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Sample records for primary astrocytes exposed

  1. Mitochondrial dysfunction and loss of glutamate uptake in primary astrocytes exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christina L.; Natarajan, Vaishaali; Hayward, Stephen L.; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-11-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are currently the second most produced engineered nanomaterial in the world with vast usage in consumer products leading to recurrent human exposure. Animal studies indicate significant nanoparticle accumulation in the brain while cellular toxicity studies demonstrate negative effects on neuronal cell viability and function. However, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles on astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the brain, have not been extensively investigated. Therefore, we determined the sub-toxic effect of three different TiO2 nanoparticles (rutile, anatase and commercially available P25 TiO2 nanoparticles) on primary rat cortical astrocytes. We evaluated some events related to astrocyte functions and mitochondrial dysregulation: (1) glutamate uptake; (2) redox signaling mechanisms by measuring ROS production; (3) the expression patterns of dynamin-related proteins (DRPs) and mitofusins 1 and 2, whose expression is central to mitochondrial dynamics; and (4) mitochondrial morphology by MitoTracker® Red CMXRos staining. Anatase, rutile and P25 were found to have LC50 values of 88.22 +/- 10.56 ppm, 136.0 +/- 31.73 ppm and 62.37 +/- 9.06 ppm respectively indicating nanoparticle specific toxicity. All three TiO2 nanoparticles induced a significant loss in glutamate uptake indicative of a loss in vital astrocyte function. TiO2 nanoparticles also induced an increase in reactive oxygen species generation, and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting mitochondrial damage. TiO2 nanoparticle exposure altered expression patterns of DRPs at low concentrations (25 ppm) and apoptotic fission at high concentrations (100 ppm). TiO2 nanoparticle exposure also resulted in changes to mitochondrial morphology confirmed by mitochondrial staining. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure has potential implications in astrocyte-mediated neurological dysfunction.Titanium dioxide (Ti

  2. Accumulation of silver nanoparticles by cultured primary brain astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Eva M.; Koehler, Yvonne; Diendorf, Joerg; Epple, Matthias; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are components of various food industry products and are frequently used for medical equipment and materials. Although such particles enter the vertebrate brain, little is known on their biocompatibility for brain cells. To study the consequences of an AgNP exposure of brain cells we have treated astrocyte-rich primary cultures with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated AgNP. The incubation of cultured astrocytes with micromolar concentrations of AgNP for up to 24 h resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of silver, but did not compromise the cell viability nor lower the cellular glutathione content. In contrast, the incubation of astrocytes for 4 h with identical amounts of silver as AgNO3 already severely compromised the cell viability and completely deprived the cells of glutathione. The accumulation of AgNP by astrocytes was proportional to the concentration of AgNP applied and significantly lowered by about 30% in the presence of the endocytosis inhibitors chloroquine or amiloride. Incubation at 4 °C reduced the accumulation of AgNP by 80% compared to the values obtained for cells that had been exposed to AgNP at 37 °C. These data demonstrate that viable cultured brain astrocytes efficiently accumulate PVP-coated AgNP in a temperature-dependent process that most likely involves endocytotic pathways.

  3. Peptidomic Analyses of Mouse Astrocytic Cell Lines and Rat Primary Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ping; Knolhoff, Ann M.; Rosenberg, Harry J.; Millet, Larry J.; Gillette, Martha U.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes play an active role in the modulation of synaptic transmission by releasing cell-cell signaling molecules in response to various stimuli that evoke a Ca2+ increase. We expand on recent studies of astrocyte intracellular and secreted proteins by examining the astrocyte peptidome in mouse astrocytic cell lines and rat primary cultured astrocytes, as well as those peptides secreted from mouse astrocytic cell lines in response to Ca2+-dependent stimulations. We identified 57 peptides derived from 24 proteins with LC–MS/MS and CE–MS/MS in the astrocytes. Among the secreted peptides, four peptides derived from elongation factor 1, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, peroxiredoxin-5, and galectin-1, were putatively identified by mass-matching to peptides confirmed to be found in astrocytes. Other peptides in the secretion study were mass-matched to those found in prior peptidomics analyses on mouse brain tissue. Complex peptide profiles were observed after stimulation, suggesting that astrocytes are actively involved in peptide secretion. Twenty-six peptides were observed in multiple stimulation experiments but not in controls and thus appear to be released in a Ca2+-dependent manner. These results can be used in future investigations to better understand stimulus-dependent mechanisms of astrocyte peptide secretion. PMID:22742998

  4. Transcriptomic analyses of primary astrocytes under TNFα treatment.

    PubMed

    Birck, Cindy; Koncina, Eric; Heurtaux, Tony; Glaab, Enrico; Michelucci, Alessandro; Heuschling, Paul; Grandbarbe, Luc

    2016-03-01

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cell population in the central nervous system, have important functional roles in the brain as blood brain barrier maintenance, synaptic transmission or intercellular communications [1], [2]. Numerous studies suggested that astrocytes exhibit a functional and morphological high degree of plasticity. For example, following any brain injury, astrocytes become reactive and hypertrophic. This phenomenon, also called reactive gliosis, is characterized by a set of progressive gene expression and cellular changes [3]. Interestingly, in this context, astrocytes can re-acquire neurogenic properties. It has been shown that astrocytes can undergo dedifferentiation upon injury and inflammation, and may re-acquire the potentiality of neural progenitors [4], [5], [6], [7]. To assess the effect of inflammation on astrocytes, primary mouse astrocytes were treated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), one of the main pro-inflammatory cytokines. The strength of this study is that pure primary astrocytes were used. As microglia are highly reactive immune cells, we used a magnetic cell sorting separation (MACS) method to further obtain highly pure astrocyte cultures devoid of microglia. Here, we provide details of the microarray data, which have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the series accession number GSE73022. The analysis and interpretation of these data are included in Gabel et al. (2015). Analysis of gene expression indicated that the NFκB pathway-associated genes were induced after a TNFα treatment. We have shown that primary astrocytes devoid of microglia can respond to a TNFα treatment with the re-expression of genes implicated in the glial cell development. PMID:26981349

  5. Probenecid protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury in primary astrocytes by regulating inflammasome activity.

    PubMed

    Jian, Zhihong; Ding, Shuai; Deng, Hongping; Wang, Jun; Yi, Wei; Wang, Lei; Zhu, Shengmei; Gu, Lijuan; Xiong, Xiaoxing

    2016-07-15

    Inflammation is extremely important in the development of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. Pannexin 1 (Panx1) channel has been reported to activate inflammasome in astrocytes and be involved in ischemic injury, but this damage effect is reversed by a Panx1 inhibitor-probenecid. However, the mechanism of probenecid protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury remains unclear. In present study, we hypothesized that probenecid protected astrocytes from ischemia/reperfusion injury in vitro by modulating the inflammasome. Primary cultured neocortical astrocytes were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/RX) and probenecid was added in this model. Viability and nuclear morphology of astrocytes, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein expressions of NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor protein 3), caspase-1, and AQP4 (Aquaporins 4), as well as release of cellular HMGB1 and IL-1β were observed to evaluate the effect and mechanisms of probenecid on OGD/reoxygenated astrocytes. Probenecid did not affect cell viability at concentrations of 1, 5, 10, and 100μM but induced significant astrocytes death at 500μM. Probenecid inhibited cell death and ROS generation in astrocytes subjected to 6h of OGD and 24h of reoxygenation. The expression levels of NLRP3, caspase-1, and AQP4 increased after 6h of OGD, but probenecid treatment attenuated this increase. Moreover, the extracellular release of IL-1β and HMGB1 from OGD/reoxygenated astrocytes increased significantly. However, treatment by probenecid resulted in substantial reduction of these proteins levels in extracellular space. In conclusion, The Panx1 inhibitor, probenecid, which was administered before OGD, provided protective effects on the OGD/reoxygenation model of cultured astrocytes by modulating inflammasome activity and downregulating AQP4 expression. PMID:27154322

  6. Gintonin stimulates gliotransmitter release in cortical primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsook; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kim, Hyeon-Joong; Jung, Suk-Won; Hwang, Sung-Hee; Rhim, Hyewon; Kim, Hyung-Chun; Cho, Ik-Hyun; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2015-08-31

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a simple and minor phospholipid, but serves as a lipid-derived neurotransmitter via activation of G protein-coupled LPA receptors. Astrocytes abundantly express LPA receptors and contain gliotransmitters that modulate astrocyte-neuron interactions. Gintonin is a novel ginseng-derived G protein-coupled LPA receptor ligand. Gintonin induces [Ca(2+)]i transients in neuronal and non-neuronal cells via activation of LPA receptors, which regulate calcium-dependent ion channels and receptors. A line of evidence shows that neurotransmitter-mediated [Ca(2+)]i elevations in astrocytes are coupled with gliotransmitter release. However, little is known about whether gintonin-mediated [Ca(2+)]i transients are coupled to gliotransmitter release in astrocytes. In the present study, we examined the effects of gintonin on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glutamate release in mouse cortical primary astrocytes. Application of gintonin to astrocytes induced [Ca(2+)]i transients in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner. However, ginsenosides, other active ingredients in ginseng, had no effect on [Ca(2+)]i transients. The induction of gintonin-mediated [Ca(2+)]i transients was attenuated/blocked by the LPA1/3 receptor antagonist Ki16425, a phospholipase C inhibitor, an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor antagonist, and an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator. Gintonin treatment on astrocytes increased ATP and glutamate release in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. BAPTA and Ki16425 attenuated gintonin-mediated ATP and glutamate release in astrocytes. The present study shows that gintonin-mediated [Ca(2+)]i transients are coupled to gliotransmitter release via LPA receptor activation. Finally, gintonin-mediated [Ca(2+)]i transients and gliotransmitter release from astrocytes via LPA receptor activation might explain one mechanism of gintonin-mediated neuromodulation in the central nervous system. PMID:26191656

  7. Effects of acrylamide on primary neonatal rat astrocyte functions.

    PubMed

    Aschner, Michael; Wu, Qi; Friedman, Marvin A

    2005-08-01

    The present study assessed biochemical endpoints indicative of acrylamide toxicity in astrocyte cultures derived from neonatal rat pups. Given earlier reports on the possible ability of acrylamide to induce astrocytomas in the Fischer 344 rat, we performed studies in neonatal rat astrocyte cultures from the Fischer 344 to assess the ability of acrylamide to induce astrocytic proliferation. Measurements on astrocytic proliferation included [3H]-leucine incorporation, [3H]-thymidine incorporation, and changes in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Although acrylamide (0.1 and 1 mM for 7, 11, 15, or 20 days) did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect [3H]-leucine or [3H]-thymidine incorporation, it significantly (P < 0.05) increased PCNA protein expression in astrocytes exposed to acrylamide for 15 and 20 days. Additional studies revealed that this effect on PCNA protein expression was not associated with activation of dopamine-2 (D2) receptors, given that quinpirole (10 microM added to cultures for the last hour of 7, 11, 15, or 20 days in culture), a selective D2 receptor agonist, did not produce results analogous to those seen with acrylamide treatment. Cotreatment of astrocytes with acrylamide (7, 11, 15, or 20 days) and the D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride (1 microM for the last 6 h of exposure), also failed to reverse acrylamide's effect on PCNA protein induction. Taken together, these studies suggest that acrylamide promotes astrocytic cell proliferation in the CNS even though DNA synthesis did not appear stimulated. PMID:16179551

  8. Gene expression in primary cultured astrocytes affected by aluminum: alteration of chaperons involved in protein folding

    PubMed Central

    Aremu, David A.; Ezomo, Ojeiru F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Aluminum is notorious as a neurotoxic metal. The aim of our study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in aluminum-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Methods Mitochondrial RNA (mRNA) was analyzed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR following pulse exposure of aluminum glycinate to primary cultured astrocytes. Tunicamycin was used as a positive control. Results Gene expression analysis revealed that Ire1β was up-regulated in astrocytes exposed to aluminum while Ire1α was up-regulated by tunicamycin. Exposure to aluminum glycinate, in contrast to tunicamycin, seemed to down-regulate mRNA expression of many genes, including the ER resident molecular chaperone BiP/Grp78 and Ca2+-binding chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin), as well as stanniocalcin 2 and OASIS. The down-regulation or non-activation of the molecular chaperons, whose expressions are known to be protective by increasing protein folding, may spell doom for the adaptive response. Exposure to aluminum did not have any significant effects on the expression of Bax and Bcl2 in astrocytes. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that aluminum may induce apoptosis in astrocytes via ER stress by impairing the protein-folding machinery. PMID:21432213

  9. Effects of Ranolazine on Astrocytes and Neurons in Primary Culture.

    PubMed

    Aldasoro, Martin; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Mauricio, M Dolores; Vila, Jose M; Marchio, Patricia; Iradi, Antonio; Aldasoro, Constanza; Jorda, Adrian; Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L

    2016-01-01

    Ranolazine (Rn) is an antianginal agent used for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris when angina is not adequately controlled by other drugs. Rn also acts in the central nervous system and it has been proposed for the treatment of pain and epileptic disorders. Under the hypothesis that ranolazine could act as a neuroprotective drug, we studied its effects on astrocytes and neurons in primary culture. We incubated rat astrocytes and neurons in primary cultures for 24 hours with Rn (10-7, 10-6 and 10-5 M). Cell viability and proliferation were measured using trypan blue exclusion assay, MTT conversion assay and LDH release assay. Apoptosis was determined by Caspase 3 activity assay. The effects of Rn on pro-inflammatory mediators IL-β and TNF-α was determined by ELISA technique, and protein expression levels of Smac/Diablo, PPAR-γ, Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD by western blot technique. In cultured astrocytes, Rn significantly increased cell viability and proliferation at any concentration tested, and decreased LDH leakage, Smac/Diablo expression and Caspase 3 activity indicating less cell death. Rn also increased anti-inflammatory PPAR-γ protein expression and reduced pro-inflammatory proteins IL-1 β and TNFα levels. Furthermore, antioxidant proteins Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD significantly increased after Rn addition in cultured astrocytes. Conversely, Rn did not exert any effect on cultured neurons. In conclusion, Rn could act as a neuroprotective drug in the central nervous system by promoting astrocyte viability, preventing necrosis and apoptosis, inhibiting inflammatory phenomena and inducing anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents. PMID:26950436

  10. Effects of Ranolazine on Astrocytes and Neurons in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Aldasoro, Martin; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Mauricio, Mª Dolores; Vila, Jose Mª; Marchio, Patricia; Iradi, Antonio; Aldasoro, Constanza; Jorda, Adrian; Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.

    2016-01-01

    Ranolazine (Rn) is an antianginal agent used for the treatment of chronic angina pectoris when angina is not adequately controlled by other drugs. Rn also acts in the central nervous system and it has been proposed for the treatment of pain and epileptic disorders. Under the hypothesis that ranolazine could act as a neuroprotective drug, we studied its effects on astrocytes and neurons in primary culture. We incubated rat astrocytes and neurons in primary cultures for 24 hours with Rn (10−7, 10−6 and 10−5 M). Cell viability and proliferation were measured using trypan blue exclusion assay, MTT conversion assay and LDH release assay. Apoptosis was determined by Caspase 3 activity assay. The effects of Rn on pro-inflammatory mediators IL-β and TNF-α was determined by ELISA technique, and protein expression levels of Smac/Diablo, PPAR-γ, Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD by western blot technique. In cultured astrocytes, Rn significantly increased cell viability and proliferation at any concentration tested, and decreased LDH leakage, Smac/Diablo expression and Caspase 3 activity indicating less cell death. Rn also increased anti-inflammatory PPAR-γ protein expression and reduced pro-inflammatory proteins IL-1 β and TNFα levels. Furthermore, antioxidant proteins Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD significantly increased after Rn addition in cultured astrocytes. Conversely, Rn did not exert any effect on cultured neurons. In conclusion, Rn could act as a neuroprotective drug in the central nervous system by promoting astrocyte viability, preventing necrosis and apoptosis, inhibiting inflammatory phenomena and inducing anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents. PMID:26950436

  11. Astrocytes Enhance Streptococcus suis-Glial Cell Interaction in Primary Astrocyte-Microglial Cell Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seele, Jana; Nau, Roland; Prajeeth, Chittappen K.; Stangel, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Seitz, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) suis infections are the most common cause of meningitis in pigs. Moreover, S. suis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can lead to meningitis in humans, mainly in adults. We assume that glial cells may play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions during S. suis infection of the central nervous system. Glial cells are considered to possess important functions during inflammation and injury of the brain in bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we established primary astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures to investigate interactions of S. suis with glial cells. For this purpose, microglial cells and astrocytes were isolated from new-born mouse brains and characterized by flow cytometry, followed by the establishment of astrocyte and microglial cell mono-cultures as well as astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures. In addition, we prepared microglial cell mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected astrocyte mono-culture supernatants and astrocyte mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected microglial cell mono-culture supernatants. After infection of the different cell cultures with S. suis, bacteria-cell association was mainly observed with microglial cells and most prominently with a non-encapsulated mutant of S. suis. A time-dependent induction of NO release was found only in the co-cultures and after co-incubation of microglial cells with uninfected supernatants of astrocyte mono-cultures mainly after infection with the capsular mutant. Only moderate cytotoxic effects were found in co-cultured glial cells after infection with S. suis. Taken together, astrocytes and astrocyte supernatants increased interaction of microglial cells with S. suis. Astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures are suitable to study S. suis infections and bacteria-cell association as well as NO release by microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of astrocytes. PMID:27304968

  12. Astrocytes Enhance Streptococcus suis-Glial Cell Interaction in Primary Astrocyte-Microglial Cell Co-Cultures.

    PubMed

    Seele, Jana; Nau, Roland; Prajeeth, Chittappen K; Stangel, Martin; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Seitz, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus (S.) suis infections are the most common cause of meningitis in pigs. Moreover, S. suis is a zoonotic pathogen, which can lead to meningitis in humans, mainly in adults. We assume that glial cells may play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions during S. suis infection of the central nervous system. Glial cells are considered to possess important functions during inflammation and injury of the brain in bacterial meningitis. In the present study, we established primary astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures to investigate interactions of S. suis with glial cells. For this purpose, microglial cells and astrocytes were isolated from new-born mouse brains and characterized by flow cytometry, followed by the establishment of astrocyte and microglial cell mono-cultures as well as astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures. In addition, we prepared microglial cell mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected astrocyte mono-culture supernatants and astrocyte mono-cultures co-incubated with uninfected microglial cell mono-culture supernatants. After infection of the different cell cultures with S. suis, bacteria-cell association was mainly observed with microglial cells and most prominently with a non-encapsulated mutant of S. suis. A time-dependent induction of NO release was found only in the co-cultures and after co-incubation of microglial cells with uninfected supernatants of astrocyte mono-cultures mainly after infection with the capsular mutant. Only moderate cytotoxic effects were found in co-cultured glial cells after infection with S. suis. Taken together, astrocytes and astrocyte supernatants increased interaction of microglial cells with S. suis. Astrocyte-microglial cell co-cultures are suitable to study S. suis infections and bacteria-cell association as well as NO release by microglial cells was enhanced in the presence of astrocytes. PMID:27304968

  13. 3-bromopyruvate inhibits glycolysis, depletes cellular glutathione, and compromises the viability of cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ehrke, Eric; Arend, Christian; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The pyruvate analogue 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an electrophilic alkylator that is considered a promising anticancer drug because it has been shown to kill cancer cells efficiently while having little toxic effect on nontumor cells. To test for potential adverse effects of 3-BP on brain cells, we exposed cultured primary rat astrocytes to 3-BP and investigated the effects of this compound on cell viability, glucose metabolism, and glutathione (GSH) content. The presence of 3-BP severely compromised cell viability and slowed cellular glucose consumption and lactate production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 100 µM 3-BP after 4 hr of incubation. The cellular hexokinase activity was not affected in 3-BP-treated astrocytes, whereas within 30 min after application of 3-BP the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was inhibited, and cellular GSH content was depleted in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 30 µM 3-BP. The depletion of cellular GSH after exposure to 100 µM 3-BP was not prevented by the presence of 10 mM of the monocarboxylates lactate or pyruvate, suggesting that 3-BP is not taken up into astrocytes predominantly by monocarboxylate transporters. The data suggest that inhibition of glycolysis by inactivation of GAPDH and GSH depletion contributes to the toxicity that was observed for 3-BP-treated cultured astrocytes. PMID:25196479

  14. Energy-dependent volume regulation in primary cultured cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Olson, J E; Sankar, R; Holtzman, D; James, A; Fleischhacker, D

    1986-08-01

    Cell volume regulation and energy metabolism were studied in primary cultured cerebral astrocytes during exposure to media of altered osmolarity. Cells suspended in medium containing 1/2 the normal concentration of NaCl (hypoosmotic) swell immediately to a volume 40-50% larger than cells suspended in isoosmotic medium. The cell volume in hypoosmotic medium then decreases over 30 min to a volume approximately 25% larger than cells in isoosmotic medium. In hyperosmotic medium (containing twice the normal concentration of NaCl), astrocytes shrink by 29%. Little volume change occurs following this initial shrinkage. Cells resuspended in isoosmotic medium after a 30 min incubation in hypoosmotic medium shrink immediately to a volume 10% less than the volume of cells incubated continuously in isoosmotic medium. Thus, the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in hypoosmotic medium involves a net reduction of intracellular osmoles. The RVD is partially blocked by inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport but is unaffected by an inhibitor of glycolysis or by an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. Inhibition of RVD by these metabolic agents is correlated with decreased cellular ATP levels. Ouabain, added immediately after hypoosmotic induced swelling, completely inhibits RVD, but does not alter cell volume if added after RVD has taken place. Ouabain also inhibits cell respiration 27% more in hypoosmotic medium than in isoosmotic medium indicating that the (Na,K)-ATPase-coupled ion pump is more active in the hypoosmotic medium. These data suggest that the cell volume response of astrocytes in hypoosmotic medium involves the net movement of osmoles by a mechanism dependent on cellular energy and tightly coupled to the (Na,K)-ATPase ion pump. This process may be important in the energy-dependent osmoregulation in the brain, a critical role attributed to the astrocyte in vivo. PMID:3015986

  15. Astrocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimelberg, Harold K.; Norenberg, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the astrocytes' function as equal partners with neurons in both the normal and the abnormal brain. Discusses the developmental scaffolds, inert scar tissue, Huntington's disease, psychiatric disorders, and the identification of these brain cells. (RT)

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen preserves neurotrophic activity of carbon monoxide-exposed astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jurič, Damijana M; Šuput, Dušan; Brvar, Miran

    2016-06-24

    In astrocytes, carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction accompanied by caspase and calpain activation. Impairment in astrocyte function can be time-dependently reduced by hyperbaric (3bar) oxygen (HBO). Due to the central role of astrocytes in maintaining neuronal function by offering neurotrophic support we investigated the hypothesis that HBO therapy may exert beneficial effect on acute CO poisoning-induced impairment in intrinsic neurotrophic activity. Exposure to 3000ppm CO in air followed by 24-72h of normoxia caused a progressive decline of gene expression, synthesis and secretion of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to different extent. 1h treatment with 100% oxygen disclosed a pressure- and time-dependent efficacy in preserving astrocytic neurotrophic support. The beneficial effect was most evident when the astrocytes were exposed to HBO 1-5h after exposure to CO. The results further support an active role of hyperbaric, not normobaric, oxygenation in reducing dysfunction of astrocytes after acute CO poisoning. By preserving endogenous neurotrophic activity HBO therapy might promote neuronal protection and thus prevent the occurrence of late neuropsychological sequelae. PMID:27113706

  17. ATP stimulates calcium influx in primary astrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, J.T.; van Breemen, C.; Forster, E.; Norenberg, L.O.; Norenberg, M.D.

    1988-12-30

    The effect of ATP and other purines on /sup 45/Ca uptake was studied in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Treatment of the cells with ATP for 1 to 30 min brought about an increase in cellular /sup 45/Ca. Stimulation of calcium influx by ATP was investigated using a 90 sec exposure to /sup 45/Ca and over a concentration range of 0.1 nM to 3 mM; a biphasic dose-response curve was obtained with EC50 values of 0.3 nM and 9 uM, indicating the presence of low and high affinity purinergic binding sites. Similar levels of /sup 45/Ca influx at 90 sec were observed with ATP, ADP and adenosine (all at 100 uM). Prior treatment of the cultures with LaCl3 blocked the purine-induced /sup 45/Ca influx. These findings indicate that one pathway for calcium entry in astrocytes involves purinergic receptor-operated, calcium channels.

  18. Ginsenoside compound K promotes β-amyloid peptide clearance in primary astrocytes via autophagy enhancement.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhui; Chang, Li; Zhang, Xin; Pei, Sujuan; Yu, Meishuang; Gao, Jianlian

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of ginsenoside compound K on β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide clearance in primary astrocytes. Aβ degradation in primary astrocytes was determined using an intracellular Aβ clearance assay. Aggregated LC3 in astrocyte cells, which is a marker for the level of autophagy, was detected using laser scanning confocal microscope. The effect of compound K on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/autophagy pathway was determined using western blot analysis, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used for Aβ detection. The results demonstrated that compound K promoted the clearance of Aβ and enhanced autophagy in primary astrocytes. In addition, it was found that phosphorylation of mTOR was inhibited by compound K, which may have contributed to the enhanced autophagy. In conclusion, compound K promotes Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy via the mTOR signaling pathway in primary astrocytes. PMID:25187838

  19. Nanoparticle-mediated conversion of primary human astrocytes into neurons and oligodendrocytes†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Kozielski, Kristen; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Liu, Huanhuan; Zamboni, Camila Gadens; Green, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases and injuries are accompanied by reactive gliosis and scarring involving the activation and proliferation of astrocytes to form hypertrophic and dense structures, which present a significant barrier to neural regeneration. Engineering astrocytes to functional neurons or oligodendrocytes may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for CNS diseases and injuries. Such direct cellular programming has been successfully demonstrated using viral vectors via the transduction of transcriptional factors, such as Sox2, which could program resident astrocytes into neurons in the adult brain and spinal cord, albeit the efficiency was low. Here we report a non-viral nanoparticle-based transfection method to deliver Sox2 or Olig2 into primary human astrocytes and demonstrate the effective conversion of the astrocytes into neurons and oligodendrocyte progenitors following the transgene expression of Sox2 and Olig2, respectively. This approach is highly translatable for engineering astrocytes to repair injured CNS tissues. PMID:27328202

  20. Nanoparticle-mediated conversion of primary human astrocytes into neurons and oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Kozielski, Kristen; Cheng, Yu-Hao; Liu, Huanhuan; Zamboni, Camila Gadens; Green, Jordan; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2016-06-21

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases and injuries are accompanied by reactive gliosis and scarring involving the activation and proliferation of astrocytes to form hypertrophic and dense structures, which present a significant barrier to neural regeneration. Engineering astrocytes to functional neurons or oligodendrocytes may constitute a novel therapeutic strategy for CNS diseases and injuries. Such direct cellular programming has been successfully demonstrated using viral vectors via the transduction of transcriptional factors, such as Sox2, which could program resident astrocytes into neurons in the adult brain and spinal cord, albeit the efficiency was low. Here we report a non-viral nanoparticle-based transfection method to deliver Sox2 or Olig2 into primary human astrocytes and demonstrate the effective conversion of the astrocytes into neurons and oligodendrocyte progenitors following the transgene expression of Sox2 and Olig2, respectively. This approach is highly translatable for engineering astrocytes to repair injured CNS tissues. PMID:27328202

  1. Biological effects of inorganic arsenic on primary cultures of rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Irene; Schiera, Gabriella; Sciandrello, Giulia; Barbata, Giusi; Caradonna, Fabio; Proia, Patrizia; Di Liegro, Italia

    2010-10-01

    It is well established that inorganic arsenic induces neurotoxic effects and neurological defects in humans and laboratory animals. The cellular and molecular mechanisms of its actions, however, remain elusive. Herein we report the effects of arsenite (NaAsO2) on primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Cells underwent induction of heat shock protein 70 only at the highest doses of inorganic arsenic (30 and 60 microM), suggesting a high threshold to respond to stress. We also investigated arsenic genotoxicity with the comet assay. Interestingly, although cells treated with 10 microM arsenite for 24 h maintained >70% viability, with respect to untreated cells, high DNA damage was already observed. Since arsenic is not known to be a direct-acting genotoxic agent, we investigated the possibility that its effects are due, in astrocytes as well, to ROS formation, as already described for other cell types. However, FACS analysis after CM-H2DCFDA staining did not evidence any significant increase of ROS production while, on the contrary, at the highest arsenite concentrations used, ROS production decreased. Concordantly, we found that, if most cells in the culture are still alive (i.e. up to 10 microM arsenite), they show a treatment-dependent increase in the concentration of SOD1. On the other hand, SOD2 concentration did not change. Finally, we found that astrocytes also synthesize PIPPin, an RNA-binding protein, the concentration of which was recently reported to change in response to stress induced by cadmium. Here we also report that, in cells exposed to high doses of arsenite, an anti-PIPPin antibody-positive faster migrating protein appears. PMID:20818482

  2. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi; Costa, Lucio G.

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  3. Astrocytes As the Main Players in Primary Degenerative Disorders of the Human Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Capani, Francisco; Quarracino, Cecilia; Caccuri, Roberto; Sica, Roberto E. P.

    2016-01-01

    Along the last years it has been demonstrated that non-neural cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of the primary degenerative disorders (PDDs) of the human central nervous system. Among them, astrocytes coordinate and participate in many different and complex metabolic processes, in close interaction with neurons. Moreover, increasing experimental evidence hints an early astrocytic dysfunction in these diseases. In this mini review we summarize the astrocytic behavior in PDDs, with special consideration to the experimental observations where astrocytic pathology precedes the development of neuronal dysfunction. We also suggest a different approach that could be consider in human investigations in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. We believe that the study of PDDs with human brain samples may hold the key of a paradigmatic physiopathological process in which astrocytes might be the main players. PMID:26973519

  4. Astrocytes As the Main Players in Primary Degenerative Disorders of the Human Central Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Capani, Francisco; Quarracino, Cecilia; Caccuri, Roberto; Sica, Roberto E P

    2016-01-01

    Along the last years it has been demonstrated that non-neural cells play a major role in the pathogenesis of the primary degenerative disorders (PDDs) of the human central nervous system. Among them, astrocytes coordinate and participate in many different and complex metabolic processes, in close interaction with neurons. Moreover, increasing experimental evidence hints an early astrocytic dysfunction in these diseases. In this mini review we summarize the astrocytic behavior in PDDs, with special consideration to the experimental observations where astrocytic pathology precedes the development of neuronal dysfunction. We also suggest a different approach that could be consider in human investigations in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. We believe that the study of PDDs with human brain samples may hold the key of a paradigmatic physiopathological process in which astrocytes might be the main players. PMID:26973519

  5. CPEB1 modulates lipopolysaccharide-mediated iNOS induction in rat primary astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Chan; Hyun Joo, So; Shin, Chan Young

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 is increased by LPS stimulation in rat primary astrocytes. {yields} JNK regulates expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 in reactive astrocytes. {yields} Down-regulation of CPEB1 using siRNA inhibits oxidative stress and iNOS induction by LPS stimulation. {yields} CPEB1 may play an important role in regulating inflammatory responses in reactive astrocytes induced by LPS. -- Abstract: Upon CNS damage, astrocytes undergo a series of biological changes including increased proliferation, production of inflammatory mediators and morphological changes, in a response collectively called reactive gliosis. This process is an essential part of the brains response to injury, yet much is unknown about the molecular mechanism(s) that induce these changes. In this study, we investigated the role of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1) in the regulation of inflammatory responses in a model of reactive gliosis, lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes. CPEB1 is an mRNA-binding protein recently shown to be expressed in astrocytes that may play a role in astrocytes migration. After LPS stimulation, the expression and phosphorylation of CPEB1 was increased in rat primary astrocytes in a JNK-dependent process. siRNA-induced knockdown of CPEB1 expression inhibited the LPS-induced up-regulation of iNOS as well as NO and ROS production, a hallmark of immunological activation of astrocytes. The results from the study suggest that CPEB1 is actively involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses in astrocytes, which might provide new insights into the regulatory mechanism after brain injury.

  6. Transport mechanisms for adenosine and uridine in primary-cultured rat cortical neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuhito; Nagasawa, Kazuki; Fujimoto, Sadaki

    2005-09-01

    Endogenous adenosine and uridine are important modulators of neural survival and activity. In the present study, we examined transport mechanisms of adenosine and uridine in primary-cultured rat cortical neurons, and compared the results for neurons with those for astrocytes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction identified the mRNAs for ENT1, ENT2, and CNT2, but not CNT1 and CNT3, in neurons and astrocytes. [3H]Adenosine and [3H]uridine were time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependently taken up into neurons and astrocytes. In kinetic analyses, the uptake of both substrates by neurons and astrocytes consisted of two and one, respectively, saturable transport components. The uptake clearance for both substrates by neurons was greater than that by astrocytes. The relative contribution of the high-affinity major component of both substrates to total uptake was estimated to be approximately 80% in neurons. The uptake of [3H]adenosine and [3H]uridine by both neurons and astrocytes was almost entirely Na+-independent, and sensitive to micro, but not nano, molar concentrations of nitrobenzylmercaptopurine riboside, which are transport characteristics of ENT2. Therefore, it was indicated that adenosine and uridine are more efficiently taken up into neurons than into astrocytes, and ENT2 may predominantly contribute to the transport of the nucleosides as a high-affinity transport system in neurons, as in the case of astrocytes. PMID:16043124

  7. Carnosine decreased neuronal cell death through targeting glutamate system and astrocyte mitochondrial bioenergetics in cultured neuron/astrocyte exposed to OGD/recovery.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Bao, Yun; Xu, Huijuan; Cheng, Jiaoyan; Wang, Bingyu; Shen, Yao; Chen, Zhong; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-06-01

    Previously, we showed that carnosine upregulated the expression level of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), which has been recognized as an important participant in the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS), with ischemic model in vitro and in vivo. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of carnosine on neuron/astrocyte co-cultures exposed to OGD/recovery, and to explore whether the ANLS or any other mechanism contributes to carnosine-induced neuroprotection on neuron/astrocyte. Co-cultures were treated with carnosine and exposed to OGD/recovery. Cell death and the extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA were measured. The mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis were detected by Seahorse Bioscience XF96 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Results showed that carnosine decreased neuronal cell death, increased extracellular GABA level, and abolished the increase in extracellular glutamate and reversed the mitochondrial energy metabolism disorder induced by OGD/recovery. Carnosine also upregulated the mRNA level of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 at 2h after OGD. Dihydrokainate, a specific inhibitor of GLT-1, decreased glycolysis but it did not affect mitochondrial respiration of the cells, and it could not reverse the increase in mitochondrial OXPHOS induced by carnosine in the co-cultures. The levels of mRNAs for monocarboxylate transporter1, 4 (MCT1, 4), which were expressed in astrocytes, and MCT2, the main neuronal MCT, were significantly increased at the early stage of recovery. Carnosine only partly reversed the increased expression of astrocytic MCT1 and MCT4. These results suggest that regulating astrocytic energy metabolism and extracellular glutamate and GABA levels but not the ANLS are involved in the carnosine-induced neuroprotection. PMID:27040711

  8. Lipogenesis from lactate in rat neurons and astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed Central

    Tabernero, A; Bolaños, J P; Medina, J M

    1993-01-01

    The rate of synthesis of phospholipid and sterol species from L-lactate in neurons and astrocytes in primary culture was studied. Both types of cells actively utilized lactate as lipid precursor, although the rate of lipogenesis was about 2-fold greater in astrocytes than in neurons. The incorporation of lactate into phospholipids was significantly higher than that into sterols in both types of cells, but the ratio of phospholipid/sterol synthesis was much higher in astrocytes than in neurons. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) was the main phospholipid synthesized in both types of cells, followed by phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol. No detectable synthesis of sphingomyelins was observed. The ratio of PC/PE synthesis was about 2-fold higher in astrocytes than in neurons. The main sterol synthesized in neurons was lanosterol, followed by desmosterol. However, the main sterol synthesized in astrocytes was desmosterol, followed by lanosterol and cholesterol. The different ratios of phospholipid/sterol and PC/PE synthesis found in neurons and astrocytes may result in different membrane fluidity being higher in astrocytes than in neurons. This may be associated with differences in the functionality of both types of cells. PMID:8379917

  9. Selective up-regulation of GLT-1 in cultured astrocytes exposed to soluble mediators released by activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Tilleux, Sébastien; Goursaud, Stéphanie; Hermans, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Impaired glial glutamate uptake is commonly involved in neuronal damages observed in acute and chronic nervous disorders. As nervous insults are frequently associated with local inflammation involving microglia, this study aims at exploring the link between activated microglia and altered glutamate uptake in astrocytes. The regulation of the expression and activity of type 1 glutamate transporter (GLT-1) was examined after exposing cultures of rat astrocytes to conditioned medium from lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia cultures. Significant increases in GLT-1 mRNA expression and dihydrokainate sensitive uptake of aspartate were observed after 72h of treatment. These effects were reproduced by direct exposure of the astrocyte cultures to tumor necrosis factor alpha, a major cytokine released by activated microglia. The regulation of GLT-1 activity in response to inflammatory stimuli was also evidenced in cells exposed to dibutyryl cAMP, recognised as a model of reactive astrocytes in which the expression of this glutamate transporter is constitutively enhanced. Taken together, these results suggest that the GLT-1-dependent control of glutamate neurotransmission by either naive or chemically activated astrocytes is influenced by microglia-mediated inflammation. PMID:19428805

  10. HIV-1 increases TLR responses in human primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Serramía, M Jesús; Muñoz-Fernández, M Ángeles; Álvarez, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are the major glial cell within the central nervous system and have a number of important physiological properties related to brain homeostasis. They provide trophic support to neurons and are immune cells with key roles during states-of-inflammation. The potential for production of proinflammatory cytokines and its consequences has been studied in the context of HIV-1 infection of normal human astrocytes (NHA). NHA express TLR3, TLR4, and TLR5. TLR3 ligation induced the strongest proinflammatory polarizing response, characterized by generation of high levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8. HIV-1 increased the transient production of key inflammatory mediators, and exposure to LPS of HIV-1-infected cells increased significantly the cytokine secretion. We confirmed that it is necessary viral gene expression from the moment of pretreatment with antiretrovirals inhibited totally HIV-1-induced TLR response. The higher response to LPS from HIV-1-infected cells did not correlate with TLR4 or MyD88 increased expression. LPS responsiveness of infected cells parallels MHC class II expression, but not CD14. HIV-1-infected NHA present increased sensitivity to the proinflammatory effects of LPS. If this phenomenon occurs in vivo, it will contribute to the immunopathogenesis of this disease and may ultimately offer novel targets for immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:26671458

  11. Differential response to acrylonitrile toxicity in rat primary astrocytes and microglia

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, synthetic rubber and acrylamide. While acute high level exposures to ACN are known to be lethal, chronic low dose exposures causes glial cell tumors in rats. Recently, these glial tumors have been characterized as microglial in origin. While effects of ACN on astrocytes, the more numerous glial cell, have been investigated, the effects on microglia are unknown. This study was conducted to compare the responses of astrocytes and microglia to ACN treatment in vitro to address differential sensitivities and adaptive responses to this toxic chemical. Cell viability, ACN uptake, lipid peroxidation byproducts (F2-isoprostanes), glutathione (GSH) levels and expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were evaluated in primary rat microglia and astrocytes following ACN treatment. Results indicate that microglia are more sensitive to ACN than astrocytes, accumulating less ACN while demonstrating higher F2-isoprostane levels. GSH levels were up-regulated in both cell types, as a protective mechanism against ACN-induced oxidative stress, while Nrf2 levels were only induced in microglia. Our data suggest that microglia and astrocytes exhibit different sensitivities and responses to ACN, which are linked to the intracellular thiol status inherent to each of these cell types. PMID:23628792

  12. Astrocytes are the primary source of tissue factor in the murine central nervous system. A role for astrocytes in cerebral hemostasis.

    PubMed Central

    Eddleston, M; de la Torre, J C; Oldstone, M B; Loskutoff, D J; Edgington, T S; Mackman, N

    1993-01-01

    Hemostasis in the brain is of paramount importance because bleeding into the neural parenchyma can result in paralysis, coma, and death. Consistent with this sensitivity to hemorrhage, the brain contains large amounts of tissue factor (TF), the major cellular initiator of the coagulation protease cascades. However, to date, the cellular source for TF in the central nervous system has not been identified. In this study, analysis of murine brain sections by in situ hybridization demonstrated high levels of TF mRNA in cells that expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein, a specific marker for astrocytes. Furthermore, primary mouse astrocyte cultures and astrocyte cell lines from mouse, rat, and human constitutively expressed TF mRNA and functional protein. These data indicated that astrocytes are the primary source of TF in the central nervous system. We propose that astrocytes forming the glia limitans around the neural vasculature and deep to the meninges are intimately involved in controlling hemorrhage in the brain. Finally, we observed an increase in TF mRNA expression in the brains of scrapie-infected mice. This modulation of TF expression in the absence of hemorrhage suggested that TF may function in processes other than hemostasis by altering protease generation in normal and diseased brain. Images PMID:8326003

  13. Rac1 and Cdc42 Play Important Roles in Arsenic Neurotoxicity in Primary Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    An, Yuan; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Xiaona; Zhao, Lijun; Wang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to explore whether Rac1 and Cdc42, representative members of Ras homologue guanosine triphosphatases (Rho GTPases), are involved in neurotoxicity induced by arsenic exposure in rat nervous system. Expressions of Rac1 and Cdc42 in rat cerebellum and cerebrum exposed to different doses of NaAsO2 (Wistar rats drank 0, 2, 10, and 50 mg/L NaAsO2 water for 3 months) were examined. Both Rac1 and Cdc42 expressions increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in cerebellum (P < 0.01) by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assay, but in cerebrum, Rac1 and Cdc42 expressions only in 2 mg/L exposure groups were significantly higher than those in control groups (P < 0.01). Five to 50 μM NaAsO2 decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in primary cultured rat astrocytes, whereas 1 μM NaAsO2 increased the cell viability in these cells. Rac1 inhibitor, NSC23766, decreased NaAsO2-induced apoptosis and increased the cell viability in primary cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes exposed to 30 μM NaAsO2. Cdc42 inhibitor, ZCL278, increased cell viability in the cells exposed to 30 μM NaAsO2. Taken together, our current studies in vivo and in vitro indicate that activations of Rac1 and Cdc42 play a very important role in arsenic neurotoxicity in rat cerebellum, providing a new insight into arsenic neurotoxicity. PMID:26231544

  14. Astrocytes contribute to the effects of etomidate on synaptic transmission in rat primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, You; Xu, Mao-Sheng; Yuan, Jie; Yu, Tian

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms of unconsciousness induced by general anesthetics. Previous studies have shown that the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) is a sensitive region to a variety of intravenous general anesthetics. Etomidate is a widely used intravenous anesthetic that can influence synaptic transmission. Recently, there are some evidences suggesting that astrocytes, a type of glia cell, also contribute to information transmission in the brain, and modulate synaptic function by releasing neuroactive substances. However, it is unknown whether astrocytes influence the effects of etomidate on information transmission in S1 pyramidal neurons. In the present study, the role of astrocytes in etomidate-induced unconsciousness was investigated by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. We observed etomidate at clinically relevant concentrations inhibited the spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs) of rat S1 pyramidal neurons in a concentration-dependent manner, and the EC50 value of etomidate for inhibiting sPSCs from the concentration-effect curve was 6.9μM. Furthermore, in the presence of fluorocitrate, a glia-selective metabolism inhibitor that blocks the aconitase enzyme, both the amplitude and frequency of sPSCs in rat S1 pyramidal neurons were reduced, and the inhibitory effects of etomidate on sPSCs amplitude was strengthened without affecting the effects of etomidate on frequency. From these data, we deduce that etomidate suppresses synaptic activity via presynaptic and postsynaptic components. Furthermore, astrocytes participate in synaptic transmission and influence the effects of etomidate on postsynaptic receptors. This study provides new insight into the role of astrocytes in etomidate-induced unconsciousness. PMID:27045115

  15. Rapid Reprogramming of Primary Human Astrocytes into Potent Tumor-Initiating Cells with Defined Genetic Factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Liu, Xinjian; Sampson, John H; Bigner, Darell D; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSC) are thought to drive brain cancer, but their cellular and molecular origins remain uncertain. Here, we report the successful generation of induced CSC (iCSC) from primary human astrocytes through the expression of defined genetic factors. Combined transduction of four factors, Myc, Oct-4, p53DD, and Ras, induced efficient transformation of primary human astrocytes into malignant cells with powerful tumor-initiating capabilities. Notably, transplantation of 100 transduced cells into nude mice was sufficient for tumor formation. The cells showed unlimited self-renewal ability with robust telomerase activities. In addition, they expressed typical glioma stem-like cell markers, such as CD133, CD15, and CD90. Moreover, these cells could form spheres in culture and differentiate into neuron-like, astrocyte-like, and oligodendrocyte-like cells. Finally, they also displayed resistance to the widely used brain cancer drug temozolomide. These iCSCs could provide important tools for studies of glioma biology and therapeutics development. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5143-50. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27364552

  16. Neurotoxic potential and cellular uptake of T-2 toxin in human astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Maria; Lenczyk, Marlies; Schwerdt, Gerald; Gekle, Michael; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-03-18

    The trichothecene mycotoxin T-2 toxin, which is produced by fungi of the Fusarium species, is a worldwide occurring contaminant of cereal based food and feed. The cytotoxic properties of T-2 toxin are already well described with apoptosis being a major mechanism of action in various cell lines as well as in primary cells of different origin. However, only few data on neurotoxic properties of T-2 toxin are reported so far, but in vivo studies showed different effects of T-2 toxin on behavior as well as on levels of brain amines in animals. To further investigate the cytotoxic properties of T-2 toxin on cells derived from brain tissue, normal human astrocytes in primary culture (NHA) were used in this study. Besides studies of cytotoxicity, apoptosis (caspase-3-activation, Annexin V) and necrosis (LDH-release), the cellular uptake and metabolism of T-2 toxin in NHA was analyzed and compared to the uptake in an established human cell line (HT-29). The results show that human astrocytes were highly sensitive to the cytotoxic properties of T-2 toxin, and apoptosis, induced at low concentrations, was identified for the first time as the mechanism of toxic action in NHA. Furthermore, a strong accumulation of T-2 toxin in NHA and HT-29 cells was detected, and T-2 toxin was subjected to metabolism leading to HT-2 toxin, a commonly found metabolite after T-2 toxin incubation in both cell types. This formation seems to occur within the cells since incubations of T-2 toxin with cell depleted culture medium did not lead to any degradation of the parent toxin. The results of this study emphasize the neurotoxic potential of T-2 toxin in human astrocytes at low concentrations after short incubation times. PMID:23363530

  17. Arctigenin Increases Hemeoxygenase-1 Gene Expression by Modulating PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in Rat Primary Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yeon-Hui; Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we found that the natural compound arctigenin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in rat primary astrocytes. Since hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a critical role as an antioxidant defense factor in the brain, we examined the effect of arctigenin on HO-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes. We found that arctigenin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also increases the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2/c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE) on HO-1 promoter. In addition, arctigenin increased ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in rat primary astrocytes. Further mechanistic studies revealed that arctigenin increased the phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream substrate of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Treatment of cells with a PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppressed the HO-1 expression, Nrf2 DNA binding and ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in arctigenin-treated astrocyte cells. The results collectively suggest that PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is at least partly involved in HO-1 expression by arctigenin via modulation of Nrf2/ARE axis in rat primary astrocytes. PMID:25489416

  18. Arctigenin Increases Hemeoxygenase-1 Gene Expression by Modulating PI3K/AKT Signaling Pathway in Rat Primary Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon-Hui; Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, we found that the natural compound arctigenin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in rat primary astrocytes. Since hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a critical role as an antioxidant defense factor in the brain, we examined the effect of arctigenin on HO-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes. We found that arctigenin increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Arctigenin also increases the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2/c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE) on HO-1 promoter. In addition, arctigenin increased ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in rat primary astrocytes. Further mechanistic studies revealed that arctigenin increased the phosphorylation of AKT, a downstream substrate of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Treatment of cells with a PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, suppressed the HO-1 expression, Nrf2 DNA binding and ARE-mediated transcriptional activities in arctigenin-treated astrocyte cells. The results collectively suggest that PI3K/AKT signaling pathway is at least partly involved in HO-1 expression by arctigenin via modulation of Nrf2/ARE axis in rat primary astrocytes. PMID:25489416

  19. Tea Polyphenols Protect Against Methylmercury-Induced Cell Injury in Rat Primary Cultured Astrocytes, Involvement of Oxidative Stress and Glutamate Uptake/Metabolism Disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhaofa; Yang, Tianyao; Deng, Yu; Xu, Bin; Feng, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an extremely dangerous environmental contaminant, accumulating preferentially in CNS and causing a series of cytotoxic effects. However, the precise mechanisms are still incompletely understood. The current study explored the mechanisms that contribute to MeHg-induced cell injury focusing on the oxidative stress and Glu uptake/metabolism disorders in rat primary cultured astrocytes. Moreover, the neuroprotective effects of tea polyphenols (TP), a natural antioxidant, against MeHg cytotoxicity were also investigated. Astrocytes were exposed to 0, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM MeHgCl for 6-30 h, or pretreated with 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM TP for 1-12 h; cell viability and LDH release were then determined. For further experiments, 50, 100, and 200 μM of TP pretreatment for 6 h followed by 10 μM MeHgCl for 24 h were performed for the examination of the responses of astrocytes, specifically addressing NPSH levels, ROS generation, ATPase activity, the expressions of Nrf2 pathway as well as Glu metabolism enzyme GS and Glu transporters (GLAST and GLT-1). Exposure of MeHg resulted in damages of astrocytes, which were shown by a loss of cell viability, and supported by high levels of LDH release, morphological changes, apoptosis rates, and NPSH depletion. In addition, astrocytes were sensitive to MeHg-mediated oxidative stress, a finding that is consistent with ROS overproduction; Nrf2 as well as its downstream genes HO-1 and γ-GCSh were markedly upregulated. Moreover, MeHg significantly inhibited GS activity, as well as expressions of GS, GLAST, and GLT-1. On the contrary, pretreatment with TP presented a concentration-dependent prevention against MeHg-mediated cytotoxic effects of astrocytes. In conclusion, the findings clearly indicated that MeHg aggravated oxidative stress and Glu uptake/metabolism dysfunction in astrocytes. TP possesses some abilities to prevent MeHg cytotoxicity through its antioxidative properties. PMID:25952541

  20. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko; Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana ; Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G.; Zorec, Robert; Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  1. Excitatory amino acid-stimulated uptake of /sup 22/Na+ in primary astrocyte cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kimelberg, H.K.; Pang, S.; Treble, D.H.

    1989-04-01

    In this study we have found that L-glutamic acid, as well as being taken up by a Na+-dependent mechanism, will stimulate the uptake of 22Na+ by primary astrocyte cultures from rat brain in the presence of ouabain. By simultaneously measuring the uptake of 22Na+ and L-3H-glutamate a stoichiometry of 2-3 Na+ per glutamate was measured, implying electrogenic uptake. Increasing the medium K+ concentration to depolarize the cells inhibited L-3H-glutamate uptake, while calculations of the energetics of the observed L-3H-glutamate accumulation also supported an electrogenic mechanism of at least 2 Na+:1 glutamate. In contrast, kinetic analysis of the Na+ dependence of L-3H-glutamate uptake indicated a stoichiometry of Na+ to glutamate of 1:1, but further analysis showed that the stoichiometry cannot be resolved by purely kinetic studies. Studies with glutamate analogs, however, showed that kainic acid was a very effective stimulant of 22Na+ uptake, but 3H-kainic acid showed no Na+ -dependent uptake. Furthermore, while L-3H-glutamate uptake was very sensitive to lowered temperatures, glutamate-stimulated 22Na+ uptake was relatively insensitive. These results indicate that glutamate-stimulated uptake of 22Na+ in primary astrocytes cultures cannot be explained solely by cotransport of Na+ with glutamate, and they suggest that direct kainic acid-type receptor induced stimulation of Na+ uptake also occurs. Since both receptor and uptake effects involve transport of Na+, accurate measurements of the Na+ :glutamate stoichiometry for uptake can only be done using completely specific inhibitors of these 2 systems.

  2. Cytotoxicity Study on Luminescent Nanocrystals Containing Phospholipid Micelles in Primary Cultures of Rat Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Tiziana; Depalo, Nicoletta; Valente, Gianpiero; Fanizza, Elisabetta; Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Fasano, Anna; Striccoli, Marinella; Colella, Matilde; Agostiano, Angela; Curri, M Lucia; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are emerging as a new tool in neuroscience field, representing superior optical probes for cellular imaging and medical diagnosis of neurological disorders with respect to organic fluorophores. However, only a limited number of studies have, so far, explored NC applications in primary neurons, glia and related cells. Indeed astrocytes, as resident cells in the central nervous system (CNS), play an important pathogenic role in several neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, therefore enhanced imaging tools for their thorough investigation are strongly amenable. Here, a comprehensive and systematic study on the in vitro toxicological effect of core-shell type luminescent CdSe@ZnS NCs incorporated in polyethylene glycol (PEG) terminated phospholipid micelles on primary cultures of rat astrocytes was carried out. Cytotoxicity response of empty micelles based on PEG modified phospholipids was compared to that of their NC containing counterpart, in order to investigate the effect on cell viability of both inorganic NCs and micelles protecting NC surface. Furthermore, since the surface charge and chemistry influence cell interaction and toxicity, effect of two different functional groups terminating PEG-modified phospholipid micelles, namely amine and carboxyl group, respectively, was evaluated against bare micelles, showing that carboxyl group was less toxic. The ability of PEG-lipid micelles to be internalized into the cells was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed by fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) assay. The results of the experiments clearly demonstrate that, once incorporated into the micelles, a low, not toxic, concentration of NCs is sufficient to be distinctly detected within cells. The overall study provides essential indications to define the optimal experimental conditions to effectively and profitably use the proposed luminescent colloidal NCs as optical probe for future in vivo

  3. Cytotoxicity Study on Luminescent Nanocrystals Containing Phospholipid Micelles in Primary Cultures of Rat Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Gianpiero; Fanizza, Elisabetta; Laquintana, Valentino; Denora, Nunzio; Fasano, Anna; Striccoli, Marinella; Colella, Matilde; Agostiano, Angela; Curri, M. Lucia; Liuzzi, Grazia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) are emerging as a new tool in neuroscience field, representing superior optical probes for cellular imaging and medical diagnosis of neurological disorders with respect to organic fluorophores. However, only a limited number of studies have, so far, explored NC applications in primary neurons, glia and related cells. Indeed astrocytes, as resident cells in the central nervous system (CNS), play an important pathogenic role in several neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases, therefore enhanced imaging tools for their thorough investigation are strongly amenable. Here, a comprehensive and systematic study on the in vitro toxicological effect of core-shell type luminescent CdSe@ZnS NCs incorporated in polyethylene glycol (PEG) terminated phospholipid micelles on primary cultures of rat astrocytes was carried out. Cytotoxicity response of empty micelles based on PEG modified phospholipids was compared to that of their NC containing counterpart, in order to investigate the effect on cell viability of both inorganic NCs and micelles protecting NC surface. Furthermore, since the surface charge and chemistry influence cell interaction and toxicity, effect of two different functional groups terminating PEG-modified phospholipid micelles, namely amine and carboxyl group, respectively, was evaluated against bare micelles, showing that carboxyl group was less toxic. The ability of PEG-lipid micelles to be internalized into the cells was qualitatively and quantitatively assessed by fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) assay. The results of the experiments clearly demonstrate that, once incorporated into the micelles, a low, not toxic, concentration of NCs is sufficient to be distinctly detected within cells. The overall study provides essential indications to define the optimal experimental conditions to effectively and profitably use the proposed luminescent colloidal NCs as optical probe for future in vivo

  4. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions. PMID:27445795

  5. Testosterone Protects Mitochondrial Function and Regulates Neuroglobin Expression in Astrocytic Cells Exposed to Glucose Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Urrego, Nicolas; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Echeverria, Valentina; Barreto, George E.

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is a hormone that has been shown to confer neuroprotection from different insults affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Testosterone induces this protection by different mechanisms that include the activation of anti-apoptotic pathways that are directly implicated in neuronal survival. However, little attention has been devoted to its actions on glial cells. In the present study, we have assessed whether testosterone exerts protection in a human astrocyte cell model, the T98G cells. Our results indicate that testosterone improves cell survival and mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces nuclear fragmentation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. These effects were accompanied by a positive regulation of neuroglobin, an oxygen-binding and sensor protein, which may serve as a regulator of ROS and nitrogen reactive species (NOS), and these protective effects of testosterone may be at least in part mediated by estradiol and DHT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that astroglia may mediate some of the protective actions of testosterone in the brain upon pathological conditions. PMID:27445795

  6. Silver nanoparticles induce tight junction disruption and astrocyte neurotoxicity in a rat blood–brain barrier primary triple coculture model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liming; Dan, Mo; Shao, Anliang; Cheng, Xiang; Zhang, Cuiping; Yokel, Robert A; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Niwa, Masami; Watanabe, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) can enter the brain and induce neurotoxicity. However, the toxicity of Ag-NPs on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the underlying mechanism(s) of action on the BBB and the brain are not well understood. Method To investigate Ag-NP suspension (Ag-NPS)-induced toxicity, a triple coculture BBB model of rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established. The BBB permeability and tight junction protein expression in response to Ag-NPS, NP-released Ag ions, and polystyrene-NP exposure were investigated. Ultrastructural changes of the microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Global gene expression of astrocytes was measured using a DNA microarray. Results A triple coculture BBB model of primary rat brain microvascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and astrocytes was established, with the transendothelial electrical resistance values >200 Ω·cm2. After Ag-NPS exposure for 24 hours, the BBB permeability was significantly increased and expression of the tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 was decreased. Discontinuous TJs were also observed between microvascular endothelial cells. After Ag-NPS exposure, severe mitochondrial shrinkage, vacuolations, endoplasmic reticulum expansion, and Ag-NPs were observed in astrocytes by TEM. Global gene expression analysis showed that three genes were upregulated and 20 genes were downregulated in astrocytes treated with Ag-NPS. Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that the 23 genes were associated with metabolic processes, biosynthetic processes, response to stimuli, cell death, the MAPK pathway, and so on. No GO term and KEGG pathways were changed in the released-ion or polystyrene-NP groups. Ag-NPS inhibited the antioxidant defense of the astrocytes by increasing thioredoxin interacting protein, which inhibits the Trx system, and

  7. Neural stem cells exposed to BrdU lose their global DNA methylation and undergo astrocytic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Leonid; d’Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine, BrdU) is a halogenated nucleotide of low toxicity commonly used to monitor DNA replication. It is considered a valuable tool for in vitro and in vivo studies, including the detection of the small population of neural stem cells (NSC) in the mammalian brain. Here, we show that NSC grown in self-renewing conditions in vitro, when exposed to BrdU, lose the expression of stem cell markers like Nestin, Sox2 and Pax6 and undergo glial differentiation, strongly up-regulating the astrocytic marker GFAP. The onset of GFAP expression in BrdU exposed NSC was paralleled by a reduced expression of key DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and a rapid loss of global DNA CpG methylation, as we determined by our specially developed analytic assay. Remarkably, a known DNA demethylating compound, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), had similar effect on demethylation and differentiation of NSC. Since our key findings apply also to NSC derived from murine forebrain, our observations strongly suggest more caution in BrdU uses in stem cells research. We also propose that BrdU and its related substances may also open new opportunities for differentiation therapy in oncology. PMID:22379135

  8. Neural stem cells exposed to BrdU lose their global DNA methylation and undergo astrocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Leonid; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2012-07-01

    Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, BrdU) is a halogenated nucleotide of low toxicity commonly used to monitor DNA replication. It is considered a valuable tool for in vitro and in vivo studies, including the detection of the small population of neural stem cells (NSC) in the mammalian brain. Here, we show that NSC grown in self-renewing conditions in vitro, when exposed to BrdU, lose the expression of stem cell markers like Nestin, Sox2 and Pax6 and undergo glial differentiation, strongly up-regulating the astrocytic marker GFAP. The onset of GFAP expression in BrdU exposed NSC was paralleled by a reduced expression of key DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) and a rapid loss of global DNA CpG methylation, as we determined by our specially developed analytic assay. Remarkably, a known DNA demethylating compound, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Decitabine), had similar effect on demethylation and differentiation of NSC. Since our key findings apply also to NSC derived from murine forebrain, our observations strongly suggest more caution in BrdU uses in stem cells research. We also propose that BrdU and its related substances may also open new opportunities for differentiation therapy in oncology. PMID:22379135

  9. Phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain of Aquaporin-4 is required for Golgi transition in primary cultured astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kadohira, Ikuko; Abe, Yoichiro Nuriya, Mutsuo; Sano, Kazumi; Tsuji, Shoji; Arimitsu, Takeshi; Yoshimura, Yasunori; Yasui, Masato

    2008-12-12

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) is expressed in the perivascular and subpial astrocytes end-feet in mammalian brain, and plays a critical component of an integrated water and potassium homeostasis. Here we examine whether AQP4 is phosphorylated in primary cultured mouse astrocytes. Astrocytes were metabolically labeled with [{sup 32}P]phosphoric acid, then AQP4 was immunoprecipitated with anti-AQP4 antibody. We observed that AQP4 was constitutively phosphorylated, which is reduced by treatment with protein kinase CK2 inhibitors. To elucidate the phosphorylation of AQP4 by CK2, myc-tagged wild-type or mutant AQP4 was transiently transfected in primary cultured astrocytes. Substitution of Ala residues for four putative CK2 phosphorylation sites in the C terminus abolished the phosphorylation of AQP4. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that the quadruple mutant was localized in the Golgi apparatus. These observations indicate that the C-terminal domain of AQP4 is constitutively phosphorylated at least in part by protein kinase CK2 and it is required for Golgi transition.

  10. Photostimulation of whole-cell conductance in primary rat neocortical astrocytes mediated by organic semiconducting thin films.

    PubMed

    Benfenati, Valentina; Martino, Nicola; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Pistone, Assunta; Toffanin, Stefano; Ferroni, Stefano; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Muccini, Michele

    2014-03-01

    Astroglial ion channels are fundamental molecular targets in the study of brain physiology and pathophysiology. Novel tools and devices intended for stimulation and control of astrocytes ion channel activity are therefore highly desirable. The study of the interactions between astrocytes and biomaterials is also essential to control and minimize reactive astrogliosis, in view of the development of implantable functional devices. Here, the growth of rat primary neocortical astrocytes on the top of a light sensitive, organic polymer film is reported; by means of patch-clamp analyses, the effect of the visible light stimulation on membrane conductance is then determined. Photoexcitation of the active material causes a significant depolarization of the astroglial resting membrane potential: the effect is associated to an increase in whole-cell conductance at negative potentials. The magnitude of the evoked inward current density is proportional to the illumination intensity. Biophysical and pharmacological characterization suggests that the ion channel mediating the photo-transduction mechanism is a chloride channel, the ClC-2 channel. These results open interesting perspectives for the selective manipulation of astrocyte bioelectrical activity by non-invasive, label-free, organic-based, photostimulation approaches. PMID:23966220

  11. Actin is not required for nanotubular protrusions of primary astrocytes grown on metal nano-lawn.

    PubMed

    Gimsa, Ulrike; Iglic, Ales; Fiedler, Stefan; Zwanzig, Michael; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Jonas, Ludwig; Gimsa, Jan

    2007-01-01

    We used sub-micron metal rod decorated surfaces, 'nano-lawn' structures, as a substrate to study cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions of primary murine astrocytes. These cells form thin membranous tubes with diameters of less than 100 nm and a length of several microns, which make contact to neighboring cells and the substrate during differentiation. While membrane protrusions grow on top of the nano-lawn pillars, nuclei sink to the bottom of the substrate. We observed gondola-like structures along those tubes, suggestive of their function as transport vehicles. Elements of the cytoskeleton such as actin fibers are commonly believed to be essential for triggering the onset and growth of tubular membrane protrusions. A rope-pulling mechanism along actin fibers has recently been proposed to account for the transport or exchange of cellular material between cells. We present evidence for a complementary mechanism that promotes growth and stabilization of the observed tubular protrusions of cell membranes. This mechanism does not require active involvement of actin fibers as the formation of membrane protrusions could not be prevented by suppressing polymerization of actin by latrunculin B. Also theoretically, actin fibers are not essential for the growing and stability of nanotubes since curvature-driven self-assembly of interacting anisotropic raft elements is sufficient for the spontaneous formation of thin nano-tubular membrane protrusions. PMID:17520481

  12. Plate reader-based cell viability assays for glioprotection using primary rat optic nerve head astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kaja, Simon; Payne, Andrew J.; Naumchuk, Yuliya; Levy, Deborah; Zaidi, Danish H.; Altman, Alexa M.; Nawazish, Saba; Ghuman, Jasleen K.; Gerdes, Bryan C.; Moore, Mark A.; Koulen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerve head astrocytes (ONHAs) are the major glia cell type in the non-myelinated optic nerve head where they contribute critically to extracellular matrix synthesis during development and throughout life. In glaucoma, and in related disorders affecting the optic nerve and the optic nerve head, pathological changes include altered astrocyte gene and protein expression resulting in their activation and extracellular matrix remodeling. ONHAs are highly sensitive to mechanical and oxidative stress resulting in the initiation of axon damage early during pathogenesis. Furthermore, ONHAs are crucial for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell physiology and function. Therefore, glioprotective strategies with the goal to preserve and/or restore the structural and functional viability of ONHA in order to slow glaucoma and related pathologies are of high clinical relevance. Herein, we describe the development of standardized methods that will allow for the systematic advancement of such glioprotective strategies. These include isolation, purification and culture of primary adult rat ONHAs, optimized immunocytochemical protocols for cell type validation, as well as plate reader-based assays determining cellular viability, proliferation and the intracellular redox state. We validated and standardized our protocols by performing a glioprotection study using primary ONHAs. Specifically, we measured protection against exogenously-applied oxidative stress using tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) as a model of disease-mediated oxidative stress in the retina and optic nerve head by the prototypic antioxidant, 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox). Levels of oxidative stress were increased in the response to exogenously applied tBHP and were assessed by 6-carboxy-2′, 7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) fluorescence. Normalized DCFDA fluorescence showed a maximal 5.1-fold increase; the half-maximal effect (EC50) for tBHP was 212 ± 25

  13. PPARgamma agonist curcumin reduces the amyloid-beta-stimulated inflammatory responses in primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Mei; Zhao, Yan-Xin; Zhang, Shi; Liu, Gui-Dong; Kang, Wen-Yan; Tang, Hui-Dong; Ding, Jian-Qing; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Accumulating data indicate that astrocytes play an important role in the neuroinflammation related to the pathogenesis of AD. It has been shown that microglia and astrocytes are activated in AD brain and amyloid-beta (Abeta) can increase the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), interleukin-1, and interleukin-6. Suppressing the inflammatory response caused by activated astrocytes may help to inhibit the development of AD. Curcumin is a major constituent of the yellow curry spice turmeric and proved to be a potential anti-inflammatory drug in arthritis and colitis. There is a low age-adjusted prevalence of AD in India, a country where turmeric powder is commonly used as a culinary compound. Curcumin has been shown to suppress activated astroglia in amyloid-beta protein precursor transgenic mice. The real mechanism by which curcumin inhibits activated astroglia is poorly understood. Here we report that the expression of COX-2 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were enhanced and that of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was decreased in Abeta(25-35)-treated astrocytes. In line with these results, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation was increased in the presence of Abeta. All these can be reversed by the pretreatment of curcumin. Furthermore, GW9662, a PPARgamma antagonist, can abolish the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin. These results show that curcumin might act as a PPARgamma agonist to inhibit the inflammation in Abeta-treated astrocytes. PMID:20413894

  14. Inhibition of astrocyte metabolism is not the primary mechanism for anaesthetic hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Voss, Logan J; Harvey, Martyn G; Sleigh, James W

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes have been promoted as a possible mechanistic target for anaesthetic hypnosis. The aim of this study was to explore this using the neocortical brain slice preparation. The methods were in two parts. Firstly, multiple general anaesthetic compounds demonstrating varying in vivo hypnotic potency were analysed for their effect on "zero-magnesium" seizure-like event (SLE) activity in mouse neocortical slices. Subsequently, the effect of astrocyte metabolic inhibition was investigated in neocortical slices, and compared with that of the anaesthetic drugs. The rationale was that, if suppression of astrocytes was both necessary and sufficient to cause hypnosis in vivo, then inhibition of astrocytic metabolism in slices should mimic the anaesthetic effect. In vivo anaesthetic potency correlated strongly with the magnitude of reduction in SLE frequency in neocortical slices (R(2) 37.7 %, p = 0.002). Conversely, SLE frequency and length were significantly enhanced during exposure to both fluoroacetate (23 and 20 % increase, respectively, p < 0.01) and aminoadipate (12 and 38 % increase, respectively, p < 0.01 and p < 0.05). The capacity of an anaesthetic agent to reduce SLE frequency in the neocortical slice is a good indicator of its in vivo hypnotic potency. The results do not support the hypothesis that astrocytic metabolic inhibition is a mechanism of anaesthetic hypnosis. PMID:27462489

  15. Preconditioning of endoplasmic reticulum stress protects against acrylonitrile-induced cytotoxicity in primary rat astrocytes: The role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bai; Wenjun, Zhao; Changsheng, Yin; Yuntao, Fang; Jing, Ma; Ben, Li; Hai, Qian; Guangwei, Xing; Suhua, Wang; Fang, Li; Aschner, Michael; Rongzhu, Lu

    2016-07-01

    This study explored the protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress preconditioning induced by 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) or oxidized dithiothreitol (DTTox) on acrylonitrile (AN)-induced cytotocity in primary rat astrocytes. Cells were pretreated with 2-DG or DTTox for different times at various concentration. Next, astrocytes were treated with 2.5mM AN for an additional 12h. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined. Expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), phosphorylated-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), P62, and Beclin1 were used to assess autophagy. In addition, 3-methyadenine (3-MA), an autophagy-specific inhibitor, was used to assess the role of autophagy in ER stress preconditioning-induced protection against AN cytotoxicity. The results showed that AN alone significantly decreased astrocytic viability and enhanced cytotoxicity. Compared to the AN-alone group, preconditioning with 2-DG or DTTox significantly increased cell viability and reduced cytotoxicity to indistinguishable levels. Decreased ROS generation and increased ΔΨm were also inherent to ER stress preconditioning with these compounds. Furthermore, autophagy was activated by both 2-DG and DTTox. Blockage of autophagy attenuated the protection afforded by 2-DG or DTTox preconditioning in AN-treated astrocytes. These results establish that ER stress preconditioning affords cellular protection against AN, and that activation of autophagy mediates the cytoprotection. Modulation of ER stress and resultant activation of autophagy may be a novel target for to ameliorate AN toxicity. PMID:27260289

  16. White Matter Compromise in Veterans Exposed to Primary Blast Forces

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Katherine H.; Hurley, Robin A.; Haswell, Courtney C.; Rowland, Jared A.; Hurt, Susan D.; Lamar, Cory D.; Morey, Rajendra A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Use Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) to investigate white matter alterations associated with blast exposure with or without acute symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants Forty-five veterans of the recent military conflicts included twenty-three exposed to primary blast without TBI symptoms, six having primary blast mild TBI, and sixteen unexposed to blast. Design Cross-sectional case control study. Main Measures Neuropsychological testing and DTI metrics that quantified the number of voxel clusters with altered fractional anisotropy (FA) radial diffusivity (RD), and axial diffusivity (AD), regardless of their spatial location. Results Significantly lower FA and higher RD was observed in veterans exposed to primary blast with and without mild TBI relative to blast unexposed veterans. Voxel clusters of lower FA were spatially dispersed and heterogeneous across affected individuals. Conclusion These results suggest that lack of clear TBI symptoms following primary blast exposure may not accurately reflect the extent of brain injury. If confirmed, our findings would argue for supplementing the established approach of making diagnoses based purely on clinical history and observable acute symptoms with novel neuroimaging-based diagnostic criteria that “look below the surface” for pathology. PMID:24590156

  17. Induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes is coupled to increased arginine transport by upregulated y(+) LAT2 transporter.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Magdalena; Milewski, Krzysztof; Skowrońska, Marta; Gajos, Anna; Ziemińska, Elżbieta; Beręsewicz, Andrzej; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-12-01

    One of the aspects of ammonia toxicity to brain cells is increased production of nitric oxide (NO) by NO synthases (NOSs). Previously we showed that ammonia increases arginine (Arg) uptake in cultured rat cortical astrocytes specifically via y(+) L amino acid transport system, by activation of its member, a heteromeric y(+) LAT2 transporter. Here, we tested the hypothesis that up-regulation of y(+) LAT2 underlies ammonia-dependent increase of NO production via inducible NOS (iNOS) induction, and protein nitration. Treatment of rat cortical astrocytes for 48 with 5 mM ammonium chloride ('ammonia') (i) increased the y(+) L-mediated Arg uptake, (ii) raised the expression of iNOS and endothelial NOS (eNOS), (iii) stimulated NO production, as manifested by increased nitrite+nitrate (Griess) and/or nitrite alone (chemiluminescence), and consequently, (iv) evoked nitration of tyrosine residues of proteins in astrocytes. Except for the increase of eNOS, all the above described effects of ammonia were abrogated by pre-treatment of astrocytes with either siRNA silencing of the Slc7a6 gene coding for y(+) LAT2 protein, or antibody to y(+) LAT2, indicating their strict coupling to y(+) LAT2 activity. Moreover, induction of y(+) LAT2 expression by ammonia was sensitive to Nf-κB inhibitor, BAY 11-7085, linking y(+) LAT2 upregulation to the Nf-κB activation in this experimental setting as reported earlier and here confirmed. Importantly, ammonia did not affect y(+) LAT2 expression nor y(+) L-mediated Arg uptake activity in the cultured cerebellar neurons, suggesting astroglia-specificity of the above described mechanism. The described coupling of up-regulation of y(+) LAT2 transporter with iNOS in ammonia-exposed astrocytes may be considered as a mechanism to ensure NO supply for protein nitration. Ammonia (NH4(+) ) increases the expression and activity of the L-arginine (Arg) transporter (Arg/neutral amino acids [NAA] exchanger) y(+) LAT2 in cultured rat cortical astrocytes

  18. Influence of drugs on gap junctions in glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Moinfar, Zahra; Dambach, Hannes; Faustmann, Pedro M.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are hemichannels on cell membrane. Once they are intercellulary connected to the neighboring cells, they build a functional syncytium which allows rapid transfer of ions and molecules between cells. This characteristic makes GJs a potential modulator in proliferation, migration, and development of the cells. So far, several types of GJs are recognized on different brain cells as well as in glioma. Astrocytes, as one of the major cells that maintain neuronal homeostasis, express different types of GJs that let them communicate with neurons, oligodendrocytes, and endothelial cells of the blood brain barrier; however, the main GJ in astrocytes is connexin 43. There are different cerebral diseases in which astrocyte GJs might play a role. Several drugs have been reported to modulate gap junctional communication in the brain which can consequently have beneficial or detrimental effects on the course of treatment in certain diseases. However, the exact cellular mechanism behind those pharmaceutical efficacies on GJs is not well-understood. Accordingly, how specific drugs would affect GJs and what some consequent specific brain diseases would be are the interests of the authors of this chapter. We would focus on pharmaceutical effects on GJs on astrocytes in specific diseases where GJs could possibly play a role including: (1) migraine and a novel therapy for migraine with aura, (2) neuroautoimmune diseases and immunomodulatory drugs in the treatment of demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, (3) glioma and antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory agents that are used in treating brain tumors, and (4) epilepsy and anticonvulsants that are widely used for seizures therapy. All of the above-mentioned therapeutic categories can possibly affect GJs expression of astrocytes and the role is discussed in the upcoming chapter. PMID:24904426

  19. Estrogen protects against dopamine neuron toxicity in primary mesencephalic cultures through an indirect P13K/Akt mediated astrocyte pathway.

    PubMed

    Bains, Mona; Roberts, James L

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes regulate neuronal homeostasis and have been implicated in affecting the viability and functioning of surrounding neurons under stressed and injured conditions. Previous data from our lab suggests indirect actions of estrogen through ERα in neighboring astroglia to protect dopamine neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) toxicity in mouse mesencephalic cultures. We further evaluate estrogen signaling in astrocytes and the mechanism of estrogen's indirect neuroprotective effects on dopamine neurons. Primary mesencephalic cultures pre-treated with 17β-estradiol and the membrane impermeable estrogen, E2-BSA, were both neuroprotective against MPP(+) -induced dopamine neuron toxicity, suggesting membrane-initiated neuroprotection. ERα was found in the plasma membrane of astrocyte cultures and colocalized with the lipid raft marker, flotillin-1. A 17β-estradiol time course revealed a significant increase in Akt, which was inhibited by the PI3 kinase inhibitor, LY294004. Estrogen conditioned media collected from pure astrocyte cultures rescued glial deficient mesencephalic cultures from MPP(+). This indirect estrogen-mediated neuroprotective effect in mesencephalic cultures was significantly reduced when PI3 kinase signaling in astrocytes was blocked prior to collecting estrogen-conditioned media using the irreversible PI3 kinase inhibitor, Wortmannin. Estrogen signaling via astrocytes is rapidly initiated at the membrane level and requires PI3 kinase signaling in order to protect primary mesencephalic dopamine neurons from MPP(+) neurotoxicity. PMID:26520464

  20. Angiotensin II regulation of angiotensin-converting enzymes in spontaneously hypertensive rat primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Gowrisankar, Yugandhar V; Clark, Michelle A

    2016-07-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II plays a critical role in cardiovascular and blood pressure regulation. Ang II is produced by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and it interacts with the Ang AT1 receptor to cause much of its well-known cardiovascular effects. Ang-(1-7) is another active peptide produced by the rennin-angiotensin system. This peptide is produced from Ang I or Ang II by the catalytic activity of ACE2. Ang-(1-7) interacts with the Mas receptor to counteract many of the effects of Ang II. Thus, the ACE2/Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis acts opposite of the ACE/Ang II/AT1 axis. In this study we investigated how Ang II regulates the key enzymes of these axes, ACE and its homolog ACE2, and determined whether they are dysregulated in the hypertensive condition. Brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes isolated from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) were used in these studies. Ang II effect on the enzymes' mRNA and protein levels was measured using quantitative PCR and western blotting techniques, respectively. Results from this study showed that Ang II up-regulated ACE protein levels, but down-regulated ACE mRNA levels in brainstem and cerebellum astrocytes in both models. Ang II also reduced ACE2 mRNA expression in SHR and Wistar astrocytes isolated from both brain regions. Ang II effects on ACE2 protein were biphasic. In SHR astrocytes, Ang II-mediated ACE2 protein initially increased then decreased at later time points. In contrast, in Wistar astrocytes, Ang II initially decreased ACE2 protein expression, but up-regulated the protein at later time points. The findings of these studies suggest that Ang II has a differential effect on ACE and ACE2 expression. Furthermore, in the SHR model there may be alteration in the ACE/ACE2 balance in a manner that favors increased Ang II generation and decreased Ang-(1-7) production contributing to the hypertensive phenotype observed in this model. The levels of angiotensin (Ang) II depend on the actions of angiotensin-converting enzyme

  1. Effect of topography of an electrospun nanofiber on modulation of activity of primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Min, Seul Ki; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Cho Rong; Paik, Sang-Min; Jung, Sang-Myung; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2013-02-01

    Several biomaterials for neural tissue engineering have recently been proposed for regeneration of damaged tissue and promotion of axonal guidance following CNS injury. When implanted into damaged nerve tissue, biomaterials should favorably induce cell infiltration and axonal guiding while suppressing inflammation. Nanofiber scaffolds are regarded as adequate materials to meet the above requirements; however, most studies of these materials conducted to date have targeted neuronal cells, not glial cells, despite their important function in the injured CNS. In this study, an electrospun nanofibrous scaffold of polycaprolactone (PCL) was investigated with respect to its topographic effects on astrocyte behavior and expression of GFAP. The results revealed that the PCL nanofiber topograghy promoted adhesion, but GFAP expression was down-regulated, leading to reduced astrocytes activity. Taken together, these results indicate that the topographic structure of electrospun nanofibers provides a scaffold that is favorable to neural regeneration via alleviation of astrogliosis. PMID:23178191

  2. Inhibition of highly productive HIV-1 infection in T cells, primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes by Sargassum fusiforme

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Li, Wen; Cotter, Robin; Klein, Michael T; Roberge, Emily; Yu, Er K; Clark, Bruce; Veille, Jean-Claude; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Y-W; Canki, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Background The high rate of HIV-1 mutation and increasing resistance to currently available antiretroviral (ART) therapies highlight the need for new antiviral agents. Products derived from natural sources have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication during various stages of the virus life cycle, and therefore represent a potential source of novel therapeutic agents. To expand our arsenal of therapeutics against HIV-1 infection, we investigated aqueous extract from Sargassum fusiforme (S. fusiforme) for ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in the periphery, in T cells and human macrophages, and for ability to inhibit in the central nervous system (CNS), in microglia and astrocytes. Results S. fusiforme extract blocked HIV-1 infection and replication by over 90% in T cells, human macrophages and microglia, and it also inhibited pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3) infection in human astrocytes by over 70%. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5)-tropic HIV-1, was dose dependant and long lasting, did not inhibit cell growth or viability, was not toxic to cells, and was comparable to inhibition by the nucleoside analogue 2', 3'-didoxycytidine (ddC). S. fusiforme treatment blocked direct cell-to-cell infection spread. To investigate at which point of the virus life cycle this inhibition occurs, we infected T cells and CD4-negative primary human astrocytes with HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which bypasses the HIV receptor requirements. Infection by pseudotyped HIV-1 (VSV/NL4-3) was also inhibited in a dose dependant manner, although up to 57% less, as compared to inhibition of native NL4-3, indicating post-entry interferences. Conclusion This is the first report demonstrating S. fusiforme to be a potent inhibitor of highly productive HIV-1 infection and replication in T cells, in primary human macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes. Results with VSV/NL4-3 infection, suggest inhibition of both entry and

  3. Astrocyte Dysfunction Induced by Alcohol in Females but Not Males.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Clare J; Hashimoto, Joel G; Roberts, Melissa L; Bloom, Shelley H; Andrew, Melissa R; Wiren, Kristine M

    2016-07-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is associated with brain damage in a sex-specific fashion, but the mechanisms involved are poorly described and remain controversial. Previous results have suggested that astrocyte gene expression is influenced by ethanol intoxication and during abstinence in vivo. Here, bioinformatic analysis of astrocyte-enriched ethanol-regulated genes in vivo revealed ubiquitin pathways as an ethanol target, but with sexually dimorphic cytokine signaling and changes associated with brain aging in females and not males. Consistent with this result, astrocyte activation was observed after exposure in female but not male animals, with reduced S100β levels in the anterior cingulate cortex and increased GFAP(+) cells in the hippocampus. In primary culture, the direct effects of chronic ethanol exposure followed by recovery on sex-specific astrocyte function were examined. Male astrocyte responses were consistent with astrocyte deactivation with reduced GFAP expression during ethanol exposure. In contrast, female astrocytes exhibited increased expression of Tnf, reduced expression of the neuroprotective cytokine Tgfb1, disrupted bioenergetics and reduced excitatory amino acid uptake following exposure or recovery. These results indicate widespread astrocyte dysfunction in ethanol-exposed females and suggest a mechanism that may underlie increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in females. PMID:26088166

  4. Enhancing NAD+ Salvage Pathway Reverts the Toxicity of Primary Astrocytes Expressing Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked Mutant Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1).

    PubMed

    Harlan, Benjamin A; Pehar, Mariana; Sharma, Deep R; Beeson, Gyda; Beeson, Craig C; Vargas, Marcelo R

    2016-05-13

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) participates in redox reactions and NAD(+)-dependent signaling pathways. Although the redox reactions are critical for efficient mitochondrial metabolism, they are not accompanied by any net consumption of the nucleotide. On the contrary, NAD(+)-dependent signaling processes lead to its degradation. Three distinct families of enzymes consume NAD(+) as substrate: poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, ADP-ribosyl cyclases (CD38 and CD157), and sirtuins (SIRT1-7). Because all of the above enzymes generate nicotinamide as a byproduct, mammalian cells have evolved an NAD(+) salvage pathway capable of resynthesizing NAD(+) from nicotinamide. Overexpression of the rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase, increases total and mitochondrial NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Moreover, targeting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase to the mitochondria also enhances NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes. Supplementation with the NAD(+) precursors nicotinamide mononucleotide and nicotinamide riboside also increases NAD(+) levels in astrocytes. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is caused by the progressive degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and motor cortex. Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations account for up to 20% of familial ALS and 1-2% of apparently sporadic ALS cases. Primary astrocytes isolated from mutant human superoxide dismutase 1-overexpressing mice as well as human post-mortem ALS spinal cord-derived astrocytes induce motor neuron death in co-culture. Increasing total and mitochondrial NAD(+) content in ALS astrocytes increases oxidative stress resistance and reverts their toxicity toward co-cultured motor neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that enhancing the NAD(+) salvage pathway in astrocytes could be a potential therapeutic target to prevent astrocyte-mediated motor neuron death in ALS. PMID:27002158

  5. Impact of Heat Shock Protein A 12B Overexpression on Spinal Astrocyte Survival Against Oxygen-Glucose-Serum Deprivation/Restoration in Primary Cultured Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xun; Ma, Yuan; Yang, Li-Bin; Cheng, Jing-Ming; Yang, Tao; Fan, Ke-Xia; Li, Yun-Ming; Liu, En-Yu; Cheng, Lin; Huang, Hai-Dong; Gu, Jian-Wen; Kuang, Yong-Qin

    2016-08-01

    Heat shock protein A 12B (HSPA12B) is a newly discovered member of the heat shock protein 70 family. Preclinical evidence indicates that HSPA12B helps protect the brain from ischemic injury, although its specific function remains unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HSPA12B overexpression can protect astrocytes from oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation/restoration (OGD/R) injury. We analyzed the effects of HSPA12B overexpression on spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury and spinal astrocyte survival. After ischemia-reperfusion injury, we found that HSPA12B overexpression decreased spinal cord water content and infarct volume. MTT assay showed that HSPA12B overexpression increased astrocyte survival after OGD/R treatment. Flow cytometry results showed a marked inhibition of OGD/R-induced astrocyte apoptosis. Western blot assay showed that HSPA12B overexpression significantly increased regulatory protein B-cell lymphocyte 2 (Bcl-2) levels, whereas it decreased expression of the Bax protein, which forms a heterodimer with Bcl-2. Measurements of the level of activation of caspase-3 by Caspase-Glo®3/7 Assay kit showed that HSPA12B overexpression markedly inhibited caspase-3 activation. Notably, we demonstrated that the effects of HSPA12B on spinal astrocyte survival depended on activation of the PI3K/Akt signal pathway. These findings indicate that HSPA12B protects against spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury and may represent a potential treatment target. PMID:27179807

  6. Astrocytes Surviving Severe Stress Can Still Protect Neighboring Neurons from Proteotoxic Injury.

    PubMed

    Gleixner, Amanda M; Posimo, Jessica M; Pant, Deepti B; Henderson, Matthew P; Leak, Rehana K

    2016-09-01

    Astrocytes are one of the major cell types to combat cellular stress and protect neighboring neurons from injury. In order to fulfill this important role, astrocytes must sense and respond to toxic stimuli, perhaps including stimuli that are severely stressful and kill some of the astrocytes. The present study demonstrates that primary astrocytes that managed to survive severe proteotoxic stress were protected against subsequent challenges. These findings suggest that the phenomenon of preconditioning or tolerance can be extended from mild to severe stress for this cell type. Astrocytic stress adaptation lasted at least 96 h, the longest interval tested. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) was raised in stressed astrocytes, but inhibition of neither Hsp70 nor Hsp32 activity abolished their resistance against a second proteotoxic challenge. Only inhibition of glutathione synthesis abolished astrocytic stress adaptation, consistent with our previous report. Primary neurons were plated upon previously stressed astrocytes, and the cocultures were then exposed to another proteotoxic challenge. Severely stressed astrocytes were still able to protect neighboring neurons against this injury, and the protection was unexpectedly independent of glutathione synthesis. Stressed astrocytes were even able to protect neurons after simultaneous application of proteasome and Hsp70 inhibitors, which otherwise elicited synergistic, severe loss of neurons when applied together. Astrocyte-induced neuroprotection against proteotoxicity was not elicited with astrocyte-conditioned media, suggesting that physical cell-to-cell contacts may be essential. These findings suggest that astrocytes may adapt to severe stress so that they can continue to protect neighboring cell types from profound injury. PMID:26374549

  7. Effects of ammonia and beta-methylene-DL-aspartate on the oxidation of glucose and pyruvate by neurons and astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, S M; Cooper, A J; Hertz, L

    1988-10-01

    Both ammonia and beta-methylene-DL-aspartate (beta-MA), an irreversible inhibitor of aspartate aminotransferase activity and thus of the malate-aspartate shuttle, were found previously to decrease oxidative metabolism in cerebral cortex slices. In the present work, the possibility that ammonia and beta-MA affect energy metabolism by a common mechanism (i.e., via inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle) was investigated using primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes. Incubation of astrocytes for 30 min with 5 mM beta-MA resulted in a decreased production of 14CO2 from [U-14C]glucose, but did not affect 14CO2 production from [2-14C]pyruvate. Conversely, incubation of astrocytes with 3 mM ammonium chloride resulted in decreased 14CO2 production from [2-14C]pyruvate, but 14CO2 production from [U-14C]glucose was not significantly affected. Ammonium chloride had no significant effect on 14CO2 production from either [U-14C]glucose or [2-14]pyruvate by neurons. However, incubation of neurons with beta-MA or beta-MA plus ammonium chloride resulted in a approximately 45% decrease of 14CO2 production from both [U-14C]glucose and [2-14C]pyruvate. A 2-h incubation of astrocytes with beta-MA resulted in no change in ATP levels, but a 35% decrease in phosphocreatine. Similar treatment of neurons resulted in greater than 50% decrease in ATP, but had little effect on phosphocreatine. beta-MA also caused a decrease in glutamate and aspartate content of neurons, but not of astrocytes. The different metabolic responses of neurons and astrocytes towards beta-MA were probably not due to a differential inhibition of aspartate aminotransferase which was inhibited by approximately 45% in astrocytes and by approximately 55% in neurons. PMID:3138386

  8. Activation of MAPK and FoxO by Manganese (Mn) in Rat Neonatal Primary Astrocyte Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Exil, Vernat; Ping, Li; Yu, Yingchun; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Caito, Samuel W.; Wells, K. Sam; Karki, Pratap; Lee, Eunsook; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) leads to a neurodegenerative disease that has shared clinical characteristics with Parkinson's disease (PD). Mn-induced neurotoxicity is time- and dose-dependent, due in part to oxidative stress. We ascertained the molecular targets involved in Mn-induced neurodegeneration using astrocyte culture as: (1) Astrocytes are vital for information processing within the brain, (2) their redox potential is essential in mitigating reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and (3) they are targeted early in the course of Mn toxicity. We first tested protein levels of Mn superoxide dismutase -2 (SOD-2) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx-1) as surrogates of astrocytic oxidative stress response. We assessed levels of the forkhead winged-helix transcription factor O (FoxO) in response to Mn exposure. FoxO is highly regulated by the insulin-signaling pathway. FoxO mediates cellular responses to toxic stress and modulates adaptive responses. We hypothesized that FoxO is fundamental in mediating oxidative stress response upon Mn treatment, and may be a biomarker of Mn-induced neurodegeneration. Our results indicate that 100 or 500 µM of MnCl2 led to increased levels of FoxO (dephosphorylated and phosphorylated) compared with control cells (P<0.01). p-FoxO disappeared from the cytosol upon Mn exposure. Pre-treatment of cultured cells with (R)-(−)-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (OTC), a cysteine analog rescued the cytosolic FoxO. At these concentrations, MAPK phosphorylation, in particular p38 and ERK, and PPAR gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) levels were increased, while AKT phosphorylation remained unchanged. FoxO phosphorylation level was markedly reduced with the use of SB203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) and PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor). We conclude that FoxO phosphorylation after Mn exposure occurs in parallel with, and independent of the insulin-signaling pathway. FoxO levels and its translocation into the nucleus are part of early events

  9. The Epigenetic Reader BRD2 as a Specific Modulator of PAI-1 Expression in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Mouse Primary Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Soon; Hong, Seong Hwi; Sim, Seobo; Cho, Kyu Suk; Kim, Ji-Woon; Yang, Sung Min; Jeon, Se Jin; You, Jueng Soo; Shin, Chan Young

    2015-11-01

    The post translational modification of lysine acetylation is a key mechanism that regulates chromatin structure. Epigenetic readers, such as the BET domains, are responsible for reading histone lysine acetylation which is a hallmark of open chromatin structure, further providing a scaffold that can be accessed by RNA polymerases as well as transcription factors. Recently, several reports have assessed and highlighted the roles of epigenetic readers in various cellular contexts. However, little is known about their role in the regulation of inflammatory genes, which is critical in exquisitely tuning inflammatory responses to a variety of immune stimuli. In this study, we investigated the role of epigenetic readers BRD2 and BRD4 in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune responses in mouse primary astrocytes. Inflammatory stimulation by LPS showed that the levels of Brd2 mRNA and protein were increased, while Brd4 mRNA levels did not change. Knocking down of Brd2 mRNA using specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) in cultured mouse primary astrocytes inhibited LPS-induced mRNA expression and secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, no other pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as Il-6, Il-1β and Tnf-α, were affected. Indeed, treatment with bromodomain-containing protein inhibitor, JQ1, blocked Pai-1 mRNA expression through the inhibition of direct BRD2 protein-binding and active histone modification on Pai-1 promoter. Taken together, our data suggest that BRD2 is involved in the modulation of neuroinflammatory responses through PAI-1 and via the regulation of epigenetic reader BET protein, further providing a potential novel therapeutic strategy in neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:26349765

  10. ZnO nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress triggers apoptosis by activating JNK signaling pathway in cultured primary astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieting; Deng, Xiaobei; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Deliang; Ding, Wenjun

    2014-03-01

    It has been documented in in vitro studies that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are capable of inducing oxidative stress, which plays a crucial role in ZnO NP-mediated apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of apoptosis in neurocytes induced by ZnO NP exposure was not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential mechanisms of apoptosis provoked by ZnO NPs in cultured primary astrocytes by exploring the molecular signaling pathways triggered after ZnO NP exposure. ZnO NP exposure was found to reduce cell viability in MTT assays, increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, stimulate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and elicit caspase-3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis occurred after ZnO NP exposure as evidenced by nuclear condensation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) cleavage. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) with a concomitant increase in the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio suggested that the mitochondria also mediated the pathway involved in ZnO NP-induced apoptosis. In addition, exposure of the cultured cells to ZnO NPs led to phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Moreover, JNK inhibitor (SP600125) significantly reduced ZnO NP-induced cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression, but not ERK inhibitor (U0126) or p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), indicating that JNK signaling pathway is involved in ZnO NP-induced apoptosis in primary astrocytes.

  11. IL-17A induces MIP-1α expression in primary astrocytes via Src/MAPK/PI3K/NF-kB pathways: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hongwei; Bai, Ying; Zhu, Xinjian; Lin, Lin; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Xiaodong; Buch, Shilpa; Wang, Longxin; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2014-12-01

    Neuroinflammation plays critical roles in multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition to the part played by the lymphocytes, the underlying mechanisms could, in part, be also attributed to activation mediated by astrocytes. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) has been implicated in a number of pathological conditions, specifically attributable to its potent chemottractant effects. Its modulation by IL-17, however, has received very little attention. In the present study, we demonstrated IL-17-mediated induction of MIP-1α in rat primary astroctyes through its binding to the cognate IL-17RA. Furthermore, this effect was mediated via the activation of Src, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), PI3K/Akt and NF-kB pathways, culminating ultimately into increased expression of MIP-1α. Exposure of primary mouse astrocytes to IL-17 resulted in increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and, this effect was abrogated in cells cultured in presence of the MIP-1α neutralizing antibody, thus underscoring its role in the activation of astrocytes. In vivo relevance of these findings was further corroborated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice that demonstrated significantly increased activation of astrocytes with concomitant increased expression of MIP-1α in the corpus callosum compared with control group. Understanding the regulation of MIP-1α expression may provide insights into the development of potential therapeutic targets for neuroinflammation associated with multiple sclerosis. PMID:24989845

  12. Attachment of primary neonatal rat astrocytes to vitronectin is mediated by integrins alphavbeta5 and alpha8beta1: modulation by the type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Gladson, C L; Stewart, J E; Olman, M A; Chang, P L; Schnapp, L M; Grammer, J R; Benveniste, E N

    2000-04-01

    Vitronectin is expressed in a cell-specific manner in the developing brain and concentrated in the brain during disease processes, such as germinal matrix hemorrhage and infarction, in which there is breakdown of the blood-brain barrier. In this study, we identified the integrin receptors that mediate attachment of primary neonatal rat astrocytes to vitronectin. Using fluorescent activated cell sorter and immunoprecipitation analyses, we established that the vitronectin receptor integrins alphavbeta5 and alpha8beta1, but not alphavbeta3, are expressed on neonatal rat astrocytes. Attachment of the neonatal astrocytes to vitronectin was inhibited (85%) in an additive manner by neutralizing anti-alphavbeta5 and anti-beta1 antibodies. Attachment to vitronectin was also inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the type I plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor. Our data demonstrate that unstimulated primary neonatal rat astrocytes attach to vitronectin, utilizing integrins alphavbeta5 and alpha8beta1, and that this attachment is regulated by PAI-1. PMID:10739899

  13. Ex vivo gene delivery of GDNF using primary astrocytes transduced with a lentiviral vector provides neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ericson, Cecilia; Georgievska, Biljana; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2005-12-01

    Astrocytes are, as normal constituents of the brain, promising vehicles for ex vivo gene delivery to the central nervous system. In the present study, we have used a lentiviral vector encoding glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to transduce rat-derived primary astrocytes, in order to evaluate their potential for long-term transgene expression in vivo and neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease. Following transplantation of GDNF-transduced astrocytes to the intact striatum, the level of released GDNF was 2.93 +/- 0.28 ng/mg tissue at 1 week post-grafting, reduced to 0.42 +/- 0.12 ng/mg tissue at 4 weeks, and thereafter was maintained at this level throughout the experiment (12 weeks; 0.53 +/- 0.068 ng/mg tissue). Similarly, grafting to the substantia nigra (SN) resulted in a significant overexpression of GDNF ( approximately 0.20 ng/mg tissue) at 1 week. Intact animals receiving transplants of GDNF-transduced astrocytes displayed an increased contralateral turning (5.39 +/- 1.19 turns/min) in the amphetamine-induced rotation test, which significantly correlated with the GDNF tissue levels measured in the striatum, indicating a stimulatory effect of GDNF on the dopaminergic function. Transplantation of GDNF-transduced astrocytes to the SN 1 week prior to an intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesion provided a significant protection of nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells. By contrast, when the cells were transplanted to the striatum, the level of released GDNF was not sufficient to rescue the striatal fibers and, hence, to protect the nigral dopaminergic neurons. Overall, our results suggest that genetically modified astrocytes expressing GDNF can provide neuroprotection in a rat model of Parkinson's disease following transplantation to the SN. PMID:16324109

  14. WIN 55,212-2, Agonist of Cannabinoid Receptors, Prevents Amyloid β1-42 Effects on Astrocytes in Primary Culture

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Mauricio, Maria D.; Vila, Jose Mª; Marchio, Patricia; Valles, Soraya L.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer´s disease (AD), a neurodegenerative illness involving synaptic dysfunction with extracellular accumulation of Aβ1-42 toxic peptide, glial activation, inflammatory response and oxidative stress, can lead to neuronal death. Endogenous cannabinoid system is implicated in physiological and physiopathological events in central nervous system (CNS), and changes in this system are related to many human diseases, including AD. However, studies on the effects of cannabinoids on astrocytes functions are scarce. In primary cultured astrocytes we studied cellular viability using MTT assay. Inflammatory and oxidative stress mediators were determined by ELISA and Western-blot techniques both in the presence and absence of Aβ1-42 peptide. Effects of WIN 55,212-2 (a synthetic cannabinoid) on cell viability, inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress were also determined. Aβ1-42 diminished astrocytes viability, increased TNF-α and IL-1β levels and p-65, COX-2 and iNOS protein expression while decreased PPAR-γ and antioxidant enzyme Cu/Zn SOD. WIN 55,212-2 pretreatment prevents all effects elicited by Aβ1-42. Furthermore, cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 also increased cell viability and PPAR-γ expression in control astrocytes. In conclusion cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 increases cell viability and anti-inflammatory response in cultured astrocytes. Moreover, WIN 55,212-2 increases expression of anti-oxidant Cu/Zn SOD and is able to prevent inflammation induced by Aβ1-42 in cultured astrocytes. Further studies would be needed to assess the possible beneficial effects of cannabinoids in Alzheimer's disease patients. PMID:25874692

  15. Primary Isoniazid Prophylaxis against Tuberculosis in HIV-Exposed Children

    PubMed Central

    Madhi, Shabir A.; Nachman, Sharon; Violari, Avy; Kim, Soyeon; Cotton, Mark F.; Bobat, Raziya; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; McSherry, George; Mitchell, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Background The dual epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis is a major cause of sickness and death in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of preexposure isoniazid prophylaxis against tuberculosis in HIV-infected children and uninfected children exposed to HIV during the perinatal period. Methods We randomly assigned 548 HIV-infected and 804 HIV-uninfected infants (91 to 120 days of age) to isoniazid (10 to 20 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) or matching placebo for 96 weeks. All patients received bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination against tuberculosis within 30 days after birth. HIV-infected children had access to antiretroviral therapy. The primary outcome measures were tuberculosis disease and death in HIV-infected children and latent tuberculosis infection, tuberculosis disease, and death in HIV-uninfected children within 96 to 108 weeks after randomization. Results Antiretroviral therapy was initiated in 98.9% of HIV-infected children during the study. Among HIV-infected children, protocol-defined tuberculosis or death occurred in 52 children (19.0%) in the isoniazid group and 53 (19.3%) in the placebo group (P = 0.93). Among HIV-uninfected children, there was no significant difference in the combined incidence of tuberculosis infection, tuberculosis disease, or death between the isoniazid group (39 children, 10%) and the placebo group (45 children, 11%; P = 0.44). The rate of tuberculosis was 121 cases per 1000 child-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 95 to 153) among HIV-infected children as compared with 41 per 1000 child-years (95% CI, 31 to 52) among HIV-uninfected children. There were no significant differences in clinical or severe laboratory toxic effects between treatment groups. Conclusions Primary isoniazid prophylaxis did not improve tuberculosis-disease–free survival among HIV-infected children or tuberculosis-infection–free survival among HIV

  16. Profiling the iron, copper and zinc content in primary neuron and astrocyte cultures by rapid online quantitative size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hare, Dominic J; Grubman, Alexandra; Ryan, Timothy M; Lothian, Amber; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Grimm, Rudolf; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Doble, Philip A; Cherny, Robert A; Bush, Ashley I; White, Anthony R; Masters, Colin L; Roberts, Blaine R

    2013-12-01

    Metals often determine the chemical reactivity of the proteins to which they are bound. Each cell in the body tightly maintains a unique metalloproteomic profile, mostly dependent on function. This paper describes an analytical online flow injection quantitative size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) method, which was applied to profiling the metal-binding proteins found in primary cultures of neurons and astrocytes. This method can be conducted using similar amounts of sample to those used for Western blotting (20-150 μg protein), and has a turnaround time of <15 minutes. Metalloprotein standards for Fe (as ferritin), Cu and Zn (as superoxide dismutase-1) were used to construct multi-point calibration curves for online quantification of metalloproteins by SEC-ICP-MS. Homogenates of primary neuron and astrocyte cultures were analysed by SEC-ICP-MS. Online quantification by external calibration with metalloprotein standards determined the mass of metal eluting from the column relative to time (as pg s(-1)). Total on-column Fe, Cu and Zn detection limits ranged from 0.825 ± 0.005 ng to 13.6 ± 0.7 pg. Neurons and astrocytes exhibited distinct metalloprotein profiles, featuring both ubiquitous and unique metalloprotein species. Separation and detection by SEC-ICP-MS allows appraisal of these metalloproteins in their native state, and online quantification was achieved using this relatively simple external calibration process. PMID:24132241

  17. Adrenergic activation attenuates astrocyte swelling induced by hypotonicity and neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Vardjan, Nina; Horvat, Anemari; Anderson, Jamie E; Yu, Dou; Croom, Deborah; Zeng, Xiang; Lužnik, Zala; Kreft, Marko; Teng, Yang D; Kirov, Sergei A; Zorec, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Edema in the central nervous system can rapidly result in life-threatening complications. Vasogenic edema is clinically manageable, but there is no established medical treatment for cytotoxic edema, which affects astrocytes and is a primary trigger of acute post-traumatic neuronal death. To test the hypothesis that adrenergic receptor agonists, including the stress stimulus epinephrine protects neural parenchyma from damage, we characterized its effects on hypotonicity-induced cellular edema in cortical astrocytes by in vivo and in vitro imaging. After epinephrine administration, hypotonicity-induced swelling of astrocytes was markedly reduced and cytosolic 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was increased, as shown by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer nanosensor. Although, the kinetics of epinephrine-induced cAMP signaling was slowed in primary cortical astrocytes exposed to hypotonicity, the swelling reduction by epinephrine was associated with an attenuated hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) excitability, which may be the key to prevent astrocyte swelling. Furthermore, in a rat model of spinal cord injury, epinephrine applied locally markedly reduced neural edema around the contusion epicenter. These findings reveal new targets for the treatment of cellular edema in the central nervous system. GLIA 2016;64:1034-1049. PMID:27018061

  18. Anthocyanin-rich açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) extract attenuates manganese-induced oxidative stress in rat primary astrocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    da Silva Santos, Vivian; Bisen-Hersh, Emily; Yu, Yingchun; Cabral, Ingridy Simone Ribeiro; Nardini, Viviani; Culbreth, Megan; Teixeira da Rocha, João Batista; Barbosa, Fernando; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for human health. However, at high concentrations Mn may be neurotoxic. Mn accumulates in astrocytes, affecting their redox status. In view of the high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of the exotic Brazilian fruit açaí (Euterpe oleracea Mart.), its methanolic extract was obtained by solid-phase extraction (SPE). This açaí extract showed considerable anthocyanins content and direct antioxidant capacity. The açaí extract scavenged 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH•) with an EC₅₀ of 19.1 ppm, showing higher antioxidant activity compared to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), but lower than ascorbic acid and quercetin. This obtained açaí extract also attenuated Mn-induced oxidative stress in primary cultured astrocytes. Specifically, the açaí extract at an optimal and nutritionally relevant concentration of 0.1 μg/ml prevented Mn-induced oxidative stress by (1) restoring GSH/GSSG ratio and net glutamate uptake, (2) protecting astrocytic membranes from lipid peroxidation, and (3) decreasing Mn-induced expression of erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) protein. A larger quantity of açaí extract exacerbated the effects of Mn on these parameters except with respect to lipid peroxidation assessed by means of F₂-isoprostanes. These studies indicate that at nutritionally relevant concentration, anthocyanins obtained from açaí protect astrocytes against Mn neurotoxicity, but at high concentrations, the "pro-oxidant" effects of its constituents likely prevail. Future studies may be profitably directed at potential protective effects of açaí anthocyanins in nutraceutical formulations. PMID:24617543

  19. Primary liver tumors among Danish patients exposed to thorotrast

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, M. Rigshospitalet Univ. Hospital, Copenhagen ); Carstensen, B.; Storm, H.H. ); Vyberg, M. ); Visfeldt, J. )

    1994-02-01

    The potential carcinogenic effects of internally deposited [alpha]-particle-emitting nuclides, notably plutonium, in the liver in humans are unknown but are of concern in relation to exposures from the nuclear industry. However, patients injected with the radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast are chronically exposed to [alpha]-particle radiation from [sup 232]ThO[sub 2] in the liver. Among 1003 patients injected with Thorotrast, 584 of whom were alive 15 years after the injection and 40 at the end of follow-up, a total of 127 liver cancers were diagnosed, 45 of which were hepatocellular carcinomas, 41 cholangiocarcinomas and 33 hemangiosarcomas. The median time from injection to diagnosis was 35 years (range 18-48) and the cumulative frequency was 55.4% after 48 years. In univariate and multivariate analyses, the cumulative frequency of liver cancer was best described as a function of the estimated mean cumulative [alpha]-particle radiation dose to the liver 15 years ago, being independent of age, gender and volume of injected Thorotrast. This may be interpreted to mean that the liver cancer rate is not related to the dose rate and that the period from malignant transformation to diagnosis of cancer is 15 years. The risk of liver carcinogenesis induced by [alpha]-particle radiation, assuming 15 years from induction to diagnosis, was estimated to be 712 cases/10[sup 4] persons per gray. This value is considerably higher than estimated earlier. 86 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Sheep primary astrocytes under starvation conditions express higher amount of LC3 II autophagy marker than neurons.

    PubMed

    Mura, Emilio; Lepore, Gianluca; Zedda, Marco; Giua, Stefano; Farina, Vittorio

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is a general term for the degradation of cytoplasmic components within lysosomes. Recent studies have clearly demonstrated that autophagy has a greater variety of physiological and pathophysiological roles than expected, such as starvation adaptation, intracellular protein and organelle clearance, development, anti-aging, elimination of microorganisms, cell death, tumor suppression and antigen presentation. MAP-LC3 is one of the most common markers  to evaluate autophagic processes. In our study, the autophagic activity in neurons and astrocytes from sheep brain under starving conditions was evaluated. In order to detect LC3 immunoreactivity, confocal analysis by double immunofluorescence was performed together with the cell type markers: GFAP to identify astrocytes, β-III tubulin to identify neurons. The results show that astrocytes are characterized by LC3-positive areas, which increase in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, LC3 immunoreactivity was very weak in neurons. Therefore, it can be assumed that astrocytes show a higher capability than neurons to cope with stress and exhibit a stronger autophagic response. PMID:25181596

  1. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene neurotoxicity - Passage effect in immortalized astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Laura L; Latham, Jackelyn D; Landis, Rory W; Song, Dong Hoon; Epstein, Tamir; Philbert, Martin A

    2016-03-01

    Age-related disturbances in astrocytic mitochondrial function are linked to loss of neuroprotection and decrements in neurological function. The immortalized rat neocortical astrocyte-derived cell line, DI-TNC1, provides a convenient model for the examination of cellular aging processes that are difficult to study in primary cell isolates from aged brain. Successive passages in culture may serve as a surrogate of aging in which time-dependent adaptation to culture conditions may result in altered responses to xenobiotic challenge. To investigate the hypothesis that astrocytic mitochondrial homeostatic function is decreased with time in culture, low passage DI-TNC1 astrocytes (LP; #2-8) and high passage DI-TNC1 astrocytes (HP; #17-28) were exposed to the mitochondrial neurotoxicant 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNB). Cells were exposed in either monoculture or in co-culture with primary cortical neurons. Astrocyte mitochondrial membrane potential, morphology, ATP production and proliferation were monitored in monoculture, and the ability of DI-TNC1 cells to buffer K(+)-induced neuronal depolarization was examined in co-cultures. In HP DI-TNC1 cells, DNB exposure decreased proliferation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and significantly decreased mitochondrial form factor. Low passage DI-TNC1 cells effectively attenuated K(+)-induced neuronal depolarization in the presence of DNB whereas HP counterparts were unable to buffer K(+) in DNB challenge. Following DNB challenge, LP DI-TNC1 cells exhibited greater viability in co-culture than HP. The data provide compelling evidence that there is an abrupt phenotypic change in DI-TNC1 cells between passage #9-16 that significantly diminishes the ability of DI-TNC1 cells to compensate for neurotoxic challenge and provide neuroprotective spatial buffering. Whether or not these functional changes have an in vivo analog in aging brain remains to be determined. PMID:26769196

  2. Regulation of hemeoxygenase-1 gene expression by Nrf2 and c-Jun in tertiary butylhydroquinone-stimulated rat primary astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin-Sun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in rat primary astrocytes. • tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an ARE-dependent manner. • tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. • Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. • Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction. - Abstract: Hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a phase II antioxidant enzyme that is primarily involved in detoxification and cytoprotection in a variety of tissues. However, the mechanism underlying HO-1 gene expression remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the regulation of HO-1 expression in primary cultured astrocytes by using the natural antioxidant compound tertiary butylhydroquinone (tBHQ). We found that tBHQ increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. Promoter analysis revealed that tBHQ enhanced HO-1 gene transcription in an antioxidant response element (ARE)-dependent manner. In addition, tBHQ increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to ARE. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) experiments demonstrated that Nrf2 and c-Jun are involved in the differential modulation of HO-1 expression. Thus, Nrf2 knockdown reduced the basal level of HO-1 expression but did not affect the fold induction by tBHQ. On the other hand, knockdown of c-Jun diminished tBHQ-mediated induction of HO-1 without affecting basal expression. The data suggest that Nrf2 generally modulates the basal expression of HO-1, while c-Jun mediates HO-1 induction in response to tBHQ. The results of co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a physical interaction between Nrf2 and c-Jun in tBHQ-treated astrocytes. The results suggest that Nrf2 and c-Jun regulate HO-1 expression via their coordinated interaction in tBHQ-treated rat primary astrocytes.

  3. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated changes in basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular calcium in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine A1 receptor stimulation on basal and histamine-stimulated levels of intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) have been investigated in primary astrocyte cultures derived from neonatal rat forebrains. 2. Histamine (0.1 microM-1 mM) caused rapid, concentration-dependent increases in [Ca2+]i over basal levels in single type-2 astrocytes in the presence of extracellular calcium. A maximum mean increase of 1,468 +/- 94 nM over basal levels was recorded in 90% of type-2 cells treated with 1 mM histamine (n = 49). The percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to histamine appeared to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the application of 1 mM histamine to type-1 astrocytes had less effect, eliciting a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 805 +/- 197 nM over basal levels in only 30% of the cells observed (n = 24). 3. In the presence of extracellular calcium, the A1 receptor-selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10 microM), caused a maximum mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 1,110 +/- 181 nM over basal levels in 30% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 53). The size of this response was concentration-dependent; however, the percentage of type-2 cells exhibiting calcium increases in response to CPA did not appear to vary in a concentration-dependent manner. A mean calcium increase of 605 +/- 89 nM over basal levels was also recorded in 23% of type-1 astrocytes treated with 10 microM CPA (n = 30). 4. In the absence of extracellular calcium, in medium containing 0.1 mM EGTA, a mean increase in [Ca2+]i of 504 +/- 67 nM over basal levels was recorded in 41% of type-2 astrocytes observed (n = 41) after stimulation with 1 microM CPA. However, in the presence of extracellular calcium, pretreatment with the A1 receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, for 5-10 min before stimulation with 1 microM CPA, completely antagonized the response in 100% of the cells observed. 5. In type-2

  4. Protopanaxatriol Ginsenoside Rh1 Upregulates Phase II Antioxidant Enzyme Gene Expression in Rat Primary Astrocytes: Involvement of MAP Kinases and Nrf2/ARE Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji-Sun; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hee-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress activates several intracellular signaling cascades that may have deleterious effects on neuronal cell survival. Thus, controlling oxidative stress has been suggested as an important strategy for prevention and/or treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we found that ginsenoside Rh1 inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced reactive oxygen species generation and subsequent cell death in rat primary astrocytes. Rh1 increased the expression of phase II antioxidant enzymes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, superoxide dismutase-2, and catalase, that are under the control of Nrf2/ARE signaling pathways. Further mechanistic studies showed that Rh1 increased the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of Nrf2 and c-Jun to the antioxidant response element (ARE), and increased the ARE-mediated transcription activities in rat primary astrocytes. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed that MAP kinases are important in HO-1 expression, and act by modulating ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. Therefore, the upregulation of antioxidant enzymes by Rh1 may provide preventive therapeutic potential for various neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with oxidative stress. PMID:26759699

  5. Relaxin Protects Astrocytes from Hypoxia In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, Jordan M.; Summerlee, Alastair J. S.

    2014-01-01

    The peptide relaxin has recently been shown to protect brain tissues from the detrimental effects of ischemia. To date, the mechanisms for this remain unclear. In order to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms by which relaxin may protect the brain, we investigated the possibility that relaxin protects astrocytes from hypoxia or oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD). Cultured astrocytes were pre-treated with either relaxin-2 or relaxin-3 and exposed to OGD for 24 or 48 hours. Following OGD exposure, viability assays showed that relaxin-treated cells exhibited a higher viability when compared to astrocytes that experienced OGD-alone. Next, to test whether relaxin reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) astrocytes were exposed to the same conditions as the previous experiment and a commercially available ROS detection kit was used to detect ROS production. Astrocytes that were treated with relaxin-2 and relaxin-3 showed a marked decrease in ROS production when compared to control astrocytes that were exposed only to OGD. Finally, experiments were performed to determine whether or not the mitochondrial membrane potential was affected by relaxin treatment during 24 hour OGD. Mitochondrial membrane potential was higher in astrocytes that were treated with relaxin-2 and relaxin-3 compared to untreated OGD-alone astrocytes. Taken together, these data present novel findings that show relaxin protects astrocytes from ischemic conditions through the reduction of ROS production and the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:24598861

  6. Small-Molecule-Based Lineage Reprogramming Creates Functional Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, E; Sun, Guoqiang; Sun, Guihua; Chao, Jianfei; Ye, Peng; Warden, Charles; Riggs, Arthur D; Shi, Yanhong

    2016-07-19

    Growing evidence indicates important roles for astrocytes in neurodevelopment and diseases. However, astrocytes and their roles in these processes remain poorly understood. Despite recent progress in reprogramming somatic cells into different types of neural cells, reprogramming to astrocytes has lagged. Here, we show that functional astrocytes can be generated from mammalian fibroblasts using only small molecules. Induced mouse astrocytes resemble primary astrocytes in astrocytic gene expression and epigenomic status and exhibit functional properties in promoting neuronal maturation, glutamate uptake, and calcium signaling. Moreover, these cells can recapitulate the Alexander disease phenotype of protein aggregation when expressing Gfap with a disease-causing mutation. The same compounds can also reprogram human fibroblasts into astroglial progenitor cells that can further mature into functional astrocytes. These chemically induced astrocytes may provide cellular models to uncover roles of astrocytes in normal neurodevelopment and pathogenesis of neurological diseases. PMID:27396343

  7. Adaptive Response in Mice Exposed to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Fields: Primary DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Zhang, Jie; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of adaptive response (AR) in animal and human cells exposed to ionizing radiation is well documented in scientific literature. We have examined whether such AR could be induced in mice exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields (RF) used for wireless communications. Mice were pre-exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 µW/cm2 power density for 4 hours/day for 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14 days and then subjected to an acute dose of 3 Gy γ-radiation. The primary DNA damage in the form of alkali labile base damage and single strand breaks in the DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was determined using the alkaline comet assay. The results indicated that the extent of damage in mice which were pre-exposed to RF for 1 day and then subjected to γ-radiation was similar and not significantly different from those exposed to γ-radiation alone. However, mice which were pre-exposed to RF for 3, 5, 7 and 14 days showed progressively decreased damage and was significantly different from those exposed to γ-radiation alone. Thus, the data indicated that RF pre-exposure is capable of inducing AR and suggested that the pre-exposure for more than 4 hours for 1 day is necessary to elicit such AR. PMID:22389679

  8. Amitriptyline induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression through ERK-dependent modulation of multiple BDNF mRNA variants in primary cultured rat cortical astrocytes and microglia.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Kajitani, Naoto; Kaneko, Masahiro; Shigetou, Takahiro; Kasai, Miho; Matsumoto, Chie; Yokoe, Toshiki; Azuma, Honami; Takebayashi, Minoru; Morioka, Norimitsu; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-03-01

    A significant role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been previously implicated in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. To ascertain the contribution of specific cell types in the brain that produce BDNF following antidepressant treatment, the effects of the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline on rat primary neuronal, astrocytic and microglial cortical cultures were examined. Amitriptyline increased the expression of BDNF mRNA in astrocytic and microglial cultures but not neuronal cultures. Antidepressants with distinct mechanisms of action, such as clomipramine, duloxetine and fluvoxamine, also increased BDNF mRNA expression in astrocytic and microglial cultures. There are multiple BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IIA, IV and VI) expressed in astrocytes and microglia and the variant induced by antidepressants has yet to be elaborated. Treatment with antidepressants increased the expression of exon I, IV and VI in astrocyte and microglia. Clomipramine alone significantly upregulated expression of exon IIA. The amitriptyline-induced expression of both total and individual BDNF mRNA variants (exon I, IV and VI) were blocked by MEK inhibitor U0126, indicating MEK/ERK signaling is required in the expression of BDNF. These findings indicate that non-neural cells are a significant target of antidepressants and further support the contention that glial production of BDNF is crucial role in the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. The current data suggest that targeting of glial function could lead to the development of antidepressants with a truly novel mechanism of action. PMID:26764533

  9. Levetiracetam inhibits oligomeric Aβ-induced glutamate release from human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Piña-Crespo, Juan C; Zhang, Xiaofei; McKercher, Scott R; Lipton, Stuart A

    2016-06-15

    A recently identified mechanism for oligomeric Aβ-induced glutamate release from astrocytes involves intracellular Ca elevation, potentially by Ca-dependent vesicular release. Evidence suggests that levetiracetam (LEV; Keppra), an antiepileptic drug, can improve cognitive performance in both humans with mild cognitive impairment and animal models of Alzheimer disease. Because LEV acts by modulating neurotransmitter release from neurons by interaction with synaptic vesicles, we tested the effect of LEV on Aβ-induced astrocytic release of glutamate. We used a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based glutamate sensor (termed SuperGluSnFR), whose structure is based on the ligand-binding site of glutamate receptors, to monitor glutamate release from primary cultures of human astrocytes exposed to oligomeric amyloid-β peptide 1-42 (Aβ42). We found that LEV (10 µM) inhibited oligomeric Aβ-induced astrocytic glutamate release. In addition, we show that this Aβ-induced glutamate release from astrocytes is sensitive to tetanus neurotoxin, an inhibitor of the vesicle release machinery. Taken together, our evidence suggests that LEV inhibits Aβ-induced vesicular glutamate release from astrocytes and thus may underlie, at least in part, the ability of LEV to reduce hyperexcitability in Alzheimer disease. PMID:27183239

  10. Primary liver tumors in beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide.

    PubMed Central

    Gillett, N. A.; Muggenburg, B. A.; Mewhinney, J. A.; Hahn, F. F.; Seiler, F. A.; Boecker, B. B.; McClellan, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Primary liver tumors developed in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of 238PuO2. Initial deposition of 238PuO2 in the respiratory tract was followed by translocation of a portion of the 238Pu to the liver and skeleton, which resulted in a large dose commitment and tumor risk to all three tissues. In a population of 144 dogs exposed to 238PuO2, 112 dogs died or were killed 4000 days after 238Pu exposure, 100 dogs had osteosarcoma, and 28 dogs had lung cancers. At increasing times after exposure, however, liver lesions have become more pronounced. Ten primary liver tumors in nine animals were diagnosed in the dogs dying before 4000 days after exposure. An additional five primary liver tumors in three dogs occurred in 9 animals killed after 4000 days after exposure. The majority of these tumors have been fibrosarcomas. The liver tumors were usually not the cause of death, and rarely metastasized. The occurrence of liver tumors in this study indicates that 238Pu is an effective hepatic carcinogen. Liver carcinogenesis is assuming an increasing importance in this study at late times after inhalation exposure. These results suggest that the liver may be an important organ at risk for the development of neoplasia in humans at time periods long after inhalation of 238Pu. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:3142267

  11. Primary liver tumors in beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Gillett, N.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Mewhinney, J.A.; Hahn, F.F.; Seiler, F.A.; Boecker, B.B.; McClellan, R.O.

    1988-11-01

    Primary liver tumors developed in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. Initial deposition of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ in the respiratory tract was followed by translocation of a portion of the /sup 238/Pu to the liver and skeleton, which resulted in a large dose commitment and tumor risk to all three tissues. In a population of 144 dogs exposed to /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/, 112 dogs died or were killed 4000 days after /sup 238/Pu exposure, 100 dogs had osteosarcoma, and 28 dogs had lung cancers. At increasing times after exposure, however, liver lesions have become more pronounced. Ten primary liver tumors in nine animals were diagnosed in the dogs dying before 4000 days after exposure. An additional five primary liver tumors in three dogs occurred in 9 animals killed after 4000 days after exposure. The majority of these tumors have been fibrosarcomas. The liver tumors were usually not the cause of death, and rarely metastasized. The occurrence of liver tumors in this study indicates that /sup 238/Pu is an effective hepatic carcinogen. Liver carcinogenesis is assuming an increasing importance in this study at late times after inhalation exposure. These results suggest that the liver may be an important organ at risk for the development of neoplasia in humans at time periods long after inhalation of /sup 238/Pu.

  12. Primary liver tumors in beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of plutonium-238 dioxide.

    PubMed

    Gillett, N A; Muggenburg, B A; Mewhinney, J A; Hahn, F F; Seiler, F A; Boecker, B B; McClellan, R O

    1988-11-01

    Primary liver tumors developed in Beagle dogs exposed by inhalation to aerosols of 238PuO2. Initial deposition of 238PuO2 in the respiratory tract was followed by translocation of a portion of the 238Pu to the liver and skeleton, which resulted in a large dose commitment and tumor risk to all three tissues. In a population of 144 dogs exposed to 238PuO2, 112 dogs died or were killed 4000 days after 238Pu exposure, 100 dogs had osteosarcoma, and 28 dogs had lung cancers. At increasing times after exposure, however, liver lesions have become more pronounced. Ten primary liver tumors in nine animals were diagnosed in the dogs dying before 4000 days after exposure. An additional five primary liver tumors in three dogs occurred in 9 animals killed after 4000 days after exposure. The majority of these tumors have been fibrosarcomas. The liver tumors were usually not the cause of death, and rarely metastasized. The occurrence of liver tumors in this study indicates that 238Pu is an effective hepatic carcinogen. Liver carcinogenesis is assuming an increasing importance in this study at late times after inhalation exposure. These results suggest that the liver may be an important organ at risk for the development of neoplasia in humans at time periods long after inhalation of 238Pu. PMID:3142267

  13. α1-Antitrypsin reduces rhinovirus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Reena; Jiang, Di; Wu, Qun; Chu, Hong Wei

    2016-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections target airway epithelium and are the leading cause of acute exacerbations of COPD. Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the severity of viral infections, but there is no effective therapy for HRV infection. We determined whether α1-antitrypsin (A1AT) reduces HRV-16 infection in CS-exposed primary human airway epithelial cells. Brushed bronchial epithelial cells from normal subjects and patients diagnosed with COPD were cultured at air–liquid interface to induce mucociliary differentiation. These cells were treated with A1AT or bovine serum albumin for 2 hours and then exposed to air or whole cigarette smoke (WCS) with or without HRV-16 (5×104 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose [TCID50]/transwell) infection for 24 hours. WCS exposure significantly increased viral load by an average of fivefold and decreased the expression of antiviral genes interferon-λ1, OAS1, and MX1. When A1AT was added to WCS-exposed cells, viral load significantly decreased by an average of 29-fold. HRV-16 infection significantly increased HRV-16 receptor intercellular adhesion molecule-1 messenger RNA expression in air-exposed cells, which was decreased by A1AT. A1AT-mediated reduction of viral load was not accompanied by increased epithelial antiviral gene expression or by inhibiting the activity of 3C protease involved in viral replication or maturation. Our findings demonstrate that A1AT treatment prevents a WCS-induced increase in viral load and for the first time suggest a therapeutic effect of A1AT on HRV infection. PMID:27354786

  14. A novel co-culture model of the blood-retinal barrier based on primary retinal endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska-Kruk, Joanna; Hoeben, Kees A; Vogels, Ilse M C; Gaillard, Pieter J; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Schlingemann, Reinier O; Klaassen, Ingeborg

    2012-03-01

    Loss of blood-retinal barrier (BRB) properties is an important feature in the pathology of diabetic macular edema (DME), but cellular mechanisms underlying BRB dysfunction are poorly understood. Therefore, we developed and characterized a novel in vitro BRB model, based on primary bovine retinal endothelial cells (BRECs). These cells were shown to maintain specific in vivo BRB properties by expressing high levels of the endothelial junction proteins occludin, claudin-5, VE-cadherin and ZO-1 at cell borders, and the specific pumps glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) and efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (MDR1). To investigate the influence of pericytes and astrocytes on BRB maintenance in vitro, we compared five different co-culture BRB models, based on BRECs, bovine retinal pericytes (BRPCs) and rat glial cells. Co-cultures of BRECs with BRPCs and glial cells showed the highest trans-endothelial resistance (TEER) as well as decreased permeability of tracers after vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulation, suggesting a major role for these cell types in maintaining barrier properties. To mimic the in vivo situation of DME, we stimulated BRECs with VEGF, which downregulated MDR1 and GLUT1 mRNA levels, transiently reduced expression levels of endothelial junctional proteins and altered their organization, increased the number of intercellular gaps in BRECs monolayers and influence the permeability of the model to differently-sized molecular tracers. Moreover, as has been shown in vivo, expression of plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein (PLVAP) was increased in endothelial cells in the presence of VEGF. This in vitro model is the first co-culture model of the BRB that mimicks in vivo VEGF-dependent changes occurring in DME. PMID:22200486

  15. Isolation and Characterization of Ischemia-Derived Astrocytes (IDAs) with Ability to Transactivate Quiescent Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Alejandro; Rosciszewski, Gerardo; Murta, Veronica; Cadena, Vanesa; Usach, Vanina; Dodes-Traian, Martin M.; Setton-Avruj, Patricia; Barbeito, Luis H.; Ramos, Alberto J.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive gliosis involving activation and proliferation of astrocytes and microglia, is a widespread but largely complex and graded glial response to brain injury. Astroglial population has a previously underestimated high heterogeneity with cells differing in their morphology, gene expression profile, and response to injury. Here, we identified a subset of reactive astrocytes isolated from brain focal ischemic lesions that show several atypical characteristics. Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDAs) were isolated from early ischemic penumbra and core. IDA did not originate from myeloid precursors, but rather from pre-existing local progenitors. Isolated IDA markedly differ from primary astrocytes, as they proliferate in vitro with high cell division rate, show increased migratory ability, have reduced replicative senescence and grow in the presence of macrophages within the limits imposed by the glial scar. Remarkably, IDA produce a conditioned medium that strongly induced activation on quiescent primary astrocytes and potentiated the neuronal death triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation. When re-implanted into normal rat brains, eGFP-IDA migrated around the injection site and induced focal reactive gliosis. Inhibition of gamma secretases or culture on quiescent primary astrocytes monolayers facilitated IDA differentiation to astrocytes. We propose that IDA represent an undifferentiated, pro-inflammatory, highly replicative and migratory astroglial subtype emerging from the ischemic microenvironment that may contribute to the expansion of reactive gliosis. Main Points: Ischemia-derived astrocytes (IDA) were isolated from brain ischemic tissue IDA show reduced replicative senescence, increased cell division and spontaneous migration IDA potentiate death of oxygen-glucose deprived cortical neurons IDA propagate reactive gliosis on quiescent astrocytes in vitro and in vivo Inhibition of gamma secretases facilitates IDA differentiation to astrocytes PMID:27313509

  16. A cortical astrocyte subpopulation inhibits axon growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Gou, Lin; Xu, Hanpeng

    2015-08-01

    Astrocytes are the most heterogeneous and predominant glial cell type in the central nervous system. However, the functional significance of this heterogeneity remains to be elucidated. Following injury, damaged astrocytes inhibit axonal regeneration in vivo and in vitro. Cultured primary astrocytes are commonly considered good supportive substrates for neuron attachment and axon regeneration. However, it is not known whether different populations of cells in the heterogeneous astrocyte culture affect neuron behavior in the same way. In the present study, the effect of astrocyte heterogeneity on neuronal attachment and neurite outgrowth was examined using an in vitro and in vivo coculture system. In vitro, neonatal cortical astrocytes were co-cultured with purified dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and astrocyte growth morphology, neuron attachment and neurite growth were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the heterogeneous astrocyte cells showed two different types of growth pattern, typical and atypical. Typical astrocytes were supportive to neuron attachment and neurite growth, which was consistent with previous studies, whereas atypical astrocytes inhibited neuron attachment and neurite growth. These inhibitory astrocytes exhibited a special growth pattern with various shapes and sizes, a high cell density, few oligodendrocytes on the top layer and occupied a smaller growth area compared with typical astrocytes. Neurites extended freely on typical supportive astrocyte populations, however, moved away when they reached atypical astrocyte growth pattern. Neurons growing on the atypical astrocyte pattern demonstrated minimal neurite outgrowth and these neurites had a dystrophic appearance, however, neuronal survival was unaffected. Immunocytochemistry studies demonstrated that these atypical inhibitory astrocytes were glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive cells. The existence of inhibitory astrocyte subpopulations in normal astrocytes reflects the

  17. Spatial and temporal single-cell volume estimation by a fluorescence imaging technique with application to astrocytes in primary culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi, Siamak; Allansson, Louise; Gustavsson, Tomas; Blomstrand, Fredrik; Hansson, Elisabeth; Olsson, Torsten

    1999-05-01

    Cell volume changes are often associated with important physiological and pathological processes in the cell. These changes may be the means by which the cell interacts with its surrounding. Astroglial cells change their volume and shape under several circumstances that affect the central nervous system. Following an incidence of brain damage, such as a stroke or a traumatic brain injury, one of the first events seen is swelling of the astroglial cells. In order to study this and other similar phenomena, it is desirable to develop technical instrumentation and analysis methods capable of detecting and characterizing dynamic cell shape changes in a quantitative and robust way. We have developed a technique to monitor and to quantify the spatial and temporal volume changes in a single cell in primary culture. The technique is based on two- and three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. The temporal information is obtained from a sequence of microscope images, which are analyzed in real time. The spatial data is collected in a sequence of images from the microscope, which is automatically focused up and down through the specimen. The analysis of spatial data is performed off-line and consists of photobleaching compensation, focus restoration, filtering, segmentation and spatial volume estimation.

  18. ASTROCYTES: EMERGING STARS IN LEUKODYSTROPHY PATHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Lanciotti, Angela; Brignone, Maria Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara C.; Aloisi, Francesca; Ambrosini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant glial cell population in the central nervous system (CNS). Once considered only passive scaffolding elements, astrocytes are now recognised as cells playing essential roles in CNS development and function. They control extracellular water and ion homeostasis, provide substrates for energy metabolism, and regulate neurogenesis, myelination and synaptic transmission. Due to these multiple activities astrocytes have been implicated in almost all brain pathologies, contributing to various aspects of disease initiation, progression and resolution. Evidence is emerging that astrocyte dysfunction can be the direct cause of neurodegeneration, as shown in Alexander’s disease where myelin degeneration is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the astrocyte-specific cytoskeleton protein glial fibrillary acidic protein. Recent studies point to a primary role for astrocytes in the pathogenesis of other genetic leukodystrophies such as megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts and vanishing white matter disease. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge of the pathophysiological role of astrocytes focusing on their contribution to the development of the above mentioned leukodystrophies and on new perspectives for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:24340223

  19. Microglial Janus kinase/signal transduction and activator of transcription 3 pathway activity directly impacts astrocyte and spinal neuron characteristics.

    PubMed

    Molet, Jenny; Mauborgne, Annie; Diallo, Mickael; Armand, Vincent; Geny, David; Villanueva, Luis; Boucher, Yves; Pohl, Michel

    2016-01-01

    After peripheral nerve injury microglial reactivity change in the spinal cord is associated with an early activation of Janus kinase (JAK)/STAT3 transduction pathway whose blockade attenuates local inflammation and pain hypersensitivity. However, the consequences of microglial JAK/STAT3-mediated signaling on neighboring cells are unknown. Using an in vitro paradigm we assessed the impact of microglial JAK/STAT3 activity on functional characteristics of astrocytes and spinal cord neurons. Purified rat primary microglia was stimulated with JAK/STAT3 classical activator interleukin-6 in the presence or absence of a selective STAT3 inhibitor and rat primary astrocytes or spinal cord neurons were exposed to microglia conditioned media (CM). JAK/STAT3 activity-generated microglial CM modulated both astrocyte and neuron characteristics. Beyond inducing mRNA expression changes in various targets of interest in astrocytes and neurons, microglia CM activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase, STAT3 and NF-κB intracellular pathways in astrocytes and promoted their proliferation. Without modifying neuronal excitability or survival, CM affected the nerve processes morphology and distribution of the post-synaptic density protein 95, a marker of glutamatergic synaptic contacts. These findings show that JAK/STAT3 activity in microglia impacts the functional characteristics of astrocytes and neurons. This suggests its participation in spinal cord tissue plasticity and remodeling occurring after peripheral nerve injury. We show that the activity of JAK/STAT3 pathway in microglial cells confers them a specific signaling modality toward neighboring cells, promoting astrocyte proliferation and changes in neuronal morphology. These in vitro data suggest that the early JAK/STAT3 activation in spinal cord microglia, associated with peripheral nerve injury, participates in functional alteration of various cell populations and in spinal tissue remodeling. PMID:26440453

  20. Primary cultured astrocytes from old rats are capable to activate the Nrf2 response against MPP+ toxicity after tBHQ pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Aguilar, Adriana; Luna-López, Armando; Ventura-Gallegos, José L; Lazzarini, Roberto; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; González-Puertos, Viridiana Y; Morán, Julio; Santamaría, Abel; Königsberg, Mina

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes are key players for brain physiology, protecting neurons by releasing antioxidant enzymes; however, they are also susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) is a central regulator of the antioxidant response, and therefore, pharmacologic inducers are often used to activate this transcription factor to induce cellular protection. To date, it still remains unknown if cells from aged animals are capable of developing this response. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to determine if cortical astrocytes derived from old rats are able to respond to tertbuthyl-hydroquinene (tBHQ) pretreatment and stimulate the Nrf2-antioxidant response pathway to induce an antioxidant strategy against MPP+ toxicity, one of the most used molecules to model Parkinson's disease. Our results show that, although astrocytes from adult and old rats were more susceptible to MPP+ toxicity than astrocytes from newborn rats, when pretreated with tertbuthyl-hydroquinene, they were able to transactivate Nrf2, increasing antioxidant enzymes and developing cellular protection. These results are discussed in terms of the doses used to create protective responses. PMID:24650792

  1. Astrocyte response to St. Louis encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Zuza, Adriano Lara; Barros, Heber Leão Silva; de Mattos Silva Oliveira, Thelma Fátima; Chávez-Pavoni, Juliana Helena; Zanon, Renata Graciele

    2016-06-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV), a flavivirus transmitted to humans by Culex mosquitoes, causes clinical symptoms ranging from acute febrile disorder to encephalitis. To reach the central nervous system (CNS) from circulating blood, the pathogen must cross the blood-brain barrier formed by endothelial cells and astrocytes. Because astrocytes play an essential role in CNS homeostasis, in this study these cells were infected with SLEV and investigated for astrogliosis, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I-dependent immune response, and apoptosis by caspase-3 activation. Cultures of Vero cells were used as a positive control for the viral infection. Cytopathic effects were observed in both types of cell cultures, and the cytotoxicity levels of the two were compared. Astrocytes infected with a dilution of 1E-01 (7.7E+08 PFU/mL) had a reduced mortality rate of more than 50% compared to the Vero cells. In addition, the astrocytes responded to the flavivirus infection with increased MHC-I expression and astrogliosis, characterized by intense glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and an increase in the number and length of cytoplasmic processes. When the astrocytes were exposed to higher viral concentrations, a proportional increase in caspase-3 expression was observed, as well as nuclear membrane destruction. SLEV immunostaining revealed a perinuclear location of the virus during the replication process. Together, these results suggest that mechanisms other than SLEV infection in astrocytes must be associated with the development of the neuroinvasive form of the disease. PMID:26975980

  2. Intracellular oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in rat primary cortical neurons exposed to cholesterol secoaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Raghavamenon, Achuthan C; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Babu, Sainath; D'Auvergne, Oswald; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J; Uppu, Rao M

    2009-08-14

    Cholesterol secoaldehyde (ChSeco or 3beta-hydroxy-5-oxo-5,6-secocholestan-6-al) has been shown to induce Abeta aggregation and apoptosis in GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of ChSeco on rat primary cortical neuronal cells. ChSeco was cytotoxic at concentrations ranging from 5 to 20 microM, while cholesterol of comparable concentrations showed little or no toxicity. In ChSeco-exposed neuronal cells, there was an increased formation of intracellular peroxide or peroxide-like substance(s), the levels of which were comparable to those found in typical menadione exposures. There was a loss in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the extent of which was dependent on concentration of ChSeco employed. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (5 mM; 1 h) offered protection against the cytotoxicity and the generation of intracellular oxidants. Cytotoxicity of ChSeco was evidenced by the loss of axonal branches and also condensed apoptotic nuclei in these cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a decreased intracellular Abeta42 staining proportional to the loss in the axonal out growth and dendritic branches. The observed decrease in Abeta42 has been suggested to be due to loss of integrity of dendrites and the plasma membrane, possibly resulting from increased production of reactive oxygen species. PMID:19505436

  3. Transcriptomics analysis of primary mouse thymocytes exposed to bis(tri-n-butyltin)dioxide (TBTO).

    PubMed

    van Kol, Sandra W M; Hendriksen, Peter J M; van Loveren, Henk; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2012-06-14

    The biocide bis(tri-n-butyltin)oxide (TBTO) causes thymus atrophy in rodents and is toxic to many cell types of which thymocytes are the most sensitive. To obtain insight in the mechanisms of action of TBTO, we exposed primary mouse thymocytes in vitro for 3, 6 and 11 h to 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2 μM TBTO. Subsequently, the cells were subjected to whole-genome gene expression profiling. Biological interpretation of the gene expression data revealed that TBTO affects a wide range of processes. Cell proliferation related genes were downregulated by all treatments except for 3 and 6 h 0.5 μM TBTO which upregulated these genes. Treatment with TBTO resulted in upregulation of genes involved in endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress, NFkB and TNFα pathways, and genes involved in DNA damage, p53 signaling and apoptosis. Remarkably, TBTO also increased the expression of genes that are known to be upregulated during T cell activation or during negative selection of thymocytes. The effect of TBTO on expression of genes involved in ER stress and apoptosis was confirmed by qPCR. Induction of the T cell activation response was corroborated by demonstrating that TBTO exposure resulted in translocation of NFAT to the nucleus, which is an essential event for T cell activation. PMID:22434021

  4. Growth of purified astrocytes in a chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.S.; De Vellis, J.

    1981-11-01

    Astrocytes purified from primary cultures of neonatal rat cerebrum can not be grown in a synthetic medium supplemented with putrescine, prostaglandin F/sub 2//sub ..cap alpha../, insulin, fibroblast growth factor, and hydrocortisone. These five supplements have a marked synergistic effect on growth when used in combination but have little effect when used individually. Astrocytes grown in the defined medium exhibit dramatic changes in morphological characteristics in comparison to cells grown in serum-free or serum-supplemented medium. In addition, these cells express the astrocyte-specific marker glial fibrillary acidic protein and are estimated by several criteria to be greater than 95% astrocytes.

  5. Aquaporin-4 knockout enhances astrocyte toxicity induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and Lipopolysaccharide via increasing the expression of cytochrome P4502E1

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Chunshu; Liu, Wei; Luan, Xiaofei; Li, Yang; Gui, Haiyan; Peng, Yan; Shen, Jianping; Hu, Gang; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    The role of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in the regulation of astrocytes function has been widely investigated. However, there is little information about its contribution to the drug metabolism enzymes such as Cytochrome P4502E1. In the present study, we investigated whether AQP4 is involved in the process of the cell damage caused by MPP+ and LPS through regulating the expression of CYP2E1 in astrocytes. Compared to the wild-type, in primary astrocytes, AQP4 knockout increased the cell damage and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production which were induced by MPP+, LPS and ethanol. Notably, AQP4 knockout enhanced the up-regulation of the expression of CYP2E1 in astrocytes exposed to MPP+, LPS and ethanol. Furthermore, Diallylsulphide (DAS), a CYP2E1 inhibitor, partially or almost abolished the cell injury and the ROS production of the astrocytes induced by MPP+ and LPS. These findings indicate AQP4 protects astrocytes from the damage caused by MPP+ and LPS through reducing the ROS production correlation to the diminished expression of CYP2E1. PMID:20615459

  6. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Astrocytic Fate and Function

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuang; Yang, Silei; Holsboer, Florian; Sousa, Nuno; Almeida, Osborne F. X.

    2011-01-01

    Glial loss in the hippocampus has been suggested as a factor in the pathogenesis of stress-related brain disorders that are characterized by dysregulated glucocorticoid (GC) secretion. However, little is known about the regulation of astrocytic fate by GC. Here, we show that astrocytes derived from the rat hippocampus undergo growth inhibition and display moderate activation of caspase 3 after exposure to GC. Importantly, the latter event, observed both in situ and in primary astrocytic cultures is not followed by either early- or late-stage apoptosis, as monitored by stage I or stage II DNA fragmentation. Thus, unlike hippocampal granule neurons, astrocytes are resistant to GC-induced apoptosis; this resistance is due to lower production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a greater buffering capacity against the cytotoxic actions of ROS. We also show that GC influence hippocampal cell fate by inducing the expression of astrocyte-derived growth factors implicated in the control of neural precursor cell proliferation. Together, our results suggest that GC instigate a hitherto unknown dialog between astrocytes and neural progenitors, adding a new facet to understanding how GC influence the cytoarchitecture of the hippocampus. PMID:21811605

  7. Heterogeneity of Notch signaling in astrocytes and the effects of GFAP and vimentin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lebkuechner, Isabell; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Möllerström, Elin; Pekna, Marcela; Pekny, Milos

    2015-10-01

    Astrocytes have multiple roles in the CNS including control of adult neurogenesis. We recently showed that astrocyte inhibition of neurogenesis through Notch signaling depends on the intermediate filament proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin. Here, we used real-time quantitative PCR to analyze gene expression in individual mouse astrocytes in primary cultures and in GFAP(POS) or Aldh1L1(POS) astrocytes freshly isolated from uninjured, contralesional and lesioned hippocampus 4 days after entorhinal cortex lesion. To determine the Notch signaling competence of individual astrocytes, we measured the mRNA levels of Notch ligands and Notch1 receptor. We found that whereas most cultured and freshly isolated astrocytes were competent to receive Notch signals, only a minority of astrocytes were competent to send Notch signals. Injury increased the fraction of astrocyte subpopulation unable to send and receive Notch signals, thus resembling primary astrocytes in vitro. Astrocytes deficient of GFAP and vimentin showed decreased Notch signal sending competence and altered expression of Notch signaling pathway-related genes Dlk2, Notch1, and Sox2. Furthermore, we identified astrocyte subpopulations based on their mRNA and protein expression of nestin and HB-EGF. This study improves our understanding of astrocyte heterogeneity, and points to astrocyte cytoplasmic intermediate filaments as targets for neural cell replacement strategies. PMID:26118771

  8. Astrocytes Grown in Alvetex(®) Three Dimensional Scaffolds Retain a Non-reactive Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ugbode, Christopher I; Hirst, Warren D; Rattray, Marcus

    2016-08-01

    Protocols which permit the extraction of primary astrocytes from either embryonic or postnatal mice are well established however astrocytes in culture are different to those in the mature CNS. Three dimensional (3D) cultures, using a variety of scaffolds may enable better phenotypic properties to be developed in culture. We present data from embryonic (E15) and postnatal (P4) murine primary cortical astrocytes grown on coated coverslips or a 3D polystyrene scaffold, Alvetex. Growth of both embryonic and postnatal primary astrocytes in the 3D scaffold changed astrocyte morphology to a mature, protoplasmic phenotype. Embryonic-derived astrocytes in 3D expressed markers of mature astrocytes, namely the glutamate transporter GLT-1 with low levels of the chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans, NG2 and SMC3. Embryonic astrocytes derived in 3D show lower levels of markers of reactive astrocytes, namely GFAP and mRNA levels of LCN2, PTX3, Serpina3n and Cx43. Postnatal-derived astrocytes show few protein changes between 2D and 3D conditions. Our data shows that Alvetex is a suitable scaffold for growth of astrocytes, and with appropriate choice of cells allows the maintenance of astrocytes with the properties of mature cells and a non-reactive phenotype. PMID:27099962

  9. Motor-Skill Learning Is Dependent on Astrocytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Padmashri, Ragunathan; Suresh, Anand; Boska, Michael D.; Dunaevsky, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Motor-skill learning induces changes in synaptic structure and function in the primary motor cortex through the involvement of a long-term potentiation- (LTP-) like mechanism. Although there is evidence that calcium-dependent release of gliotransmitters by astrocytes plays an important role in synaptic transmission and plasticity, the role of astrocytes in motor-skill learning is not known. To test the hypothesis that astrocytic activity is necessary for motor-skill learning, we perturbed astrocytic function using pharmacological and genetic approaches. We find that perturbation of astrocytes either by selectively attenuating IP3R2 mediated astrocyte Ca2+ signaling or using an astrocyte specific metabolic inhibitor fluorocitrate (FC) results in impaired motor-skill learning of a forelimb reaching-task in mice. Moreover, the learning impairment caused by blocking astrocytic activity using FC was rescued by administration of the gliotransmitter D-serine. The learning impairments are likely caused by impaired LTP as FC blocked LTP in slices and prevented motor-skill training-induced increases in synaptic AMPA-type glutamate receptor in vivo. These results support the conclusion that normal astrocytic Ca2+ signaling during a reaching task is necessary for motor-skill learning. PMID:26346977

  10. Understanding the Role of Dicer in Astrocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Howng, Shen-Yi Bruce; Huang, Yong; Ptáček, Louis; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The Dicer1 allele is used to show that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in astrocyte development and functions. While it is known that astrocytes that lack miRNAs are dysregulated, the in vivo phenotypes of these astrocytes are not well understood. In this study, we use Aldh1l1-EGFP transgene, a marker of astrocytes, to characterize mouse models with conditional Dicer1 ablation (via either human or mouse GFAP-Cre). This transgene revealed novel features of the defective astrocytes from the absence of miRNA. Although astrocyte miRNAs were depleted in both lines, we found histological and molecular differences in the Aldh1l1-EGFP cells between the two Cre lines. Aldh1l1-EGFP cells from hGFAP-Cre mutant lines displayed up-regulation of Aldh1l1-EGFP with increased proliferation and a genomic profile that acquired many features of wildtype primary astrocyte cultures. In the young mGFAP-Cre mutant lines we found that Aldh1l1-EGFP cells were disorganized and hyperproliferative in the developing cerebellum. Using the Aldh1l1-EGFP transgene, our work provides new insights into the roles of miRNAs in astrocyte development and the features of astrocytes in these two mouse models. PMID:25962146

  11. Striatal astrocytes act as a reservoir for L-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, Masato; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Murakami, Shinki; Diaz-Corrales, Francisco J; Ogawa, Norio

    2014-01-01

    L-DOPA is therapeutically efficacious in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), although dopamine (DA) neurons are severely degenerated. Since cortical astrocytes express neutral amino acid transporter (LAT) and DA transporter (DAT), the uptake and metabolism of L-DOPA and DA in striatal astrocytes may influence their availability in the dopaminergic system of PD. To assess possible L-DOPA- and DA-uptake and metabolic properties of striatal astrocytes, we examined the expression of L-DOPA, DA and DAT in striatal astrocytes of hemi-parkinsonian model rats after repeated L-DOPA administration, and measured the contents of L-DOPA, DA and their metabolite in primary cultured striatal astrocytes after L-DOPA/DA treatment. Repeated injections of L-DOPA induced apparent L-DOPA- and DA-immunoreactivities and marked expression of DAT in reactive astrocytes on the lesioned side of the striatum in hemi-parkinsonian rats. Exposure to DA for 4h significantly increased the levels of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in cultured striatal astrocytes. L-DOPA was also markedly increased in cultured striatal astrocytes after 4-h L-DOPA exposure, but DA was not detected 4 or 8h after L-DOPA treatment, despite the expression of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase in astrocytes. Furthermore, the intracellular level of L-DOPA in cultured striatal astrocytes decreased rapidly after removal of extracellular L-DOPA. The results suggest that DA uptaken into striatal astrocytes is rapidly metabolized and that striatal astrocytes act as a reservoir of L-DOPA that govern the uptake or release of L-DOPA depending on extracellular L-DOPA concentration, but are less capable of converting L-DOPA to DA. PMID:25188235

  12. Inhibition of Astrocytic Glutamine Synthetase by Lead is Associated with a Slowed Clearance of Hydrogen Peroxide by the Glutathione System

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Stephen R.; Lee, Alan; Bishop, Glenda M.; Czerwinska, Hania; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Lead intoxication in humans is characterized by cognitive impairments, particularly in the domain of memory, where evidence indicates that glutamatergic neurotransmission may be impacted. Animal and cell culture studies have shown that lead decreases the expression and activity of glutamine synthetase (GS) in astrocytes, yet the basis of this effect is uncertain. To investigate the mechanism responsible, the present study exposed primary astrocyte cultures to a range of concentrations of lead acetate (0–330 μM) for up to 24 h. GS activity was significantly reduced in cells following 24 h incubation with 100 or 330 μM lead acetate. However, no reduction in GS activity was detected when astrocytic lysates were co-incubated with lead acetate, suggesting that the mechanism is not due to a direct interaction and involves intact cells. Since GS is highly sensitive to oxidative stress, the capacity of lead to inhibit the clearance of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. It was found that exposure to lead significantly diminished the capacity of astrocytes to degrade H2O2, and that this was due to a reduction in the effectiveness of the glutathione system, rather than to catalase. These results suggest that the inhibition of GS activity in lead poisoning is a consequence of slowed H2O2 clearance, and supports the glutathione pathway as a primary therapeutic target. PMID:26696846

  13. Endothelin, Astrocytes and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna, Ganesh; Krishnamoorthy, Raghu; Yorio, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that astrocytes may play an important role in the genesis of glaucoma. Astrogliosis occurs in response to ocular stress or the presence of noxious stimuli. Agents that appear to stimulate reactive gliosis are becoming increasingly clear. One class of agents that is emerging is the endothelins (ETs; specifically, ET-1). In this review we examine the interactions of ET-1 with astrocytes and provide examples where ET-1 appears to contribute to activation of astrocytes and play a role in the neurodegenerative effects that accompany such reactivation resulting in astrogliosis. These actions are presented in the context of glaucoma although information is also presented with respect to ET-1's role in the central nervous system and brain. While much has been learned with respect to ET-1/astrocyte interactions, there are still a number of questions concerning the potential therapeutic implications of these findings. Hopefully this review will stimulate others to examine this potential. PMID:20849847

  14. Novel astrocyte targets

    PubMed Central

    Carmignoto, Giorgio; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years, it has been well established that a finely tuned, continuous crosstalk between neurons and astrocytes not only critically modulates physiological brain functions but also underlies many neurological diseases. In particular, this novel way of interpreting brain activity is markedly influencing our current knowledge of epilepsy, prompting a re-evaluation of old findings and guiding novel experimentation. Here, we review recent studies that have unraveled novel and unique contributions of astrocytes to the generation and spread of convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures and epileptiform activity. The emerging scenario advocates an overall framework in which a dynamic and reciprocal interplay among astrocytic and neuronal ensembles is fundamental for a fuller understanding of epilepsy. In turn, this offers novel astrocytic targets for the development of those really novel chemical entities for the control of convulsive and nonconvulsive seizures that have been acknowledged as a key priority in the management of epilepsy. PMID:24609207

  15. A mental health intervention strategy for low-income, trauma-exposed Latina immigrants in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Kaltman, Stacey; de Mendoza, Alejandra Hurtado; Serrano, Adriana; Gonzales, Felisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Latinos in the United States face significant mental health disparities related to access to care, quality of care, and outcomes. Prior research suggests that Latinos prefer to receive care for common mental health problems (e.g., depression and anxiety disorders) in primary care settings, suggesting a need for evidence-based mental health services designed for delivery in these settings. This study sought to develop and preliminarily evaluate a mental health intervention for trauma-exposed Latina immigrants with depression and/or PTSD for primary care clinics that serve the uninsured. The intervention was designed to be simultaneously responsive to patients’ preferences for individual psychotherapy, to the needs of safety-net primary care clinics for efficient services, and to address the social isolation that is common to the Latina immigrant experience. Developed based on findings from the research team’s formative research, the resulting intervention incorporated individual and group sessions and combined evidence-based interventions to reduce depression and PTSD symptoms, increase group readiness, and improve perceived social support. Twenty-eight trauma-exposed low-income Latina immigrant women who screened positive for depression and/or PTSD participated in an open pilot trial of the intervention at a community primary care clinic. Results indicated that the intervention was feasible, acceptable, and safe. A randomized controlled trial of the intervention is warranted. PMID:26913774

  16. A novel human astrocyte cell line (A735) with astrocyte-specific neurotransmitter function.

    PubMed

    Price, T N; Burke, J F; Mayne, L V

    1999-05-01

    Studies of brain cell function and physiology are hampered by the limited availability of immortal human brain-derived cell lines, as a result of the technical difficulties encountered in establishing immortal human cells in culture. In this study, we demonstrate the application of recombinant DNA vectors expressing SV40 T antigen for the development of immortal human cell cultures, with morphological, growth, and functional properties of astrocytes. Primary human astrocytes were transfected with the SV40 T antigen expression vectors, pSV3neo or p735.6, and cultures were established with an extended lifespan. One of these cultures gave rise to an immortal cell line, designated A735. All the human SV40-derived lines retained morphological features and growth properties of type 1 astrocytes. Immunohistochemical studies and Western blot analysis of the intermediate filament proteins and glutamine synthetase demonstrated a differentiated but immature astrocyte phenotype. Transport of gamma-amino butyric acid and glutamate were examined and found to be by a glial-specific mechanism, consistent with the cell lines' retaining aspects of normal glial function. We conclude that methods based on the use of SV40 T antigen can successfully immortalize human astrocytes, retaining key astrocyte functions, but T antigen-induced proliferation appeared to interfere with expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein. We believe A735 is the first documented nontumor-derived human glial cell line which is immortal. PMID:10475274

  17. Decreased face primary motor cortex (face-M1) excitability induced by noxious stimulation of the rat molar tooth pulp is dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Awamleh, L; Pun, H; Lee, J-C; Avivi-Arber, L

    2015-04-01

    Acute inflammatory dental pain is a prevalent condition often associated with limited jaw movements. Mustard oil (MO, a small-fiber excitant/inflammatory irritant) application to the rat molar tooth pulp induces increased excitability (i.e., central sensitization) of trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons that can be modulated by MDH application of the astrocytic inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO). The objectives of the study were to determine whether MO application to the rat right maxillary first molar tooth pulp affects left face-M1 excitability manifested as altered intracortical microstimulation thresholds for evoking electromyographic activity in the right anterior digastric (RAD, jaw-opening muscle), and whether MSO application to face-M1 can modulate this MO effect. Under Ketamine general anesthesia, Sprague-Dawley male rats had a microelectrode positioned at a low-threshold (≤30 μA) face-M1 site. Then MO (n = 16) or control solution (n = 16) was applied to the previously exposed tooth pulp, and RAD threshold was monitored for 15 min. MSO (0.1 mM, n = 8) or saline (n = 8) was then applied to the face-M1, and RAD thresholds were monitored every 15 min for 120 min. ANOVA followed by post hoc Bonferroni was used to analyze data (p < 0.05). Within 15 min of MO (but not control) pulp application, RAD thresholds increased significantly (p < 0.001) as compared to baseline. One hour following MSO (but not saline) application to the face-M1, RAD thresholds decreased significantly (p = 0.005) toward baseline. These novel findings suggest that acute inflammatory dental pain is associated with decreased face-M1 excitability that may be dependent on the functional integrity of face-M1 astrocytes and related to mechanisms underlying limited jaw movements in acute orofacial pain conditions. PMID:25618005

  18. Astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 and TDP43 trigger motoneuron death that is mediated via sodium channels and nitroxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Fabiola; Cortes, Nicole; Abarzua, Sebastian; Dyrda, Agnieszka; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motor neurons. Multiple disease-causing mutations, including in the genes for SOD1 and TDP-43, have been identified in ALS. Astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS: we have shown that media conditioned by astrocytes carrying mutant SOD1G93A contains toxic factor(s) that kill motoneurons by activating voltage-sensitive sodium (Nav) channels. In contrast, a recent study suggests that astrocytes expressing mutated TDP43 contribute to ALS pathology, but do so via cell-autonomous processes and lack non-cell-autonomous toxicity. Here we investigate whether astrocytes that express diverse ALS-causing mutations release toxic factor(s) that induce motoneuron death, and if so, whether they do so via a common pathogenic pathway. We exposed primary cultures of wild-type spinal cord cells to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes (ACM) that express SOD1 (ACM-SOD1G93A and ACM-SOD1G86R) or TDP43 (ACM-TDP43A315T) mutants; we show that such exposure rapidly (within 30–60 min) increases dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence (indicative of nitroxidative stress) and leads to extensive motoneuron-specific death within a few days. Co-application of the diverse ACMs with anti-oxidants Trolox or esculetin (but not with resveratrol) strongly improves motoneuron survival. We also find that co-incubation of the cultures in the ACMs with Nav channel blockers (including mexiletine, spermidine, or riluzole) prevents both intracellular nitroxidative stress and motoneuron death. Together, our data document that two completely unrelated ALS models lead to the death of motoneuron via non-cell-autonomous processes, and show that astrocytes expressing mutations in SOD1 and TDP43 trigger such cell death through a common pathogenic pathway that involves nitroxidative stress, induced at least in part by Nav channel activity. PMID:24570655

  19. Effects of a low-voltage static electric field on energy metabolism in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, R.; Peng, L.; Hertz, L.

    1997-03-01

    Mouse astrocytes (glial cells) in primary cultures were exposed to a low-voltage static DC electric field with no current flow and thus with no generation of magnetic fields. The electric field altered the rate of glycolysis, measured by 2-deoxyglucose accumulation. The magnitude and direction of this effect depended on the polarization of the field and the applied voltage. The maximum effect was an increase of {approximately}30%, which occurred with field across the cells at an intensity that can be calculated to be 0.3 mV/cm or less. Reversal of the polarization converted the stimulation to a small but statistically significant inhibition.

  20. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  1. Astrocytes are central in the pathomechanisms of vanishing white matter

    PubMed Central

    Dooves, Stephanie; Bugiani, Marianna; Postma, Nienke L.; Polder, Emiel; Land, Niels; Horan, Stephen T.; van Deijk, Anne-Lieke F.; van de Kreeke, Aleid; Jacobs, Gerbren; Vuong, Caroline; Klooster, Jan; Kamermans, Maarten; Wortel, Joke; Wisse, Lisanne E.; Scheper, Gert C.; Abbink, Truus E.M.; Heine, Vivi M.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2016-01-01

    Vanishing white matter (VWM) is a fatal leukodystrophy that is caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (eIF2B). Disease onset and severity are codetermined by genotype. White matter astrocytes and oligodendrocytes are almost exclusively affected; however, the mechanisms of VWM development remain unclear. Here, we used VWM mouse models, patients’ tissue, and cell cultures to investigate whether astrocytes or oligodendrocytes are the primary affected cell type. We generated 2 mouse models with mutations (Eif2b5Arg191His/Arg191His and Eif2b4Arg484Trp/Arg484Trp) that cause severe VWM in humans and then crossed these strains to develop mice with various mutation combinations. Phenotypic severity was highly variable and dependent on genotype, reproducing the clinical spectrum of human VWM. In all mutant strains, impaired maturation of white matter astrocytes preceded onset and paralleled disease severity and progression. Bergmann glia and retinal Müller cells, nonforebrain astrocytes that have not been associated with VWM, were also affected, and involvement of these cells was confirmed in VWM patients. In coculture, VWM astrocytes secreted factors that inhibited oligodendrocyte maturation, whereas WT astrocytes allowed normal maturation of VWM oligodendrocytes. These studies demonstrate that astrocytes are central in VWM pathomechanisms and constitute potential therapeutic targets. Importantly, astrocytes should also be considered in the pathophysiology of other white matter disorders. PMID:26974157

  2. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  3. Paracrine effect of carbon monoxide - astrocytes promote neuroprotection through purinergic signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Queiroga, Cláudia S F; Alves, Raquel M A; Conde, Sílvia V; Alves, Paula M; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-08-15

    The neuroprotective role of carbon monoxide (CO) has been studied in a cell-autonomous mode. Herein, a new concept is disclosed - CO affects astrocyte-neuron communication in a paracrine manner to promote neuroprotection. Neuronal survival was assessed when co-cultured with astrocytes that had been pre-treated or not with CO. The CO-pre-treated astrocytes reduced neuronal cell death, and the cellular mechanisms were investigated, focusing on purinergic signaling. CO modulates astrocytic metabolism and extracellular ATP content in the co-culture medium. Moreover, several antagonists of P1 adenosine and P2 ATP receptors partially reverted CO-induced neuroprotection through astrocytes. Likewise, knocking down expression of the neuronal P1 adenosine receptor A2A-R (encoded by Adora2a) reverted the neuroprotective effects of CO-exposed astrocytes. The neuroprotection of CO-treated astrocytes also decreased following prevention of ATP or adenosine release from astrocytic cells and inhibition of extracellular ATP metabolism into adenosine. Finally, the neuronal downstream event involves TrkB (also known as NTRK2) receptors and BDNF. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TrkB receptors reverts neuroprotection triggered by CO-treated astrocytes. Furthermore, the neuronal ratio of BDNF to pro-BDNF increased in the presence of CO-treated astrocytes and decreased whenever A2A-R expression was silenced. In summary, CO prevents neuronal cell death in a paracrine manner by targeting astrocytic metabolism through purinergic signaling. PMID:27383770

  4. Identification and characterization of complement C3 receptors on human astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gasque, P; Chan, P; Mauger, C; Schouft, M T; Singhrao, S; Dierich, M P; Morgan, B P; Fontaine, M

    1996-03-15

    Astrocytes express C components and have been implicated as a major source of intrathecal C. To ascertain the effects of C activation on these cells, we have evaluated the expression of CR1, CR2, and CR3 (CD35, CD21, and CD11b/CD18) in primary fetal astrocytes and astrocyte cell lines. None of the astrocyte cells tested expressed CR3, whereas primary astrocytes and one of four astrocyte cell lines expressed CR1 (220 kDa), as assessed at the protein and mRNA level. Primary fetal astrocytes and all four astrocyte cell lines expressed CR2 (155 kDa). Expression of CR2 by astrocytes was confirmed at mRNA level by reverse-transcriptase PCR, using different combinations of seven specific CR2 oligonucleotides, and by partial sequencing of the astrocyte CR2 cDNA. Astrocyte CR2 cDNA presented 100% homology with the lymphocyte CR2 cDNA between the position 181 bp to 600 bp and position 1017 bp to 1347 bp. An alternative splicing pattern of exon 11, reported previously in B cells, was observed in astrocyte CR2 cDNA. Astrocyte CR2 was functional, in that it specifically bound C3d and the EBV surface protein gp340, and the binding was blocked specifically with polyclonal anti-CR2. Scatchard analysis of membrane expression of CR2 on astrocytes revealed 2000 functional sites per cell with a Kd (3 x 10(-7) M) identical with that of CR2 on B cell (Raji). PMID:8690915

  5. Cardiac arrhythmia is the primary response of embryonic Pacific herring (Clupea pallasi) exposed to crude oil during weathering.

    PubMed

    Incardona, John P; Carls, Mark G; Day, Heather L; Sloan, Catherine A; Bolton, Jennie L; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L

    2009-01-01

    Teleost embryos develop a syndrome characterized by edema when exposed to water that weathers substrates contaminated with crude oil. Previous studies using zebrafish demonstrated that crude oil exposure causes cardiogenic edema, and that the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in weathered crude oils (tricyclic fluorenes, dibenzothiophenes, and phenanthrenes) are cardiotoxic, causing arrhythmia through a pathway that does not require activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). We demonstrate here for Pacific herring, a species impacted by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, that the developing heart is the primary target of crude oil exposure. Herring embryos exposed to the effluent of oiled gravel columns developed dose-dependent edema and irregular cardiac arrhythmia soon afterthe heartbeat was established. At a dose that produced cardiac dysfunction in 100% of exposed embryos, tissue levels of tricyclic PAHs were below 1 micromol/kg, suggesting a specific, high affinity target in the heart. These findings have implications for understanding the mechanism of tricyclic PAH cardiotoxicity, the development of biomarkers for the effects of PAH exposure in fish, and understanding the long-term impacts of oil spills and other sources of PAH pollution in aquatic environments. PMID:19209607

  6. A mental health intervention strategy for low-income, trauma-exposed Latina immigrants in primary care: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kaltman, Stacey; Hurtado de Mendoza, Alejandra; Serrano, Adriana; Gonzales, Felisa A

    2016-01-01

    Latinos in the United States face significant mental health disparities related to access to care, quality of care, and outcomes. Prior research suggests that Latinos prefer to receive care for common mental health problems (e.g., depression and anxiety disorders) in primary care settings, suggesting a need for evidence-based mental health services designed for delivery in these settings. This study sought to develop and preliminarily evaluate a mental health intervention for trauma-exposed Latina immigrants with depression and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for primary care clinics that serve the uninsured. The intervention was designed to be simultaneously responsive to patients' preferences for individual psychotherapy and to the needs of safety-net primary care clinics for efficient services and to address the social isolation that is common to the Latina immigrant experience. The resulting intervention, developed on the basis of findings from the research team's formative research, incorporated individual and group sessions and combined evidence-based interventions to reduce depression and PTSD symptoms, increase group readiness, and improve perceived social support. Low-income Latina immigrant women (N = 28), who screened positive for depression and/or PTSD participated in an open pilot trial of the intervention at a community primary care clinic. Results indicated that the intervention was feasible, acceptable, and safe. A randomized controlled trial of the intervention is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26913774

  7. Exposed human pulp caused by trauma and/or caries in primary dentition: a histological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Nabih; Wetzel, Willi-Eckhard

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pulpal reactions after exposure due to trauma and/or caries and to suggest the appropriate treatment options for the management of pulp, in the light of the histological findings in the primary teeth. Fifteen primary maxillary incisors with pulpal exposure were examined with light microscope in a blind study. After the histological evaluation, teeth were divided into three groups for the etiological factors due to the exposure according to the patient's files: trauma group, caries group and caries and trauma group. The inflammatory infiltration was diminished from the pulp chamber towards the apical third of the root canal in all of the examined teeth. Teeth in the trauma group presented fewer inflammatory cells in the root canal in comparison with other groups. It was concluded that the teeth with traumatic pulp exposure were considered as more likely to respond positively to pulpotomy technique. Pulpectomy or extraction seemed to be indicated for the decayed or decayed and traumatically injured teeth. PMID:16643290

  8. L-type voltage-operated calcium channels contribute to astrocyte activation In vitro.

    PubMed

    Cheli, Veronica T; Santiago González, Diara A; Smith, Jessica; Spreuer, Vilma; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Paez, Pablo M

    2016-08-01

    We have found a significant upregulation of L-type voltage-operated Ca(++) channels (VOCCs) in reactive astrocytes. To test if VOCCs are centrally involved in triggering astrocyte reactivity, we used in vitro models of astrocyte activation in combination with pharmacological inhibitors, siRNAs and the Cre/lox system to reduce the activity of L-type VOCCs in primary cortical astrocytes. The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as high extracellular K(+) , glutamate, and ATP promote astrogliosis in vitro. L-type VOCC inhibitors drastically reduce the number of reactive cells, astrocyte hypertrophy, and cell proliferation after these treatments. Astrocytes transfected with siRNAs for the Cav1.2 subunit that conducts L-type Ca(++) currents as well as Cav1.2 knockout astrocytes showed reduce Ca(++) influx by ∼80% after plasma membrane depolarization. Importantly, Cav1.2 knock-down/out prevents astrocyte activation and proliferation induced by LPS. Similar results were found using the scratch wound assay. After injuring the astrocyte monolayer, cells extend processes toward the cell-free scratch region and subsequently migrate and populate the scratch. We found a significant increase in the activity of L-type VOCCs in reactive astrocytes located in the growing line in comparison to quiescent astrocytes situated away from the scratch. Moreover, the migration of astrocytes from the scratching line as well as the number of proliferating astrocytes was reduced in Cav1.2 knock-down/out cultures. In summary, our results suggest that Cav1.2 L-type VOCCs play a fundamental role in the induction and/or proliferation of reactive astrocytes, and indicate that the inhibition of these Ca(++) channels may be an effective way to prevent astrocyte activation. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1396-1415. PMID:27247164

  9. Primary nasal epithelium exposed to house dust mite extract shows activated expression in allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Vroling, Aram B; Jonker, Martijs J; Luiten, Silvia; Breit, Timo M; Fokkens, Wytske J; van Drunen, Cornelis M

    2008-03-01

    Nasal epithelial cells form the outermost protective layer against environmental factors. However, this defense is not just physical; it has been shown that epithelial cells respond by the production of inflammatory mediators that may affect local immune responses. In this research we set out to characterize potential differences between the responses of nasal epithelium from healthy and allergic individuals to house dust mite (HDM) allergen. These differences will help us to define local mechanisms that could contribute to allergic disease expression. Epithelial cells were cultured from nasal biopsies taken from five healthy and five allergic individuals. These cultures were exposed for 24 hours to culture medium containing HDM allergen, or to culture medium alone. Isolated RNA was used for microarray analysis. Gene-ontology of the response in healthy epithelium revealed mainly up-regulation of chemokines, growth factors, and structural proteins. Moreover, we saw increased expression of two transcription factors (NF-kappaB and AP-1) and their regulatory members. The expression pattern of epithelium from allergic individuals in the absence of the HDM stimulus suggests that it is already in an activated state. Most striking is that, while the already activated NF-kappaB regulatory pathway remained unchanged in allergic epithelium, the AP-1 pathway is down-regulated upon exposure to HDM allergen; this is contrary to what we see in healthy epithelium. Clear differences in the expression pattern exist between epithelial cells isolated from healthy and allergic individuals at baseline and between their responses to allergen exposure; these differences may contribute to the inflammatory response. PMID:17901406

  10. Time-dependent activity of Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 and homeostasis of intracellular pH in astrocytes exposed to CoCl2 treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Ling; Zhang, Zhenxiang; Kan, Quancheng; Gao, Feng; Chen, Suyan

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxia causes injury to the central nervous system during stroke and has significant effects on pH homeostasis. Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) is important in the mechanisms of hypoxia and intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis. As a well-established hypoxia-mimetic agent, CoCl2 stabilizes and increases the expression of hypoxia inducible factor‑1α (HIF-1α), which regulates several genes involved in pH balance, including NHE1. However, it is not fully understood whether NHE1 is activated in astrocytes under CoCl2 treatment. In the current study, pHi and NHE activity were analyzed using the pHi‑sensitive dye BCECF‑AM. Using cariporide (an NHE1‑specific inhibitor) and EIPA (an NHE nonspecific inhibitor), the current study demonstrated that it was NHE1, not the other NHE isoforms, that was important in regulating pHi homeostasis in astrocytes during CoCl2 treatment. Additionally, the present study observed that, during the early period of CoCl2 treatment (the first 2 h), NHE1 activity and pHi dropped immediately, and NHE1 mRNA expression was reduced compared with control levels, whereas expression levels of the NHE1 protein had not yet changed. In the later period of CoCl2 treatment, NHE1 activity and pHi significantly increased compared with the control levels, as did the mRNA and protein expression levels of NHE1. Furthermore, the cell viability and injury of astrocytes was not changed during the initial 8 h of CoCl2 treatment; their deterioration was associated with the higher levels of pHi and NHE1 activity. The current study concluded that NHE1 activity and pHi homeostasis are regulated by CoCl2 treatment in a time-dependent manner in astrocytes, and may be responsible for the changes in cell viability and injury observed under hypoxia-mimetic conditions induced by CoCl2 treatment. PMID:27035646

  11. Primary succession on slopes exposed to intense erosion: the case of Vesuvius Grand Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinca, Adriano; Battista Chirico, Giovanni; Bonanomi, Giuliano

    2014-05-01

    Mt. Vesuvius (1281 m a.s.l.) is an active volcano dominating the central part of the Campania Region coastline, with a distinctive barren crater summit, known as Grand Cone, formed during the eruption of AD 79. Local environmental factors hindered the colonization of the Vesuvius Grand Cone by vascular plants after the last eruptions of 1906 and 1944. The Grand Cone exhibits very steep planar slopes (33-35 degrees), covered by unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits, mainly formed by lapilli and gravels, characterized by an extremely low water holding capacity and very low organic matter and nitrogen contents, and exposed to intense water and wind erosion. In the last decade Genista aetnensis (Biv.) DC. (Fabaceae), has been expanding over the Grand Cone, facilitating the colonization by other species, especially herbaceous, with a dramatic change of the landscape appearance of the Vesuvius Grand Cone. G. aetnensis is a plant endemic of Mt. Etna and Eastern Sardinia and was firstly introduced at the base of Mt. Vesuvius within reforestation programs after the eruption of 1906. This plant is a nitrogen fixing species with a strong ability to colonize andosols, much more pronounced than the indigenous brooms (Cytisus scoparius and Spartium junceum). An intensive investigation has been conducted to explore the eco-hydrological processes driving the vegetation dynamics observed on the slopes of Grand Cone. Specific field surveys and laboratory experiments have been carried out to assess the effects of the G. aetnensis on soil physical and chemical properties, on the above- and below-ground microclimate, on the soil hydrological regime and on the distribution of coexisting species. The G. aetnensis triggers a pedogenetic process that contributes to a rapid increase of carbon and nitrogen stocks, available phosphorous, cation exchange capacity and a reduction of soil pH. The increase of carbon content also significantly improves the water retention properties in this coarse

  12. Cellular responses in primary epidermal cultures from rainbow trout exposed to zinc chloride.

    PubMed

    Ní Shúilleabháin, Sharon; Mothersill, Carmel; Sheehan, David; O'Brien, Nora M; O' Halloran, John; van Pelt, Frank N A M; Kilemade, Michael; Davoren, Maria

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of zinc chloride (ZnCl(2)) (0-200mg/L) on primary epidermal cultures from Oncorhynchus mykiss. Increases in the rate and amount of mucus released were detected post-exposure, as was a dose-dependent increase in the synthesis of acidic glycoproteins. The cytotoxicity of ZnCl(2) to the cultures was significantly increased (P< or =0.05) when exposures were conducted in serum-free medium as opposed to medium containing serum. Significant increases in the levels of apoptosis and necrosis were observed with increasing exposure concentration, but these were seen to decrease over time. The in vitro cytological and pathological changes observed in this study were found to be in accordance with previously published in vivo studies on the effects of heavy metals on the integument. This model system may help to further elucidate the effects of ecotoxicants on the external innate immune system of fish. PMID:16223524

  13. Decreased face primary motor cortex (face-M1) excitability induced by noxious stimulation of the rat molar tooth pulp is dependent on the functional integrity of medullary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pun, H; Awamleh, L; Lee, J-C; Avivi-Arber, L

    2016-03-01

    We have recently shown that application of the small-fiber excitant and inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO) to the rat molar tooth pulp can decrease face-M1 excitability, but increase the excitability of trigeminal medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons and that application of the astrocytic inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to the face-M1 or MDH can attenuate the MO-induced changes. The present study aimed to determine whether medullary MSO application could modulate the MO-induced decreased face-M1 excitability. Under ketamine general anesthesia, electromyographic (EMG) electrodes were implanted into the right anterior digastric (RAD, jaw-opening muscle) of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. A microelectrode was positioned at a low-threshold (≤30 μA) site in the left face-M1. Then MO (n = 16) or control-solution (n = 16) was applied to the previously exposed molar tooth pulp, and intracortical microstimulation threshold intensities for evoking RAD EMG activities were monitored for 15 min. MSO (0.1 mM, n = 8) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, n = 8) was then applied to the MDH and RAD thresholds monitored every 15 min for 120 min. Statistics used ANOVA followed by post hoc Bonferroni as appropriate (p < 0.05). As compared to baseline, RAD thresholds significantly increased (i.e., decreased excitability) within 1 min (26.3 ± 7.9 %, p = 0.007) and peaked at 15 min following pulpal MO application (49.9 ± 5.7 %, p < 0.001) but not following control-solution. Following MSO (but not PBS) application to the medulla, RAD thresholds significantly decreased within 15 min (26.5 ± 3.0 %, p = 0.05) and at 60 min approached 6.3 ± 2.4 %, of baseline values (p = 0.1). These novel findings suggest that clinically related motor disturbances arising from dental pain may involve decreased face-M1 excitability that is modulated by medullary astrocytes. PMID:26487182

  14. L-DOPA Uptake in Astrocytic Endfeet Enwrapping Blood Vessels in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Inyushin, M. Y.; Huertas, A.; Kucheryavykh, Y. V.; Kucheryavykh, L. Y.; Tsydzik, V.; Sanabria, P.; Eaton, M. J.; Skatchkov, S. N.; Rojas, L. V.; Wessinger, W. D.

    2012-01-01

    Astrocyte endfeet surround brain blood vessels and can play a role in the delivery of therapeutic drugs for Parkinson's disease. However, there is no previous evidence of the presence of LAT transporter for L-DOPA in brain astrocytes except in culture. Using systemic L-DOPA administration and a combination of patch clamp, histochemistry and confocal microscopy we found that L-DOPA is accumulated mainly in astrocyte cell bodies, astrocytic endfeet surrounding blood vessels, and pericytes. In brain slices: (1) astrocytes were exposed to ASP+, a fluorescent monoamine analog of MPP+; (2) ASP+ taken up by astrocytes was colocalized with L-DOPA fluorescence in (3) glial somata and in the endfeet attached to blood vessels; (4) these astrocytes have an electrogenic transporter current elicited by ASP+, but intriguingly not by L-DOPA, suggesting a different pathway for monoamines and L-DOPA via astrocytic membrane. (5) The pattern of monoamine oxidase (MAO type B) allocation in pericytes and astrocytic endfeet was similar to that of L-DOPA accumulation. We conclude that astrocytes control L-DOPA uptake and metabolism and, therefore, may play a key role in regulating brain dopamine level during dopamine-associated diseases. These data also suggest that different transporter mechanisms may exist for monoamines and L-DOPA. PMID:22888467

  15. Morphological assessment of neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neuron-astrocyte co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Gennaro; Costa, Lucio G

    2012-05-01

    Neurite outgrowth is a fundamental event in brain development, as well as in regeneration of damaged neurons. Astrocytes play a major role in neuritogenesis, by expressing and releasing factors that facilitate neurite outgrowth, such as extracellular matrix proteins, and factors that can inhibit neuritogenesis, such as the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan neurocan. In this unit we describe a noncontact co-culture system of hippocampal neurons and cortical (or hippocampal) astrocytes for measurement of neurite outgrowth. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are plated on glass coverslips, which are inverted onto an astrocyte feeder layer, allowing exposure of neurons to astrocyte-derived factors without direct contact between these two cell types. After co-culture, neurons are stained and photographed, and processes are assessed morphologically using Metamorph software. This method allows exposing astrocytes to various agents before co-culture in order to assess how these exposures may influence the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth. PMID:22549268

  16. Increased Expression of GM1 Detected by Electrospray Mass Spectrometry in Rat Primary Embryonic Cortical Neurons Exposed to Glutamate Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Hee; Wang, Lynn; Pittock, Paula; Lajoie, Gilles; Whitehead, Shawn Narain

    2016-08-01

    Neurons within different brain regions have varying levels of vulnerability to external stress and respond differently to injury. A potential reason to explain this may lie within a key lipid class of the cell's plasma membrane called gangliosides. These glycosphingolipid species have been shown to play various roles in the maintenance of neuronal viability. The purpose of this study is to use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and immunohistochemistry to evaluate the temporal expression profiles of gangliosides during the course of neurodegeneration in rat primary cortical neurons exposed to glutamate toxicity. Primary embryonic (E18) rat cortical neurons were cultured to DIV (days in vitro) 14. Glutamate toxicity was induced for 1, 3, 6, and 24 h to injure and kill neurons. Immunofluorescence was used to stain for GM1 and GM3 species, and ESI-MS was used to quantify the ganglioside species expressed within these injured neurons. ESI-MS data revealed that GM1, GM2, and GM3 were up-regulated in neurons exposed to glutamate. Interestingly, using immunofluorescence, we demonstrated that the GM1 increase following glutamate exposure occurred in viable neurons, possibly indicating a potential intrinsic neuroprotective response. To test this potential neuroprotective property, neurons were pretreated with GM1 for 24 h prior to glutamate exposure. Pretreatment with GM1 conferred significant neuroprotection against glutamate-induced cell death. Overall, work from this study validates the use of ESI-MS for cell-derived gangliosides and supports the further development of lipid based strategies to protect against neuron cell death. PMID:27376483

  17. p53 isoforms regulate astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Turnquist, C; Horikawa, I; Foran, E; Major, E O; Vojtesek, B; Lane, D P; Lu, X; Harris, B T; Harris, C C

    2016-09-01

    Bidirectional interactions between astrocytes and neurons have physiological roles in the central nervous system and an altered state or dysfunction of such interactions may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Astrocytes exert structural, metabolic and functional effects on neurons, which can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective. Their neurotoxic effect is mediated via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) involving pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6), while their neuroprotective effect is attributed to neurotrophic growth factors (e.g., NGF). We here demonstrate that the p53 isoforms Δ133p53 and p53β are expressed in astrocytes and regulate their toxic and protective effects on neurons. Primary human astrocytes undergoing cellular senescence upon serial passaging in vitro showed diminished expression of Δ133p53 and increased p53β, which were attributed to the autophagic degradation and the SRSF3-mediated alternative RNA splicing, respectively. Early-passage astrocytes with Δ133p53 knockdown or p53β overexpression were induced to show SASP and to exert neurotoxicity in co-culture with neurons. Restored expression of Δ133p53 in near-senescent, otherwise neurotoxic astrocytes conferred them with neuroprotective activity through repression of SASP and induction of neurotrophic growth factors. Brain tissues from AD and ALS patients possessed increased numbers of senescent astrocytes and, like senescent astrocytes in vitro, showed decreased Δ133p53 and increased p53β expression, supporting that our in vitro findings recapitulate in vivo pathology of these neurodegenerative diseases. Our finding that Δ133p53 enhances the neuroprotective function of aged and senescent astrocytes suggests that the p53 isoforms and their regulatory mechanisms are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27104929

  18. Astrocytes Promote Oligodendrogenesis after White Matter Damage via Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Nobukazu; Maki, Takakuni; Shindo, Akihiro; Liang, Anna C.; Maeda, Mitsuyo; Egawa, Naohiro; Itoh, Kanako; Lo, Evan K.; Lok, Josephine; Ihara, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in the adult brain contribute to white matter homeostasis. After white matter damage, OPCs compensate for oligodendrocyte loss by differentiating into mature oligodendrocytes. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully defined. Here, we test the hypothesis that, during endogenous recovery from white matter ischemic injury, astrocytes support the maturation of OPCs by secreting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). For in vitro experiments, cultured primary OPCs and astrocytes were prepared from postnatal day 2 rat cortex. When OPCs were subjected to chemical hypoxic stress by exposing them to sublethal CoCl2 for 7 d, in vitro OPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes was significantly suppressed. Conditioned medium from astrocytes (astro-medium) restored the process of OPC maturation even under the stressed conditions. When astro-medium was filtered with TrkB-Fc to remove BDNF, the BDNF-deficient astro-medium no longer supported OPC maturation. For in vivo experiments, we analyzed a transgenic mouse line (GFAPcre/BDNFwt/fl) in which BDNF expression is downregulated specifically in GFAP+ astrocytes. Both wild-type (GFAPwt/BDNFwt/fl mice) and transgenic mice were subjected to prolonged cerebral hypoperfusion by bilateral common carotid artery stenosis. As expected, compared with wild-type mice, the transgenic mice exhibited a lower number of newly generated oligodendrocytes and larger white matter damage. Together, these findings demonstrate that, during endogenous recovery from white matter damage, astrocytes may promote oligodendrogenesis by secreting BDNF. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The repair of white matter after brain injury and neurodegeneration remains a tremendous hurdle for a wide spectrum of CNS disorders. One potentially important opportunity may reside in the response of residual oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs). OPCs may serve as a back-up for generating mature oligodendrocytes in damaged white

  19. Striatal neuronal death mediated by astrocytes from the Gcdh-/- mouse model of glutaric acidemia type I.

    PubMed

    Olivera-Bravo, Silvia; Ribeiro, César A J; Isasi, Eugenia; Trías, Emiliano; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Díaz-Amarilla, Pablo; Woontner, Michael; Beck, Cheryl; Goodman, Stephen I; Souza, Diogo; Wajner, Moacir; Barbeito, Luis

    2015-08-15

    Glutaric acidemia type I (GA-I) is an inherited neurometabolic childhood disorder caused by defective activity of glutaryl CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH) which disturb lysine (Lys) and tryptophan catabolism leading to neurotoxic accumulation of glutaric acid (GA) and related metabolites. However, it remains unknown whether GA toxicity is due to direct effects on vulnerable neurons or mediated by GA-intoxicated astrocytes that fail to support neuron function and survival. As damaged astrocytes can also contribute to sustain high GA levels, we explored the ability of Gcdh-/- mouse astrocytes to produce GA and induce neuronal death when challenged with Lys. Upon Lys treatment, Gcdh-/- astrocytes synthetized and released GA and 3-hydroxyglutaric acid (3HGA). Lys and GA treatments also increased oxidative stress and proliferation in Gcdh-/- astrocytes, both prevented by antioxidants. Pretreatment with Lys also caused Gcdh-/- astrocytes to induce extensive death of striatal and cortical neurons when compared with milder effect in WT astrocytes. Antioxidants abrogated the neuronal death induced by astrocytes exposed to Lys or GA. In contrast, Lys or GA direct exposure on Gcdh-/- or WT striatal neurons cultured in the absence of astrocytes was not toxic, indicating that neuronal death is mediated by astrocytes. In summary, GCDH-defective astrocytes actively contribute to produce and accumulate GA and 3HGA when Lys catabolism is stressed. In turn, astrocytic GA production induces a neurotoxic phenotype that kills striatal and cortical neurons by an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. Targeting astrocytes in GA-I may prompt the development of new antioxidant-based therapeutical approaches. PMID:25968119

  20. GABA release by hippocampal astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Le Meur, Karim; Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Grandes, Pedro; Audinat, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes can directly influence neuronal activity through the release of various transmitters acting on membrane receptors expressed by neurons. However, in contrast to glutamate and ATP for instance, the release of GABA (γ-amino-butyric acid) by astrocytes is still poorly documented. Here, we used whole-cell recordings in rat acute brain slices and electron microscopy to test whether hippocampal astrocytes release the inhibitory transmitter GABA. We observed that slow transient inhibitory currents due to the activation of GABAA receptors occur spontaneously in principal neurons of the three main hippocampal fields (CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus). These currents share characteristics with the slow NMDA receptor-mediated currents previously shown to result from astrocytic glutamate release: they occur in the absence of synaptic transmission and have variable kinetics and amplitudes as well as low frequencies. Osmotic pressure reduction, known to enhance transmitter release from astrocytes, similarly increased the frequency of non-synaptic GABA and glutamate currents. Simultaneous occurrence of slow inhibitory and excitatory currents was extremely rare. Yet, electron microscopy examination of immunostained hippocampal sections shows that about 80% of hippocampal astrocytes [positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)] were immunostained for GABA. Our results provide quantitative characteristics of the astrocyte-to-neuron GABAergic signaling. They also suggest that all principal neurons of the hippocampal network are under a dual, excitatory and inhibitory, influence of astrocytes. The relevance of the astrocytic release of GABA, and glutamate, on the physiopathology of the hippocampus remains to be established. PMID:22912614

  1. Induction of cytopathic effect and cytokines in coxsackievirus B3-infected murine astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coxsackievirus commonly infects children and occasionally causes severe meningitis and/or encephalitis in the newborn. The underlying mechanism(s) behind the central nervous system pathology is poorly defined. Methods It is hypothesized that astrocytes may be involved in inflammatory response induced by CVB3 infection. Here we discuss this hypothesis in the context of CVB3 infection and associated inflammatory response in primary mouse astrocytes. Results The results showed that coxsackievirus receptor (CAR) was distributed homogeneously on the astrocytes, and that CVB3 could infect and replicate in astrocytes, with release of infectious virus particles. CVB3 induced cytopathic effect and production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, and chemokine CXCL10 from astrocytes. Conclusion These data suggest that direct astrocyte damage and cytokines induction could be a mechanism of virus-induced meningitis and/or encephalitis. PMID:23693026

  2. Pituitary Adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide orchestrates neuronal regulation of the astrocytic glutamate-releasing mechanism system xc (.).

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghai; Albano, Rebecca; Madayag, Aric; Raddatz, Nicholas; Mantsch, John R; Choi, SuJean; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate signaling is achieved by an elaborate network involving neurons and astrocytes. Hence, it is critical to better understand how neurons and astrocytes interact to coordinate the cellular regulation of glutamate signaling. In these studies, we used rat cortical cell cultures to examine whether neurons or releasable neuronal factors were capable of regulating system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate-releasing mechanism that is expressed primarily by astrocytes and has been shown to regulate synaptic transmission. We found that astrocytes cultured with neurons or exposed to neuronal-conditioned media displayed significantly higher levels of Sxc activity. Next, we demonstrated that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) may be a neuronal factor capable of regulating astrocytes. In support, we found that PACAP expression was restricted to neurons, and that PACAP receptors were expressed in astrocytes. Interestingly, blockade of PACAP receptors in cultures comprised of astrocytes and neurons significantly decreased Sxc activity to the level observed in purified astrocytes, whereas application of PACAP to purified astrocytes increased Sxc activity to the level observed in cultures comprised of neurons and astrocytes. Collectively, these data reveal that neurons coordinate the actions of glutamate-related mechanisms expressed by astrocytes, such as Sxc, a process that likely involves PACAP. A critical gap in modeling excitatory signaling is how distinct components of the glutamate system expressed by neurons and astrocytes are coordinated. In these studies, we found that system xc (-) (Sxc), a glutamate release mechanism expressed by astrocytes, is regulated by releasable neuronal factors including PACAP. This represents a novel form of neuron-astrocyte communication, and highlights the possibility that pathological changes involving astrocytic Sxc may stem from altered neuronal activity. PMID:26851652

  3. Modifications in astrocyte morphology and calcium signaling induced by a brain capillary endothelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Elizabeth J

    2002-04-15

    Astrocytes extend specialized endfoot processes to perisynaptic and perivascular regions, and thus are positioned to mediate the bidirectional flow of metabolic, ionic, and other transmissive substances between neurons and the blood stream. While mutual structural and functional interactions between neurons and astrocytes have been documented, less is known about the interactions between astrocytes and cerebrovascular cells. For example, although the ability of astrocytes to induce structural and functional changes in endothelial cells is established, the reciprocity of brain endothelial cells to induce changes in astrocytes is undetermined. This issue is addressed in the present study. Changes in primary cultures of neonatal mouse cortical astrocytes were investigated following their coculture with mouse brain capillary endothelial (bEnd3) cells. The presence of bEnd3 cells altered the morphology of astrocytes by transforming them from confluent monolayers into networks of elongated multicellular columns. These columns did not occur when either bEnd3 cells or astrocytes were cocultured with other cell types, suggesting that astrocytes undergo specific morphological consequences when placed in close proximity to brain endothelial cells. In addition to these structural changes, the pharmacological profile of astrocytes was modified by coculture with bEnd3 cells. Astrocytes in the cocultures showed an increased Ca2+ responsiveness to bradykinin and glutamate, but no change in responsiveness to ATP, as compared to controls. Coculturing the astrocytes with a neuronal cell line resulted in increased responsiveness of the glial responses to glutamate but not to bradykinin. These studies indicate that brain endothelial cells induce changes in astrocyte morphology and pharmacology. PMID:11948807

  4. Biopathology of astrocytes in human traumatic and complicated brain injuries. Review and hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Castejón, Orlando José

    2015-01-01

    The biopathology of astrocyte cells in severe human brain traumatic injuries complicated with subdural and epidural haematoma and hygroma is reviewed. Clear and dense oedematous and hypertrophic reactive astrocytes are distinguished in severe primary traumatic vasogenic and secondary cytotoxic brain oedema. Swollen perineuronal astrocytes appear compressing and indenting clear and dark degenerated pyramidal and non-pyramidal nerve cells, degenerated myelinated axons and synaptic contacts. Hypertrophic astrocytes display dense cytoplasm and contain numerous rosettes of alpha, beta- and gamma-type glycogen granules, swollen mitochondria, dilated smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum, oedematous Golgi apparatus, microtubules, gliofilaments, intermediate filaments, lysosomes and liposomes. The perisynaptic astrocyte ensheathment of synaptic contacts, containing beta type-glycogen granules, can be traced in the neuropil, surrounding swollen, bead-shaped dendritic profiles, and degenerated myelinated axons. This perisynaptic glial layer is absent in severe oedematous regions. The glycogen-rich and glycogendepleted perivascular astrocyte end-feet appear attached or dissociated from the capillary basement membrane. Phagocytic astrocytes can be seen engulfing degenerated synaptic contacts, necrotic membranes, degenerated myelinated axons, and myelin ovoids. Lipofuscin-rich astrocytes are also observed. The interastrocytary gap junctions appear either widened, fused or fragmented. The key role of aquaporin in astrocyte swelling and brain oedema is emphasized. The findings are compared with those reported in experimental traumatic animal models, a large variety of pathogenetically related neuropathological conditions, and in vivo and in vitro experimental conditions. The contribution of pathological astrocytes to neurobehavioral disorders, such as loss of consciousness, neurological deficits and seizures is emphasized. Some hypotheses are postulated related to the

  5. The use of astrocytes in culture as model systems for evaluating neurotoxic-induced-injury.

    PubMed

    Aschner, M; Kimelberg, H K

    1991-01-01

    The prevailing thought that astrocytes function predominantly as passive metabolic or even physical support for neurons has faded over the last 20 years. Today these stellar shaped cells are credited with an expanded role, playing key functions in CNS development, homeostasis, and pathology. In probing their expanded roles, primary astrocyte culture systems have proven to be an indispensable tool. Astrocytes have been implicated in both a defensive and facilitatory capacity for many toxic injuries. Evidence for a protective role of astrocytes in modulating CNS toxicity is afforded by observations that the toxicity of glutamate to cortical neurons is diminished upon astrocytic enrichment of the cell culture (Rosenberg and Aizenman, 1989). In cultures of rat cerebral cortex in which astrocyte proliferation is stringently suppressed, glutamate neurotoxicity occurs at low glutamate concentrations similar to those which are normally found in the extracellular space in the hippocampus. In the presence of excess astrocytes, concentrations of glutamate one-hundred fold higher are required to produce equivalent neurotoxicity (Rosenberg and Aizenman, 1989). Astrocytes can facilitate the action of neurotoxins via a modulating process which takes place within the astrocyte or by a direct cytotoxic effect. Whereas primary astrocyte cultures remain unaffected by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP; Marini et al., 1989), they function prominently in the selective destruction of dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway in humans, other primates and rodents (Davis et al. 1979; Langston et al., 1983; Burns et al., 1983; Langston et al., 1984; Heikkila et al., 1984; Jarvis and Wagner, 1985). Thus, while MPTP by itself is not toxic to cerebellar cells in co-culture with cerebellar astrocytes, MPTP is toxic to the granule cells (Marini et al, 1989). This is thought to be due to an astrocyte-mediated conversion of MPTP to its highly polar and toxic metabolite, 1

  6. Targeted deletion in astrocyte intermediate filament (Gfap) alters neuronal physiology.

    PubMed Central

    McCall, M A; Gregg, R G; Behringer, R R; Brenner, M; Delaney, C L; Galbreath, E J; Zhang, C L; Pearce, R A; Chiu, S Y; Messing, A

    1996-01-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a member of the family of intermediate filament structural proteins and is found predominantly in astrocytes of the central nervous system (CNS). To assess the function of GFAP, we created GFAP-null mice using gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. The GFAP-null mice have normal development and fertility, and show no gross alterations in behavior or CNS morphology. Astrocytes are present in the CNS of the mutant mice, but contain a severely reduced number of intermediate filaments. Since astrocyte processes contact synapses and may modulate synaptic function, we examined whether the GFAP-null mice were altered in long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The GFAP-null mice displayed enhanced long-term potentiation of both population spike amplitude and excitatory post-synaptic potential slope compared to control mice. These data suggest that GFAP is important for astrocyte-neuronal interactions, and that astrocyte processes play a vital role in modulating synaptic efficacy in the CNS. These mice therefore represent a direct demonstration that a primary defect in astrocytes influences neuronal physiology. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692820

  7. PUMA is invovled in ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis of mouse cerebral astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, H; Tian, M; Jin, L; Jia, H; Jin, Y

    2015-01-22

    PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis), a BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 protein family, is required for p53-dependent and p53-independent forms of apoptosis. PUMA has been invovled in the onset and progress of several diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and ischemic brain disease. Although many studies have shown that ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) can induce the apoptosis of astrocytes, the role of PUMA in I/R-mediated apoptosis of cerebral astrocyte apoptosis remains unclear. To mimic in vivo I/R conditions, primary mouse cerebral astrocytes were incubated in a combinational cultural condition of oxygen, glucose, and serum deprivation (OSGD) for 1 h followed by reperfusion (OSGD/R). Cell death determination assays and cell viability assays indicated that OSGD and OSGD/R induce the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The expression of PUMA was significantly elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD/R. Moreover, targeted down-regulation of PUMA by siRNA transfection significantly decreased the OSGD/R-induced apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. We also found that OSGD and OSGD/R triggered the release of cytochrome c in astrocytes, indicating the dependence on a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was extremely generated during OSGD and OSGD/R, and the elimination of ROS by treated with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) remarkably inhibited the expression of PUMA and the apoptosis of primary cerebral astrocytes. The activation of Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 was extremely elevated in primary cerebral astrocytes during OSGD. In addition, we found that knockdown of PUMA led to the depressed expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 during OSGD/R. These results indicate that PUMA is invovled in the apoptosis of cerebral astrocytes upon I/R injury. PMID:25451294

  8. Hypothermia protects against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced neuronal injury by down-regulating the reverse transport of glutamate by astrocytes as mediated by neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Zhao, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, T; Shang, X; Wang, J; Liu, Y; Kong, Q; Sun, B; Mu, L; Liu, X; Wang, G; Li, H

    2013-05-01

    Glutamate is the major mediator of excitotoxic neuronal death following cerebral ischemia. Under severe ischemic conditions, glutamate transporters can functionally reverse to release glutamate, thereby inducing further neuronal injury. Hypothermia has been shown to protect neurons from brain ischemia. However, the mechanism(s) involved remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism(s) mediating glutamate release during brain ischemia-reperfusion injury under hypothermic conditions. Neuron/astrocyte co-cultures were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) at various temperatures for 2h, and cell viability was assayed 12h after reoxygenation. PI and MAP-2 staining demonstrated that hypothermia significantly decreased neuronal injury. Furthermore, [(3)H]-glutamate uptake assays showed that hypothermia protected rat primary cortical cultures against OGD reoxygenation-induced injury. Protein levels of the astrocytic glutamate transporter, GLT-1, which is primarily responsible for the clearance of extracellular glutamate, were also found to be reduced in a temperature-dependent manner. In contrast, expression of GLT-1 in astrocyte-enriched cultures was found to significantly increase following the addition of neuron-conditioned medium maintained at 37 °C, and to a lesser extent with neuron-conditioned medium at 33 °C. In conclusion, the neuroprotective effects of hypothermia against brain ischemia-reperfusion injury involve down-regulation of astrocytic GLT-1, which mediates the reverse transport of glutamate. Moreover, this process may be regulated by molecules secreted by stressed neurons. PMID:23402854

  9. The Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule, SynCAM1, Mediates Astrocyte-to-Astrocyte and Astrocyte-to-GnRH Neuron Adhesiveness in the Mouse Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Sandau, Ursula S.; Mungenast, Alison E.; McCarthy, Jack; Biederer, Thomas; Corfas, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified synaptic cell adhesion molecule 1 (SynCAM1) as a component of a genetic network involved in the hypothalamic control of female puberty. Although it is well established that SynCAM1 is a synaptic adhesion molecule, its contribution to hypothalamic function is unknown. Here we show that, in addition to the expected neuronal localization illustrated by its presence in GnRH neurons, SynCAM1 is expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes. Cell adhesion assays indicated that SynCAM is recognized by both GnRH neurons and astrocytes as an adhesive partner and promotes cell-cell adhesiveness via homophilic, extracellular domain-mediated interactions. Alternative splicing of the SynCAM1 primary mRNA transcript yields four mRNAs encoding membrane-spanning SynCAM1 isoforms. Variants 1 and 4 are predicted to be both N and O glycosylated. Hypothalamic astrocytes and GnRH-producing GT1-7 cells express mainly isoform 4 mRNA, and sequential N- and O-deglycosylation of proteins extracted from these cells yields progressively smaller SynCAM1 species, indicating that isoform 4 is the predominant SynCAM1 variant expressed in astrocytes and GT1-7 cells. Neither cell type expresses the products of two other SynCAM genes (SynCAM2 and SynCAM3), suggesting that SynCAM-mediated astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-GnRH neuron adhesiveness is mostly mediated by SynCAM1 homophilic interactions. When erbB4 receptor function is disrupted in astrocytes, via transgenic expression of a dominant-negative erbB4 receptor form, SynCAM1-mediated adhesiveness is severely compromised. Conversely, SynCAM1 adhesive behavior is rapidly, but transiently, enhanced in astrocytes by ligand-dependent activation of erbB4 receptors, suggesting that erbB4-mediated events affecting SynCAM1 function contribute to regulate astrocyte adhesive communication. PMID:21486931

  10. Role of Astrocytes in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, Douglas A.; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes express ion channels, transmitter receptors, and transporters and, thus, are endowed with the machinery to sense and respond to neuronal activity. Recent studies have implicated that astrocytes play important roles in physiology, but these cells also emerge as crucial actors in epilepsy. Astrocytes are abundantly coupled through gap junctions allowing them to redistribute elevated K+ and transmitter concentrations from sites of enhanced neuronal activity. Investigation of specimens from patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy and epilepsy models revealed alterations in expression, localization, and function of astroglial K+ and water channels. In addition, malfunction of glutamate transporters and the astrocytic glutamate-converting enzyme, glutamine synthetase, has been observed in epileptic tissue. These findings suggest that dysfunctional astrocytes are crucial players in epilepsy and should be considered as promising targets for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25732035

  11. Binding of a protein to an AU-rich domain of tumour necrosis factor alpha mRNA as a 35 kDa complex and its regulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y U; Rus, H G; Fisher, S N; Pitha, P M; Shin, M L

    1996-06-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) induces tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) gene transcription and increases the mRNA stability. NDV stabilizes TNF alpha mRNA by preventing poly(A) shortening in a protein kinase C-dependent manner. TNF alpha 3'-untranslated region (UTR) contains an AU-rich domain (ARD) with seven AUUUA pentamers, a motif implicated in poly(A) removal and mRNA degradation. In this report, protein binding to TNF alpha ARD and the effects of NDV and kinases on ARD-binding activity were investigated in primary rat astrocytes. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts contained proteins binding to centrally located 27 nt AUUUAUUAUUUAUUUAUUAUUUAUUUA, within TNF alpha ARD. Portions of ARD with a single AUUUA did not show ARD-binding activity. The ARD-protein complexes migrated as two bands on electrophoretic mobility-shift assay. The slower moving complexes appeared either as a broader band or doublets. The UV cross-linked ARD-protein complexes, however, migrated as a single 35 kDa band on SDS/PAGE. In cytoplasmic extracts treated with alkaline phosphatase there was a decrease in the faster moving complex and an increase in the slower moving complex, whereas NDV infection produced the reverse effect. In addition, the faster moving complex was decreased when cytoplasmic extracts from NDV-infected cells were treated with protein phosphatase 1 or 2A. Neither NDV infection nor phosphatase treatment affected the mobility pattern of nuclear extracts. The data indicate that a protein of molecular mass less than 35 kDa binds to a segment of TNF alpha ARD containing primarily UUAUUUAUU motifs, and the ARD-binding activity in cytoplasmic compartment is post-transcriptionally modified. PMID:8687387

  12. Binding of a protein to an AU-rich domain of tumour necrosis factor alpha mRNA as a 35 kDa complex and its regulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y U; Rus, H G; Fisher, S N; Pitha, P M; Shin, M L

    1996-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) induces tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) gene transcription and increases the mRNA stability. NDV stabilizes TNF alpha mRNA by preventing poly(A) shortening in a protein kinase C-dependent manner. TNF alpha 3'-untranslated region (UTR) contains an AU-rich domain (ARD) with seven AUUUA pentamers, a motif implicated in poly(A) removal and mRNA degradation. In this report, protein binding to TNF alpha ARD and the effects of NDV and kinases on ARD-binding activity were investigated in primary rat astrocytes. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic extracts contained proteins binding to centrally located 27 nt AUUUAUUAUUUAUUUAUUAUUUAUUUA, within TNF alpha ARD. Portions of ARD with a single AUUUA did not show ARD-binding activity. The ARD-protein complexes migrated as two bands on electrophoretic mobility-shift assay. The slower moving complexes appeared either as a broader band or doublets. The UV cross-linked ARD-protein complexes, however, migrated as a single 35 kDa band on SDS/PAGE. In cytoplasmic extracts treated with alkaline phosphatase there was a decrease in the faster moving complex and an increase in the slower moving complex, whereas NDV infection produced the reverse effect. In addition, the faster moving complex was decreased when cytoplasmic extracts from NDV-infected cells were treated with protein phosphatase 1 or 2A. Neither NDV infection nor phosphatase treatment affected the mobility pattern of nuclear extracts. The data indicate that a protein of molecular mass less than 35 kDa binds to a segment of TNF alpha ARD containing primarily UUAUUUAUU motifs, and the ARD-binding activity in cytoplasmic compartment is post-transcriptionally modified. PMID:8687387

  13. Astrocytes: Orchestrating synaptic plasticity?

    PubMed

    De Pittà, M; Brunel, N; Volterra, A

    2016-05-26

    Synaptic plasticity is the capacity of a preexisting connection between two neurons to change in strength as a function of neural activity. Because synaptic plasticity is the major candidate mechanism for learning and memory, the elucidation of its constituting mechanisms is of crucial importance in many aspects of normal and pathological brain function. In particular, a prominent aspect that remains debated is how the plasticity mechanisms, that encompass a broad spectrum of temporal and spatial scales, come to play together in a concerted fashion. Here we review and discuss evidence that pinpoints to a possible non-neuronal, glial candidate for such orchestration: the regulation of synaptic plasticity by astrocytes. PMID:25862587

  14. Are astrocytes executive cells within the central nervous system?

    PubMed

    Sica, Roberto E; Caccuri, Roberto; Quarracino, Cecilia; Capani, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that astrocytes play a crucial role in the physiology of the central nervous system (CNS) by modulating synaptic activity and plasticity. Based on what is currently known we postulate that astrocytes are fundamental, along with neurons, for the information processing that takes place within the CNS. On the other hand, experimental findings and human observations signal that some of the primary degenerative diseases of the CNS, like frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, Huntington's dementia, primary cerebellar ataxias and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, all of which affect the human species exclusively, may be due to astroglial dysfunction. This hypothesis is supported by observations that demonstrated that the killing of neurons by non-neural cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of those diseases, at both their onset and their progression. Furthermore, recent findings suggest that astrocytes might be involved in the pathogenesis of some psychiatric disorders as well. PMID:27556379

  15. CHF5074 (CSP-1103) induces microglia alternative activation in plaque-free Tg2576 mice and primary glial cultures exposed to beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Porrini, V; Lanzillotta, A; Branca, C; Benarese, M; Parrella, E; Lorenzini, L; Calzà, L; Flaibani, R; Spano, P F; Imbimbo, B P; Pizzi, M

    2015-08-27

    Activation of microglia associated with neuroinflammation and loss of phagocytic activity is considered to play a prominent role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). CHF5074 (CSP-1103) has been shown to improve cognition and reduce brain inflammation in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). CHF5074 was also found to reverse impairments in recognition memory and improve hippocampal long-term potentiation when administered to plaque-free Tg2576 mice (5-month-old) for 4 weeks. Though, no investigation has focused on the consequence of CHF5074 treatment on microglia polarization yet. In this study we evaluated the effect of CHF5074 administration (375 ppm in the diet) to 5-month-old Tg2576 mice on the expression of pro-inflammatory (M1) genes, Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) and inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS), and anti-inflammatory/phagocytic (M2) markers Mannose Receptor type C 1 (MRC1/CD206), Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) and Chitinase 3-like 3 (Ym1). No changes of pro-inflammatory gene transcription but a reduced expression of MRC1/CD206, TREM2 and Ym1 were detected in the hippocampus of young Tg2576 mice receiving normal diet, when compared to wild-type littermates. CHF5074 did not affect the pro-inflammatory transcription but significantly increased the expression of MRC1/CD206 and Ym1. CHF5074 effects appeared to be hippocampus-specific, as the M2 transcripts were only slightly modified in the cerebral cortex. In primary cultures of mouse astrocyte-microglia, CHF5074 totally suppressed the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS induced by 10 μM β-amyloid1-42 (Aβ42). Moreover, CHF5074 significantly increased the expression of anti-inflammatory/phagocytic markers MRC1/CD206 and TREM2, reduced by the Aβ42 application alone. The effect of CHF5074 was not reproduced by ibuprofen (3 μM or 500 μM) or R-flurbiprofen (3 μM or 100 μM), as both compounds limited the pro

  16. The Role of Intermittent Hypoxia on the Proliferative Inhibition of Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Sheng-Chun; Lin, Yu-Jou; Huang, Sung-Ying; Lien, Chih-Feng; Chen, Shee-Ping; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Lin, Jian-Hong; Yang, Kun-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome, characterized by intermittent hypoxia (IH), is linked with increased oxidative stress. This study investigates the mechanisms underlying IH and the effects of IH-induced oxidative stress on cerebellar astrocytes. Rat primary cerebellar astrocytes were kept in an incubator with an oscillating O2 concentration between 20% and 5% every 30 min for 1–4 days. Although the cell loss increased with the duration, the IH incubation didn’t induce apoptosis or necrosis, but rather a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of cerebellar astrocytes was noted. ROS accumulation was associated with cell loss during IH. PARP activation, resulting in p21 activation and cyclin D1 degradation was associated with cell cycle G0/G1 arrest of IH-treated cerebellar astrocytes. Our results suggest that IH induces cell loss by enhancing oxidative stress, PARP activation and cell cycle G0/G1 arrest in rat primary cerebellar astrocytes. PMID:26172116

  17. Enhanced expression of the calcium-sensing receptor in reactive astrocytes following ischemic injury in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pak, Ha-Jin; Riew, Tae-Ryong; Shin, Yoo-Jin; Choi, Jeong-Heon; Jin, Xuyan; Lee, Mun-Yong

    2016-07-15

    We recently demonstrated that the G protein-coupled calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is associated with the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke and may be involved in vascular remodeling and astrogliosis. To further substantiate the involvement of CaSR in the astroglial reaction common to ischemic insults, we investigated the temporal and cell type-specific expression patterns of CaSR in the hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia. CaSR was constitutively expressed in neurons of the pyramidal and granule cell layers, whereas increased CaSR immunoreactivity was observed in reactive astrocytes, but not in activated microglia or macrophages, in the CA1 region of the post-ischemic hippocampus. Astroglial induction of CaSR expression was evident on days 3-7 after reperfusion and appeared to increase progressively through day 28, at which time CaSR expression was prominent in astrocytes with a highly reactive hypertrophic phenotype and elevated levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein. This expression pattern was supported by results of immunoblot analyses. Furthermore, CaSR expression was upregulated in rat primary cortical astrocytes exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation, which undergo reactive gliosis-like changes. Thus, our results demonstrate that selective and long-lasting astroglial induction of CaSR expression is a common characteristic of ischemic injury and suggest its involvement in the ischemia-induced astroglial reaction. PMID:27288786

  18. INTEGRATED DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS (DBP) MIXTURES RESEARCH: GENE EXPRESSION ALTERATIONS IN PRIMARY RAT HEPATOCYTE CULTURES EXPOSED TO DBP MIXTURES FORMED BY CHLORINATION AND OZONATION/POSTCHLORINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    What is the study?
    This study was designed to provide data on the in vitro toxicity of water concentrates containing complex mixtures of DBPs. Rat hepatocytes in primary culture were exposed for 24 hr to full strength, 1:10 or 1:20 dilutions of chlorination or ozonation/chl...

  19. Increasing Nurturing Relationships between Primary Caregivers and Infants Prenatally Exposed to Cocaine through a Neighbor-Implemented Individual and Group Training Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrentino, Michael P.

    This practicum was designed to increase nurturing relationships between primary caregivers and infants prenatally exposed to cocaine. Goals were to increase the general emotional well-being of the caregivers within the family unit, to increase the interpersonal competence of the caregivers in relation to the care receiving infants, and to increase…

  20. Determine the yield of micronucleated cells in primary human fibroblasts exposed to focused soft X-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin M. Prise

    2007-01-02

    This project was a small part of a larger collaborative study headed by Dr Aloke Chatterjee, (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) and including Drs Les Braby, John Ford (Texas A&M) and Kathy Held (MGH Boston), which was developing an integrated theoretical and experimental model of the radiation-induced bystander response. Our part of the study has been to determine the effectiveness of soft X-rays at inducing chromosomal damage under conditions of direct and bystander exposure. The aim was to compare this with the effectiveness of the low energy 60 kV electron microbeam available at Texas A&M. Previous studies have been performed with primary human fibroblasts measuring micronuclei formation to determine the relative yields of direct versus bystander mediated micronuclei formation after cells were individually irradiated utilizing our novel focused soft X-ray microprobe, which is capable of producing localized submicron beams of carbon-K (278 eV) X-rays. Only a brief overview is given here as the study has been published in several papers. Our original hypothesis was to study yields of bystander-induced micronucleated cells in both wild-type and mutant fibroblast from mouse embryo fibroblasts. Difficulties with the level of background micronuclei in the MEFs prevented systematic studies of bystander responses in the laboratories involved in the collaboration. We then performed these studies with AG1522 primary human fibroblast cells using a siRNA approach developed by John Ford at Texas A&M to knock down DNA PKcs in the first instance. Our soft X-ray source has been in routine use for carbon-K X-rays and is now available with Aluminium-K (1.49 keV) and titanium-K (4.5 keV), although the dose-rate from titanium is still too low at present for most experiments, where large numbers of cells need to be exposed. A separately funded project developed a new soft X-ray microprobe which will give much greater flexibility for changing energies and giving high dose

  1. Glia Maturation Factor Deficiency Suppresses 1-Methyl-4-Phenylpyridinium-Induced Oxidative Stress in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Zaheer, Smita; Zaheer, Asgar

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is closely intertwined with pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Increasing evidence suggests that inhibition of glia-mediated inflammation might represent a promising therapeutic target for PD. Glia maturation factor (GMF), an inflammatory protein, predominantly localized in astrocytes is previously isolated, sequenced and cloned in our laboratory. In the present investigation, we demonstrate that GMF-deficiency in astrocytes upregulates the antioxidant status and limit the extent of lipid peroxidation and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) along with diminished nuclear factor-κB-mediated inflammatory responses in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced toxicity. Primary astrocytes obtained from wild-type (Wt) and GMF-deficient (GMF-KO) mice were treated with 5, 10, and 20 μM MPP+ for 24, 48, and 72 h in vitro. Our results show decreased release of ROS and increased level of glutathione in astrocytes obtained from GMF-KO mice when compared to astrocytes derived from Wt mice following MPP+ treatment. Additionally, we found decreased activity of NF-κB, and reduced levels of proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor- α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-17, IL-33, and chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in GMF-KO astrocytes when compared to Wt astrocytes. Our overall results suggest that GMF-KO astrocytes are significantly resistant to MPP+ toxicity when compared to Wt astrocytes. PMID:24430624

  2. Differences in vulnerability of neurons and astrocytes to heme oxygenase-1 modulation: Implications for mitochondrial ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Song, Ning; Guo, Xinli; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Haoyun; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was observed in both astrocytes and neurons in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the current study, we investigated whether HO-1 behaves differently between neurons and astrocytes under the condition of neurotoxicity related to PD. The results showed a time-dependent HO-1 upregulation in primary cultured ventral mesencephalon neurons and astrocytes treated with the mitochondria complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) or recombinant α-synuclein. However, HO-1 upregulation appeared much later in neurons than in astrocytes. The HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) aggravated MPP(+)- or α-synuclein-induced oxidative damage in both astrocytes and neurons, indicating that this HO-1 response was cytoprotective. For neurons, the HO-1 activator cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) exerted protective effects against MPP(+) or α-synuclein during moderate HO-1 upregulation, but it aggravated damage at the peak of the HO-1 response. For astrocytes, CoPPIXalways showed protective effects. Higher basal and CoPPIX-induced mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) levels were detected in astrocytes. Lentivirus-mediated MtFt overexpression rescued the neuronal damage induced by CoPPIX, indicating that large MtFt buffering capacity contributes to pronounced HO-1 tolerance in astrocytes. Such findings suggest that astrocyte-targeted HO-1 interventions and MtFt modulations have potential as novel pharmacological strategies in PD. PMID:27097841

  3. Complement Peptide C3a Promotes Astrocyte Survival in Response to Ischemic Stress.

    PubMed

    Shinjyo, Noriko; de Pablo, Yolanda; Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela

    2016-07-01

    Astrocytes are the most numerous cells in the central nervous system with a range of homeostatic and regulatory functions. Under normal conditions as well as after ischemia, astrocytes promote neuronal survival. We have previously reported that the complement-derived peptide C3a stimulates neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells and protects the immature brain tissue against hypoxic-ischemic injury. Here, we studied the effects of C3a on the response of mouse cortical astrocytes to ischemia. We have found that chemical ischemia, induced by combined inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis, upregulates the expression of C3a receptor in cultured primary astrocytes. C3a treatment protected wild-type but not C3a receptor-deficient astrocytes from cell death induced by chemical ischemia or oxygen-glucose deprivation by reducing ERK signaling and caspase-3 activation. C3a attenuated ischemia-induced upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein; however, the protective effects of C3a were not dependent on the presence of the astrocyte intermediate filament system. Pre-treatment of astrocytes with C3a during recovery abrogated the ischemia-induced neuroprotective phenotype of astrocytes. Jointly, these results provide the first evidence that the complement peptide C3a modulates the response of astrocytes to ischemia and increases their ability to cope with ischemic stress. PMID:25972241

  4. Differences in vulnerability of neurons and astrocytes to heme oxygenase-1 modulation: Implications for mitochondrial ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaojun; Song, Ning; Guo, Xinli; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Haoyun; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was observed in both astrocytes and neurons in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the current study, we investigated whether HO-1 behaves differently between neurons and astrocytes under the condition of neurotoxicity related to PD. The results showed a time-dependent HO-1 upregulation in primary cultured ventral mesencephalon neurons and astrocytes treated with the mitochondria complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) or recombinant α-synuclein. However, HO-1 upregulation appeared much later in neurons than in astrocytes. The HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) aggravated MPP+- or α-synuclein-induced oxidative damage in both astrocytes and neurons, indicating that this HO-1 response was cytoprotective. For neurons, the HO-1 activator cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) exerted protective effects against MPP+ or α-synuclein during moderate HO-1 upregulation, but it aggravated damage at the peak of the HO-1 response. For astrocytes, CoPPIXalways showed protective effects. Higher basal and CoPPIX-induced mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) levels were detected in astrocytes. Lentivirus-mediated MtFt overexpression rescued the neuronal damage induced by CoPPIX, indicating that large MtFt buffering capacity contributes to pronounced HO-1 tolerance in astrocytes. Such findings suggest that astrocyte-targeted HO-1 interventions and MtFt modulations have potential as novel pharmacological strategies in PD. PMID:27097841

  5. Glia maturation factor deficiency suppresses 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced oxidative stress in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Zaheer, Smita; Zaheer, Asgar

    2014-08-01

    Inflammation is closely intertwined with pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Increasing evidence suggests that inhibition of glia-mediated inflammation might represent a promising therapeutic target for PD. Glia maturation factor (GMF), an inflammatory protein, predominantly localized in astrocytes is previously isolated, sequenced and cloned in our laboratory. In the present investigation, we demonstrate that GMF-deficiency in astrocytes upregulates the antioxidant status and limit the extent of lipid peroxidation and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) along with diminished nuclear factor-κB-mediated inflammatory responses in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced toxicity. Primary astrocytes obtained from wild-type (Wt) and GMF-deficient (GMF-KO) mice were treated with 5, 10, and 20 μM MPP(+) for 24, 48, and 72 h in vitro. Our results show decreased release of ROS and increased level of glutathione in astrocytes obtained from GMF-KO mice when compared to astrocytes derived from Wt mice following MPP(+) treatment. Additionally, we found decreased activity of NF-κB, and reduced levels of proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor- α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-17, IL-33, and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) in GMF-KO astrocytes when compared to Wt astrocytes. Our overall results suggest that GMF-KO astrocytes are significantly resistant to MPP(+) toxicity when compared to Wt astrocytes. PMID:24430624

  6. Astrocytes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ludwin, Samuel K; Rao, Vijayaraghava Ts; Moore, Craig S; Antel, Jack P

    2016-08-01

    Recent experimental and clinical studies on astrocytes are unraveling the capabilities of these multi-functional cells in normal homeostasis, and in central nervous system (CNS) disease. This review focuses on understanding their behavior in all aspects of the initiation, evolution, and resolution of the multiple sclerosis (MS) lesion. Astrocytes display remarkable flexibility and variability of their physical structure and biochemical output, each aspect finely tuned to the specific stage and location of the disease, participating in both pathogenic and beneficial changes seen in acute and progressive forms. As examples, chemo-attractive or repulsive molecules may facilitate the entry of destructive immune cells but may also aid in the recruitment of oligodendrocyte precursors, essential for repair. Pro-inflammatory cytokines may attack pathogenic cells and also destroy normal oligodendrocytes, myelin, and axons. Protective trophic factors may also open the blood-brain barrier and modulate the extracellular matrix to favor recruitment and persistence of CNS-specific immune cells. A chronic glial scar may confer structural support following tissue loss and inhibit ingress of further noxious insults and also inhibit migration of reparative cells and molecules into the damaged tissue. Continual study into these processes offers the therapeutic opportunities to enhance the beneficial capabilities of these cells while limiting their destructive effects. PMID:27207458

  7. Neuronal influences are necessary to produce mitochondrial co-localization with glutamate transporters in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ugbode, Christopher I; Hirst, Warren D; Rattray, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the predominant astrocyte glutamate transporter, GLT-1/ Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2 (EAAT2) is associated with mitochondria. We used primary cultures of mouse astrocytes to assess co-localization of GLT-1 with mitochondria, and tested whether the interaction was dependent on neurons, actin polymerization or the kinesin adaptor, TRAK2. Mouse primary astrocytes were transfected with constructs expressing V5-tagged GLT-1, pDsRed1-Mito with and without dominant negative TRAK2. Astrocytes were visualized using confocal microscopy and co-localization was quantified using Volocity software. Image analysis of confocal z-stacks revealed no co-localization between mitochondria and GLT-1 in pure astrocyte cultures. Co-culture of astrocytes with primary mouse cortical neurons revealed more mitochondria in processes and a positive correlation between mitochondria and GLT-1. This co-localization was not further enhanced after neuronal depolarization induced by 1 h treatment with 15 mM K+. In pure astrocytes, a rho kinase inhibitor, Y27632 caused the distribution of mitochondria to astrocyte processes without enhancing GLT-1/mitochondrial co-localization, however, in co-cultures, Y27632 abolished mitochondrial:GLT-1 co-localization. Disrupting potential mitochondrial: kinesin interactions using dominant negative TRAK2 did not alter GLT-1 distribution or GLT-1: mitochondrial co-localization. We conclude that the association between GLT-1 and mitochondria is modest, is driven by synaptic activity and dependent on polymerized actin filaments.Mitochondria have limited co-localization with the glutamate transporter GLT-1 in primary astrocytes in culture. Few mitochondria are in the fine processes where GLT-1 is abundant. It is necessary to culture astrocytes with neurones to drive a significant level of co-localization, but co-localization is not further altered by depolarization, manipulating sodium ion gradients or Na/K ATPase activity. PMID

  8. Effect of 8-bromo-cAMP and dexamethasone on glutamate metabolism in rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zielke, H.R.; Tildon, J.T.; Landry, M.E.; Max, S.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in cultured rat astrocytes was measured in extracts and compared to the intracellular rate of glutamine synthesis by intact control astrocytes or astrocytes exposed to 1 mM 8-bromo-cAMP (8Br-cAMP) + 1 microM dexamethasone (DEX) for 4 days. GS activity in extracts of astrocytes treated with 8Br-cAMP + DEX was 7.5 times greater than the activity in extracts of control astrocytes. In contrast, the intracellular rate of glutamine synthesis by intact cells increased only 2-fold, suggesting that additional intracellular effectors regulate the expression of GS activity inside the intact cell. The rate of glutamine synthesis by astrocytes was 4.3 times greater in MEM than in HEPES buffered Hank's salts. Synthesis of glutamine by intact astrocytes cultured in MEM was independent of the external glutamine or ammonia concentrations but was increased by higher extracellular glutamate concentrations. In studies with intact astrocytes 80% of the original (U-{sup 14}C)glutamate was recovered in the medium as radioactive glutamine, 2-3% as aspartate, and 7% as glutamate after 2 hours for both control and treated astrocytes. The results suggest: (1) astrocytes are highly efficient in the conversion of glutamate to glutamine; (2) induction of GS activity increases the rate of glutamate conversion to glutamine by astrocytes and the rate of glutamine release into the medium; (3) endogenous intracellular regulators of GS activity control the flux of glutamate through this enzymatic reaction; and (4) the composition of the medium alters the rate of glutamine synthesis from external glutamate.

  9. Parkinsonian toxin-induced oxidative stress inhibits basal autophagy in astrocytes via NQO2/quinone oxidoreductase 2: Implications for neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Janda, Elzbieta; Lascala, Antonella; Carresi, Cristina; Parafati, Maddalena; Aprigliano, Serafina; Russo, Vanessa; Savoia, Claudia; Ziviani, Elena; Musolino, Vincenzo; Morani, Federica; Isidoro, Ciro; Mollace, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) stimulates autophagy in different cellular systems, but it remains controversial if this rule can be generalized. We have analyzed the effect of chronic OS induced by the parkinsonian toxin paraquat (PQ) on autophagy in astrocytoma cells and primary astrocytes, which represent the first cellular target of neurotoxins in the brain. PQ decreased the basal levels of LC3-II and LC3-positive vesicles, and its colocalization with lysosomal markers, both in the absence and presence of chloroquine. This was paralleled by increased number and size of SQSTM1/p62 aggregates. Downregulation of autophagy was also observed in cells chronically exposed to hydrogen peroxide or nonlethal concentrations of PQ, and it was associated with a reduced astrocyte capability to protect dopaminergic cells from OS in co-cultures. Surprisingly, PQ treatment led to inhibition of MTOR, activation of MAPK8/JNK1 and MAPK1/ERK2-MAPK3/ERK1 and upregulation of BECN1/Beclin 1 expression, all signals typically correlating with induction of autophagy. Reduction of OS by NMDPEF, a specific NQO2 inhibitor, but not by N-acetylcysteine, abrogated the inhibitory effect of PQ and restored autophagic flux. Activation of NQO2 by PQ or menadione and genetic manipulation of its expression confirmed the role of this enzyme in the inhibitory action of PQ on autophagy. PQ did not induce NFE2L2/NRF2, but when it was co-administered with NMDPEF NFE2L2 activity was enhanced in a SQSTM1-independent fashion. Thus, a prolonged OS in astrocytes inhibits LC3 lipidation and impairs autophagosome formation and autophagic flux, in spite of concomitant activation of several pro-autophagic signals. These findings outline an unanticipated neuroprotective role of astrocyte autophagy and identify in NQO2 a novel pharmacological target for its positive modulation. PMID:26046590

  10. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes. PMID:26976322

  11. Galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry formation induced by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Chen, Wenliang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Bin; Chen, Aanjing; He, Ying; Wang, Jian; Li, Xingang

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most lethal primary brain tumors found in humans. In high-grade gliomas, vasculogenic mimicry is often detected and has been correlated with prognosis, thus suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target. Vasculogenic mimicry mainly forms vascular-like channels independent of endothelial cells; however, little is known about the relationship between astrocytes and vasculogenic mimicry. In our study, we demonstrated that the presence of astrocytes promoted vasculogenic mimicry. With suspension microarray technology and in vitro tube formation assays, we identified that astrocytes relied on TGF-β1 to enhance vasculogenic mimicry. We also found that vasculogenic mimicry was inhibited by galunisertib, a promising TGF-β1 inhibitor currently being studied in an ongoing trial in glioma patients. The inhibition was partially attributed to a decrease in autophagy after galunisertib treatment. Moreover, we observed a decrease in VE-cadherin and smooth muscle actin-α expression, as well as down-regulation of Akt and Flk phosphorylation in galunisertib-treated glioma cells. By comparing tumor weight and volume in a xenograft model, we acquired promising results to support our theory. This study expands our understanding of the role of astrocytes in gliomas and demonstrates that galunisertib inhibits glioma vasculogenic mimicry induced by astrocytes. PMID:26976322

  12. Active Sulforhodamine 101 Uptake into Hippocampal Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Christian; Hagos, Yohannes; Hülsmann, Swen

    2012-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is widely used as a marker of astrocytes. In this study we investigated labeling of astrocytes by SR101 in acute slices from the ventrolateral medulla and the hippocampus of transgenic mice expressing EGFP under the control of the astrocyte-specific human GFAP promoter. While SR101 efficiently and specifically labeled EGFP-expressing astrocytes in hippocampus, we found that the same staining procedure failed to label astrocytes efficiently in the ventrolateral medulla. Although carbenoxolone is able to decrease the SR101-labeling of astrocytes in the hippocampus, it is unlikely that SR101 is taken up via gap-junction hemichannels because mefloquine, a blocker for pannexin and connexin hemichannels, was unable to prevent SR101-labeling of hippocampal astrocytes. However, SR101-labeling of the hippocampal astrocytes was significantly reduced by substrates of organic anion transport polypeptides, including estron-3-sulfate and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, suggesting that SR101 is actively transported into hippocampal astrocytes. PMID:23189143

  13. Ischemia preconditioning protects astrocytes from ischemic injury through 14-3-3γ.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ying; Chai, Chao Rui; Gao, Kai; Jia, Xi Hua; Kong, Jin Ge; Chen, Xiao Qian; Vatcher, Greg; Chen, Jian Guo; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi

    2015-10-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability, and new strategies are required to reduce neuronal injury and improve prognosis. Ischemia preconditioning (IPC) is an intrinsic phenomenon that protects cells from subsequent ischemic injury and might provide promising mechanisms for clinical treatment. In this study, primary astrocytes exhibited significantly less cell death than control when exposed to different durations of IPC (15, 30, 60, or 120 min). A 15-min duration was the most effective IPC to protect astrocytes from 8-hr-ischemia injury. The protective mechanisms of IPC involve the upregulation of protective proteins, including 14-3-3γ, and attenuation of malondialdehyde (MDA) content and ATP depletion. 14-3-3γ is an antiapoptotic intracellular protein that was significantly upregulated for up to 84 hr after IPC. In addition, IPC promoted activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)-1/2, p38, and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathways. When JNK was specifically inhibited with SP600125, the upregulation of 14-3-3γ induced by IPC was almost completely abolished; however, there was no effect on ATP or MDA levels. This suggests that, even though both energy preservation and 14-3-3γ up-regulation were turned on by IPC, they were controlled by different pathways. The ERK1/2, p38, and Akt signaling pathways were not involved in the 14-3-3γ upregulation and energy preservation. These results indicate that IPC could protect astrocytes from ischemia injury by inducing 14-3-3γ and by alleviating energy depletion through different pathways, suggesting multiple protection of IPC and providing new insights into potential stroke therapies. PMID:25711139

  14. Prostaglandin E2 released from activated microglia enhances astrocyte proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dan; Hu Xiaoming; Qian Li; Wilson, Belinda; Lee, Christopher; Flood, Patrick; Langenbach, Robert; Hong, J.-S.

    2009-07-01

    Microglial activation has been implicated in many astrogliosis-related pathological conditions including astroglioma; however, the detailed mechanism is not clear. In this study, we used primary enriched microglia and astrocyte cultures to determine the role of microglial prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) in the proliferation of astrocytes. The proliferation of astrocytes was measured by BrdU incorporation. The level of PGE{sub 2} was measured by ELISA method. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of COX-2 in microglia were also applied in this study. We found that proliferation of astrocytes increased following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment in the presence of microglia. Furthermore, increased proliferation of astrocytes was observed in the presence of conditioned media from LPS-treated microglia. The potential involvement of microglial PGE{sub 2} in enhanced astrocyte proliferation was suggested by the findings that PGE{sub 2} production and COX-2 expression in microglia were increased by LPS treatment. In addition, activated microglia-induced increases in astrocyte proliferation were blocked by the PGE{sub 2} antagonist AH6809, COX-2 selective inhibitor DuP-697 or by genetic knockout of microglial COX-2. These findings were further supported by the finding that addition of PGE{sub 2} to the media significantly induced astrocyte proliferation. These results indicate that microglial PGE{sub 2} plays an important role in astrocyte proliferation, identifying PGE{sub 2} as a key neuroinflammatory molecule that triggers the pathological response related to uncontrollable astrocyte proliferation. These findings are important in elucidating the role of activated microglia and PGE{sub 2} in astrocyte proliferation and in suggesting a potential avenue in the use of anti-inflammatory agents for the therapy of astroglioma.

  15. Postischemic Oxidative Stress Promotes Mitochondrial Metabolic Failure in Neurons and Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fiskum, Gary; Danilov, Camelia A.; Mehrabian, Zara; Bambrick, Linda L.; Kristian, Tibor; McKenna, Mary C.; Hopkins, Irene; Richards, E.M.; Rosenthal, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been closely associated in many subcellular, cellular, animal, and human studies of both acute brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. Our animal models of brain injury caused by cardiac arrest illustrate this relationship and demonstrate that both oxidative molecular modifications and mitochondrial metabolic impairment are exacerbated by reoxygenation of the brain using 100% ventilatory O2 compared to lower levels that maintain normoxemia. Numerous molecular mechanisms may be responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction caused by oxidative stress, including oxidation and inactivation of mitochondrial proteins, promotion of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition, and consumption of metabolic cofactors and intermediates, e.g., NAD(H). Moreover, the relative contribution of these mechanisms to cell injury and death is likely different among different types of brain cells, e.g., neurons and astrocytes. In order to better understand these oxidative stress mechanisms and their relevance to neurologic disorders, we have undertaken studies with primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons exposed to O2 and glucose deprivation and reoxygenation and compared the results of these studies to those using a rat model of neonatal asphyxic brain injury. These results support the hypothesis that release and or consumption of mitochondrial NAD(H) is at least partially responsible for respiratory inhibition, particularly in neurons. PMID:19076438

  16. Antidepressants Impact Connexin 43 Channel Functions in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeanson, Tiffany; Pondaven, Audrey; Ezan, Pascal; Mouthon, Franck; Charvériat, Mathieu; Giaume, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Glial cells, and in particular astrocytes, are crucial to maintain neuronal microenvironment by regulating energy metabolism, neurotransmitter uptake, gliotransmission, and synaptic development. Moreover, a typical feature of astrocytes is their high expression level of connexins, a family of membrane proteins that form gap junction channels allowing intercellular exchanges and hemichannels that provide release and uptake pathways for neuroactive molecules. Interestingly, several studies have revealed unexpected changes in astrocytes from depressive patients and rodent models of depressive-like behavior. Moreover, changes in the expression level of the astroglial connexin 43 (Cx43) have been reported in a depressive context. On the other hand, antidepressive drugs have also been shown to impact the expression of this connexin in astrocytes. However, so far there is little information concerning the functional consequence of these changes, i.e., the status of gap junctional communication and hemichannel activity in astrocytes exposed to antidepressants. In the present work we focused our attention on the action of seven antidepressants from four different therapeutic classes and tested their effects on Cx43 expression and on the two connexin-based channels functions studied in cultured astrocytes. We here report that when used at non-toxic and clinically relevant concentrations they have no effects on Cx43 expression but differential effects on Cx43 gap junction channels. Moreover, all tested antidepressants inhibit Cx43 hemichannel with different efficiency depending on their therapeutic classe. By studying the impact of antidepressants on the functional status of astroglial connexin channels, contributing to dynamic neuroglial interactions, our observations should help to better understand the mechanism by which these drugs provide their effect in the brain. PMID:26778961

  17. Malignant gliomas induce and exploit astrocytic mesenchymal-like transition by activating canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Wang, Yajing; Liu, Xiuting; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kequan; Wang, Qing; Hu, Rong

    2016-07-01

    The complex microenvironment of malignant gliomas plays a dynamic and usually cancer-promoting role in glioma progression. Astrocytes, the major stromal cells in the brain, can be activated by glioma microenvironment, resulting in a layer of reactive astrocytes surrounding the gliomas. Reactive astrocytes are universally characterized with the upregulation of glial fibrillary protein and glycoprotein podoplanin. In this work, we investigated the role of reactive astrocytes on malignant glioma microenvironment and the potential mechanism by which glioma cells activated the tumor-associated astrocytes (TAAs). The reactive astrocytes were observed around gliomas in the intracranial syngeneic implantation of rat C6 and mouse GL261 glioma cells in vivo, as well as primary astrocytes cultured with glioma cells condition medium in vitro. Besides, reactive astrocytes exhibited distinct epithelial-to-mesenchymal (-like) transition and enhanced migration and invasion activity, with the decrease of E-cadherin and concomitant increase of vimentin and matrix metalloproteinases. Furthermore, canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated in TAAs. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway inhibitor XAV939 and β-catenin plasmid were used to verify the regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on TAAs and their invasion ability. Taken together, our findings established that glioma cells remarkably activated astrocytes via upregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling, with obviously mesenchymal-like transition and increased migration and invasion ability, indicating that glioma cells may stimulate adjacent astrocytes to degrade extracellular matrix and thereby promoting tumor invasiveness. PMID:27236327

  18. Reactive Transformation and Increased BDNF Signaling by Hippocampal Astrocytes in Response to MK-801

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yueming; Li, Guanjun; Wang, Lihua; Li, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    MK-801, also known as dizocilpine, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist that induces schizophrenia-like symptoms. While astrocytes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, astrocytic responses to MK-801 and their significance to schizotypic symptoms are unclear. Changes in the expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP), a marker of astrocyte activation in response to a variety of pathogenic stimuli, were examined in the hippocampus of rats treated with the repeated MK-801 injection (0.5 mg/10ml/kg body weight for 6 days) and in primary cultured hippocampal astrocytes incubated with MK-801 (5 or 20 μM for 24 h). Moreover, the expression levels of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75 were examined in MK-801-treated astrocyte cultures. MK-801 treatment enhanced GFAP expression in the rat hippocampus and also increased the levels of GFAP protein and mRNA in hippocampal astrocytes in vitro. Treatment of cultured hippocampal astrocytes with MK-801 enhanced protein and mRNA levels of BDNF, TrkB, and p75. Collectively, our results suggest that hippocampal astrocytes may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia symptoms associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by reactive transformation and altered BDNF signaling. PMID:26700309

  19. Astrocytic activation in the anterior cingulate cortex is critical for sleep disorder under neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Akira; Hamada, Asami; Suhara, Yuki; Kawabe, Rui; Yanase, Makoto; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Narita, Michiko; Matsui, Ryosuke; Okano, Hideyuki; Narita, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    Insomnia, depression, and anxiety disorder are common problems for people with neuropathic pain. In this study, mild noxious heat stimuli increased the duration and number of spontaneous pain-like behaviors in sciatic nerve-ligated mice. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to visualize the increased blood oxygenation level-dependent signal intensity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of mice with sciatic nerve ligation under mild noxious stimuli. Such stimuli significantly increased the release of glutamate in the ACC of nerve-ligated mice. In addition, sciatic nerve ligation and mild noxious stimuli changed the morphology of astrocytes in the ACC. Treatment of cortical astrocytes with glutamate caused astrocytic activation, as detected by a stellate morphology. Furthermore, glutamate induced the translocation of GAT-3 to astrocyte cell membranes using primary cultured glial cells from the mouse cortex. Moreover, the GABA level at the synaptic cleft in the ACC of nerve-ligated mice was significantly decreased exposure to mild noxious stimuli. Finally, we investigated whether astrocytic activation in the ACC could directly mediate sleep disorder. With the optogenetic tool channel rhodopsin-2 (ChR2), we demonstrated that selective photostimulation of these astrocytes in vivo triggered sleep disturbance. Taken together, these results suggest that neuropathic pain-like stimuli activated astrocytes in the ACC and decreased the extracellular concentration of GABA via an increase in the release of glutamate. Furthermore, these findings provide novel evidence that astrocytic activation in the ACC can mimic sleep disturbance in mice. PMID:24488840

  20. Phosphorylation Status of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Distinguishes Metabolic Phenotypes of Cultured Rat Brain Astrocytes and Neurons

    PubMed Central

    HALIM, NADER D.; McFATE, THOMAS; MOHYELDIN, AHMED; OKAGAKI, PETER; KOROTCHKINA, LIOUBOV G; PATEL, MULCHAND S; JEOUNG, NAM HO; HARRIS, ROBERT A.; SCHELL, MICHAEL J.; VERMA, AJAY

    2010-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in nervous tissue has been proposed to occur in a compartmentalized manner with astrocytes contributing largely to glycolysis and neurons being the primary site of glucose oxidation. However, mammalian astrocytes and neurons both contain mitochondria and it remains unclear why in culture neurons oxidize glucose, lactate, and pyruvate to a much larger extent than astrocytes. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyruvate metabolism is differentially regulated in cultured neurons vs. astrocytes. Expression of all components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC), the rate-limiting step for pyruvate entry into the Krebs cycle, was determined in cultured astrocytes and neurons. In addition, regulation of PDC enzymatic activity in the two cell types via protein phosphorylation was examined. We show that all components of the PDC are expressed in both cell types in culture but that PDC activity is kept strongly inhibited in astrocytes through phosphorylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase alpha subunit (PDHα). In contrast, neuronal PDC operates close to maximal levels with much lower levels of phosphorlyated PDHα. Dephosphorylation of astrocytic PDHα restores PDC activity and lowers lactate production. Our findings suggest that the glucose metabolism of astrocytes and neurons may be far more flexible than previously believed. PMID:20544852

  1. Meteorin is upregulated in reactive astrocytes and functions as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Shin; Lee, Soon-Hee; Cha, Jong-Ho; Seo, Ji Hae; Ahn, Bum Ju; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2015-08-01

    Reactive gliosis is a glial response to a wide range of central nervous system insults, which results in cellular and molecular changes to resting glial cells. Despite its fundamental effect on neuropathologies, the identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression profile and functions of the astrocytic neurotrophic factor, meteorin, in the progression of reactive gliosis. A mouse model of photothrombotic ischemia, and a primary astrocyte culture were used in the present study. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to examine the expression levels of meteorin and reactive gliosis markers. Increased expression levels of meteorin were observed in reactive astrocytes in a photothrombotic ischemia mouse model, as well as in cultured astrocytes, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1. Exogenous treatment of the astrocytes with meteorin did not induce janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling, however, silencing the expression of meteorin in the astrocytes resulted in an upregulation of reactive astrocyte markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100β, indicating that endogenous meteorin is required for the maintenance of astrocytic homeostasis. These results suggested a novel role for meteorin as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis. PMID:25873382

  2. Meteorin is upregulated in reactive astrocytes and functions as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis

    PubMed Central

    LEE, HYE SHIN; LEE, SOON-HEE; CHA, JONG-HO; SEO, JI HAE; AHN, BUM JU; KIM, KYU-WON

    2015-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is a glial response to a wide range of central nervous system insults, which results in cellular and molecular changes to resting glial cells. Despite its fundamental effect on neuropathologies, the identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression profile and functions of the astrocytic neurotrophic factor, meteorin, in the progression of reactive gliosis. A mouse model of photothrombotic ischemia, and a primary astrocyte culture were used in the present study. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to examine the expression levels of meteorin and reactive gliosis markers. Increased expression levels of meteorin were observed in reactive astrocytes in a photothrombotic ischemia mouse model, as well as in cultured astrocytes, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1. Exogenous treatment of the astrocytes with meteorin did not induce janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling, however, silencing the expression of meteorin in the astrocytes resulted in an upregulation of reactive astrocyte markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100β, indicating that endogenous meteorin is required for the maintenance of astrocytic homeostasis. These results suggested a novel role for meteorin as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis. PMID:25873382

  3. [Relationship between the oxidation-reduction system of astrocytes with production of active forms of oxygen].

    PubMed

    Semenkova, G N; Kvacheva, Z B; Obydennikova, S V; Cherenkevich, S N; Titov, L P

    1998-01-01

    Cells of neuroglia--the astrocytes are of interest from the point of view of their participation in phagocytosis. Phagocyte ability to generate active oxygen forms (AOF) as used as the basic criterion of the estimation of their functional activity. For the purpose to clear up molecular and cellular mechanisms of phagocytosis a study of astrocyte redox-systems, participating in production of AOF, was undertaken. Registration of AOF in astrocytes was carried out using a method of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Primary culture of guinea pig astrocytes was used. Spontaneous chemiluminescence of low intensity was found for the astrocytes at the presence of luminol. The destruction of the cells was accompanied by a significant growth of the intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence. Suspension of endocutosis inductors, particle of latex and phytohemagglutinin, added to astrocytes did not result in formation of AOF, characteristic for other cells, possessing phagocytosis. It was established, that addition of hydrogen peroxide destroys astrocytes at the presence of luminol and gives rise to the emission. Chemiluminescence was not observed in similar experiments with intact cells. A conclusion was made that inside astrocytes there are structures, which show peroxidase-like activity. PMID:9848214

  4. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone. PMID:16187755

  5. Cleavable ester linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to study the solvent exposed lysine residues of peptides/proteins, we previously reported disulfide linked N-hydrosuccinimide ester modified silica coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NHS-SS-SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs). The presence of a disulfide bond in the linker limits the use of disulfide r...

  6. Gene expression as a sensitive endpoint to evaluate cell differentiation and maturation of the developing central nervous system in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) exposed to pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Hogberg, Helena T.; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hartung, Thomas; Coecke, Sandra; Bal-Price, Anna K.

    2009-03-15

    The major advantage of primary neuronal cultures for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment. In our studies using primary culture of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) we have evaluated whether the gene expression relevant to the most critical developmental processes such as neuronal differentiation (NF-68 and NF-200) and functional maturation (NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors), proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes (GFAP and S100{beta}) as well as the presence of neural precursor cells (nestin and Sox10) could be used as an endpoint for in vitro DNT. The expression of these genes was assessed after exposure to various pesticides (paraquat parathion, dichlorvos, pentachlorophenol and cycloheximide) that could induce developmental neurotoxicity through different mechanisms. All studied pesticides significantly modified the expression of selected genes, related to the different stages of neuronal and/or glial cell development and maturation. The most significant changes were observed after exposure to paraquat and parathion (i.e. down-regulation of mRNA expression of NF-68 and NF-200, NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors). Similarly, dichlorvos affected mainly neurons (decreased mRNA expression of NF-68 and GABA{sub A} receptors) whereas cycloheximide had an effect on neurons and astrocytes, as significant decreases in the mRNA expression of both neurofilaments (NF-68 and NF-200) and the astrocyte marker (S100{beta}) were observed. Our results suggest that toxicity induced by pesticides that target multiple pathways of neurodevelopment can be identified by studying expression of genes that are involved in different stages of cell development and maturation, and that gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening to identify the compounds with the potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide modulates astrocytic S100B secretion: a study in cerebrospinal fluid and astrocyte cultures from rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammatory responses in brain are primarily mediated by microglia, but growing evidence suggests a crucial importance of astrocytes. S100B, a calcium-binding protein secreted by astrocytes, has properties of a neurotrophic or an inflammatory cytokine. However, it is not known whether primary signals occurring during induction of an inflammatory response (e.g. lipopolysaccharide, LPS) directly modulate S100B. Methods In this work, we evaluated whether S100B levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of Wistar rats are affected by LPS administered by intraperitoneal (IP) or intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection, as well as whether primary astrocyte cultures respond directly to lipopolysaccharide. Results Our data suggest that S100B secretion in brain tissue is stimulated rapidly and persistently (for at least 24 h) by ICV LPS administration. This increase in CSF S100B was transient when LPS was IP administered. In contrast to these S100B results, we observed an increase in in TNFα levels in serum, but not in CSF, after IP administration of LPS. In isolated astrocytes and in acute hippocampal slices, we observed a direct stimulation of S100B secretion by LPS at a concentration of 10 μg/mL. An involvement of TLR4 was confirmed by use of specific inhibitors. However, lower levels of LPS in astrocyte cultures were able to induce a decrease in S100B secretion after 24 h, without significant change in intracellular content of S100B. In addition, after 24 h exposure to LPS, we observed a decrease in astrocytic glutathione and an increase in astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein. Conclusions Together, these data contribute to the understanding of the effects of LPS on astrocytes, particularly on S100B secretion, and help us to interpret cerebrospinal fluid and serum changes for this protein in neuroinflammatory diseases. Moreover, non-brain S100B-expressing tissues may be differentially regulated, since LPS administration did not lead to increased

  8. Neuropharmacological effects of Phoneutria nigriventer venom on astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rapôso, Catarina; Björklund, Ulrika; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Biber, Björn; Alice da Cruz-Höfling, Maria; Hansson, Elisabeth

    2016-06-01

    Bites from genus Phoneutria (Ctenidae, Araneomorpha) are the second most frequent source of spider accidents in Southeast Brazil. Severe envenoming from Phoneutria nigriventer produces vision disturbance, tremor and convulsion, suggesting that the CNS is involved; however, the mechanisms by which P. nigriventer venom (PNV) affects the CNS remain poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate whether PNV directly impairs astrocytes. Cultured astrocytes were exposed to PNV, and intracellular Ca(2+) release and signaling were measured (Fura-2/AM), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) involvement were investigated, actin filaments were stained (Alexa™ 488-conjugated phalloidin probe), the G-actin/F-actin ratio was determined, and the expression level of connexin 43 (Cx43) was assessed. Incubation in Ca(2+)-free buffer did not change the Ca(2+) responses. However, pre-incubation in thapsigargin/caffeine completely abolished these responses, suggesting that PNV-evoked Ca(2+) transients were from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. Pretreatment with a Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase antagonist (ouabain) or a TLR4 antagonist (LPS-RS) decreased or increased the Ca(2+)-evoked transients, respectively. Astrocytes showed altered actin filament structure after PNV exposure. PNV treatment increased the expression levels of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and Cx43 but decreased those of TLR4. The present results suggest that PNV directly affects astrocytes. Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase may thus represent a more specific drug target for controlling the neurotoxicity of PNV. PMID:27094845

  9. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  10. Increased proliferation and gliogenesis of cultured rat neural progenitor cells by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Go, Hyo Sang; Shin, Chan Young; Lee, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Se-Jin; Kim, Ki Chan; Choi, Chang Soon; Ko, Kwang Ho

    2009-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPC) are self-renewing multipotent cells that generate neurons and glial cells in the brain. NPCs generate neurons and glia not only during development but also after neural injury. Recent studies have shown that endogenous NPCs are activated after brain injury and migrate toward damaged areas where astrocyte activation occurs. Considering the massive proliferation of astrocytes as well as the production of several kinds of cytoactive molecules after brain injury, such as NO, growth factors and cytokines, it is tempting to think that cytoactive molecules released by activated glial cells regulate neural progenitor differentiation and proliferation through inflammatory mediators. To test this hypothesis, we stimulated rat primary astrocytes with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce the activation of astrocytes. After addition of the conditioned media from LPS-stimulated astrocytes to NPC culture, proliferation was examined by MTT assay and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. The differentiation of NPC into neurons and astrocytes was examined by Western blot, ELISA and immunocytochemical staining with cell-type-specific markers. Conditioned media from LPS-stimulated astrocytes increased NPC proliferation as well as gliogenesis as compared with control conditioned media from astrocytes without LPS stimulation. In contrast, neurogenesis was decreased by LPS-conditioned media. To investigate the molecular mechanism mediating glial differentiation and proliferation of NPC by reactive astrocytes, we added inhibitors of the Erk and JNK pathways during LPS stimulation. These inhibitors - except for a p38 inhibitor - decreased NPC proliferation and glial differentiation. These results suggest that LPS stimulated astrocytes generate factors regulating NPC proliferation and gliogenesis via the Erk and JNK pathways. PMID:19609085

  11. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Angelova, Plamena R.; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Ackland, Gareth L.; Funk, Gregory D.; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2. Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca2+]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to detect

  12. Functional Oxygen Sensitivity of Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Angelova, Plamena R; Kasymov, Vitaliy; Christie, Isabel; Sheikhbahaei, Shahriar; Turovsky, Egor; Marina, Nephtali; Korsak, Alla; Zwicker, Jennifer; Teschemacher, Anja G; Ackland, Gareth L; Funk, Gregory D; Kasparov, Sergey; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gourine, Alexander V

    2015-07-22

    In terrestrial mammals, the oxygen storage capacity of the CNS is limited, and neuronal function is rapidly impaired if oxygen supply is interrupted even for a short period of time. However, oxygen tension monitored by the peripheral (arterial) chemoreceptors is not sensitive to regional CNS differences in partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 ) that reflect variable levels of neuronal activity or local tissue hypoxia, pointing to the necessity of a functional brain oxygen sensor. This experimental animal (rats and mice) study shows that astrocytes, the most numerous brain glial cells, are sensitive to physiological changes in PO2 . Astrocytes respond to decreases in PO2 a few millimeters of mercury below normal brain oxygenation with elevations in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i). The hypoxia sensor of astrocytes resides in the mitochondria in which oxygen is consumed. Physiological decrease in PO2 inhibits astroglial mitochondrial respiration, leading to mitochondrial depolarization, production of free radicals, lipid peroxidation, activation of phospholipase C, IP3 receptors, and release of Ca(2+) from the intracellular stores. Hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases in astrocytes trigger fusion of vesicular compartments containing ATP. Blockade of astrocytic signaling by overexpression of ATP-degrading enzymes or targeted astrocyte-specific expression of tetanus toxin light chain (to interfere with vesicular release mechanisms) within the brainstem respiratory rhythm-generating circuits reveals the fundamental physiological role of astroglial oxygen sensitivity; in low-oxygen conditions (environmental hypoxia), this mechanism increases breathing activity even in the absence of peripheral chemoreceptor oxygen sensing. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are functionally specialized CNS oxygen sensors tuned for rapid detection of physiological changes in brain oxygenation. Significance statement: Most, if not all, animal cells possess mechanisms that allow them to

  13. Astrocyte cell lineage. II. Mouse fibrous astrocytes and reactive astrocytes in cultures have vimentin- and GFP-containing intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Fedoroff, S; White, R; Neal, J; Subrahmanyan, L; Kalnins, V I

    1983-04-01

    When cells from mouse neopallium are grown in colony cultures for 10-12 days, small cells with many processes, resembling normal fibrous astrocytes, form on top of the astrocyte precursor cells independently of the presence of dBcAMP in the culture medium. These cells are distinctly different from the much larger, previously described reactive astrocytes which also form in colony cultures and whose maturation is greatly enhanced by the presence of dBcAMP in the culture medium. Immunofluorescence studies showed that both vimentin-containing and glial filament protein (GFP)-containing intermediate filaments (IF) are present in the small normal fibrous astrocytes as well as in the larger reactive astrocytes. The vimentin-containing IF are assembled first in astrocyte precursor cells, whereas GFP-containing IF are assembled later toward the final stages of astrocyte differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. Thus in respect to the expression of the two types of IF, astrocyte differentiation in vitro closely resembles that in vivo. Parallel studies by electron microscopy showed that the vimentin-positive but GFP-negative astrocyte precursor cells contain single IF or small groups of IF, whereas in the more differentiated normal fibrous astrocytes and reactive astrocytes which are also GFP-positive, additional IF arranged in large bundles are present. PMID:6303521

  14. Cleavable ester-linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent-exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ujwal S; Osorno, Laura; Ellender, Angela; Grimm, Casey; Tarr, Matthew A

    2015-09-01

    To study the solvent-exposed lysine residues of peptides/proteins, we previously reported disulfide-linked N-hydroxysuccinimide ester-modified silica-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NHS-SS-SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs). The presence of a disulfide bond in the linker limits the use of disulfide reducing agent during protein digestion and allows unwanted disulfide formation between the MNPs and protein. In the current work, the disulfide bond was replaced with a cleavable ester group to synthesize NHS ester-modified SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs. Use of the cleavable ester group provides an improved method for protein labeling and allows the use of disulfide reducing agents during protein digestion. PMID:25983234

  15. Astrocytes Underlie Neuroinflammatory Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Osso, Lindsay A; Chan, Jonah R

    2015-12-17

    Neuroinflammation is being increasingly recognized as a potential mediator of cognitive impairments in various neurological conditions. Habbas et al. demonstrate that the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha signals through astrocytes to alter synaptic transmission and impair cognition in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26687350

  16. Direct Reprogramming of RESTing Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengzhong; Fong, Helen; Huang, Yadong

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying neuronal fate determination will provide important insights into brain development and regenerative approaches to neurological diseases. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Masserdotti et al. (2015) use neuronal conversion of astrocytes to dissect transcriptional mechanisms of fate determination and identify circuits that mediate cellular identity. PMID:26140600

  17. Molecular analysis of acute and chronic reactive astrocytes in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Clasadonte, Jerome; Morel, Lydie; Barrios-Camacho, Camila M; Chiang, Ming Sum R; Zhang, Jinhua; Iyer, Lakshmanan; Haydon, Philip G; Yang, Yongjie

    2016-07-01

    Astroglia, the most abundant glial cells in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), are considered an emerging key player in seizure induction and progression. Although astrocytes undergo reactive gliosis in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with dramatic morphological and molecular changes, specific astrocyte targets/molecular pathways that contribute to the induction and progression of seizure remain largely unknown. By combining translating ribosomal affinity purification (TRAP) with the pilocarpine model of TLE in BAC aldh1l1 TRAP mice, we profiled translating mRNAs from hippocampal or cortical astrocytes at different phases (3days, 30days, and 60days post-pilocarpine injections) of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy models. Our results found that hippocampal (but not cortical) astrocytes undergo early and unique molecular changes at 3days post-pilocarpine injections. These changes indicate a potentially primary pathogenic role of hippocampal astrocytes in seizure induction and progression and provide new insights about the involvement of specific astrocytic pathways/targets in epilepsy. In particular, we validated expression changes of ocrl and aeg1 in pilocarpine models. Follow-up studies on these genes may reveal new roles of hippocampal astrocytes in TLE. PMID:27060558

  18. Intracellular Na(+) inhibits volume-regulated anion channel in rat cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Minieri, Laura; Pivonkova, Helena; Harantova, Lenka; Anderova, Miroslava; Ferroni, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that increased intracellular Na(+) concentration ([Na(+) ]i ) in astroglial cells is associated with the development of brain edema under ischemic conditions, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we report that in primary cultured rat cortical astrocytes, elevations of [Na(+) ]i reflecting those achieved during ischemia cause a marked decrease in hypotonicity-evoked current mediated by volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC). Pharmacological manipulations revealed that VRAC inhibition was not due to the reverse mode of the plasma membrane sodium/calcium exchanger. The negative modulation of VRAC was also observed in an astrocytic cell line lacking the predominant astrocyte water channel aquaporin 4, indicating that [Na(+) ]i effect was not mediated by the regulation of aquaporin 4 activity. The inward rectifier Cl(-) current, which is also expressed by cultured astrocytes, was not affected by [Na(+) ]i increase. VRAC depression by high [Na(+) ]i was confirmed in adult astrocytes, suggesting that it was not developmentally regulated. Altogether, these results provide the first evidence that intracellular Na(+) dynamics can modulate astrocytic membrane conductance that controls functional processes linked to cell volume regulation and add further support to the concept that limiting astrocyte intracellular Na(+) accumulation might be a favorable strategy to counteract the development of brain edema. PMID:25279950

  19. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K(+) and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  20. Predominant enhancement of glucose uptake in astrocytes versus neurons during activation of the somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chuquet, Julien; Quilichini, Pascale; Nimchinsky, Esther A.; Buzsáki, György

    2010-01-01

    Glucose is the primary energetic substrate of the brain and measurements of its metabolism are the basis of major functional cerebral imaging methods. Contrary to the general view that neurons are fueled solely by glucose in proportion to their energetic needs, recent in vitro and ex vivo analyses suggest that glucose preferentially feeds astrocytes. However, the cellular fate of glucose in the intact brain has not yet been directly observed. We have used a real-time method for measuring glucose uptake in astrocytes and neurons in vivo in male rats by imaging the trafficking of the non-metabolizable glucose analog 6-NBDG using two-photon microscopy. During resting conditions we found that astrocytes and neurons both uptake 6-NBDG at the same rate in the barrel cortex of the rat. However, during intense neuronal activity triggered by whisker stimulation, astrocytes rapidly accelerated their uptake whereas neuronal uptake remained almost unchanged. Following the stimulation period, astrocytes returned to their pre-activation rates of uptake paralleling the neuronal rate of uptake. These observations suggest that glucose is primarily taken-up by astrocytes, supporting the view that functional imaging experiments based on glucose analogs extraction may predominantly reflect the metabolic activity of the astrocytic network. PMID:21068334

  1. Central Role of Maladapted Astrocytic Plasticity in Ischemic Brain Edema Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Feng; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema formation and the ensuing brain damages are the major cause of high mortality and long term disability following the occurrence of ischemic stroke. In this process, oxygen and glucose deprivation and the resulting reperfusion injury play primary roles. In response to the ischemic insult, the neurovascular unit experiences both intracellular and extracellular edemas, associated with maladapted astrocytic plasticity. The astrocytic plasticity includes both morphological and functional plasticity. The former involves a reactive gliosis and the subsequent glial retraction. It relates to the capacity of astrocytes to buffer changes in extracellular chemical levels, particularly K+ and glutamate, as well as the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The latter involves the expression and activity of a series of ion and water transport proteins. These molecules are grouped together around glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and water channel protein aquaporin 4 (AQP4) to form functional networks, regulate hydromineral balance across cell membranes and maintain the integrity of the BBB. Intense ischemic challenges can disrupt these capacities of astrocytes and result in their maladaptation. The maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke cannot only disrupt the hydromineral homeostasis across astrocyte membrane and the BBB, but also leads to disorders of the whole neurovascular unit. This review focuses on how the maladapted astrocytic plasticity in ischemic stroke plays the central role in the brain edema formation. PMID:27242440

  2. Astrocytes Release Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids by Lipopolysaccharide Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Fuka; Nishinaka, Takashi; Yamashita, Takuya; Nakamoto, Kazuo; Koyama, Yutaka; Kasuya, Fumiyo; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that levels of long-chain fatty acids (FAs) including docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) increase in the hypothalamus of inflammatory pain model mice. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the increment of free fatty acids (FFAs) in the brain during inflammation remains unknown. In this study, we characterized FFAs released by inflammatory stimulation in rat primary cultured astrocytes, and tested the involvement of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on these mechanisms. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation significantly increased the levels of several FAs in the astrocytes. Under these conditions, mRNA expression of cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2) and calcium-independent PLA2 (iPLA2) in LPS-treated group increased compared with the control group. Furthermore, in the culture media, the levels of DHA and arachidonic acid (ARA) significantly increased by LPS stimuli compared with those of a vehicle-treated control group whereas the levels of saturated FAs (SFAs), namely palmitic acid (PAM) and stearic acid (STA), did not change. In summary, our findings suggest that astrocytes specifically release DHA and ARA by inflammatory conditions. Therefore astrocytes might function as a regulatory factor of DHA and ARA in the brain. PMID:27374285

  3. Improvement of neuronal cell survival by astrocyte-derived exosomes under hypoxic and ischemic conditions depends on prion protein.

    PubMed

    Guitart, Kathrin; Loers, Gabriele; Buck, Friedrich; Bork, Ute; Schachner, Melitta; Kleene, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Prion protein (PrP) protects neural cells against oxidative stress, hypoxia, ischemia, and hypoglycemia. In the present study we confirm that cultured PrP-deficient neurons are more sensitive to oxidative stress than wild-type neurons and present the novel findings that wild-type, but not PrP-deficient astrocytes protect wild-type cerebellar neurons against oxidative stress and that exosomes released from stressed wild-type, but not from stressed PrP-deficient astrocytes reduce neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress. We show that neuroprotection by exosomes of stressed astrocytes depends on exosomal PrP but not on neuronal PrP and that astrocyte-derived exosomal PrP enters into neurons, suggesting neuronal uptake of astrocyte-derived exosomes. Upon exposure of wild-type astrocytes to hypoxic or ischemic conditions PrP levels in exosomes were increased. By mass spectrometry and Western blot analysis, we detected increased levels of 37/67 kDa laminin receptor, apolipoprotein E and the ribosomal proteins S3 and P0, and decreased levels of clusterin/apolipoprotein J in exosomes from wild-type astrocytes exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation relative to exosomes from astrocytes maintained under normoxic conditions. The levels of these proteins were not altered in exosomes from stressed PrP-deficient astrocytes relative to unstressed PrP-deficient astrocytes. These results indicate that PrP in astrocytes is a sensor for oxidative stress and mediates beneficial cellular responses, e.g. release of exosomes carrying PrP and other molecules, resulting in improved survival of neurons under hypoxic and ischemic conditions. GLIA 2016;64:896-910. PMID:26992135

  4. Neuroprotective effects of levetiracetam target xCT in astrocytes in parkinsonian mice.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Ikuko; Murakami, Shinki; Torigoe, Nao; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Asanuma, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes but not neurons express cystine/glutamate exchange transporter (xCT), which takes up cystine, and consequently supplies the substrate for GSH synthesis in neurons. It is recognized that GSH synthesis in neurons is dependent on the expression of xCT in astrocytes. Previous studies reported that levetiracetam (LEV), an anti-epileptic drug, increased xCT expression in vivo. The purpose of this study was to examine neuroprotective effects of LEV in parkinsonian models and demonstrate xCT in astrocytes as a target of neuroprotection against dopaminergic neurodegeneration. We identified striatal astrocytes cultured with LEV showed significant increase in xCT expression and GSH levels. Preincubation of primary cultured mesencephalic dopamine neurons with conditioned media from LEV-treated astrocytes protected against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity. These protective effects were canceled by xCT inhibitor. Furthermore, reduction of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in 6-OHDA-lesioned parkinsonian mice was significantly abrogated by repeated injections of LEV. Treatment with LEV significantly increased the expression of xCT in striatal astrocytes in the hemi-parkinsonian mice. In conclusion, LEV exerts neuroprotective effects against neurodegeneration via up-regulation of xCT and GSH in astrocytes. Thus, xCT in astrocytes could be a potential target in novel neuroprotective approaches to prevent degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Glutathione (GSH) is the most potent intrinsic antioxidant. Since extracellular cysteine is readily oxidized to form cystine, cystine transport mechanisms are essential to provide cells with cysteine. Cystine uptake is mediated by cystine/glutamate exchange transporter (xCT), expressed primarily on astrocytes, but not on neurons. Astrocytes take up cystine via xCT and reduce it to cysteine to supply cysteine, the substrate for GSH synthesis in neurons. This study demonstrated that levetiracetam (LEV), an anti

  5. Differential Pro-Inflammatory Responses of Astrocytes and Microglia Involve STAT3 Activation in Response to 1800 MHz Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonghui; He, Mindi; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Shangcheng; Zhang, Lei; He, Yue; Chen, Chunhai; Liu, Chuan; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Microglia and astrocytes play important role in maintaining the homeostasis of central nervous system (CNS). Several CNS impacts have been postulated to be associated with radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields exposure. Given the important role of inflammation in neural physiopathologic processes, we investigated the pro-inflammatory responses of microglia and astrocytes and the involved mechanism in response to RF fields. Microglial N9 and astroglial C8-D1A cells were exposed to 1800 MHz RF for different time with or without pretreatment with STAT3 inhibitor. Microglia and astrocytes were activated by RF exposure indicated by up-regulated CD11b and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, RF exposure induced differential pro-inflammatory responses in astrocytes and microglia, characterized by different expression and release profiles of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, PGE2, nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). Moreover, the RF exposure activated STAT3 in microglia but not in astrocytes. Furthermore, the STAT3 inhibitor Stattic ameliorated the RF-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in microglia but not in astrocytes. Our results demonstrated that RF exposure differentially induced pro-inflammatory responses in microglia and astrocytes, which involved differential activation of STAT3 in microglia and astrocytes. Our data provide novel insights into the potential mechanisms of the reported CNS impacts associated with mobile phone use and present STAT3 as a promising target to protect humans against increasing RF exposure. PMID:25275372

  6. VARIABILITY IN THE PRIMARY SITE OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC DAMAGE IN SYMBIODINIUM SP. (DINOPHYCEAE) EXPOSED TO THERMAL STRESS(1).

    PubMed

    Buxton, Lucy; Takahashi, Shunichi; Hill, Ross; Ralph, Peter J

    2012-02-01

    Exposure to elevated temperature is known to cause photosynthetic inhibition in the coral symbiont Symbiodinium sp. Through the use of the artificial electron acceptor, methyl viologen, this study identified how reduced photosynthetic capacity occurs as a result of inhibition up- and/or downstream of ferredoxin in Symbiodinium sp. in hospite and in culture. Heterogeneity between coral species and symbiont clades was identified in the thermal sensitivity of photosynthesis in the symbionts of the scleractinian corals Stylophora pistillata and Pocillopora damicornis, as well as among Symbiodinium cultures of clades A, B, and C. The in hospite symbionts of S. pistillata and the cultured clade C Symbiodinium both exhibited similar patterns in that their primary site of thermal inhibition occurred downstream of ferredoxin at 32°C. In contrast, the primary site of thermal inhibition occurred upstream of ferredoxin in clades A and B at 32°C, while at 34°C, all samples showed combined up- and downstream inhibition. Although clade C is common to both P. damicornis and S. pistillata, the manner of thermal inhibition was not consistent when observed in hospite. Results showed that there is heterogeneity in the primal site of thermal damage in Symbiodinium among coral species and symbiont clades. PMID:27009656

  7. The effect of resilience on posttraumatic stress disorder in trauma-exposed inner-city primary care patients.

    PubMed

    Wrenn, Glenda L; Wingo, Aliza P; Moore, Renee; Pelletier, Tiffany; Gutman, Alisa R; Bradley, Bekh; Ressler, Kerry J

    2011-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has previously been associated with increased risk for a variety of chronic medical conditions and it is often underdiagnosed in minority civilian populations. The current study examined the effects of resilience on the likelihood of having a diagnosis of PTSD in an inner-city sample of primary care patients (n=767). We measured resilience with the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, trauma with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and Trauma Events Inventory, and assessed for PTSD with the modified PTSD symptom scale. Multiple logistic regression model with presence/absence of PTSD as the outcome yielded 3 significant factors: childhood abuse, nonchild abuse trauma, and resilience. One type of childhood abuse in moderate to severe range (OR, 2.01; p = .0001), 2 or more types of childhood abuse in moderate to severe range (OR, 4.00; p < or = .0001), and 2 or more types of nonchildhood abuse trauma exposure (OR, 3.33; p < or = .0001), were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of PTSD, while resilience was robustly and significantly associated with a decreased likelihood of PTSD (OR, 0.93; p < or = .0001). By understanding the role of resilience in recovery from adverse experiences, improved treatment and interventional methods may be developed. Furthermore, these results suggest a role for assessing resilience in highly traumatized primary care populations as a way to better characterize risk for PTSD and direct screening/psychiatric referral efforts. PMID:21999030

  8. Quercetin protects primary human osteoblasts exposed to cigarette smoke through activation of the antioxidative enzymes HO-1 and SOD-1.

    PubMed

    Braun, Karl F; Ehnert, Sabrina; Freude, Thomas; Egaña, José T; Schenck, Thilo L; Buchholz, Arne; Schmitt, Andreas; Siebenlist, Sebastian; Schyschka, Lilianna; Neumaier, Markus; Stöckle, Ulrich; Nussler, Andreas K

    2011-01-01

    Smokers frequently suffer from impaired fracture healing often due to poor bone quality and stability. Cigarette smoking harms bone cells and their homeostasis by increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether Quercetin, a naturally occurring antioxidant, can protect osteoblasts from the toxic effects of smoking. Human osteoblasts exposed to cigarette smoke medium (CSM) rapidly produced ROS and their viability decreased concentration- and time-dependently. Co-, pre- and postincubation with Quercetin dose-dependently improved their viability. Quercetin increased the expression of the anti-oxidative enzymes heme-oxygenase- (HO-) 1 and superoxide-dismutase- (SOD-) 1. Inhibiting HO-1 activity abolished the protective effect of Quercetin. Our results demonstrate that CSM damages human osteoblasts by accumulation of ROS. Quercetin can diminish this damage by scavenging the radicals and by upregulating the expression of HO-1 and SOD-1. Thus, a dietary supplementation with Quercetin could improve bone matter, stability and even fracture healing in smokers. PMID:22203790

  9. Thiopental sodium preserves the responsiveness to glutamate but not acetylcholine in rat primary cultured neurons exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotaka; Shibuta, Satoshi; Kosaka, Jun; Fujino, Yuji

    2016-06-15

    Although many in vitro studies demonstrated that thiopental sodium (TPS) is a promising neuroprotective agent, clinical attempts to use TPS showed mainly unsatisfactory results. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of TPS against hypoxic insults (HI), and the responses of the neurons to l-glutamate and acetylcholine application. Neurons prepared from E17 Wistar rats were used after 2weeks in culture. The neurons were exposed to 12-h HI with or without TPS. HI-induced neurotoxicity was evaluated morphologically. Moreover, we investigated the dynamics of the free intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) in the surviving neurons after HI with or without TPS pretreatment following the application of neurotransmitters. TPS was neuroprotective against HI according to the morphological examinations (0.73±0.06 vs. 0.52±0.07, P=0.04). While the response to l-glutamate was maintained (0.89±0.08 vs. 1.02±0.09, P=0.60), the [Ca(2+)]i response to acetylcholine was notably impaired (0.59±0.02 vs. 0.94±0.04, P<0.01). Though TPS to cortical cultures was neuroprotective against HI morphologically, the [Ca(2+)]i response not to l-glutamate but to acetylcholine was impaired. This may partially explain the inconsistent results regarding the neuroprotective effects of TPS between experimental studies and clinical settings. PMID:27206889

  10. Protective effect of donepezil in primary-cultured rat cortical neurons exposed to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) toxicity.

    PubMed

    Akasofu, Shigeru; Kimura, Manami; Kosasa, Takashi; Ogura, Hiroo; Sawada, Kohei

    2006-01-20

    Donepezil has a neuroprotective effect against oxygen-glucose deprivation injury and glutamate toxicity in cultured cortical neurons. In this study, we further characterized the neuroprotective properties of donepezil in rat cortical cell cultures using glutamate receptor-specific agonists (N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and kainate). Pretreatment with donepezil (1 microM) for 12 h significantly decreased the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in response to NMDA (100 microM) by 43.8%, and reduced the LDH release in response to kainate (100 microM) and AMPA (100 microM) by 11.9% and 7.5% (without statistical significance), respectively. Donepezil appeared to inhibit LDH release in a concentration-dependent manner at 0.1-10 microM. Cortical neurons exposed to NMDA retained a normal morphological appearance in the presence of 10 microM donepezil. In binding assay for glutamate receptors, donepezil at 100 microM only slightly inhibited binding to the glycine and polyamine sites on NMDA receptor complex. On the other hand, 12 h pretreatment with donepezil at 10 and 100 microM significantly decreased the NMDA-induced increase of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). In conclusion, our results show that donepezil has protective activity against NMDA toxicity in cortical neurons, and this neuroprotection seems to be partially mediated by inhibition of the increase of [Ca2+]i. PMID:16406045

  11. Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts protein-1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor signaling in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lanciotti, Angela; Brignone, Maria Stefania; Visentin, Sergio; De Nuccio, Chiara; Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Petrini, Stefania; Caramia, Martino; Veroni, Caterina; Minnone, Gaetana; Bernardo, Antonietta; Franciolini, Fabio; Pessia, Mauro; Bertini, Enrico; Petrucci, Tamara Corinna; Ambrosini, Elena

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in the MLC1 gene, which encodes a protein expressed in brain astrocytes, are the leading cause of MLC, a rare leukodystrophy characterized by macrocephaly, brain edema, subcortical cysts, myelin and astrocyte vacuolation. Although recent studies indicate that MLC1 protein is implicated in the regulation of cell volume changes, the exact role of MLC1 in brain physiology and in the pathogenesis of MLC disease remains to be clarified. In preliminary experiments, we observed that MLC1 was poorly expressed in highly proliferating astrocytoma cells when compared with primary astrocytes, and that modulation of MLC1 expression influenced astrocyte growth. Because volume changes are key events in cell proliferation and during brain development MLC1 expression is inversely correlated to astrocyte progenitor proliferation levels, we investigated the possible role for MLC1 in the control of astrocyte proliferation. We found that overexpression of wild type but not mutant MLC1 in human astrocytoma cells hampered cell growth by favoring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) degradation and by inhibiting EGF-induced Ca(+) entry, ERK1/2 and PLCγ1 activation, and calcium-activated KCa3.1 potassium channel function, all molecular pathways involved in astrocyte proliferation stimulation. Interestingly, MLC1 did not influence AKT, an EGFR-stimulated kinase involved in cell survival. Moreover, EGFR expression was higher in macrophages derived from MLC patients than from healthy individuals. Since reactive astrocytes proliferate and re-express EGFR in response to different pathological stimuli, the present findings provide new information on MLC pathogenesis and unravel an important role for MLC1 in other brain pathological conditions where astrocyte activation occurs. PMID:26908604

  12. Characterization of Amino Acid Profile and Enzymatic Activity in Adult Rat Astrocyte Cultures.

    PubMed

    Souza, Débora Guerini; Bellaver, Bruna; Hansel, Gisele; Arús, Bernardo Assein; Bellaver, Gabriela; Longoni, Aline; Kolling, Janaina; Wyse, Angela T S; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-07-01

    Astrocytes are multitasking players in brain complexity, possessing several receptors and mechanisms to detect, participate and modulate neuronal communication. The functionality of astrocytes has been mainly unraveled through the study of primary astrocyte cultures, and recently our research group characterized a model of astrocyte cultures derived from adult Wistar rats. We, herein, aim to characterize other basal functions of these cells to explore the potential of this model for studying the adult brain. To characterize the astrocytic phenotype, we determined the presence of GFAP, GLAST and GLT 1 proteins in cells by immunofluorescence. Next, we determined the concentrations of thirteen amino acids, ATP, ADP, adenosine and calcium in astrocyte cultures, as well as the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and acetylcholine esterase. Furthermore, we assessed the presence of the GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB 1) in the astrocytes. Cells demonstrated the presence of glutamine, consistent with their role in the glutamate-glutamine cycle, as well as glutamate and D-serine, amino acids classically known to act as gliotransmitters. ATP was produced and released by the cells and ADP was consumed. Calcium levels were in agreement with those reported in the literature, as were the enzymatic activities measured. The presence of GAT 1 was detected, but the presence of CB 1 was not, suggesting a decreased neuroprotective capacity in adult astrocytes under in vitro conditions. Taken together, our results show cellular functionality regarding the astrocytic role in gliotransmission and neurotransmitter management since they are able to produce and release gliotransmitters and to modulate the cholinergic and GABAergic systems. PMID:26915106

  13. Increased utilisation of primary healthcare in persons exposed to severe stress in prenatal life: a national population-based study in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiong; Yang, Hu; Guldin, Mai-Britt; Vedsted, Peter; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent studies have suggested that stress in a pregnant mother may affect the future health of the unborn child negatively. An excellent proxy for health problems is the use of healthcare resources. Using nationwide data, we examined whether persons born to mothers who lost a close relative during pregnancy have more contacts to general practice. Design Population-based cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants We included all children born in Denmark from 1973 to 2002 (N=2 032 528). Exposure of prenatal stress was defined as maternal bereavement by the death of a close relative during the antenatal period. The outcome of interest was contact with general practice between 2003 and 2009 when the participants were between 1 and 35 years of age. Poisson regression was used to assess the association between exposure and outcome. Outcome measures Contacts to general practitioner. Results Overall, persons exposed to prenatal stress had 2% more GP contacts than those not exposed, primarily due to increased utilisation of healthcare services during late adolescence and early adulthood. The exposed persons born to mothers who had lost a spouse had a higher risk (relative risk (RR) 1.12, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.14) and so did those born to mothers who had lost a close relative due to unexpected death (RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.06). Exposed persons had more contacts to general practice in daytime and more psychometric tests, talk therapies and C reactive protein tests than unexposed persons. Conclusions Prenatal stress following maternal bereavement was associated with a slightly increased utilisation of primary healthcare, mainly due to increased healthcare needs related to mental health and infections. Understanding how stress during pregnancy influences the future health of the child is an important aspect of prenatal care. PMID:25573520

  14. Diphenylarsinic Acid Induced Activation of Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes: Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Upregulation of Transcription Factors, and Release of Brain-Active Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Mami; Kojima, Mikiya; Asai, Ryota; Kanehira, Tomoko; Sakaguchi, Fumika; Takahata, Kazuaki; Arakaki, Rina; Aoyama, Yohei; Yoshida, Hikari; Yoshida, Kenji; Yukawa, Kazunori; Tashiro, Tomoko; Hirano, Seishiro

    2016-03-01

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was detected as the primary compound responsible for the arsenic poisoning that occurred in Kamisu, Ibaraki, Japan, where people using water from a well that was contaminated with a high level of arsenic developed neurological (mostly cerebellar) symptoms and dysregulation of regional cerebral blood flow. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism of DPAA-induced cerebellar symptoms, we focused on astrocytes, which have a brain-protective function. Incubation with 10 µM DPAA for 96 h promoted cell proliferation, increased the expression of antioxidative stress proteins (heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70), and induced the release of cytokines (MCP-1, adrenomedullin, FGF2, CXCL1, and IL-6). Furthermore, DPAA overpoweringly increased the phosphorylation of three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) (ERK1/2, p38MAPK, and SAPK/JNK), which indicated MAPK activation, and subsequently induced expression and/or phosphorylation of transcription factors (Nrf2, CREB, c-Jun, and c-Fos) in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes. Structure-activity relationship analyses of DPAA and other related pentavalent organic arsenicals revealed that DPAA at 10 µM activated astrocytes most effective among organic arsenicals tested at the same dose. These results suggest that in a cerebellum exposed to DPAA, abnormal activation of the MAPK-transcription factor pathway and irregular secretion of these neuroactive, glioactive, and/or vasoactive cytokines in astrocytes can be the direct/indirect cause of functional abnormalities in surrounding neurons, glial cells, and vascular cells: This in turn might lead to the onset of cerebellar symptoms and disruption of cerebral blood flow. PMID:26645585

  15. Properties of astrocytes cultured from GFAP over-expressing and GFAP mutant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Woosung; Messing, Albee

    2009-04-15

    Alexander disease is a fatal leukoencephalopathy caused by dominantly-acting coding mutations in GFAP. Previous work has also implicated elevations in absolute levels of GFAP as central to the pathogenesis of the disease. However, identification of the critical astrocyte functions that are compromised by mis-expression of GFAP has not yet been possible. To provide new tools for investigating the nature of astrocyte dysfunction in Alexander disease, we have established primary astrocyte cultures from two mouse models of Alexander disease, a transgenic that over-expresses wild type human GFAP, and a knock-in at the endogenous mouse locus that mimics a common Alexander disease mutation. We find that mutant GFAP, as well as excess wild type GFAP, promotes formation of cytoplasmic inclusions, disrupts the cytoskeleton, decreases cell proliferation, increases cell death, reduces proteasomal function, and compromises astrocyte resistance to stress.

  16. Ferrous Iron Induces Nrf2 Expression in Mouse Brain Astrocytes to Prevent Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenwen; Zhong, Zhihong; Yang, Yong; Wang, Baofeng; Sun, Yuhao; Sun, Qingfang; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Bian, Liuguan

    2016-08-01

    Free radical damage caused by ferrous iron is involved in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a major phase II gene regulator that binds to antioxidant response element, represents an important cellular cytoprotective mechanism against oxidative damage. We hypothesized that Nrf2 might protect astrocytes from damage by Fe(2+) . Therefore, we examined cytotoxicity in primary astrocytes induced by iron overload and evaluated the effects of Fe(2+) on Nrf2 expression. The results demonstrated that 24-h Fe(2+) exposure exerted time- and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in astrocytes. Furthermore, Fe(2+) exposure in astrocytes resulted in time- and concentration-dependent increases in Nrf2 expression, which preceded Fe(2+) toxicity. Nrf2-specific siRNA further knocked down Nrf2 levels, resulting in greater Fe(2+) -induced astrocyte cytotoxicity. These data indicate that induction of Nrf2 expression could serve as an adaptive self-defense mechanism, although it is insufficient to completely protect primary astrocytes from Fe(2+) -induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27037625

  17. Nucleoside transporter expression and function in cultured mouse astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Huang, Rong; Yu, Albert C H; Fung, King Y; Rathbone, Michel P; Hertz, Leif

    2005-10-01

    Uptake of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides in astrocytes is important for several reasons: (1) uptake of nucleosides contributes to nucleic acid synthesis; (2) astrocytes synthesize AMP, ADP, and ATP from adenosine and GTP from guanosine; and (3) adenosine and guanosine function as neuromodulators, whose effects are partly terminated by cellular uptake. It has previously been shown that adenosine is rapidly accumulated by active uptake in astrocytes (Hertz and Matz, Neurochem Res 14:755-760, 1989), but the ratio between active uptake and metabolism-driven uptake of adenosine is unknown, as are uptake characteristics for guanosine. The present study therefore aims at providing detailed information of nucleoside transport and transporters in primary cultures of mouse astrocytes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction identified the two equilibrative nucleoside transporters, ENT1 and ENT2, together with the concentrative nucleoside transporter CNT2, whereas CNT3 was absent, and CNT1 expression could not be investigated. Uptake studies of tritiated thymidine, formycin B, guanosine, and adenosine (3-s uptakes at 1-4 degrees C to study diffusional uptake and 1-60-min uptakes at 37 degrees C to study concentrative uptake) demonstrated a fast diffusional uptake of all four nucleosides, a small, Na(+)-independent and probably metabolism-driven uptake of thymidine (consistent with DNA synthesis), larger metabolism-driven uptakes of guanosine (consistent with synthesis of DNA, RNA, and GTP) and especially of adenosine (consistent with rapid nucleotide synthesis), and Na(+)-dependent uptakes of adenosine (consistent with its concentrative uptake) and guanosine, rendering neuromodulator uptake independent of nucleoside metabolism. Astrocytes are accordingly well suited for both intense nucleoside metabolism and metabolism-independent uptake to terminate neuromodulator effects of adenosine and guanosine. PMID:15892125

  18. Cleavable ester linked magnetic nanoparticles for labeling of solvent exposed primary amine groups of peptides/proteins

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ujwal S.; Osorno, Laura; Ellender, Angela; Grimm, Casey; Tarr, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Covalent labeling of solvent exposed amino acid residues using chemical reagents/crosslinkers followed by mass spectrometric analysis can be used to determine the solvent accessible amino acids of a protein. A variety of chemical reagents containing cleavable bonds were developed to label abundantly found lysine residues on the surface of protein. To achieve efficient separation of labeled peptides prior to mass spectrometric analysis, magnetic nanoparticles can be decorated with amino acid reactive functional groups and utilized for quick recovery of labeled peptides. [1] In this work, iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4 MNPs) were synthesized by thermal decomposition method and coated with silica (SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs) by reverse micro emulsion approach. The Fe3O4 MNPs and SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs were characterized by TEM and XRD. The SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs were further coated with amine groups and conjugated to N-hydroxysuccinimidyl (NHS) ester groups via a cleavable ester bond. Fluorescence based qualitative analysis of ester linked NHS ester modified SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs was performed to confirm the presence of NHS ester group. The active NHS ester sites on the surface of SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs were determined by depletion approach and found to be 694 active sites per 1 mg of SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs. Free amine groups of a small peptide, ACTH (4–11) were labeled by ester linked, NHS ester modified SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs under physiological conditions. Superparamagnetic nature of SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs allowed quick and efficient magnetic separation of labeled peptides from the solution. The ester bond was further cleaved to separate labeled peptides followed by mass spectrometric analysis. The ester linked, NHS ester modified SiO2@Fe3O4 MNPs introduced a mass shift of 115.09 Da on amine groups of ACTH (4–11), which was confirmed by mass spectrometry. PMID:26217806

  19. Functional and phenotypic differences of pure populations of stem cell-derived astrocytes and neuronal precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Kleiderman, Susanne; Sá, João V; Teixeira, Ana P; Brito, Catarina; Gutbier, Simon; Evje, Lars G; Hadera, Mussie G; Glaab, Enrico; Henry, Margit; Sachinidis, Agapios; Alves, Paula M; Sonnewald, Ursula; Leist, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Availability of homogeneous astrocyte populations would facilitate research concerning cell plasticity (metabolic and transcriptional adaptations; innate immune responses) and cell cycle reactivation. Current protocols to prepare astrocyte cultures differ in their final content of immature precursor cells, preactivated cells or entirely different cell types. A new method taking care of all these issues would improve research on astrocyte functions. We found here that the exposure of a defined population of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSC) to BMP4 results in pure, nonproliferating astrocyte cultures within 24-48 h. These murine astrocytes generated from embryonic stem cells (mAGES) expressed the positive markers GFAP, aquaporin 4 and GLT-1, supported neuronal function, and acquired innate immune functions such as the response to tumor necrosis factor and interleukin 1. The protocol was applicable to several normal or disease-prone pluripotent cell lines, and the corresponding mAGES all exited the cell cycle and lost most of their nestin expression, in contrast to astrocytes generated by serum-addition or obtained as primary cultures. Comparative gene expression analysis of mAGES and NSC allowed quantification of differences between the two cell types and a definition of an improved marker set to define astrocytes. Inclusion of several published data sets in this transcriptome comparison revealed the similarity of mAGES with cortical astrocytes in vivo. Metabolic analysis of homogeneous NSC and astrocyte populations revealed distinct neurochemical features: both cell types synthesized glutamine and citrate, but only mature astrocytes released these metabolites. Thus, the homogeneous cultures allowed an improved definition of NSC and astrocyte features. PMID:26689134

  20. Dynamic reactive astrocytes after focal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shinghua

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes are specialized and most numerous glial cell type in the central nervous system and play important roles in physiology. Astrocytes are also critically involved in many neural disorders including focal ischemic stroke, a leading cause of brain injury and human death. One of the prominent pathological features of focal ischemic stroke is reactive astrogliosis and glial scar formation associated with morphological changes and proliferation. This review paper discusses the recent advances in spatial and temporal dynamics of morphology and proliferation of reactive astrocytes after ischemic stroke based on results from experimental animal studies. As reactive astrocytes exhibit stem cell-like properties, knowledge of dynamics of reactive astrocytes and glial scar formation will provide important insights for astrocyte-based cell therapy in stroke. PMID:25657720

  1. Astrocytes in the tempest of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miljković, Djordje; Timotijević, Gordana; Mostarica Stojković, Marija

    2011-12-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell population within the CNS of mammals. Their glial role is perfectly performed in the healthy CNS as they support functions of neurons. The omnipresence of astrocytes throughout the white and grey matter and their intimate relation with blood vessels of the CNS, as well as numerous immunity-related actions that these cells are capable of, imply that astrocytes should have a prominent role in neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The role of astrocytes in MS is rather ambiguous, as they have the capacity to both stimulate and restrain neuroinflammation and tissue destruction. In this paper we present some of the proved and the proposed functions of astrocytes in neuroinflammation and discuss the effect of MS therapeutics on astrocytes. PMID:21443873

  2. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-02-01

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function. PMID:26814587

  3. Involvement of astrocytes in neurovascular communication.

    PubMed

    Nuriya, M; Hirase, H

    2016-01-01

    The vascular interface of the brain is distinct from that of the peripheral tissue in that astrocytes, the most numerous glial cell type in the gray matter, cover the vasculature with their endfeet. This morphological feature of the gliovascular junction has prompted neuroscientists to suggest possible functional roles of astrocytes including astrocytic modulation of the vasculature. Additionally, astrocytes develop an intricate morphology that intimately apposes neuronal synapses, making them an ideal cellular mediator of neurovascular coupling. In this article, we first introduce the classical anatomical and physiological findings that led to the proposal of various gliovascular interaction models. Next, we touch on the technological advances in the past few decades that enabled investigations and evaluations of neuro-glio-vascular interactions in situ. We then review recent experimental findings on the roles of astrocytes in neurovascular coupling from the viewpoints of intra- and intercellular signalings in astrocytes. PMID:27130410

  4. Astrocytes Control Synapse Formation, Function, and Elimination

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Won-Suk; Allen, Nicola J.; Eroglu, Cagla

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, through their close associations with synapses, can monitor and alter synaptic function, thus actively controlling synaptic transmission in the adult brain. Besides their important role at adult synapses, in the last three decades a number of critical findings have highlighted the importance of astrocytes in the establishment of synaptic connectivity in the developing brain. In this article, we will review the key findings on astrocytic control of synapse formation, function, and elimination. First, we will summarize our current structural and functional understanding of astrocytes at the synapse. Then, we will discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms through which developing and mature astrocytes instruct the formation, maturation, and refinement of synapses. Our aim is to provide an overview of astrocytes as important players in the establishment of a functional nervous system. PMID:25663667

  5. Gliotransmission: Exocytotic release from astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, Vladimir; Zorec, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Gliotransmitters are chemicals released from glial cells fulfilling a following set of criteria: i) they are synthesized by and/or stored in glia; ii) their regulated release is triggered by physiological and/or pathological stimuli; iii) they activate rapid (milliseconds to seconds) responses in neighboring cells; and iv) they play a role in (patho)physiological processes. Astrocytes can release a variety of gliotransmitters into the extracellular space using several different mechanisms. In this review, we focus on exocytotic mechanism(s) underlying the release of three classes of gliotransmitters: (i) amino acids, such as, glutamate and D-serine; (ii) nucleotides, like adenosine 5'-triphosphate; and (iii) peptides, such as, atrial natriuretic peptide and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. It is becoming clear that astrocytes are endowed with elements that qualify them as cells communicating with neurons and other cells within the central nervous system by employing regulated exocytosis. PMID:19948188

  6. Disentangling calcium-driven astrocyte physiology.

    PubMed

    Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2015-04-01

    Astrocytes seem to rely on relatively sluggish and spatially blurred Ca(2+) waves to communicate with fast and point-precise neural circuits. This apparent discrepancy could, however, reflect our current inability to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved. Difficulties in detecting and interpreting astrocyte Ca(2+) signals may have led to some prominent controversies in the field. Here, we argue that a deeper understanding of astrocyte physiology requires a qualitative leap in our experimental and analytical strategies. PMID:25757560

  7. Targeting astrocytes in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Li, Baoman; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes are homeostatic cells of the central nervous system, which are critical for development and maintenance of synaptic transmission and hence of synaptically connected neuronal ensembles. Astrocytic densities are reduced in bipolar disorder, and therefore deficient astroglial function may contribute to overall disbalance in neurotransmission and to pathological evolution. Classical anti-bipolar drugs (lithium salts, valproic acid and carbamazepine) affect expression of astroglial genes and modify astroglial signalling and homeostatic cascades. Many effects of both antidepressant and anti-bipolar drugs are exerted through regulation of glutamate homeostasis and glutamatergic transmission, through K(+) buffering, through regulation of calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (that controls metabolism of arachidonic acid) or through Ca(2+) homeostatic and signalling pathways. Sometimes anti-depressant and anti-bipolar drugs exert opposite effects, and some effects on gene expression in drug treated animals are opposite in neurones vs. astrocytes. Changes in the intracellular pH induced by anti-bipolar drugs affect uptake of myo-inositol and thereby signalling via inositoltrisphosphate (InsP3), this being in accord with one of the main theories of mechanism of action for these drugs. PMID:27015045

  8. Astrocytes: Everything but the glue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The current knowledge in neuroscience indicates that neural tissue has two major cell populations: neurons and glia (term derived from the Greek word for glue). Neuronal population is characterized by the capacity to produce action potentials, whereas glial cells are typically identified as the subordinate cell population of neurons. To date, this point of view has changed dramatically and growing evidence indicates that glial cells play a crucial role in normal mental functions and the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Classically, glial cells include four major populations clearly discernible in the adult brain: astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia cells and NG2 glia. Astrocytes, also referred as to astroglia, are by far the most abundant cell lineage in the adult brain. These cells are in close contact with several tissue components of the brain parenchyma including neurons, vasculature, extracellular matrix and other glial populations. Hence, the number and strategic position of astrocytes provide them with exceptional capacity for modulating multiple functions in the neural tissue. PMID:25938129

  9. Lateral regulation of synaptic transmission by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Covelo, A; Araque, A

    2016-05-26

    Fifteen years ago the concept of the "tripartite synapse" was proposed to conceptualize the functional view that astrocytes are integral elements of synapses. The signaling exchange between astrocytes and neurons within the tripartite synapse results in the synaptic regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity through an autocrine form of communication. However, recent evidence indicates that the astrocyte synaptic regulation is not restricted to the active tripartite synapse but can be manifested through astrocyte signaling at synapses relatively distant from active synapses, a process termed lateral astrocyte synaptic regulation. This phenomenon resembles the classical heterosynaptic modulation but is mechanistically different because it involves astrocytes and its properties critically depend on the morphological and functional features of astrocytes. Therefore, the functional concept of the tripartite synapse as a fundamental unit must be expanded to include the interaction between tripartite synapses. Through lateral synaptic regulation, astrocytes serve as an active processing bridge for synaptic interaction and crosstalk between synapses with no direct neuronal connectivity, supporting the idea that neural network function results from the coordinated activity of astrocytes and neurons. PMID:25732135

  10. Astrocytic involvement in learning and memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Marie E; Hutchinson, Dana; Hertz, Leif

    2008-07-01

    Astrocytes play fundamental roles in brain function, interacting with neurons and other astrocytes, yet their role in learning is not widely recognized. This review focuses on astrocytic involvement in memory consolidation following bead discrimination learning in day-old chick and draws parallels to mammalian learning, providing strong empirical support for the conclusion that the described neuronal-astrocytic interactions are universally valid. It identifies specific mechanisms whereby astrocytes support memory consolidation. Uptake of glucose, stimulated in astrocytes by beta(3)-noradrenergic receptor activation, provides energy by glycolytic/oxidative metabolism. Unlike neurons, astrocytes carry out net synthesis of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates needed for synthesis of transmitter glutamate formed by rapid degradation of glucose-derived glycogen and stimulated by beta(2)-noradrenergic receptor activation. This makes learning dependent on glycogenolysis and its stimulation by noradrenaline. Astrocytes take up most synaptically released glutamate, terminating transmitter activity and returning glutamate to neurons in a glutamate-glutamine cycle, interference with which abolishes learning. The various astrocytic activities follow a rigidly controlled time schedule, easily determined after bead discrimination learning but also detectable in other paradigms. PMID:18462796

  11. Astrocytic Actions on Extrasynaptic Neuronal Currents

    PubMed Central

    Pál, Balázs

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, knowledge about astrocytic functions has significantly increased. It was demonstrated that astrocytes are not passive elements of the central nervous system (CNS), but active partners of neurons. There is a growing body of knowledge about the calcium excitability of astrocytes, the actions of different gliotransmitters and their release mechanisms, as well as the participation of astrocytes in the regulation of synaptic functions and their contribution to synaptic plasticity. However, astrocytic functions are even more complex than being a partner of the “tripartite synapse,” as they can influence extrasynaptic neuronal currents either by releasing substances or regulating ambient neurotransmitter levels. Several types of currents or changes of membrane potential with different kinetics and via different mechanisms can be elicited by astrocytic activity. Astrocyte-dependent phasic or tonic, inward or outward currents were described in several brain areas. Such currents, together with the synaptic actions of astrocytes, can contribute to neuromodulatory mechanisms, neurosensory and -secretory processes, cortical oscillatory activity, memory, and learning or overall neuronal excitability. This mini-review is an attempt to give a brief summary of astrocyte-dependent extrasynaptic neuronal currents and their possible functional significance. PMID:26696832

  12. Upregulation of PRDM5 Is Associated with Astrocyte Proliferation and Neuronal Apoptosis Caused by Lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, Xiaojuan; Xue, Huaqing; Liu, Xiaorong; Dai, Aihua; Song, Yan; Ke, Kaifu; Cao, Maohong

    2016-05-01

    PRDM5 (PR domain containing 5) belongs to PRDM family which consists of transcriptional regulators that modulate cellular processes such as cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. However, the function of PRDM5 in central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory response is unknown. In recent study, an adult rat neuroinflammation model via lipopolysaccharide (LPS) lateral ventricle injection was constructed. PRDM5 expression was increased in activated astrocytes and apoptotic neurons of the adult rat cerebral cortex after LPS injection. In vitro studies showed that the remarkable upregulation of PRDM5 might be involved in rat primary astrocyte proliferation and rat primary neuronal apoptosis in the cerebral cortex following LPS administration. In addition, using PRDM5 RNA interference both in rat primary asrtocytes and neurons, further indicated that PRDM5 was required for astrocyte proliferation and neuronal apoptosis induced by LPS. Our findings on the cellular signaling pathway may provide a new therapeutic strategy against neuroinflammation in the CNS. PMID:27074744

  13. Acamprosate {monocalcium bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate)} reduces ethanol-drinking behavior in rats and glutamate-induced toxicity in ethanol-exposed primary rat cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Oka, Michiko; Hirouchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masaru; Sugahara, Seishi; Oyama, Tatsuya

    2013-10-15

    Acamprosate, the calcium salt of bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate), contributes to the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol-dependent patients, but its mechanism of action in the central nervous system is unclear. Here, we report the effect of acamprosate on ethanol-drinking behavior in standard laboratory Wistar rats, including voluntary ethanol consumption and the ethanol-deprivation effect. After forced ethanol consumption arranged by the provision of only one drinking bottle containing 10% ethanol, the rats were given a choice between two drinking bottles, one containing water and the other containing 10% ethanol. In rats selected for high ethanol preference, repeated oral administration of acamprosate diminished voluntary ethanol drinking. After three months of continuous access to two bottles, rats were deprived of ethanol for three days and then presented with two bottles again. After ethanol deprivation, ethanol preference was increased, and the increase was largely abolished by acamprosate. After exposure of primary neuronal cultures of rat cerebral cortex to ethanol for four days, neurotoxicity, as measured by the extracellular leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), was induced by incubation with glutamate for 1h followed by incubation in the absence of ethanol for 24h. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker 5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine, the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonist 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine and the voltage-gated calcium-channel blocker nifedipine all inhibited glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons. Acamprosate inhibited the glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons more strongly than that from intact neurons. In conclusion, acamprosate showed effective reduction of drinking behavior in rats and protected ethanol-exposed neurons by multiple blocking of glutamate signaling. PMID:24012782

  14. Macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes from two multiply exposed, uninfected individuals resist infection with primary non-syncytium-inducing isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, R I; Paxton, W A; Sheridan, K E; Koup, R A

    1996-01-01

    Despite multiple, high-risk sexual exposures, some individuals remain uninfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CD4+ lymphocytes from these individuals are less susceptible to infection in vitro with some strains of HIV-1, suggesting that the phenotype of the virus may influence its ability to interact with certain CD4+ cells. In the present study, we examined the susceptibility of CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages from two exposed uninfected individuals (EU2 and EU3) to infection with a panel of biologically cloned isolates of HIV-1 having either a non-syncytium-inducing (NSI) or a syncytium-inducing (SI) phenotype. Our results indicate that CD4+ T lymphocytes from EU2 and EU3 are resistant to infection with NSI isolates of HIV-1 but are susceptible to infection with primary SI isolates. In addition, we found that macrophages from EU2 and EU3 are resistant to infection with both NSI and SI isolates. The latter finding was confirmed by using several uncloned NSI and SI isolates obtained from patients during acute HIV-1 infection. In further experiments, env clones encoding glycoproteins characteristic of NSI or SI viruses were used in single-cycle infectivity assays to evaluate infection of CD4+ lymphocytes and macrophages from EU2 and EU3. Consistent with our previous results, we found that macrophages from these individuals are resistant to infection with NSI and SI env-pseudotyped viruses, while CD4+ T lymphocytes are resistant to NSI, but not SI, pseudotyped viruses. Overall, our results demonstrate that CD4+ cells from two exposed uninfected individuals resist infection in vitro with primary, macrophage-tropic, NSI isolates of HIV-1, which is the predominant viral phenotype found following HIV-1 transmission. Furthermore, infection with NSI isolates was blocked in both CD4+ T lymphocytes and macrophages from these individuals, suggesting that there may be a common mechanism for resistance in both cell types. PMID:8971004

  15. Transport of 3-hydroxybutyrate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Stevenson, J.H.; Couto, R.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Studies by a number of investigators have shown that 3-hydroxybutyrate is a preferred energy substrate for brain during early development. Since recent studies by the authors group suggest that the utilization of oxidizable substrates by brain may be regulated in part by transport across the plasma membrane, the authors investigated the transport of ({sup 3}H) D- and L-3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxy-(3-{sup 14}C) butyrate by primary cultures of rat brain astrocytes. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that 3-hydroxybutyrate is taken up into cultured rat brain astrocytes by both diffusion and a carrier mediated transport system, and further support the concept that transport at the cellular level contributes to the regulation of substrate utilization by brain cells.

  16. Microglia trigger astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection via purinergic gliotransmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Youichi; Nomura, Masatoshi; Iwatsuki, Ken; Moriyama, Yoshinori; Gachet, Christian; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2014-03-01

    Microglia are highly sensitive to even small changes in the brain environment, such as invasion of non-hazardous toxicants or the presymptomatic state of diseases. However, the physiological or pathophysiological consequences of their responses remain unknown. Here, we report that cultured microglia sense low concentrations of the neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHglow) and provide neuroprotection against MeHg, for which astrocytes are also required. When exposed to MeHglow, microglia exocytosed ATP via p38 MAPK- and vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT)-dependent mechanisms. Astrocytes responded to the microglia-derived ATP via P2Y1 receptors and released interleukin-6 (IL-6), thereby protecting neurons against MeHglow. These neuroprotective actions were also observed in organotypic hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, but not in slices prepared from VNUT knockout or P2Y1 receptor knockout mice. These findings suggest that microglia sense and respond to even non-hazardous toxicants such as MeHglow and change their phenotype into a neuroprotective one, for which astrocytic support is required.

  17. Astrocytic TIMP-1 Promotes Oligodendrocyte Differentiation and Enhances CNS Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Craig S.; Milner, Richard; Nishiyama, Akiko; Frausto, Ricardo F.; Serwanski, David R.; Pagarigan, Roberto R.; Whitton, J. Lindsay; Miller, Robert H.; Crocker, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is an extracellular protein and endogenous regulator of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) secreted by astrocytes in response to CNS myelin injury. We have previously reported that adult TIMP-1KO mice exhibit poor myelin repair following demyelinating injury. This observation led us to hypothesize a role for TIMP-1 in oligodendrogenesis and CNS myelination. Herein, we demonstrate that compact myelin formation is significantly delayed in TIMP-1KO mice which coincided with dramatically reduced numbers of white matter astrocytes in the developing CNS. Analysis of differentiation in CNS progenitor cells (neurosphere) cultures from TIMP-1KO mice revealed a specific deficit of NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Application of rmTIMP-1 to TIMP-1KO neurosphere cultures evoked a dose-dependent increase in NG2+ cell numbers, while treatment with GM6001, a potent broad spectrum MMP inhibitor did not. Similarly, administration of recombinant murine TIMP-1 (rmTIMP-1) to A2B5+ immunopanned oligodendrocyte progenitors significantly increased the number of differentiated O1+ oligodendrocytes, while antisera to TIMP-1 reduced oligodendrocyte numbers. We also determined that A2B5+ oligodendrocyte progenitors grown in conditioned media derived from TIMP-1KO primary glial cultures resulted in reduced differentiation of mature O1+ oligodendrocytes. Finally, we report that addition of rmTIMP-1 to primary glial cultures resulted in a dose-dependent proliferative response of astrocytes. Together, these findings describe a previously uncharacterized role for TIMP-1 in the regulation of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes during development and provide a novel function for TIMP-1 on myelination in the developing CNS. PMID:21508247

  18. Decreased Astrocytic Thrombospondin-1 Secretion After Chronic Ammonia Treatment Reduces the Level of Synaptic Proteins: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumar, A. R.; Tong, X. Y.; Curtis, K. M.; Ruiz-Cordero, R.; Shamaladevi, N.; Abuzamel, M.; Johnstone, J.; Gaidosh, G.; Rama Rao, K.V.; Norenberg, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) is a major complication in patients with severe liver disease. Elevated blood and brain ammonia levels have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and astrocytes are the principal neural cells involved in this disorder. Since defective synthesis and release of astrocytic factors have been shown to impair synaptic integrity in other neurological conditions, we examined whether thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an astrocytic factor involved in the maintenance of synaptic integrity, is also altered in CHE. Cultured astrocytes were exposed to ammonia (NH4Cl, 0.5–2.5 mM) for 1–10 days, and TSP-1 content was measured in cell extracts and culture media. Astrocytes exposed to ammonia exhibited a reduction in intra- and extracellular TSP-1 levels. Exposure of cultured neurons to conditioned media (CM) from ammonia-treated astrocytes showed a decrease in synaptophysin, PSD95 and synaptotagmin levels. CM from TSP-1 overexpressing astrocytes that were treated with ammonia, when added to cultured neurons, reversed the decline in synaptic proteins. Recombinant TSP-1 similarly reversed the decrease in synaptic proteins. Metformin, an agent known to increase TSP-1 synthesis in other cell types also reversed the ammonia-induced TSP-1 reduction. Likewise, we found a significant decline in TSP-1 level in cortical astrocytes, as well as a reduction in synaptophysin content in vivo in a rat model of CHE. These findings suggest that TSP-1 may represent an important therapeutic target for CHE. PMID:25040426

  19. Astrocyte-to-neuron intercellular prion transfer is mediated by cell-cell contact

    PubMed Central

    Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Arkhipenko, Alexander; Zhu, Seng; Syan, Sylvie; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are caused by misfolding of the cellular protein PrPC to an infectious conformer, PrPSc. Intercellular PrPSc transfer propagates conversion and allows infectivity to move from the periphery to the brain. However, how prions spread between cells of the central nervous system is unclear. Astrocytes are specialized non-neuronal cells within the brain that have a number of functions indispensable for brain homeostasis. Interestingly, they are one of the earliest sites of prion accumulation in the brain. A fundamental question arising from this observation is whether these cells are involved in intercellular prion transfer and thereby disease propagation. Using co-culture systems between primary infected astrocytes and granule neurons or neuronal cell lines, we provide direct evidence that prion-infected astrocytes can disseminate prion to neurons. Though astrocytes are capable of secreting PrP, this is an inefficient method of transferring prion infectivity. Efficient transfer required co-culturing and direct cell contact. Astrocytes form numerous intercellular connections including tunneling nanotubes, containing PrPSc, often colocalized with endolysosomal vesicles, which may constitute the major mechanism of transfer. Because of their role in intercellular transfer of prions astrocytes may influence progression of the disease. PMID:26857744

  20. Glycolytic flux controls d-serine synthesis through glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka; Sasabe, Jumpei; Miyoshi, Yurika; Kuwasako, Kanako; Muto, Yutaka; Hamase, Kenji; Matsuoka, Masaaki; Imanishi, Nobuaki; Aiso, Sadakazu

    2015-01-01

    d-Serine is an essential coagonist with glutamate for stimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors. Although astrocytic metabolic processes are known to regulate synaptic glutamate levels, mechanisms that control d-serine levels are not well defined. Here we show that d-serine production in astrocytes is modulated by the interaction between the d-serine synthetic enzyme serine racemase (SRR) and a glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In primary cultured astrocytes, glycolysis activity was negatively correlated with d-serine level. We show that SRR interacts directly with GAPDH, and that activation of glycolysis augments this interaction. Biochemical assays using mutant forms of GAPDH with either reduced activity or reduced affinity to SRR revealed that GAPDH suppresses SRR activity by direct binding to GAPDH and through NADH, a product of GAPDH. NADH allosterically inhibits the activity of SRR by promoting the disassociation of ATP from SRR. Thus, astrocytic production of d-serine is modulated by glycolytic activity via interactions between GAPDH and SRR. We found that SRR is expressed in astrocytes in the subiculum of the human hippocampus, where neurons are known to be particularly vulnerable to loss of energy. Collectively, our findings suggest that astrocytic energy metabolism controls d-serine production, thereby influencing glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus. PMID:25870284

  1. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  2. A versatile 3D culture model facilitates monitoring of astrocytes undergoing reactive gliosis

    PubMed Central

    East, Emma; Golding, Jonathan P; Phillips, James B

    2009-01-01

    A major impediment to CNS repair is the glial scar, which forms following damage and is composed mainly of ramified, ‘reactive’ astrocytes that inhibit neuronal regrowth. The transition of astrocytes into this reactive phenotype (reactive gliosis) is a potential therapeutic target, but glial scar formation has proved difficult to study in monolayer cultures because they induce constitutive astrocyte activation. Here we demonstrate a 3D collagen gel system in which primary rat astrocytes were maintained in a persistently less reactive state than comparable cells in monolayer, resembling their status in the undamaged CNS. Reactivity, proliferation and viability were monitored and quantified using confocal, fluorescence and time-lapse microscopy, 3D image analysis, RT–PCR and ELISA. To assess the potential of this system as a model of reactive gliosis, astrocytes in 3D were activated with TGFβ1 to a ramified, reactive phenotype (elevated GFAP, Aquaporin 4, CSPG, Vimentin and IL-6 secretion). This provides a versatile system in which astrocytes can be maintained in a resting state, then be triggered to undergo reactive gliosis, enabling real-time monitoring and quantitative analysis throughout and providing a powerful new tool for research into CNS damage and repair. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:19813215

  3. Astrocyte/neuron ratio and its importance on glutamate toxicity: an in vitro voltammetric study.

    PubMed

    Hacimuftuoglu, Ahmet; Tatar, Abdulgani; Cetin, Damla; Taspinar, Numan; Saruhan, Fatih; Okkay, Ufuk; Turkez, Hasan; Unal, Deniz; Stephens, Robert Louis; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between neuron cells and astrocyte cells in regulating glutamate toxicity on the 10th and 20th day in vitro. A mixed primary culture system from newborn rats that contain cerebral cortex neurons cells was employed to investigate the glutamate toxicity. All cultures were incubated with various glutamate concentrations, then viability tests and histological analyses were performed. The activities of glutamate transporters were determined by using in vitro voltammetry technique. Viable cell number was decreased significantly on the 10th day at 10(-7) M and at 10(-6) M glutamate applications, however, viable cell number was not decreased at 20th day. Astrocyte number was increased nearly six times on the 20th day as compared to the 10th day. The peak point of glutamate reuptake capacity was about 2 × 10(-4) M on the 10th day and 10(-3) M on the 20th day. According to our results, we suggested that astrocyte age was important to maintain neuronal survival against glutamate toxicity. Thus, we revealed activation or a trigger point of glutamate transporters on astrocytes due to time since more glutamate was taken up by astrocytes when glutamate transporters on the astrocyte were triggered with high exogenous glutamate concentrations. In conclusion, the present investigation is the first voltammetric study on the reuptake parameters of glutamate in vitro. PMID:26438331

  4. Dynamics of β-adrenergic/cAMP signaling and morphological changes in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Vardjan, Nina; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The morphology of astrocytes, likely regulated by cAMP, determines the structural association between astrocytes and the synapse, consequently modulating synaptic function. β-Adrenergic receptors (β-AR), which increase cytosolic cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i ), may affect cell morphology. However, the real-time dynamics of β-AR-mediated cAMP signaling in single live astrocytes and its effect on cell morphology have not been studied. We used the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensor Epac1-camps to study time-dependent changes in [cAMP]i ; morphological changes in primary rat astrocytes were monitored by real-time confocal microscopy. Stimulation of β-AR by adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline, a specific agonist of β-AR, rapidly increased [cAMP]i (∼15 s). The FRET signal response, mediated via β-AR, was faster than in the presence of forskolin (twofold) and dibutyryl-cAMP (>35-fold), which directly activate adenylyl cyclase and Epac1-camps, respectively, likely due to slow entry of these agents into the cytosol. Oscillations in [cAMP]i have not been recorded, indicating that cAMP-dependent processes operate in a slow time domain. Most Epac1-camps expressing astrocytes revealed a morphological change upon β-AR activation and attained a stellate morphology within 1 h. The morphological changes exhibited a bell-shaped dependency on [cAMP]i . The 5-10% decrease in cell cross-sectional area and the 30-50% increase in cell perimeter are likely due to withdrawal of the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region and the appearance of protrusions on the surface of astrocytes. Because astrocyte processes ensheath neurons, β-AR/cAMP-mediated morphological changes can modify the geometry of the extracellular space, affecting synaptic, neuronal, and astrocyte functions in health and disease. PMID:24464905

  5. Chronic treatment with anti-bipolar drugs causes intracellular alkalinization in astrocytes, altering their functions.

    PubMed

    Song, Dan; Li, Baoman; Yan, Enzhi; Man, Yi; Wolfson, Marina; Chen, Ye; Peng, Liang

    2012-11-01

    Bipolar disorder I and II are affective disorders with mood changes between depressive and manic (bipolar I) or hypomanic (bipolar II) periods. Current therapy of these conditions is chronic treatment with one or more of the anti-bipolar drugs, Li(+) ('lithium'), carbamazepine and valproic acid. The pathophysiology of bipolar disorder is multifactorial and far from clear. Recent data on the dependence of normal brain function on neuronal-astrocytic interactions raise the possibility of astrocytic involvement. We will discuss our previously published and new results on effects of chronic treatment of primary cultures of normal mouse astrocytes with any of three conventional anti-bipolar drugs. The focus will be on several drug-induced events in relation to therapeutic effects of the drugs, such as myo-inositol uptake, intracellular pH and alkalinization, drug-induced modulation of glutamatergic activity in astrocytes and release of astrocytic 'gliotransmitters'. Finally, we will discuss the importance of phospholipase A2 (PLA(2)) and arachidonic acid cascade in drug-treated astrocytes, partly based on Dr. Barneda Cuirana's published thesis. All three drugs cause gradual intracellular alkalinization through different mechanisms. Alkalinization inhibit myo-inositol uptake, resulting in reduced inositolphosphate/phospholipid signaling. Accordingly, transmitter-induced increase in free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) becomes inhibited, aborting release of astrocytic 'gliotransmitters'. The reduction of "gliotransmitter" effects on neurons may have therapeutic effects in mania. Alkalinization also up-regulates expression of cPLA(2), an enzyme releasing arachidonic acid, and triggered arachidonic acid cascade and production, but perhaps not release, of prostaglandins. Whenever tested, identical effects were observed in freshly isolated astrocytes, but not neurons, from carbamazepine-treated healthy animals. PMID:22965852

  6. Globular adiponectin induces a pro-inflammatory response in human astrocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Zhongxiao; Mah, Dorrian; Simtchouk, Svetlana; Klegeris, Andis; Little, Jonathan P.

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Adiponectin receptors are expressed in human astrocytes. • Globular adiponectin induces secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 from cultured astrocytes. • Adiponectin may play a pro-inflammatory role in astrocytes. - Abstract: Neuroinflammation, mediated in part by activated brain astrocytes, plays a critical role in the development of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Adiponectin is the most abundant adipokine secreted from adipose tissue and has been reported to exert both anti- and pro-inflammatory effects in peripheral tissues; however, the effects of adiponectin on astrocytes remain unknown. Shifts in peripheral concentrations of adipokines, including adiponectin, could contribute to the observed link between midlife adiposity and increased AD risk. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of globular adiponectin (gAd) on pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression and secretion in human U373 MG astrocytic cells and to explore the potential involvement of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3 K) signaling pathways in these processes. We demonstrated expression of adiponectin receptor 1 (adipoR1) and adipoR2 in U373 MG cells and primary human astrocytes. gAd induced secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, and gene expression of IL-6, MCP-1, IL-1β and IL-8 in U373 MG cells. Using specific inhibitors, we found that NF-κB, p38MAPK and ERK1/2 pathways are involved in gAd-induced induction of cytokines with ERK1/2 contributing the most. These findings provide evidence that gAd may induce a pro-inflammatory phenotype in human astrocytes.

  7. Astrocytic αVβ3 Integrin Inhibits Neurite Outgrowth and Promotes Retraction of Neuronal Processes by Clustering Thy-1

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Frischknecht, Renato; Maldonado, Horacio; Seidenbecher, Constanze I.; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Hetz, Claudio; Aylwin, María de la Luz; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2012-01-01

    Thy-1 is a membrane glycoprotein suggested to stabilize or inhibit growth of neuronal processes. However, its precise function has remained obscure, because its endogenous ligand is unknown. We previously showed that Thy-1 binds directly to αVβ3 integrin in trans eliciting responses in astrocytes. Nonetheless, whether αVβ3 integrin might also serve as a Thy-1-ligand triggering a neuronal response has not been explored. Thus, utilizing primary neurons and a neuron-derived cell line CAD, Thy-1-mediated effects of αVβ3 integrin on growth and retraction of neuronal processes were tested. In astrocyte-neuron co-cultures, endogenous αVβ3 integrin restricted neurite outgrowth. Likewise, αVβ3-Fc was sufficient to suppress neurite extension in Thy-1(+), but not in Thy-1(−) CAD cells. In differentiating primary neurons exposed to αVβ3-Fc, fewer and shorter dendrites were detected. This effect was abolished by cleavage of Thy-1 from the neuronal surface using phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Moreover, αVβ3-Fc also induced retraction of already extended Thy-1(+)-axon-like neurites in differentiated CAD cells as well as of axonal terminals in differentiated primary neurons. Axonal retraction occurred when redistribution and clustering of Thy-1 molecules in the plasma membrane was induced by αVβ3 integrin. Binding of αVβ3-Fc was detected in Thy-1 clusters during axon retraction of primary neurons. Moreover, αVβ3-Fc-induced Thy-1 clustering correlated in time and space with redistribution and inactivation of Src kinase. Thus, our data indicates that αVβ3 integrin is a ligand for Thy-1 that upon binding not only restricts the growth of neurites, but also induces retraction of already existing processes by inducing Thy-1 clustering. We propose that these events participate in bi-directional astrocyte-neuron communication relevant to axonal repair after neuronal damage. PMID:22479590

  8. Astrocytes and Developmental White Matter Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sen, Ellora; Levison, Steven W.

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that the astrocytes in the immature periventricular white matter are vulnerable to ischemia and respond to inflammation. Here we provide a synopsis of the articles that have evaluated the causes and consequences of developmental brain injuries to white matter astrocytes as well as the consequences of several…

  9. Neuron-astrocyte signaling and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2013-06-01

    Astrocytes express a plethora of ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors and transporters and thus are endowed with the machinery to sense and respond to neuronal activity. Recent studies have implicated astrocytes in important physiological roles in the CNS, such as synchronization of neuronal firing, ion homeostasis, neurotransmitter uptake, glucose metabolism and regulation of the vascular tone. Astrocytes are abundantly coupled through gap junctions allowing them to redistribute elevated K(+) concentration from sites of excessive neuronal activity. Growing evidence now suggests that dysfunctional astrocytes are crucial players in epilepsy. Investigation of specimens from patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy and epilepsy models revealed alterations in expression, localization and function of astroglial K(+) and water channels, entailing impaired K(+) buffering. Moreover, malfunction of glutamate transporters and the astrocytic glutamate-converting enzyme, glutamine synthetase, as observed in epileptic tissue suggested that astrocyte dysfunction is causative of hyperexcitation, seizure spread and neurotoxicity. Accordingly, dysfunctional astrocytes should be considered as promising targets for new therapeutic strategies. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge of astrocyte dysfunction in temporal lobe epilepsy and discuss putative mechanisms underlying these alterations. PMID:21925173

  10. Three-Dimensional Environment Sustains Morphological Heterogeneity and Promotes Phenotypic Progression During Astrocyte Development.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Swarnalatha; Packard, John A; Leach, Jennie B; Powell, Elizabeth M

    2016-06-01

    Astrocytes are critical for coordinating normal brain function by regulating brain metabolic homeostasis, synaptogenesis and neurotransmission, and blood-brain barrier permeability and maintenance. Dysregulation of normal astrocyte ontogeny contributes to neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders, epilepsies, and adverse responses to injury. To achieve these multiple essential roles, astrocyte phenotypes are regionally, morphologically, and functionally heterogeneous. Therefore, the best regenerative medicine strategies may require selective production of distinct astrocyte subpopulations at defined maturation levels. However, little is known about the mechanisms that direct astrocyte diversity or whether heterogeneity is represented in biomaterials. In vitro studies report lack of normal morphologies and overrepresentation of the glial scar type of reactive astrocyte morphology and expression of markers, questioning how well the in vitro astrocytes represent glia in vivo and whether in vitro tissue engineering methods are suitable for regenerative medicine applications. Our previous work with neurons suggests that the three-dimensional (3D) environment, when compared with standard two-dimensional (2D) substrate, yields cellular and molecular behaviors that more closely approximately normal ontogeny. To specifically study the effects of dimensionality, we used purified glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expressing primary cerebral cortical astrocyte cultures from single pups and characterized the cellular maturation profiles in 2D and 3D milieu. We identified four morphological groups in vitro: round, bipolar, stellate, and putative perivascular. In the 3D hydrogel culture environment, postnatal astrocytes transitioned from a population of nearly all round cells and very few bipolar cells toward a population with significant fractions of round, stellate, and putative perivascular cells within a few days, following the in vivo ontogeny. In 2D, however