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Sample records for primary human nasal

  1. Testing gene therapy vectors in human primary nasal epithelial cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huibi; Ouyang, Hong; Ip, Wan; Du, Kai; Duan, Wenming; Avolio, Julie; Wu, Jing; Duan, Cathleen; Yeger, Herman; Bear, Christine E; Gonska, Tanja; Hu, Jim; Moraes, Theo J

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which codes for a chloride/bicarbonate channel in the apical epithelial membranes. CFTR dysfunction results in a multisystem disease including the development of life limiting lung disease. The possibility of a cure for CF by replacing defective CFTR has led to different approaches for CF gene therapy; all of which ultimately have to be tested in preclinical model systems. Primary human nasal epithelial cultures (HNECs) derived from nasal turbinate brushing were used to test the efficiency of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector expressing CFTR. HD-Ad-CFTR transduction resulted in functional expression of CFTR at the apical membrane in nasal epithelial cells obtained from CF patients. These results suggest that HNECs can be used for preclinical testing of gene therapy vectors in CF. PMID:26730394

  2. Testing gene therapy vectors in human primary nasal epithelial cultures.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huibi; Ouyang, Hong; Ip, Wan; Du, Kai; Duan, Wenming; Avolio, Julie; Wu, Jing; Duan, Cathleen; Yeger, Herman; Bear, Christine E; Gonska, Tanja; Hu, Jim; Moraes, Theo J

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) results from mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which codes for a chloride/bicarbonate channel in the apical epithelial membranes. CFTR dysfunction results in a multisystem disease including the development of life limiting lung disease. The possibility of a cure for CF by replacing defective CFTR has led to different approaches for CF gene therapy; all of which ultimately have to be tested in preclinical model systems. Primary human nasal epithelial cultures (HNECs) derived from nasal turbinate brushing were used to test the efficiency of a helper-dependent adenoviral (HD-Ad) vector expressing CFTR. HD-Ad-CFTR transduction resulted in functional expression of CFTR at the apical membrane in nasal epithelial cells obtained from CF patients. These results suggest that HNECs can be used for preclinical testing of gene therapy vectors in CF. PMID:26730394

  3. Primary human nasal epithelial cell response to titanium surface with a nanonetwork structure in nasal implant applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei-En; Lan, Ming-Ying; Lee, Sheng-Wei; Chang, Jeng-Kuei; Huang, Her-Hsiung

    2015-04-01

    In nasal reconstruction applications, the response of cells to titanium (Ti) implants is largely determined by the surface characteristics of the implant. This study investigated an electrochemical anodization surface treatment intended to improve the response of primary human nasal epithelial cells (HNEpC) to Ti surfaces in nasal implant applications. We used a simple and fast electrochemical anodization treatment, i.e., applying anodic current, to produce a titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanonetwork layer on the Ti surface with average lateral pore size below 100 nm, depending on the current applied. The TiO2 nanonetwork layer exhibited enhanced hydrophilicity and protein adsorption ability compared with untreated Ti surfaces. In addition, the spreading morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, and proliferation of HNEpC on the nanonetwork layer indicated excellent cell response characteristics. This research advances our understanding regarding the means by which a TiO2 nanonetwork layer can improve the response of HNEpC to Ti surfaces in nasal implant applications.

  4. Nasal trauma: Primary reconstruction with open rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, I; Malliari, H; Metaxas, S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the prominent location of the nose, the most common facial traumas are nasal injuries. Although nasal traumas usually require staged intervention at a later period of time, in selected cases, primary reconstruction can be effective. A 20-year-old man who was referred from the emergency department with nasal trauma is presented. He reported a fall after feeling unsteady, which caused a direct nasal injury. Clinical examination revealed septal fracture with obstruction of the left nasal cavity and deformity of the nasal pyramid (inverted V deformity). The patient also had a complete dissection of the columella skin. Epistaxis was self-limited, and an open rhinoplasty procedure was decided because the trauma occurred 1 h before admission and there was no significant edema. Surgical intervention included septal reconstruction combined with restoration of the nasal pyramid and columella. One month later, the patient had patent nasal airways, and he was satisfied with the aesthetic result. PMID:22942663

  5. Nasal trauma: Primary reconstruction with open rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, I; Malliari, H; Metaxas, S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the prominent location of the nose, the most common facial traumas are nasal injuries. Although nasal traumas usually require staged intervention at a later period of time, in selected cases, primary reconstruction can be effective. A 20-year-old man who was referred from the emergency department with nasal trauma is presented. He reported a fall after feeling unsteady, which caused a direct nasal injury. Clinical examination revealed septal fracture with obstruction of the left nasal cavity and deformity of the nasal pyramid (inverted V deformity). The patient also had a complete dissection of the columella skin. Epistaxis was self-limited, and an open rhinoplasty procedure was decided because the trauma occurred 1 h before admission and there was no significant edema. Surgical intervention included septal reconstruction combined with restoration of the nasal pyramid and columella. One month later, the patient had patent nasal airways, and he was satisfied with the aesthetic result. PMID:22942663

  6. Primary Air-Liquid Interface Culture of Nasal Epithelium for Nasal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ong, Hui Xin; Jackson, Claire L; Cole, Janice L; Lackie, Peter M; Traini, Daniela; Young, Paul M; Lucas, Jane; Conway, Joy

    2016-07-01

    Nasal drug administration is a promising alternative to oral and parenteral administration for both local and systemic delivery of drugs. The benefits include its noninvasive nature, rapid absorption, and circumvention of first pass metabolism. Hence, the use of an in vitro model using human primary nasal epithelial cells could be key to understanding important functions and parameters of the respiratory epithelium. This model will enable investigators to address important and original research questions using a biologically relevant in vitro platform that mimics the in vivo nasal epithelial physiology. The purpose of this study was to establish, systematically characterize, and validate the use of a primary human nasal epithelium model cultured at the air-liquid interface for the study of inflammatory responses and drug transport and to simultaneously quantify drug effects on ciliary activity. PMID:27223825

  7. Depicting the inner and outer nose: the representation of the nose and the nasal mucosa on the human primary somatosensory cortex (SI).

    PubMed

    Gastl, Mareike; Brünner, Yvonne F; Wiesmann, Martin; Freiherr, Jessica

    2014-09-01

    The nose is important not only for breathing, filtering air, and perceiving olfactory stimuli. Although the face and hands have been mapped, the representation of the internal and external surface of the nose on the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is still poorly understood. To fill this gap functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to localize the nose and the nasal mucosa in the Brodman areas (BAs) 3b, 1, and 2 of the human postcentral gyrus (PG). Tactile stimulation during fMRI was applied via a customized pneumatically driven device to six stimulation sites: the alar wing of the nose, the lateral nasal mucosa, and the hand (serving as a reference area) on the left and right side of the body. Individual representations could be discriminated for the left and right hand, for the left nasal mucosa and left alar wing of the nose in BA 3b and BA 1 by comparing mean activation maxima and Euclidean distances. Right-sided nasal conditions and conditions in BA 2 could further be separated by different Euclidean distances. Regarding the alar wing of the nose, the results concurred with the classic sensory homunculus proposed by Penfield and colleagues. The nasal mucosa was not only determined an individual and bilateral representation, its position on the somatosensory cortex is also situated closer to the caudal end of the PG compared to that of the alar wing of the nose and the hand. As SI is commonly activated during the perception of odors, these findings underscore the importance of the knowledge of the representation of the nasal mucosa on the primary somatosensory cortex, especially for interpretation of results of functional imaging studies about the sense of smell. PMID:24659451

  8. Primary Nasal Reconstruction in Self-Inflicted Nasal Injury.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Abizer; John, Jerry R; Gaba, Sunil; Sharma, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Self-inflicted injury of the nose is extremely rare. It may be associated with severe psychopathology and suicidal ideation. The authors report a case of a 24-year-old man, who presented with soft-tissue loss over both the alae of his nose. He had cut off the alar rims with an ordinary razor blade. He was overtly concerned about his nose being excessively broad and fat. A diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder with nonsuicidal self-injury was made. Patient was observed during 72 hours in hospital with psychiatric support and local dressings. The authors undertook primary nasal reconstruction with nasolabial flaps on both sides for coverage. In conclusion, self-inflicted nasal injury mandates a judicious balancing of psychiatric support and surgical reconstruction. This can prevent untoward sequelae including further self-harm and suicide. PMID:26468831

  9. In vivo Cigarette Smoke Exposure Decreases CCL20, SLPI, and BD-1 Secretion by Human Primary Nasal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Jukosky, James; Gosselin, Benoit J; Foley, Leah; Dechen, Tenzin; Fiering, Steven; Crane-Godreau, Mardi A

    2015-01-01

    Smokers and individuals exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke have a higher risk of developing chronic sinus and bronchial infections. This suggests that cigarette smoke (CS) has adverse effects on immune defenses against pathogens. Epithelial cells are important in airway innate immunity and are the first line of defense against infection. Airway epithelial cells not only form a physical barrier but also respond to the presence of microbes by secreting antimicrobials, cytokines, and chemokines. These molecules can lyse infectious microorganisms and/or provide signals critical to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. We examined the effects of CS on antimicrobial secretions of primary human nasal epithelial cells (PHNECs). Compared to non-CS-exposed individuals, PHNEC from in vivo CS-exposed individuals secreted less chemokine ligand (C-C motif) 20 (CCL20), Beta-defensin 1 (BD-1), and SLPI apically, less BD-1 and SLPI basolaterally, and more CCL20 basolaterally. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure in vitro decreased the apical secretion of CCL20 and beta-defensin 1 by PHNEC from non-CS-exposed individuals. Exposing PHNEC from non-CS exposed to CSE also significantly decreased the levels of many mRNA transcripts that are involved in immune signaling. Our results show that in vivo or in vitro exposure to CS alters the secretion of key antimicrobial peptides from PHNEC, but that in vivo CS exposure is a much more important modifier of antimicrobial peptide secretion. Based on the gene expression data, it appears that CSE disrupts multiple immune signaling pathways in PHNEC. Our results provide mechanistic insight into how CS exposure alters the innate immune response and increases an individual's susceptibility to pathogen infection. PMID:26793127

  10. In vivo Cigarette Smoke Exposure Decreases CCL20, SLPI, and BD-1 Secretion by Human Primary Nasal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jukosky, James; Gosselin, Benoit J.; Foley, Leah; Dechen, Tenzin; Fiering, Steven; Crane-Godreau, Mardi A.

    2016-01-01

    Smokers and individuals exposed to second-hand cigarette smoke have a higher risk of developing chronic sinus and bronchial infections. This suggests that cigarette smoke (CS) has adverse effects on immune defenses against pathogens. Epithelial cells are important in airway innate immunity and are the first line of defense against infection. Airway epithelial cells not only form a physical barrier but also respond to the presence of microbes by secreting antimicrobials, cytokines, and chemokines. These molecules can lyse infectious microorganisms and/or provide signals critical to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. We examined the effects of CS on antimicrobial secretions of primary human nasal epithelial cells (PHNECs). Compared to non-CS-exposed individuals, PHNEC from in vivo CS-exposed individuals secreted less chemokine ligand (C-C motif) 20 (CCL20), Beta-defensin 1 (BD-1), and SLPI apically, less BD-1 and SLPI basolaterally, and more CCL20 basolaterally. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure in vitro decreased the apical secretion of CCL20 and beta-defensin 1 by PHNEC from non-CS-exposed individuals. Exposing PHNEC from non-CS exposed to CSE also significantly decreased the levels of many mRNA transcripts that are involved in immune signaling. Our results show that in vivo or in vitro exposure to CS alters the secretion of key antimicrobial peptides from PHNEC, but that in vivo CS exposure is a much more important modifier of antimicrobial peptide secretion. Based on the gene expression data, it appears that CSE disrupts multiple immune signaling pathways in PHNEC. Our results provide mechanistic insight into how CS exposure alters the innate immune response and increases an individual’s susceptibility to pathogen infection. PMID:26793127

  11. Primary Nasal Tuberculosis in a 10-Year-Old Girl

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Murat; Özsurekçi, Yasemin; Cengiz, Ali Bülent; Özçelik, Uğur; Yalçın, Ebru; Gököz, Özay

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tuberculosis is a rare clinical entity which mainly presents in elderly people. Nasal tuberculosis has always been considered to be secondary to tuberculosis of the lungs, and in rare instances it is a primary infection, usually when mycobacteria are inhaled. We describe the case of a 10-year-old girl who was successfully treated for primary nasal tuberculosis. This patient is one of the very few children who have been reported to have primary nasal tuberculosis. PMID:27366187

  12. Nasal drug delivery in humans.

    PubMed

    Bitter, Christoph; Suter-Zimmermann, Katja; Surber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Intranasal administration is an attractive option for local and systemic delivery of many therapeutic agents. The nasal mucosa is--compared to other mucosae--easily accessible. Intranasal drug administration is noninvasive, essentially painless and particularly suited for children. Application can be performed easily by patients or by physicians in emergency settings. Intranasal drug delivery offers a rapid onset of therapeutic effects (local or systemic). Nasal application circumvents gastrointestinal degradation and hepatic first-pass metabolism of the drug. The drug, the vehicle and the application device form an undividable triad. Its selection is therefore essential for the successful development of effective nasal products. This paper discusses the feasibility and potential of intranasal administration. A series of questions regarding (a) the intended use (therapeutic considerations), (b) the drug, (c) the vehicle and (d) the application device (pharmaceutical considerations) are addressed with a view to their impact on the development of products for nasal application. Current and future trends and perspectives are discussed. PMID:21325837

  13. Morphogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus in human primary nasal ciliated epithelial cells occurs at surface membrane microdomains that are distinct from cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Jumat, Muhammad Raihan; Yan, Yan; Ravi, Laxmi Iyer; Wong, Puisan; Huong, Tra Nguyen; Li, Chunwei; Tan, Boon Huan; Wang, De Yun; Sugrue, Richard J.

    2015-10-15

    The distribution of cilia and the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) nucleocapsid (N) protein, fusion (F) protein, attachment (G) protein, and M2-1 protein in human ciliated nasal epithelial cells was examined at between 1 and 5 days post-infection (dpi). All virus structural proteins were localized at cell surface projections that were distinct from cilia. The F protein was also trafficked into the cilia, and while its presence increased as the infection proceeded, the N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time of infection. The presence of the F protein in the cilia correlated with cellular changes in the cilia and reduced cilia function. At 5 dpi extensive cilia loss and further reduced cilia function was noted. These data suggested that although RSV morphogenesis occurs at non-cilia locations on ciliated nasal epithelial cells, RSV infection induces changes in the cilia body that leads to extensive cilia loss. - Highlights: • Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects nasal ciliated epithelial cells. • Virus morphogenesis occurs within filamentous projections distinct from cilia. • The RSV N protein was not detected in the cilia at any time during infection. • Trafficking of the F protein into the cilia occurred early in infection. • Presence of the F protein in cilia correlated with impaired cilia function.

  14. [Primary melanoma of the nasal and paranasal sinus mucosa].

    PubMed

    Raĭkov, S; Avramov, T; Despotov, O

    2001-01-01

    The authors make short review on the one of most malignant neoplasms in human pathology--its incidence, ethiology, pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, treatment and prognostic features. We present a clinical case from our practice--a melanoma of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses--a rare localization. Melanocarcinomas of the mucous membranes of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses are almost uniformly fatal. Undoubtedly some of the contributory reasons for their grave prognosis are the delay in detection and in accurate histologic diagnosis, the frequent injudicious therapy, the difficulties in adequate operative removal. Melanomas o mucous membranes may arise in mucosa lined by either normally present, or metaplastic stratified squamous epithelium. PMID:12024680

  15. Resident aerobic microbiota of the adult human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, T T; Kirkeby, L P; Poulsen, K; Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    2000-10-01

    Recent evidence strongly suggests that the microbiota of the nasal cavity plays a crucial role in determining the reaction patterns of the mucosal and systemic immune system. However, little is known about the normal microbiota of the nasal cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine the microbiota in different parts of the nasal cavity and to develop and evaluate methods for this purpose. Samples were collected from 10 healthy adults by nasal washes and by swabbing of the mucosa through a sterile introduction device. Both methods gave results that were quantitatively and qualitatively reproducible, and revealed significant differences in the density of the nasal microbiota between individuals. The study revealed absence of gram-negative bacteria that are regular members of the commensal microbiota of the pharynx. Likewise, viridans type streptococci were sparsely represented. The nasal microbiota was dominated by species of the genera Corynebacterium, Aureobacterium, Rhodococcus, and Staphylococcus, including S. epidermis, S. capitis, S. hominis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis and S. warneri. These studies show that the microbiota of the nasal cavity of adults is strikingly different from that of the pharynx, and that the nasal cavity is a primary habitat for several species of diphtheroids recognized as opportunistic pathogens. Under special circumstances, single species, including IgA1 protease-producing bacteria, may become predominant in a restricted area of the nasal mucosa. PMID:11200821

  16. Correlation of nasal geometry with aerosol deposition in human volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Seng; Simpson, S.Q.; Cheng, Kuo-His; Swift, D.L.; Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Guilmette, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    The nasal airways act as the first filter in the respiratory tract to remove very large or small particles, that would otherwise penetrate to the lower airways. Aerosol deposition data obtained with human volunteers vary considerably under comparable experimental conditions. Reasons for the intersubject variations have been frequently attributed to the geometry of the nasal passages. Because there is no direct proof of this hypothesis, nasal deposition of ultrafine particles in human volunteers has been studied in our laboratory. Preliminary results obtained with four adult volunteers also vary considerably between subjects. The purpose of this part of the study was to establish a theoretical equation relating diffusional deposition in nasal airways to the geometrical dimensions of the individual nasal airways. This relationship was then applied to the experimental deposition data and measurement of airway morphometry for correlation.

  17. Nasal cytochrome P4502A: Identification in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Ding, Xinxin

    1995-12-01

    The nasal mucosa, the first tissue of contact for inhaled xenobiotics, possesses substantial enobiotic-metabolizing capacti. Enzymes of the nasal cavity may metabolize xenobiotics to innocuous, more water-soluble compounds that are eliminated from the body, or they may bioactivate them to toxic metabolites. These toxic metabolites may find to cellular macromolecules in the nasal cavity or be transported to other parts of the body where they may react. Nasal carcinogenesis in rodents often results from bioactivation of xenobiotics. The increased incidences of nasal tumors associated with certain occupations suggest that xenobiotic bioactivation may be important in human nasal cancer etiology, as well. The increasing popularity of the nose as a route of drug administration makes information concerning nasal drug metabolism and disposition vital to accomplish therapeutic goals. For these reasons, the study of xenobiotic-met abolizing capacity of the nasal cavity is an important area of health-related research. In the present study, we have confirmed the presence of CYP2A6 mRNA in human respiratory mucosa.

  18. Air-conditioning in the human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Elad, David; Wolf, Michael; Keck, Tilman

    2008-11-30

    Healthy humans normally breathe through their nose even though its complex geometry imposes a significantly higher resistance in comparison with mouth breathing. The major functional roles of nasal breathing are defense against infiltrating particles and conditioning of the inspired air to nearly alveolar conditions in order to maintain the internal milieu of the lung. The state-of-the-art of the existing knowledge on nasal air-conditioning will be discussed in this review, including in vivo measurements in humans and computational studies on nasal air-conditioning capacity. Areas where further studies will improve our understanding and may help medical diagnosis and intervention in pathological states will be introduced. PMID:18565805

  19. Exploring the bacterial assemblages along the human nasal passage.

    PubMed

    Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Jáuregui, Ruy; Oxley, Andrew P A; Kaspar, Ursula; Plumeier, Iris; Kahl, Silke; Rudack, Claudia; Becker, Karsten; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2016-07-01

    The human nasal passage, from the anterior nares through the nasal vestibule to the nasal cavities, is an important habitat for opportunistic pathogens and commensals alike. This work sampled four different anatomical regions within the human nasal passage across a large cohort of individuals (n = 79) comprising individuals suffering from chronic nasal inflammation clinically known as chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and individuals not suffering from inflammation (CRS-free). While individuals had their own unique bacterial fingerprint that was consistent across the anatomical regions, these bacterial fingerprints formed into distinct delineated groups comprising core bacterial members, which were consistent across all four swabbed anatomical regions irrespective of health status. The most significant observed pattern was the difference between the global bacterial profiles of swabbed and tissue biopsy samples from the same individuals, being also consistent across different anatomical regions. Importantly, no statistically significant differences could be observed concerning the global bacterial communities, any of the bacterial species or the range of diversity indices used to compare between CRS and CRS-free individuals, and between two CRS phenotypes (without nasal polyps and with nasal polyps). Thus, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of sinusitis remains uncertain. PMID:27207744

  20. The ontogeny of nasal floor shape variation in extant humans.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Christina L; Franciscus, Robert G

    2014-11-01

    Variation in nasal floor topography has generated both neontological and paleontological interest. Three categories of nasal floor shape (Franciscus: J Hum Evol 44 (2003) 699-727) have been used when analyzing this trait in extant humans and fossil Homo: flat, sloped, and depressed (or "bi-level"). Variation in the frequency of these configurations within and among extant and fossil humans has been well-documented (Franciscus: J Hum Evol 44 (2003) 699-727; Wu et al.: Anthropol Sci 120 (2012) 217-226). However, variation in this trait in Homo has been observed primarily in adults, with comparatively small subadult sample sizes and/or large age gradients that may not sufficiently track key ontogenetic changes. In this study, we investigate the ontogeny of nasal floor shape in a relatively large cross-sectional age sample of extant humans (n = 382) ranging from 4.0 months fetal to 21 years post-natal. Results indicate that no fetal or young infant individuals possess a depressed nasal floor, and that a depressed nasal floor, when present (ca. 21% of the sample), does not occur until 3.0 years postnatal. A canonical variates analysis of maxillary shape revealed that individuals with depressed nasal floors were also characterized by relatively taller anterior alveolar regions. This suggests that palate remodeling at about 3.0-3.5 years after birth, under the influence of tooth development, strongly influences nasal floor variation, and that various aspects of dental development, including larger crown/root size, may contribute to the development of a depressed nasal floor. These results in extant humans may help explain the high frequency of this trait found in Neandertal and other archaic Homo maxillae. PMID:25043897

  1. Shape of the human nasal cavity promotes retronasal smell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trastour, Sophie; Melchionna, Simone; Mishra, Shruti; Zwicker, David; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Brenner, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Humans are exceptionally good at perceiving the flavor of food. Flavor includes sensory input from taste receptors but is dominated by olfactory (smell) receptors. To smell food while eating, odors must be transported to the nasal cavity during exhalation. Olfactory performance of this retronasal route depends, among other factors, on the position of the olfactory receptors and the shape of the nasal cavity. One biological hypothesis is that the derived configuration of the human nasal cavity has resulted in a greater capacity for retronasal smell, hence enhanced flavor perception. We here study the air flow and resulting odor deposition as a function of the nasal geometry and the parameters of exhalation. We perform computational fluid dynamics simulations in realistic geometries obtained from CT scans of humans. Using the resulting flow fields, we then study the deposition of tracer particles in the nasal cavity. Additionally, we derive scaling laws for the odor deposition rate as a function of flow parameters and geometry using boundary layer theory. These results allow us to assess which changes in the evolution of the human nose led to significant improvements of retronasal smell.

  2. Characterizing adult human nasal airway dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Guilmette, R.A.; Griffith, W.C.

    1994-11-01

    Respiratory tract models used in calculating radiation dose from exposure to inhaled radioactive aerosols have only recently focused attention on the importance of the nasal airways (NAs). Because the NAs are the first tissues of the respiratory tract available for aerosol deposition in normally nose-breathing people, any deposition of aerosol in this anatomical structure will reduce the amounts available to be deposited in the remainder of the respiratory tract. Thus, uncertainties in estimating the deposition fractions in the NAs will propagate throughout the remainder of the respiratory tract, creating errors in the calculated dose estimates. Additionally, there is evidence that the NAs are also at risk for induction of cancer from exposure to certain occupational aerosols such as wood dust, leather dust, chromium, and nickel. The purpose of this investigation was to conduct an anatomical study to assess the variabilities in NA dimensions.

  3. The morphological interaction between the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses in living humans.

    PubMed

    Holton, Nathan; Yokley, Todd; Butaric, Lauren

    2013-03-01

    To understand how variation in nasal architecture accommodates the need for effective conditioning of respired air, it is necessary to assess the morphological interaction between the nasal cavity and other aspects of the nasofacial skeleton. Previous studies indicate that the maxillary sinuses may play a key role in accommodating climatically induced nasal variation such that a decrease in nasal cavity volume is associated with a concomitant increase in maxillary sinus volume. However, due to conflicting results in previous studies, the precise interaction of the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses, in humans, is unclear. This is likely due to the prior emphasis on nasal cavity size, whereas arguably, nasal cavity shape is more important with regard to the interaction with the maxillary sinuses. Using computed tomography scans of living human subjects (N=40), the goal of this study is to assess the interaction between nasal cavity form and maxillary sinus volume in European- and African-derived individuals with differences in nasal cavity morphology. First, we assessed whether there is an inverse relationship between nasal cavity and maxillary sinus volumes. Next, we examined the relationship between maxillary sinus volume and nasal cavity shape using multivariate regression. Our results show that there is a positive relationship between nasal cavity and maxillary sinus volume, indicating that the maxillary sinuses do not accommodate variation in nasal cavity size. However, maxillary sinus volume is significantly correlated with variation in relative internal nasal breadth. Thus, the maxillary sinuses appear to be important for accommodating nasal cavity shape rather than size. PMID:23382025

  4. Immediate effect of benzalkonium chloride in decongestant nasal spray on the human nasal mucosal temperature.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Leiacker, R; Wiesmiller, K; Rettinger, G; Keck, T

    2004-08-01

    Benzalkonium chloride is a preservative commonly used in nasal decongestant sprays. It has been suggested that benzalkonium chloride may be harmful to the nasal mucosa. Decongestion with the vasoconstrictor xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride has been shown to cause a significant reduction of the nasal mucosal temperature. The purpose of the present study was to determine the short-term influence of xylometazoline nasal spray with and without benzalkonium chloride on the nasal mucosal temperature. Healthy volunteers (30) were included in the study. Fifteen volunteers received xylometazoline nasal spray (1.0 mg/mL) containing benzalkonium chloride (0.1 mg/mL) and 15 age-matched subjects, received xylometazoline nasal spray without benzalkonium chloride. Using a miniaturized thermocouple the septal mucosal temperature was continuously measured at defined intranasal detection sites before and after application of the nasal spray. The mucosal temperature values did not significantly differ between the group receiving xylometazoline containing benzalkonium chloride and the group receiving xylometazoline spray without benzalkonium chloride before and after decongestion (P > 0.05). In both study groups septal mucosal temperatures significantly decreased after decongestion (P < 0.05) because of a reduction of the nasal mucosal blood flow following vasoconstriction. This study indicates that benzalkonium chloride itself does not seem to influence nasal blood flow and nasal mucosal temperature in topical nasal decongestants. PMID:15270822

  5. Multifocal primary cutaneous extranodal NK/T lymphoma nasal type*

    PubMed Central

    de Vasconcelos, Pedro; Ferreira, Cristina; Soares-Almeida, Luís; Filipe, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Nasal type extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma is a distinct entity according to the World Health Organization classification. Although 60% to 90% of patients with this disease present with a destructive mass in the midline facial tissues, it may also primarily or secondarily involve extranasal sites, like the skin. We report the case of a 77-year-old patient that came to our department with erythematous plaques of the right leg and eczematous lesions of the trunk. These lesions were biopsied and the patient was diagnosed with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type. He was treated with multi-agent systemic chemotherapy but died 5 months after diagnosis. This case highlights the rarity and variability of cutaneous features of this disease and its aggressive course and poor prognosis. PMID:27192524

  6. Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements Inside the Human Nasal Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, James; Hopkins, Lisa; Sreenivas, K. R.; Wexler, Anthony; Prasad, Ajay

    1998-11-01

    In some applications (such as biological flows) the flow passage exhibits a highly complex geometry. A method is described by which such a flow passage is rendered as a three-dimensional model. A computer model of an adult human nasal cavity was generated from digitized computed tomography (CT) scan images, using the I-DEAS modeling package, and was converted to a stereolithographic file for rapid prototyping. Rapid prototyping yielded a water soluble negative of the airway. Silicone elastomer was poured over the negative, which was washed out after the silicone hardened. This technique can be used to obtain an accurate, transparent, silicone, replicate model of any arbitrary geometry. If the working fluid is refractive-index matched to the silicone, it is possible to obtain PIV measurements in any cross-section. We demonstrate the technique by creating a double-scale model of the human nasal passage, and obtaining PIV measurements.

  7. Primary Intestinal-type Adenocarcinoma of the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Belli, S; Taskin, U; Caglar, A; Tetikkurt, US

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report a rare case of sinonasal intestinal-type adenocarcinoma in the nasal cavity. A 31-year old man presented with headache and epistaxis. We identified a malignant tumour, which is a rare pathology, with detailed physical examination, anterior rhinoscopy, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathologic examination. Endoscopic excision of the tumour was performed. After three years of follow-up of the patient in our clinic, there was no sign of any recurrence. PMID:25803391

  8. The Human Nasal Microbiota and Staphylococcus aureus Carriage

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel N.; Feazel, Leah M.; Bessesen, Mary T.; Price, Connie S.; Janoff, Edward N.; Pace, Norman R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Colonization of humans with Staphylococcus aureus is a critical prerequisite of subsequent clinical infection of the skin, blood, lung, heart and other deep tissues. S. aureus persistently or intermittently colonizes the nares of ∼50% of healthy adults, whereas ∼50% of the general population is rarely or never colonized by this pathogen. Because microbial consortia within the nasal cavity may be an important determinant of S. aureus colonization we determined the composition and dynamics of the nasal microbiota and correlated specific microorganisms with S. aureus colonization. Methodology/Principal Findings Nasal specimens were collected longitudinally from five healthy adults and a cross-section of hospitalized patients (26 S. aureus carriers and 16 non-carriers). Culture-independent analysis of 16S rRNA sequences revealed that the nasal microbiota of healthy subjects consists primarily of members of the phylum Actinobacteria (e.g., Propionibacterium spp. and Corynebacterium spp.), with proportionally less representation of other phyla, including Firmicutes (e.g., Staphylococcus spp.) and Proteobacteria (e.g. Enterobacter spp). In contrast, inpatient nasal microbiotas were enriched in S. aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis and diminished in several actinobacterial groups, most notably Propionibacterium acnes. Moreover, within the inpatient population S. aureus colonization was negatively correlated with the abundances of several microbial groups, including S. epidermidis (p = 0.004). Conclusions/Significance The nares environment is colonized by a temporally stable microbiota that is distinct from other regions of the integument. Negative association between S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and other groups suggests microbial competition during colonization of the nares, a finding that could be exploited to limit S. aureus colonization. PMID:20498722

  9. Involvement of the appendix in a relapsed case of primary nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, H; Takagi, T; Tamaru, J; Sakai, C

    2000-05-01

    We report here a 20-year-old man presenting with primary nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma which showed an aggressive clinical course spreading to the spleen and skin despite various treatments. Eight months after high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, acute appendicitis with perforation occurred and the patient underwent appendectomy. The histopathological diagnosis was NK/T-cell lymphoma of the appendix. Lymphoma of the appendix is extremely rare and the majority of appendiceal lymphomas are of B-cell origin. This is the first report of involvement of appendix by nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma. PMID:11042526

  10. Primary NK/T cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Bilbao, Érica Rojas; Garate, Gonzalo Martín; de los Ángeles Vicente Repáraz, María; del Olmo, Mercedes; Casali, Claudia Érica; Zerga, Marta Elisa; Chirife, Ana María; Cicco, Juan Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Since nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type are rare diseases, colonic involvement has seldom been seen. We report a case of a patient with a primary NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type of the colon. The patient had no history of malignant diseases and was diagnosed after exhaustive study in the context of fever of unknown origin. The first therapeutic approach followed the DA-EPOCH-protocol: etoposide, prednisone, doxor-rubicin, vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The persistence of constitutional symptoms after the first treatment course motivated the switch to a second line following the SMILE-protocol: dexamethasone, metotrexate, ifosfamide, E.coli L-asparaginase, and etoposide. Despite intensive chemotherapy, the patient died 2 months after the diagnose of an extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma of the colon and 4 months after the first symptomatic appearance of disease. PMID:23772308

  11. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells alleviate nasal mucosa radiation damage in a guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hong-Gang; Ji, Fang; Zheng, Chun-Quan; Wang, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Nasal complications after radiotherapy severely affect the quality of life of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, and there is a compelling need to find novel therapies for nasal epithelial cell radiation damage. Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic effect of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) in guinea pig model of nasal mucosa radiation damage and explored its therapeutic mechanism. Cultured hUC-MSCs were injected intravenously immediately after radiation in the nasal mucosa-radiation-damage guinea pig model. Migration of hUC-MSCs into the nasal mucosa and the potential for differentiation into nasal epithelial cells were evaluated by immunofluorescence. The therapeutic effects of hUC-MSCs were evaluated by mucus clearance time (MCT), degree of nasal mucosa edema, and the nasal mucosa cilia form and coverage ratio. Results indicate that the hUC-MSCs migrated to the nasal mucosa lamina propria and did not differentiate into nasal epithelial cells in this model. The MCT and degree of mucosal edema were improved at 1 week and 1 month after radiation, respectively, but no difference was found at 3 months and 6 months after radiation. The nasal mucosa cilia form and coverage ratio was not improved 6 months after radiation. Thus, hUC-MSCs can migrate to the nasal mucosa lamina propria and improve MCT and mucosa edema within a short time period, but these cells are unable to differentiate into nasal epithelial cells and improve nasal epithelial regeneration in the nasal mucosa radiation damage guinea pig model. PMID:25209829

  12. A Recently Established Murine Model of Nasal Polyps Demonstrates Activation of B Cells, as Occurs in Human Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Young; Lee, Sun Hye; Carter, Roderick G; Kato, Atsushi; Schleimer, Robert P; Cho, Seong H

    2016-08-01

    Animal model systems are invaluable for examining human diseases. Our laboratory recently established a mouse model of nasal polyps (NPs) and investigated similarities and differences between this mouse model and human NPs. We especially focus on the hypothesis that B cell activation occurs during NP generation in the murine model. After induction of ovalbumin-induced allergic rhinosinusitis, 6% ovalbumin and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (10 ng) were instilled into the nasal cavity of mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The development of structures that somewhat resemble NPs (which we will refer to as NPs) was confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The mRNA and protein levels of various inflammatory cell markers and mediators were measured by real-time PCR in nasal tissue and by ELISA in nasal lavage fluid (NLF), respectively. Total Ig isotype levels in NLF were also quantitated using the Mouse Ig Isotyping Multiplex kit (EMD Millipore, Billerica, MA) on a Luminex 200 instrument (Life Technologies, Grand Island, NY). Similar to human NPs, there were significant increases in gene expression of inflammatory cell markers, such as CD19, CD138, CD11c, and mast cell protease-6 in nasal tissue samples of the NP group compared with those of the control group. In further investigations of B cell activation, mRNA expressions of B cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand were found to be significantly increased in mouse NP tissue. B cell-activating factor protein concentration and IgA and IgG1 levels in NLF were significantly higher in the NP group compared with the control group. In this study, the NP mouse model demonstrated enhanced B cell responses, which are reminiscent of B cell responses in human NPs. PMID:27163839

  13. Primary myelolipoma presenting as a nasal cavity polyp: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Myelolipomas are rare, benign tumors comprising mature adipose tissue and hematopoietic elements. The vast majority occur within the adrenal glands, but extra-adrenal myelolipomas have also been reported in the presacral region, retroperitoneum, mesentery, stomach, spleen, liver, mediastinum and lungs. Here, we present a case of primary myelolipoma occurring in an unusual site: the nasal cavity. To the best of our knowledge, we believe that this location for extra-adrenal myelolipoma has not been previously described in the literature. Case presentation We report a case of primary myelolipoma occurring in the nasal cavity of a 48-year-old Asian woman. We describe the etiology, pathology and differential diagnosis of extra-adrenal myelolipomas, and review the literature. Conclusions We chose to present this case because of its unusual location. Although myelolipomas are rare, we conclude that they it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions in this site. PMID:22584001

  14. Human nasal rhinosporidiosis: a case report from Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Uledi, Sefu; Fauzia, Ayubu

    2011-01-01

    Rhinosporidiosis is a rare chronic granulomatous disease, characterised by polypous lesions of the mucous membrane. Commonly affects the mucous membrane of the naso-pharynx, conjunctiva and palate. Its causative agent is Rhinosporidium seeberi. The disease is more prevalent in the Indian subcontinent, but remains quite rare in our environment. We hereby present a case description of a 70 year old native Malawian male with a polypoid nasal rhinosporidiosis. Patient presented with long standing history of nasal obstruction and intermittent epistaxis for three years. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and he was successfully treated by complete surgical excision. This was a very unusual cause of nasal masses in our setting. Nasal rhinosporidioss lesions may largely mimic other ordinary nasal polyps, it is crucial therefore for clinicians in our region to consider rhinosporidiosis as a differential diagnosis when assessing patients presenting with nasal swellings. PMID:22355433

  15. Characteristics of Chloride Transport in Nasal Mucosa from Patients with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Do-Yeon; Hwang, Peter H.; Illek, Beate

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited disorder that produces lifelong difficulties with chronic airway inflammation. Little is known about the role of chronic airway inflammation on chloride ion transport properties in PCD. This study is to assess the cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl) ion transport properties of freshly excised nasal mucosa from PCD compared with normal and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Study Design Electrophysiology study utilizing Ussing type hemi-chamber technique with three different types of nasal tissue (normal, CRS, PCD) obtained from patients during endoscopic surgery at tertiary referral center. Methods Nasal tissues were examined under short-circuit conditions and gradient-driven Cl currents were continuously recorded. The cAMP elevating agonist (forskolin) was added to stimulate CFTR-mediated Cl secretion. To prevent misinterpretation of flux measurement, Cl transport inhibitors were used at the end of all experiments. Basal Cl currents (ICl) and changes in IClto forskolin (ΔICl) were compared between normal, CRS and PCD nasal tissues. Results Forskolin stimulated Cl currents across all different types of nasal epithelia. The Cl secretory response was effectively blocked by the Cl ion transport inhibitors. ICl were significantly higher in normals (155.0 ± 9.3μA/cm2) compared to CRS (79.1 ± 15.0μA/cm2) and PCD (70.9 ± 20.4μA/cm2) (p = 0.005). ΔICl in CRS (14.8 ± 2.3μA/cm2) and PCD (12.2 ± 2.4μA/cm2) were markedly diminished compared to normals (28.3 ± 4.7μA/cm2) (p = 0.024). Conclusions PCD tissues were characterized by impaired ICl and ΔICl. Both parameters were reduced by 54.3 % and 56.9 % in PCD when compared to normals. PMID:20564725

  16. Phagocytosis of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia by primary nasal epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Botterel, Françoise; Gross, Karine; Ibrahim-Granet, Oumaïma; Khoufache, Khaled; Escabasse, Virginie; Coste, André; Cordonnier, Catherine; Escudier, Estelle; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Background Invasive aspergillosis, which is mainly caused by the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, is an increasing problem in immunocompromised patients. Infection occurs by inhalation of airborne conidia, which are first encountered by airway epithelial cells. Internalization of these conidia into the epithelial cells could serve as a portal of entry for this pathogenic fungus. Results We used an in vitro model of primary cultures of human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) at an air-liquid interface. A. fumigatus conidia were compared to Penicillium chrysogenum conidia, a mould that is rarely responsible for invasive disease. Confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and anti-LAMP1 antibody labeling studies showed that conidia of both species were phagocytosed and trafficked into a late endosomal-lysosomal compartment as early as 4 h post-infection. In double immunolabeling experiments, the mean percentage of A. fumigatus conidia undergoing phagocytosis 4 h post-infection was 21.8 ± 4.5%. Using combined staining with a fluorescence brightener and propidium iodide, the mean rate of phagocytosis was 18.7 ± 9.3% and the killing rate 16.7 ± 7.5% for A. fumigatus after 8 h. The phagocytosis rate did not differ between the two fungal species for a given primary culture. No germination of the conidia was observed until 20 h of observation. Conclusion HNEC can phagocytose fungal conidia but killing of phagocytosed conidia is low, although the spores do not germinate. This phagocytosis does not seem to be specific to A. fumigatus. Other immune cells or mechanisms are required to kill A. fumigatus conidia and to avoid further invasion. PMID:18564423

  17. In vivo deposition of ultrafine aerosols in human nasal and oral airways

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Swift, D.L.; Simpson, S.Q.

    1995-12-01

    The extrathoracic airways, including the nasal passage, oral passage, pharynx, and larynx, are the first targets for inhaled particles and provide an important defense for the lung. Understanding the deposition efficiency of the nasal and oral passages is therefore crucial for assessing doses of inhaled particles to the extrathoracic airways and the lung. Significant inter-subject variability in nasal deposition has been shown in recent studies by Rasmussen, T.R. et al, using 2.6 {mu}m particles in 10 human subjects and in our preliminary studies using 0.004-0.15 {mu}m particles in four adult volunteers. No oral deposition was reported in either of these studies. Reasons for the intersubject variations have been frequently attributed to the geometry of the nasal passages. The aims of the present study were to measure in vivo the nasal airway dimensions and the deposition of ultrafine aerosols in both the nasal and oral passages, and to determine the relationship between nasal airway dimensions and aerosol deposition. A statistical procedure incorporated with the diffusion theory was used to model the dimensional features of the nasal airways which may be responsible for the biological variability in particle deposition. In summary, we have correlated deposition of particles in the size range of 0.004 to 0.15 {mu}m with the nasal dimensions of each subject.

  18. COMMENTS ON RECENT DATA FOR PARTICLE DEPOSITION IN HUMAN NASAL PASSAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The deposition of inhaled particles within human nasal passages has important toxicologic and pharmacologic applications. owever, experimental data quantitating factors affecting particle deposition are rare. e have evaluated findings from investigations employing either replica ...

  19. MORPHOMETRIC ASPECTS OF CILIARY DISTRIBUTION AND CILIOGENESIS IN HUMAN NASAL EPITHELIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Observations of freeze-fracture preparations of human nasal epithelium have provided a unique perspective of the spatial distribution of epithelial cell cilia unattainable by more conventional ultrastructural techniques. The initial stages of ciliogenesis were characterized ultra...

  20. Recommendations for the standardisation of oxytocin nasal administration and guidelines for its reporting in human research.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Adam J; Hickie, Ian B; McGuinness, Margaret M; Otis, Melissa; Woods, Elizabeth A; Disinger, Hannah M; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chen, Timothy F; Banati, Richard B

    2013-05-01

    A series of studies have reported on the salubrious effects of oxytocin nasal spray on social cognition and behavior in humans, across physiology (e.g., eye gaze, heart rate variability), social cognition (e.g., attention, memory, and appraisal), and behavior (e.g., trust, generosity). Findings suggest the potential of oxytocin nasal spray as a treatment for various psychopathologies, including autism and schizophrenia. There are, however, increasing reports of variability of response to oxytocin nasal spray between experiments and individuals. In this review, we provide a summary of factors that influence transmucosal nasal drug delivery, deposition, and their impact on bioavailability. These include variations in anatomy and resultant airflow dynamic, vascularisation, status of blood vessels, mode of spray application, gallenic formulation (including presence of uptake enhancers, control release formulation), and amount and method of administration. These key variables are generally poorly described and controlled in scientific reports, in spite of their potential to alter the course of treatment outcome studies. Based on this review, it should be of no surprise that differences emerge across individuals and experiments when nasal drug delivery methods are employed. We present recommendations for researchers to use when developing and administering the spray, and guidelines for reporting on peptide nasal spray studies in humans. We hope that these recommendations assist in establishing a scientific standard that can improve the rigor and subsequent reliability of reported effects of oxytocin nasal spray in humans. PMID:23265311

  1. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  2. Demonstration of carboxylesterase in cytology samples of human nasal respiratory epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, D.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Avila, K.

    1995-12-01

    The epithelial lining of the nasal airways is a target for responses induced by a variety of toxicant exposures. The high metabolic capacity of this tissue has been suggested to play a role in both protection of the airways through detoxication of certain toxicants, as well as in activation of other compounds to more toxic metabolites. Specifically, nasal carboxylesterase (CE) has been shown to mediate the toxicity of inhaled esters and acrylates by converting them to more toxic acid and alcohol metabolites which can be cytotoxic and/or carcinogenic to the nasal mucosa. Due to difficulties in extrapolating rodent models to human, new paradigms using human cells and tissues are essential to understanding and evaluating the metabolic processes in human nasal epithelium.

  3. Inhalation of nasally derived nitric oxide modulates pulmonary function in humans.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, J O; Settergren, G; Gelinder, S; Lundberg, J M; Alving, K; Weitzberg, E

    1996-12-01

    The vasodilator gas nitric oxide (NO) is produced in the paranasal sinuses and is excreted continuously into the nasal airways of humans. This NO will normally reach the lungs with inspiration, especially during nasal breathing. We wanted to investigate the possible effects of low-dose inhalation of NO from the nasal airways on pulmonary function. The effects of nasal and oral breathing on transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcPO2) were studied in healthy subjects. Furthermore, we also investigated whether restoring low-dose NO inhalation would influence pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) and arterial oxygenation (PaO2) in intubated patients who are deprived of NO produced in the nasal airways. Thus, air derived from the patient's own nose was aspirated and led into the inhalation limb of the ventilator. In six out of eight healthy subjects tcPO2 was 10% higher during periods of nasal breathing when compared with periods of oral breathing. In six out of six long-term intubated patients PaO2 increased by 18% in response to the addition of nasal air samples. PVRI was reduced by 11% in four of 12 short-term intubated patients when nasal air was added to the inhaled air. The present study demonstrates that tcPO2 increases during nasal breathing compared with oral breathing in healthy subjects. Furthermore, in intubated patients, who are deprived of self-inhalation of endogenous NO. PaO2 increases and pulmonary vascular resistance may decrease by adding NO-containing air, derived from the patient's own nose, to the inspired air. The involvement of self-inhaled NO in the regulation of pulmonary function may represent a novel physiological principle, namely that of an enzymatically produced airborne messenger. Furthermore, our findings may help to explain one biological role of the human paranasal sinuses. PMID:8971255

  4. Nasal vascularization: experiences using the microcorrosion technique in human foetuses.

    PubMed

    Passàli, D; Buccella, M G; Vetuschi, A; Bellussi, L

    1992-06-01

    The authors have studied the three-dimensional aspect of the vascular architecture of the nasal mucosa, using the microcorrosion method followed by scanning electron microscopical observation of casts of the vascular networks in both the septum and the lateral part of the nose. Batson's compound was introduced into the vascular system through the ascending aorta, in order to obtain a replica of the nasal mucosa vessels. Twelve- to 24-week-old foetuses obtained from spontaneous abortions were used for this purpose. PMID:1411101

  5. Cephalometric Pattern and Nasal Patency in Children with Primary Snoring: The Evidence of a Direct Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Zicari, Anna Maria; Duse, Marzia; Occasi, Francesca; Luzzi, Valeria; Ortolani, Emanuela; Bardanzellu, Flaminia; Bertin, Serena; Polimeni, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) might affect craniofacial growth and children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome present an increase in total and lower anterior heights of the face and a more anterior and inferior position of the hyoid bone when compared to nasal breathers. Objective To investigate the correlation between rhinomanometric and cephalometric parameters in children with primary snoring (PS), without apnea or gas exchange abnormalities. Materials and Methods Thirty children with habitual snoring (16 females and 14 males) aged 4–8 years (mean age 6.85±1.51 years) were selected by a SDB validate questionnaire. All subjects underwent lateral cephalometric, panoramic radiographies. Results In our sample 10 children (33%) had snoring 3 nights/week, 11 (37%) 4–6 nights/week and 9 (30%) every night/week. Overall 7 patients (23.3%) were affected by adenoid hypertrophy (AH), 4 (13.3%) by tonsillar hypertrophy (TH) and 13 (43.3%) by AH and TH. We found a more vertical position of the hyoid bone to the mandibular plane (H⊥VT) in patients with a higher frequency (7.3±2.7 vs 7.6±3.7 vs 10.9±2.5 in children snoring 3 nights/week, 4–6 nights/week and every night/week respectively; p = 0.032). Concerning nasal patency significant correlations were found with ANB (maxillary and jaw position with respect to the cranial base), NS∧Ar (growth predictor), sumangle, FMA (total divergence), SnaSnp∧GoMe (inferior divergence), BaN∧PtGn (facial growth pattern), Phw1_PsP (posterosuperior airway space), AHC3H (the horizontal distance between the most anterosuperior point of the hyoid bone and the third cervical vertebra). Conclusion The present study supports the relationship between nasal obstruction and specific craniofacial characteristics in children with primary snoring and lead us to hypothesize that nasal obstruction might explain the indirect link between snoring and cephalometric alterations. PMID:25360610

  6. Reconstituted Human Upper Airway Epithelium as 3-D In Vitro Model for Nasal Polyposis

    PubMed Central

    de Borja Callejas, Francisco; Martínez-Antón, Asunción; Alobid, Isam; Fuentes, Mireya; Cortijo, Julio; Picado, César

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary human airway epithelial cells cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) develop a well-differentiated epithelium. However, neither characterization of mucociliar differentiation overtime nor the inflammatory function of reconstituted nasal polyp (NP) epithelia have been described. Objectives 1st) To develop and characterize the mucociliar differentiation overtime of human epithelial cells of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) in ALI culture system; 2nd) To corroborate that 3D in vitro model of NP reconstituted epithelium maintains, compared to control nasal mucosa (NM), an inflammatory function. Methods Epithelial cells were obtained from 9 NP and 7 control NM, and differentiated in ALI culture for 28 days. Mucociliary differentiation was characterized at different times (0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days) using ultrastructure analysis by electron microscopy; ΔNp63 (basal stem/progenitor cell), β-tubulin IV (cilia), and MUC5AC (goblet cell) expression by immunocytochemistry; and mucous (MUC5AC, MUC5B) and serous (Lactoferrin) secretion by ELISA. Inflammatory function of ALI cultures (at days 0, 14, and 28) through cytokine (IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α, and IL-12p70) and chemokine (RANTES, MIG, MCP-1, IP-10, eotaxin-1, and GM-CSF) production was analysed by CBA (Cytometric Bead Array). Results In both NP and control NM ALI cultures, pseudostratified epithelium with ciliated, mucus-secreting, and basal cells were observed by electron microscopy at days 14 and 28. Displaying epithelial cell re-differentation, β-tubulin IV and MUC5AC positive cells increased, while ΔNp63 positive cells decreased overtime. No significant differences were found overtime in MUC5AC, MUC5B, and lactoferrin secretions between both ALI cultures. IL-8 and GM-CSF were significantly increased in NP compared to control NM regenerated epithelia. Conclusion Reconstituted epithelia from human NP epithelial cells cultured in ALI system provides a 3D in vitro model

  7. Nasal Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement CONDITIONS Adult ... Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly ...

  8. Induction by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase of hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway

    PubMed Central

    Turner, P J; Maggs, J R L; Foreman, J C

    2000-01-01

    The effects of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) on the responsiveness of the human nasal airway were investigated, by measuring the nasal response to histamine and bradykinin. Repeated intranasal administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), 1 μmol per nostril every 30 min for 6 h, increased the nasal obstruction induced by histamine, 50–500 μg, and bradykinin, 200 μg per nostril. A single administration of L-NAME, 1 μmol per nostril did not induce hyperresponsiveness to histamine. Pretreatment with L-arginine, 30 μmol, abolished the hyperresponsiveness to histamine caused by L-NAME, 1 μmol. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (D-NAME), 1 μmol, did not induce hyperresponsiveness to histamine. Repeated administration of L-NAME, 1 μmol, caused a significant reduction in the amount of nitric oxide measured in the nasal cavity. Neither L-NMMA, 1 μmol, nor L-arginine, 30 μmol, altered the nasal hyperresponsiveness induced by platelet activating factor (PAF), 60 μg. PAF did not alter the levels of nitric oxide in the nasal cavity. The results suggest that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase induces a hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway, and that this occurs by a mechanism different from that involved in PAF-induced hyperresponsiveness. PMID:10991932

  9. Neutrophil influx measured in nasal lavages of humans exposed to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.; Henderson, F.; House, D.

    1988-05-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) obtained by nasal lavage were counted to determine if ozone, an oxidant air pollutant, induces an acute inflammatory response in the upper respiratory tract (URT) of humans. Background data were obtained by the nasal lavages from 200 nonexperimentally exposed subjects. Then, using a known inflammatory agent for the URT, rhinovirus-type 39, the induction, peak, and resolution of an acute inflammatory response was shown to be documented by the nasal lavage PMN counts. To determined if ozone induces this response, 41 subjects were exposed to either filtered air or 0.5 ppm ozone for 4 hr, on 2 consecutive days. Nasal lavages were taken pre-, immediately post each exposure, and 22 hr following the last exposure. Lavage PMN counts increased significantly (p = .005) in the ozone-exposed group, with 3.5-, 6.5-, and 3.9-fold increases over the air-exposed group at the post 1, pre 2, and post 2 time points, respectively. Ozone induces an inflammatory response in the URT of humans, and nasal lavage PMN counts are useful to assay the inflammatory properties of air pollutants.

  10. Primary nasal-paranasal oropharyngeal lymphoma in the pediatric age group.

    PubMed

    Wollner, N; Mandell, L; Filippa, D; Exelby, P; McGowan, N; Lieberman, P

    1990-03-15

    Nasal-paranasal oropharyngeal (NPOP) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is a disease of the very young (median age, 5 years) and of the aging adult (median age, 50-60 years). Of a total of 208 pediatric patients with NHL studied, 20 (9.6%) had primary NPOP. Sixty percent of the patients had Stage I and II disease. Primary sites were maxillary sinus in eight patients; tonsils in eight; posterior pharynx in two; mandible in one; and orbit in one patient. Histologically, the disease is different than that of the adults since most patients had B-cell lymphomas of the diffuse undifferentiated type (Rappaport) or small cell non-cleaved types (Lukes-Collins, Kiel, and Working Formulation). None of these patients had gastrointestinal involvement. All patients were treated with the LSA2-L2 regimen and radiation therapy was given to primary unresectable tumors and regional metastases. The lymphoma event-free survival was 75%, with a median observation period of 99+ months. In staging systems that refer mostly to amount of disease outside of the primary (such as ours, Murphy's, and the Ann Arbor staging systems) stage did not correlate well with disease-free survival. In the TNM staging of 1977, a staging system that refers to size of primary tumor as well as regional and systemic disease, stage correlated better with prognosis and survival. In our staging system, eight of 12 patients (66.7%) with Stage I and II disease; four of four with Stage III; two of two with Stage IVA; and zero of two with Stage IVB survived. In the TNM staging system, three of three patients with Stage II and III disease and 12 of 18 patients (67%) with Stage IV disease survived. All recurrences occurred early suggesting that early intensification of chemotherapy may produce better results. PMID:2306688

  11. Biomarkers of inflammation in ozone-exposed humans: Comparison of the nasal and bronchoalveolar lavage

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.E.; Koren, H.S.

    1989-06-01

    An influx of neutrophils (PMNs), a primary feature of acute inflammation, has been associated with the development of lower lung disorders, such as emphysema and idiopathic fibrosis, as well as airway hyperreactivity and increased mucus secretion. It was previously established that an acute inflammatory response in the upper respiratory tract of humans could be studied by analysis of nasal lavages (NL), which is inexpensive, non-invasive, and atraumatic. However, the relationship of the cellular changes in the upper respiratory tract to changes in the lower airways has not been thoroughly investigated in humans. Here the cellular changes detected in the NL with those detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) taken from the same individual have been compared. Ten subjects were exposed to either filtered air or 0.4 ppm ozone (O3), with exercise, for 2 hrs. The NL was done prior to, immediately following an 18 hr post exposure, while the BAL was done only at 18 hr post exposure. A significant increase in PMNs was detected in the NL immediately post exposure to 03, (7.7-fold increase; p=.003), and remained elevated in the 18 hr post-03 NL (6.1-fold increase; p<.001).

  12. From the Cover: Comparative Numerical Modeling of Inhaled Nanoparticle Deposition in Human and Rat Nasal Cavities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingliang; Shang, Yidan; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan; Chen, Rui; Bai, Ru; Wang, Dongliang; Chen, Chunying

    2016-08-01

    To gain a better understanding of nanoparticle exposure in human nasal cavities, laboratory animals (e.g. rat) are used for in vivo studies. However, due to anatomical differences between human and rodent nasal cavities, direct particle deposition comparisons between species are difficult. This paper presents a comparative nanoparticle (1 nm, 10 nm, and 100 nm) deposition study using anatomically realistic models of a human and rat nasal cavity. The particle deposition fraction was highest consistently in the main nasal passage, for all nanoparticles tested, in the human model; whereas this was only the case for 10 nm, and 100 nm particles for the rodent model, where greater deposition was found in the anterior nose for 1 nm particles. A deposition intensity (DI) term was introduced to represent the accumulated deposition fraction on cross-sectional slices. A common and preferential deposition site in the human model was found for all nanoparticles occurring at a distance of 3.5 cm inside the nasal passage. For the rodent model maximum DI occurred in the vestibule region at a distance of 0.3 cm, indicating that the rodent vestibule produces exceptionally high particle filtration capability. We also introduced a deposition flux which was a ratio of the regional deposition fraction relative to the region's surface area fraction. This value allowed direct comparison of deposition flux between species, and a regional extrapolation scaling factor was found (e.g. 1/10 scale for vestibule region for rat to human comparison). This study bridges the in vitro exposure experiments and in vivo nanomaterials toxicity studies, and can contribute towards improving inter-species exposure extrapolation studies in the future. PMID:27208081

  13. Polyvinylidene fluoride film based nasal sensor to monitor human respiration pattern: an initial clinical study.

    PubMed

    Roopa Manjunatha, G; Rajanna, K; Mahapatra, D Roy; Nayak, M M; Krishnaswamy, Uma Maheswari; Srinivasa, R

    2013-12-01

    Design and development of a piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) thin film based nasal sensor to monitor human respiration pattern (RP) from each nostril simultaneously is presented in this paper. Thin film based PVDF nasal sensor is designed in a cantilever beam configuration. Two cantilevers are mounted on a spectacle frame in such a way that the air flow from each nostril impinges on this sensor causing bending of the cantilever beams. Voltage signal produced due to air flow induced dynamic piezoelectric effect produce a respective RP. A group of 23 healthy awake human subjects are studied. The RP in terms of respiratory rate (RR) and Respiratory air-flow changes/alterations obtained from the developed PVDF nasal sensor are compared with RP obtained from respiratory inductance plethysmograph (RIP) device. The mean RR of the developed nasal sensor (19.65 ± 4.1) and the RIP (19.57 ± 4.1) are found to be almost same (difference not significant, p > 0.05) with the correlation coefficient 0.96, p < 0.0001. It was observed that any change/alterations in the pattern of RIP is followed by same amount of change/alterations in the pattern of PVDF nasal sensor with k = 0.815 indicating strong agreement between the PVDF nasal sensor and RIP respiratory air-flow pattern. The developed sensor is simple in design, non-invasive, patient friendly and hence shows promising routine clinical usage. The preliminary result shows that this new method can have various applications in respiratory monitoring and diagnosis. PMID:23771706

  14. Validation of Human Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model for Vinyl Acetate Against Human Nasal Dosimetry Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hinderliter, Paul M.; Thrall, Karla D.; Corley, Rick A.; Bloemen, Louis J.; Bogdanffy, M S.

    2005-05-01

    Vinyl acetate has been shown to induce nasal lesions in rodents in inhalation bioassays. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for vinyl acetate has been used in human risk assessment, but previous in vivo validation was conducted only in rats. Controlled human exposures to vinyl acetate were conducted to provide validation data for the application of the model in humans. Five volunteers were exposed to 1, 5, and 10 ppm 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate via inhalation. A probe inserted into thenasopharyngeal region sampled both 13 C1 , 13 C2 vinyl acetate and the major metabolite 13 C1 , 13 C2 acetaldehyde during rest and light exercise. Nasopharyngeal air concentrations were analyzed in real time by ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Experimental concentrations of both vinyl acetate and acetaldehyde were then compared to predicted concentrations calculated from the previously published human model. Model predictions of vinyl acetate nasal extraction compared favorably with measured values of vinyl acetate, as did predictions of nasopharyngeal acetaldehyde when compared to measured acetaldehyde. The results showed that the current PBPK model structure and parameterization are appropriate for vinyl acetate. These analyses were conducted from 1 to 10 ppm vinyl acetate, a range relevant to workplace exposure standards but which would not be expected to saturate vinyl acetate metabolism. Risk assessment based on this model further concluded that 24 h per day exposures up to 1 ppm do not present concern regarding cancer or non-cancer toxicity. Validation of the vinyl acetate human PBPK model provides support for these conclusions.

  15. Biomechanical characterisation of the human nasal cartilages; implications for tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Griffin, M F; Premakumar, Y; Seifalian, A M; Szarko, M; Butler, P E M

    2016-01-01

    Nasal reconstruction is currently performed using autologous grafts provides but is limited by donor site morbidity, tissue availability and potentially graft failure. Additionally, current alternative alloplastic materials are limited by their high extrusion and infection rates. Matching mechanical properties of synthetic materials to the native tissue they are replacing has shown to be important in the biocompatibility of implants. To date the mechanical properties of the human nasal cartilages has not been studied in depth to be able to create tissue-engineered replacements with similar mechanical properties to native tissue. The young's modulus was characterized in compression on fresh-frozen human cadaveric septal, alar, and lateral cartilage. Due to the functional differences experienced by the various aspects of the septal cartilage, 16 regions were evaluated with an average elastic modulus of 2.72 ± 0.63 MPa. Furthermore, the posterior septum was found to be significantly stiffer than the anterior septum (p < 0.01). The medial and lateral alar cartilages were tested at four points with an elastic modulus ranging from 2.09 ± 0.81 MPa, with no significant difference between the cartilages (p < 0.78). The lateral cartilage was tested once in all cadavers with an average elastic modulus of 0.98 ± 0.29 MPa. In conclusion, this study provides new information on the compressive mechanical properties of the human nasal cartilage, allowing surgeons to have a better understanding of the difference between the mechanical properties of the individual nasal cartilages. This study has provided a reference, by which tissue-engineered should be developed for effective cartilage replacements for nasal reconstruction. PMID:26676857

  16. Toxicology of the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this work include: Comparative Anatomy and Function of the Nasal Passages; Light Microscopic Examination of the Rat Nasal Passages: Preparation and Morphologic Features; Histopathology of Acute and Subacute Nasal Toxicity; Pathology of Chronic Nasal Toxic Responses Including Cancer; Responses of the Nasal Mucociliary Apparatus to Airborne Irritants; Effects of Chemical Exposure on Olfaction in Humans, Possible Consequences of Cytochrome P-450-Dependent Monooxygenases in Nasal Tissues.

  17. Cytotoxicity of Different Excipients on RPMI 2650 Human Nasal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Tamás; Bartos, Csilla; Bocsik, Alexandra; Kiss, Lóránd; Veszelka, Szilvia; Deli, Mária A; Újhelyi, Gabriella; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Ambrus, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The nasal route receives a great deal of attention as a non-invasive method for the systemic administration of drugs. For nasal delivery, specific formulations containing excipients are used. Because of the sensitive respiratory mucosa, not only the active ingredients, but also additives need to be tested in appropriate models for toxicity. The aim of the study was to measure the cytotoxicity of six pharmaceutical excipients, which could help to reach larger residence time, better permeability, and increased solubility dissolution rate. The following excipients were investigated on RPMI 2650 human nasal septum tumor epithelial cells: β-d-mannitol, sodium hyaluronate, α and β-cyclodextrin, polyvinyl alcohol and methylcellulose. 3-(4,5-dimethyltiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye conversion assay and real-time impedance analysis were used to investigate cytotoxicity. No excipient showed toxicity at 0.3% (w/v) concentration or below while 1% concentration a significantly reduced metabolic activity was measured by MTT assay for methylcellulose and cyclodextrins. Using impedance measurements, only β-cyclodextrin (1%) was toxic to cells. Mannitol at 1% concentration had a barrier opening effect on epithelial cells, but caused no cellular damage. Based on the results, all additives at 0.3%, sodium hyaluronate and polyvinyl alcohol at 1% concentrations can be safely used for nasal formulations. PMID:27213303

  18. Attenuation of human nasal airway responses to bradykinin and histamine by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Dear, J. W.; Ghali, S.; Foreman, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase and local anaesthetics were studied on changes in human nasal airway patency and albumin extravasation in response to bradykinin and histamine, in vivo. 2. Compared with the action of the vasoconstrictor, ephedrine, 2.5 mumol, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 1 mumol alone, did not change the resting value of the minimal cross-sectional area (A min) of the human nasal airway. L-NAME, 0.1 to 10 mumol, produced a dose-related inhibition of the reduction in A min caused by bradykinin, 300 micrograms. NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), 1 mumol, similarly reduced the effect of bradykinin, 300 micrograms, on A min, but NG-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester (D-NAME), had no effect. L-NAME, 0.1 to 10 mumol, or L-NMMA, 10 mumol, failed to inhibit the effect of histamine, 300 micrograms on A min. 3. The inhibition by L-NAME, 1 mumol of the action of bradykinin, 300 micrograms on A min was maximal between 15 and 30 min after pretreatment with L-NAME. 4. L-NAME, 1 and 10 mumol, inhibited the extravasation of albumin into the nasal cavity induced by bradykinin, 300 micrograms, and also by histamine, 300 micrograms. D-NAME, 1 and 10 mumol had no effect on the extravasation of albumin in response to bradykinin or histamine. 5. L-Arginine, 30 mumol, reversed the effect of L-NAME, 1 mumol, on the bradykinin- and histamine-induced albumin extravasation into the nasal airway. 6. Local anaesthesia of the nasal airway with lignocaine, 10 mg, or benzocaine, 10 mg, failed to inhibit the reduction in A min or the albumin extravasation induced by either bradykinin, 300 micrograms, and histamine, 300 micrograms. 7. We conclude that the extravasation of plasma albumin caused by bradykinin and by histamine involves the generation of nitric oxide. The nasal blockage induced by bradykinin involves nitric oxide generation but the nasal blockage induced by histamine does not. PMID:8818341

  19. Host innate inflammatory factors and staphylococcal protein A influence the duration of human Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Amy L.; Muthukrishnan, Gowrishankar; Chong, Christine; Beavis, Ashley; Eade, Colleen R.; Wood, Matthew P.; Deichen, Michael G.; Cole, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Human Staphylococcus aureus (SA) nasal carriage provides a reservoir for the dissemination of infectious strains; however, factors regulating the establishment and persistence of nasal colonization are mostly unknown. We measured carriage duration and nasal fluid inflammatory markers after nasally inoculating healthy participants with their previously isolated SA strains. Ten out of 15 studies resulted in rapid clearance (9±6 days) that corresponded with upregulated chemokines, growth factors, and predominantly Th1-type cytokines, but not IL-17. Nasal SA persistence corresponded with elevated baseline levels of MIP-1β, IL-1β, and IL-6, no induction of inflammatory factors post-inoculation, and decreased IL-1RA:IL-1β ratio. SA-expressed staphylococcal protein A (SpA) levels correlated positively with carriage duration. Competitive inoculation studies revealed that isogenic SpA knockout (ΔSpA) strains were cleared faster than wild-type only in participants with upregulated inflammatory markers post-inoculation. The remaining participants did not mount an inflammatory response and did not clear either strain. ΔSpA strains demonstrated lower growth rates in carrier nasal fluids and lower survival rates when incubated with neutrophils. Collectively, the presented studies identify innate immune effectors that cooperatively modulate nasal carriage duration, and confirm SpA as a bacterial co-determinant of SA nasal carriage. PMID:26838052

  20. Giant Primary Schwannoma of the Left Nasal Cavity and Ethmoid Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Justin; Oh, Lawrence; Cox, Daniel; Forer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A unilateral tumour in the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses is commonly caused by polyps, cysts, and mucoceles, as well as invasive tumours such as papillomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Schwannomas, in contrast, are rare lesions in this area (Minhas et al., 2013). We present a case of a 52-year-old female who presented with a 4-year progressive history of mucous hypersecretion, nasal obstruction, pain, and fullness. Imaging of the paranasal sinuses showed complete opacification of the entire left nasal cavity and sinuses by a tumour causing subsequent obstruction of the frontal and maxillary sinuses. The tumour was completely excised endoscopically. Histopathology was consistent with that of a schwannoma. PMID:27379190

  1. Effects of Endogenous Formaldehyde in Nasal Tissues on Inhaled Formmaldehyde Dosimetry Predictions in the Rat, Monkey, and Human Nasal Passages

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Formaldehyde, a nasal carcinogen, is also an endogenous compound that is present in all living cells. Due to its high solubility and reactivity, quantitative risk estimates for inhaled formaldehyde rely on internal dose calculations in the upper respiratory tract which ...

  2. Hyperresponsiveness in the human nasal airway: new targets for the treatment of allergic airway disease.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, P J; Foreman, J C

    1999-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a condition which affects over 15% of the population in the United Kingdom. The pathological process involves two stages: nasal inflammation, and the development of nasal airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to allergen and a number of other stimuli. This results in the amplification of any subsequent allergic reaction, contributing to the chronic allergic state. A number of different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the underlying mechanism of AHR, including a role for eosinophil-derived proteins, free radicals and neuropeptides. While there may be a number of independent pathways which can result in AHR, evidence obtained from both animal models and in vivo experiments in humans indicate that some mediators may interact with one another, resulting in AHR. Further research into these interactions may open new avenues for the pharmacological treatment of chronic allergic rhinitis, and possibly other allergic airway diseases. PMID:10704051

  3. Determination of baseline human nasal pH and the effect of intranasally administered buffers.

    PubMed

    Washington, N; Steele, R J; Jackson, S J; Bush, D; Mason, J; Gill, D A; Pitt, K; Rawlins, D A

    2000-04-01

    The nose is becoming a common route of drug administration, however, little is known about the pH of the human nasal cavity. Local pH may have a direct effect on the rate and extent of absorption of ionizable compounds and hence this study was performed to investigate normal pH values and whether pH could be manipulated by various buffers. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in a study to measure pH in the anterior and posterior sites of the nasal cavity. Miniature pH electrodes were placed 3 cm apart in the nasal cavity and a baseline was recorded for 30 min once the pH had stabilized. One hundred microlitres of isotonic solution was sprayed into the nostril and the pH was measured for 4 h post-dose. The following five formulations were tested: formulation A--sodium chloride (0.9%) at pH 7.2; formulation B--sodium chloride (0.9%) at pH 5.8; formulation C--Sorensens phosphate buffer (0.06 M) at pH 5. 8; formulation D--Sorensens phosphate buffer (0.13 M) at pH 5.8 and formulation E--formulation as (c) but adjusted to pH 5.0. Each formulation also contained saccharin sodium (0.5%) as a taste marker for nasal clearance. The time at which each subject detected the taste of saccharin was noted. The 30-minute baseline recording prior to administration of the nasal spray formulation demonstrates that there was both considerable intersubject and intrasubject variation in nasal pH. The average pH in the anterior of the nose was 6.40 (+0. 11, -0.15 S.D.) when calculated from H(+) values. The pH in the posterior of the nasal cavity was 6.27 (+0.13, -0.18 S.D.). The overall range in pH was 5.17-8.13 for anterior pH and 5.20-8.00 for posterior pH. Formulation A caused the pH in the anterior part of the nasal cavity to reach a maximum of 7.06 in 11.25 min from the baseline of pH 6.14 (P<0.05). The mean baseline pH was 6.5 for the posterior part of the nose which did not change over the recording period. Formulation B caused the anterior pH to increase from pH 6. 60 to 7

  4. EPOS Primary Care Guidelines: European Position Paper on the Primary Care Diagnosis and Management of Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps 2007 - a summary.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mike; Yawn, Barbara P; Price, David; Lund, Valerie; Mullol, Jocquim; Fokkens, Wytske

    2008-06-01

    This paper is a summary of the 2007 European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EP3OS)1 which was published in Rhinology in 2007. In order to widen dissemination of the EP3OS paper, the editors of Rhinology and the Primary Care Respiratory Journal (PCRJ) have agreed to publish this summary - which is focussed on the needs of general practitioners and community-based non-specialist clinicians - in the PCRJ. In the EP3OS process, an evidence-based methodology was used to identify evidence and to grade recommendations for clinical practice for the management of rhinosinusitis. The EP3OS Taskforce was commissioned by the European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) with the aims of: * Presenting specialist and generalist clinicians with an updated summary of knowledge of rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis * Providing clinicans with an evidence-based summary of diagnostic methods appropriate for specialist and generalist settings * Providing evidence-based recommendations for management in specialist and generalist settings * Proposing guidance for definitions and outcome measurements in clinical practice and in research in different settings. The current document aims to distil the information presented in the full EP3OS document1 into a shorter and more concise format suitable for use in primary care generalist settings. The summary recommendations for generalists are that clinicians should be aware that rhinitis and sinusitis usually co-exist, and that management strategies should encompass this. Acute rhinosinusitis is an inflammatory condition that may be diagnosed on the basis of acute symptoms of nasal blockage, obstruction, congestion with or without facial pain or reduced smell; many episodes are self-limiting, but where symptoms persist or increase after five days, topical nasal steroids may be considered, with addition of antibiotics in patients with more severe or increasing symptoms. Non-resolution in 14 days, or the

  5. A recovery method for airborne gunshot residue retained in human nasal mucus.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H; Zona, C A

    1995-07-01

    Each living person is equipped with their own personal particle filter, a nose. The human nose is capable of filtering and trapping airborne gunshot residue (AGSR) from discharged firearms. An extraction/concentration technique has been developed to recover the AGSR retained in human nasal mucus. The technique has successfully recovered abundant AGSR from 48 hours postfiring sample collection times. The AGSR particles were characterized by a JEOL 6400 scanning electron microscope coupled with a Noran Voyager energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. PMID:7595306

  6. Microarray Determination of the Expression of Drug Transporters in Humans and Animal Species Used for the Investigation of Nasal Absorption.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghabeish, Manar; Scheetz, Todd; Assem, Mahfoud; Donovan, Maureen D

    2015-08-01

    Mice and rats are commonly used to investigate in vivo nasal drug absorption, yet their small nasal cavities limit their use for in vitro investigations. Bovine tissue explants have been used to investigate drug transport through the nasal respiratory and olfactory mucosae, yet limited information is available regarding the similarities and differences among these animal models compared to humans. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of a number of important drug transporters in the nasal mucosa of these species. DNA microarray results for nasal samples from humans, rats, and mice were obtained from GenBank, while DNA microarray and RT-PCR were performed on bovine nasal explants. The drug transporters of interest include multidrug resistance, cation, anion, peptide, and nucleoside transporters. Each of the species (mouse, rat, cattle, and human) shows similar patterns of expression for most of the important drug transporters. Several transporters were highly expressed in all the species, including MRP1, OCTN2, PEPT2, and y+LAT2. While some differences in transporter mRNA and protein expression were observed, the transporter expression patterns were quite similar among the species. The differences suggest that it is important to be aware of any specific differences in transporter expression for a given compound being investigated, yet the similarities support the continued use of these animal models during preclinical investigation of intranasally administered therapeutics. PMID:26106909

  7. Microarray Determination of the Expression of Drug Transporters in Humans and Animal Species Used for the Investigation of Nasal Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghabeish, Manar; Scheetz, Todd; Assem, Mahfoud; Donovan, Maureen D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Mice and rats are commonly used to investigate in vivo nasal drug absorption, yet their small nasal cavities limit their use for in vitro investigations. Bovine tissue explants have been used to investigate drug transport through the nasal respiratory and olfactory mucosae, yet limited information is available regarding the similarities and differences among these animal models compared to humans. The aim of this study was to compare the presence of a number of important drug transporters in the nasal mucosa of these species. Methods DNA microarray results for nasal samples from humans, rats and mice were obtained from GenBank, while DNA microarray and RT-PCR were performed on bovine nasal explants. The drug transporters of interest include multidrug resistance, cation, anion, peptide, and nucleoside transporters. Results Each of the species (mouse, rat, cow and human) shows similar patterns of expression for most of the important drug transporters. Several transporters were highly expressed in all the species, including MRP1, OCTN2, PEPT2 and y+LAT2. Conclusion While some differences in transporter mRNA and protein expression were observed, the transporter expression patterns were quite similar among the species. The differences suggest that it is important to be aware of any specific differences in transporter expression for a given compound being investigated, yet the similarities support the continued use of these animal models during preclinical investigation of intranasally administered therapeutics. PMID:26106909

  8. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  9. A Novel Approach for Full-Thickness Defect of the Nasal Alar Rim: Primary Closure of the Defect and Reduction of the Contralateral Normal Ala for Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Yun Seon; Kim, Min-Woo

    2015-01-01

    In full-thickness defects of the nasal alar rim, to achieve projection and maintain airway patency, cartilage graft is frequently needed. However, cartilage graft presents a challenge in considerations such as appropriate donor site, skeletal shape and size, and healing of the donor area. To avoid these demerits, we tried primary closure of alar rim defects by also making the contralateral normal ala smaller. We treated two patients who had a full-thickness nasal alar defect after tumor excision. Cartilage graft was considered for the reconstruction. However, their alar rims were overly curved and their nostril openings were large. To utilize their nasal shape, we did primary closure of the defect rather than cartilage graft, and then downsized the contralateral nasal ala by means of wedge resection to make the alae symmetric. Both patients were satisfied with their aesthetic results, which showed a smaller nostril and nearly straight alar rims. Moreover, functionally, there was no discomfort during breathing in both patients. We propose our idea as one of the reconstruction options for nasal alar defects. It is a simple and easy-to-perform procedure, in addition to enhancing the nasal contour. This method would be useful for patients with a large nostril and an overly curved alar rim. PMID:26719646

  10. Primary nasal epithelium exposed to house dust mite extract shows activated expression in allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Vroling, Aram B; Jonker, Martijs J; Luiten, Silvia; Breit, Timo M; Fokkens, Wytske J; van Drunen, Cornelis M

    2008-03-01

    Nasal epithelial cells form the outermost protective layer against environmental factors. However, this defense is not just physical; it has been shown that epithelial cells respond by the production of inflammatory mediators that may affect local immune responses. In this research we set out to characterize potential differences between the responses of nasal epithelium from healthy and allergic individuals to house dust mite (HDM) allergen. These differences will help us to define local mechanisms that could contribute to allergic disease expression. Epithelial cells were cultured from nasal biopsies taken from five healthy and five allergic individuals. These cultures were exposed for 24 hours to culture medium containing HDM allergen, or to culture medium alone. Isolated RNA was used for microarray analysis. Gene-ontology of the response in healthy epithelium revealed mainly up-regulation of chemokines, growth factors, and structural proteins. Moreover, we saw increased expression of two transcription factors (NF-kappaB and AP-1) and their regulatory members. The expression pattern of epithelium from allergic individuals in the absence of the HDM stimulus suggests that it is already in an activated state. Most striking is that, while the already activated NF-kappaB regulatory pathway remained unchanged in allergic epithelium, the AP-1 pathway is down-regulated upon exposure to HDM allergen; this is contrary to what we see in healthy epithelium. Clear differences in the expression pattern exist between epithelial cells isolated from healthy and allergic individuals at baseline and between their responses to allergen exposure; these differences may contribute to the inflammatory response. PMID:17901406

  11. Nasal nitric oxide and pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance as supplementary tools in diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Marthin, June Kehlet

    2010-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, usually autosomal recessive inherited disorder, characterized by abnormalities in ciliary structure and/or function. Frequent, intermittent or chronic airway infections precipitated by impaired airway mucociliary clearance may cause permanent lung damage and reduced lung function. Early diagnosis is considered important for the prevention of lung damage, but diagnosis is probably often delayed or even missed since diagnosis of PCD is both complex and time consuming, and yet not always exact. The aims of this PhD thesis were to evaluate the discriminative capacity and "real-life" clinical application of two candidates for supplemental diagnostic testing for PCD: Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) measurement placed as a first line test to point out probable PCD patients for further investigation or exclude patients, regardless of age, Pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance (PRMC) as a second line test for PCD investigation in children from 5 years of age. And additionally, Proposing an algorithm for the pathway of diagnosing PCD based on these two studies and recommendations from the literature. Nasal NO and PRMC demonstrated to be two highly valid supplementary diagnostic tools to be placed in each end of the diagnostic pathway when investigating selected patients referred for PCD work up. Nasal NO measurement demonstrated to have an obvious place as a first line test in the pathway of PCD investigation and PRMC as second line test as a supplement to ciliary function test and EM-test in cases of difficult diagnoses. Neither of these tests can stand alone in diagnosis or excluding of PCD. PCD remains to be a diagnosis that should be made at a tertiary PCD centre, as clinical evaluation of referred patients is crucial before excluding the disease. PMID:20682136

  12. Adult human nasal mesenchymal-like stem cells restore cochlear spiral ganglion neurons after experimental lesion.

    PubMed

    Bas, Esperanza; Van De Water, Thomas R; Lumbreras, Vicente; Rajguru, Suhrud; Goss, Garrett; Hare, Joshua M; Goldstein, Bradley J

    2014-03-01

    A loss of sensory hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons from the inner ear causes deafness, affecting millions of people. Currently, there is no effective therapy to repair the inner ear sensory structures in humans. Cochlear implantation can restore input, but only if auditory neurons remain intact. Efforts to develop stem cell-based treatments for deafness have demonstrated progress, most notably utilizing embryonic-derived cells. In an effort to bypass limitations of embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells that may impede the translation to clinical applications, we sought to utilize an alternative cell source. Here, we show that adult human mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) obtained from nasal tissue can repair spiral ganglion loss in experimentally lesioned cochlear cultures from neonatal rats. Stem cells engraft into gentamicin-lesioned organotypic cultures and orchestrate the restoration of the spiral ganglion neuronal population, involving both direct neuronal differentiation and secondary effects on endogenous cells. As a physiologic assay, nasal MSC-derived cells engrafted into lesioned spiral ganglia demonstrate responses to infrared laser stimulus that are consistent with those typical of excitable cells. The addition of a pharmacologic activator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway concurrent with stem cell treatment promoted robust neuronal differentiation. The availability of an effective adult autologous cell source for inner ear tissue repair should contribute to efforts to translate cell-based strategies to the clinic. PMID:24172073

  13. The influence of vegetative stimuli on the human nasal mucous membrane.

    PubMed

    Simon, H; Schmidt-Kloiber, H

    1985-03-01

    Measuring probes were inserted into the inferior nasal meatus in humans to record the effects of certain defined vegetative stimuli on the cavernous state and the temperature of the mucous membrane. An unilateral carotis compression induces a bilateral reactivity of the mucous membrane in the sense of a sympathicus stimulus. An unilateral bulbus pressure causes a bilateral reaction of the mucous membrane opposite to that of carotis compression. Blocking of the stellate ganglion produces a tonus reduction of the nervus sympathicus as was also found in animal experiments by other authors. Trigeminus stimulation induces a swelling of the nasal mucous membrane, whereas a voluntary breathing stop causes decongestion. Facial blushing, the only undefined and involuntary stimulus, is followed by an unswelling and a decrease of mucous membrane temperature. The results of our investigations are in agreement with analogous animal experiments. This is not surprising as man has a vegetative nervous system which is essentially unchanged from the beginning of evolutionary development. Only blushing is an expression of a reaction behaviour characteristic of human beings only. PMID:4001756

  14. Numerical simulation of airflow and micro-particle deposition in human nasal airway pre- and post-virtual sphenoidotomy surgery.

    PubMed

    Bahmanzadeh, Hojat; Abouali, Omid; Faramarzi, Mohammad; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, the effects of endoscopic sphenoidotomy surgery on the flow patterns and deposition of micro-particles in the human nasal airway and sphenoid sinus were investigated. A realistic model of a human nasal passage including nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses was constructed using a series of CT scan images of a healthy subject. Then, a virtual sphenoidotomy by endoscopic sinus surgery was performed in the left nasal passage and sphenoid sinus. Transient airflow patterns pre- and post-surgery during a full breathing cycle (inhalation and exhalation) were simulated numerically under cyclic flow condition. The Lagrangian approach was used for evaluating the transport and deposition of inhaled micro-particles. An unsteady particle tracking was performed for the inhalation phase of the breathing cycle for the case that particles were continuously entering into the nasal airway. The total deposition pattern and sphenoid deposition fraction of micro-particles were evaluated and compared for pre- and post-surgery cases. The presented results show that sphenoidotomy increased the airflow into the sphenoid sinus, which led to increased deposition of micro-particles in this region. Particles up to 25 μm were able to penetrate into the sphenoid in the post-operation case, and the highest deposition in the sphenoid for the resting breathing rate occurred for 10 μm particles at about 1.5%. PMID:25862997

  15. Detection of novel Chlamydiae and Legionellales from human nasal samples of healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Daniele; Venditti, Danielle

    2015-07-01

    Chlamydiae are intracellular bacterial parasites of eukaryotes, ranging from amoebae to humans. They comprise many novel members and are investigated as emerging pathogens. Environmental studies highlighted similarities between the ecologies of chlamydiae and legionellae, both groups being important agents of respiratory infections. Herein, we analyzed nasal samples from healthy persons, searching for the presence of amoebae, chlamydiae and legionellae. From a total of 25 samples, we recovered by PCR eight samples positive to chlamydiae and six samples positive to legionellae. Among these samples, four were positive to both organisms. The sequencing of 16S rDNAs allowed to identify (i) among Chlamydiae: Parachlamydia acanthamoebae, Chlamydophila psittaci, Chlamydophila felis, and members of Rhabdochlamydiaceae, Simkaniaceae and E6 lineage and (ii) among Legionellaceae: Legionella longbeachae, Legionella bozemanii and Legionella impletisoli. Unexpectedly, we also recovered Diplorickettsia sp. Amoebae collected from nasal mucosae, Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba, were endosymbiont-free, and chlamydiae revealed refractory to amoeba coculture. This study shows common exposure to chlamydiae and legionellae and suggests open air activities like gardening as a probable additional source of infection. PMID:25697709

  16. Human upper respiratory tract responses to inhaled pollutants with emphasis on nasal lavage

    SciTech Connect

    Koren, H.S.; Devlin, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    A set of symptoms has been described during the past two decades which has been called the sick building syndrome. These symptoms include eye, nose, and throat irritation; headache; mental fatigue; and respiratory distress. It is likely that volatile organic compounds (VOC) present in synthetic materials used in homes and office buildings contribute to these symptoms. However, there have been few studies in which humans have been exposed to known amounts of VOC under carefully controlled conditions. In the study 14 subjects have been exposed to a mixture of VOC (25 mg/cu m total hydrocarbon) representative of what is found in new homes and office buildings. Since irritation of the nose and throat are symptoms often associated with the upper respiratory tract and may result from an inflammatory response in the upper airways, the authors have used nasal lavage to monitor neutrophil (PMN) influx into the nasal passages following exposure to VOC. The authors report statistically significant increases in PMNs both immediately after a four hour exposure to VOC, as well as 18 hours later.

  17. Treatment of nasal hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Simic, R; Vlahovic, A; Subarevic, V

    2009-10-01

    Hemangiomas are the most common soft tissue tumors of infancy. Almost 60% of these tumors develop in the head and neck region. Nasal hemangiomas, distort human physiognomy and leave long lasting psychological sequelae. Conservative approach (intralesional corticosteroids, laser) may accelerate involution. Proponents of an early surgery suggest that aesthetic improvement during a critical period in child development can be achieved. Fourteen patients with nasal hemangioma were treated during 5-year period (2003-2007) with intralesional corticosteroids, lenticular excision, open rhinoplasty excision, and circular excision with "purse string suture". The first line of treatment for large nasal hemangiomas is intralesional corticosteroids. Excision is indicated for small hemangiomas, while subtotal excision is preferable for large nasal hemangiomas. Circular excision and "purse string suture" is appropriate for prominent hemangiomas with predominant deep component. In our opinion surgery with maximal care for nasal architecture is the treatment option for nasal hemangioma. PMID:19656579

  18. Verruculogen associated with Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae and conidia modifies the electrophysiological properties of human nasal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Khoufache, Khaled; Puel, Olivier; Loiseau, Nicolas; Delaforge, Marcel; Rivollet, Danièle; Coste, André; Cordonnier, Catherine; Escudier, Estelle; Botterel, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Background The role of Aspergillus fumigatus mycotoxins in the colonization of the respiratory tract by conidia has not been studied extensively, even though patients at risk from invasive aspergillosis frequently exhibit respiratory epithelium damage. In a previous study, we found that filtrates of A. fumigatus cultures can specifically alter the electrophysiological properties of human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) compared to those of non pathogenic moulds. Results We fractionated the organic phase of filtrate from 3-day old A. fumigatus cultures using high-performance liquid chromatography. The different fractions were tested for their ability to modify the electrophysiological properties of HNEC in an in vitro primary culture model. The fraction collected between 20 and 30 min mimicked the effects of the whole filtrate, i.e. decrease of transepithelial resistance and increase of potential differences, and contained secondary metabolites such as helvolic acid, fumagillin, and verruculogen. Only verruculogen (10-8 M) had effects similar to the whole filtrate. We verified that verruculogen was produced by a collection of 67 human, animal, plant and environmental A. fumigatus isolates. Using MS-MS analysis, we found that verruculogen was associated with both mycelium and conidia extracts. Conclusion Verruculogen is a secondary metabolite that modifies the electrophysiological properties of HNEC. The role of these modifications in the colonization and invasion of the respiratory epithelium by A. fumigatus on first contact with the epithelium remains to be determined. PMID:17244350

  19. Dosimetry of nasal uptake of soluble and reactive gases: A first study of inter-human variability (Journal Article)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anatomically accurate human child and adult nasal tract models will be used in concert with computationally simulated air flow information to investigate the influence of age-related differences in anatomy on inhalation dosimetry in the upper and lower airways. The findings of t...

  20. Effects of pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S.; Sileno, A. P.; deMeireles, J. C.; Dua, R.; Pimplaskar, H. K.; Xia, W. J.; Marinaro, J.; Langenback, E.; Matos, F. J.; Putcha, L.; Romeo, V. D.; Behl, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of formulation pH and dose on nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide, the single most effective drug available for the prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by motion sickness. METHODS: Human subjects received scopolamine nasally at a dose of 0.2 mg/0.05 mL or 0.4 mg/0.10 mL, blood samples were collected at different time points, and plasma scopolamine concentrations were determined by LC-MS/MS. RESULTS: Following administration of a 0.2 mg dose, the average Cmax values were found to be 262+/-118, 419+/-161, and 488+/-331 pg/ mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At the 0.4 mg dose the average Cmax values were found to be 503+/-199, 933+/-449, and 1,308+/-473 pg/mL for pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0 formulations, respectively. At a 0.2 mg dose, the AUC values were found to be 23,208+/-6,824, 29,145+/-9,225, and 25,721+/-5,294 pg x min/mL for formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. At a 0.4 mg dose, the average AUC value was found to be high for pH 9.0 formulation (70,740+/-29,381 pg x min/mL) as compared to those of pH 4.0 (59,573+/-13,700 pg x min/mL) and pH 7.0 (55,298+/-17,305 pg x min/mL) formulations. Both the Cmax and AUC values were almost doubled with doubling the dose. On the other hand, the average Tmax, values decreased linearly with a decrease in formulation pH at both doses. For example, at a 0.4 mg dose, the average Tmax values were 26.7+/-5.8, 15.0+/-10.0, and 8.8+/-2.5 minutes at formulation pH 4.0, 7.0, and 9.0, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Nasal absorption of scopolamine hydrobromide in human subjects increased substantially with increases in formulation pH and dose.

  1. Silver resistance in MRSA isolated from wound and nasal sources in humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Loh, Jia V; Percival, Steven L; Woods, Emma J; Williams, Nicola J; Cochrane, Christine A

    2009-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonises skin, nasal passages and dermal wounds. Methods used to manage wounds infected and colonised with MRSA often include the use of topical antiseptics such as ionic silver and iodine. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of silver-resistance (sil) genes in MRSA and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CNS) isolated from wounds and nasal cavities of humans and animals, and also to determine the susceptibility of sil-positive and sil-negative MRSA isolates to a silver-containing Hydrofiber (SCH) wound dressing, on planktonic silE-positive and silE-negative MRSA. Polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the presence of three silver-resistance (sil) genes, silE, silP and silS in 33 MRSA and 8 methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MR-CNS). SilP and silS genes were absent in all isolates tested; however, two MRSA strains were found to contain the silE gene, together with one isolate of MR-CNS. Phenotypic resistance of the silE-positive strains and their susceptibility to the SCH dressing was evaluated using the zone of inhibition test on Mueller Hinton agar, and confocal laser microscopy using a live/dead fluorescent stain. Results confirmed that the SCH dressing was effective in killing all MRSA strains with and without the silE gene. First, this study showed that the prevalence of sil genes was low in the isolates investigated; and secondly, that the presence of a silver-resistance gene (silE) in MRSA and MR-CNS did not afford protection to the organism in the presence of a SCH wound dressing. The use of topical antiseptics in chronic wound care should be considered before the use of antibiotics that can result in their overuse and the risk of further resistance. PMID:19291113

  2. Permeation and pathways of human calcitonin (hCT) across excised bovine nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Lang, S; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Perriard, J C; Schmidt, M C; Merkle, H P

    1998-01-01

    In vitro permeation of human calcitonin (hCT), salmon calcitonin (sCT), and the somatostatin analog octreotide (SMS) through excised bovine nasal mucosa was studied applying donor/receiver experiments and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Permeabilities of gonadorelin, buserelin, Hoe013, and of thymopoietin fragments TP5 and TP4 were also included. Apparent permeability coefficients (Peff) ranged between 4 x 10(-5) (SMS) and 1.7 x 10(-5) cm s(-1) (TP4). Such Peff are typical for leaky-type airway epithelia. The order of permeabilities was: SMS > hCT, sCT > buserelin, Hoe013 > TP5 > TP4, LHRH. The relatively high permeability of hCT and sCT contrasted to their high molecular weight. At 37 degrees C, the permeability of hCT from mucosal to serosal (m-to-s) was found two-fold higher (p < 0.05) than from serosal to mucosal (s-to-m). Controls using 3H-mannitol showed equal permeabilities in both directions. At 4 degrees C, permeation of hCT was reduced but equal in both directions (m-to-s and s-to-m). As evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy, uptake studies with FITC-18-hCT revealed intracellular fluorescence in the epithelial cells, at 10 min/10 microM exposure in the form of fluorescent vesicles. By combination of these findings, an endocytotic pathway is suggested to contribute to the transport of hCT through nasal epithelium. PMID:9533651

  3. EFFECT OF DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ON HUMAN NASAL LAVAGE CELLS AND DNA ADDUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The overall aim of this study is to determine (using a nasal challenge model) the effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on nasal responses including induction of inflammation, immune changes and DNA damage. We are also examining how treatment of DEP with ozone (oz-DEP)modify ...

  4. Human Reconstituted Nasal Epithelium, a promising in vitro model to assess impacts of environmental complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Gaëlle; Mignon, Virginie; Momas, Isabelle; Achard, Sophie; Seta, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    Considering the impact of respiratory diseases around the world, appropriate experimental tools to help understand the mechanisms involved in such diseases are becoming essential. Our aim was to investigate the cellular and morphological reactivity of a human Reconstituted Nasal Epithelium (hRNE) to evaluate the impact of environmental complex mixture (ECM), with tobacco smoke as a model, after three weeks of repeated exposures. Staining of hRNE showed a multilayered ciliated epithelium, with a regular cilia beats, and a mucus production. When hRNE was exposed to ECM for 5 min once or twice a week, during 3 weeks, significant changes occurred: IL-8 production significantly increased 24h after the first exposure compared with Air-exposure and only during the first week, without any loss of tissue integrity. Immunostaining of F-actin cytoskeleton showed a modification in cellular morphology (number and diameter). Taken together our results indicate that hRNE is well suited to study the cellular and morphological effects of repeated exposures to an environmental complex mixture. Human reconstituted epithelium models are currently the best in vitro representation of human respiratory tract physiology, and also the most robust for performing repeated exposures to atmospheric pollutants. PMID:26631767

  5. Comments on recent data for particle deposition in human nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Martonen, T.B.; Zhang, Z.

    1992-01-01

    The deposition of inhaled particles within human nasal passages has important toxicologic and pharmacologic applications. However, experimental data quantitating factors affecting particle deposition are rare. The authors have evaluated findings from investigations employing either replica nasopharyngeal (NP) casts or surrogate model airways and compared them to each other and to human subject results. For ultrafine particles, studies using casts and models are incompatible, measured deposition values from the latter being lower by an entire order of magnitude. Possible sources of discrepancies between the data are suggested herein. Studies with diverse NP replicates, however, have yielded consistent deposition data over a wide particle size range, about 0.005 - 7 micrometers. Cast experiments underestimate, but in a systematic manner, in vivo information over a 0.5 - 3 micrometers interval. It is recommended, therefore, that NP replica cast data, rather than NP model airway data, be used to simulate human passages. For extrapolation modeling purposes, an original empirical formula based upon a logistic theory is derived which describes deposition over a particle size range of three orders of magnitude.

  6. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  7. Aspects of nitrogen dioxide toxicity in environmental urban concentrations in human nasal epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, C.; Ginzkey, C.; Friehs, G.; Hackenberg, S.; Froelich, K.; Scherzed, A.; Burghartz, M.; Kessler, M.; Kleinsasser, N.

    2010-06-01

    Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) as part of urban exhaust pollution are widely discussed as potential hazards to human health. This study focuses on toxic effects of NO{sub 2} in realistic environmental concentrations with respect to the current limit values in a human target tissue of volatile xenobiotics, the epithelium of the upper aerodigestive tract. Nasal epithelial cells of 10 patients were cultured as an air-liquid interface and exposed to 0.01 ppm NO{sub 2}, 0.1 ppm NO{sub 2}, 1 ppm NO{sub 2}, 10 ppm NO{sub 2} and synthetic air for half an hour. After exposure, genotoxicity was evaluated by the alkaline single-cell microgel electophoresis (Comet) assay and by induction of micronuclei in the micronucleus test. Depression of proliferation and cytotoxic effects were determined using the micronucleus assay and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. The experiments revealed genotoxic effects by DNA fragmentation starting at 0.01 ppm NO{sub 2} in the Comet assay, but no micronucleus inductions, no changes in proliferation, no signs of necrosis or apoptosis in the micronucleus assay, nor did the trypan blue exclusion assay show any changes in viability. The present data reveal a possible genotoxicity of NO{sub 2} in urban concentrations in a screening test. However, permanent DNA damage as indicated by the induction of micronuclei was not observed. Further research should elucidate the effects of prolonged exposure.

  8. A critical review of the influence of oxytocin nasal spray on social cognition in humans: evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Guastella, Adam J; Graustella, Adam J; MacLeod, Colin

    2012-03-01

    The past eight years of research has demonstrated that oxytocin nasal spray has a significant impact on human social cognition. The aim of this review is to provide critical comment on the literature using an information-processing framework. We provide a summary of fundamental assumptions of information-processing models and highlight an impressive range of consistent findings that demonstrate the impact of oxytocin nasal spray on social information processing. These findings include that oxytocin nasal spray improves the early conceptual detection of affect from social cues and improves the accurate appraisal of affect from social cues at elaborate and strategic levels of processing. There is some evidence that these effects may be particularly powerful for positive social cues. This review comments on inconsistent results that have been reported. We argue that such inconsistencies can, in part, be explained by variability across experiments in the degree to which potential extraneous confounds have been controlled, the different methods upon which studies assessed cognition, and the extent to which the focus of investigation has been on group-based outcomes. Finally, we argue that sound cognitive experimental methods can provide powerful tools to identify markers of response to oxytocin nasal spray that can be integrated into more complex circuitry models. The identification of robust markers has particular value in predicting behavioral and therapeutic response to intervention. This should now be a major focus for future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. PMID:22265852

  9. Reconstruction of nasal tip support in primary, open approach septorhinoplasty : A retrospective analysis between the tongue-in-groove technique and the columellar strut.

    PubMed

    Karaiskakis, Periklis; Bromba, Michael; Dietz, Andreas; Sand, Michael; Dacho, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    The reconstruction of the nasal tip support is one of the most essential issues in septorhinoplasty. A comparison of the results after using the tongue-in-groove technique and the columellar strut technique was the target of this study. Thirty-three patients who underwent a primary, open approach septorhinoplasty using the above-mentioned techniques were retrospectively analyzed. The gain in tip rotation postoperatively, the sensitivity and the rigidity of the nasal tip and the aesthetic outcome after surgery were examined and evaluated. Both techniques led to an increase in nasal tip rotation postoperatively. The gain in rotation was higher in patients, treated with the tongue-in-groove technique (p = 0.0052). The sensitivity of the tip region in the tongue-in-groove group of patients was significantly lower than that in the columellar strut group of patients (p = 0.0424). Both techniques led to high percentages of tip rigidity after surgery with satisfactory aesthetic results though. The tongue-in-groove technique and the columellar strut technique are both reliable techniques for reconstructing the nasal tip support and correcting a droopy tip. Although the tongue-in-groove technique might result in a more significant increase in tip rotation, it leads to less sensitivity in the tip region. PMID:26846403

  10. Enhancing Effect of Borneol and Muscone on Geniposide Transport across the Human Nasal Epithelial Cell Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Gong, Xin; Lu, Yang; Du, Shouying; Yang, Zhihui; Bai, Jie; Li, Pengyue; Wu, Huichao

    2014-01-01

    Geniposide is widely used in the treatment of cerebral ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular diseases for its anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies demonstrated that geniposide could be absorbed promptly and thoroughly by intranasal administration in mice and basically transported into the brain. Here, we explored its transport mechanism and the effect of borneol and muscone on its transport by human nasal epithelial cell (HNEC) monolayer. The cytotoxicity of geniposide, borneol, muscone and their combinations on HNECs was evaluated by the MTT assay. Transcellular transport of geniposide and the influence of borneol and muscone were studied using the HNEC monolayer. Immunostaining and transepithelial electrical resistance were measured to assess the integrity of the monolayer. The membrane fluidity of HNEC was evaluated by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Geniposide showed relatively poor absorption in the HNEC monolayer and it was not a P-gp substrate. Geniposide transport in both directions significantly increased when co-administrated with increasing concentrations of borneol and muscone. The enhancing effect of borneol and muscone on geniposide transport across the HNEC may be attributed to the significant enhancement on cell membrane fluidity, disassembly effect on tight junction integrity and the process was reversible. These results indicated that intranasal administration has good potential to treat cerebrovascular diseases. PMID:24992195

  11. Human upper respiratory tract responses to inhaled pollutants with emphasis on nasal lavage

    SciTech Connect

    Koren, H.S.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1992-04-30

    A set of symptoms has been described during the past two decades. These symptoms, which have been called the sick building syndrome, include eye, nose, and throat irritation; headache; mental fatigue; and respiratory distress. It is likely that VOCs present in synthetic materials used in homes and office buildings contribute to these symptoms. There have been few studies, however, in which humans have been exposed to known amounts of VOCs under carefully controlled conditions. In this study, 14 subjects have been exposed to a mixture of VOCs (25 mg/m3 total hydrocarbon) representative of what is found in new homes and office buildings. Because irritation of the nose and throat are symptoms often associated with the upper respiratory tract and may result from an inflammatory response in the upper airways, we have used NAL to monitor PMN influx into the nasal passages following exposure to VOCs. We report statistically significant increases in PMNs both immediately after a 4-hr exposure to VOCs, as well as 18 hr later.

  12. Assessment of cell surface glycoconjugates in normal, benign and malignant human nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Fang, S Y; Ohyama, M

    1997-12-01

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins is a common characteristic of neoplastic changes. No reports exist relating cell surface glycoconjugates to normal, benign and malignant human nasal mucosa. Using lectin affinity histochemistry, glycoconjugate reactivities for peanut agglutinin (PNA), concanavalin A (Con A), Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II (GSA-II), soy bean agglutinin (SBA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin l (UEA-I) were analysed in the following groups: normal, benign (polyp, papilloma, and inverted papilloma) and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) alone, SCC arising in inverted papilloma, and adenocarcinoma). The positive rate of lectin staining was evaluated using a quantitative AutoCAD programme. We correlated glycoconjugate expression to clinical features, diagnosis, and malignant transformation. The positive rate of PNA after neuraminidase pre-treatment (NA-PNA) staining was higher in inverted papilloma, while all-negative in polyp and papilloma. NA-PNA staining may be used as a differential diagnostic tool. Both inverted papilloma portions and SCC portions of the SCC synchronized with inverted papilloma subjects showed similar Con A and NA-PNA staining patterns. The biological characteristics define inverted papilloma as a pre-malignant neoplasm. The positive rate of PNA staining was significantly higher in inverted papilloma (inverted papilloma transformed to SCC) compared to inverted papilloma alone. Hence, PNA staining may predict malignant transformation of inverted papilloma. However, further investigations are required to prove this possibly worthwhile prognostic marker. PMID:9532636

  13. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Afrin® Nasal Spray ... Anefrin® Nasal Spray ... Dristan® Nasal Spray ... Mucinex® Nasal Spray ... Nostrilla® Nasal Spray ... Vicks Sinex® Nasal Spray ... Zicam® Nasal Spray ... Oxymetazoline nasal spray is used to relieve nasal discomfort caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. It is also used to ...

  14. Expression of ICAM-1 in nasal epithelium and levels of soluble ICAM-1 in nasal lavage fluid during human experimental rhinovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Winther, Birgit; Arruda, Eurico; Witek, Theodore J; Marlin, Steven D; Tsianco, Michael M; Innes, Donald J; Hayden, Frederick G

    2002-02-01

    Most rhinovirus serotypes use intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) as the receptor to enter cells, but ICAM-1 expression has not been detected on normal nasal epithelial cells. During experimental rhinovirus infection, expression of ICAM-1 on nasal epithelial cells was examined with immunohistochemical staining of nasal scrape biopsy specimens, and levels of soluble ICAM-1 in nasal lavage fluid were measured by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Expression of ICAM-1 on nasal epithelial cells increased following inoculation in 20 of 23 infected subjects. The median number of ICAM-1-positive cells per 6.25-mm(2) area of stained biopsy specimen was 0 in control samples (day 20 or 33 after inoculation), and in those without infection, 6 on day 1 (P< or =.05), 14.5 on day 3 (P< or =.01), 1.5 on day 5, and 0 on day 9. In a different group of volunteers, soluble ICAM-1 in nasal lavage fluid was higher on days 1 and 3 compared with preinoculation levels (P< or =.001), but only 11 of 23 infected subjects had a 2-fold or greater increase. Up-regulation of ICAM-1 receptor expression on nasal epithelial cells occurred within 24 hours after inoculation in experimental rhinovirus infections (prior to onset of symptoms) and declined promptly by day 5. PMID:11843719

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A ... weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can cause AIDS ( ...

  16. N-acetylcysteine inhibits Na+ absorption across human nasal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Thierry; Lacroix, Jean-Silvain; Jornot, Lan

    2004-10-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a widely used mucolytic drug in patients with a variety of respiratory disorders. The mechanism of action is based on rupture of the disulfide bridges of the high molecular glycoproteins present in the mucus, resulting in smaller subunits of the glycoproteins and reduced viscosity of the mucus. Because Na(+) absorption regulates airway surface liquid volume and thus the efficiency of mucociliary clearance, we asked whether NAC affects the bioelectric properties of human nasal epithelial cells. A 24-h basolateral treatment with 10 mM of NAC decreased the transepithelial potential difference and short-circuit current (I(SC)) by 40%, and reduced the amiloride-sensitive current by 50%, without affecting the transepithelial resistance. After permeabilization of the basolateral membranes of cells with amphotericin B in the presence of a mucosal-to-serosal Na(+) gradient (135:25 mM), NAC inhibited 45% of the amiloride-sensitive current. The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump activity and the basolateral K(+) conductance were not affected by NAC treatment. NAC did not alter total cell mRNA and protein levels of alpha-epithelial Na(+) channel (EnaC) subunit, but reduced abundance of alpha-ENaC subunits in the apical cell membrane as quantified by biotinylation. This effect can be ascribed to the sulphydryl (SH) group of NAC, since N-acetylserine and S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine were ineffective. Given the importance of epithelial Na(+) channels in controlling the thin layer of fluid that covers the surface of the airways, the increase in the fluidity of the airway mucus following NAC treatment in vivo might be in part related to downregulation of Na(+) absorption and consequently water transport. PMID:15281093

  17. Expression of P-glycoprotein in excised human nasal mucosa and optimized models of RPMI 2650 cells.

    PubMed

    Dolberg, Anne M; Reichl, Stephan

    2016-07-11

    To assess the transmucosal drug transport in the development of medications for intranasal administration, cellular in vitro models are preferred over the use of animal tissues due to inter-species variations and ethical concerns. With regard to the distribution of active agents and multidrug resistance, the ABC transporter P-glycoprotein plays a major role in several mammalian tissues. The present study compares the expression of this efflux pump in optimized in vitro models based on the human RPMI 2650 cell line with specimens of human turbinate mucosa. The presence of the ABCB1 gene was investigated at the mRNA and protein levels using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in differently cultured RPMI 2650 cells and excised human nasal epithelium. Furthermore, the localization and activity of P-gp was examined by immunohistochemical staining and functionality assays using different substrates in both in vitro and ex vivo models. Both mRNA and protein expression of P-gp was found in all studied models. Furthermore, transporter functionality was detected in both RPMI 2650 cell culture models and excised human mucosa. The results demonstrated a highly promising comparability between RPMI 2650 models and explants of human nasal tissue concerning the influence of MDR1 on drug disposition. The RPMI 2650 cell line might become a useful tool in preclinical trials to improve reproducibility and achieve greater applicability to humans of experimental data regarding passive diffusion and active efflux of drug candidates. PMID:27155589

  18. Differential Response of Human Nasal and Bronchial Epithelial Cells upon Exposure to Size-fractionated Dairy Dust

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Brie; Schaeffer, Joshua; Poole, Jill A.; Dooley, Gregory P.; Reynolds, Stephen; Volckens, John

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to organic dusts is associated with increased respiratory morbidity and mortality in agricultural workers. Organic dusts in dairy farm environments are complex, polydisperse mixtures of toxic and immunogenic compounds. Previous toxicological studies focused primarily on exposures to the respirable size fraction, however, organic dusts in dairy farm environments are known to contain larger particles. Given the size distribution of dusts from dairy farm environments, the nasal and bronchial epithelia represent targets of agricultural dust exposures. In this study, well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells and human nasal epithelial cells were exposed to two different size fractions (PM10 and PM>10) of dairy parlor dust using a novel aerosol-to-cell exposure system. Levels of pro-inflammatory transcripts (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) were measured two hr after exposure. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was also measured as an indicator of cytotoxicity. Cell exposure to dust was measured in each size fraction as a function of mass, endotoxin, and muramic acid levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the effects of distinct size fractions of agricultural dust on human airway epithelial cells. Our results suggest that both PM10 and PM>10 size fractions elicit a pro-inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells and that the entire inhalable size fraction needs to be considered when assessing potential risks from exposure to agricultural dusts. Further, data suggest that human bronchial cells respond differently to these dusts than human nasal cells and, therefore, the two cell types need to be considered separately in airway cell models of agricultural dust toxicity. PMID:25965193

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Appearances of Primary Amelanotic Malign Melanoma in the Nasal Cavity: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Gunbey, Emre; Sayit, Asli Tanrivermis; Aslan, Kerim

    2015-01-01

    Malign melanoma of the nasal cavity that arises at such an unusual location is an exceptional case only occasionally mentioned in the literature. An amelanotic form, which is an uncommon type for this malignancy, also has an unusual radiological appearence from the classic melanotic form. We report here the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 46-year-old man who had a nasal cavity mass diagnosed as an amelanotic malign melanoma and discuss the importance of differential diagnosis with such an unusual radiological manifestation in this location. PMID:25859499

  20. A Real-time Method to Evaluate the Nasal Deposition and Clearance of Acetone in the Human Volunteer

    SciTech Connect

    Thrall, Karla D. ); Schwartz, Ronald E.; Weitz, Karl K. ); Soelberg, Jolen J. ); Foureman, Gary L.; Prah, James D.; Timchalk, Charles

    2003-05-01

    Nasal dosimetry models have become increasingly quantitative as insights into tissue deposition/clearance and computational fluid dynamics have become available. Validation of these models requires sufficient experimental data. However, investigations into respiratory deposition, particularly in human volunteers, have been historically limited due to methodological limitations. To overcome this, a method for evaluating the nasal wash-in, wash-out phenomena of a highly water-soluble compound in human volunteers was developed and characterized. This methodology was assessed using controlled human inhalation exposures to uniformly labeled 13C-acetone at approximately 1 ppm concentration for 30 minutes under different breathing maneuvers (inhale nose/exhale nose; inhale nose/exhale mouth; inhale mouth/exhale nose). A small-diameter air-sampling probe inserted in the nasopharyngeal cavity of the volunteer was connected directly to an ion-trap mass spectrometer capable of sampling every 0.8 sec. A second ion-trap mass spectrometer simultaneously sampled from the volunteer?s exhaled breath stream via a breath-inlet device interface. Together, the two mass spectrometers provided real-time appraisal of the 13C-acetone concentrations in the nasopharyngeal region and in the exhaled breath stream before, during, and after the different breathing maneuvers. The breathing cycle (depth and frequency) and heart rate were concurrently monitored throughout the exposure using a heart rate monitor and a human plethysmograph to differentiate inhalation and exhalation. Graphical overlay of the plethysmography results with the mass spectrometer measurements show clear quantifiable differences in 13C-acetone levels at the nasal probe as a function of breathing maneuvers. Breath-by-breath analysis of 13C-acetone concentrations indicate that between 40-75% of the compound is absorbed upon inhalation and nearly all of that absorbed released back into the breath stream during exhalation.

  1. Airflow in the Human Nasal Passage and Sinuses of Chronic Rhinosinusitis Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Haribalan; Jain, Ravi; Douglas, Richard G.; Tawhai, Merryn H.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery is performed on patients with chronic inflammatory disease of the paranasal sinuses to improve sinus ventilation. Little is known about how sinus surgery affects sinonasal airflow. In this study nasal passage geometry was reconstructed from computed tomographic imaging from healthy normal, pre-operative, and post-operative subjects. Transient air flow through the nasal passage during calm breathing was simulated. Subject-specific differences in ventilation of the nasal passage were observed. Velocity magnitude at ostium was different between left and right airway. In FESS, airflow in post-surgical subjects, airflow at the maxillary sinus ostium was upto ten times higher during inspiration. In a Lothrop procedure, airflow at the frontal sinus ostium can be upto four times higher during inspiration. In both post-operative subjects, airflow at ostium was not quasi-steady. The subject-specific effect (of surgery) on sinonasal interaction evaluated through airflow simulations may have important consequences for pre- and post-surgical assessment and surgical planning, and design for improvement of the delivery efficiency of nasal therapeutics. PMID:27249219

  2. Different reactions of human nasal and Eustachian tube mucosa after hyperbaric oxygen exposure: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mutzbauer, Till S; Neubauer, Birger; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2013-03-01

    Impairment of Eustachian tube function has been observed after hyperbaric oxygen treatment as well as after diving on oxygen used as breathing gas. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of hyperbaric oxygen exposure on Eustachian tube ventilatory function and airflow characteristics of the nose. Six police task force divers performing two consecutive dives within a regular training schedule on oxygen were examined. Middle ear impedance, and nasal airflow velocities before and after diving as well as on the morning after the dive day were measured. Middle ear impedance decreased overnight in comparison to pre-dive values (P = 0.027) as well as compared to the value after the first dive (P = 0.032). Rhinoflowmetry did not reveal any changes of nasal airflow velocities related to the dives. Furthermore, no association between middle ear impedance and nasal airflow velocities was found. An impairment of Eustachian tube ventilatory function was obtained after hyperbaric oxygen exposure during dives employing oxygen as breathing gas. This impairment, however, was not associated with altered airflow characteristics of divers' noses. Thus, it seems unlikely that hyperbaric oxygen exerts an effect on the nasal mucosa similar to that on the Eustachian tube mucosa. PMID:22829159

  3. Primary Intestinal Extranodal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type: A Comprehensive Clinicopathological Analysis of 55 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bao-Hua; Shui, Ruo-Hong; Sheng, Wei-Qi; Wang, Chao-Fu; Lu, Hong-Fen; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Xiong-Zeng; Li, Xiao-Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinicopathological features, survival and prognostic factors of primary intestinal extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (PI-ENKTCL). Methods Clinical and histological characteristics of PI-ENKTCL cases were retrospectively evaluated. Immunohistochemical phenotype and status of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement were examined. The overall survival and prognostic parameters were also analyzed. Results Fifty-five (2.7%) cases with PI-ENKTCL were identified out of 2017 archived ENKTCL cases, with a median age of 39 years and a male to female ratio of 2.1:1. The most common symptom was abdominal pain (90.9%), accompanied frequently with fever and less commonly with intestinal perforation or B symptoms. Small intestine (50.9%) was the most common site to be involved. 47.3% and 36.4% cases presented with stage I and II diseases, respectively. Histologically, most cases displayed characteristic morphologic changes of ENKTCL. Cytoplasmic CD3, TIA-1 and CD56 expression was found in 100%, 94.5% and 89.1% of cases, respectively. In situ hybridization detection for EBV demonstrated positive results in all cases. Monoclonal TCR gene rearrangement was found in 52.9% of tested cases. Chemotherapy with a DICE or L-asparaginase/peg-asparginase-containing regimen was most often employed. Both advanced tumor stage and B symptoms were independent inferior prognostic factors (p = 0.001 and p = 0.010). Noticeably, 6 cases demonstrated a CD4-positive phenotype. These cases featured a relatively older median age (58 years), predominance of small/medium-sized neoplastic cells, a higher rate of TCR rearrangement and slightly favorable outcome. Conclusion We reported by far the largest series of PI-ENKTCL, and demonstrated its heterogeneity, aggressive clinical behavior and unsatisfying response to the current therapeutic strategies. Those CD4-positive cases might represent a unique subtype of PI-ENKTCL or

  4. A Review of the Comparative Anatomy, Histology, Physiology and Pathology of the Nasal Cavity of Rats, Mice, Dogs and Non-human Primates. Relevance to Inhalation Toxicology and Human Health Risk Assessment.

    PubMed

    Chamanza, R; Wright, J A

    2015-11-01

    There are many significant differences in the structural and functional anatomy of the nasal cavity of man and laboratory animals. Some of the differences may be responsible for the species-specific nasal lesions that are often observed in response to inhaled toxicants. This paper reviews the comparative anatomy, physiology and pathology of the nasal cavity of the rat, mouse, dog, monkey and man, highlighting factors that may influence the distribution of nasal lesions. Gross anatomical variations such as turbinate structure, folds or grooves on nasal walls, or presence or absence of accessory structures, may influence nasal airflow and species-specific uptake and deposition of inhaled material. In addition, interspecies variations in the morphological and biochemical composition and distribution of the nasal epithelium may affect the local tissue susceptibility and play a role in the development of species-specific nasal lesions. It is concluded that, while the nasal cavity of the monkey might be more similar to that of man, each laboratory animal species provides a model that responds in a characteristic and species-specific manner. Therefore for human risk assessment, careful consideration must be given to the anatomical differences between a given animal model and man. PMID:26460093

  5. A multicentre, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial, comparing high flow therapy with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as primary support for preterm infants with respiratory distress (the HIPSTER trial): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Calum T; Owen, Louise S; Manley, Brett J; Donath, Susan M; Davis, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High flow (HF) therapy is an increasingly popular mode of non-invasive respiratory support for preterm infants. While there is now evidence to support the use of HF to reduce extubation failure, there have been no appropriately designed and powered studies to assess the use of HF as primary respiratory support soon after birth. Our hypothesis is that HF is non-inferior to the standard treatment—nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP)— as primary respiratory support for preterm infants. Methods and analysis The HIPSTER trial is an unblinded, international, multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Eligible infants are preterm infants of 28–36+6 weeks’ gestational age (GA) who require primary non-invasive respiratory support for respiratory distress in the first 24 h of life. Infants are randomised to treatment with either HF or NCPAP. The primary outcome is treatment failure within 72 h after randomisation, as determined by objective oxygenation, blood gas, and apnoea criteria, or the need for urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of intubation, pneumothorax, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, nasal trauma, costs associated with hospital care and parental stress. With a specified non-inferiority margin of 10%, using a two-sided 95% CI and 90% power, the study requires 375 infants per group (total 750 infants). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been granted by the relevant human research ethics committees at The Royal Women's Hospital (13/12), The Royal Children's Hospital (33144A), The Mercy Hospital for Women (R13/34), and the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority (2013/1657). The trial is currently recruiting at 9 centres in Australia and Norway. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed international journals, and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ID: ACTRN

  6. Functional and pharmacological characterization of volume-regulated anion channels in human normal and cystic fibrosis bronchial and nasal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stott, Jennifer B; deCourcey, Francine; Ennis, Madeleine; Zholos, Alexander V

    2014-10-01

    Volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs) are widely present in various cell types and have important functions ranging from regulatory volume decrease to control of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here we aimed to compare the biophysical features and pharmacological profiles of VRAC currents in healthy and cystic fibrosis (CF) respiratory epithelial cells in order to characterize these currents both functionally and pharmacologically. Whole-cell electrophysiology was used to characterize the VRAC current in normal (16HBE14o-; HBE) and CF cell lines (CFBE14o-; CFBE), as well as in native human nasal epithelial cells. Application of hypotonic solution produced current responses of similar sizes in both HBE and CFBE cells. Biophysical properties of VRACs, such as instantaneous activation and deactivation upon voltage step, some inactivation at potentials positive to 40 mV and outwardly-rectifying I-V curves, were indistinguishable in both cell types. Extensive pharmacological analysis of the currents revealed a similar pharmacological profile in response to three blockers--NPPB, DCPIB and DIDS. Native primary human nasal epithelial cells from both healthy and CF volunteers also showed typical VRAC responses of comparable sizes. VRACs in these cells were more sensitive to external solution hypotonicity compared to HBE and CFBE cells. In all cell types studied robust VRAC currents could be induced at constant cell volume by G-protein activation with GTPγS infusion. This study provides the first extensive comparative functional and pharmacological analysis of VRAC currents in normal and CF airway epithelial cells and shows that VRACs are unimpaired molecularly or functionally in CF. PMID:25034811

  7. Nasal Physiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... nose is constantly exposed to inhaled debris and microbes (viruses, bacteria, and fungus). The respiratory system has ... Mucus is designed to trap inhaled particles (including microbes) that are subsequently cleared from the airways. Nasal ...

  8. Nasal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 43. Becker SS. Surgical management of polyps in the treatment of nasal airway ...

  9. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Your paranasal sinuses are small hollow spaces around the nose. They are lined with cells that make mucus, which keeps your nose from drying out. The nasal cavity is the passageway just behind your ...

  10. Neandertal nasal structures and upper respiratory tract "specialization".

    PubMed

    Franciscus, R G

    1999-02-16

    Schwartz and Tattersall [Schwartz, J. H. & Tattersall, I. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10852-10854] have argued for a previously unrecognized suite of autapomorphies in the internal nasal region of Neandertals that make them unique, not only among hominids, but possibly among all other terrestrial mammals. These purported autapomorphies include (i) the development of an internal nasal margin bearing a well developed and vertically oriented medial projection; (ii) a pronounced medial swelling of the lateral nasal wall into the posterior nasal cavity; and (iii) the lack of an ossified roof over the lacrimal groove. In addition, Laitman et al. [Laitman, J. T., Reidenberg, J. S., Marquez, S. & Gannon, P. J. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10543-10545] pointed to these features as evidence for upper respiratory tract specializations among the Neandertals, indicating potential differences in behavior compared with modern humans. Critically reviewing the anatomical basis for Schwartz and Tattersall's contentions reveals several serious problems with their analysis, including (i) reliance on specimens with damaged, incomplete, or, in some cases, entirely absent relevant anatomy; (ii) failure to consider primary vs. secondary spatial consequences in nasal trait conceptualization; and (iii) failure to consider actual ranges of variation in these traits in both fossil and recent humans. Accordingly, the unique phylogenetic and adaptive "specializations" attributed to Neandertal internal nasal structures are unwarranted. PMID:9990106

  11. Neandertal nasal structures and upper respiratory tract “specialization”

    PubMed Central

    Franciscus, Robert G.

    1999-01-01

    Schwartz and Tattersall [Schwartz, J. H. & Tattersall, I. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10852–10854] have argued for a previously unrecognized suite of autapomorphies in the internal nasal region of Neandertals that make them unique, not only among hominids, but possibly among all other terrestrial mammals. These purported autapomorphies include (i) the development of an internal nasal margin bearing a well developed and vertically oriented medial projection; (ii) a pronounced medial swelling of the lateral nasal wall into the posterior nasal cavity; and (iii) the lack of an ossified roof over the lacrimal groove. In addition, Laitman et al. [Laitman, J. T., Reidenberg, J. S., Marquez, S. & Gannon, P. J. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93, 10543–10545] pointed to these features as evidence for upper respiratory tract specializations among the Neandertals, indicating potential differences in behavior compared with modern humans. Critically reviewing the anatomical basis for Schwartz and Tattersall’s contentions reveals several serious problems with their analysis, including (i) reliance on specimens with damaged, incomplete, or, in some cases, entirely absent relevant anatomy; (ii) failure to consider primary vs. secondary spatial consequences in nasal trait conceptualization; and (iii) failure to consider actual ranges of variation in these traits in both fossil and recent humans. Accordingly, the unique phylogenetic and adaptive “specializations” attributed to Neandertal internal nasal structures are unwarranted. PMID:9990106

  12. Modulation of TNF and GM-CSF release from dispersed human nasal polyp cells and human whole blood by inhibitors of different PDE isoenzymes and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Marx, Degenhard; Tassabehji, Mahmoud; Heer, Sabine; Hüttenbrink, K-B; Szelenyi, Istvan

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the inhibitors of different PDE isoenzymes (PDE 1-5) on the production of two pro-inflammatory cytokines - tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Two in vitro models were used to compare the antiinflammatory properties of PDE inhibitors with that of glucocorticoids. The effect on TNF release from diluted human blood following lipopolysaccharide (LPS from Salmonella abortus equi) stimulation as well as the GM-CSF and TNF release from human nasal polyp cells following allergic stimulation were investigated. Both models proofed to be well suited for the characterisation of the antiinflammatory properties of new chemical entities. In diluted human blood and dispersed human nasal polyp cells the induced TNF release was most potently suppressed by selective PDE4 inhibitors. Amrinone and milrinone, selective PDE3 inhibitors, suppressed TNF secretion to a lesser extent. The effects of theophylline (unspecific PDE inhibitor), vinpocetine (PDE1 inhibitor), EHNA (PDE2 inhibitor) and the PDE5 inhibitors zaprinast and E 4021 were weak. In human blood, the tested glucocorticoids beclomethasone, dexamethasone and fluticasone inhibited the LPS induced TNF release potently in a concentration dependent manner, whereas in dispersed human nasal polyp cells, the effect of the glucocorticoids on allergically induced TNF release, with the exception of dexamethasone, was much less pronounced. Glucocorticoids were the most potent inhibitors of GM-CSF release and the effect correlates well with the affinity to the glucocorticoid receptor. The selective PDE 4 inhibitors, and to a certain extent the PDE3 inhibitors amrinone and milrinone, reduced the GM-CSF release in a concentration dependent manner. In all investigations selective PDE4 inhibitors reduced TNF release to a much higher degree (4-10 fold) than GM-CSF release. PMID:11969359

  13. Enhanced chondrogenesis of human nasal septum derived progenitors on nanofibrous scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Abbas; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Sadat Taherzadeh, Elham; Dinarvand, Peyman; Soleimani, Masoud; Ai, Jafar

    2014-07-01

    Topographical cues can be exploited to regulate stem cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation and function in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of different nanofibrous topographies on the chondrogenic differentiation potential of nasal septum derived progenitors (NSP) in vitro. Aligned and randomly oriented Ploy (l-lactide) (PLLA)/Polycaprolactone (PCL) hybrid scaffolds were fabricated via electrospinning. First, scaffolds were fully characterized, and then NSP were seeded on them to study their capacity to support stem cell attachment, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. Compared to randomly oriented nanofibers, aligned scaffolds showed a high degree of nanofiber alignment with much better tensile strength properties. Both scaffolds supported NSP adhesion, proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation. Despite the higher rate of cell proliferation on random scaffolds, a better chondrogenic differentiation was observed on aligned nanofibers as deduced from higher expression of chondrogenic markers such as collagen type II and aggrecan on aligned scaffolds. These findings demonstrate that electrospun constructs maintain NSP proliferation and differentiation, and that the aligned nanofibrous scaffolds can significantly enhance chondrogenic differentiation of nasal septum derived progenitors. PMID:24857513

  14. Effect of High, Medium, and Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronan on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in an In Vitro Model of Human Nasal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Albano, Giusy Daniela; Bonanno, Anna; Cavalieri, Luca; Ingrassia, Eleonora; Di Sano, Caterina; Siena, Liboria; Riccobono, Loredana; Gagliardo, Rosalia; Profita, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    IL-17A is involved in the activation of oxidative stress and inflammation in nasal epithelial cells. Hyaluronan (HA) in its high molecular weight form (HMW-HA) shows anti-inflammatory responses in contrast to low and medium molecular weight HA (LMW-HA and MMW-HA). The aim of this study was to investigate the pro- or anti-inflammatory biologic function of HA at different molecular weight in an in vitro model of nasal inflammation IL-17A mediated. We evaluated the ERK1/2 and IκBα phosphorylation, NF-κB signal pathway activation, ROS production, IL-8 and NOX-4 protein, and mRNA levels, in nasal epithelial cells RPMI 2650 stimulated with recombinant human (rh) IL-17A. Furthermore, the cells were treated with HMW-HA, MMW-HA, LMW-HA, and U0126. Our results showed that rhIL-17A increased the ERK1/2, IκBα phosphorylation and NF-κB signal pathway activation, ROS production, IL-8 and NOX-4 proteins, and mRNA levels. The addiction of HMW-HA or U0126 showed a significant downregulatory effect on inflammation due to the rhIL-17A stimulation in nasal epithelial cells. IL-17A is able to generate oxidative stress and inflammation via the activation of ERK1/2/NF-κB pathway in nasal epithelial cells. The HMW-HA might represent a coadjuvant of the classic anti-inflammatory/antioxidative treatment of nasal epithelial cells during IL-17A nasal inflammation. PMID:27212811

  15. Effect of High, Medium, and Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronan on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in an In Vitro Model of Human Nasal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albano, Giusy Daniela; Bonanno, Anna; Cavalieri, Luca; Ingrassia, Eleonora; Di Sano, Caterina; Siena, Liboria; Riccobono, Loredana; Gagliardo, Rosalia; Profita, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    IL-17A is involved in the activation of oxidative stress and inflammation in nasal epithelial cells. Hyaluronan (HA) in its high molecular weight form (HMW-HA) shows anti-inflammatory responses in contrast to low and medium molecular weight HA (LMW-HA and MMW-HA). The aim of this study was to investigate the pro- or anti-inflammatory biologic function of HA at different molecular weight in an in vitro model of nasal inflammation IL-17A mediated. We evaluated the ERK1/2 and IκBα phosphorylation, NF-κB signal pathway activation, ROS production, IL-8 and NOX-4 protein, and mRNA levels, in nasal epithelial cells RPMI 2650 stimulated with recombinant human (rh) IL-17A. Furthermore, the cells were treated with HMW-HA, MMW-HA, LMW-HA, and U0126. Our results showed that rhIL-17A increased the ERK1/2, IκBα phosphorylation and NF-κB signal pathway activation, ROS production, IL-8 and NOX-4 proteins, and mRNA levels. The addiction of HMW-HA or U0126 showed a significant downregulatory effect on inflammation due to the rhIL-17A stimulation in nasal epithelial cells. IL-17A is able to generate oxidative stress and inflammation via the activation of ERK1/2/NF-κB pathway in nasal epithelial cells. The HMW-HA might represent a coadjuvant of the classic anti-inflammatory/antioxidative treatment of nasal epithelial cells during IL-17A nasal inflammation. PMID:27212811

  16. [Primary human demodicosis. A disease sui generis].

    PubMed

    Hsu, C-K; Zink, A; Wei, K-J; Dzika, E; Plewig, G; Chen, W

    2015-03-01

    Human Demodex mites (Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis) are unique in that they are an obligate human ectoparasite that can inhabit the pilosebaceous unit lifelong without causing obvious host immune response in most cases. The mode of symbiosis between humans and human Demodex mites is unclear, while the pathogenicity of human Demodex mites in many inflammatory skin diseases is now better understood. Primary human demodicosis is a skin disease sui generis not associated with local or systemic immunosuppression. Diagnosis is often underestimated and differentiation from folliculitis, papulopustular rosacea and perioral dermatitis is not always straightforward. Dependent on the morphology and degree of inflammation, the clinical manifestations can be classified into spinulate, papulopustular, nodulocystic, crustic and fulminant demodicosis. Therapy success can be achieved only with acaricides/arachidicides. The effective doses, optimal regimen and antimicrobial resistance remain to be determined. PMID:25744530

  17. Immunization with Staphylococcus aureus Clumping Factor B, a Major Determinant in Nasal Carriage, Reduces Nasal Colonization in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Adam C.; Solinga, Robert M.; Cocchiaro, Jordan; Portoles, Marta; Kiser, Kevin B.; Risley, Allison; Randall, Suzanne M.; Valtulina, Viviana; Speziale, Pietro; Walsh, Evelyn; Foster, Timothy; Lee, Jean C.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a wide range of infections, including soft tissue infections and potentially fatal bacteremias. The primary niche for S. aureus in humans is the nares, and nasal carriage is a documented risk factor for staphylococcal infection. Previous studies with rodent models of nasal colonization have implicated capsule and teichoic acid as staphylococcal surface factors that promote colonization. In this study, a mouse model of nasal colonization was utilized to demonstrate that S. aureus mutants that lack clumping factor A, collagen binding protein, fibronectin binding proteins A and B, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin, or the accessory gene regulator colonized as well as wild-type strains colonized. In contrast, mutants deficient in sortase A or clumping factor B (ClfB) showed reduced nasal colonization. Mice immunized intranasally with killed S. aureus cells showed reduced nasal colonization compared with control animals. Likewise, mice that were immunized systemically or intranasally with a recombinant vaccine composed of domain A of ClfB exhibited lower levels of colonization than control animals exhibited. A ClfB monoclonal antibody (MAb) inhibited S. aureus binding to mouse cytokeratin 10. Passive immunization of mice with this MAb resulted in reduced nasal colonization compared with the colonization observed after immunization with an isotype-matched control antibody. The mouse immunization studies demonstrate that ClfB is an attractive component for inclusion in a vaccine to reduce S. aureus nasal colonization in humans, which in turn may diminish the risk of staphylococcal infection. As targets for vaccine development and antimicrobial intervention are assessed, rodent nasal colonization models may be invaluable. PMID:16552044

  18. Pathogenesis of nasal polyps: an update.

    PubMed

    Pawliczak, Rafal; Lewandowska-Polak, Anna; Kowalski, Marek L

    2005-11-01

    The cause of nasal polyp formation is still unknown. Genetic predisposition has been suggested, but there are scanty data to support such theories. Activated epithelial cells may be the major source of mediators inducing influx of inflammatory cells (mostly eosinophils) and proliferation and activation of fibroblasts leading to nasal polyp formation. Infectious agents (including viruses, bacteria, or fungi) may be potential primary factors activating nasal epithelial cells. Proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors play important roles in the persistence of mucosal inflammation associated with nasal polyps. Arachidonic acid metabolites seem to be particularly important in the pathogenesis of nasal polyps in patients with aspirin hypersensitivity rhinosinusitis/asthma syndrome. PMID:16216171

  19. dsRNA-induced changes in gene expression profiles of primary nasal and bronchial epithelial cells from patients with asthma, rhinitis and controls

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rhinovirus infections are the most common cause of asthma exacerbations. The complex responses by airway epithelium to rhinovirus can be captured by gene expression profiling. We hypothesized that: a) upper and lower airway epithelium exhibit differential responses to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and b) that this is modulated by the presence of asthma and allergic rhinitis. Objectives Identification of dsRNA-induced gene expression profiles of primary nasal and bronchial epithelial cells from the same individuals and examining the impact of allergic rhinitis with and without concomitant allergic asthma on expression profiles. Methods This study had a cross-sectional design including 18 subjects: 6 patients with allergic asthma with concomitant rhinitis, 6 patients with allergic rhinitis, and 6 healthy controls. Comparing 6 subjects per group, the estimated false discovery rate was approximately 5%. RNA was extracted from isolated and cultured primary epithelial cells from nasal biopsies and bronchial brushings stimulated with dsRNA (poly(I:C)), and analyzed by microarray (Affymetrix U133+ PM Genechip Array). Data were analysed using R and the Bioconductor Limma package. Overrepresentation of gene ontology groups were captured by GeneSpring GX12. Results In total, 17 subjects completed the study successfully (6 allergic asthma with rhinitis, 5 allergic rhinitis, 6 healthy controls). dsRNA-stimulated upper and lower airway epithelium from asthma patients demonstrated significantly fewer induced genes, exhibiting reduced down-regulation of mitochondrial genes. The majority of genes related to viral responses appeared to be similarly induced in upper and lower airways in all groups. However, the induction of several interferon-related genes (IRF3, IFNAR1, IFNB1, IFNGR1, IL28B) was impaired in patients with asthma. Conclusions dsRNA differentially changes transcriptional profiles of primary nasal and bronchial epithelial cells from patients with allergic

  20. Effect of nasal decongestion on voice spectrum of a nasal consonant-vowel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guo-She; Yang, Cheryl C H; Wang, Ching-Ping; Kuo, Terry B J

    2005-03-01

    The nasal cavity and its related structures make significant contributions to human phonation, especially the resonance of voice spectra. The voice spectra of the nasal consonant-vowel (CV), [md:], in the subjects with nasal obstruction were obtained and were compared with the spectra of the same CV vocalized by the same subjects after topical nasal decongestion treatment with 1:1000 epinephrine solution. Results revealed that the intensity damping was more marked in the high-frequency area (>1600 Hz) after the nasal decongestion. Moreover, the intensities of the spectral valleys damped more than the spectral peaks, especially the spectral valley of 1000-2700 Hz. Therefore, a more complex spectral pattern was formed by the resultant uneven damping effect after nasal decongestion. The nasal cavity plays an important role in the formation of spectral peaks and valleys, and such engraved voice spectra may also characterize nasal voices like the nasal CV [md:] demonstrated in our study. PMID:15766851

  1. Characteristics of Nasal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (NALT) and Nasal Absorption Capacity in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Haihong; Yan, Mengfei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2013-01-01

    As the main mucosal immune inductive site of nasal cavity, nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT) plays an important role in both antigen recognition and immune activation after intranasal immunization. However, the efficiency of intranasal vaccines is commonly restricted by the insufficient intake of antigen by the nasal mucosa, resulting from the nasal mucosal barrier and the nasal mucociliary clearance. The distribution of NALT and the characteristic of nasal cavity have already been described in humans and many laboratory rodents, while data about poultry are scarce. For this purpose, histological sections of the chicken nasal cavities were used to examine the anatomical structure and histological characteristics of nasal cavity. Besides, the absorptive capacity of chicken nasal mucosa was also studied using the materials with different particle size. Results showed that the NALT of chicken was located on the bottom of nasal septum and both sides of choanal cleft, which mainly consisted of second lymphoid follicle. A large number of lymphocytes were distributed under the mucosal epithelium of inferior nasal meatus. In addition, there were also diffuse lymphoid tissues located under the epithelium of the concha nasalis media and the walls of nasal cavity. The results of absorption experiment showed that the chicken nasal mucosa was capable to absorb trypan blue, OVA, and fluorescent latex particles. Inactivated avian influenza virus (IAIV) could be taken up by chicken nasal mucosa except for the stratified squamous epithelium sites located on the forepart of nasal cavity. The intake of IAIV by NALT was greater than that of the nasal mucosa covering on non-lymphoid tissue, which could be further enhanced after intranasal inoculation combined with sodium cholate or CpG DNA. The study on NALT and nasal absorptive capacity will be benefit for further understanding of immune mechanisms after nasal vaccination and development of nasal vaccines for poultry. PMID

  2. Nasal endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Nasal endoscopy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  3. Visual exploration of nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Stefan; Muigg, Philipp; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Doleisch, Helmut; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    Rhinologists are often faced with the challenge of assessing nasal breathing from a functional point of view to derive effective therapeutic interventions. While the complex nasal anatomy can be revealed by visual inspection and medical imaging, only vague information is available regarding the nasal airflow itself: Rhinomanometry delivers rather unspecific integral information on the pressure gradient as well as on total flow and nasal flow resistance. In this article we demonstrate how the understanding of physiological nasal breathing can be improved by simulating and visually analyzing nasal airflow, based on an anatomically correct model of the upper human respiratory tract. In particular we demonstrate how various Information Visualization (InfoVis) techniques, such as a highly scalable implementation of parallel coordinates, time series visualizations, as well as unstructured grid multi-volume rendering, all integrated within a multiple linked views framework, can be utilized to gain a deeper understanding of nasal breathing. Evaluation is accomplished by visual exploration of spatio-temporal airflow characteristics that include not only information on flow features but also on accompanying quantities such as temperature and humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth visual exploration of the physiological function of the nose over several simulated breathing cycles under consideration of a complete model of the nasal airways, realistic boundary conditions, and all physically relevant time-varying quantities. PMID:19834215

  4. Detection of primary cilia in human glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisian, Matthew R.; Siebzehnrubl, Dorit; Hoang-Minh, Lan; Deleyrolle, Loic; Silver, Daniel J.; Siebzehnrubl, Florian A.; Guadiana, Sarah M.; Srivinasan, Gayathri; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Steindler, Dennis A.; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant adult brain tumor and carries a poor prognosis due to primary and acquired resistance. While many cellular features of GBM have been documented, it is unclear if cells within these tumors extend a primary cilium, an organelle whose associated signaling pathways may regulate proliferation, migration, and survival of neural precursor and tumor cells. Using immunohistochemical and electron microscopy (EM) techniques, we screened human GBM tumor biopsies and primary cell lines for cilia. Immunocytochemical staining of five primary GBM cell lines revealed that between 8 and 25 % of the cells in each line possessed gamma tubulin-positive basal bodies from which extended acetylated, alpha-tubulin-positive axonemes. EM analyses confirmed the presence of cilia at the cell surface and revealed that their axonemes contained organized networks of microtubules, a structural feature consistent with our detection of IFT88 and Arl13b, two trafficked cilia proteins, along the lengths of the axonemes. Notably, cilia were detected in each of 23 tumor biopsies (22 primary and 1 recurrent) examined. These cilia were distributed across the tumor landscape including regions proximal to the vasculature and within necrotic areas. Moreover, ciliated cells within these tumors co-stained with Ki67, a marker for actively dividing cells, and ZEB1, a transcription factor that is upregulated in GBM and linked to tumor initiation, invasion, and chemoresistance. Collectively, our data show that subpopulations of cells within human GBM tumors are ciliated. In view of mounting evidence supporting roles of primary cilia in tumor initiation and propagation, it is likely that further study of the effects of cilia on GBM tumor cell function will improve our understanding of GBM pathogenesis and may provide new directions for GBM treatment strategies. PMID:24510433

  5. Gene targeting in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Sadovsky, Yoel; Jansson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Studies in primary human trophoblasts provide critical insights into placental function in normal and complicated pregnancies. Mechanistic studies in these cells require experimental tools to modulate gene expression. Lipid-based methods to transfect primary trophoblasts are fairly simple to use and allow for the efficient delivery of nucleic acids, but potential toxic effects limit these methods. Viral vectors are versatile transfection tools of native trophoblastic or foreign cDNAs, providing high transfection efficiency, low toxicity and stable DNA integration into the trophoblast genome. RNA interference (RNAi), using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA, constitutes a powerful approach to silence trophoblast genes. However, off-target effects, such as regulation of unintended complementary transcripts, inflammatory responses and saturation of the endogenous RNAi machinery, are significant concerns. Strategies to minimize off-target effects include using multiple individual siRNAs, elimination of pro-inflammatory sequences in the siRNA construct and chemical modification of a nucleotide in the guide strand or of the ribose moiety. Tools for efficient gene targeting in primary human trophoblasts are currently available, albeit not yet extensively validated. These methods are critical for exploring the function of human trophoblast genes and may provide a foundation for the future application of gene therapy that targets placental trophoblasts. PMID:22831880

  6. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in human nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Li; Jia, Lei; Bai, Lu; He, Long; Yang, Binyan; Wu, Changyou; Li, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4+ T cells are recognized to play an important role in the inflammatory response of nasal polyps (NPs), the biological functions of CD8+ T cells in polypogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed cell markers, cytokine expression and transcription factors in IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues of NP patients. The results showed that the majority of IL-21-producing CD8+ T cells were effector memory cells and they co-expressed IFN-γ. IL-21-expressing CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues expressed higher CXCR5, PD-1, and ICOS levels than cells in control tissues and showed significantly higher T-bet and Bcl-6 expression levels compared with IL-21−CD8+ T cells. Purified polyp CD8+ T cells promoted IgG production from isolated polyp B cells in vitro, and recombinant IL-12 modulated the expression of IL-21, IFN-γ and CD40L in purified polyp CD8+ T cells. Moreover, the percentage of IL-21+CD8+ T cells in polyp tissues was positively correlated with endoscopic and CT scan scores in NP patients. These findings indicated that polyp CD8+ T cells, by co-expressing IL-21 and IFN-γ and other markers, display a Tfh cell functionality, which is associated with the clinical severity of NP patients. PMID:27468819

  7. Phenotypic and functional characteristics of IL-21-expressing CD8(+) T cells in human nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Li; Jia, Lei; Bai, Lu; He, Long; Yang, Binyan; Wu, Changyou; Li, Huabin

    2016-01-01

    Although CD4(+) T cells are recognized to play an important role in the inflammatory response of nasal polyps (NPs), the biological functions of CD8(+) T cells in polypogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed cell markers, cytokine expression and transcription factors in IL-21-expressing CD8(+) T cells in polyp tissues of NP patients. The results showed that the majority of IL-21-producing CD8(+) T cells were effector memory cells and they co-expressed IFN-γ. IL-21-expressing CD8(+) T cells in polyp tissues expressed higher CXCR5, PD-1, and ICOS levels than cells in control tissues and showed significantly higher T-bet and Bcl-6 expression levels compared with IL-21(-)CD8(+) T cells. Purified polyp CD8(+) T cells promoted IgG production from isolated polyp B cells in vitro, and recombinant IL-12 modulated the expression of IL-21, IFN-γ and CD40L in purified polyp CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, the percentage of IL-21(+)CD8(+) T cells in polyp tissues was positively correlated with endoscopic and CT scan scores in NP patients. These findings indicated that polyp CD8(+) T cells, by co-expressing IL-21 and IFN-γ and other markers, display a Tfh cell functionality, which is associated with the clinical severity of NP patients. PMID:27468819

  8. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage among outpatients attending primary health care centers: a comparative study of two cities in Saudi Arabia and Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abou Shady, Hala M; Bakr, Alaa Eldin A; Hashad, Mahmoud E; Alzohairy, Mohammad A

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and molecular data on community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) are still scarce in both Egypt and Saudi Arabia. There is almost no data regarding methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) prevalence in both countries. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus and MRSA nasal carriage among outpatients attending primary health care centers in two big cities in both countries. A total of 206 nasal swabs were obtained, 103 swabs from each country. S. aureus isolates were characterized by antibiotic susceptibility, presence of mecA and PVL genes, SCCmec-typing and spa typing, the corresponding Multi locus sequence typing clonal complex was assigned for each spa type based on Ridom StaphType database. MRSA was detected in 32% of the Egyptian outpatients while it was found in 25% of the Saudi Arabian outpatients. All MRSA isolates belonged to SCCmec type V and IVa, where some isolates in Saudi Arabia remained nontypeable. Surprisingly PVL(+) isolates were low in frequency: 15% of MRSA Egyptian isolates and 12% of MRSA isolates in Saudi Arabia. Two novel spa types were detected t11839 in Egypt, and t11841 in Saudi Arabia. We found 8 spa types among 20 isolates from Egypt, and 12 spa types out of 15 isolates from Saudi Arabia. Only two spa types t008 and t223 coexisted in both countries. Four clonal complexes (CC5, CC8, CC22, and CC80) were identified in both Egypt and Saudi Arabia. However, the data collected lacked a representation of isolates from different parts of each country as only one health center from each country was included, it still partially illustrates the CA-MRSA situation in both countries. In conclusion a set of control measures is required to prevent further increase in MRSA prevalence. PMID:25523075

  9. COMPARISON OF PM-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES BETWEEN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS AND NASAL EPITHELIAL CELLS IN HUMAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have linked exposures to particulate matter (PM) and increased pulmonary mortality and morbidity. Bronchial epithelial cells (BEC) are the primary target of PM. PM exposure induces a wide array of biological responses in BEC. Primary human BEC, however, need...

  10. The Effect of Menstrual Cycle on Nasal Resonance Characteristics in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Suman; Basu, Shriya; Sinha, Anisha; Chatterjee, Indranil

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze resonance characteristics (nasality and nasalance values) during the menstrual cycle. Previous studies indicate changes in voice quality and nasal mucosa due to temporary falling estrogen levels in human females during their menstrual cycle. The present study compared the nasality and "nasalance scores"…

  11. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose (rhinitis) caused by hay fever, other allergies, or ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray ...

  12. Nasal ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation is likely to have an increasing role in the management of acute ventilatory failure, weaning, and chronic ventilatory problems. Further improvements in ventilator and mask design will be seen. Appropriate application is likely to reduce both mortality and admissions to intensive care, while domiciliary use can improve life expectancy and/or quality of life in chronic ventilatory disorders. As with any new technique, enthusiasm should not outweigh clear outcome information, and possible new indications should always be subject to careful assessment. Images Figure 2 PMID:9799887

  13. BIOMARKERS OF INFLAMMATION IN OZONE-EXPOSED HUMANS: COMPARISON OF THE NASAL AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR LAVAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An influx of neutrophils (PMNs), a primary feature of acute inflammation, has been associated with the development of lower lung disorders, such as emphysema and idiopathic fibrosis, as well as airway hyperreactivity and increased mucus secretion. reviously, we established that a...

  14. RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS INFECTION OF HUMAN PRIMARY NASAL AND BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELL CULTURES AND BRONCHOALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In adult clinical symptoms caused by respiratory syncytial virus RSV are confined to the upper respiratory tract, while RSV infection in infants frequently causes bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The preferential localization of RSV infection to the Upper airways may be due partially...

  15. Notes from the field: primary amebic meningoencephalitis associated with ritual nasal rinsing--St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin islands, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-11-15

    On November 21, 2012, the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) Department of Health documented the first case and death from primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in the territory. PAM, a rare and almost universally fatal condition, results when Naegleria fowleri, a free-living thermophilic ameba found in warm freshwater, enters the nose and migrates to the brain. The patient was a man aged 47 years whose only reported freshwater exposures were the use of tap water for daily household activities and for ablution, a ritual cleansing that he practiced several times a day in preparation for Islamic prayer. Ablution can include nasal rinsing. On November 16, 2012, the patient had visited the emergency department with a headache; he was treated symptomatically and released. The following day, the patient returned to the emergency department by ambulance with fever, confusion, agitation, and a severe headache, for which he was admitted. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies were consistent with bacterial meningitis, and antibiotics were started. On November 18, neurologic findings included fixed nonresponsive pupils, no response in the upper or lower extremities, muted plantar responses, and no response to verbal commands. Microscopic examination of the CSF obtained from a second lumbar puncture revealed motile amebic trophozoites. CSF specimens sent to CDC for confirmatory testing were positive for N. fowleri by real-time polymerase chain reaction testing. On the morning of November 21, the patient was pronounced brain dead based on neurologic criteria. PMID:24226628

  16. Human Rhinovirus-induced Proinflammatory Cytokine and Interferon-β Responses in Nasal Epithelial Cells From Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Heui; Kim, You-Sun; Cho, Gye Song; Kim, Nam Hee; Gong, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Bong-Jae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Asthma exacerbation from human rhinovirus (HRV) infection is associated with deficient antiviral interferon (IFN) secretion. Although chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), an inflammatory upper airway disease, is closely linked to asthma, IFN-β responses to HRV infections in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs) from CRS patients remain to be studied. We evaluated inflammatory and antiviral responses to HRV infection in HNECs from CRS patients. Methods HNECs, isolated from turbinate tissue of 13 patients with CRS and 14 non-CRS controls, were infected with HRV16 for 4 hours. The HRV titer, LDH activity, production of proinflammatory cytokines and IFN-β proteins, and expression levels of RIG-I and MDA5 mRNA were assessed at 8, 24, and 48 hours after HRV16 infection. Results The reduction in viral titer was slightly delayed in the CRS group compared to the non-CRS control group. IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly increased to a similar extent in both groups after HRV infection. In the control group, IFN-β production and MDA5 mRNA expression were significantly increased at 8 and 24 hours after HRV16 infection, respectively. By contrast, in the CRS group, IFN-β was not induced by HRV infection; however, HRV-induced MDA5 mRNA expression was increased, but the increase was slightly delayed compared to the non-CRS control group. The RIG-I mRNA level was not significantly increased by HRV16 infection in either group. Conclusions HRV-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in CRS patients was not different from that in the non-CRS controls. However, reductions in viral titer, IFN-β secretion, and MDA5 mRNA expression in response to HRV infection in CRS patients were slightly impaired compared to those in the controls, suggesting that HRV clearance in CRS patients might be slightly deficient. PMID:26122508

  17. Pilot study to establish a nasal tip prediction method from unknown human skeletal remains for facial reconstruction and skull photo superimposition as applied to a Japanese male populations.

    PubMed

    Utsuno, Hajime; Kageyama, Toru; Uchida, Keiichi; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko; Sakurada, Koichi; Uemura, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Skull-photo superimposition is a technique used to identify the relationship between the skull and a photograph of a target person: and facial reconstruction reproduces antemortem facial features from an unknown human skull, or identifies the facial features of unknown human skeletal remains. These techniques are based on soft tissue thickness and the relationships between soft tissue and the skull, i.e., the position of the ear and external acoustic meatus, pupil and orbit, nose and nasal aperture, and lips and teeth. However, the ear and nose region are relatively difficult to identify because of their structure, as the soft tissues of these regions are lined with cartilage. We attempted to establish a more accurate method to determine the position of the nasal tip from the skull. We measured the height of the maxilla and mid-lower facial region in 55 Japanese men and generated a regression equation from the collected data. We obtained a result that was 2.0±0.99mm (mean±SD) distant from the true nasal tip, when applied to a validation set consisting of another 12 Japanese men. PMID:26724561

  18. A Controlled Challenge Study on Di(2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate (DEHP) in House Dust and the Immune Response in Human Nasal Mucosa of Allergic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Deutschle, Tom; Reiter, Rudolf; Butte, Werner; Heinzow, Birger; Keck, Tilman; Riechelmann, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Background Few studies have yet addressed the effects of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in house dust on human nasal mucosa. Objectives We investigated the effects of house dust containing DEHP on nasal mucosa of healthy and house dust mite (HDM)–allergic subjects in a short-term exposure setting. Methods We challenged 16 healthy and 16 HDM-allergic subjects for 3 hr with house dust at a concentration of 300 μg/m3 containing either low (0.41 mg/g) or high (2.09 mg/g) levels of DEHP. Exposure to filtered air served as control. After exposure, we measured proteins and performed a DNA microarray analysis. Results Nasal exposure to house dust with low or high DEHP had no effect on symptom scores. Healthy subjects had almost no response to inhaled dust, but HDM-allergic subjects showed varied responses: DEHPlow house dust increased eosinophil cationic protein, granulocyte-colony–stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin (IL)-5, and IL-6, whereas DEHPhigh house dust decreased G-CSF and IL-6. Furthermore, in healthy subjects, DEHP concentration resulted in 10 differentially expressed genes, whereas 16 genes were differentially expressed in HDM-allergic subjects, among them anti-Müllerian hormone, which was significantly up-regulated after exposure to DEHPhigh house dust compared with exposure to DEHPlow house dust, and fibroblast growth factor 9, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-β1, which were down-regulated. Conclusions Short-term exposure to house dust with high concentrations of DEHP has attenuating effects on human nasal immune response in HDM-allergic subjects, concerning both gene expression and cytokines. PMID:19057701

  19. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  1. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  4. In vivo implantation of tissue engineered human nasal septal neocartilage constructs: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Angela A.; Reuther, Marsha S.; Briggs, Kristen K.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Williams, Gregory M.; Corr, Maripat; Sah, Robert L.; Watson, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the in vivo biocompatibility of septal neocartilage constructs developed in vitro by an alginate intermediate step. Study Design Prospective, animal model. Setting Research laboratory. Subjects and Methods A murine model was used to examine the maturation of neocartilage constructs in vivo. Chondrocytes collected from patients undergoing septoplasty were expanded in monolayer and suspended in alginate beads for three-dimensional culture in media containing human serum and growth factors. After in vitro incubation for 5 weeks, the constructs were implanted in the dorsum of athymic mice for 30 and 60 days (n=9). After the mice were sacrificed, the constructs were recovered for assessment of their morphological, histochemical, biochemical, and biomechanical properties. Results The mice survived and tolerated the implants well. Infection and extrusion were not observed. Neocartilage constructs maintained their general shape and size, and demonstrated cell viability after implantation. The implanted constructs were firm and opaque, sharing closer semblance to native septal tissue relative to the gelatinous, translucent pre-implant constructs. Histochemical staining with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) revealed that the constructs exhibited distinct morphologies characteristic of native tissue, which were not observed in pre-implant constructs. DNA and type II collagen increased with duration of implantation, whereas type I collagen and glycoaminoglycans (GAG) decreased. Mechanical testing of a 60-day implanted construct demonstrated characteristics similar to native human septal cartilage. Conclusions Neocartilage constructs are viable in an in vivo murine model. The histologic, biochemical, and biomechanical features of implanted constructs closely resemble native septal tissue when compared to pre-implant constructs. PMID:22031592

  5. Global Patterns in Human Consumption of Net Primary Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.; Bounoua, Lahouari; Ricketts, Taylor; Loucks, Colby; Harriss, Robert; Lawrence William T.

    2004-01-01

    The human population and its consumption profoundly affect the Earth's ecosystems. A particularly compelling measure of humanity's cumulative impact is the fraction of the planet's net primary production that we appropriate for our Net primary production-the net amount of solar energy converted to plant organic matter through photosynthesis-can be measured in units of elemental carbon and represents the primary food energy source for the world's ecosystems. Human appropriation of net primary production, apart from leaving less for other species to use, alters the composition of the atmosphere, levels of biodiversity, flows within food webs and the provision of important primary production required by humans and compare it to the total amount generated on the landscape. We then derive a spatial ba!mce sheet of net primary production supply and demand for the world. We show that human appropriation of net primary production varies spatially from almost zero to many times the local primary production. These analyses reveal the uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations depend on net primary production "imports" and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of human appropriation of net primary production.

  6. VR-based interactive CFD data comparison of flow fields in a human nasal cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerndt, Andreas; Kuhlen, Torsten; van Reimersdahl, Thomas; Haack, Matthias; Bischof, Christian

    2004-05-01

    The Virtual Reality Center Aachen is developing a Virtual Reality based operation planning system in cooperation with aerodynamics scientists and physicians of several clinical centers. This system is meant to help the preparation of nose surgeries aimed at the elimination of respiratory diseases. A core part is the interactive comparison of experimental data and simulation data in the area of fluid dynamics. In a first step, data comparison is to depict the differences between healthy noses and diseased noses. Later on, data comparison should supply evidence for successful virtual surgeries, which finally results in guidance on the real operation. During virtual surgery sessions, scientists can interactively explore, analyze, annotate, and compare various medical and aerodynamics data sets. Image-based methods are used to extract several features in one image and between compared data sets. The determination of linked features between different data sets is a particular challenge because of their different time frames, scales, and distortions. An optimized human computer interface enables the user to interact intuitively within a virtual environment in order to select and deal with these data sets. Additionally to this interactive exploration, the system also allows automatic searches for cut plane and key frame candidates corresponding to given feature patterns. The comparison system makes use of an already implemented parallelized Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) postprocessing, which also extracts enhanced flow features that allow automatic detection of relevant flow regions. Beside vortex detection, the computation of critical points including flow field segmentation is a current research activity. These flow features are favored characteristics for the comparison and help considerably to classify different nose geometries and operation recommendations.

  7. A hybrid CFD-PBPK model for naphthalene in rat and human with IVIVE for nasal tissue metabolism and cross-species dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Jerry L; Andersen, Melvin E; Clewell, Harvey J

    2014-05-01

    A PBPK model for naphthalene in the rat and human that incorporates a hybrid CFD-PBPK description of the upper respiratory tract was developed to support cross-species dosimetry comparisons of naphthalene concentrations and tissue normalized rate of metabolism in the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium, lung and liver. In vitro measurements of metabolic rates from microsomal incubations published for rat and monkey (surrogate for human) were scaled to the specific tissue based on the tissue microsomal content and volume of tissue. The model reproduces time courses for naphthalene blood concentrations from intravenous and inhalation exposures in rats and upper respiratory tract extraction data in both naïve rats and rats pre-treated to inhibit nasal metabolism. This naphthalene model was applied to estimate human equivalent inhalation concentrations (HECs) corresponding to several NOAELs or LOAELs for the non-cancer effects of naphthalene in rats. Two approaches for cross-species extrapolation were compared: (1) equivalence based on tissue naphthalene concentration and (2) equivalence based on amount metabolized per minute (normalized to tissue volume). At the NOAEL of 0.1 ppm, the regional gas dosimetry ratio (RGDR) based on naphthalene concentration was 0.18 for the dorsal olfactory region; however, the RGDR rises to 5.4 when based on the normalized amount metabolized due to the lower of expression of CYP isozymes in the nasal epithelium of primates and humans. The resulting HEC is 0.12 ppm (0.63 mg/m(3)) continuous exposure at the rat NOAEL of 0.1 ppm (6 h/day, 5 days/week). PMID:24666369

  8. Postirradiation sarcoma of the head and neck: a report of three late sarcomas following therapeutic irradiation for primary malignancies of the paranasal sinus, nasal cavity, and larynx. [/sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Coia, L.R.; Fazekas, J.T.; Kramer, S.

    1980-11-01

    Sarcoma of the head and neck region following irradiation for primary malignancy other than retinoblastoma has rarely been reported. Three cases of postirradiation sarcoma arising in the head and neck region following definitive radiotherapy for primary malignancies of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and larynx are presented. The dosage ranged from 6000 to 6400 rads using conventional fractionation on a /sup 60/Cobalt teletherapy unit. Methotrexate was utilized during the initial course of radiation in two of the three patients. The cases conform well to established criteria for the diagnosis of radiation-induced sarcoma.

  9. Primary Bioassay of Human Myeloma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, Anne; Salmon, Sydney E.

    1977-01-01

    The ability to clone primary tumors in soft agar has proven useful in the study of the kinetics and biological properties of tumor stem cells. We report the development of an in vitro assay which permits formation of colonies of human monoclonal plasma cells in soft agar. Colony growth has been observed from bone marrow aspirates from 75% of the 70 patients with multiple myeloma or related monoclonal disorders studied. Growth was induced with either 0.02 ml of human type O erythrocytes or 0.25 ml of medium conditioned by the adherent spleen cells of mineral oil-primed BALB/c mice. 5-500 colonies appeared after 2-3 wk in culture yielding a plating efficiency of 0.001-0.1%. The number of myeloma colonies was proportional to the number of cells plated between concentrations of 105-106 and back-extrapolated through zero, suggesting that colonies were clones derived from single myeloma stem cells. Morphological, histochemical, and functional criteria showed the colonies to consist of immature plasmablasts and mature plasma cells. 60-80% of cells picked from colonies contained intracytoplasmic monoclonal immunoglobulin. Colony growth was most easily achieved from the bone marrow cells of untreated patients or those in relapse. Only 50% of bone marrow samples from patients in remission were successfully cultured. Tritiated thymidine suicide studies provided evidence that for most myeloma patients, a very high proportion of myeloma colony-forming cells was actively in transit through the cell cycle. Velocity sedimentation at 1 g showed myeloma stem cells sedimented in a broad band with a peak at 13 mm/h. Antibody to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not reduce the number or size of the colonies. Increased numbers of myeloma colonies were seen when the marrow was depleted of colony-stimulating factor elaborating adherent cells before plating. This bioassay should prove useful in studying the in vitro biological behavior of certain bone marrow-derived (B

  10. Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Lateral Intercrural Suture to Decrease the Interdomal Distance to Improve the Definition of the Nasal Tip in Primary Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Caio Márcio Correia; Mocelin, Marcos; Pasinato, Rogerio; Berger, Cezar Augusto Sarraf; Grocoske, Francisco Luiz Busato; Issa, Maria Julia Abrão

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Several surgical techniques emphasizing sutures on the lower lateral cartilage have been studied by surgeons as instruments to improve nasal tip remodeling. It is already known that the domal divergence angle and its definition angle can be modified by lateral intercrural suture (LIS). Techniques for measuring these structures are not yet standardized. Objectives Assess the efficacy of LIS using polydioxanone 4–0 absorbable thread by interdomal distance and systematize the LIS technique to improve nasal tip definition. Materials and Methods This prospective study measured and analyzed interdomal distances measured preoperatively and perioperatively compared with 3- and 6-month postoperative measurements. Results LIS was efficient on reducing interdomal distances. Conclusion LIS is statistically safe and efficient and has low morbidity when utilized in patients with mild to moderate deformities, because it reduces the domal divergence angle, effectively sustaining the nasal tip. PMID:25992073

  11. Nasal Wash Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Make the nasal wash solution. Do not use tap water for the nasal wash (unless boiled or filtered ... water. You may use: Distilled water Sterilized water Tap water that has been boiled for 1 minute (at ...

  12. Post-Nasal Drip

    MedlinePlus

    ... guaifenesin (Humibid®, Robitussin®) may also thin secretions. Nasal irrigations may alleviate thickened secretions. These can be performed ... device or a Water Pik® with a nasal irrigation nozzle. Warm water with baking soda or salt ( ...

  13. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone nasal gel is used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men ...

  14. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve symptoms of sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. It ... nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose). Mometasone nasal spray should not be used to ...

  15. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lining of the nose) after nasal polyp removal surgery. Beclomethasone nasal spray should not be used ... as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this ...

  16. Nasal fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000554.htm Nasal fracture - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... that gives your nose its shape. A nasal fracture occurs when the bony part of your nose ...

  17. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - nasal mucosa; Nose biopsy ... to fast for a few hours before the biopsy. ... Nasal mucosal biopsy is usually done when abnormal tissue is seen during examination of the nose. It may also be done ...

  18. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... Allergic rhinitis symptoms , such as congestion, runny nose, sneezing, itching, or swelling of the nasal passageway Nasal ... Repeat these steps for the other nostril. Avoid sneezing or blowing your nose right after spraying.

  19. Poly(I:C) reduces expression of JAM-A and induces secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} via distinct NF-{kappa}B pathways in human nasal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Fuchimoto, Jun; Kamekura, Ryuta; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Himi, Tetsuo; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-01-01

    Human nasal epithelium is an important physical barrier and innate immune defense protecting against inhaled substances and pathogens. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, which plays a key role in the innate immune response, has not been well characterized in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs), including the epithelial tight junctional barrier. In the present study, mRNAs of TLR1-10 were detected in hTERT-transfected HNECs, which can be used as an indispensable and stable model of normal HNECs, similar to primary cultured HNECs. To investigate the changes of tight junction proteins and the signal transduction pathways via TLRs in HNECs in vitro, hTERT-transfected HNECs were treated with TLR2 ligand P{sub 3}CSK{sub 4}, TLR3 ligand poly(I:C), TLR4 ligand LPS, TLR7/8 ligand CL097, TLR8 ligand ssRNA40/LyoVec, and TLR9 ligand ODN2006. In hTERT-transfected HNECs, treatment with poly(I:C) significantly reduced expression of the tight junction protein JAM-A and induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-{alpha}. Both the reduction of JAM-A expression and the induction of secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} after treatment with poly(I:C) were modulated by distinct signal transduction pathways via EGFR, PI3K, and p38 MAPK and finally regulated by a TLR3-mediated NF-{kappa}B pathway. The control of TLR3-mediated signaling pathways in HNECs may be important not only in infection by viral dsRNA but also in autoimmune diseases caused by endogenous dsRNA released from necrotic cells.

  20. Nasal Harmony in Aguaruna.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Gui-Sun

    A discussion of the nasal harmony of Aguaruna, a language of the Jivaroan family in South America, approaches the subject from the viewpoint of generative phonology. This theory of phonology proposes an underlying nasal consonant, later deleted, that accounts for vowel nasalization. Complex rules that suppose a complex system of vowel and…

  1. Saline nasal washes

    MedlinePlus

    Salt water washes; Nasal irrigation; Nasal lavage; Sinusitis - nasal wash ... by mixing: 3 teaspoons (tsp) canning or pickling salt (no iodine) 1 tsp baking soda 1 cup warm distilled, filtered, or boiled water To use the wash: Fill the device with ...

  2. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... is recommended by a doctor. Children 6 to 12 years of age should use oxymetazoline nasal spray carefully and under adult supervision. Oxymetazoline is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by narrowing the blood vessels in the nasal passages.

  3. Persistence of nasal colonization with human pathogenic bacteria and associated antimicrobial resistance in the German general population.

    PubMed

    Köck, R; Werner, P; Friedrich, A W; Fegeler, C; Becker, K

    2016-01-01

    The nares represent an important bacterial reservoir for endogenous infections. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of nasal colonization by different important pathogens, the associated antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1878 nonhospitalized volunteers recruited from the general population in Germany. Participants provided nasal swabs at three time points (each separated by 4-6 months). Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and important nonfermenters were cultured and subjected to susceptibility testing. Factors potentially influencing bacterial colonization patterns were assessed. The overall prevalence of S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenters was 41.0, 33.4 and 3.7%, respectively. Thirteen participants (0.7%) were colonized with methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Enterobacteriaceae were mostly (>99%) susceptible against ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (100%). Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing isolates were not detected among Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Several lifestyle- and health-related factors (e.g. household size, travel, livestock density of the residential area or occupational livestock contact, atopic dermatitis, antidepressant or anti-infective drugs) were associated with colonization by different microorganisms. This study unexpectedly demonstrated high nasal colonization rates with Enterobacteriaceae in the German general population, but rates of antibiotic resistance were low. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage was rare but highly associated with occupational livestock contact. PMID:26862431

  4. Systemic, nasal and oral live vaccines against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a clinical trial of immunogenicity in lower airways of human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bumann, Dirk; Behre, Christoph; Behre, Katharina; Herz, Steffen; Gewecke, Britta; Gessner, J Engelbert; von Specht, Bernd Ulrich; Baumann, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a desirable, yet challenging strategy for prevention of airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We compared the formation of antibodies in lower airways induced by systemic and mucosal vaccination strategies. We immunised 48 volunteers in six vaccination groups with either a systemic, a nasal, or four newly constructed oral live vaccines based on attenuated live Salmonella (strains CVD908 and Ty21a), followed by a systemic booster vaccination. All vaccines were based on a recombinant fusion protein of the highly conserved P. aeruginosa outer membrane proteins OprF and OprI as antigen. While systemic and mucosal vaccines induced a comparable rise of serum antibody titers, a significant rise of IgA and IgG antibodies in the lower airways was noted only after nasal and oral vaccinations. We conclude that nasal and oral OprF-OprI vaccines are promising candidates for development of antipseudomonal immunisation through inducing a specific antibody response in the lung. PMID:19887136

  5. Persistence of nasal colonization with human pathogenic bacteria and associated antimicrobial resistance in the German general population

    PubMed Central

    Köck, R.; Werner, P.; Friedrich, A.W.; Fegeler, C.; Becker, K.; Bindewald, O.; Bui, T.T.; Eckhoff, C.; Epping, R.; Kähmann, L.; Meurer, M.; Steger, J.; von Auenmüller, L.

    2015-01-01

    The nares represent an important bacterial reservoir for endogenous infections. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of nasal colonization by different important pathogens, the associated antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1878 nonhospitalized volunteers recruited from the general population in Germany. Participants provided nasal swabs at three time points (each separated by 4–6 months). Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and important nonfermenters were cultured and subjected to susceptibility testing. Factors potentially influencing bacterial colonization patterns were assessed. The overall prevalence of S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenters was 41.0, 33.4 and 3.7%, respectively. Thirteen participants (0.7%) were colonized with methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Enterobacteriaceae were mostly (>99%) susceptible against ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (100%). Extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing isolates were not detected among Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Several lifestyle- and health-related factors (e.g. household size, travel, livestock density of the residential area or occupational livestock contact, atopic dermatitis, antidepressant or anti-infective drugs) were associated with colonization by different microorganisms. This study unexpectedly demonstrated high nasal colonization rates with Enterobacteriaceae in the German general population, but rates of antibiotic resistance were low. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage was rare but highly associated with occupational livestock contact. PMID:26862431

  6. Specific Induction of TSLP by the Viral RNA Analogue Poly(I:C) in Primary Epithelial Cells Derived from Nasal Polyps

    PubMed Central

    van Egmond, Danielle; de Groot, Esther J.; Fokkens, Wytske J.; van Drunen, Cornelis M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis is an inflammatory disease that, although not directly linked to allergy, often displays a Th2-skewed inflammation characterized by elevated local IgE and IL-5 levels. The nasal cavity is constantly exposed to bacteria and viruses that may trigger epithelial inflammatory responses. To gain more insight into mechanisms by which such a biased inflammation might arise, we have investigated the epithelial expression of the Th2 skewing mediators (TSLP, IL-25, and IL-33) in relationship to disease and microbial triggers. Methods Epithelial cells were obtained from polyp tissues of nasal polyposis patients and from inferior turbinates of non-diseased controls. Cells were exposed to various TLR-specific triggers to study the effect on mRNA and protein expression level of TSLP, IL-25, and IL-33 and the potential regulatory mechanisms through the expression profile the transcription factors ATF-3, DUSP-1, EGR-1, and NFKB-1. Results The TLR3 agonist and viral analogue poly(I:C) induced TSLP mRNA 13.0 ± 3.1 fold (p < 0.05) and protein expression by 12.1 ± 2.3-fold (p < 0.05) higher in epithelium isolated from nasal polyposis patients than in epithelium form healthy controls. This enhanced induction of TSLP may be a consequence of a down-regulated expression of DUSP-1 in polyp epithelium. Conclusion The TLR3 induced expression of TSLP introduces a mechanism by which the Th2-skewed tissue environment might arise in nasal polyps and invites a further evaluation of the potential contribution of current or past viral infections to polyposis pathogenesis. PMID:27050744

  7. The nasal cavity microbiota of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbiota of the nares has been widely studied. However, relatively few studies have investigated the microbiota of the nasal cavity posterior to the nares. This distinct environment has the potential to contain a distinct microbiota and play an important role in health. Results We obtained 35,142 high-quality bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequence reads from the nasal cavity and oral cavity (the dorsum of the tongue and the buccal mucosa) of 12 healthy adult humans and deposited these data in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) (Bioproject: PRJNA248297). In our initial analysis, we compared the bacterial communities of the nasal cavity and the oral cavity from ten of these subjects. The nasal cavity bacterial communities were dominated by Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria and were statistically distinct from those on the tongue and buccal mucosa. For example, the same Staphylococcaceae operational taxonomic unit (OTU) was present in all of the nasal cavity samples, comprising up to 55% of the community, but Staphylococcaceae was comparatively uncommon in the oral cavity. Conclusions There are clear differences between nasal cavity microbiota and oral cavity microbiota in healthy adults. This study expands our knowledge of the nasal cavity microbiota and the relationship between the microbiota of the nasal and oral cavities. PMID:25143824

  8. Nasal Tip Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerkes, Nazim

    2016-01-01

    Nasal tip deficiency can be congenital or secondary to previous nasal surgeries. Underdeveloped medial crura usually present with underprojected tip and lack of tip definition. Weakness or malposition of lateral crura causes alar rim retraction and lateral nasal wall weakness. Structural grafting of alar cartilages strengthens the tip framework, reinforces the disrupted support mechanisms, and controls the position of the nasal tip. In secondary cases, anatomic reconstruction of the weakened or interrupted alar cartilages and reconstitution of a stable nasal tip tripod must be the goal for a predictable outcome. PMID:26616702

  9. Comparative pathology of the nasal mucosa in laboratory animals exposed to inhaled irritants

    SciTech Connect

    Harkema, J.R. )

    1990-04-01

    The nasal cavity is susceptible to chemically induced injury as a result of exposure to inhaled irritants. Some responses of the nasal mucosa to inhaled toxicants are species specific. These species-related differences in response may be due to variations in structural, physiologic, and biochemical factors, such as gross nasal cavity structure, distribution of luminal epithelial cell populations along the nasal airway, intranasal airflow patterns, nasal mucociliary apparatus, and nasal xenobiotic metabolism among animal species. This paper reviews the comparative anatomy and irritant-induced pathology of the nasal cavity in laboratory animals. The toxicologist, pathologist, and environmental risk assessor must have a good working knowledge of the similarities and differences in normal nasal structure and response to injury among species before they can select animal models for nasal toxicity studies, recognize toxicant-induced lesions in the nasal airway, and extrapolate experimental results to estimate the possible effects of an inhaled toxicant on the human nasal airway.

  10. Integrated Modular Teaching of Human Biology for Primary Care Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Michael S.

    1977-01-01

    Describes the use of integrated modular teaching of the human biology component of the Health Associate Program at Johns Hopkins University, where the goal is to develop an understanding of the sciences as applied to primary care. Discussion covers the module sequence, the human biology faculty, goals of the human biology faculty, laboratory…

  11. Free Auricular Composite Graft for Acquired Nasal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Charles A.; Lawlor, Claire M.; Gray, Mingyang Liu; Graham, H. Devon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acquired nasal stenosis poses a reconstructive challenge for the facial plastic surgeon. Many surgical options are available, ranging from primary closure to skin grafts to free flap reconstruction for complex defects. The free auricular composite graft is a single-stage procedure that can be used to repair nasal vestibular stenosis causing nasal obstruction. Case Report: We present the case of a patient with acquired nasal stenosis as a result of prolonged nasal tampon placement secondary to severe epistaxis and subsequent nasal vestibular infection. Repair via auricular composite graft was successful, and we provide a thorough explanation of graft design and operative technique. Conclusion: Free auricular composite grafts can produce desirable functional and aesthetic outcomes and should be considered in patients presenting with acquired nasal stenosis. PMID:27303225

  12. Computational Study of Human Head Response to Primary Blast Waves of Five Levels from Three Directions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D.; Miller, Mark C.; Wood, Adam R.; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts. PMID:25409326

  13. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D; Miller, Mark C; Wood, Adam R; Vipperman, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts. PMID:25409326

  14. Deposition of {open_quotes}unattached{close_quotes} radon daughters in models of human nasal and oral airways

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, J.C.; Swift, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    In order to estimate accurately an effective dose equivalent for exposures to radon daughters, knowledge of their deposition in the lung is required. However, the nose and mouth are effective filters for removing aerosol particles, especially in the range of sizes of {open_quotes}unattached{close_quotes} radon daughters. Therefore, it is equally important to have reliable data on deposition in this region of the respiratory tract. We will describe our work in studying nasal and oral deposition of {open_quotes}unattached{close_quotes} radon daughters in casts of these airways. Several hollow casts of adult and child nasal and oral airways were fabricated at The John Hopkins University from layers of Perspect{trademark} (an acrylic plastic). The shapes of the airway passages were obtained from nuclear magnetic resonance sectional images of healthy subjects. The casts were exposed to radon gas and daughters produced by flushing filtered air through a commercially available {sup 226}Ra source. The gas stream was drawn through a 1.4-L cylindrical tube to allow measurable growth of {sup 218}Po activity before it was passed through casts of both nasal passages or the oral cavity. The deposition of {open_quotes}unattached{close_quotes} {sup 218}Po was measured by comparing the activity collected on filters mounted in series and in parallel with a cast. Measurements were made at various flow rates (Q; 4 to 20 L min{sup -1}). The diffusion coefficient (D) of {sup 218}Po was measured each time the flow rate was changed, by replacing the cast with a stainless steel gauze screen and measuring the activity penetrating the screen. The measured diffusion coefficient ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 cm{sup 2} s{sup -1} and was found to vary with the residence time of {sup 218}Po in the growth tube. The deposition efficiency ({eta}) of {sup 218}Po measured in these casts ranged from 50 to 70%, and was similar to values we found previously, using casts of nasal and oral airways from cadavers.

  15. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  16. Nasal Septal Deviation and Facial Skeletal Asymmetries.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Christopher; Holton, Nathan; Miller, Steven; Yokley, Todd; Marshall, Steven; Srinivasan, Sreedevi; Southard, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    During ontogeny, the nasal septum exerts a morphogenetic influence on the surrounding facial skeleton. While the influence of the septum is well established in long snouted animal models, its role in human facial growth is less clear. If the septum is a facial growth center in humans, we would predict that deviated septal growth would be associated with facial skeletal asymmetries. Using computed tomographic (CT) scans of n = 55 adult subjects, the purpose of this study was to test whether there is a correlation between septal deviation and facial asymmetries using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric techniques. We calculated deviation as a percentage of septal volume relative to the volume of a modeled non-deviated septum. We then recorded skeletal landmarks representing the nasal, palatal, and lateral facial regions. Landmark data were superimposed using Procrustes analysis. First, we examined the correlation between nasal septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry. Next, we assessed whether there was a relationship between nasal septal deviation and more localized aspects of asymmetry using multivariate regression analysis. Our results indicate that while there was no correlation between septal deviation and the overall magnitude of asymmetry, septal deviation was associated with asymmetry primarily in the nasal floor and the palatal region. Septal deviation was unassociated with asymmetries in the lateral facial skeleton. Though we did not test the causal relationship between nasal septal deviation and facial asymmetry, our results suggest that the nasal septum may have an influence on patterns of adult facial form. PMID:26677010

  17. Low prevalence of oral and nasal human papillomavirus in employees performing CO2-laser evaporation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure of cervical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Kristian; Norrbom, Christina; Forslund, Ola; Møller, Charlotte; Frøding, Ligita P; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Markauskas, Algirdas; Blomberg, Maria; Baumgartner-Nielsen, Jane; Madsen, Jakob Torp; Strauss, Gitte; Madsen, Klaus G; Sand, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    Risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) transmission during laser vaporisation of genital warts or loop electrode excision procedure is controversial. An oral rinse, a nasal swabs, history of HPV related diseases and data on HPV exposure were collected from 287 employees at departments of dermato-venerology and gynaecology in Denmark. A mucosal HPV type was found among 5.8% of employees with experience of laser treatment of genital warts as compared to 1.7% of those with no experience (p = 0.12). HPV prevalence was not higher in employees participating in electrosurgical treatment or cryotherapy of genital warts, or loop electrode excision procedure compared with those who did not. HPV 6 or 11 were not detected in any samples. Hand warts after the age of 24 years was more common among dermatology than among non-dermatology personnel (18% vs. 8.0%, p = 0.03). Mucosal HPV types are infrequent in the oral and nasal cavity of health care personnel, however, employees at departments of dermato-venereology are at risk of acquiring hand warts. PMID:24941064

  18. Correlation between nasal membrane permeability and nasal absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hefei; Lin, Chih-Wei; Donovan, Maureen D

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between in vitro permeability (Papp) values obtained from isolated nasal tissues and the absorption rates (ka) of the same compounds following nasal administration in animals and humans. The Papp of a set of 11 drug compounds was measured using animal nasal explants and plasma time-concentration profiles for each of the same compounds following intravenous (IV) and intranasal (IN) administration were experimentally determined or obtained from literature reports. The plasma clearance was estimated from the IV plasma time-concentration profiles, and ka was determined from the IN plasma time-concentration profiles using a deconvolution approach. The level of correlation between Papp and ka was established using Pearson correlation analysis. A good correlation (r=0.77) representing a point-to-point relationship for each of the compounds was observed. This result indicates that the nasal absorption for many drug candidates can be estimated from a readily measured in vitro Papp value. PMID:23225081

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Nasal Epithelial Cells from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Papon, Jean-François; Chhuon, Cerina; Zadigue, Patricia; Prulière-Escabasse, Virginie; Amselem, Serge; Escudier, Estelle; Coste, André; Edelman, Aleksander

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease remains incompletely understood. New explanations for the pathogenesis of CF lung disease may be discovered by studying the patterns of protein expression in cultured human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC). To that aim, we compared the level of protein expressions in primary cultures of HNEC from nasal polyps secondary to CF (CFNP, n = 4), primary nasal polyps (NP, n = 8) and control mucosa (CTRL, n = 4) using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with liquid chromatography (LC)-MS-MS. The analysis of the data revealed 42 deregulated protein expressions in CFNP compared to NP and CTRL, suggesting that these alterations are related to CF. Overall, AmiGo analysis highlighted six major pathways important for cell functions that seem to be impaired: metabolism, G protein process, inflammation and oxidative stress response, protein folding, proteolysis and structural proteins. Among them, glucose and fatty acid metabolic pathways could be impaired in CF with nine deregulated proteins. Our proteomic study provides a reproducible set of differentially expressed proteins in airway epithelial cells from CF patients and reveals many novel deregulated proteins that could lead to further studies aiming to clarify the involvement of such proteins in CF pathophysiology. PMID:25268127

  20. Nasal vs oral intubation.

    PubMed

    Holzapfel, L

    2003-05-01

    Both nasal and oral route for intubation have advantages and disadvantages. Oral intubation is easier to perform, faster and less painful than nasal intubation under direct laryngoscopy, while blind nasal intubation represents a good alternative in conscious patient, without sedation. In trauma patient, oral route should be preferred, with cervical immobilisation. By the contrary, nasal intubation can cause bleeding, retro-pharyngeal and turbinate bones injury, but it seems preferable in preventing laryngeal complications. Moreover nasal intubation seem to increase risk for sinusitis while, there is no clear advantage for any of the two routes, concerning nosocomial pneumonia, bacteriemia and otitis. Nevertheless nasal route increases comfort for the patient and decreases injury and necrosis of tongue and lips; tube fastening is simpler thus reducing accidental extubation. PMID:12768165

  1. Nonneoplastic nasal lesions in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Monticello, T M; Morgan, K T; Uraih, L

    1990-01-01

    Rodents are commonly used for inhalation toxicology studies, but until recently the nasal passages have often been overlooked or only superficially examined. The rodent nose is a complex organ in which toxicant-induced lesions may vary, depending on the test compound. A working knowledge of rodent nasal anatomy and histology is essential for the proper evaluation of these responses. Lack of a systematic approach for examining rodent nasal tissue has led to a paucity of information regarding nonneoplastic lesions in the rodent nose. Therefore, slides from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) and the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) were examined, and the literature was reviewed to assemble the spectrum of nonneoplastic rodent nasal pathology. Presented are lesions associated with the various types of epithelia lining the rodent nasal cavity plus lesions involving accessory nasal structures. Even though there are anatomic and physiologic differences between the rodent and human nose, both rats and mice provide valuable animal models for the study of nasal epithelial toxicity, following administration of chemical compounds. Images PLATE 1. PLATE 2. PLATE 3. PLATE 4. PLATE 5. PLATE 6. PLATE 7. PLATE 8. PLATE 9. PLATE 10. PLATE 11. PLATE 12. PLATE 13. PLATE 14. PLATE 15. PLATE 16. PLATE 17. PLATE 18. PLATE 19. PLATE 20. PLATE 21. PLATE 22. PLATE 23. PLATE 24. PLATE 25. PLATE 26. PLATE 27. PLATE 28. PLATE 29. PLATE 30. PLATE 31. PLATE 32. PLATE 33. PLATE 34. PLATE 35. PLATE 36. PLATE 37. PLATE 38. PMID:2200665

  2. The multisensory function of the human primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Murray, Micah M; Thelen, Antonia; Thut, Gregor; Romei, Vincenzo; Martuzzi, Roberto; Matusz, Pawel J

    2016-03-01

    It has been nearly 10 years since Ghazanfar and Schroeder (2006) proposed that the neocortex is essentially multisensory in nature. However, it is only recently that sufficient and hard evidence that supports this proposal has accrued. We review evidence that activity within the human primary visual cortex plays an active role in multisensory processes and directly impacts behavioural outcome. This evidence emerges from a full pallet of human brain imaging and brain mapping methods with which multisensory processes are quantitatively assessed by taking advantage of particular strengths of each technique as well as advances in signal analyses. Several general conclusions about multisensory processes in primary visual cortex of humans are supported relatively solidly. First, haemodynamic methods (fMRI/PET) show that there is both convergence and integration occurring within primary visual cortex. Second, primary visual cortex is involved in multisensory processes during early post-stimulus stages (as revealed by EEG/ERP/ERFs as well as TMS). Third, multisensory effects in primary visual cortex directly impact behaviour and perception, as revealed by correlational (EEG/ERPs/ERFs) as well as more causal measures (TMS/tACS). While the provocative claim of Ghazanfar and Schroeder (2006) that the whole of neocortex is multisensory in function has yet to be demonstrated, this can now be considered established in the case of the human primary visual cortex. PMID:26275965

  3. Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production - Can Earth Keep Up?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imhoff, Marc L.

    2006-01-01

    The amount of Earth's vegetation or net primary production required to support human activities is powerful measure of aggregate human impacts on the biosphere. Biophysical models applied to consumption statistics were used to estimate the annual amount of net primary production in the form of elemental carbon required for food, fibre, and fuel-wood by the global population. The calculations were then compared to satellite-based estimates of Earth's average net primary production to produce a geographically explicit balance sheet of net primary production "supply" and "demand". Humans consume 20% of Earth's net primary production (11.5 petagrams carbon) annually and this percentage varies regionally from 6% (South America) to over 70% (Europe and Asia), and locally from near 0% (central Australia) to over 30,000% (New York City, USA). The uneven footprint of human consumption and related environmental impacts, indicate the degree to which human populations are vulnerable to climate change and suggest policy options for slowing future growth of NPP demand.

  4. The crooked nasal tip.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jeremy; Adamson, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Successful treatment of the crooked nasal tip includes proper analysis and assessment, employment of the proper techniques, reaching ideal tip dynamics, and close follow-up. Both the caudal septum and the nasal tip cartilages must be addressed. When executed properly, satisfaction should be high for both the patient and the surgeon. PMID:22028009

  5. Protocol for a human in vivo model of acute cigarette smoke inhalation challenge in smokers with COPD: monitoring the nasal and systemic immune response using a network biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Clare L; Galloway-Phillipps, Neil; Armstrong, Paul C; Mitchell, Jane A; Warner, Timothy D; Brearley, Christopher; Ito, Mari; Tunstall, Tanushree; Elkin, Sarah; Kon, Onn Min; Hansel, Trevor T; Paul-Clark, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cigarette smoke contributes to a diverse range of diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disorders and many cancers. There currently is a need for human challenge models, to assess the acute effects of a controlled cigarette smoke stimulus, followed by serial sampling of blood and respiratory tissue for advanced molecular profiling. We employ precision sampling of nasal mucosal lining fluid by absorption to permit soluble mediators measurement in eluates. Serial nasal curettage was used for transcriptomic analysis of mucosal tissue. Methods and analysis Three groups of strictly defined patients will be studied: 12 smokers with COPD (GOLD Stage 2) with emphysema, 12 matched smokers with normal lung function and no evidence of emphysema, and 12 matched never smokers with normal spirometry. Patients in the smoking groups are current smokers, and will be given full support to stop smoking immediately after this study. In giving a controlled cigarette smoke stimulus, all patients will have abstained from smoking for 12 h, and will smoke two cigarettes with expiration through the nose in a ventilated chamber. Before and after inhalation of cigarette smoke, a series of samples will be taken from the blood, nasal mucosal lining fluid and nasal tissue by curettage. Analysis of plasma nicotine and metabolites in relation to levels of soluble inflammatory mediators in nasal lining fluid and blood, as well as assessing nasal transcriptomics, ex vivo blood platelet aggregation and leucocyte responses to toll-like receptor agonists will be undertaken. Implications Development of acute cigarette smoke challenge models has promise for the study of molecular effects of smoking in a range of pathological processes. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the West London National Research Ethics Committee (12/LO/1101). The study findings will be presented at conferences and will be reported in peer-reviewed journals

  6. Nasal PMN response to repeated challenge with endotoxin in healthy volunteers**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Rationale: We have employed nasal challenge with Iipopolysaccharid (lPS) followed by nasal lavage (NU to experimentally induce and examine upper airway inflammation in human volunteers.It is unclear however whether adaptation within individuals occurs following repeated ...

  7. Comparison of Nasal Acceleration and Nasalance across Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Elias B.; Virnik, Boris T.; Stepp, Cara E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of normalized nasal acceleration (NNA) relative to nasalance as estimates of nasalized versus nonnasalized vowel and sentence productions. Method: Participants were 18 healthy speakers of American English. NNA was measured using a custom sensor, and nasalance was measured using…

  8. Similarity and Enhancement: Nasality from Moroccan Arabic Pharyngeals and Nasals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellou, Georgia Eve

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies of the articulation, acoustics, and perception of nasal and pharyngeal consonants and adjacent vowels were conducted to investigate nasality in Moroccan Arabic (MA). The status of nasality in MA is described as coarticulatorily complex, where two phoneme types (pharyngeal segments and nasal segments) yield similar…

  9. Efficacy of a Carrageenan nasal spray in patients with common cold: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The common cold is the most widespread viral infection in humans. Iota-carrageenan has previously shown antiviral effectiveness against cold viruses in clinical trials. This study investigated the efficacy of a carrageenan-containing nasal spray on the duration of the common cold and nasal fluid viral load in adult patients. Methods In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 211 patients suffering from early symptoms of the common cold were treated for seven days. Application was performed three times daily with either a carrageenan-supplemented nasal spray or saline solution as placebo with an overall observation period of 21 days. The primary endpoint was the duration of disease defined as the time until the last day with symptoms followed by all other days in the study period without symptoms. During the study, but prior unblinding, the definition of disease duration was adapted from the original protocol that defines disease duration as the time period of symptoms followed by 48 hours without symptoms. Results In patients showing a laboratory-confirmed cold virus infection and adherence to the protocol, alleviation of symptoms was 2.1 days faster in the carrageenan group in comparison to placebo (p = 0.037). The primary endpoint that had been prespecified but was changed before unblinding was not met. Viral titers in nasal fluids showed a significantly greater decrease in carrageenan patients in the intention-to-treat population (p = 0.024) and in the per protocol population (p = 0.018) between days 1 and 3/4. Conclusions In adults with common cold virus infections, direct local administration of carrageenan with nasal sprays reduced the duration of cold symptoms. A significant reduction of viral load in the nasal wash fluids of patients confirmed similar findings from earlier trials in children and adults. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80148028 PMID:24219370

  10. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-01-01

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health. PMID:24713325

  11. Young Scientists Explore the Human Body. Book 11 Primary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Linda

    Designed to present interesting facts about science and to heighten the curiosity of primary age students, this book contains activities about the natural world and numerous black and white illustrations. The activities specifically focus on the human body and encourage a positive self-concept. The theme of the first section is air--the breath of…

  12. Pharmacotherapy of nasal disease.

    PubMed

    Mygind, N

    1985-01-01

    Rhinitis may be classified as infectious (purulent), seasonal allergic, perennial allergic, perennial nonallergic (vasomotor) and nasal polyps. Pharmacotherapy can be local or systemic. A variety of compounds are available, including alpha adrenergic agonists, mast cell stabilizing agents, Beta-2 agonists, antihistamines, cholinergic antagonists and corticosteroids. In terms of histamine receptors, H1 receptors predominate in the epithelium and glands but both H1 and H2 receptors are present in nasal blood vessels. Trigeminus-reflex mediated nasal secretions, can be treated by parasympatholytic drugs. PMID:2888012

  13. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Coppel, R.L.; McNeilage, L.J.; Surh, C.D.; Van De Water, J.; Spithill, T.W.; Whittingham, S.; Gershwin, M.E. )

    1988-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a M{sub r} 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects.

  14. In vivo microvascular imaging of human oral and nasal cavities using swept-source optical coherence tomography with a single forward/side viewing probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    We report three-dimensional (3D) imaging of microcirculation within human cavity tissues in vivo using a high-speed swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) at 1.3 μm with a modified probe interface. Volumetric structural OCT images of the inner tissues of oral and nasal cavities are acquired with a field of view of 2 mm x 2 mm. Two types of disposable and detachable probe attachments are devised and applied to the port of the imaging probe of OCT system, enabling forward and side imaging scans for selective and easy access to specific cavity tissue sites. Blood perfusion is mapped with OCT-based microangiography from 3D structural OCT images, in which a novel vessel extraction algorithm is used to decouple dynamic light scattering signals, due to moving blood cells, from the background scattering signals due to static tissue elements. Characteristic tissue anatomy and microvessel architectures of various cavity tissue regions of a healthy human volunteer are identified with the 3D OCT images and the corresponding 3D vascular perfusion maps at a level approaching capillary resolution. The initial finding suggests that the proposed method may be engineered into a promising tool for evaluating and monitoring tissue microcirculation and its alteration within a wide-range of cavity tissues in the patients with various pathological conditions.

  15. Antigen-specific modulation of experimental myasthenia gravis: nasal tolerization with recombinant fragments of the human acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit.

    PubMed

    Barchan, D; Souroujon, M C; Im, S H; Antozzi, C; Fuchs, S

    1999-07-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is the major autoantigen. The immune response in these diseases is heterogeneous and is directed to a wide variety of T and B cell epitopes of AcChoR. Candidate molecules for specific immunotherapy of MG should, therefore, have a broad specificity. We used recombinant fragments of the human AcChoR, encompassing the extracellular domain of the alpha-subunit, or shorter fragments derived from it, in experiments to modulate EAMG. We have demonstrated that intranasal administration of these recombinant fragments, which represent a major portion of epitopes involved in MG, prevents the induction of EAMG in rats and immunosuppresses an ongoing disease, as assessed by clinical symptoms, weight loss, and muscle AcChoR content. These effects on EAMG were accompanied by a marked reduction in the proliferative T-cell response and IL-2 production in response to AcChoR, in reduced anti-self AcChoR antibody titers and in an isotype switch of AcChoR-specific antibodies, from IgG2 to IgG1. We conclude that nasal tolerance induced by appropriate recombinant fragments of human AcChoR is effective in suppressing EAMG and might possibly be considered as a therapeutic modality for MG. PMID:10393952

  16. Antigen-specific modulation of experimental myasthenia gravis: Nasal tolerization with recombinant fragments of the human acetylcholine receptor α-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Barchan, Dora; Souroujon, Miriam C.; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Antozzi, Carlo; Fuchs, Sara

    1999-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) and experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) are antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases in which the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR) is the major autoantigen. The immune response in these diseases is heterogeneous and is directed to a wide variety of T and B cell epitopes of AcChoR. Candidate molecules for specific immunotherapy of MG should, therefore, have a broad specificity. We used recombinant fragments of the human AcChoR, encompassing the extracellular domain of the α-subunit, or shorter fragments derived from it, in experiments to modulate EAMG. We have demonstrated that intranasal administration of these recombinant fragments, which represent a major portion of epitopes involved in MG, prevents the induction of EAMG in rats and immunosuppresses an ongoing disease, as assessed by clinical symptoms, weight loss, and muscle AcChoR content. These effects on EAMG were accompanied by a marked reduction in the proliferative T-cell response and IL-2 production in response to AcChoR, in reduced anti-self AcChoR antibody titers and in an isotype switch of AcChoR-specific antibodies, from IgG2 to IgG1. We conclude that nasal tolerance induced by appropriate recombinant fragments of human AcChoR is effective in suppressing EAMG and might possibly be considered as a therapeutic modality for MG. PMID:10393952

  17. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene knockout in primary human airway epithelial cells reveals a proinflammatory role for MUC18.

    PubMed

    Chu, H W; Rios, C; Huang, C; Wesolowska-Andersen, A; Burchard, E G; O'Connor, B P; Fingerlin, T E; Nichols, D; Reynolds, S D; Seibold, M A

    2015-10-01

    Targeted knockout of genes in primary human cells using CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-editing represents a powerful approach to study gene function and to discern molecular mechanisms underlying complex human diseases. We used lentiviral delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 machinery and conditional reprogramming culture methods to knockout the MUC18 gene in human primary nasal airway epithelial cells (AECs). Massively parallel sequencing technology was used to confirm that the genome of essentially all cells in the edited AEC populations contained coding region insertions and deletions (indels). Correspondingly, we found mRNA expression of MUC18 was greatly reduced and protein expression was absent. Characterization of MUC18 knockout cell populations stimulated with TLR2, 3 and 4 agonists revealed that IL-8 (a proinflammatory chemokine) responses of AECs were greatly reduced in the absence of functional MUC18 protein. Our results show the feasibility of CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene knockouts in AEC culture (both submerged and polarized), and suggest a proinflammatory role for MUC18 in airway epithelial response to bacterial and viral stimuli. PMID:26043872

  18. RANK and RANK ligand expression in primary human osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Branstetter, Daniel; Rohrbach, Kathy; Huang, Li-Ya; Soriano, Rosalia; Tometsko, Mark; Blake, Michelle; Jacob, Allison P; Dougall, William C

    2015-09-01

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) is an essential mediator of osteoclast formation, function and survival. In patients with solid tumor metastasis to the bone, targeting the bone microenvironment by inhibition of RANKL using denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific to RANKL, has been demonstrated to prevent tumor-induced osteolysis and subsequent skeletal complications. Recently, a prominent functional role for the RANKL pathway has emerged in the primary bone tumor giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB). Expression of both RANKL and RANK is extremely high in GCTB tumors and denosumab treatment was associated with tumor regression and reduced tumor-associated bone lysis in GCTB patients. In order to address the potential role of the RANKL pathway in another primary bone tumor, this study assessed human RANKL and RANK expression in human primary osteosarcoma (OS) using specific mAbs, validated and optimized for immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate RANKL expression was observed in the tumor element in 68% of human OS using IHC. However, the staining intensity was relatively low and only 37% (29/79) of samples exhibited≥10% RANKL positive tumor cells. RANK expression was not observed in OS tumor cells. In contrast, RANK expression was clearly observed in other cells within OS samples, including the myeloid osteoclast precursor compartment, osteoclasts and in giant osteoclast cells. The intensity and frequency of RANKL and RANK staining in OS samples were substantially less than that observed in GCTB samples. The observation that RANKL is expressed in OS cells themselves suggests that these tumors may mediate an osteoclastic response, and anti-RANKL therapy may potentially be protective against bone pathologies in OS. However, the absence of RANK expression in primary human OS cells suggests that any autocrine RANKL/RANK signaling in human OS tumor cells is not operative, and anti-RANKL therapy

  19. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by ... is a controlled substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist ...

  20. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... prescribed by your doctor.Ciclesonide nasal spray is only for use in the nose. Do not swallow ...

  1. Measuring Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Jarrod; Most, Sam P

    2016-08-01

    The nose and the nasal airway is highly complex with intricate 3-dimensional anatomy, with multiple functions in respiration and filtration of the respired air. Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a complex problem with no clearly defined "gold-standard" in measurement. There are 3 tools for the measurement of NAO: patient-derived measurements, physician-observed measurements, and objective measurements. We continue to work towards finding a link between subjective and objective nasal obstruction. The field of evaluation and surgical treatment for NAO has grown tremendously in the past 4-5 decades and will continue to grow as we learn more about the pathophysiology and treatment of nasal obstruction. PMID:27400845

  2. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is in a class of ... Olopatadine nasal spray controls the symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis, but does not cure these condition. Continue to ...

  3. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Mometasone nasal spray is in a class of ... taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring ...

  4. Olopatadine Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... relieve sneezing and a stuffy, runny or itchy nose caused by allergic rhinitis (hay fever). Olopatadine is ... comes as a liquid to spray in the nose. Olopatadine nasal spray is usually sprayed in each ...

  5. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to relieve sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused ... treat symptoms (e.g., sneezing, stuffy, runny, itchy nose) caused by the common cold. Budesonide nasal spray ...

  6. Fentanyl Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Fentanyl nasal spray is used to treat breakthrough pain (sudden episodes of pain that occur despite round ... effects of the medication) to narcotic pain medications. Fentanyl is in a class of medications called narcotic ( ...

  7. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  8. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  9. Diversity in primary palate ontogeny of amniotes revealed with 3D imaging.

    PubMed

    Abramyan, John; Thivichon-Prince, Beatrice; Richman, Joy Marion

    2015-05-01

    The amniote primary palate encompasses the upper lip and the nasal cavities. During embryonic development, the primary palate forms from the fusion of the maxillary, medial nasal and lateral nasal prominences. In mammals, as the primary palate fuses, the nasal and oral cavities become completely separated. Subsequently, the tissue demarcating the future internal nares (choanae) thins and becomes the bucconasal membrane, which eventually ruptures and allows for the essential connection of the oral and nasal cavities to form. In reptiles (including birds), the other major amniote group, primary palate ontogeny is poorly studied with respect to prominence fusion, especially the formation of a bucconasal membrane. Using 3D optical projection tomography, we found that the prominences that initiate primary palate formation are similar between mammals and crocodilians but distinct from turtles and lizards, which are in turn similar to each other. Chickens are distinct from all non-avian lineages and instead resemble human embryos in this aspect. The majority of reptiles maintain a communication between the oral and nasal cavities via the choanae during primary palate formation. However, crocodiles appear to have a transient separation between the oral and nasal cavities. Furthermore, the three lizard species examined here, exhibit temporary closure of their external nares via fusion of the lateral nasal prominences with the frontonasal mass, subsequently reopening them just before hatching. The mechanism of the persistent choanal opening was examined in chicken embryos. The mesenchyme posterior/dorsal to the choana had a significant decline in proliferation index, whereas the mesenchyme of the facial processes remained high. This differential proliferation allows the choana to form a channel between the oral and nasal cavities as the facial prominences grow and fuse around it. Our data show that primary palate ontogeny has been modified extensively to support the array of

  10. Humanization policy in primary health care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Junges, José Roque

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze humanization practices in primary health care in the Brazilian Unified Health System according to the principles of the National Humanization Policy. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was carried out, followed by a meta-synthesis, using the following databases: BDENF (nursing database), BDTD (Brazilian digital library of theses and dissertations), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to nursing and allied health literature), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean health care sciences literature), MedLine (International health care sciences literature), PAHO (Pan-American Health Care Organization Library) and SciELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online). The following descriptors were used: Humanization; Humanizing Health Care; Reception: Humanized care: Humanization in health care; Bonding; Family Health Care Program; Primary Care; Public Health and Sistema Único de Saúde (the Brazilian public health care system). Research articles, case studies, reports of experiences, dissertations, theses and chapters of books written in Portuguese, English or Spanish, published between 2003 and 2011, were included in the analysis. RESULTS Among the 4,127 publications found on the topic, 40 studies were evaluated and included in the analysis, producing three main categories: the first referring to the infrastructure and organization of the primary care service, made clear the dissatisfaction with the physical structure and equipment of the services and with the flow of attendance, which can facilitate or make difficult the access. The second, referring to the health work process, showed issues about the insufficient number of professionals, fragmentation of the work processes, the professional profile and responsibility. The third category, referring to the relational technologies, indicated the reception, bonding, listening, respect and dialog with the service users. CONCLUSIONS Although many practices were cited as humanizing they do not produce changes

  11. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  12. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  13. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  14. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  15. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  16. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  17. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  18. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  19. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  20. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  1. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-02-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  2. Human alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pu; Wu, Songling; Li, Jianchun; Fu, Wei; He, Weiqun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Slutsky, Arthur S; Zhang, Haibo; Li, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells are a key structure and defender in the lung but also are the targets in many lung diseases, including acute respiratory distress syndrome, ventilator-induced lung injury, and pulmonary fibrosis. We sought to establish an optimized method for high yielding and long maintenance of characteristics of primary human AEII cells to facilitate the investigation of the mechanisms of lung diseases at the cellular and molecular levels. Adult human peripheral normal lung tissues of oncologic patients undergoing lung resection were collected. The AEII cells were isolated and identified by the expression of pro-surfactant protein (SP)C, epithelial sodium channel (αENaC) and cytokeratin (CK)-8, the lamellar bodies specific for AEII cells, and confirmed by the histology using electron microscopy. The phenotype of AEII cells was characterized by the expression of surfactant proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D), CK-8, KL-6, αENaC, and aquaporin (AQP)-3, which was maintained over 20 days. The biological activity of the primary human AEII cells producing SP-C, cytokines, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was vigorous in response to stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-α. We have modified previous methods and optimized a method for isolation of high purity and long maintenance of the human AEII cell phenotype in primary culture. This method provides an important tool for studies aiming at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of lung diseases exclusively in AEII cells. PMID:25677546

  3. Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsillar tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Kathleen; Radabaugh, Rebecca; Coad, James E.

    2011-03-01

    Clinical implementation of a thermal therapy requires the ability to predict tissue injury following exposures to specific thermal histories. As part of an effort to develop a nonexcisional alternative to tonsillectomy, the degree of primary hyperthermic tissue injury in human tonsil was characterized. Fifteen fresh pediatric hypertrophic tonsillectomy specimens were sectioned and treated in a NIST-calibrated saline bath at temperatures of 40 to 70°C with hold times of one to seven minutes. The treated tissues were subsequently nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) stained to assess for thermal respiratory enzyme inactivation as a marker of cellular injury/death. The NBT stains were quantitatively image analyzed and used to calculate Arrhenius parameters for primary thermal injury in human tonsils.

  4. Serum-free primary human fibroblast and keratinocyte coculture.

    PubMed

    Mujaj, Sally; Manton, Kerry; Upton, Zee; Richards, Sean

    2010-04-01

    Research has shown that the inclusion of a fibroblast cell support layer is required for the isolation and expansion of primary keratinocytes. Recent advances have provided keratinocyte culture with fibroblast-free alternatives. However, these technologies are often undefined and rely on the incorporation of purified proteins/components. To address this problem we developed a medium that used recombinant proteins to support the serum-free isolation and expansion of human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes. The human dermal fibroblasts were able to be isolated serum free by adding recombinant human albumin to a collagenase solution. These fibroblasts were then expanded using a serum-free medium containing recombinant proteins: epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, chimeric vitronectin:insulin-like growth factor-I protein, and recombinant human albumin. These fibroblasts maintained a typical morphology and expressed fibroblast markers during their serum-free isolation, expansion, and freezing. Moreover, these fibroblasts were able to support the serum-free isolation and expansion of primary keratinocytes using these recombinant proteins. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that there were no differences in expression levels of p63 or keratins 1, 6, and 10 when keratinocytes were grown in either serum-supplemented or serum-free medium. Using a three-dimensional human skin equivalent model we demonstrated that these keratinocytes also maintained their ability to reform an epidermal layer. In summary, the techniques described provide a valuable alternative for culturing fibroblasts and keratinocytes using recombinant proteins. PMID:19929322

  5. Nasal vaccine innovation.

    PubMed

    Jabbal-Gill, Inderjit

    2010-12-01

    The current vaccine market is gaining momentum in the development of alternative administration routes namely intranasal, oral, topical, pulmonary, vaginal, and rectal; the nasal route offers the most promising opportunity for vaccine administration. It can enhance convenience, safety, elicit both local and systemic immune responses; thus potentially provide protection from pathogens at the site of entry. Nasal vaccine innovation comes with both opportunities and challenges. The innovative strategies used by industry and researchers to overcome the hurdles are discussed in this article: these include live-attenuated vaccines, adjuvants, mucoadhesives, particulate delivery systems, virus-like particles, vaccine manufacture, challenges of regulatory authorities, and the nasal vaccine impact on market potential. Critical issues for effective nasal vaccination are the antigen-retention period that enables its interaction with the lymphatic system and choice of an adjuvant that is nontoxic and induces the required immune response. Co-adjuvanting by means of a mucoadhesive technology addresses some of these issues. ChiSys(®), a natural bioadhesive with proven intranasal safety profile, has already demonstrated efficacy for several nasally delivered vaccines including norovirus. With the looming threat of a pandemic, alternatives such as intranasal vaccination will ultimately facilitate greater public compliance and rapid mass global vaccination. PMID:21047271

  6. The Nature of the Attenuation of Salmonella typhimurium Strains Expressing Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Virus-Like Particles Determines the Systemic and Mucosal Antibody Responses in Nasally Immunized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Benyacoub, Jalil; Hopkins, Sally; Potts, Alexandra; Kelly, Sandra; Kraehenbuhl, Jean-Pierre; Curtiss, Roy; De Grandi, Pierre; Nardelli-Haefliger, Denise

    1999-01-01

    We have recently shown by using a recombinant Salmonella typhimurium PhoPc strain in mice the feasibility of using a Salmonella-based vaccine to prevent infection by the genital human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16). Here, we compare the HPV16-specific antibody responses elicited by nasal immunization with recombinant S. typhimurium strains harboring attenuations that, in contrast to PhoPc, are suitable for human use. For this purpose, χ4989 (Δcya Δcrp) and χ4990 [Δcya Δ(crp-cdt)] were constructed in the ATCC 14028 genetic background, and comparison was made with the isogenic PhoPc and PhoP− strains. Although the levels of expression of HPV16 virus-like particle (VLP) were similar in all strains, only PhoPc HPV16 induced sustained specific antibody responses after nasal immunization, while all strains induced high antibody responses with a single nasal immunization when an unrelated viral hepatitis B core antigen was expressed. The level of the specific antibody responses induced did not correlate with the number of recombinant bacteria surviving in various organs 2 weeks after immunization. Our data suggest that the immunogenicity of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains does not correlate with either the number of persisting bacteria after immunization or the levels of in vitro expression of the antigen carried. Rather, the PhoPc phenotype appears to provide the unique ability in Salmonella to induce immune responses against HPV16 VLPs. PMID:10377159

  7. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T.; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection. PMID:27306590

  8. Transcriptional comparison of human induced and primary midbrain dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ninuo; Zhang, Pengbo; Fang, Fang; Wang, Zhengyuan; Rothstein, Megan; Angulo, Benjamin; Chiang, Rosaria; Taylor, James; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of induced dopaminergic (iDA) neurons may provide a significant step forward towards cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD). To study and compare transcriptional programs of induced cells versus primary DA neurons is a preliminary step towards characterizing human iDA neurons. We have optimized a protocol to efficiently generate iDA neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). We then sequenced the transcriptomes of iDA neurons derived from 6 different hPSC lines and compared them to that of primary midbrain (mDA) neurons. We identified a small subset of genes with altered expression in derived iDA neurons from patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). We also observed that iDA neurons differ significantly from primary mDA neurons in global gene expression, especially in genes related to neuron maturation level. Results suggest iDA neurons from patient iPSCs could be useful for basic and translational studies, including in vitro modeling of PD. However, further refinement of methods of induction and maturation of neurons may better recapitulate full development of mDA neurons from hPSCs. PMID:26842779

  9. Cosmetic and Functional Nasal Deformities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  10. Axonal Degeneration in Dental Pulp Precedes Human Primary Teeth Exfoliation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Lovera, M; Schmachtenberg, O; Couve, E

    2015-10-01

    The dental pulp in human primary teeth is densely innervated by a plethora of nerve endings at the coronal pulp-dentin interface. This study analyzed how the physiological root resorption (PRR) process affects dental pulp innervation before exfoliation of primary teeth. Forty-four primary canine teeth, classified into 3 defined PRR stages (early, middle, and advanced) were fixed and demineralized. Longitudinal cryosections of each tooth were stained for immunohistochemical and quantitative analysis of dental pulp nerve fibers and associated components with confocal and electron microscopy. During PRR, axonal degeneration was prominent and progressive in a Wallerian-like scheme, comprising nerve fiber bundles and nerve endings within the coronal and root pulp. Neurofilament fragmentation increased significantly during PRR progression and was accompanied by myelin degradation and a progressive loss of myelinated axons. Myelin sheath degradation involved activation of autophagic activity by Schwann cells to remove myelin debris. These cells expressed a sequence of responses comprising dedifferentiation, proliferative activity, GAP-43 overexpression, and Büngner band formation. During the advanced PRR stage, increased immune cell recruitment within the dental pulp and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II upregulation by Schwann cells characterized an inflammatory condition associated with the denervation process in preexfoliative primary teeth. The ensuing loss of dental pulp axons is likely to be responsible for the progressive reduction of sensory function of the dental pulp during preexfoliative stages. PMID:26149320

  11. Nasal reconstruction after epithelioma.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Camps, S

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present our procedure for the treatment, histopathological diagnosis, and resection of skin cancer in the nasal pyramid and its subsequent reconstruction. Because we are dealing with the most important anatomical feature of the face our goal is an aesthetic reconstruction [2,4] according to the anatomical subunits criterion of Burget [3]. First, a histopathological diagnosis is made to determine the nature of the tumor. Then, we proceed with the resection according to the Mohs Micrographic Surgery [1,5,7]. Then we begin with the first step of the nasal reconstruction. PMID:11568830

  12. Burkholderia pseudomallei induces IL-23 production in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kulsantiwong, Panthong; Pudla, Matsayapan; Boondit, Jitrada; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Dunachie, Susanna J; Chantratita, Narisara; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a gram-negative intracellular bacterium, is a causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium has been shown to induce the innate immune response, particularly pro-inflammatory cytokine production in several of both mouse and human cell types. In the present study, we investigate host immune response in B. pseudomallei-infected primary human monocytes. We discover that wild-type B. pseudomallei is able to survive and multiply inside the primary human monocytes. In contrast, B. pseudomallei LPS mutant, a less virulent strain, is susceptible to host killing during bacterial infection. Moreover, microarray result showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei but not B. pseudomallei LPS mutant is able to activate gene expression of IL-23 as demonstrated by the up-regulation of p19 and p40 subunit expression. Consistent with gene expression analysis, the secretion of IL-23 analyzed by ELISA also showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei induces a significantly higher level of IL-23 secretion than that of B. pseudomallei LPS mutant. These results implied that IL-23 may be an important cytokine for the innate immune response during B. pseudomallei infection. The regulation of IL-23 production may drive the different host innate immune responses between patients and may relate to the severity of melioidosis. PMID:26563410

  13. On the pulpal nerve supply in primary human teeth: evidence for the innervation of primary dentine.

    PubMed

    Egan, C A; Hector, M P; Bishop, M A

    1999-03-01

    The presence of nerves in human tooth pulp has been recognized for over a hundred years, and the innervation of dentine for about 40 years. These observations have been made in permanent teeth. Very few studies have reported on the innervation of the primary pulp and dentine. The purpose of this study was to describe the innervation of the primary tooth pulp-dentine complex. Ten mature primary teeth (one incisor, six canines and three molars) were used. Immediately following extraction they were divided into three sections using a diamond disc and saline coolant. They were then immersion fixed in a solution of formaldehyde and picric acid dissolved in a phosphate buffer pH 7.4). The teeth were then demineralized for 1-3 weeks in formic acid. Following complete demineralization, 30 microns sections were cut on a freezing microtome. Neural tissue was stained using a specific antibody to calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). Sections were mounted on glass slides and examined using light microscopy. No individual nerve fibres were seen in the control sections, suggesting that the method used was specific for CGRP-containing nerve fibres. The primary teeth appeared to be well innervated. Myelinated and unmyelinated nerves were seen. There was a dense but variable subodontoblastic plexus of nerves (plexus of Raschkow) and nerve fibres were seen to leave this to travel towards the odontoblast layer. Most terminated here, but a few penetrated the odontoblast layer to enter predentine and the dentine tubules. The maximum penetration was 125 microns but most terminated within 30 microns of the dentinopulpal junction. The coronal region was more densely innervated than the root. Within the crown the cervical third was the most densely innervated region, followed by the pulp horn and the middle third. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that mature primary tooth contains a pulp which is well innervated and has many nerve endings terminating in or near the odontoblast

  14. Nasalance Norms in Greek Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal…

  15. Airflow, gas deposition, and lesion distribution in the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, K.T.; Monticello, T.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The nasal passages of laboratory animals and man are complex, and lesions induced in the delicate nasal lining by inhaled air pollutants vary considerably in location and nature. The distribution of nasal lesions is generally a consequence of regional deposition of the inhaled material, local tissue susceptibility, or a combination of these factors. Nasal uptake and regional deposition are are influenced by numerous factors including the physical and chemical properties of the inhaled material, such as water solubility and reactivity; airborne concentration and length of exposure; the presence of other air contaminants such as particulate matter; nasal metabolism, and blood and mucus flow. For certain highly water-soluble or reactive gases, nasal airflow patterns play a major role in determining lesion distribution. Studies of nasal airflow in rats and monkeys, using casting and molding techniques combined with a water-dye model, indicate that nasal airflow patterns are responsible for characteristic differences in the distribution of nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde in these species. Local tissue susceptibility is also a complex issue that may be a consequence of many factors, including physiologic and metabolic characteristics of the diverse cell populations that comprise each of the major epithelial types lining the airways. Identification of the principal factors that influence the distribution and nature of nasal lesions is important when attempting the difficult process of determining potential human risks using data derived from laboratory animals. Toxicologic pathologists can contribute to this process by carefully identifying the site and nature of nasal lesions induced by inhaled materials. 61 references.

  16. Involvement of B2 Receptor in Bradykinin-Induced Proliferation and Proinflammatory Effects in Human Nasal Mucosa-Derived Fibroblasts Isolated from Chronic Rhinosinusitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yih-Jeng; Hao, Sheng-Po; Chen, Chih-Li; Lin, Brian J.; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the sinonasal mucosa either accompanied by polyp formation (CRSwNP) or without polyps (CRSsNP). CRSsNP accounts for the majority of CRS cases and is characterized by fibrosis and neutrophilic inflammation. However, the pathogenesis of CRS, especially CRSsNP, remains unclear. Immunohistochemistry of CRSsNP specimens in the present study showed that the submucosa, perivascular areas, and the mucous glands were abundant in fibroblasts. Therefore, we investigated the effects bradykinin (BK), an autacoid known to participate in inflammation, on human CRSsNP nasal mucosa-derived fibroblasts (NMDFs). BK increased CXCL1 and -8 secretion and mRNA expression with EC50 ranging from 0.15~0.35 μM. Moreover, BK enhanced cell proliferation and upregulated the expressions of proinflammatory molecules, including cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2. These functionally caused an increase in monocyte adhesion to fibroblast monolayer. Using pharmacological intervention and BKR siRNA knockdown, we demonstrated that the BK-induced CXCL chemokine release, cell proliferation and COX and CAM expressions were mainly through the B2 receptor (B2R). Accordingly, the B2R was preferentially expressed in the NMDFs than B1R. The B2R was highly expressed in the CRSsNP than the control specimens, while the B1R and kininogen (KNG)/BK expression slightly increased in the CRSsNP mucosa. Collectively, we report here for the first time that fibroblasts, KNG/BK, and BKRs are overexpressed in CRSsNP mucosa and BK upregulates chemokine expression, proliferation, and proinflammatory molecule expression in NMDFs via B2R activation, which lead to a functional increase in monocyte-fibroblast interaction. Our findings reveal a critical role of fibroblast, KNG/BK, and BKRs in the development of CRSsNP. PMID:25970620

  17. [Pharmacological and clinical evalutation of nasal obstruction: application to xylometazoline].

    PubMed

    Pradalier, André

    2006-01-01

    Nasal obstruction, a prominent feature of rhinitis, may be quantified in humans by haemodynamic techniques (measuring local blood flux), static methods (measuring the geometry of nasal cavities) and dynamic methods (assessing the patency of nasal airways through the measure of resistance to air flow). These methods demonstrated the nasal decongestant activity of xylometazoline in healthy volunteers and rhinitis patients. Controlled double-blind studies established the clinical efficacy of xylometazoline in infectious and allergic (seasonal and perennial) rhinitis versus placebo and in comparison with various reference substances. The effects on nasal epithelium ciliary activity which are observed in vitro are modest and even less pronounced in vivo owing to dilution in situ and protective physiological processes. PMID:16792148

  18. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... improve. Follow the directions on your prescription or product label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to ... ingredients in fluticasone nasal spray. Check the package label for a list of the ... and herbal products you are taking, or have recently taken, or ...

  19. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    Ciclesonide nasal spray is used to treat the symptoms of seasonal (occurs only at certain times of the year), and perennial ( ... Ciclesonide comes as a solution (liquid) to spray in the nose. It is usually sprayed in each nostril once daily. Use ciclesonide at around the same time every day. Follow the ...

  20. Zolmitriptan Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea and stomach pain caused by decreased blood flow to the intestines). Your doctor may tell you not to use zolmitriptan nasal spray.tell your doctor if you smoke or are overweight; if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or liver or ...

  1. Cromolyn Sodium Nasal Solution

    MedlinePlus

    Cromolyn comes as a solution to use with a special nasal applicator. It usually is inhaled three to six times a day to prevent allergy ... first time, read the instructions provided with the solution. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to ...

  2. Naloxone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms, he or she should give you your first naloxone dose and then call 911 immediately. After receiving the naloxone nasal spray, ... the person on their side (recovery position) and call for emergency medical ... after giving the first naloxone dose. If the person does not respond ...

  3. Regulation of human renin expression in chorion cell primary cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, K.G.; Haidar, M.A.; Baxter, J.D.; Reudelhuber, T.L. )

    1990-10-01

    The human renin gene is expressed in the kidney, placenta, and several other sites. The release of renin or its precursor, prorenin, can be affected by several regulatory agents. In this study, primary cultures of human placental cells were used to examine the regulation of prorenin release and renin mRNA levels and of the transfected human renin promoter linked to chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter sequences. Treatment of the cultures with a calcium ionophore alone, calcium ionophore plus forskolin (that activates adenylate cyclase), or forskolin plus a phorbol ester increased prorenin release and renin mRNA levels 1.3{endash} to 6{endash}fold, but several classes of steroids did not affect prorenin secretion or renin RNA levels. These results suggest that (i) the first 584 base pairs of the renin gene 5'{endash}flanking DNA do not contain functional glucocorticoid or estrogen response elements, (ii) placental prorenin release and renin mRNA are regulated by calcium ion and by the combinations of cAMP with either C kinase or calcium ion, and (iii) the first 100 base pairs of the human renin 5'{endash}flanking DNA direct accurate initiation of transcription and can be regulated by cAMP. Thus, some control of renin release in the placenta (and by inference in other tissues) occurs via transcriptional influences on its promoter.

  4. Isolation of highly enriched primary human microglia for functional studies.

    PubMed

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Park, Thomas I-H; Schweder, Patrick; Scotter, John; Correia, Jason; Smith, Amy M; Gibbons, Hannah M; Oldfield, Robyn L; Bergin, Peter S; Mee, Edward W; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Scott Graham, E; Dragunow, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the resident macrophages of the central nervous system play vital roles in brain homeostasis through clearance of pathogenic material. Microglia are also implicated in neurological disorders through uncontrolled activation and inflammatory responses. To date, the vast majority of microglial studies have been performed using rodent models. Human microglia differ from rodent counterparts in several aspects including their response to pharmacological substances and their inflammatory secretions. Such differences highlight the need for studies on primary adult human brain microglia and methods to isolate them are therefore required. Our procedure generates microglial cultures of >95% purity from both biopsy and autopsy human brain tissue using a very simple media-based culture procedure that takes advantage of the adherent properties of these cells. Microglia obtained in this manner can be utilised for research within a week. Isolated microglia demonstrate phagocytic ability and respond to inflammatory stimuli and their purity makes them suitable for numerous other forms of in vitro studies, including secretome and transcriptome analysis. Furthermore, this protocol allows for the simultaneous isolation of neural precursor cells during the microglial isolation procedure. As human brain tissue is such a precious and valuable resource the simultaneous isolation of multiple cell types is highly beneficial. PMID:26778406

  5. Development of a Transnasal Delivery System for Recombinant Human Growth Hormone (rhGH): Effects of the Concentration and Molecular Weight of Poly-L-arginine on the Nasal Absorption of rhGH in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Ryo; Uchida, Masaki; Yamaki, Tsutomu; Ohtake, Kazuo; Hatanaka, Tomomi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hideo; Kobayashi, Jun; Morimoto, Yasunori; Natsume, Hideshi

    2016-01-01

    A novel system for delivering recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) that is noninvasive and has a simple method of administration is strongly desired to improve the compliance of children. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential for the intranasal (i.n.) co-administration of rhGH with poly-L-arginine (PLA) as a novel delivery system by evaluating the effects of the concentration and molecular weight of PLA on the nasal absorption of rhGH. The influence of the formation of insoluble aggregates and a soluble complex in the dosage formulation on nasal rhGH absorption was also evaluated by size-exclusion chromatography and ultrafiltration. PLA enhanced the nasal absorption of rhGH at each concentration and molecular weight examined. Nasal rhGH absorption increased dramatically when the PLA concentration was 1.0 % (w/v) due to the improved solubility of rhGH in the formulation. A delay in rhGH absorption was observed when the molecular weight of PLA was increased. This appeared to be because the increase in molecular weight caused the formation of a soluble complex. It seems that the PLA concentration affects the absorption-enhancing effect on rhGH, while the molecular weight of PLA affects the time when the maximum plasma rhGH concentration was reached (Tmax) of rhGH after i.n. administration, mainly because of the interactions among rhGH, PLA, and additives. Therefore, the transnasal rhGH delivery system using PLA is considered to be a promising alternative to subcutaneous (s.c.) injection if these interactions are sufficiently controlled. PMID:26725528

  6. Telomerase Contributes to Fludarabine Resistance in Primary Human Leukemic Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shawi, May; Chu, Tsz Wai; Martinez-Marignac, Veronica; Yu, Y.; Gryaznov, Sergei M.; Johnston, James B.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Assouline, Sarit E.; Autexier, Chantal; Aloyz, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    We report that Imetelstat, a telomerase inhibitor that binds to the RNA component of telomerase (hTR), can sensitize primary CLL lymphocytes to fludarabine in vitro. This effect was observed in lymphocytes from clinically resistant cases and with cytogenetic abnormalities associated with bad prognosis. Imetelstat mediated-sensitization to fludarabine was not associated with telomerase activity, but with the basal expression of Ku80. Since both Imetelstat and Ku80 bind hTR, we assessed 1) if Ku80 and Imetelstat alter each other's binding to hTR in vitro and 2) the effect of an oligonucleotide complementary to the Ku binding site in hTR (Ku oligo) on the survival of primary CLL lymphocytes exposed to fludarabine. We show that Imetelstat interferes with the binding of Ku70/80 (Ku) to hTR and that the Ku oligo can sensitize CLL lymphocytes to FLU. Our results suggest that Ku binding to hTR may contribute to fludarabine resistance in CLL lmphocytes. This is the first report highlighting the potentially broad effectiveness of Imetelstat in CLL, and the potential biological and clinical implications of a functional interaction between Ku and hTR in primary human cancer cells. PMID:23922990

  7. Telomerase contributes to fludarabine resistance in primary human leukemic lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Shawi, May; Chu, Tsz Wai; Martinez-Marignac, Veronica; Yu, Y; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Johnston, James B; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Assouline, Sarit E; Autexier, Chantal; Aloyz, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    We report that Imetelstat, a telomerase inhibitor that binds to the RNA component of telomerase (hTR), can sensitize primary CLL lymphocytes to fludarabine in vitro. This effect was observed in lymphocytes from clinically resistant cases and with cytogenetic abnormalities associated with bad prognosis. Imetelstat mediated-sensitization to fludarabine was not associated with telomerase activity, but with the basal expression of Ku80. Since both Imetelstat and Ku80 bind hTR, we assessed 1) if Ku80 and Imetelstat alter each other's binding to hTR in vitro and 2) the effect of an oligonucleotide complementary to the Ku binding site in hTR (Ku oligo) on the survival of primary CLL lymphocytes exposed to fludarabine. We show that Imetelstat interferes with the binding of Ku70/80 (Ku) to hTR and that the Ku oligo can sensitize CLL lymphocytes to FLU. Our results suggest that Ku binding to hTR may contribute to fludarabine resistance in CLL lmphocytes. This is the first report highlighting the potentially broad effectiveness of Imetelstat in CLL, and the potential biological and clinical implications of a functional interaction between Ku and hTR in primary human cancer cells. PMID:23922990

  8. Rational design of nasal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Slütter, Bram; Hagenaars, Niels; Jiskoot, Wim

    2008-01-01

    Nasal vaccination is a promising alternative to classical parental vaccination, as it is non-invasive and, in principle, capable of eliciting strong systemic and local immune responses. However, the protective efficacy of nasally administered antigens is often impaired because of delivery problems: free antigens are readily cleared from the nasal cavity, poorly absorbed by nasal epithelial cells and generally have low intrinsic immunogenicity. In this review paper, we describe the main physiological hurdles to nasal vaccine delivery, survey the progress made in technological approaches to overcome these hurdles and discuss emerging opportunities for improving nasal vaccines. According to current insights, encapsulation of the antigen into bioadhesive (nano)particles is a promising approach towards successful nasal vaccine delivery. These antigen-loaded particles can be tailor made by supplying them with targeting ligands, adjuvants or endosomal escape mediators to form the desired vaccine that provides long-lasting protective immunity. PMID:18172815

  9. Cellular Proteome Dynamics during Differentiation of Human Primary Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, Marie-Catherine; Barrio-Hernandez, Inigo; Mortensen, Tenna Pavia; Henningsen, Jeanette; Jensen, Søren Skov; Bigot, Anne; Blagoev, Blagoy; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2015-08-01

    Muscle stem cells, or satellite cells, play an important role in the maintenance and repair of muscle tissue and have the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in response to physiological or environmental changes. Although they have been extensively studied, the key regulatory steps and the complex temporal protein dynamics accompanying the differentiation of primary human muscle cells remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the advantages of applying a MS-based quantitative approach, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), for studying human myogenesis in vitro and characterize the fine-tuned changes in protein expression underlying the dramatic phenotypic conversion of primary mononucleated human muscle cells during in vitro differentiation to form multinucleated myotubes. Using an exclusively optimized triple encoding SILAC procedure, we generated dynamic expression profiles during the course of myogenic differentiation and quantified 2240 proteins, 243 of which were regulated. These changes in protein expression occurred in sequential waves and underlined vast reprogramming in key processes governing cell fate decisions, i.e., cell cycle withdrawal, RNA metabolism, cell adhesion, proteolysis, and cytoskeletal organization. In silico transcription factor target analysis demonstrated that the observed dynamic changes in the proteome could be attributed to a cascade of transcriptional events involving key myogenic regulatory factors as well as additional regulators not yet known to act on muscle differentiation. In addition, we created of a dynamic map of the developing myofibril, providing valuable insights into the formation and maturation of the contractile apparatus in vitro. Finally, our SILAC-based quantitative approach offered the possibility to follow the expression profiles of several muscle disease-associated proteins simultaneously and therefore could be a valuable resource for future studies investigating

  10. Primary human monocyte differentiation regulated by Nigella sativa pressed oil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Oxidized low density lipoprotein plays an important role in development of foam cells in atherosclerosis. The study was focused on regulation of primary human monocyte growth and CD11b expression in presence of Nigella sativa oil. Methods Primary human monocytes were isolated from whole blood and grown at 37°C and 5% CO2 saturation for five days prior to treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The cells were plated and washed before treatment with ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) as positive control and combined treatment of ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) and (140 ng/ml) Nigella sativa oil. The growth progression was monitored every 24 hours for 3 days. Results Macrophages showed reduced growth in comparison to monocytes 24 hours after treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The mean cell diameter was significantly different between untreated and treated condition in monocytes and macrophages (p < 0.001). Similarly, intracellular lipid accumulation was hindered in combined treatment with Nigella sativa oil. This was further supported by cell surface expression analysis, where CD11b was markedly reduced in cells treated with combination oxLDL and Nigella sativa oil compared to oxLDL alone. More cells differentiated into macrophage-like cells when monocytes were supplemented with oxidized LDL alone. Conclusions The finding provides preliminary evidence on regulation of cell growth and differentiation in monocyte and monocyte-derived macrophages by Nigella sativa oil. Further investigations need to be conducted to explain its mechanism in human monocyte. PMID:22104447