accidents, independent toiletings, and cathartic use. Over 177 reliability observations (home visits) were conducted. For two of the children, treatment with cathartics and child-time remedied their soiling accidents and increased their independent toiletings in 8 to 11 weeks. While the cathartics and child-time increased the rate of appropriate bowel movements, they did not eliminate the soiling accidents with the other two children. Independent toiletings for these two children were achieved after 32 to 39 weeks of treatment when punishment procedures (positive practice, time-out, and hourly toilet sits) were incorporated and the suppositories were faded systematically. PMID:3733585

  7. Composite Crew Module: Primary Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to design, build, and test a full-scale crew module primary structure, using carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based composite materials. The overall goal of the Composite Crew Module project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project's baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. This report discusses the project management aspects of the project including team organization, decision making, independent technical reviews, and cost and schedule management approach.

  8. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0103191

  9. Primary Atomic Clock Reference System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An artist's concept of the Primary Atomic Clock Reference System (PARCS) plarned to fly on the International Space Station (ISS). PARCS will make even more accurate atomic time available to everyone, from physicists testing Einstein's Theory of Relativity, to hikers using the Global Positioning System to find their way. In ground-based atomic clocks, lasers are used to cool and nearly stop atoms of cesium whose vibrations are used as the time base. The microgravity of space will allow the atoms to be suspended in the clock rather than circulated in an atomic fountain, as required on Earth. PARCS is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with principal investigators at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado, Boulder. See also No. 0100120.

  10. Three Dimensional Primary Hepatocyte Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoffe, Boris

    1998-01-01

    Our results demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of culturing PHH in microgravity bioreactors that exceeded the longest period obtained using other methods. Within the first week of culture, isolated hepatocytes started to form aggregates, which continuously increased in size (up to 1 cm) and macroscopically appeared as a multidimensional tissue-like assembly. To improve oxygenation and nutrition within the spheroids we performed experiments with the biodegradable nonwoven fiber-based polymers made from PolyGlycolic Acid (PGA). It has been shown that PGA scaffolds stimulate isolated cells to regenerate tissue with defined sizes and shapes and are currently being studied for various tissue-engineering applications. Our data demonstrated that culturing hepatocytes in the presence of PGA scaffolds resulted in more efficient cell assembly and formations of larger cell spheroids (up to 3 cm in length, see figure). The histology of cell aggregates cultured with PGA showed polymer fibers with attached hepatocytes. We initiated experiments to co-culture primary human hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells in the bioreactor. The presence of endothelial cells in co-cultures were established by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD34 monoclonal Ab. Our preliminary data demonstrated that cultures of purified hepatocytes with human microvascular endothelial cells exhibited better growth and expressed higher levels of albumin MRNA for a longer period of time than cultures of ppfified, primary human hepatocytes cultured alone. We also evaluated microsomal deethylation activity of hepatocytes cultured in the presence of endothelial cells.In summary, we have established liver cell culture, which mimicked the structure and function of the parent tissue.

  11. Primary prevention protects public health.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, Lorenzo

    2002-12-01

    It is widely accepted that epidemiological data provide the only reliable evidence of a carcinogenic effect in humans, but epidemiology is unable to provide early warning of a cancer risk. The experimental approach to carcinogenicity can ascertain and predict potential cancer risks to humans in time for primary prevention to be successful. Unfortunately, only in rare instances were experimental data considered sufficiently convincing per se to stimulate the adoption of preventive measures. The experimental testing of environmental agents is the second line of defense against potential human carcinogens. The first line is the testing of synthesized agents, be these pesticides, medical drugs, or industrial chemical/physical agents, at the time of their development. We do not know, however, how many substances have been prevented from entering the environment because most tests are carried out by commercial or private laboratories and results are rarely released. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the sequence of events of the carcinogenesis process will eventually lead to a more accurate characterization and quantification of risks. However, the ways that mechanistic data have been used lately for evaluating evidence of carcinogenicity have not necessarily meant that the evaluations were more closely oriented toward public health. A tendency has surfaced to dismiss the relevance of long-term carcinogenicity studies. In the absence of absolute certainty, rarely if ever reached in biology, it is essential to adopt an attitude of responsible caution, in line with the principles of primary prevention, the only one that may prevent unlimited experimentation on the entire human species. PMID:12562637

  12. Interaction of palliative care and primary care.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrita; Dzeng, Elizabeth; Cheng, M Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Primary care physicians are often the first medical providers patients seek out, and are in an excellent position to provide primary palliative care. Primary palliative care encompasses basic skills including basic evaluation and management of symptoms and discussions about goals of care and advance care planning. Specialty palliative care consultation complements primary care by assisting with complex psychosocial-spiritual patient and family situations. This article reviews primary palliative care skill sets and criteria for when to consider referring patients to specialty palliative care and hospice services. PMID:25920056

  13. Primary Hepatic Osteosarcoma: A Rare Cause of Primary Liver Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tamang, Tsering Gyalpo Lama; Shuster, Marina; Chandra, Abhinav B.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Extraosseous osteosarcomas are rare, accounting for approximately 4% of all osteosarcomas. A literature review yields very few cases of osteosarcoma primarily arising from the hepatic parenchyma. CASE REPORT This report describes a case of a man in his 50s with a history of hepatitis C and cirrhosis who presented with 5 days of progressive right upper quadrant pain. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a 4.4 cm × 4.8 cm × 4.8 cm right hepatic lobe mass with a large area of necrosis and peripheral enhancement. The subsequent liver biopsy showed few cores of tumor composed of fibroblastic malignant cells producing lace-like osteoid matrix. Osteosarcomatous foci in other parts of the body were excluded by performing extensive physical examination, radiologic imaging, and biopsy. Hence, a primary osteosarcoma was diagnosed. The patient underwent portal vein embolization in preparation for a surgical resection of the right liver lobe. He was admitted six weeks after the embolization for dyspnea and abdominal distension and expired due to abdominal hematoma and pulmonary embolism. CONCLUSION Based on the rarity, lack of consensus in treatment, and dismal prognosis, extraosseous osteosarcoma should be considered a separate entity from osseous osteosarcoma. More data and research are needed in this rare and understudied malignancy. PMID:27081321

  14. Primary Progressive Aphasia and Apraxia of Speech

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youngsin; Duffy, Joseph R.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia is a neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by progressive language dysfunction. The majority of primary progressive aphasia cases can be classified into three subtypes: non-fluent/agrammatic, semantic, and logopenic variants of primary progressive aphasia. Each variant presents with unique clinical features, and is associated with distinctive underlying pathology and neuroimaging findings. Unlike primary progressive aphasia, apraxia of speech is a disorder that involves inaccurate production of sounds secondary to impaired planning or programming of speech movements. Primary progressive apraxia of speech is a neurodegenerative form of apraxia of speech, and it should be distinguished from primary progressive aphasia given its discrete clinicopathological presentation. Recently, there have been substantial advances in our understanding of these speech and language disorders. Here, we review clinical, neuroimaging, and histopathological features of primary progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech. The distinctions among these disorders will be crucial since accurate diagnosis will be important from a prognostic and therapeutic standpoint. PMID:24234355

  15. ASME Task Group report on primary stress

    SciTech Connect

    Pastor, T.P.; Hechmer, J.

    1997-02-01

    This paper considers the subject of primary stress as applied in pressure vessel design carried out in accordance with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (1992). The paper is the result of discussions held by members of the Task Group on Primary Stress. Specific subjects discussed include methods for calculating primary stresses, the ASME limits on primary stresses and their meaning, use of the Code stress classification table in pressure vessel design, and commentary on the use of state-of-the-art analysis techniques to design pressure vessels and satisfy Code primary stress limits. A modified definition for primary stress is given, and examples for evaluating primary stresses for different geometries is provided.

  16. Bone disease in primary hypercalciuria

    PubMed Central

    Sella, Stefania; Cattelan, Catia; Realdi, Giuseppe; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Primary Hypercalciuria (PH) is very often accompanied with some degrees of bone demineralization. The most frequent clinical condition in which this association has been observed is calcium nephrolithiasis. In patients affected by this disorder bone density is very frequently low and increased susceptibility to fragility fractures is reported. The very poor definition of this bone disease from a histomorphometric point of view is a crucial aspect. At present, the most common finding seems to be a low bone turnover condition. Many factors are involved in the complex relationships between bone loss and PH. Since bone loss was mainly reported in patients with fasting hypercalciuria, a primary alteration in bone metabolism was proposed as a cause of both hypercalciuria and bone demineralization. This hypothesis was strengthened by the observation that some bone resorbing-cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α are high in hypercalciuric patients. The effect of an excessive response to the acid load induced by dietary protein intake seems an additional factor explaining a primitive alteration of bone. The intestine plays a major role in the clinical course of bone disease in PH. Patients with absorptive hypercalciuria less frequently show bone disease and a reduction in dietary calcium greatly increases the probability of bone loss in PH subjects. It has recently been reported that greater bone loss is associated with a larger increase in intestinal calcium absorption in PH patients. Considering the absence of PTH alterations, it was proposed that this is not a compensatory phenomenon, but probably the marker of disturbed cell calcium transport, involving both intestinal and bone tissues. While renal hypercalciuria is rather uncommon, the kidney still seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of bone loss of PH patients, possibly via the effect of mild to moderate urinary phosphate loss with secondary hypophosphatemia. In conclusion, bone loss is very common in PH

  17. Learning from UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Hays, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The Australian Government is wise to examine other health care systems as it strives to improve the quality of care and address rising costs to both governments and individuals. Focus is currently on the United Kingdom, whose National Health Service (NHS) stands out as one that delivers good care at a reasonable price to all who need it. The Australian and UK systems have many similarities: universal access, tax payer support, no or low cost at point of delivery, and good population health outcomes. They also face similar pressures on services from aging, increasingly unwell yet expectant populations.However, there are also differences, largely in the way that health care is funded, organised and delivered. The NHS is a huge system for 60 million people in four home countries with diverging policies. Within England, the system is managed through 10 strategic health authorities, each responsible for about 5 million people and having the right to interpret national policy. Population based health care, including tertiary care, is funded locally via primary care trusts. PMID:19283244

  18. Update on Primary Ovarian Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Meghan; Mahalingaiah, Shruthi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review Despite an incidence of one percent among women under the age of forty, primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is still poorly understood. As the variable etiology and presentation of POI complicate its management, a standard regimen for treatment remains to be established. However, emerging research has provided new insight on current mainstays of treatment as well as novel management approaches and therapeutic interventions. Recent findings Recent clinical trials in women with POI indicate that the widely-used regimen of transdermal estradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate restores bone mineral density (BMD) to a level equal to women with normal ovarian function. Further research verifies that compounded bioidentical hormones and androgen supplementation are inadequate in treating POI and lowering risk for long-term sequelae. Additionally, assessing changes in bone turnover markers may be useful for monitoring BMD. Alternative therapies such as acupuncture, DHEA, and buproprion may be effective in treating the effects of estrogen deficiency at some level, but require further investigation. Summary Recent updates show promise in improving management methods and reducing risk of long-term sequelae. Additional research that expands upon the most current literature is critical in order to achieve an evidence-based standard of best practice. PMID:26512773

  19. Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Kuroshima, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brain metastases for neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is reportedly 1.5~5%, and the origin is usually pulmonary. A 77-year-old man presented to our hospital with headache and disturbance of specific skilled motor activities. Computed tomography (CT) showed a massive neoplastic lesion originating in the left temporal and parietal lobes that caused a mass edematous effect. Grossly, total resection of the tumor was achieved. Histological examination revealed much nuclear atypia and mitotic figures. Staining for CD56, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin was positive, indicating NET. The MIB-1 index was 37%. Histopathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as NET. After surgery, gastroscopy and colonoscopy were performed, but the origin was not seen. After discharge, CT and FDG-PET (fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography) were performed every 3 months. Two years later we have not determined the origin of the tumor. It is possible that the brain is the primary site of this NET. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this phenomenon. PMID:25506006

  20. GWAS in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Gulamhusein, Aliya F.; Juran, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have been a significant technological advance in our ability to evaluate the genetic architecture of complex diseases such as Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC). To date, six large-scale studies have been performed which identified 27 non-HLA risk loci associated with PBC. The identified risk variants emphasize important disease concepts; namely, that disturbances in immunoregulatory pathways are important in the pathogenesis of PBC and that such perturbations are shared among a diverse number of autoimmune diseases – suggesting the risk architecture may confer a generalized propensity to autoimmunity not necessarily specific to PBC. Furthermore, the impact of non-HLA risk variants, particularly in genes involved with IL-12 signaling, and ethnic variation in conferring susceptibility to PBC have been highlighted. While GWAS have been a critical stepping-stone in understanding common genetic variation contributing to PBC, limitations pertaining to power, sample availability, and strong linkage disequilibrium across genes have left us with an incomplete understanding of the genetic underpinnings of disease pathogenesis. Future efforts to gain insight into this missing heritability, the genetic variation that contributes to important disease outcomes and the functional consequences of associated variants will be critical if practical clinical translation is to be realized. PMID:26676814