Science.gov

Sample records for primary management choice

  1. Managing the menopause: practical choices faced in primary care.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J

    2011-12-01

    Over the last 10 years, the management of the menopause has changed dramatically following the controversy surrounding hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Non-drug options have become increasingly popular with women and this has presented new challenges to us as their physicians. This report includes insights into how women feel about their menopause management, in particular their need to make an informed decision about their menopause management. This will ensure that they are committed to the option selected. Non-drug options should be viewed as a different approach to HRT, not as a substitute, and they should be recommended specifically to ensure that quality is assured. A guide is included as to how to select non-drug options, in particular for the phytoestrogen supplement products. Our role as physicians is to offer our patients the best possible choices to manage their health, and this should now include non-drug options that have been well-researched in terms of efficacy and safety. PMID:22074009

  2. Managing School Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Issues of school choice have become prominent in public discussion, particularly in the last decade since limits on the establishment of new schools were reduced by the Federal Government with a resultant increase in possible choices for families. Alongside issues of choice are the issues that arise when a change of school choice is necessary.…

  3. Choice and privatisation in Swedish primary care.

    PubMed

    Anell, Anders

    2011-10-01

    In 2007, a new wave of local reforms involving choice for the population and privatisation of providers was initiated in Swedish primary care. Important objectives behind reforms were to strengthen the role of primary care and to improve performance in terms of access and responsiveness. The purpose of this article was to compare the characteristics of the new models and to discuss changes in financial incentives for providers and challenges regarding governance from the part of county councils. A majority of the models being introduced across the 21 county councils can best be described as innovative combinations between a comprehensive responsibility for providers and significant degrees of freedom regarding choice for the population. Key financial characteristics of fixed payment and comprehensive financial responsibility for providers may create financial incentives to under-provide care. Informed choices by the population, in combination with reasonably low barriers for providers to enter the primary care market, should theoretically counterbalance such incentives. To facilitate such competition is indeed a challenge, not only because of difficulties in implementing informed choices but also because the new models favour large and/or horizontally integrated providers. To prevent monopolistic behaviour, county councils may have to accept more competition as well as more governance over clinical practice than initially intended. PMID:20701829

  4. Consumer satisfaction with primary care provider choice and associated trust

    PubMed Central

    Chu-Weininger, Ming Ying L; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2006-01-01

    Background Development of managed care, characterized by limited provider choice, is believed to undermine trust. Provider choice has been identified as strongly associated with physician trust. Stakeholders in a competitive healthcare market have competing agendas related to choice. The purpose of this study is to analyze variables associated with consumer's satisfaction that they have enough choice when selecting their primary care provider (PCP), and to analyze the importance of these variables on provider trust. Methods A 1999 randomized national cross-sectional telephone survey conducted of United States residential households, who had a telephone, had seen a medical professional at least twice in the past two years, and aged ≥ 20 years was selected for secondary data analyses. Among 1,117 households interviewed, 564 were selected as the final sample. Subjects responded to a core set of questions related to provider trust, and a subset of questions related to trust in the insurer. A previously developed conceptual framework was adopted. Linear and logistic regressions were performed based on this framework. Results Results affirmed 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' was significantly (p < .001) associated with provider trust. 'PCP's care being extremely effective' was strongly associated with 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' and 'provider trust'. Having sought a second opinion(s) was associated with lower trust. 'Spoke to the PCP outside the medical office,' 'satisfaction with the insurer' and 'insurer charges less if PCP within network' were all variables associated with 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' (all p < .05). Conclusion This study confirmed the association of 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' with provider trust. Results affirmed 'enough PCP choice' was a strong predictor of provider trust. 'Second opinion on PCP' may indicate distrust in the provider. Data such as 'trust in providers in general' and 'the role of provider performance information' in choice, though import in PCP choice, were not available for analysis and should be explored in future studies. Results have implications for rethinking the relationships among consumer choice, consumer behaviors in making trade-offs in PCP choice, and the role of healthcare experiences in 'satisfaction with amount of PCP choice' or 'provider trust.' PMID:17059611

  5. Management choices for hypertension with coexistent hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Feher, M D; Lant, A F

    1991-01-01

    Guidelines for the management of either hypertension or hyperlipidaemia have been widely published. However, recent data have shown the high frequency of an abnormal lipid profile in hypertensive subjects. We have therefore surveyed 195 general practitioners throughout Britain to determine current community-based attitudes and management approaches to hypertension with coexistent hypercholesterolaemia. Routine screening for lipids in hypertensive subjects was recommended by 40% of respondents. First-line antihypertensive drug choices were influenced by the knowledge of a hypercholesterolaemia, with preference for drugs known to have no adverse effects on the lipid profile. When first-choice drug failed to effectively lower blood pressure, the additional drug or the substitute choices were not influenced by the metabolic profiles of the alternative selected. The current wide choice of antihypertensive drugs and the complexity of metabolic complications of treatment plus the relationship of risk factor clustering has made the formulation of management strategies very difficult. This was supported by the finding that 88% of respondents in our survey felt that there was a clear need for consensus management guidelines for the treatment of hypertension with coexistent hypercholesterolaemia. PMID:2027144

  6. Patient choice and access to primary physician services in Norway.

    PubMed

    Grytten, Jostein; Sørensen, Rune J

    2009-01-01

    Quasi-markets have become fashionable within health care. This is also the case in Norway where primary physician services are organized as a quasi-market. Physicians compete for patients, and patients can choose another physician if they are not satisfied with the physician they have. This is meant to provide incentives for physicians to provide services that are both efficient and of high quality. One condition that is necessary in order for such a market to function is that there is excess supply to ensure that patients have a real opportunity for choice. In this study we investigated the influence of excess supply on patient access and the mobility of patients between primary physicians in Norway. The analyses were performed on data from two comprehensive national surveys. Access to physicians is better for physicians who have spare capacity than for physicians who have a lack of capacity. Patients take advantage of their possibilities for choice. They move from physicians who have too little capacity to physicians who have spare capacity. Patient choice means that patients are not 'stuck' with physicians who have too little capacity to provide adequate services for their patients. The results show that quasi-markets can ensure good access to primary physician services, but this presupposes that there is enough spare capacity to provide patients with a real choice of physician. PMID:19099615

  7. Primary eye care management.

    PubMed

    De Beer, Annelize

    2003-01-01

    Due to a financial recession in South Africa, the registered nurses (RNs) at an excimer laser center faced dismissal. In order to continue a career in ophthalmology, these nurses needed to create their own income. To this end, a primary eye care (PEC) clinic was established to provide examination and treatment(s) to the underprivileged community with the assistance of local ophthalmologists. The PEC clinic, which provides basic services for a nominal fee, has bridged the gap between excellent private eye care and inadequate government eye care. Since 1999, 791 patients have been examined and 515 surgical procedures have been performed. PMID:12703249

  8. Knowledge Management Technology: Making Good Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Linda D. R.; Coukos, Eleni D.; Pisapia, John

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the reliability of technology products that support knowledge management, particularly in higher education. Presents a conceptual framework for knowledge management technology, evaluates available software products, concludes that most products perform poorly, and offers recommendations for knowledge management strategies. (LRW)

  9. Identity as the Primary Determinant of Language Choice in Valencia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrer, Raquel Casesnoves; Sankoff, David

    2003-01-01

    Examines the determinants of language choice using sociodemographic, behavioral, and ideological data on a sample of 180 high school students in the city of Valencia, Spain and the neighboring town of Xativa. Evaluates the relative importance of sociodemographic and ideological factors on the choice of Valencian or Castilian in several contexts…

  10. Perspectives on "Choice and Challenge" in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses "Choice and Challenge" as a tool for school improvement and as a "practicable pedagogy" that attempts to embody the principles of "learning without limits," rejecting ability grouping and labelling. As considered here, "Choice and Challenge" emerges specifically from practice at the…

  11. Factors Influencing Career Choice of Management Students in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwala, Tanuja

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the influence of a range of factors on the career choice of management students in India. The importance of different individuals in the family and at work in making career choices among these students is also to be explored. In addition, the study seeks to address the relationship of the cultural values of…

  12. Choice-Based Segmentation as an Enrollment Management Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents an approach to enrollment management based on target marketing strategies developed from a choice-based segmentation methodology. Students are classified into "switchable" or "non-switchable" segments based on their probability of selecting specific majors. A modified multinomial logit choice model is used to identify…

  13. Parental Choice and the Rural Primary School: Lifestyle, Locality and Loyalty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marion; Clark, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the geography of parental choice in a rural locale and shows how a group of parents negotiated their way through the process of primary school choice. Using ethnographic data collected through interviews and observations with parents and staff from three rural primary schools in England, the research utilises Bourdieu's

  14. School Choice or Schools' Choice? Managing in an Era of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on a year and a half of ethnographic research in three New York City small high schools, this study examines the role of the school in managing school choice and asks what social processes are associated with principals' disparate approaches. Although district policy did not allow principals to select students based on their performance,…

  15. School Choice or Schools' Choice? Managing in an Era of Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on a year and a half of ethnographic research in three New York City small high schools, this study examines the role of the school in managing school choice and asks what social processes are associated with principals' disparate approaches. Although district policy did not allow principals to select students based on their performance,

  16. Children as Researchers in Primary Schools: Choice, Voice and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucknall, Sue

    2012-01-01

    "Children as Researchers in Primary Schools" is an innovative and unique resource for practitioners supporting children to become "real world" researchers in the primary classroom. It will supply you with the skills and ideas you need to implement a "children as researchers" framework in your school that can be adapted for different ages and…

  17. Choosing Schools: Explorations in Post-Primary School Choice in an Urban Irish Working Class Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Kevin; Hall, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines post-primary school choice processes in the urban Irish working-class community of Portown. Here, there is an awareness of hegemonic neoliberal ideals and how school choice becomes a significantly classed space characterised by market ideologies and structural inequality. This critical ethnography explored the world through…

  18. Choice.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jay

    2008-09-01

    Understanding how and why analysands make the choices they do is central to both the clinical and the theoretical projects of psychoanalysis. And yet we know very little about the process of choice or about the relationship between choices and motives. A striking parallel is to be found between the ways choice is narrated in ancient Greek texts and the experience of analysts as they observe patients making choices in everyday clinical work. Pursuing this convergence of classical and contemporary sensibilities will illuminate crucial elements of the various meanings of choice, and of the way that these meanings change over the course of psychoanalytic treatment. PMID:18802123

  19. Career Choice in Management: Findings from US MBA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Eddy S. W.; Burke, Ronald J.; Fiksenbaum, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to explore the role of values, family, and non-family influences on career choice in management among a sample of US MBA students. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires from 109 students in a mid-sized university located on the west coast of the USA. The respondents were in…

  20. Patient Choice for Older People in English NHS Primary Care: Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Andrew J. E.; Sanders, Frances; Lara, Antonieta Medina; van Teijlingen, Edwin R.; Wood, Cate; Galpin, Di; Baron, Sue; Crowe, Sam; Sharma, Sheetal

    2014-01-01

    In the English National Health Service (NHS), patients are now expected to choose the time and place of treatment and even choose the actual treatment. However, the theory on which patient choice is based and the implementation of patient choice are controversial. There is evidence to indicate that attitudes and abilities to make choices are relatively sophisticated and not as straightforward as policy developments suggest. In addition, and surprisingly, there is little research on whether making individual choices about care is regarded as a priority by the largest NHS patient group and the single largest group for most GPs—older people. This conceptual paper examines the theory of patient choice concerning accessing and engaging with healthcare provision and reviews existing evidence on older people and patient choice in primary care. PMID:24967329

  1. Weight management practices among primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, G M; Reifsnider, E; Allan, J D

    2000-04-01

    This pilot study examined how primary care providers manage patients with weight problems, an important component of primary care. A convenience sample of 17 nurse practitioners and 15 physicians were surveyed about assessments and interventions used in practice for weight management along with perceived barriers to providing effective weight management. Practice patterns between gender, profession and practice setting of the nurse practitioners were compared. PMID:11930414

  2. Integrating bipolar disorder management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Goodrich, David E; O'Donnell, Allison N; Miller, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    There is growing realization that persons with bipolar disorder may exclusively be seen in primary (general medical) care settings, notably because of limited access to mental health care and stigma in seeking mental health treatment. At least two clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder recommend collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) to help integrate mental health care to better manage this illness. CCMs, which include provider guideline support, self-management support, care management, and measurement-based care, are well-established in primary care settings, and may help primary care practitioners manage bipolar disorder. However, further research is required to adapt CCMs to support complexities in diagnosing persons with bipolar disorder, and integrate decision-making processes regarding medication safety and tolerability in primary care. Additional implementation studies are also needed to adapt CCMs for persons with bipolar disorder in primary care, especially those seen in smaller practices with limited infrastructure and access to mental health care. PMID:23001382

  3. Expanding choice of primary care in Finland: much debate but little change so far.

    PubMed

    Tynkkynen, Liina-Kaisa; Chydenius, Miisa; Saloranta, Anna; Keskimäki, Ilmo

    2016-03-01

    "Putting the patient in the driver's seat" is one of the top issues on the health policy agenda in Finland. One of the means believed to promote patient empowerment and patient centeredness is the introduction and further expansion of choice policies with accompanying competition between public and private service providers. However, the Finnish health care system has a highly decentralized administration with multiple funding sources and three different types of providers that people can seek primary care from (municipal health centers, occupational health care services, and private sector providers). This complicates the implementation of choice at the level of primary health care. In this paper, we describe the current policy debates and initiatives promoting the expansion of the choice of primary care provider in Finland. We examine the legislation and policies that have contributed to the current, complex service system in Finland. In light of this examination, we critically discuss the current debate on choice policies as well as the introduction of choice in the context of primary health care. PMID:26819142

  4. Medicaid enrollment choice into managed care health plans.

    PubMed

    Morton, L W

    1998-06-01

    Rural Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) Medicaid recipients were surveyed to identify factors that influenced their enrollment choice between two managed care health plans and the traditional Medicaid free-for-service plan. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses provided evidence that the Medicaid institutional information structure directly influenced recipient decision to enroll in managed care plans. Current smokers were more likely to choose a managed care plan in this sample. There was no evidence that health status, health service use patterns, marital status, or ethnicity was related to the enrollment decision. Of those who chose the traditional Medicaid fee-for-service plan, 41 percent reported that they did not understand what managed care was. PMID:9615563

  5. Managing coastal area resources by stated choice experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wirtz, Kai W.

    2010-02-01

    In many coastal regions, oil spills can be considered as one of the most important and certainly the most noticeable forms of marine pollution. Efficient contingency management responding to oil spills on waters, which aims at minimizing pollution effects on coastal resources, turns out to be critically important. Such a decision making highly depends on the importance attributed to different coastal economic and ecological resources. Economic uses can, in principal, be addressed by standard measures such as value added. However, there is a missing of market in the real world for natural goods. Coastal resources such as waters and beach cannot be directly measured in money terms, which increases the risk of being neglected in a decision making process. This paper evaluates these natural goods of coastal environment in a hypothetical market by employing stated choice experiments. Oil spill management practice in German North Sea is used as an example. Results from a pilot survey show that during a combat process, beach and eider ducks are of key concerns for households. An environmental friendly combat option has to be a minor cost for households. Moreover, households with less children, higher monthly income and a membership of environmental organization are more likely to state that they are willing to pay for combat option to prevent coastal resources from an oil pollution. Despite that choice experiments require knowledge of designing questionnaire and statistical skills to deal with discrete choices and conducting a survey is time consumed, the results have important implications for oil spill contingency management. Overall, such a stated preference method can offer useful information for decision makers to consider coastal resources into a decision making process and can further contribute to finding a cost-effective oil preventive measure, also has a wide application potential in the field of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM).

  6. Surgical management of persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

    PubMed

    Stark, W J

    1981-01-01

    Instruments designed for pars plana vitrectomy can be used to manage complicated congenital cataracts such as those with persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV). We have applied closed-eye vitrectomy techniques through a limbal approach in seven eyes with PHPV. A clear pupillary space was achieved in all cases. The management of children with complicated congenital cataracts such as PHPV is discussed. PMID:7343346

  7. Concussion management by primary care providers

    PubMed Central

    Pleacher, M D; Dexter, W W

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess current concussion management practices of primary care providers. Methods An 11 item questionnaire was mailed to primary care providers in the state of Maine, with serial mailings to non‐respondents. Results Over 50% of the questionnaires were completed, with nearly 70% of primary care providers indicating that they routinely use published guidelines as a tool in managing patients with concussion. Nearly two thirds of providers were aware that neuropsychological tests could be used, but only 16% had access to such tests within a week of injury. Conclusions Primary care providers are using published concussion management guidelines with high frequency, but many are unable to access neuropsychological testing when it is required. PMID:16371479

  8. Determinants of primary care specialty choice: a non-statistical meta-analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bland, C J; Meurer, L N; Maldonado, G

    1995-07-01

    This paper analyzes and synthesizes the literature on primary care specialty choice from 1987 through 1993. To improve the validity and usefulness of the conclusions drawn from the literature, the authors developed a model of medical student specialty choice to guide the synthesis, and used only high-quality research (a final total of 73 articles). They found that students predominantly enter medical school with a preference for primary care careers, but that this preference diminishes over time (particularly over the clinical clerkship years). Student characteristics associated with primary care career choice are: being female, older, and married; having a broad undergraduate background; having non-physician parents; having relatively low income expectations; being interested in diverse patients and health problems; and having less interest in prestige, high technology, and surgery. Other traits, such as value orientation, personality, or life situation, yet to be reliably measured, may actually be responsible for some of these associations. Two curricular experiences are associated with increases in the numbers of students choosing primary care: required family practice clerkships and longitudinal primary care experiences. Overall, the number of required weeks in family practice shows the strongest association. Students are influenced by the cultures of the institutions in which they train, and an important factor in this influence is the relative representation of academically credible, full-time primary care faculty within each institution's governance and everyday operation. In turn, the institutional culture and faculty composition are largely determined by each school's mission and funding sources--explaining, perhaps, the strong and consistent association frequently found between public schools and a greater output of primary care physicians. Factors that do not influence primary care specialty choice include early exposure to family practice faculty or to family practitioners in their own clinics, having a high family medicine faculty-to-student ratio, and student debt level, unless exceptionally high. Also, students view a lack of understanding of the specialties as a major impediment to their career decisions, and it appears they acquire distorted images of the primary care specialties as they learn within major academic settings. Strikingly few schools produce a majority of primary care graduates who enter family practice, general internal medicine, or general practice residencies or who actually practice as generalists. Even specially designed tracks seldom produce more than 60% primary care graduates. Twelve recommendations for strategies to increase the proportion of primary care physicians are provided. PMID:7612128

  9. Expanding Medicaid managed care: the right choice for Texas?

    PubMed

    Reddy, Swapna; Finley, Marisa; Posey, Dan; Rohack, James J

    2012-10-01

    We set out to determine whether expanding Medicaid managed care in Texas is the solution to the challenges faced by the state of meeting the healthcare needs of a rapidly growing Medicaid population while addressing its own fiscal limitations. We reviewed the Texas Medicaid program, the potential effects of federal healthcare reform, and the state political climate through the perspectives (advantages and disadvantages) of the primary stakeholders: patients, practitioners, hospitals, and insurers. Research was performed through online, federal and state regulatory, and legislative review. In addition, we reviewed government and peer-reviewed reports and articles pertaining to issues related to Medicaid populations, healthcare practitioners, and hospitals that serve them. Each primary stakeholder had potential advantages and disadvantages associated with the expansion of Medicaid managed care. We conclude that expanding Medicaid managed care, if done in a manner responsive to the needs of recipients, can meet enrollees' healthcare needs while controlling the state's costs. PMID:23038487

  10. Use of the NHS Choices website for primary care consultations: results from online and general practice surveys

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joanna; Majeed, Azeem; Khan, Muhammad Saleem; Lee, John Tayu; Nelson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of using the NHS Choices website on primary care consultations in England and Wales. We examined the hypothesis that using NHS Choices may reduce the frequency of primary care consultations among young, healthy users. Design Two cross-sectional surveys of NHS Choices users. Setting Survey of NHS Choices users using an online pop-up questionnaire on the NHS Choices website and a snapshot survey of patients in six general practices in London. Participants NHS Choices website users and general practice patients. Main outcome measures For both surveys, we measured the proportion of people using NHS Choices when considering whether to consult their GP practice and on subsequent frequency of primary care consultations. Results Around 59% (n = 1559) of online and 8% (n = 125) of general practice survey respondents reported using NHS Choices in relation to their use of primary care services. Among these, 33% (n = 515) of online and 18% (n = 23) of general practice respondents reported reduced primary care consultations as a result of using NHS Choices. We estimated the equivalent capacity savings in primary care from reduced consultations as a result of using NHS Choices to be approximately £94 million per year. Conclusions NHS Choices has been shown to alter healthcare-seeking behaviour, attitudes and knowledge among its users. Using NHS Choices results in reduced demand for primary care consultations among young, healthy users for whom reduced health service use is likely to be appropriate. Reducing potentially avoidable consultations can result in considerable capacity savings in UK primary care. PMID:21847438

  11. Primary urban energy-management-planning methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, Joseph; Meador, Toni

    1980-11-01

    Metropolitan Dade County, Florida, developed a pragmatic, transferable methodology to assist local governments in attempts to develop and implement energy management plans. A summary of that work is presented and suggestions are provided to guide the application and refinement of a Primary Urban Energy Management Planning Methodology. The methodology provides local governments with the systematic approach for dealing with short and intermediate-term urban energy management problems while at the same time laying the groundwork for the formulation of long-term energy management activities. The five tasks of the methodology summarized are: organizing for the PEP process; performing an energy use and supply inventory; formulating energy management goals and objectives; developing strategies to achieve the energy management objectives; and monitoring and evaluation. (MCW)

  12. Managing chronic pain in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Jennifer

    2016-03-15

    At least 100 million adults in the United States are afflicted with chronic pain. Nurse practitioners and other providers are often challenged by the complexity of chronic pain management. This article discusses systematic strategies to facilitate safe, efficient, satisfactory, and quality care of patients with chronic pain in primary care. PMID:26886269

  13. 25 CFR 502.19 - Primary management official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Primary management official. 502.19 Section 502.19... THIS CHAPTER 502.19 Primary management official. Primary management official means: (a) The person... designated by the tribe as a primary management official....

  14. 25 CFR 502.19 - Primary management official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Primary management official. 502.19 Section 502.19... THIS CHAPTER 502.19 Primary management official. Primary management official means: (a) The person... designated by the tribe as a primary management official....

  15. 25 CFR 502.19 - Primary management official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Primary management official. 502.19 Section 502.19... THIS CHAPTER 502.19 Primary management official. Primary management official means: (a) The person... designated by the tribe as a primary management official....

  16. 25 CFR 502.19 - Primary management official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Primary management official. 502.19 Section 502.19... THIS CHAPTER 502.19 Primary management official. Primary management official means: (a) The person... designated by the tribe as a primary management official....

  17. 25 CFR 502.19 - Primary management official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Primary management official. 502.19 Section 502.19... THIS CHAPTER 502.19 Primary management official. Primary management official means: (a) The person... designated by the tribe as a primary management official....

  18. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  19. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management related... services. (b) Primary care case management services may be offered by the State— (1) As a voluntary...

  20. Managing chronic conditions for elderly adults: the VNS CHOICE model.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Holly Michaels; McCabe, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    Chronic illness combined with functional impairment often results in an increased need for medical care and supportive long-term care (LTC) services. Navigating the health care system is challenging and complex, and even more so for patients with complex needs. Traditional fee-for-service care does not support and facilitate coordination and collaboration between providers and service settings. In New York State, managed LTC, a model of coordinated care for the chronically ill, endeavors to provide a bridge between primary, acute, home and community-based, and institutional LTC services for a medically complex and functionally frail nursing home eligible population. PMID:17288076

  1. Managing Chronic Conditions for Elderly Adults: The VNS CHOICE Model

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Holly Michaels; McCabe, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    Chronic illness combined with functional impairment often results in an increased need for medical care and supportive long-term care (LTC) services. Navigating the health care system is challenging and complex, and even more so for patients with complex needs. Traditional fee-for-service care does not support and facilitate coordination and collaboration between providers and service settings. In New York State, managed LTC, a model of coordinated care for the chronically ill, endeavors to provide a bridge between primary, acute, home and community-based, and institutional LTC services for a medically complex and functionally frail nursing home eligible population. PMID:17288076

  2. [Nonsurgical management of mild primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Imanishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism(PHPT)is one of the common endocrine disorders, which results clinically in nephrolithiasis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, cardiac and psychiatric abnormalities even in a mild or asymptomatic disease. Parathyroidectomy(PTX)is the only definitive treatment for PHPT, however, some patients with sporadic PHPT refuse surgery, are medically unfit, or have residual or recurrent disease inaccessible to further surgery. These patients may require intervention for management of symptomatic or moderate to severe hypercalcemia, bone loss or kidney calculi. PMID:27230840

  3. Risk preferences in strategic wildfire decision making: a choice experiment with U.S. wildfire managers.

    PubMed

    Wibbenmeyer, Matthew J; Hand, Michael S; Calkin, David E; Venn, Tyron J; Thompson, Matthew P

    2013-06-01

    Federal policy has embraced risa management as an appropriate paradigm for wildfire management. Economic theory suggests that over repeated wildfire events, potential economic costs and risas of ecological damage are optimally balanced when management decisions are free from biases, risa aversion, and risa seeking. Of primary concern in this article is how managers respond to wildfire risa, including the potential effect of wildfires (on ecological values, structures, and safety) and the likelihood of different fire outcomes. We use responses to a choice experiment questionnaire of U.S. federal wildfire managers to measure attitudes toward several components of wildfire risa and to test whether observed risa attitudes are consistent with the efficient allocation of wildfire suppression resources. Our results indicate that fire managers' decisions are consistent with nonexpected utility theories of decisions under risa. Managers may overallocate firefighting resources when the likelihood or potential magnitude of damage from fires is low, and sensitivity to changes in the probability of fire outcomes depends on whether probabilities are close to one or zero and the magnitude of the potential harm. PMID:23078036

  4. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions 440.168 Primary care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management...

  5. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions 440.168 Primary care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management...

  6. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions 440.168 Primary care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management...

  7. Current management of primary pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Klings, E S; Farber, H W

    2001-01-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a rare disorder with an annual incidence of 1 to 2 per million people. The aetiology of this disorder is unknown, but it appears to result from an abnormal interaction of environmental and genetic factors leading to a vasculopathy. The pulmonary arteries in these patients exhibit a spectrum of pathological lesions ranging from the early medial hypertrophy to the end-stage fibrotic plexiform lesions. This characteristic pathology is also observed in pulmonary hypertension resulting from connective tissue disease (particularly systemic sclerosis), HIV infection, portal hypertension and certain toxins. PPH is a condition that is difficult to diagnose and treat, with a median survival of 2.8 years in historical studies. One of the difficulties in treating patients with PHH is that the subacute nature of disease presentation often prevents an accurate diagnosis during the early stages of the illness. Progressive dyspnoea on exertion is the most common presenting symptom. Diagnostic evaluation should include electrocardiography, chest radiograph and echocardiography, and laboratory and other studies to evaluate for secondary causes (e.g. pulmonary function tests, chest computed tomography and ventilation/perfusion scans, pulmonary arteriogram, cardiopulmonary testing, right heart catherisation). PHH is a disorder for which there is no known cure. Current medical and surgical treatment options for patients with PHH include anticoagulation, vasodilators and transplantation. Calcium channel antagonists are currently the oral drugs of choice for the treatment of patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class II disease. These agents, in particular the dihydropyridine compounds, have beneficial effects on haemodynamics and right ventricular function, and possibly increased survival. Epoprostenol is administered by intravenous infusion, and studies have demonstrated short- and long-term improvements in symptoms, haemodynamics and survival. It is well tolerated and has become the treatment of choice for patients with NYHA Class III and IV disease. Inotropic agents are used as a bridge to transplant, which is indicated in patients who do not respond to maximal medical therapy. Experience has shown that single lung, double lung and heart-lung transplantation are approximately of equal efficacy. Currently, single lung transplant appears to be the procedure of choice. Newer agents, such as sildenafil, beraprost and bosentan, are presently being evaluated for the treatment of this disorder. Future study should include elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms in the development of this vasculopathy, which will hopefully lead to the development of improved treatment options for patients with PHH. PMID:11708765

  8. Building Choice and Quality into Your Managed Care Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaldi, Stephen J.

    1997-01-01

    The challenge of containing health-care costs continues despite a break from cost increases. Most experts would advise school employees to replace existing health plans with a triple-choice HMO plan using $10 copayments. Armed with quality data and a choice-based plan design, school business officials can improve their chances for long-term cost…

  9. Primary Care Management of Alcohol Misuse.

    PubMed

    Berger, Douglas; Bradley, Katharine A

    2015-09-01

    More than one in four American adults consume alcohol in quantities exceeding recommended limits. One in 12 have an alcohol use disorder marked by harmful consequences. Both types of alcohol misuse contribute to acute injury and chronic disease, making alcohol the third largest cause of preventable death in the United States. Alcohol misuse alters the management of common conditions from insomnia to anemia. Primary care providers should screen adult patients to identify the full spectrum of alcohol misuse. A range of effective treatments are available - from brief counselling interventions and mutual help groups to medications and behavioral therapies. PMID:26320043

  10. Differences between primary auditory cortex and auditory belt related to encoding and choice for AM sounds

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Mamiko; Johnson, Jeffrey S.; O’Connor, Kevin N.; Sutter, Mitchell L.

    2013-01-01

    We recorded from middle-lateral (ML) and primary (A1) auditory cortex while macaques discriminated amplitude modulated (AM) from unmodulated noise. Compared to A1, ML had a higher proportion of neurons that encode increasing AM depth by decreasing their firing-rates (‘decreasing’ neurons), particularly with responses that were not synchronized to the modulation. Choice probability (CP) analysis revealed that A1 and ML activity were different during the first half of the test stimulus. In A1, significant CP begins prior to the test stimulus, remains relatively constant (or increases slightly) during the stimulus and increases greatly within 200 ms of lever-release. Neurons in ML behave similarly, except that significant CP disappears during the first half of the stimulus and reappears during the second half and pre-release periods. CP differences between A1 and ML depend on neural response type. In ML (but not A1), when activity is lower during the first half of the stimulus in non-synchronized ‘decreasing’ neurons, the monkey is more likely to report AM. Neurons that both increase firing rate with increasing modulation depth (‘increasing’ neurons) and synchronize their responses to AM had similar choice-related activity dynamics in ML and A1. The results suggest that, when ascending the auditory system, there is a transformation in coding AM from primarily synchronized ‘increasing’ responses in A1 to non-synchronized and dual (‘increasing’/’decreasing’) coding in ML. This sensory transformation is accompanied by changes in the timing of activity related to choice, suggesting functional differences between A1 and ML related to attention and/or behavior. PMID:23658177

  11. Preferred Primary Healthcare Provider Choice Among Insured Persons in Ashanti Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Boachie, Micheal Kofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: In early 2012, National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) members in Ashanti Region were allowed to choose their own primary healthcare providers. This paper investigates the factors that enrolees in the Ashanti Region considered in choosing preferred primary healthcare providers (PPPs) and direction of association of such factors with the choice of PPP. Methods: Using a cross-sectional study design, the study sampled 600 NHIS enrolees in Kumasi Metro area and Kwabre East district. The sampling methods were a combination of simple random and systematic sampling techniques at different stages. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse demographic information and the criteria for selecting PPP. Multinomial logistic regression technique was used to ascertain the direction of association of the factors and the choice of PPP using mission PPPs as the base outcome. Results: Out of the 600 questionnaires administered, 496 were retained for further analysis. The results show that availability of essential drugs (53.63%) and doctors (39.92%), distance or proximity (49.60%), provider reputation (39.52%), waiting time (39.92), additional charges (37.10%), and recommendations (48.79%) were the main criteria adopted by enrolees in selecting PPPs. In the regression, income (-0.0027), availability of doctors (-1.82), additional charges (-2.14) and reputation (-2.09) were statistically significant at 1% in influencing the choice of government PPPs. On the part of private PPPs, availability of drugs (2.59), waiting time (1.45), residence (-2.62), gender (-2.89), and reputation (-2.69) were statistically significant at 1% level. Presence of additional charges (-1.29) was statistically significant at 5% level. Conclusion: Enrolees select their PPPs based on such factors as availability of doctors and essential drugs, reputation, waiting time, income, and their residence. Based on these findings, there is the need for healthcare providers to improve on their quality levels by ensuring constant availability of essential drugs, doctors, and shorter waiting time. However, individual enrolees may value each criterion differently. Thus, not all enrolees may be motivated by same concerns. This requires providers to be circumspect regarding the factors that may attract enrolees. The National Health Insurance Authority (NHIA) should also ensure timely release of funds to help providers procure the necessary medical supplies to ensure quality service PMID:26927586

  12. Management of hypertension in primary aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Aronova, Anna; Iii, Thomas J Fahey; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2014-05-26

    Hypertension causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, owing to its deleterious effects on the cardiovascular and renal systems. Primary hyperaldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of reversible hypertension, affecting 5%-18% of adults with hypertension. PA is estimated to result from bilateral adrenal hyperplasia in two-thirds of patients, and from unilateral aldosterone-secreting adenoma in approximately one-third. Suspected cases are initially screened by measurement of the plasma aldosterone-renin-ratio, and may be confirmed by additional noninvasive tests. Localization of aldostosterone hypersecretion is then determined by computed tomography imaging, and in selective cases with adrenal vein sampling. Solitary adenomas are managed by laparoscopic or robotic resection, while bilateral hyperplasia is treated with mineralocorticoid antagonists. Biochemical cure following adrenalectomy occurs in 99% of patients, and hemodynamic improvement is seen in over 90%, prompting a reduction in quantity of anti-hypertensive medications in most patients. End-organ damage secondary to hypertension and excess aldosterone is significantly improved by both surgical and medical treatment, as manifested by decreased left ventricular hypertrophy, arterial stiffness, and proteinuria, highlighting the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperaldosteronism. Although numerous independent predictors of resolution of hypertension after adrenalectomy for unilateral adenomas have been described, the Aldosteronoma Resolution Score is a validated multifactorial model convenient for use in daily clinical practice. PMID:24944753

  13. Free Choice of Learning Management Systems: Do Student Habits Override Inherent System Quality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Gavin W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although multiple studies examine institutional transitions of learning management systems (LMS) or compare their merits, studies examining students' free choice of access on parallel LMSs for the same course are absent from the literature. In order to investigate usage in a free-choice situation, identical content was posted at the…

  14. Women in construction management: Creating a theory of career choice and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Jennifer Dawn

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to create a theory of women's career choice and development in the context of the construction industry. Focused on female constructors, or those engaged in the management of construction projects or companies, this study investigated the relevant factors, processes, and experiences of women who choose to enter the construction industry through construction management degree programs. The goal was to communicate as a theoretically and practically grounded theory of career choice and development an understanding of who female constructors are and those factors which led them to the construction industry and those influencing their career development. As a grounded theory research design, qualitative research methods were employed as the primary means of collecting and analyzing data. Purposive and snowball sampling were used to garner a sample of 24 women who had graduated within a ten year period and were actively employed as constructors. Participants' views and experiences, captured through small focus group interviews, were analyzed with quantitative data of demographics, education, construction experience, self-efficacy, personality, and career satisfaction and commitment gathered from a written questionnaire, to create a profile of female constructors used in this theory. The profiles completed from these data are complex, providing for an extensive understanding of their career choice and development process. The strongest common characteristic in the career development of these women was a mentor. This influence in cannot be overlooked, especially in light of the rather constant sense of isolation many of these women expressed as a significant minority in every facet of their careers. Recommendations for academia and industry are in many ways related to these findings. Recommendations for recruitment center on educating youth and those able to influence the career choice making process of youth about the career paths available within the construction industry. Suggestions for retention centered on: (a) the need for mentoring programs and support networks, and (b) modification of industry demands to allow for a better work-family balance. In all, this study provides insights and recommendations for those focused on attracting, hiring, and retaining the employees necessary to meet ever-increasing staffing demands.

  15. Management of Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jimmy; Choy, Bonnie N K; Shum, Jennifer W H

    2016-01-01

    Primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) is a progressive optic nerve degeneration and is defined as a glaucomatous optic neuropathy with associated characteristic enlargement of optic disc cupping and visual field loss that is secondary to ocular hypertension caused by closure of the drainage angle. Angle closure is caused by appositional approximation or adhesion between the iris and the trabecular meshwork. The main treatment strategy for PACG lies in the reduction of intraocular pressure, reopening of the closed angle, and possible prevention of further angle closure. There is no universally agreed best surgical treatment for PACG. Trabeculectomy, goniosynechialysis (GSL), glaucoma implant, and cyclodestructive procedures are effective surgical options. Each of them plays an important role in the management of PACG with its own pros and cons. Accumulating evidence is available to show the effectiveness of visually significant and visually nonsignificant cataract extraction in the treatment of PACG. Trabeculectomy and GSL are often combined with cataract extraction, which may offer additional pressure control benefits to patients with PACG. This review article will discuss laser peripheral iridotomy, argon laser peripheral iridoplasty, and surgeries such as GSL, phacoemulsification, and phaco plus glaucoma surgeries that lower intraocular pressure and also alter the anterior segment and/or drainage angle anatomy. Currently, glaucoma implants and cyclodestruction are mainly reserved for PACG patients who have failed previous filtering operations. Their role as initial surgical treatment for PACG will not be discussed. PMID:26886121

  16. Better Choices: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Behavior Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acuna, Miguel T.

    2011-01-01

    Managing student behavior is often looked upon as a sidebar in teaching. The lack of formal classroom management training in teacher education programs reveals the low importance placed on this skill. As a result, teachers are often very well prepared to instruct, but in terms of effectively understanding the behavior of students--particularly…

  17. Rumour Has It: The Impact of Maternal Talk on Primary School Choice for Children Diagnosed with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Rozanna

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the pivotal role of rumour in shaping primary school choice decisions for parents of children diagnosed with autism. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 22 mothers conducted in Sydney, Australia, this study points to the varied functions of grapevine knowledge about schools gleaned in diverse contexts, including early

  18. Rumour Has It: The Impact of Maternal Talk on Primary School Choice for Children Diagnosed with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Rozanna

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the pivotal role of rumour in shaping primary school choice decisions for parents of children diagnosed with autism. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 22 mothers conducted in Sydney, Australia, this study points to the varied functions of grapevine knowledge about schools gleaned in diverse contexts, including early…

  19. Caries Management Strategies for Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Santamaria, R.M.; Innes, N.P.T.; Machiulskiene, V.; Evans, D.J.P.; Splieth, C.H.

    2014-01-01

    Minimal invasive approaches to managing caries, such as partial caries removal techniques, are showing increasing evidence of improved outcomes over the conventional complete caries removal. There is also increasing interest in techniques where no caries is removed. We present the 1-yr results of clinical efficacy for 3 caries management options for occlusoproximal cavitated lesions in primary molars: conventional restorations (CR; complete caries removal and compomer restoration), Hall technique (HT; no caries removal, sealing in with stainless steel crowns), and nonrestorative caries treatment (NRCT; no caries removal, opening up the cavity, teaching brushing and fluoride application). In sum, 169 children (3-8 yr old; mean, 5.56 ± 1.45 yr) were enrolled in this secondary care–based, 3-arm, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial. Treatments were carried out by specialist pediatric dentists or postgraduate trainees. One lesion per child received CR, HT, or NRCT. Outcome measures were clinical failure rates, grouped as minor failure (restoration loss/need for replacement, reversible pulpitis, caries progression, etc.) and major failure (irreversible pulpitis, abscess, etc.). There were 148 children (87.6%) with a minimum follow-up of 11 mo (mean, 12.23 ± 0.98 mo). Twenty teeth were recorded as having at least 1 minor failure: NRCT, n = 8 (5%); CR, n = 11 (7%); HT, n = 1 (1%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Only the comparison between NRCT and CR showed no significant difference (p = .79, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.80). Nine (6%) experienced at least 1 major failure: NRCT, n = 4 (2%); CR, n = 5 (3%); HT, n = 0 (0%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Individual comparison of NRCT and CR showed no statistically significant difference in major failures (p = .75, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.76). Success and failure rates were not significantly affected by pediatric dentists’ level of experience (p = .13, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.14). The HT was significantly more successful clinically than NRCT and CR after 1 yr, while pairwise analyses showed comparable results for treatment success between NRCT and CR (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01797458). PMID:25216660

  20. What factors influence choice of waste management practice? Evidence from rice straw management in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Launio, Cheryll C; Asis, Constancio A; Manalili, Rowena G; Javier, Evelyn F; Belizario, Annabelle F

    2014-02-01

    This study applied a multinomial logit model to understand why farmers choose to burn, incorporate or remove rice straw in the field. Four hundred randomly selected farmers were interviewed in four major rice-producing provinces covering the 2009 wet and 2010 dry seasons. Results of the model with burning as the baseline category indicate farm type, location dummies, number of household members with older than 13 years, cow ownership and distance from farm to house as significant variables influencing farmers' choice of straw incorporation or removal over burning. Significant perception variables are the negative impacts of open-field burning, awareness of environmental regulations and attitude towards incentives. Other factors significantly influencing the decision to incorporate over-burn are training attendance and perceptions of effects of straw incorporation. Income from non-rice farming, total area cultivated, tenure status, presence of burning and solid waste management provincial ordinances are significant factors affecting choice to remove over burn. Continually providing farmers' training in rice production, increasing demand for rice straw for other uses, and increasing awareness of environmental laws and regulations are policy directions recommended. PMID:24519228

  1. School Management Information Systems in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demir, Kamile

    2006-01-01

    Developments in information technologies have been impacting upon educational organizations. Principals have been using management information systems to improve the efficiency of administrative services. The aim of this research is to explore principals' perceptions about management information systems and how school management information…

  2. Primary hyperparathyroidism in the 1990s. Choice of surgical procedures for this disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, E L; Yashiro, T; Salti, G

    1992-01-01

    Many advances have occurred in recent years in the diagnosis, localization, and treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism. Several different operative choices for primary hyperparathyroidism also have been proposed--a unilateral approach versus the standard bilateral parathyroid exploration. The unilateral approach is based on the concept that if an enlarged parathyroid gland and a normal gland are found on the first side of the neck that is explored, then this is an adenoma and the second side should not be explored. Only if both glands on the initial side are recognized to be abnormal is the second side explored. The theoretical advantages of this unilateral approach are a decrease in operative morbidity rates--hypoparathyroidism and nerve injuries--and a decrease in operative time. Furthermore, proponents argue that if persistent hyperparathyroidism occurs, the second side can be easily explored because it was previously untouched. In the hands of several expert parathyroid surgeons, excellent results have been achieved. However, the unilateral approach has a number of disadvantages. It places considerable pressure on the surgeon and pathologist, for they have only one parathyroid gland other than the large one to examine. There is a significant potential risk of missing double adenomas or asymmetric hyperplasia because the second, ipsilateral parathyroid gland may appear normal or near normal in these conditions. This could lead to an increased incidence of persistent or recurrent hyperparathyroidism. Furthermore, a significant reduction of operative time may be questioned, especially when the time for performing special fat stains, which often are performed with unilateral explorations, is added. Finally, even if the intent is to perform a unilateral exploration, a bilateral exploration will be necessary about half of the time. The authors strongly recommend a bilateral parathyroid exploration for all patients undergoing an initial parathyroid operation. In cases of adenoma, bilateral visualization of normal parathyroid glands and careful biopsy of only one of them will minimize hypoparathyroidism. This operative approach will lead to better results, especially for the less experienced parathyroid surgeon. Images FIG. 5. FIG. 6. FIG. 7. FIG. 8. FIG. 9. FIG. 10. PMID:1558410

  3. Women in Municipal Management: Choice, Challenge and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Ruth Ann; And Others

    This study on women in municipal management examines their personal agendas, the barriers they encounter as individual professionals, their career opportunities, the credentialing requirements they face, and the skills they perceive as necessary for their effective performance and career advancement. Data were collected through survey research,…

  4. Managing choices for older patients with colon cancer: adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Christina; Goldberg, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Colon cancer is among the most common cancers in the United States, and the median age of patients at diagnosis is 70. Medical oncologists are commonly asked to comprehensively evaluate elderly patients to estimate individual risk/benefit ratios for adjuvant treatment. Although 40% of patients with colon cancer are elderly, clinical trials enroll mainly younger patients. Consequently, we are forced to depend on subgroup analyses, observational studies, and personal experience to guide recommendations. Decision-making in adjuvant therapy for colon cancer is increasingly complex, as we subdivide patients with stage II to III colon cancer by molecular as well as anatomic staging to predict which are likely to benefit from chemotherapy and then whether the addition of oxaliplatin to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is worth the toxicity. It is likely that the tumor biology of younger and older patients differs, and more research is needed to dissect out the biologic heterogeneity of both the tumors and their elderly hosts to help guide treatment. We recognize that our evaluations should not solely be based on temporal age and factor physiology, pharmacology, psychology, functional status, and social support into these considerations. Older patients who are treated must be monitored closely for toxicities when undergoing treatment. Although there is a clear need for clinical trials in this population, treatment decisions confront us today in the absence of definitive evidence. How can we help our patients navigate through these important choices? PMID:23714498

  5. The primary role: how the availability of primary care physicians affects diabetes care management.

    PubMed

    Furno, Megan

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses how the primary care physician shortage impacts health outcomes, specifically diabetes. The effect of the availability of primary care physicians on diabetes care management is examined by assessing primary care physician-to-population ratios and comparing those ratios against evidence-based medicine preventive practices for diabetes care. A discussion is included as to how the Patient-Centered Medical Home model can greatly contribute to primary care success through better care delivery implementation methods. PMID:25807609

  6. The health plan choices of retirees under managed competition.

    PubMed Central

    Buchmueller, T C

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of price on the health insurance decisions of Medicare-eligible retirees in a managed competition setting. DATA SOURCE: The study is based on four years of administrative data from the University of California (UC) Retiree Health Benefits Program, which closely resembles the managed competition model upon which several leading Medicare reform proposals are based. STUDY DESIGN: A change in UC's premium contribution policy between 1993 and 1994 created a unique natural experiment for investigating the effect of price on retirees' health insurance decisions. This study consists of two related analyses. First, I estimate the effect of changes in out-of-pocket premiums between 1993 and 1994 on the decision to switch plans during open enrollment. Second, using data from 1993 to 1996, I examine the extent to which rising premiums for fee-for-service Medigap coverage increased HMO enrollment among Medicare-eligible UC retirees. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Price is a significant factor affecting the health plan decisions of Medicare-eligible UC retirees. However, these retirees are substantially less price sensitive than active UC employees and the non-elderly in other similar programs. This result is likely attributable to higher nonpecuniary switching costs facing older individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Although it is not clear exactly how price sensitive enrollees must be in order to generate price competition among health plans, the behavioral differences between retirees and active employees suggest that caution should be taken in extrapolating from research on the non-elderly to the Medicare program. PMID:11130806

  7. Rational Treatment Choices for Non-major Depressions in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Ronald T; Williams, John W

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This review synthesizes available evidence for managing clinically significant dysphoric symptoms encountered in primary care, when formal criteria for major depression or dysthymia are not met. Discussion is focused on premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and minor depression because of their significant prevalence in the primary care setting and the lack of clear practice guidelines for addressing each illness. DESIGN English language literature from prior systematic reviews was supplemented by searching medline, embase, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality National Guideline Clearinghouse, and bibliographies of selected papers. Studies addressing the natural history or treatment of minor depression or PMDD were selected for review. Data were abstracted by 1 of 2 independent reviewers and studies were synthesized qualitatively. RESULTS Five individual studies that compared antidepressant or psychological treatments to placebo in patients with minor depression suggest short-term improvements in depressive symptoms with paroxetine, problem-solving therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy, but not with amitryptiline. Modest benefits on mental health function were reported with paroxetine and with problem-solving therapy, but only in patients with severe functional impairment at baseline. Twenty-four controlled trials were identified that compared antidepressant or psychological treatments to placebo in patients with premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Pooled results from a recent systematic review of 15 randomized controlled trials and one additional trial abstract provide strong evidence for a significantly greater improvement in physical and psychological symptoms with serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor medications when compared with placebo. Individual trials also suggest significantly greater improvements in symptom scores with venlafaxine, but not with tricyclic antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS The limited evidence base for minor depression provides only mixed support for a small to moderate benefit for few antidepressant medications and psychological treatments tested. For the treatment of severe psychological or physical symptoms causing functional impairment in patients with PMDD, sertraline and fluoxetine are clearly beneficial in carefully selected patients. PMID:11972726

  8. Crisis Management in a Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Colette

    2004-01-01

    Dunblane Primary School, Scotland, and Columbine High School, USA. Two headline tragedies that have led to trauma for their pupils and staff. Trauma that could be devastating because of the psychological impact and the practical requirements a crisis brings. Children's social and personal development can be negatively affected, their academic…

  9. Improving the Primary School. Educational Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Joan

    This book offers suggestions to primary schools about how they can improve their work in preparing children for a rapidly changing world. Chapter 1 sets the stage by considering various definitions of educational improvement, efficacy, and goals. Chapter 2 assesses research on school effectiveness and critically considers components of school…

  10. Crisis Management in a Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Colette

    2004-01-01

    Dunblane Primary School, Scotland, and Columbine High School, USA. Two headline tragedies that have led to trauma for their pupils and staff. Trauma that could be devastating because of the psychological impact and the practical requirements a crisis brings. Children's social and personal development can be negatively affected, their academic

  11. Managing Health and Safety in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Since science in primary schools is very safe, the coordinator's role in respect of health and safety can be a relatively modest one and integrated with other parts of the job. In this article, the author outlines the role of the science coordinator and sources of advice.

  12. Teaching Teachers about Supply Chain Management to Influence Students' Career and Education Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Leslie L.

    2013-01-01

    Since teachers are influential in high school students' career choices, enabling high school teachers to introduce educational and career opportunities in supply chain management is a viable strategy for reaching high school students about these opportunities. This article presents a pilot program of supply chain workshops to educate high school…

  13. The Role of Culture and Gender in the Choice of a Career in Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malach-Pines, Ayala; Kaspi-Baruch, Oshrit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The paper addresses the influence of culture and gender on the choice of a management career among men and women MBA students in Israel, the USA, the UK, Turkey, Cyprus, Hungary and India. The culture by gender comparison enabled an examination of five theories: two that focused on culture (Hofstede's and an application of Schneider's ASA…

  14. Managing Dilemmas in Education: The Tightrope Walk of Strategic Choice in More Autonomous Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatter, Ron

    This paper applies Cuban's (1992) concept of "managing dilemmas" to the current market-based reforms in English and Welsh education at both the macro (policy) and, particularly, at the micro (individual and school) levels. The Parental and School Choice Interaction (PASCI) Study is currently investigating the interaction between parental choice…

  15. The Use of Management and Marketing Textbook Multiple-Choice Questions: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, David R.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Four management and four marketing professors classified multiple-choice questions in four widely adopted introductory textbooks according to the two levels of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives: knowledge and intellectual ability and skill. Inaccuracies may cause instructors to select questions that require less thinking than they intend.…

  16. Teaching Teachers about Supply Chain Management to Influence Students' Career and Education Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Leslie L.

    2013-01-01

    Since teachers are influential in high school students' career choices, enabling high school teachers to introduce educational and career opportunities in supply chain management is a viable strategy for reaching high school students about these opportunities. This article presents a pilot program of supply chain workshops to educate high school

  17. Application of Total Quality Management System in Thai Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prueangphitchayathon, Setthiya; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn

    2015-01-01

    The present study seeks to develop a total quality management (TQM) system that can be applied to primary schools. The approach focuses on customer orientation, total involvement of all constituencies and continuous improvement. TQM principles were studied and synthesized according to case studies of the best practices in 3 primary schools (small,

  18. Application of Total Quality Management System in Thai Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prueangphitchayathon, Setthiya; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn

    2015-01-01

    The present study seeks to develop a total quality management (TQM) system that can be applied to primary schools. The approach focuses on customer orientation, total involvement of all constituencies and continuous improvement. TQM principles were studied and synthesized according to case studies of the best practices in 3 primary schools (small,…

  19. Perceptual classes established with forced-choice primary generalization tests and transfer of function.

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, K F; Fields, L

    2001-01-01

    In Experiment 1, 20 college students learned two identity conditional discriminations using squares that differed in interior-fill percentage (called Fill23 and Fill77). A two-choice generalization test was then presented with number of test trials varied across groups of subjects. The test samples were 19 squares that ranged in fill value from 23% to 77%; the comparisons were squares with Fill23 and Fill77. The resulting gradients did not vary as a function of number of test trials. When the generalization test was repeated with a third comparison, "neither," the ranges of fill values that occasioned the exclusive selection of Fill23 or Fill77 were direct functions of the number of prior two-choice generalization trials. Finally, a disriminability test revealed that Fill23 and Fill77 were disciminable from the intermediate fill values. In Experiment 2, perceptual classes were established with 5 new students using 760 forced-choice generalization test trials. The student were then trained to select a different glyph in the presence of Fill23 and Fill77, followed by a three-choice generalization test in which the 19 fill stimuli served as samples and the two glyphs served as comparisons. The gradients ovelapped with those previously obtained during the three-choice generalization test that used Fill23 and Fill77 as comparisons. Finally, a discriminability test showed that many adjacent stimuli along thc fill dimension were discriminable from each other. Together, the results of both experiments suggest that ranges of fill-based stimuli functioned as members of perceptual classes, and each class also functioned as a transfer network for a new selection-based response. PMID:11516117

  20. Management of advanced primary urethral carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Dayyani, Farshid; Hoffman, Karen; Eifel, Patricia; Guo, Charles; Vikram, Raghu; Pagliaro, Lance C; Pettaway, Curtis

    2014-07-01

    Primary urethral carcinoma (PUC) is a rare malignancy accounting for <1% of genitourinary cancers, with a predilection for men and African-Americans. The sites and histology of urethral carcinoma vary by gender and anatomical location. Squamous cell carcinoma is most common among both genders but adenocarcinomas are noted in 15-35% of cases among women. Obstructive or irritative symptoms and haematuria are common modes of presentation. Clinical evaluation includes cystourethroscopy with biopsy and examination under anaesthesia. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a highly effective method to image the primary tumour while defıning the potential involvement of surrounding structures. Most tumours are localised, with regional metastases to nodal sites seen in up to 30% of cases in both genders, while distant metastases at presentation are rare (0-6%), but occur in up to 40% of cases with recurrent disease. Among men, the two most important prognostic factors are disease location and stage. Low-stage tumours (T1-2) and tumours involving the fossa navicularis or the penile urethra have a better prognosis than higher stage tumours (>T2 or N+) and lesions involving the bulbomembranous urethra. In women, in addition to stage and location, the size of the tumour has also prognostic implications. While surgery and radiation therapy (RT) are of benefit in early stage disease, advanced stage PUC requires multimodal treatment strategies to optimise local control and survival. These include induction chemotherapy followed by surgery or RT and concurrent chemoradiation with or without surgery. The latter strategy has been used successfully to treat other human papillomavirus-related cancers of the vagina, cervix and anus and may be of value in achieving organ preservation. Given the rarity of PUC, prospective multi-institutional studies are needed to better define the optimal treatment approach for this disease entity. PMID:24447439

  1. The Effects of Primary Care Versus Traditional Training on Career Choice in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Crain, Lucy S.; Dienst, Evelyn R.; Malloy, Mary J.

    1981-01-01

    In response to concerns questioning the relevance for future pediatric generalists of traditional hospital-based, subspecialty-oriented pediatric residency training, new residency programs emphasizing increased ambulatory, continuity care training experiences have been developed. We compared the career activities of physicians who had received their pediatric residency training in the traditional, predominantly inpatient program and in the predominantly ambulatory primary care program at the University of California, San Francisco. Three groups were surveyed: (1) pre-1975, those who received training in the traditional program before 1975, (2) post-1975, those who were trained in the traditional program after 1975 and (3) primary care, those who received their training in the primary care program beginning in 1975. The results indicate that more than twice as many former primary care residents as traditional residents are practicing primary care. Since the development of two pediatric training tracks, satisfaction with program relevance has increased among those who practice primary care. The results indicate that there is a greater commitment to primary care practice among residents trained in the primary care program. PMID:7340128

  2. Contraceptive introduction and the management of choice: the role of Cyclofem in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Simmons, R; Fajans, P; Lubis, F

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a programmatic perspective on the relationship between the introduction of new contraceptive technology and expanding contraceptive options, using the example of Cyclofem in Indonesia. Past approaches to contraceptive introduction have considered only the characteristics of the new method in the decision-making process. In assessing whether the introduction of a new method actually expands contraceptive choice for women and whether the program has the managerial capabilities to assure quality of care in this process, the authors argue that consideration must be given to all methods within a delivery system and how new technology relates to the management of contraceptive choice. Using this perspective, the authors suggest that choice would not necessarily be expanded with scaled-up service delivery of a new once-a month injectable in the Indonesian public sector context. PMID:8045135

  3. Impact of an informed choice invitation on uptake of screening for diabetes in primary care (DICISION): trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Eleanor; Prevost, A Toby; Griffin, Simon; Kellar, Ian; Sutton, Stephen; Parker, Michael; Sanderson, Simon; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Marteau, Theresa M

    2009-01-01

    Background Screening invitations have traditionally been brief, providing information only about population benefits. Presenting information about the limited individual benefits and potential harms of screening to inform choice may reduce attendance, particularly in the more socially deprived. At the same time, amongst those who attend, it might increase motivation to change behavior to reduce risks. This trial assesses the impact on attendance and motivation to change behavior of an invitation that facilitates informed choices about participating in diabetes screening in general practice. Three hypotheses are tested: 1. Attendance at screening for diabetes is lower following an informed choice compared with a standard invitation. 2. There is an interaction between the type of invitation and social deprivation: attendance following an informed choice compared with a standard invitation is lower in those who are more rather than less socially deprived. 3. Amongst those who attend for screening, intentions to change behavior to reduce risks of complications in those subsequently diagnosed with diabetes are stronger following an informed choice invitation compared with a standard invitation. Method/Design 1500 people aged 40–69 years without known diabetes but at high risk are identified from four general practice registers in the east of England. 1200 participants are randomized by households to receive one of two invitations to attend for diabetes screening at their general practices. The intervention invitation is designed to facilitate informed choices, and comprises detailed information and a decision aid. A comparison invitation is based on those currently in use. Screening involves a finger-prick blood glucose test. The primary outcome is attendance for diabetes screening. The secondary outcome is intention to change health related behaviors in those attenders diagnosed with diabetes. A sample size of 1200 ensures 90% power to detect a 10% difference in attendance between arms, and in an estimated 780 attenders, 80% power to detect a 0.2 sd difference in intention between arms. Discussion The DICISION trial is a rigorous pragmatic denominator based clinical trial of an informed choice invitation to diabetes screening, which addresses some key limitations of previous trials. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN73125647 PMID:19232112

  4. Primary healthcare in transition – a qualitative study of how managers perceived a system change

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare in Sweden has undergone widespread reforms in recent years, including freedom of choice regarding provider, freedom of establishment and increased privatisation. The key aims of the reforms were to strengthen the role of the patient and improve performance in terms of access and responsiveness. The aim of this study was to explore how managers at publicly owned primary healthcare centres perceived the transition of the primary healthcare system and the impact it has had on their work. Methods In this qualitative study, 24 managers of publicly owned primary healthcare centres in the metropolitan region of Gothenburg were recruited. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and data were analysed using content analysis inspired by Silverman. Results The analysis revealed two core themes: The transition is perceived as a rapid change, enforced mainly through financial incentives and Prioritisation conflicts arise between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment. The transition has produced powerful and rapid effects that were considered to be both positive and negative. While the new financial incentives were seen as a driving force and a tool for change, they also became a stress factor due to uncertainty, competition with other primary healthcare centres and negative feelings associated with staff cutbacks. The shift in power towards the patient improved access and service but also led to more patients with unreasonable demands. Managers found it difficult to prioritise correctly between patient groups with different needs, demands and levels of empowerment and they were concerned about potentially negative effects on less empowered patients, e.g. multi-morbid patients. Managers also experienced shortcomings in their change management skills. Conclusions This qualitative study shows the complexity of the system change and describes the different effects and perceptions of the transition from a manager’s perspective. This suggests a need for improved follow-up and control in order to monitor and govern system changes and ensure development towards a more effective and sustainable primary healthcare system. PMID:24090138

  5. Diagnosing and managing psychosis in primary care.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Kate; Brain, Susannah; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2011-05-01

    Psychosis is broadly defined as the presence of delusions and hallucinations. It can be organic or functional. The former is secondary to an underlying medical condition, such as delirium or dementia, the latter to a psychiatric disorder, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The identification and treatment of psychosis is vital as it is associated with a 10% lifetime risk of suicide and significant social exclusion. Psychosis can be recognised by taking a thorough history, examining the patient's mental state and obtaining a collateral history. The history usually enables a distinction to be made between bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other causes. Early symptoms often include low mood, declining educational or occupational functioning, poor motivation, changes in sleep, perceptual changes, suspiciousness and mistrust. The patient's appearance, e.g. unkempt or inappropriately attired, may reflect their predominant mental state. There may be signs of agitation, hostility or distractibility. Speech may be disorganised and difficult to follow or there may be evidence of decreased speech. Mood may be depressed or elated or change rapidly. Patients may describe abnormal thoughts and enquiry into thoughts of suicide should be routine. Disturbances of thought such as insertion or withdrawal may be present along with perceptual abnormalities i.e. illusions, hallucinations. Insight varies during the course of a psychotic illness but should be explored as it has implications for management. All patients presenting with first episode psychosis for which no organic cause can be found should be referred to the local early intervention service. In patients with a known diagnosis consider referral if there is: poor response or nonadherence to treatment; intolerable side effects; comorbid substance misuse; risk to self or others. PMID:21714473

  6. Managing dengue fever in primary care: A practical approach.

    PubMed

    Lum, Lcs; Ng, C J; Khoo, E M

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a common cause of illness seen in primary care in the tropical and subtropical countries. An understanding of the course of disease progression, risk factors, recognition of the warning signs and look out for clinical problems during the different phases of the disease will enable primary care physicians to manage dengue fever in an appropriate and timely manner to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:25893065

  7. Administration to innovation: the evolving management challenge in primary care.

    PubMed

    Laing, A; Marnoch, G; McKee, L; Joshi, R; Reid, J

    1997-01-01

    The concept of the primary health-care team involving an increasingly diverse range of health care professionals is widely recognized as central to the pursuit of a primary care-led health service in the UK. Although GPs are formally recognized as the team leaders, there is little by way of policy prescription as to how team roles and relationships should be developed, or evidence as to how their roles have in fact evolved. Thus the notion of the primary health-care team while commonly employed, is in reality lacking definition with the current contribution of practice managers to the operation of this team being poorly understood. Focusing on the career backgrounds of practice managers, their range of responsibilities, and their involvement in innovation in general practice, presents a preliminary account of a chief scientist office-funded project examining the role being played by practice managers in primary health-care innovation. More specifically, utilizing data gained from the ongoing study, contextualizes the role played by practice managers in the primary health-care team. By exploring the business environment surrounding the NHS general practice, the research seeks to understand the evolving world of the practice manager. Drawing on questionnaire data, reinforced by qualitative data from the current interview phase, describes the role played by practice managers in differing practice contexts. This facilitates a discussion of a set of ideal type general practice organizational and managerial structures. Discusses the relationships and skills required by practice managers in each of these organizational types with reference to data gathered to date in the research. PMID:10173249

  8. Recommendations for the allergy management in the primary care.

    PubMed

    Jutel, M; Papadopoulos, N G; Gronlund, H; Hoffman, H-J; Bohle, B; Hellings, P; Braunstahl, G-J; Braunsthal, G-J; Muraro, A; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P; Zuberbier, T; Agache, I

    2014-06-01

    The majority of patients seeking medical advice for allergic diseases are first seen in a primary care setting. Correct diagnosis with identification of all offending allergens is an absolute prerequisite for appropriate management of allergic disease by the general practitioner. Allergy diagnostic tests recommended for use in primary care are critically reviewed in accordance with the significant workload in a primary care setting. Simplified pathways for recognition and diagnosis of allergic diseases are proposed, that should be further adapted to local (national) conditions. PMID:24628378

  9. Optimizing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P

    2011-02-01

    Diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in primary care is complex, as many clinical symptoms are similar to asthma and heart disease, which may lead to misdiagnosis and suboptimal disease management. Spirometry is the best method for diagnosing COPD and distinguishing between COPD, asthma, and cardiovascular diseases. Airway obstruction is fully reversible in asthma, but not in COPD, and can be confirmed when the postbronchodilator ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity (FVC) is <0.7. Knowledge of COPD treatment guidelines and a proactive attitude toward disease management by primary care physicians are key to improving symptom control and patients' quality of life. Identification of the appropriate drug/inhaler combination, patient education, training on inhaler use followed by regular monitoring, and pulmonary rehabilitation are also vital to successful COPD management. This review outlines steps to aid physicians in devising and implementing an optimal management plan for COPD patients. PMID:21079536

  10. Choice, Cost and Community: The Hidden Complexities of the Rural Primary School Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marion

    2010-01-01

    National rural policy places the local primary school as a key resource within the rural community, yet as a consequence of countywide financial constraints, some small schools are undergoing reorganization, involving amalgamation, federation and school closure. This article considers the complexities involved in the workings of the English rural…

  11. The effect of managed care on the incomes of primary care and specialty physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Simon, C J; Dranove, D; White, W D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of managed care growth on the incomes of primary care and specialist physicians. DATA SOURCES: Data on physician income and managed care penetration from the American Medical Association, Socioeconomic Monitoring System (SMS) Surveys for 1985 and 1993. We use secondary data from the Area Resource File and U.S. Census publications to construct geographical socioeconomic control variables, and we examine data from the National Residency Matching Program. STUDY DESIGN: Two-stage least squares regressions are estimated to determine the effect of local managed care penetration on specialty-specific physician incomes, while controlling for factors associated with local variation in supply and demand and accounting for the potential endogeneity of managed care penetration. DATA COLLECTION: The SMS survey is an annual telephone survey conducted by the American Medical Association of approximately one percent of nonfederal, post-residency U.S. physicians. Response rates average 60-70 percent, and analysis is weighted to account for nonresponse bias. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The incomes of primary care physicians rose most rapidly in states with higher managed care growth, while the income growth of hospital-based specialists was negatively associated with managed care growth. Incomes of medical subspecialists were not significantly affected by managed care growth over this period. These findings are consistent with trends in postgraduate training choices of new physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence is consistent with a relative increase in the demand for primary care physicians and a decline in the demand for some specialists under managed care. Market adjustments have important implications for health policy and physician workforce planning. PMID:9685122

  12. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays: An Unexpected Challenge for the Choice of an Assay in Primary Cervical Screening

    PubMed Central

    Ejegod, Ditte Møller; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41% tested positive on all four. Agreement was lower in women aged ≥30 years (30%, vs. 49% at <30 years), in primary screening samples (29%, vs. 38% in follow-up samples), and in women with concurrent normal cytology (22%, vs. 68% with abnormal cytology). Among primary screening samples from women aged 30–65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women. PMID:24466262

  13. Total Quality Management Practices in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toremen, Fatih; Karakus, Mehmet; Yasan, Tezcan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of total quality management (TQM) practices in primary schools based on teachers' perceptions, and how their perceptions are related to different variables. Design/methodology/approach: In this study, a survey based descriptive scanning model was used. This study was carried out in…

  14. Total Quality Management Practices in Turkish Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toremen, Fatih; Karakus, Mehmet; Yasan, Tezcan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of total quality management (TQM) practices in primary schools based on teachers' perceptions, and how their perceptions are related to different variables. Design/methodology/approach: In this study, a survey based descriptive scanning model was used. This study was carried out in

  15. Cardiovascular risk management in diabetes in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-08-01

    This communication describes simple targets and interventions, aimed at cardiovascular risk reduction in diabetes mellitus, which are feasible at primary care level. It summarizes therapeutic goals and strategies for management of high blood pressure, dyslipidaemia, and anti-platelet therapy. PMID:26228345

  16. Primary Care Evaluation and Management of Gastroenterologic Issues in Women.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vijaya L; Micic, Dejan; Kim, Karen E

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders often present to the primary care setting where initial preventive, diagnostic, and treatment strategies are implemented. This article reviews the presentation and diagnosis of common gastrointestinal disorders, including colorectal cancer, irritable bowel syndrome, peptic ulcer disease, gallbladder disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, gastroesophageal reflux, and Barrett's esophagus. We focus on the evaluation and management of these diseases in women. PMID:27212096

  17. Women and managed care: satisfaction with provider choice, access to care, plan costs and coverage.

    PubMed

    Wyn, R; Collins, K S; Brown, E R

    1997-01-01

    This article reports on differences in satisfaction with provider choice, access to care, and plan costs and coverage between women enrolled in fee-for-service and those in managed car plans. It also examines differences in satisfaction, access, and costs and coverage between higher and lower income women and between those in reported fair or poor health and those in excellent or good health, among women in managed care plans. The data for this study are from The Commonwealth Fund's 1994 Managed Care Survey, which included 1,544 women with employer- or union-sponsored insurance in Boston, Los Angeles, and Miami. The study found that women in managed care were less satisfied with provider choice and access to services, but more satisfied with out-of-pocket costs for services and the range of services covered. Both low-income women and those in fair to poor health reported more problems with access barriers than did either higher income women or those in excellent or good health. PMID:9127994

  18. Managed Care Quality of Care and Plan Choice in New York SCHIP

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hangsheng; Phelps, Charles E; Veazie, Peter J; Dick, Andrew W; Klein, Jonathan D; Shone, Laura P; Noyes, Katia; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine whether low-income parents of children enrolled in the New York State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) choose managed care plans with better quality of care. Data Sources 2001 New York SCHIP evaluation data; 2001 New York State Managed Care Plan Performance Report; 2000 New York State Managed Care Enrollment Report. Study Design Each market was defined as a county. A final sample of 2,325 new enrollees was analyzed after excluding those in markets with only one SCHIP plan. Plan quality was measured using seven Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey (CAHPS) and three Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) scores. A conditional logit model was applied with plan and individual/family characteristics as covariates. Principle Findings There were 30 plans in the 45 defined markets. The choice probability increased 2.5 percentage points for each unit increase in the average CAHPS score, and the association was significantly larger in children with special health care needs. However, HEDIS did not show any statistically significant association with plan choice. Conclusions Low-income parents do choose managed care plans with higher CAHPS scores for their newly enrolled children, suggesting that overall quality could improve over time because of the dynamics of enrollment. PMID:19208091

  19. Sustainable Assessment for Large Science Classes: Non-Multiple Choice, Randomised Assignments through a Learning Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Madeleine

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a tool that generates randomised, non-multiple choice assessment within the BlackBoard Learning Management System interface. An accepted weakness of multiple-choice assessment is that it cannot elicit learning outcomes from upper levels of Biggs' SOLO taxonomy. However, written assessment items require…

  20. How are Scottish integrated primary care organisations managed?

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; Scott, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    In the absence of central guidance on the development of integrated primary care organisations, a diversity of models is emerging. This paper examines the management arrangements of Scottish local health care co-operatives (LHCCs). A postal questionnaire survey of all 79 LHCCs was conducted. The response rate was 35 per cent. LHCCs set up management bodies and created workgroups. Stakeholder representation was not socially inclusive: attempts to engage patients and local communities were limited and need to be stepped up to increase responsiveness and accountability to local health care users. LHCCs were also vehicles for local ownership and control of health care provision. To facilitate co-operation among participating practices, LHCCs need to focus on issues of leadership, organisation, and involvement in decision making. Finally, management expenditure per capita was comparable with that of other types of integrated primary care organisations. PMID:12800278

  1. Building home care into managed long-term care: the VNS CHOICE model.

    PubMed

    Fisher, H M; Raphael, T G

    2000-06-01

    New approaches to home and community-centered long term care offer strategic opportunities for home health providers to thrive by providing expanded service options for the growing population of chronically ill, frail elders. The traditional expertise of home health providers makes a powerful combination with the flexibility of capitation financing to successfully meet both the needs of dually eligible older adults and government mandates to reduce overall expenditures. VNS CHOICE, a home-centered, managed long-term care program, is built on the principles and delivery system of home health care. By understanding the VNS CHOICE service delivery model and lessons learned from its first two years of operating experience, home care providers across the country may identify innovations to incorporate into their agency product lines. PMID:11010145

  2. [Professional autonomy in the choice and management of therapy. Medicolegal aspects].

    PubMed

    Bolino, G; Alfano, C

    2002-02-01

    Any discussion of the delicate subject of a doctor's autonomy in the choice and management of therapy entails addressing the intimate question of professional and ethical conduct. The professional freedom to choose which therapy to use continues to be the most quintessential expression of the medical professional and, in respect of the primary purpose of safeguarding health, must be aligned with: the choices of the informed patient or his/her legal representatives, existing guidelines and the equitable allocation of resources. On these grounds, the author sets out brief considerations regarding a number of issues frequently raised in the everyday work of the pediatrician and neonatologist: from the doctor's autonomy to adopt a diagnostic-therapeutic approach, with special reference to the prescription of drugs and the subtle differences compared to pharmacological trials, to the promotion and protection of breastfeeding, with explicit reference to the Ministry of Health's recent Circular no. 16 of 24.10.2000 ("Promotion and protection of breastfeeding") which, following a cursory reading of the text, appears to highlight restrictions to the pediatrician's decision-making autonomy. Special emphasis is also given to the medicolegal problems of caring for high-risk neonates. The clinical practice of neonatology often places the doctor in "critical" decision-making situations, with far from negligible ethical and moral implications, not to mention juridical and forensic ones. The author sets out a number of decision-making parameters for use as guidelines: the statistical criterion, the legal criterion and the clinical criterion, the only one capable of adjusting to scientific progress and to the specific technical and professional resources of the medical centre where the doctor is required to intervene in order to preserve even the simple "possibility" of autonomous life for the fetus. From this point of view, the so-called chronological vitality and scientifically proven statistics form part of the numerous criteria available for clinical evaluation. If the clinical criterion is not met, namely if the product of conception is not vital and has never been fully alive in the biologically complete sense of the term, then the omission of therapeutic support is not particularly important in professional and juridical terms. On the contrary, it would show an obstinate persistence of therapy, which would be both ethically and professionally incorrect. Lastly, even during the final stages of life, the doctor must play a participatory role not only by providing palliative treatment but also, and above all, offering moral assistance to sanction the ineluctable end of the therapeutic alliance, that "feeling together" which is the most literal and profound meaning of the word "consent", indicating both "information" but to an even greater extent "discussion" and "empathy" with the patient and his/her family. PMID:11862168

  3. A case of severe ectopic ACTH syndrome from an occult primary – diagnostic and management dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Katherine; Amer, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Summary Resection of primary tumour is the management of choice in patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome. However, tumours may remain unidentified or occult in spite of extensive efforts at trying to locate them. This can, therefore, pose a major management issue as uncontrolled hypercortisolaemia can lead to life-threatening infections. We present the case of a 66-year-old gentleman with ectopic ACTH syndrome from an occult primary tumour with multiple significant complications from hypercortisolaemia. Ectopic nature of his ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome was confirmed by non-suppression with high-dose dexamethasone suppression test and bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling. The primary ectopic source remained unidentified in spite of extensive anatomical and functional imaging studies, including CT scans and Dotatate-PET scan. Medical adrenolytic treatment at maximum tolerated doses failed to control his hypercortisolaemia, which led to recurrent intra-abdominal and pelvic abscesses, requiring multiple surgical interventions. Laparoscopic bilateral adrenalectomy was considered but decided against given concerns of technical difficulties due to recurrent intra-abdominal infections and his moribund state. Eventually, alcohol ablation of adrenal glands by retrograde adrenal vein approach was attempted, which resulted in biochemical remission of Cushing's syndrome. Our case emphasizes the importance of aggressive management of hypercortisolaemia in order to reduce the associated morbidity and mortality and also demonstrates that techniques like percutaneous adrenal ablation using a retrograde venous approach may be extremely helpful in patients who are otherwise unable to undergo bilateral adrenalectomy. Learning points Evaluation and management of patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome from an unidentified primary tumour can be very challenging.Persisting hypercortisolaemia in this setting can lead to debilitating and even life-threatening complications and hence needs to be managed aggressively.Bilateral adrenalectomy should be considered when medical treatment is ineffective or poorly tolerated.Percutaneous adrenal ablation may be considered in patients who are otherwise unable to undergo bilateral adrenalectomy. PMID:26649179

  4. Factors influencing the choice of anesthetic technique for primary hip and knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wong, Patrick By; McVicar, Jason; Nelligan, Kathleen; Bleackley, Joanne C; McCartney, Colin Jl

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence in the literature, continuing wide variation exists in anesthetic technique for primary joint arthroplasties. Recent evidence suggests that neuraxial anesthesia has advantages over general anesthesia in terms of mortality, major morbidity and healthcare utilization. Yet, despite the proposed benefits, utilization of these two techniques varies greatly across geographical locations, with general anesthesia being most common for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in parts of the world. We uncover some factors that promote or hinder the use of neuraxial anesthesia in THA and TKA. Healthcare professionals should be familiarized with the evidence for neuraxial anesthesia, and unbiased educational material should be developed for patients regarding anesthetic options for THA and TKA in order to promote best practice. PMID:26984367

  5. Guideline for primary care management of headache in adults

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Werner J.; Findlay, Ted; Moga, Carmen; Scott, N. Ann; Harstall, Christa; Taenzer, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To increase the use of evidence-informed approaches to diagnosis, investigation, and treatment of headache for patients in primary care. Quality of evidence A comprehensive search was conducted for relevant guidelines and systematic reviews published between January 2000 and May 2011. The guidelines were critically appraised using the AGREE (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool, and the 6 highest-quality guidelines were used as seed guidelines for the guideline adaptation process. Main message A multidisciplinary guideline development group of primary care providers and other specialists crafted 91 specific recommendations using a consensus process. The recommendations cover diagnosis, investigation, and management of migraine, tension-type, medication-overuse, and cluster headache. Conclusion A clinical practice guideline for the Canadian health care context was created using a guideline adaptation process to assist multidisciplinary primary care practitioners in providing evidence-informed care for patients with headache. PMID:26273080

  6. Management of common fungal infections in primary care.

    PubMed

    Parker, Julius

    Nurses are increasingly the first point of contact for patients in primary care settings such as general practice surgeries, community clinics and walk-in centres. Such roles are likely to continue to expand. This article discusses diagnosis and management options for the most common fungal infections and describes clinical situations that might require further investigation or referral. Accurate diagnosis is essential for successful therapy and, in all cases, can provide an opportunity for discussion, reassurance and advice. PMID:19634606

  7. Implementation of a primary care physician network obesity management program.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, S; Bellman, M; Saltsman, P; Garvey, D; Pimstone, K; Skootsky, S; Wang, H J; Elashoff, R; Heber, D

    2001-11-01

    Most primary care physicians do not treat obesity, citing lack of time, resources, insurance reimbursement, and knowledge of effective interventions as significant barriers. To address this need, a 10-minute intervention delivered by the primary care physician was coupled with individual dietary counseling sessions delivered by a registered dietitian via telephone with an automated calling system (House-Calls, Mobile, AL). Patients were seen for follow-up by their physician at weeks 4, 12, 24, 36 and 52. A total of 252 patients (202 women and 50 men) were referred by 18 primary care physicians to the program. The comorbid conditions reported for all patients at baseline included low back pain, 29% (n = 72); hypertension, 45% (n = 113); hypercholesterolemia, 41% (n = 104); type 2 diabetes, 10% (n = 26); and sleep apnea, 5% (n = 12). When offered a choice of meal plans based on foods or meal replacements, two-thirds of patients (n = 166) chose to use meal replacements (Ultra Slim-Fast; Slim-Fast Foods Co., West Palm Beach, FL) at least once daily. Baseline weights of subjects averaged 200 +/- 46 lb for women (n = 202) and 237 +/- 45 lb for men (n = 50). Patients completing 6 months in the program lost an average of 19.0 +/- 4.0 lb for women (n = 94) and 15.5 +/- 8.2 lb for men (n = 26). Physicians reported a high degree of satisfaction with the program, suggesting that a brief, effective physician-directed program with nutritionist support by telephone can be implemented in a busy primary care office. PMID:11707560

  8. Making Choices about the Use of the Outdoors in Manager and Management Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mossman, Alan

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest a framework for analyzing "outdoor management development" so as to help potential consumers assess the compatibility of provider organizations and their own. (Author/SSH)

  9. Changing concepts in management of primary obstructive megaureter

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, M.A.; Escala, J.; Snyder, H.M. III; Heyman, S.; Duckett, J.W.

    1989-08-01

    The management of neonatal urinary tract dilatations represents one of the most challenging dilemmas in pediatric urology today. We have been confronted with 44 renal units in 35 neonates diagnosed as having primary obstructive megaureter during the last 6 years. Of these units 23 in 17 infants were diagnosed antenatally and 20 (87 per cent) have been managed without surgical intervention. Notably, 16 renal units were graded as moderate to severe megaureters by an excretory urogram. The decision to manage conservatively was based on the initial extraction of the /sup 99m/diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid renal scan (the extraction factor). This estimate of absolute renal function has been used to differentiate dilatations with obstructive implications for the renal parenchyma from those without. Significantly, expectant treatment has resulted in improvement of dilatation on sequential excretory urograms in 15 megaureters and none has shown a deterioration of function by renal scan. Similar diagnostic criterion also has resulted in conservative management for 12 of 21 additional neonatal megaureters seen during this period with symptoms or they were discovered serendipitously. Only 2 of these 12 megaureters required surgical correction. The neonatal primary megaureter appears in many cases to represent a different entity than those that commonly presented before the advent of antenatal and perinatal diagnosis.

  10. Controversies in the management of primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Nayagam, Jeremy S; Pereira, Stephen P; Devlin, John; Harrison, Phillip M; Joshi, Deepak

    2016-02-18

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains a rare but significant disease, which affects mainly young males in association with inflammatory bowel disease. There have been few advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the condition and no therapeutics with proven mortality benefit aside from liver transplantation. There remain areas of controversy in the management of PSC which include the differentiation from other cholangiopathies, in particular immunoglobulin G4 related sclerosing cholangitis, the management of dominant biliary strictures, and the role of ursodeoxycholic acid. In addition, the timing of liver transplantation in PSC remains difficult to predict with standard liver severity scores. In this review, we address these controversies and highlight the latest evidence base in the management of PSC. PMID:26925200

  11. Controversies in the management of primary sclerosing cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Nayagam, Jeremy S; Pereira, Stephen P; Devlin, John; Harrison, Phillip M; Joshi, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) remains a rare but significant disease, which affects mainly young males in association with inflammatory bowel disease. There have been few advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the condition and no therapeutics with proven mortality benefit aside from liver transplantation. There remain areas of controversy in the management of PSC which include the differentiation from other cholangiopathies, in particular immunoglobulin G4 related sclerosing cholangitis, the management of dominant biliary strictures, and the role of ursodeoxycholic acid. In addition, the timing of liver transplantation in PSC remains difficult to predict with standard liver severity scores. In this review, we address these controversies and highlight the latest evidence base in the management of PSC. PMID:26925200

  12. [Management of the esophageal candidiasis by the primary care physician].

    PubMed

    Behrens, Garance; Bocherens, Astrid; Senn, Nicolas

    2014-05-14

    Esophageal candidiasis is one of the most common opportunistic infections in patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This pathology is also found in patients without overt immunodeficiency. Other risk factors are known to be associated with this disease like inhaled or systemic corticosteroid treatment or proton-pump inhibitors and H2 receptor antagonists. In the absence of identified risk factors, a primary immune deficiency should be sought. Prevention of esophageal candidiasis is based primarily on the identification of risk factors, and a better control of them. This article presents a review of the physiopathology, clinical presentation and management of esophageal candidiasis by primary care physicians. We will also discuss ways of preventing esophageal candidiasis when necessary. PMID:24930154

  13. Management of primary sclerosing cholangitis: Conventions and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Chandok, Natasha; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2012-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic inflammatory cholangiopathy that results in fibrotic strictures and dilations of the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. PSC is uncommon, occurs predominantly in males and has a strong association with inflammatory bowel disease. While the pathogenesis of PSC has not been fully elucidated, emerging evidence supports roles for the innate and adaptive immune systems, and genome-wide analyses have identified several genetic associations. Using the best available evidence, the present review summarizes the current understanding of the diagnosis, pathogenesis and management of PSC. Despite its rarity, there is an urgent need for collaborative research efforts to advance therapeutic options for PSC beyond liver transplantation. PMID:22590699

  14. Diagnosis and management of dementia in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Jasneet; Dobbs, Bonnie; McKay, Rhianne; Kirwan, Catherine; Cooper, Tim; Marin, Alexandra; Gupta, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current identification and management of patients with dementia in a primary care setting; to determine the accuracy of identification of dementia by primary care physicians; to examine reasons (triggers) for referral of patients with suspected dementia to the geriatric assessment team (GAT) from the primary care setting; and to compare indices of identification and management of dementia between the GAT and primary care network (PCN) physicians and between the GAT and community care (CC). Design Retrospective chart review and comparisons, based on quality indicators of dementia care as specified in the Third Canadian Consensus Conference on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia, were conducted from matching charts obtained from 3 groups of health care providers. Setting Semirural region in the province of Alberta involving a PCN, CC, and a GAT. Participants One hundred patients who had been assessed by the GAT randomly selected from among those diagnosed with dementia or mild cognitive impairment by the GAT. Main outcome measures Diagnosis of dementia and indications of high-quality dementia care listed in PCN, CC, and GAT charts. Results Only 59% of the patients diagnosed with dementia by the GAT had a documented diagnosis of dementia in their PCN charts. None of the 12 patients diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment by the GAT had been diagnosed by the PCN. Memory decline was the most common reason for referral to the GAT. There were statistically significant differences between the PCN and the GAT on all quality indicators of dementia, with underuse of diagnostic and functional assessment tools and lack of attention to wandering, driving, medicolegal, and caregiver issues, and underuse of community supports in the PCN. There was higher congruence between CC and the GAT on assessment and care indices. Conclusion Dementia care remains a challenge in primary care. Within our primary care setting, there are opportunities for synergistic collaboration among the health care professionals from the PCN, CC, and the GAT. Currently they exist as individual entities in the system. An integrated model of care is required in order to build capacity to meet the needs of an aging population. PMID:24829010

  15. Choice of Scottish Gaelic-Medium and Welsh-Medium Education at the Primary and Secondary School Stages: Parent and Pupil Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hanlon, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparative study of the reasons for parental choice of Scottish Gaelic-medium and Welsh-medium primary education in the year 2000 and of the reasons for pupils' decisions to continue with Gaelic or Welsh-medium education at secondary school in 2007. Parents in both contexts cited the quality of Celtic-medium…

  16. Parental Choice of Schooling, Learning Processes and Inter-Ethnic Friendship Patterns: The Case of Malay Students in Chinese Primary Schools in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sua, Tan Yao; Ngah, Kamarudin; Darit, Sezali Md.

    2013-01-01

    This study surveys 200 Malay students enrolled in three Chinese primary schools in relation to three issues, i.e., parental choice of schooling, learning processes and inter-ethnic friendship patterns. The three issues are explored through a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Parental expectations for their…

  17. Parental Choice of Schooling, Learning Processes and Inter-Ethnic Friendship Patterns: The Case of Malay Students in Chinese Primary Schools in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sua, Tan Yao; Ngah, Kamarudin; Darit, Sezali Md.

    2013-01-01

    This study surveys 200 Malay students enrolled in three Chinese primary schools in relation to three issues, i.e., parental choice of schooling, learning processes and inter-ethnic friendship patterns. The three issues are explored through a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Parental expectations for their

  18. Current Management of Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Bovi, Joseph

    2010-03-01

    Primary central nervous cell lymphoma (PCNSL) is an uncommon neoplasm of the brain, leptomeninges, and rarely the spinal cord. Initially thought to be characteristically associated with congenital, iatrogenic, or acquired immunosuppression, PCNSL is now recognized with increasing frequency in immunocompetent individuals. The role of surgery is limited to establishing diagnosis, as PCNSL is often multifocal with a propensity to involve the subarachnoid space. A whole-brain radiation volume has empirically been used to adequately address the multifocal tumor frequently encountered at the time of PCNSL diagnosis. Despite high rates of response after whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), rapid recurrence is common and long-term survival is the exception. Chemotherapy alone or in combination with WBRT has more recently become the treatment of choice. Most effective regimens contain high-dose methotrexate and or other agents that are capable of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. High response rates and improved survival with the use of chemotherapy has led to treatment strategies that defer or eliminate WBRT in hopes of lessening the risk of neurotoxicity attributed to WBRT. Unfortunately, elimination of WBRT is also associated with a higher rate of relapse. Combined chemotherapy and WBRT regimens are now being explored that use lower total doses of radiation and altered fractionation schedules with the aim of maintaining high rates of tumor control while minimizing neurotoxicity. Pretreatment, multifactor prognostic indices have recently been described that may allow selection of treatment regimens that strike an appropriate balance of risk and benefit for the individual PCNSL patient.

  19. Depression management in primary care: an observational study of management changes related to PHQ-9 score for depression monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael; Ali, Saima; Stuart, Beth; Leydon, Gerry M; Ovens, Jessica; Goodall, Chris; Kendrick, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Background Since 2009 UK GPs have been incentivised to use depression severity scores to monitor patients’ response to treatment after 5–12 weeks of treatment. Aim To examine the association between the severity scores obtained and follow-up questionnaires to monitor depression and subsequent changes made to the treatment of it. Design and setting A retrospective cohort study utilising routine primary care records was conducted between April 2009 and March 2011 in 13 general practices recruited from within Hampshire, Wiltshire, and Southampton City primary care trusts. Method Records were examined of 604 patients who had received a new diagnosis of depression since 1 April 2009, and who had completed the nine-item depression scale of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) at initial diagnosis and a subsequent PHQ-9 within 6 months. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) for a change in depression management. Change in management was defined as change in antidepressant drug prescription, dose, or referral. Results Controlling for the effects of potentially confounding factors, patients who showed an inadequate response in score change at the time of second assessment were nearly five times as likely to experience a subsequent change to treatment in comparison with those who showed an adequate response (OR 4.72, 95% confidence interval = 2.83 to 7.86). Conclusion GPs’ decisions to change treatment or to make referrals following a second PHQ-9 appear to be in line with guidance from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence for the monitoring of depression in primary care. Although the present study demonstrates an association between a lack of change in questionnaire scores and treatment changes, the extent to which scores influence choice and whether they are associated with improvements in depression outcomes is an important area for further research. PMID:22687239

  20. Reducing uncertainty in managing respiratory tract infections in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Naomi; Francis, Nick A; Butler, Chris C

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) remain the commonest reason for acute consultations in primary care in resource-rich countries. Their spectrum and severity has changed from the time that antibiotics were discovered, largely from improvements in the socioeconomic determinants of health as well as vaccination. The benefits from antibiotic treatment for common RTIs have been shown to be largely overstated. Nevertheless, serious infections do occur. Currently, no clinical features or diagnostic test, alone or in combination, adequately determine diagnosis, aetiology, prognosis, or response to treatment. This narrative review focuses on emerging evidence aimed at helping clinicians reduce and manage uncertainty in treating RTIs. Consultation rate and prescribing rate trends are described, evidence of increasing rates of complications are discussed, and studies and the association with antibiotic prescribing are examined. Methods of improving diagnosis and identifying those patients who are at increased risk of complications from RTIs, using clinical scoring systems, biomarkers, and point of care tests are also discussed. The evidence for alternative management options for RTIs are summarised and the methods for changing public and clinicians' beliefs about antibiotics, including ways in which we can improve clinicianpatient communication skills for management of RTIs, are described. PMID:21144191

  1. A Training Intervention to Improve Information Management in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Reed, Virginia A.; Homa, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Training programs designed to improve information management have been implemented but not adequately tested. Three critical components for information management were tested in a randomized control study: (1) knowledge of valid, synthesized summary information, (2) skills to use Web-based resources that provide access to these summaries, and (3) use of Web-based resources in clinical practice. Methods Twenty-four primary care practices were provided with computers and high-speed Internet access and then matched, with half randomly assigned to receive training and half to receive training at a later date. Training was designed to address knowledge, skills, and use of Web-based information. Outcomes were assessed by comparing baseline and follow-up questionnaires that focused on five conceptual domains related to Web-based resource use for patient care decisions and patient education. Results Compared to the delayed training group, the initial training group increased their knowledge and skill of Web-based resources and use for patient care decisions. Some measures of communication with patients about using Web-based resources and of incorporating use of Web-based resources into daily practice increased from baseline to follow-up for all participants. Conclusions Our findings suggest that training and providing computers and Internet connections have measurable effects on information management behaviors. PMID:18773781

  2. Kid's Choice Program improves weight management behaviors and weight status in school children.

    PubMed

    Hendy, Helen M; Williams, Keith E; Camise, Thomas S

    2011-04-01

    The present study examined the effectiveness of the Kid's Choice Program (KCP) for increasing children's weight management behaviors, and decreasing body mass index percentile (BMI%) for overweight and average-weight children. It also evaluated KCP characteristics relevant to long-term application in schools. Participants included 382 children assigned to two groups: a KCP group that received token rewards for three "Good Health Behaviors" including eating fruits or vegetables first at meals (FVFIRST), choosing low-fat and low-sugar healthy drinks (HDRINK), and showing 5000 exercise steps recorded on pedometers (EXERCISE), or a control group that received token rewards for three "Good Citizenship Behaviors." School lunch observations and pedometer records were completed for one month under baseline and three months under reward conditions. The school nurse calculated children's BMI% one year before baseline, at baseline, at the end of KCP application, and six months later. The KCP increased FVFIRST, HDRINK, and EXERCISE from baseline through reward conditions, with ANCOVAs demonstrating that these increases were associated with both the offer of reward and nearby peer models. Overweight (n=112) and average-weight (n=200) children showed drops in BMI% after the three-month KCP, but overweight children re-gained weight six months later, suggesting the need for more ongoing KCP application. HDRINK choice was the behavior most associated with BMI% drops for overweight children. Small teams of parent volunteers effectively delivered the KCP, and school staff endorsed parent volunteers as the best personnel to deliver the KCP, which costs approximately two U.S. dollars per child per month of application. PMID:21277924

  3. Academy of Medicine-Ministry of Health Clinical Practice Guidelines: Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Seong Feei; Agarwal, Rachna; Chan, Jerry; Chia, Sing Joo; Cho, Li Wei; Lim, Lean Huat; Lau, Matthew Sie Kuei; Loh, Sheila Kia Ee; Hendricks, Marianne Sybille; Nair, Suresh; Quah, Joanne Hui Min; Tan, Heng Hao; Wong, PC; Yeong, Cheng Toh; Yu, Su Ling

    2014-01-01

    The Academy of Medicine (AMS) and Ministry of Health (MOH) have developed the clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level to provide doctors and patients in Singapore with evidence-based treatment for infertility. This article reproduces the introduction and executive summary (with recommendations from the guidelines) from the AMS-MOH clinical practice guidelines on Assessment and Management of Infertility at Primary Healthcare Level, for the information of SMJ readers. Chapters and page numbers mentioned in the reproduced extract refer to the full text of the guidelines, which are available from the Ministry of Health website: http://www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/healthprofessionalsportal/doctors/guidelines/cpg_ medical/2013/cpgmed_infertility.html. The recommendations should be used with reference to the full text of the guidelines. Following this article are multiple choice questions based on the full text of the guidelines. PMID:24570313

  4. Management of Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Primary Care: Identifying the Challenges and Unmet Needs

    PubMed Central

    Feltner, Douglas E.; Dugar, Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Background: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in primary care, although it is often underrecognized and undertreated. GAD is chronic, disabling, and associated with other health problems. Treatment response is often unsatisfactory, but the clinical evidence base for new treatments has expanded substantially in the past decade and suggests a growing range of options for reducing the burden of GAD. The objective of this article was to review current literature on GAD and its management to provide an overview of the clinical importance of GAD in primary care and available treatments. Data Sources: Recent studies (ie, over the past decade) on the epidemiology and treatment of GAD were identified by searching Medline using the term generalized anxiety disorder only and in combination with the terms epidemiology and treatment and for each drug class (benzodiazepines, azapirones, antidepressants, antihistamines, alpha-2-delta ligands, and antipsychotics) and for named drugs (buspirone, venlafaxine, duloxetine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, olanzapine, paroxetine, pregabalin, quetiapine, and risperidone in addition to psychological therapies and cognitive-behavioral therapy. The literature search was conducted in August 2008 for the period 1987–2009. Study Selection: Studies were included if judged to be relevant to a review of the epidemiology and management of GAD. Articles were excluded if they were not written in English or were published more than 10 years before the literature search was conducted. A few older studies were included for which more recent research evidence was not available. Recent national and international guidelines for the management of GAD were also reviewed. Data Extraction/Synthesis: Most currently available interventions have similar overall efficacy, and treatment choices should reflect the situation of individual patients. Important unmet needs exist for treatments (1) that work rapidly, with (2) broad spectrum benefits, (3) that can improve rates of remission and well-being, (4) are devoid of risk for withdrawal symptoms, and (5) have few if any adverse interactions with other drugs. Additional needs include (6) safer drugs for the elderly, (7) safe and effective drugs for children with GAD, (8) further evaluation of psychotherapy, and (9) understanding the appropriate circumstances for, and optimal choices of, drug combination. Conclusion: While the development of novel treatments evolves, current management approaches can focus on improving identification and defining optimal use of available therapies for GAD. PMID:20694114

  5. Practice parameter for the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Francisco A; Khan, David A; Ballas, Zuhair K; Chinen, Javier; Frank, Michael M; Hsu, Joyce T; Keller, Michael; Kobrynski, Lisa J; Komarow, Hirsh D; Mazer, Bruce; Nelson, Robert P; Orange, Jordan S; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Sorensen, Ricardo U; Verbsky, James W; Bernstein, David I; Blessing-Moore, Joann; Lang, David; Nicklas, Richard A; Oppenheimer, John; Portnoy, Jay M; Randolph, Christopher R; Schuller, Diane; Spector, Sheldon L; Tilles, Stephen; Wallace, Dana

    2015-11-01

    The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing the "Practice parameter for the diagnosis and management of primary immunodeficiency." This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task Force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion. PMID:26371839

  6. Resistant hypertension: an approach to management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Yaxley, Julian P.; Thambar, Sam V.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is widely encountered in family medicine. Despite its prevalence, many patients have uncontrolled or difficult-to-control blood pressure. Resistant hypertension is defined as hypertension that is poorly responsive to treatment and requires the use of multiple medications to achieve acceptable blood pressure ranges. It may be a consequence of secondary hypertension or have no identifiable cause. Resistant hypertension is important to recognise because it places patients at risk of end-organ damage. Primary care physicians should be aware of the therapeutic approach for hypertension when traditional therapy fails. This article aims to familiarise readers with the evaluation and management of resistant hypertension by outlining the most recent evidence-based treatment options. PMID:25949966

  7. Primary immunodeficiency in the neonate: Early diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Walkovich, Kelly; Connelly, James A

    2016-02-01

    Many primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) manifest in the neonatal period but can be challenging to diagnose and manage optimally. In part, the difficulty stems from the natural immaturity of the neonatal immune system that may mask immune deficits and/or complicate interpretation of clinical findings and laboratory assays. The great diversity of PIDs - from innate immune system defects to those that impact the humoral and/or cellular components of the adaptive immune system - and the rapid rate at which new PIDs are being discovered makes it challenging for practioners to stay current. Moreover, recent appreciation for immune deficiencies that lead to autoinflammation and autoimmunity have broadened the spectrum of neonatal PID, adding additional complexity to an already intricate field. This article serves to highlight the deficiencies in the neonatal immune system, while providing a review of the more common PIDs that present in the neonate and guidelines for diagnosis and supportive care. PMID:26776073

  8. Review on the Management of Primary Congenital Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu Chan, Julia Yan; Choy, Bonnie NK; Ng, Alex LK

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite being documented in medical history from over 2400 years ago, primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), being a disease with low incidence rate, remains a challenge to ophthalmologists. The article provides a broad overview on the pathophysiology and diagnostic approach to PCG with major emphasis on the treatment options of PCG. While reviewing on the well-established treatment options, namely goniotomy, trabeculo-tomy and combined trabeculotomy-trabeculectomy, emphasis has also been made to recent updates on secondary treatments: trabeculectomy, antimetabolites, glaucoma-drainage devices and cyclodestructive procedures. It is, however, important to note that the rarity of PCG places limitations on study design, most studies are, thus, retrospective, nonrandomized and have different definitions of surgical success. Ophthalmologists need to interpret the results with critical thinking and formulate individual treatment plans for each patient. How to cite this article: Yu Chan JY, Choy BNK, Alex LK Ng, Shum JWH. Review on the Management of Primary Congenital Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):92-99. PMID:26997844

  9. Delivering the choice agenda as a framework to manage adverse effects: a mental health nurse perspective on prescribing psychiatric medication.

    PubMed

    Jones, M; Jones, A

    2007-06-01

    The article describes the clinical management of a patient referred, with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, who experienced adverse effects associated with an elevated prolactin level. A reflective model was adopted to inform the new learning which emerged from the clinical scenario. It highlights that Mental Health Nurse Supplementary Prescribers need to develop a prescribing value base underpinned by choice in addition to advanced technical skills to manage unhelpful effects of medication. PMID:17517033

  10. Diagnosis and management of primary intraocular lymphoma: an update

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Kristoph; Thiel, Eckhard; Abrey, Lauren E; Neuwelt, Edward A; Korfel, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    Despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis of primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) remains poor, and the optimal treatment has yet to be defined. This review presents an overview of the current status of PIOL with a focus on recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Recent studies show a decreasing time interval from symptom presentation to diagnosis, likely due to increased awareness of the disease and improved diagnostic tools. Advances in the pathologic characterization of PIOL have been made over the past years, and the development of PIOL animal models can offer the opportunity to study aspects of PIOL pathology, pathogenesis and treatment. Regarding treatment of PIOL, recent larger case series favor the use of systemic chemotherapy plus local ocular treatment as first-line management for patients with concomitant PIOL and PCNSL. For patients with isolated PIOL, the current trend focuses on local first-line treatment and early diagnosis of PIOL. Future studies are needed to confirm these trends. Future directions in the management of PIOL should include studies about pathogenesis, prognostic factors, and treatment optimization. In the future, monoclonal antibodies and radioimmunotherapy could prove useful for PIOL treatment. PMID:19668478

  11. Primary headaches interfere with the efficacy of temporomandibular disorders management

    PubMed Central

    PORPORATTI, André Luís; COSTA, Yuri Martins; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; CALDERON, Patrícia dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the influence of Primary Headache (PH) on efficacy of a Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) conservative therapy and its association with the presence of self-reported parafunctional habits. SAMPLE AND METHODS: Sample was composed of 400 medical records, divided into four groups: I) Muscular TMD (n=64); II) Muscular TMD+PH (n=48); III) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD (n=173); IV) Muscular TMD+Articular TMD+PH (n=115). All groups had undergone a TMD therapy for three months with a stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes, with no specific headache management. Current pain intensity and existence or not of self-reported bruxism were assessed. Repeated measures ANOVA and Chi-Square test followed by Odds were used for statistical analysis, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: results of this study showed that: (1) A conservative therapy with stabilization appliance and counseling for habits and behavioral changes was effective in the TMD pain relief; (2) Groups with an additional diagnosis of PH had worsened the pain improvement significantly; and (3) no association between the presence of self-reported bruxism and PH was found. CONCLUSIONS: this study could elucidate the important effect that headache may have on the TMD management. PMID:25004051

  12. Surgical Management of Stone Disease in Patient with Primary Hyperoxaluria

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Alonso; Granberg, Candace F.; Gettman, Matthew T.; Milliner, Dawn S.; Krambeck, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To present our experience with surgical management of nephrolithiasis in patients with primary hyperoxaluria (PH). Methods A retrospective chart review from 1994–2012 was perform to identify patients with diagnosis of PH. Results A total of 14 patients with PH were identified with median follow-up of 18.6 years (range: 0.9–51). Median age at initial symptom and subsequent diagnosis were 6.7 years (range: 1.1–35.5) and 0.42 years (range: 0–33.25), respectively. Patients underwent a total of 54 procedures at our institution including: ureteroscopy 27 (50%), percutaneous nephrolithotomy 15 (28%), shock wave lithotripsy 8 (15%), and combined procedures 4 (7%). Overall non-intraparenchymal stone free rate after first, second, and third procedure(s) were 59%, 76%, and 78%, respectively. On average 1.6 procedures (range: 1–4) were required to rid patients of symptomatic stones, which subsequently afforded them a mean of 3.62 years (range: 0.25–21.5) without the need of additional intervention. There were 6 Clavien grade ≥ III complications in 4 patients, including immediate postoperative ESRD in 3. Conclusions Despite optimal medical and surgical management, patients experience recurrent acute stone events requiring multiple urologic interventions. Significant complications such as ESRD can occur secondary to surgical intervention. PMID:25733260

  13. The Choices among "Choice."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Administrator, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Describes various school choice options and explains how each relates to school improvement. Variations include interdistrict choice, postsecondary options, second-chance programs, teacher-initiated or chartered schools, controlled choice (to aid desegregation efforts), and magnet schools offering choice within a traditional district assignment

  14. Simplified stepwise management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marquette, C-H; Marx, A; Leroy, S; Vaniet, F; Ramon, P; Caussade, S; Smaiti, N; Bonfils, C

    2006-03-01

    In primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) requiring intervention, removal of air from the pleural space can be achieved by manual needle aspiration or by pleural drainage after insertion of a chest tube. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a serial-steps approach with a single system (small-calibre catheter/Heimlich valve) in a homogeneous population of patients with a first episode of PSP. All patients had an 8.5 F distally multiperforated polyurethane pigtail catheter inserted via the anterior route, at the bedside without any guidance, using the Seldinger technique. A one-way Heimlich valve was connected to the catheter, allowing the air to flow spontaneously outwards for 24-48 h. Thereafter, if the lung failed to re-expand wall suction was applied. Patients with an air leak persisting for >4 days were referred for surgery. Primary end-points were success rates at 24 h and 1 week, and 1 yr recurrence-free survival. In total, 41 consecutive patients entered the study. They were typically thin, young, smoking males. No procedure-related complications were observed. The need for pain relief medication was minimal. Within the first 24 h, most of the patients were able to walk around and half of them were able to take a shower with their catheter in place. The 24-h and 1-week success rates were 61 and 85%, respectively, and the actuarial 1-yr recurrence rate was 24%. Four patients underwent surgical pleurodesis because of a persistent air leak. The length of stay when excluding the four surgical cases was 2.3+/-1.3 days. When 24-h and 1-week success rates and recurrence at 12 months were taken as end-points, the method described here is as effective as simple manual needle aspiration or a conventional chest tube thoracotomy. These results support further studies assessing this "one system, serial-steps approach" in an outpatient management algorithm. PMID:16507845

  15. ITI choice for the optimal management of inhibitor patients - from a clinical and pharmacoeconomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, J; Austin, S K; Kessler, C M

    2014-09-01

    The development of alloantibody inhibitors against factor VIII (FVIII) represents the most significant complication of haemophilia care. Inhibitors tend to develop early in the course of treatment in about 20-30% of patients with severe haemophilia who receive on-demand or prophylactic FVIII therapy. Many factors are associated with inhibitor formation, including disease severity, major FVIII gene defects, family history and non-Caucasian race, as well as age at first treatment, intensity of early treatment, use of prophylaxis and product choice. As these latter treatment-related variables are modifiable, they provide opportunity to minimize inhibitor incidence at the clinical level. Data from the Bonn Centre in Germany have indicated an overall success rate of 78% for immune tolerance induction (ITI) therapy, with a failure rate of 15% and with some treatments either ongoing (3%) or withdrawn (4%). Similarly, data from the G-ITI study, the largest international multicentre ITI study using a single plasma-derived (pd) FVIII/von Willebrand factor (VWF) product, have demonstrated success rates (complete and partial) in primary and rescue ITI of 87% and 74%, respectively, with 85% of poor prognosis patients achieving success. Favourable clinical results based on success rates and time to tolerization continue to be reported for use of pdFVIII/VWF in ITI, with pdFVIII/VWF having a particular role in patients who require rescue ITI and those with a poor prognosis for success. Data from prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies, such as RES.I.ST (Rescue Immune Tolerance Study), are eagerly awaited. Another factor to consider with ITI therapy is cost; preliminary data from an updated decision analytic model have provided early evidence that ITI has an economic advantage compared with on-demand or prophylactic therapy. PMID:24975701

  16. Public management 'reform' narratives and the changing organisation of primary care.

    PubMed

    Ferlie, Ewan

    2010-12-01

    This paper explores how different models of public management affect the changing organisation of primary care. It examines important non-clinical drivers of major organisational change. It uses the concept of a 'reform narrative' to connect public management reform ideas, political doctrines and their effects on primary care organisations. It outlines a set of possible models of public management and their application with primary care settings. It explores what might be the dominant reform ideas of the next decade. PMID:25949627

  17. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) management in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Anil

    2012-10-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) occurs in up to 50% of men by age 50, and the incidence increases with age. This common clinical problem is diagnosed by history, including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire, and physical examination by digital rectal examination (DRE). Initial management for BPH includes lifestyle modification, and smooth muscle relaxant alpha blocker therapy. Alpha blockers usually take effect quickly within 3-5 days, and have minimal side effects. Current commonly used alpha blockers include the selective alpha blockers tamsulosin (Flomax), alfusosin (Xatral), and silodosin (Rapaflo). For patients with larger prostates, the 5-alpha reductase inhibitor class (finasteride (Proscar) and dutasteride (Avodart)) work effectively to shrink prostate stroma resulting in improved voiding. The 5-ARI class of drugs, in addition to reducing prostate size, also reduce the need for future BPH-related surgery, and reduce the risk of future urinary retention. Drugs from the phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor class may now be considered for treating BPH. Once daily 5 mg tadalafil has been shown to improve BPH-related symptoms and is currently approved to treat patients with BPH. Referral to a urologist can be considered for patients with a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA), especially while on 5-ARI, failure of urinary symptom control despite maximal medical therapy, suspicion of prostate cancer, hematuria, recurrent urinary infections, urinary retention, or renal failure. Currently the primary care physician is armed with multiple treatment options to effectively treat men with symptomatic BPH. PMID:23089343

  18. Approach to management of the patient with primary or secondary intrathoracic goiter.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Bonnema, Steen J

    2010-12-01

    Intrathoracic (substernal) goiter, depending on definition, is seen in up to 45% of all patients operated for goiter. It can either be primary (ectopic thyroid tissue detached from a cervical thyroid mass), which is very rare (1%), or (more commonly) secondary, where a portion of the goiter extends retrosternally. There is no consensus on diagnostic or therapeutic management, partly because many are asymptomatic. Classification involves functional characterization with serum TSH and morphological characterization with diagnostic imaging and cytology to rule out malignancy, which is not more common than in cervical goiters. Pulmonary function is often affected in asymptomatic individuals also. Therefore, but also because natural history is continuous growth and evolution from euthyroidism to hyperthyroidism, most experts recommend therapy. In primary as well as secondary intrathoracic goiter, the therapy of choice is total/near-total thyroidectomy and subsequent levothyroxine substitution. Data suggest that complications are only slightly more prevalent than in cervical goiters. Although levothyroxine is not recommended for goiter shrinkage, there is increasing focus on radioactive iodine as an alternative to surgery in secondary intrathoracic goiters. Here it can reduce thyroid size by on average 40% after 1 yr and improve respiratory function and quality of life. Recent studies show that recombinant human TSH, currently used off-label, can augment the radioiodine-related goiter shrinkage by 30-50%. With currently used doses of recombinant human TSH, the side effects, besides hypothyroidism, are rare and mild. Future studies should also explore the use of radioiodine in primary intrathoracic goiter and compare surgery and radioiodine, head to head. PMID:21131536

  19. Preschool Education and Primary School Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions about Classroom Management: A Metaphorical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uysal, Hatice; Burçak, Firdevs; Tepetas, Gülüzar Sule; Akman, Berrin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the perceptions of preschool and primary school teachers about classroom management by means of metaphors. The sample which selected by the use of convenience sampling techniques was drawn from preschool and primary school undergraduate students who had taken the "Classroom Management" course in…

  20. Working Capital Management, Corporate Performance, and Strategic Choices of the Wholesale and Retail Industry in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuan-guo; Dong, Hui-min; Chen, Shou; Yang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the influence of strategic choice on working capital configurations and observe how the relationship between working capital ratio and operational performance differs depending on strategy. By clustering the strategic factors of the wholesale and retail industry, we find three categories of strategies: terminal market strategy, middle market strategy, and hybrid strategy. Using the panel data of the listed companies of the wholesale and retail industry as our sample, we analyze the differences in the ways companies configure working capital, the speed with which working capital adjusts to its target, and the effects of working capital on performance for companies that make different strategic choices. The empirical results suggest that working capital is configured and adjusted to its target in different ways under different competitive strategic choices. This effect is finally transferred to influence the relationship between working capital configuration and operational performance. PMID:25121141

  1. Working capital management, corporate performance, and strategic choices of the wholesale and retail industry in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-guo; Dong, Hui-min; Chen, Shou; Yang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We examine the influence of strategic choice on working capital configurations and observe how the relationship between working capital ratio and operational performance differs depending on strategy. By clustering the strategic factors of the wholesale and retail industry, we find three categories of strategies: terminal market strategy, middle market strategy, and hybrid strategy. Using the panel data of the listed companies of the wholesale and retail industry as our sample, we analyze the differences in the ways companies configure working capital, the speed with which working capital adjusts to its target, and the effects of working capital on performance for companies that make different strategic choices. The empirical results suggest that working capital is configured and adjusted to its target in different ways under different competitive strategic choices. This effect is finally transferred to influence the relationship between working capital configuration and operational performance. PMID:25121141

  2. A case study for efficient management of high throughput primary lab data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In modern life science research it is very important to have an efficient management of high throughput primary lab data. To realise such an efficient management, four main aspects have to be handled: (I) long term storage, (II) security, (III) upload and (IV) retrieval. Findings In this paper we define central requirements for a primary lab data management and discuss aspects of best practices to realise these requirements. As a proof of concept, we introduce a pipeline that has been implemented in order to manage primary lab data at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK). It comprises: (I) a data storage implementation including a Hierarchical Storage Management system, a relational Oracle Database Management System and a BFiler package to store primary lab data and their meta information, (II) the Virtual Private Database (VPD) implementation for the realisation of data security and the LIMS Light application to (III) upload and (IV) retrieve stored primary lab data. Conclusions With the LIMS Light system we have developed a primary data management system which provides an efficient storage system with a Hierarchical Storage Management System and an Oracle relational database. With our VPD Access Control Method we can guarantee the security of the stored primary data. Furthermore the system provides high performance upload and download and efficient retrieval of data. PMID:22005096

  3. Management of the nonvertex second twin: primary cesarean section, external version, or primary breech extraction.

    PubMed

    Gocke, S E; Nageotte, M P; Garite, T; Towers, C V; Dorcester, W

    1989-07-01

    Six hundred eighty-two consecutive twin deliveries were reviewed. Included in the study were 136 sets of vertex-nonvertex twins with birth weights greater than 1500 gm. A primary attempt at delivery of the second twin by external version was performed on 41 twins, 55 twins underwent attempted breech extraction, and 40 patients had a primary cesarean section solely because of physician preference. There were no differences in the incidence of neonatal morbidity or mortality among the modes of delivery. External version was associated with a higher failure rate than primary breech extraction (p less than 0.01). External version was associated with complications (fetal distress, cord prolapse, and compound presentation) that were not seen in the other two groups. Primary breech extraction of the second nonvertex twin weighing greater than 1500 gm appears to be a reasonable alternative to either cesarean section or external version. PMID:2750792

  4. Diagnosis and management of neck metastases from an unknown primary

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, L; Jereczek-Fossa, BA; Jassem, J; Rocca, A; Bruschini, R; Orecchia, R; Chiesa, F

    2005-01-01

    Summary Neck lymph node metastases from occult primary constitute about 5%-10% of all patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site. Metastases in the upper and middle neck (levels I-II-III-V) are generally attributed to head and neck cancers, whereas the lower neck (level IV) involvement is often associated with primaries below the clavicles. Diagnostic procedures include a careful clinical evaluation and a fiberoptic endoscopic examination of the head and neck mucosa, biopsies from all suspicious sites or blindly from the sites of possible origin of the primary, computerized tomography scan, and magnetic resonance. The most frequent histological finding is Squamous Cell Carcinoma, particularly when the upper neck is involved. In these cases, a systematic tonsillectomy in the absence of suspicious lesions is discussed since up to 25% of primary tumours can be detected in this site. Thoracic, and abdominal primaries (especially from lung, oesophagus, stomach, ovary or pancreas) should be sought in the case of adenocarcinoma and involvement of the lower neck. Positron emission tomography with fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose allows detection of primary tumour in about 25% of cases, but this procedure is still considered investigational. Therapeutic approaches include surgery (neck dissection), with or without post-operative radiotherapy, radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy followed by surgery as reported by several guide-lines. In early stages (N1), neck dissection and radiotherapy seem to have similar efficacy, whereas more advanced cases (N2, N3) require combined approaches. The extent of radiotherapy (irradiation of bilateral neck and mucosa versus ipsilateral neck radiotherapy) remains debatable. A potential benefit from extensive radiotherapy should be weighed against its acute and late morbidity and difficulties in re-irradiation in the case of subsequent primary emergence. The role of other methods, such as chemotherapy and hyperthermia, remains to be determined. PMID:16080309

  5. Primary care management of depression in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Haefner, Judy

    2016-06-19

    Depression is the most common mental health disorder in children and adolescents, and primary care is often the first point of contact for children and adolescents with depression. Depression impacts all areas of life, impairing academics and interactions with family and friends. The purpose of this article is to help NPs identify and treat children and adolescents presenting with depression in the primary care setting. PMID:27214067

  6. Newcomers Navigating Language Choice and Seeking Voice: Peer Talk in a Multilingual Primary School Classroom in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokkonen, Alicia Copp

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how two young newcomers navigate an institutional policy of "English only" in a Finnish primary school and how this policy impacts opportunities for voice. From a discourse analytic and sociolinguistic perspective, the analysis takes an ethnographic path to a focal event of language conflict in the classroom. The analysis…

  7. Newcomers Navigating Language Choice and Seeking Voice: Peer Talk in a Multilingual Primary School Classroom in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokkonen, Alicia Copp

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates how two young newcomers navigate an institutional policy of "English only" in a Finnish primary school and how this policy impacts opportunities for voice. From a discourse analytic and sociolinguistic perspective, the analysis takes an ethnographic path to a focal event of language conflict in the classroom. The analysis

  8. School Management Related Knowledge Levels of Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugurlu, Celal Teyyar

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge levels of the teachers affect the qualifications of operations and transactions in schools. School management related knowledge of the teachers is an essential tool to reach the targets of the school. The objective of this study was to determine the school management related knowledge levels of the teachers. Qualitative and…

  9. A multi-stakeholder framework for urban runoff quality management: Application of social choice and bargaining techniques.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, Seyed Hamed; Kerachian, Reza; Zahmatkesh, Zahra

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, an integrated framework is proposed for urban runoff management. To control and improve runoff quality and quantity, Low Impact Development (LID) practices are utilized. In order to determine the LIDs' areas and locations, the Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II), which considers three objective functions of minimizing runoff volume, runoff pollution and implementation cost of LIDs, is utilized. In this framework, the Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) is used for stream flow simulation. The non-dominated solutions provided by the NSGA-II are considered as management scenarios. To select the most preferred scenario, interactions among the main stakeholders in the study area with conflicting utilities are incorporated by utilizing bargaining models including a non-cooperative game, Nash model and social choice procedures of Borda count and approval voting. Moreover, a new social choice procedure, named pairwise voting method, is proposed and applied. Based on each conflict resolution approach, a scenario is identified as the ideal solution providing the LIDs' areas, locations and implementation cost. The proposed framework is applied for urban water quality and quantity management in the northern part of Tehran metropolitan city, Iran. Results show that the proposed pairwise voting method tends to select a scenario with a higher percentage of reduction in TSS (Total Suspended Solid) load and runoff volume, in comparison with the Borda count and approval voting methods. Besides, the Nash method presents a management scenario with the highest cost for LIDs' implementation and the maximum values for percentage of runoff volume reduction and TSS removal. The results also signify that selection of an appropriate management scenario by stakeholders in the study area depends on the available financial resources and the relative importance of runoff quality improvement in comparison with reducing the runoff volume. PMID:26849322

  10. Urolithiasis in primary obstructive megaureter: a management dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arvind; Goel, Apul; Singh, Manmeet; Sankwar, Satya Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Megaureter with urolithiasis is an uncommon entity. These stones may be located in the kidney, ureter or both. Management of these cases is difficult due to free mobility and stone multiplicity. As there are no guidelines about the management, the surgeon usually manages according to her/his experience, stone location or burden. The goal is to remove the stones and reimplant the ureters in the same session, if possible. We describe single-stage management of one such patient who presented with bilateral multiple ureteral and left renal stones. The left ureteral stones were first flushed into the kidney by the ureteroscope. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy was then performed and stones were removed intact. The patient was then turned supine and the location of right ureteral stones was confirmed by fluoroscopy in the same location (right lower ureter). The patient underwent successful bilateral ureteroneocystostomy with simultaneous removal of right lower ureteral stones. PMID:24879732

  11. The role of primary care providers in managing falls.

    PubMed

    Demons, Jamehl L; Duncan, Pamela W

    2014-01-01

    Falls threaten the ability of older adults to live independently in the community. Fortunately, national and state organizations have created tools that allow primary care providers to easily assess fall risk, and small changes in practice patterns can provide patients with the resources necessary to prevent falls, thus helping to reverse a costly, deadly epidemic. PMID:25237872

  12. Identifying Primary Care Skills and Competencies in Opioid Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.; Zacharoff, Kevin; Bond, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care physicians (PCPs) treat a high proportion of chronic pain patients but often lack training about how to assess and address issues associated with prescribing opioids when they are an appropriate component of therapy. The result may be that they may avoid treating these patients, which can lead to an undertreatment of…

  13. Recognizing, managing medical consequences of eating disorders in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, Leah P; Franco, Kathleen N; Rome, Ellen S; Auron, Moises

    2014-04-01

    Eating disorders can lead to serious health problems, and as in many other disorders, primary care physicians are on the front line. Problems that can arise from intentional malnutrition and from purging affect multiple organ systems. Treatment challenges include maximizing weight gain while avoiding the refeeding syndrome. PMID:24692444

  14. The management of colon injuries by primary repair or colostomy.

    PubMed

    Demetriades, D; Rabinowitz, B; Sofianos, C; Prümm, E

    1985-11-01

    This retrospective study comprises 134 cases of penetrating colon injuries. In 92 cases the injury involved the left colon and in the remaining 42 the right colon. Death due to the colonic injury occurred in 1.5 per cent and the incidence of abdominal complications was 17.9 per cent. Patients treated by primary repair of the colon had less colon-related complications and a shorter hospital stay than patients treated by colostomy. Left and right colon injuries treated by primary repair had similar complication rates and hospital stay (P greater than 0.05). We believe that primary repair can safely be performed more frequently than is generally accepted. The site of colon injury, the presence of shock and the presence of multiple associated intra-abdominal injuries do not exclude primary repair. It is suggested that colostomy should be reserved for both left and right colon injuries with gross peritoneal contamination, extensive colonic damage, and large amount of hard faeces in the colon. PMID:4063755

  15. Identifying Primary Care Skills and Competencies in Opioid Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.; Zacharoff, Kevin; Bond, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Primary care physicians (PCPs) treat a high proportion of chronic pain patients but often lack training about how to assess and address issues associated with prescribing opioids when they are an appropriate component of therapy. The result may be that they may avoid treating these patients, which can lead to an undertreatment of

  16. [Management of malnutrition in preschool children: the role of primary health care services].

    PubMed

    Hoerée, Tom; Kolsteren, Patrick; Roberfroid, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Although the prevalence of malnutrition in developing countries is decreasing, it is still a major problem for many children under five. As socio-economic conditions are the main determinants, a final solution for this problem can only be envisaged in the long run. Still, short-term strategies need to be defined in order to relieve the sufferings of individual children and their families. Understanding the problem and consequently formulating intervention programs at the local level remains a complex and difficult issue. The first reason being that the process of malnutrition expresses itself in different forms and with variable consequences. A second reason making malnutrition a complex problem is that the primary causes -- the interaction between insufficient food supply and the frequent recurrence of infectious diseases -- are determined by a multitude of factors of different natures. This complexity -- of its expressions, effects, and causality -- makes it difficult to get a global vision and understanding of the problem, which clearly impedes the definition of rational and integrated intervention strategies. Nevertheless, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of malnutrition and of the factors that influence the growth process in preschool age, will help to better direct actions. To this effect, a conceptual model will be built, based on recent insight in the process of malnutrition within this age group. From this model, two lines of action for increasing the chances of preschool children to express their initial growth potential, become apparent. A first series of activities could tackle the process that, via wasting and recurrence of infections, leads to an increased mortality risk. As timely intervention reduces the risk of depletion of energy reserves, these activities would also have an indirect impact on physical development. Elaborating strategies for secondary prevention and for treating severe cases belongs to the specific competence of the health sector. In the second line of action, the aim is to intervene before reserves are depleted. Here, primary prevention and health promotion are choice activities. This frame of reference will be used for analysing existing health programs for preschool children and how they propose to improve the management of malnutrition. This analysis will show that primary health care services can play a much more important role than usually attributed to them. Identifying these gaps and elaborating alternatives is the purpose of this article. PMID:11943644

  17. Impact of chronic disease self-management programs on type 2 diabetes management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Forjuoh, Samuel N; Ory, Marcia G; Jiang, Luohua; Vuong, Ann M; Bolin, Jane N

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) on glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and selected self-reported measures. METHODS: We compared patients who received a diabetes self-care behavioral intervention, the CDSMP developed at the Stanford University, with controls who received usual care on their HbA1c and selected self-reported measures, including diabetes self-care activities, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), pain and fatigue. The subjects were a subset of participants enrolled in a randomized controlled trial that took place at seven regional clinics of a university-affiliated integrated healthcare system of a multi-specialty group practice between January 2009 and June 2011. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from randomization to 12 mo. Data were analyzed using multilevel statistical models and linear mixed models to provide unbiased estimates of intervention effects. RESULTS: Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics were generally comparable between the two groups. The average baseline HbA1c values in the CDSMP and control groups were 9.4% and 9.2%, respectively. Significant reductions in HbA1c were seen at 12 mo for the two groups, with adjusted changes around 0.6% (P < 0.0001), but the reductions did not differ significantly between the two groups (P = 0.885). Few significant differences were observed in participants’ diabetes self-care activities. No significant differences were observed in the participants’ HRQOL, pain, or fatigue measures. CONCLUSION: The CDSMP intervention may not lower HbA1c any better than good routine care in an integrated healthcare system. More research is needed to understand the benefits of self-management programs in primary care in different settings and populations. PMID:24936263

  18. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Management of Primary Antibody Deficiencies and Infections

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Ari J.; Bonilla, Francisco A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Primary antibody deficiencies are the most common primary immunodeficiency diseases. They are a heterogeneous group of disorders with various degrees of dysfunctional antibody production resulting from a disruption of B-cell differentiation at different stages. While there has been tremendous recent progress in the understanding of some of these disorders, the etiology remains unknown for the majority of patients. As there is a large spectrum of underlying defects, the age at presentation varies widely, and the clinical manifestations range from an almost complete absence of B cells and serum immunoglobulins to selectively impaired antibody responses to specific antigens with normal total serum immunoglobulin concentrations. However, all of these disorders share an increased susceptibility to infections, affecting predominantly the respiratory tract. A delay of appropriate treatment for some diseases can result in serious complications related to infections, while timely diagnosis and adequate therapy can significantly decrease morbidity and increase life expectancy and quality of life. PMID:19597006

  19. Laparoscopic Management of Primary Segmental Omental Infarction Mimicking Acute Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khalid; Munir, Aimel; Wahla, Madiha Saeed; Mian, Muhammad Amer; Masood, Jovaria

    2015-10-01

    Primary Segmental Infarction (PSI) of the greater omentum is rare. It usually presents as acute appendicitis and the diagnosis is made per operatively. We report a case of 22 years male who presented with history and clinical features suggestive of acute appendicitis. Laparoscopic appendicectomy was planned but during diagnostic laparoscopic phase, omentum was found infarcted in the right lower abdomen and the appendix was normal. Laparoscopic omentectomy of the infarcted segment was done and the patient had smooth recovery. PMID:26522213

  20. Principals' and Teachers' Perceptions of Quality Management in Hong Kong Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Alison Lai Fong; Yau, Hon Keung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of a sample of Hong Kong principals and teachers of the extent to which quality management (QM) has been effectively implemented in primary schools. The features of QM improvement implemented in Hong Kong primary schools include: values and duties, systems and teams(ST) resources and…

  1. Principals' and Teachers' Perceptions of Quality Management in Hong Kong Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Alison Lai Fong; Yau, Hon Keung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceptions of a sample of Hong Kong principals and teachers of the extent to which quality management (QM) has been effectively implemented in primary schools. The features of QM improvement implemented in Hong Kong primary schools include: values and duties, systems and teams(ST) resources and

  2. The Effective Management of Primary Schools in Ekiti State, Nigeria: An Analytical Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adeyemi, T. O.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the management of education in primary schools in Ekiti State, Nigeria. As a correlational research, the study population comprised all the 694 primary schools in the State. Out of this, a sample of 320 schools was selected through the stratified random sampling technique. Two instruments were used to collect data for the…

  3. Managing Self-Governing Primary Schools in the Locally Maintained, Grant-Maintained and Private Sectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Les; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses a study that surveyed heads of locally maintained, grant-maintained, and private sector (British) primary schools concerning their management styles. Questionnaire and interview data suggest that autonomous primary schools are characterized by collective decision making and high job satisfaction levels. Private sector school heads'…

  4. 25 CFR 558.3 - Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and primary management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... key employees and primary management officials to the Commission. 558.3 Section 558.3 Indians NATIONAL... KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.3 Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and...

  5. 25 CFR 558.3 - Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and primary management...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... key employees and primary management officials to the Commission. 558.3 Section 558.3 Indians NATIONAL... KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS GAMING LICENSES FOR KEY EMPLOYEES AND PRIMARY MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS § 558.3 Procedures for forwarding applications and reports for key employees and...

  6. In Search of Understanding: A Qualitative Comparison of Primary School Management in the Shaanxi Region of China and England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Paul; Duan, Chen Xiao; Merry, Roger

    1998-01-01

    Compares the methods of educational management in primary schools in England and China using the results from case studies on three primary schools in China's Shaanxi province. Focuses on the purposes of education in the primary schools, styles of management, who exercises control, and the financial management employed in the schools. (CMK)

  7. Missing an opportunity: the embedded nature of weight management in primary care.

    PubMed

    Asselin, J; Osunlana, A M; Ogunleye, A A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D

    2015-12-01

    The 5As Team study was designed to create, implement and evaluate a flexible intervention to improve the quality and quantity of weight management visits in primary care. The objective of this portion of the study was to explore how primary care providers incorporate weight management in their practice. 5AsT is a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on the implementation of a 6-month 5 As Team (5AsT) intervention designed to operationalize the 5As of obesity management in primary care. Data for the qualitative portion of the study presented here included semi-structured interviews with 29 multidisciplinary team providers and field notes of intervention sessions. Thematic analysis was undertaken. A key pattern that emerged from the data was that healthcare providers usually do not address obesity as a primary focus for a visit. Rather, obesity is embedded in a wide range of primary care encounters for other conditions. Implications were it can take extra time to discuss weight, it can be inappropriate to bring up weight as a topic, and treating risk factors and root causes of obesity have indirect benefits to patient weight management. Our findings have implications for obesity treatment approaches and tools that assume a discreet weight management visit. The embedded nature of obesity management in primary care can be harnessed to leverage multiple opportunities for asking and assessing root causes of obesity, and working longitudinally towards individual health goals. PMID:26303812

  8. Riverine threat indices to assess watershed condition and identify primary management capacity of agriculture natural resource management agencies.

    PubMed

    Fore, Jeffrey D; Sowa, Scott P; Galat, David L; Annis, Gust M; Diamond, David D; Rewa, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Managers can improve conservation of lotic systems over large geographies if they have tools to assess total watershed conditions for individual stream segments and can identify segments where conservation practices are most likely to be successful (i.e., primary management capacity). The goal of this research was to develop a suite of threat indices to help agriculture resource management agencies select and prioritize watersheds across Missouri River basin in which to implement agriculture conservation practices. We quantified watershed percentages or densities of 17 threat metrics that represent major sources of ecological stress to stream communities into five threat indices: agriculture, urban, point-source pollution, infrastructure, and all non-agriculture threats. We identified stream segments where agriculture management agencies had primary management capacity. Agriculture watershed condition differed by ecoregion and considerable local variation was observed among stream segments in ecoregions of high agriculture threats. Stream segments with high non-agriculture threats were most concentrated near urban areas, but showed high local variability. 60 % of stream segments in the basin were classified as under U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) primary management capacity and most segments were in regions of high agricultural threats. NRCS primary management capacity was locally variable which highlights the importance of assessing total watershed condition for multiple threats. Our threat indices can be used by agriculture resource management agencies to prioritize conservation actions and investments based on: (a) relative severity of all threats, (b) relative severity of agricultural threats, and (c) and degree of primary management capacity. PMID:24390081

  9. Riverine Threat Indices to Assess Watershed Condition and Identify Primary Management Capacity of Agriculture Natural Resource Management Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fore, Jeffrey D.; Sowa, Scott P.; Galat, David L.; Annis, Gust M.; Diamond, David D.; Rewa, Charles

    2014-03-01

    Managers can improve conservation of lotic systems over large geographies if they have tools to assess total watershed conditions for individual stream segments and can identify segments where conservation practices are most likely to be successful (i.e., primary management capacity). The goal of this research was to develop a suite of threat indices to help agriculture resource management agencies select and prioritize watersheds across Missouri River basin in which to implement agriculture conservation practices. We quantified watershed percentages or densities of 17 threat metrics that represent major sources of ecological stress to stream communities into five threat indices: agriculture, urban, point-source pollution, infrastructure, and all non-agriculture threats. We identified stream segments where agriculture management agencies had primary management capacity. Agriculture watershed condition differed by ecoregion and considerable local variation was observed among stream segments in ecoregions of high agriculture threats. Stream segments with high non-agriculture threats were most concentrated near urban areas, but showed high local variability. 60 % of stream segments in the basin were classified as under U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) primary management capacity and most segments were in regions of high agricultural threats. NRCS primary management capacity was locally variable which highlights the importance of assessing total watershed condition for multiple threats. Our threat indices can be used by agriculture resource management agencies to prioritize conservation actions and investments based on: (a) relative severity of all threats, (b) relative severity of agricultural threats, and (c) and degree of primary management capacity.

  10. Primary Care Management of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Veterans: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, S. Sobiya; Nader, Samir; Wang, Jia; Lawler, Timothy; Hagenlocker, Brian; Roos, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians managing older patients with chronic pain play an important role. This paper explores the attitudes of primary care clinicians (PCPs) toward chronic nonmalignant pain management and their experiences using a clinical decision support system. Our investigation followed a qualitative approach based on grounded theory. Twenty-one PCPs

  11. Collaborative Classroom Management in a Co-Taught Primary School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rytivaara, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers manage their classroom in co-taught lessons. The data were collected by observing and interviewing a pair of primary school teachers. The most important influence of collaboration on classroom management seemed to be the emotional support of another adult, and the opportunity to use different

  12. Responsibility for Financial Management in Primary Schools: Evidence from an English Local Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Drake, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Financial management in primary schools has changed in the UK with the introduction of the Schools Financial Value Standard (SFVS). There is increasing delegation of financial responsibility to the management team in the school, increasing the role of the head teacher and the governing body as part of overall responsibility for the strategic…

  13. Responsibility for Financial Management in Primary Schools: Evidence from an English Local Authority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Sarah; Drake, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Financial management in primary schools has changed in the UK with the introduction of the Schools Financial Value Standard (SFVS). There is increasing delegation of financial responsibility to the management team in the school, increasing the role of the head teacher and the governing body as part of overall responsibility for the strategic

  14. Primary Care Management of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Veterans: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, S. Sobiya; Nader, Samir; Wang, Jia; Lawler, Timothy; Hagenlocker, Brian; Roos, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians managing older patients with chronic pain play an important role. This paper explores the attitudes of primary care clinicians (PCPs) toward chronic nonmalignant pain management and their experiences using a clinical decision support system. Our investigation followed a qualitative approach based on grounded theory. Twenty-one PCPs…

  15. Collaborative Classroom Management in a Co-Taught Primary School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rytivaara, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teachers manage their classroom in co-taught lessons. The data were collected by observing and interviewing a pair of primary school teachers. The most important influence of collaboration on classroom management seemed to be the emotional support of another adult, and the opportunity to use different…

  16. Teacher Classroom Behaviour Management Preparation in Undergraduate Primary Education in Australia: A Web-Based Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Sue C.; Stephensen, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Classroom behaviour management is an essential skill required by all teacher graduates to facilitate instruction in curriculum content. This article describes the classroom behaviour management (CBM) content on offer in Australian undergraduate primary education programs. To date, no nationwide studies exist that report the CBM instruction on

  17. Dental Management of Patients with Dementia in Primary Dental Care.

    PubMed

    Moosajee, Sukina; Rafique, Sobia; Daly, Blánaid

    2015-05-01

    Dementia is an umbrella term for a set of symptoms that include memory loss, changes in mood and problems with reasoning, attention and communication. It is a progressive condition and there is ample evidence that oral health declines as the severity of dementia increases. Most of this decline is attributable to the effects of cognitive impairment on oral hygiene capability and/or acceptance of help from others in supporting oral hygiene. Factors such as altered salivary flow, taste change, use of high-energy food supplements and syrup-based medications also contribute to the risk of oral and dental diseases. In its role as part of the wider health and social care network, the primary dental care team can make an important contribution to securing the oral health of people living with dementia. PMID:26556259

  18. Implementation and evaluation of a clinical data management programme in a primary care centre.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, J; McHugh, S; Perry, I J

    2014-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHR)support clinical management, administration, quality assurance, research, and service planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical data management programme to improve consistency, completeness and accuracy of EHR information in a large primary care centre with 10 General Practitioners (GPs). A Clinical Data Manager was appointed to implement a Data Management Strategy which involved coding consultations using ICPC-2 coding, tailored support and ongoing individualised feedback to clinicians. Over an eighteen month period there were improvements in engagement with and level of coding. Prior to implementation (August 2011) 4 of the 10 GPs engaged in regular coding and 69% of their consultation notes were coded. After 12 months, all 10 GPs and 6 nurses were ICPC-2 coding their consultations and monthly coding levels had increased to 98%. This structured Data Management Strategy provides a feasible sustainable way to improve information management in primary care. PMID:25556259

  19. Improving the identification and management of chronic kidney disease in primary care: lessons from a staged improvement collaborative

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Gill; Oliver, Kathryn; Humphreys, John; Rothwell, Katy; Hegarty, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Quality problem Undiagnosed chronic kidney disease (CKD) contributes to a high cost and care burden in secondary care. Uptake of evidence-based guidelines in primary care is inconsistent, resulting in variation in the detection and management of CKD. Initial assessment Routinely collected general practice data in one UK region suggested a CKD prevalence of 4.1%, compared with an estimated national prevalence of 8.5%. Of patients on CKD registers, ∼30% were estimated to have suboptimal management according to Public Health Observatory analyses. Choice of solution An evidence-based framework for implementation was developed. This informed the design of an improvement collaborative to work with a sample of 30 general practices. Implementation A two-phase collaborative was implemented between September 2009 and March 2012. Key elements of the intervention included learning events, improvement targets, Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles, benchmarking of audit data, facilitator support and staff time reimbursement. Evaluation Outcomes were evaluated against two indicators: number of patients with CKD on practice registers; percentage of patients achieving evidence-based blood pressure (BP) targets, as a marker for CKD care. In Phase 1, recorded prevalence of CKD in collaborative practices increased ∼2-fold more than that in comparator local practices; in Phase 2, this increased to 4-fold, indicating improved case identification. Management of BP according to guideline recommendations also improved. Lessons learned An improvement collaborative with tailored facilitation support appears to promote the uptake of evidence-based guidance on the identification and management of CKD in primary care. A controlled evaluation study is needed to rigorously evaluate the impact of this promising improvement intervention. PMID:25525148

  20. Advances in non-surgical management of primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Liu, Hai-Peng; Li, Mei; Qiao, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer and the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. There have been great improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of HCC in recent years, but the problems, including difficult diagnosis at early stage, quick progression, and poor prognosis remain unsolved. Surgical resection is the mainstay of the treatment for HCC. However, 70%-80% of HCC patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage when most are ineligible for potentially curative therapies such as surgical resection and liver transplantation. In recent years, non-surgical management for unrespectable HCC, such as percutaneous ethanol injection, percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, biotherapy, and hormonal therapy have been developed. These therapeutic options, either alone or in combination, have been shown to control tumor growth, prolong survival time, and improve quality of life to some extent. This review covers the current status and progress of non-surgical management for HCC. PMID:25469032

  1. [Management of COPD exacerbations: from primary care to hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Jouneau, Stéphane; Brinchault, Graziella; Desrues, Benoît

    2014-12-01

    The Société de pneumologie de langue française defines acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE COPD) as an increase in daily respiratory symptoms, basically duration ≥ 48h or need for treatment adjustment. Etiology of EA COPD are mainly infectious, viral (rhinovirus, influenzae or parainfluenzae virus, coronavirus, adenovirus and respiratory syncytial virus) or bacterial (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or Moraxella catarrhalis). Pollutant exposure can also lead to AE COPD, such as NO2, SO2, ozone or particulates (PM10 and PM2.5). In 30% the etiology remains unknown. Differential diagnoses of AE COPD include infectious pneumonia, pneumothorax, acute heart failure and pulmonary embolism. Presences of signs of severity impose hospitalization: signs of respiratory distress, shock, acute confusion but also fragile patients, insufficient home support or absence of response to initial treatment. AE COPD treatments consist on increase in bronchodilators, chest physiotherapy, and antibiotics if sputum is frankly purulent. Systemic corticosteroids should not be systematic. Recommended dose is 0.5 mg/kg on short course (5-7 days). During hospitalization, oxygen supplementation and thromboprophylaxis could be prescribed. The main interest in non-invasive ventilation is persistent hypercapnia despite optimal medical management. During ambulatory management or hospitalization, clinical assessment at 48-72 h is mandatory. PMID:25451635

  2. The clinical characteristics of adolescents reporting methamphetamine as their primary drug of choice: an examination of youth admitted to inpatient substance-abuse treatment in northern British Columbia, Canada, 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Russell C; Brands, Bruna; Taylor, Lawren; Lentz, Tim

    2007-03-01

    We conducted a 5-year medical-chart review of all admissions to an inpatient adolescent substance-abuse program. Youth indicating methamphetamine as their primary drug of choice did not have worse dropout rates or a more severe baseline profile on 4 Addiction Severity Index subscales (Family/Social Conflict, Legal, Psychological, and Medical), compared to adolescents reporting another drug of choice. PMID:17321434

  3. Allergy management in primary care across European countries -- actual status.

    PubMed

    Agache, I; Ryan, D; Rodriguez, M R; Yusuf, O; Angier, E; Jutel, M

    2013-07-01

    The standard of care for allergies within a primary care (PC) setting has a strong influence on disease prevention and control, quality of life, and patient satisfaction. The level of knowledge of allergic diseases and the accessibility to regular follow-up are essential. EAACI and IPCRG conducted a survey to evaluate the actual status of care for allergic diseases in PC. Access to allergy and asthma specialist treatment was identified as the greatest 'unmet need'. The average waiting time between a referral and being seen in a public health service is usually >6 weeks. Referring the patients to an 'organ' specialist is much easier compared with referral to an allergist. Most PCPs have access to blood tests for total and specific IgE. Skin prick testing is available in only half of the cases, while provocation tests, allergen quantification in homes, and a dietician service are even less available. 20.6% of practices do not have access to allergy tests at all. Other issues raised were low political or general public awareness, lack of understanding by the patients of their allergic disease, the need to invest in PC, and to achieve sufficient competence at the appropriate level of care. PMID:23735183

  4. Clinical features and management of primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Crosignani, Andrea; Battezzati, Pier Maria; Invernizzi, Pietro; Selmi, Carlo; Prina, Elena; Podda, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), which is characterized by progressive destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts, is not a rare disease since both prevalence and incidence are increasing during the last years mainly due to the improvement of case finding strategies. The prognosis of the disease has improved due to both the recognition of earlier and indolent cases, and to the wide use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). New indicators of prognosis are available that will be useful especially for the growing number of patients with less severe disease. Most patients are asymptomatic at presentation. Pruritus may represent the most distressing symptom and, when UDCA is ineffective, cholestyramine represents the mainstay of treatment. Complications of long-standing cholestasis may be clinically relevant only in very advanced stages. Available data on the effects of UDCA on clinically relevant end points clearly indicate that the drug is able to slow but not to halt the progression of the disease while, in advanced stages, the only therapeutic option remains liver transplantation. PMID:18528929

  5. A Collaborative Approach to Diabetes Management: The Choice Made for Colorado Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Wyckoff, Leah; Patrick, Kathleen; White, Cathy; Glass, Sue; Carlson, Jessie Parker; Perreault, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Students with diabetes deserve a school nurse who can effectively manage the disease. Tensions between the school and families sometimes emerge when a child with diabetes goes to school. To resolve these tensions in Colorado, stakeholders collaborated to implement a statewide program to meet the needs of students with diabetes. Colorado school

  6. Chinese Postgraduate Choices When Considering a UK Business and Management Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manns, Yihan; Swift, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated Chinese students' decision making processes for enrolling on a postgraduate taught business and management programme in a UK university, based on structured interviews, followed by a survey of just over 450 respondents. The validity and reliability of the research instrument were assessed prior to issuing the survey.

  7. Family-Focused Management: Treatment of Choice for Deviant and Dependent Familes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanzer, Jerry P.

    1978-01-01

    By taking an advocacy stance between the intrafamilial and extrafamilial systems, focusing on individual and family need levels, the family-focused approach to managing mental health/social deviancy problems offers the clinician a promising framework to broaden the scope of service delivery befitting a wider and growing knowledge base. (Author)

  8. A Collaborative Approach to Diabetes Management: The Choice Made for Colorado Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Nichole; Wyckoff, Leah; Patrick, Kathleen; White, Cathy; Glass, Sue; Carlson, Jessie Parker; Perreault, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Students with diabetes deserve a school nurse who can effectively manage the disease. Tensions between the school and families sometimes emerge when a child with diabetes goes to school. To resolve these tensions in Colorado, stakeholders collaborated to implement a statewide program to meet the needs of students with diabetes. Colorado school…

  9. Chinese Postgraduate Choices When Considering a UK Business and Management Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manns, Yihan; Swift, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated Chinese students' decision making processes for enrolling on a postgraduate taught business and management programme in a UK university, based on structured interviews, followed by a survey of just over 450 respondents. The validity and reliability of the research instrument were assessed prior to issuing the survey.…

  10. Managing Minor Ailments; The Public’s Preferences for Attributes of Community Pharmacies. A Discrete Choice Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Mandy; Bond, Christine; Watson, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Background Demand for health services continues to rise. Greater use of community pharmacy services instead of medical services for minor ailments could help relieve pressure on healthcare providers in high-cost settings. Community pharmacies are recognised sources of treatment and advice for people wishing to manage these ailments. However, increasing the public’s use of pharmacy services may depend on attributes of pharmacies and their staff. This study aimed to determine the general public’s relative preferences for community pharmacy attributes using a discrete choice experiment (DCE). Method A UK-wide DCE survey of the general public was conducted using face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews. Attributes and levels for the DCE were informed by a literature review and a cohort study of community pharmacy customers. The context for the experiment was a minor ailment scenario describing flu-like symptoms. The DCE choice sets described two hypothetical community pharmacy services; respondents were asked to choose which (if either) of the two pharmacies they would prefer to help them manage symptoms. Data from 1,049 interviews were analysed using an error components logit model. Willingness to pay (WTP), a monetary measure of benefit, was estimated for the different attribute levels. Results When seeking help or treatment for flu-like symptoms, respondents most valued a pharmacy service that would improve their understanding and management of symptoms (WTP = £6.28), provided by staff who are trained (WTP (pharmacist) = £2.63: WTP(trained assistant) = £3.22), friendly and approachable (WTP = £3.38). Waiting time, pharmacy location and availability of parking also contributed to respondents’ preferences. WTP for a service comprising the best possible combination of attributes and levels was calculated as £55.43. Conclusion Attributes of a community pharmacy and its staff may influence people’s decisions about which pharmacy they would visit to access treatment and advice for minor ailments. In line with the public’s preferences, offering community pharmacy services that help people to better understand and manage symptoms, are provided promptly by trained staff who are friendly and approachable, and in a local setting with easy access to parking, has the potential to increase uptake amongst those seeking help to manage minor ailments. In this way it may be possible to shift demand away from high-cost health services and make more efficient use of scarce public resources. PMID:27031588

  11. Primary care management of patients who self-harm.

    PubMed

    Allan, Charlotte L; Behrman, Sophie; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2012-05-01

    Self-harm is best defined as 'any act of self-poisoning or self-injury carried out by an individual irrespective of motivation'. With a 10.5% lifetime risk, self-reported self-harm is common in the community. Self-harm can occur at any age but is most common in young people. Prior self-harm is the key risk factor both for repeated self-harm and also for subsequent suicide. The presence of depressive symptoms predicts repeated self-harm, as does any history of psychiatric illness. Assessment of self-harm (actual or planned) should include: details of preplanning; final acts; the event itself; what happened afterwards; as well as broader psychosocial risk factors. Patients should be asked to reflect on the episode to consider whether they regret it, or whether they are likely to repeat it. Patients should be screened for depression, anxiety, psychosis and history of self-harm. Physical illness and substance misuse increase risk. Referral to secondary care community mental health teams should be considered for patients who present in primary care with a history of self-harm and a risk of repetition. Patients with continuing thoughts or serious intent of self-harm, where supportive or protective factors cannot be identified, may need urgent referral to secondary care. Prediction of further episodes of self-harm is difficult. Some clinicians may find the use of standardised rating scales, such as the SAD PERSONS scale, a useful way to identify patients who warrant referral and further assessment. The GP should provide long-term continuity of care, and maintain a holistic awareness of a patient's life events enabling discussion of the patient's emotional problems at an early stage with the aim of intervening before a crisis. PMID:22774378

  12. Approach to the surgical management of primary aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Citton, Marilisa; Viel, Giovanni; Rossi, Gian Paolo; Nitti, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of endocrine hypertension; it has been reported in more than 11% of referred hypertensive patients. PA may be caused by unilateral adrenal involvement [aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) or unilateral adrenal hyperplasia (UAH)], and bilateral disease (idiopathic adrenal hyperplasia). Only patients with unilateral adrenal hypersecretion may be cured by unilateral adrenalectomy, while patients with bilateral and non-surgically correctable PA are usually treated by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists; thus the distinction between unilateral and bilateral aldosterone hypersecretion is crucial. Most experts agree that the referral diagnostic test for lateralization of aldosterone hypersecretion should be adrenal venous sampling (AVS) because the interpretation of other imaging techniques [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and scintigraphy] may lead to inappropriate treatment. Adrenalectomy represents the elective treatment in unilateral PA variants. Laparoscopic surgery, using transperitoneal or retroperitoneal approaches, is the preferred strategy. Otherwise, the indications to laparoscopic unilateral total or partial adrenalectomy in patients with unilateral PA remain controversial. Adrenalectomy is highly successful in curing the PA, with correction of hypokalemia in virtually all patients, cure of hypertension in about 30-60% of cases, and a marked improvement of blood pressure values in the remaining patients. Interestingly, in several papers the outcomes of surgery focus only on blood pressure changes and the normalization of serum potassium levels is often used as a surrogate of PA recovery. However, the goal of surgery is the normalization of aldosterone, because chronically elevated levels of this hormone can lead to cardiovascular complications, independently from blood pressure levels. Thus, we strongly advocate the need of considering the postoperative normalization of aldosterone-renin ratio (ARR) as the main endpoint for determining outcomes of PA. PMID:25713782

  13. A choice experiment of the residential preference of waste management services - the example of Kagoshima city, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yusuke

    2007-01-01

    Municipal governments have attempted to reduce waste disposal and increase recycling rates in Japan. However, it is difficult to get full cooperation from residents. Using experiments in which residents are given an opportunity to choose the components of the waste management system (choice experiments), we measure the cost of each characteristic of the waste collection services. The estimation result reveals that there are trade-offs between the risk, payments, and handling costs. The marginal loss in utility revenues from an increase in the types of waste being separated is almost 200 yen (US$ 1.74) and a 1% increase in the recycling rate raises the cost of service by 53 yen (US$ 0.46). In addition, the results show the need for communications about risks between municipal authorities and residents. PMID:16716583

  14. Systematic review of guidelines for the management of suspected lung cancer in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, M. Elisabeth Del; Young, Sheila-Mae; Vella, Emily T.; Ash, Marla; Bansal, Praveen; Robinson, Andrew; Skrastins, Roland; Ung, Yee; Zeldin, Robert; Levitt, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To systematically review the literature and provide an update and integration of existing peer-reviewed guidelines with recent systematic reviews and with primary studies related to the early recognition and management of lung cancer in primary care. Data sources MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant articles. The quality of the evidence to support existing guideline recommendations, and the consistency of recommendations with updated evidence, were assessed. Applicability in a Canadian primary care setting was also evaluated. Study selection All studies that explored signs or symptoms of or risk factors for lung cancer in the primary care setting were included. All diagnostic studies in which symptomatic primary care patients underwent 1 or more investigations were also searched. Synthesis Recommendations were consistent among guidelines despite a paucity of supporting evidence. Updated evidence provided further support for the recommendations. Recommendations for identifying signs and symptoms of lung cancer presenting in primary care and for initial management can be adopted and applied within a Canadian primary care setting. Conclusion This updated review of recommendations might help promote evidence-based practice and, ultimately, more timely management and improved prognosis for lung cancer patients. It might also assist in the development of lung cancer diagnostic assessment programs. PMID:25122830

  15. Making a technological choice for disaster management and poverty alleviation in India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2009-03-01

    The right mix of policy, institutional arrangements and use of technology provides the framework for a country's approach to disaster mitigation. Worldwide, there has been a shift away from a strictly 'top-down' approach relying on government alone, to a combination of 'top-down' and 'bottom-up' approaches. The aim is to enhance the indigenous coping mechanisms of vulnerable communities; draw on their cooperative spirit and energy; and empower them through appropriate information and contextual knowledge to mitigate natural disasters. In light of this, the paper examines India's use of space technology in its disaster management efforts. Poverty alleviation and disaster management are almost inseparable in many parts of the country, as vulnerability to natural disasters is closely aligned with poverty. Addressing these issues together requires integrated knowledge systems. The paper examines how knowledge inputs from space technology have strengthened the national resolve to combat natural disasters in conjunction with alleviating rural poverty. PMID:18498370

  16. Management of trade-offs in geoengineering through optimal choice of non-uniform radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, Douglas G.; Keith, David W.; Kravitz, Ben; Caldeira, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Solar radiation management could be used to offset some or all anthropogenic radiative forcing, with the goal of reducing some of the associated climatic change. However, the degree of compensation will vary, with residual climate changes larger in some regions than others. Similarly, the insolation reduction that best compensates climate changes in one region may not be the same as for another, leading to concerns about equity. Here we show that optimizing the latitudinal and seasonal distribution of solar reduction can improve the fidelity with which solar radiation management offsets anthropogenic climate change. Using the HadCM3L general circulation model, we explore several trade-offs. First, residual temperature and precipitation changes in the worst-off region can be reduced by 30% relative to uniform solar reduction, with only a modest impact on global root-mean-square changes; this has implications for moderating regional inequalities. Second, the same root-mean-square residual climate changes can be obtained with up to 30% less insolation reduction, implying that it may be possible to reduce solar radiation management side-effects and risks (for example, ozone depletion if stratospheric sulphate aerosols are used). Finally, allowing spatial and temporal variability increases the range of trade-offs to be considered, raising the question of how to weight different objectives.

  17. Created versus natural coastal islands: Atlantic waterbird populations, habitat choices, and management implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Allen, D.H.; Jenkins, D.

    2003-01-01

    Nesting colonial waterbirds along the Atlantic Coast of the United States face a number of landscape-level threats including human disturbance, mammalian predator expansion, and habitat alteration. There have been changes from 1977 to the mid-1990s in use of nesting habitats and populations of a number of seabird species of concern in the region, including black skimmers Rynchops niger Linnaeaus, common terns Sterna hirundo Linnaeaus, gull-billed terns Sterna nilotica Linnaeaus, least terns Sterna antillarum Lesson, royal terns Sterna maxima Boddaert, and sandwich terns Sterna sandvicensis Cabot. These species form colonies primarily on the following habitat types: large, sandy barrier or shoal islands, natural estuarine or bay islands (mostly marsh), man-made islands of dredged deposition materials (from navigation channels), and the mainland. Significant changes in the use of the dredged material islands have occurred for these species in New Jersey and North Carolina, but not in Virginia. Population declines and changes in bird habitat use appear to be at least partially associated with the conditions and management of the existing dredged material islands, coastal policy changes associated with creating new dredged material islands, and competing demands for sand for beach augmentation by coastal communities. As these and other coastal habitats become less suitable for colonial waterbirds, other manmade sites, such as bridges and buildings have become increasingly more important. In regions with intense recreational demands, coastal wildlife managers need to take a more aggressive role in managing natural and man-made habitats areas and as stakeholders in the decision-making process involving dredged materials and beach sand allocation.

  18. Shared Care: A Quality Improvement Initiative to Optimize Primary Care Management of Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Vernacchio, Louis; Trudell, Emily; Antonelli, Richard; Nurko, Samuel; Leichtner, Alan M.; Lightdale, Jenifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric constipation is commonly managed in the primary care setting, where there is much variability in management and specialty referral use. Shared Care is a collaborative quality improvement initiative between Boston Children’s Hospital and the Pediatric Physician’s Organization at Children’s (PPOC), through which subspecialists provide primary care providers with education, decision-support tools, pre-referral management recommendations, and access to advice. We investigated whether Shared Care reduces referrals and improves adherence to established clinical guidelines. METHODS: We reviewed the primary care management of patients 1 to 18 years old seen by a Boston Children’s Hospital gastroenterologist and diagnosed with constipation who were referred from PPOC practices in the 6 months before and after implementation of Shared Care. Charts were assessed for patient factors and key components of management. We also tracked referral rates for all PPOC patients for 29 months before implementation and 19 months after implementation. RESULTS: Fewer active patients in the sample were referred after implementation (61/27 365 [0.22%] vs 90/27 792 [0.36%], P = .003). The duration of pre-referral management increased, and the rate of fecal impaction decreased after implementation. No differences were observed in documentation of key management recommendations. Analysis of medical claims showed no statistically significant change in referrals. CONCLUSIONS: A multifaceted initiative to support primary care management of constipation can alter clinical care, but changes in referral behavior and pre-referral management may be difficult to detect and sustain. Future efforts may benefit from novel approaches to provider engagement and systems integration. PMID:25896837

  19. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease: Do they exist?

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians is conducted. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such chronic disease. Despite specialist care being essential, much IBD care could and probably should be delivered in primary care with continued collaboration between all stakeholders. Whilst most primary care physicians only have few patients currently affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician’s IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated supportive literature. The purpose of this review is to investigate what non-specialist tools, action plans or guidelines for IBD are published in readily searchable medical literature and compare these to those which exist for other chronic conditions. PMID:25914455

  20. Tools for primary care management of inflammatory bowel disease: do they exist?

    PubMed

    Bennett, Alice L; Munkholm, Pia; Andrews, Jane M

    2015-04-21

    Healthcare systems throughout the world continue to face emerging challenges associated with chronic disease management. Due to the likely increase in chronic conditions in the future it is now vital that cooperation and support between specialists, generalists and primary health care physicians is conducted. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is one such chronic disease. Despite specialist care being essential, much IBD care could and probably should be delivered in primary care with continued collaboration between all stakeholders. Whilst most primary care physicians only have few patients currently affected by IBD in their caseload, the proportion of patients with IBD-related healthcare issues cared for in the primary care setting appears to be widespread. Data suggests however, that primary care physician's IBD knowledge and comfort in management is suboptimal. Current treatment guidelines for IBD are helpful but they are not designed for the primary care setting. Few non-expert IBD management tools or guidelines exist compared with those used for other chronic diseases such as asthma and scant data have been published regarding the usefulness of such tools including IBD action plans and associated supportive literature. The purpose of this review is to investigate what non-specialist tools, action plans or guidelines for IBD are published in readily searchable medical literature and compare these to those which exist for other chronic conditions. PMID:25914455

  1. Positive practice environments influence job satisfaction of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses constitute the majority of the health workforce in South Africa and they play a major role in providing primary health care (PHC) services. Job satisfaction influences nurse retention and successful implementation of health system reforms. This study was conducted in light of renewed government commitment to reforms at the PHC level, and to contribute to the development of solutions to the challenges faced by the South African nursing workforce. The objective of the study was to determine overall job satisfaction of PHC clinic nursing managers and the predictors of their job satisfaction in two South African provinces. Methods During 2012, a cross-sectional study was conducted in two South African provinces. Stratified random sampling was used to survey a total of 111 nursing managers working in PHC clinics. These managers completed a pre-tested Measure of Job Satisfaction questionnaire with subscales on personal satisfaction, workload, professional support, training, pay, career prospects and standards of care. Mean scores were used to measure overall job satisfaction and various subscales. Predictors of job satisfaction were determined through multiple logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 108 nursing managers completed the survey representing a 97% response rate. The mean age of respondents was 49 years (SD = 7.9) and the majority of them (92%) were female. Seventy-six percent had a PHC clinical training qualification. Overall mean job satisfaction scores were 142.80 (SD = 24.3) and 143.41 (SD = 25.6) for Gauteng and Free State provinces respectively out of a maximum possible score of 215. Predictors of job satisfaction were: working in a clinic of choice (RRR = 3.10 (95% CI: 1.11 to 8.62, P = 0.030)), being tired at work (RRR = 0.19 (95% CI: 0.08 to 0.50, P = 0.001)) and experience of verbal abuse (RRR = 0.18 (95% CI: 0.06 to 0.55, P = 0.001). Conclusion Allowing nurses greater choice of clinic to work in, the prevention of violence and addressing workloads could improve the practice environment and job satisfaction of PHC clinic nursing managers. PMID:24885785

  2. A Review of Management of Clostridium difficile Infection: Primary and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Yasmeen; Manji, Arif; Gregory-Miller, Kathleen; Lee, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potentially fatal illness, especially in the elderly and hospitalized individuals. The recurrence and rates of CDI are increasing. In addition, some cases of CDI are refractory to the currently available antibiotics. The search for improved modalities for the management of primary and recurrent CDI is underway. This review discusses the current antibiotics, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) and other options such as immunotherapy and administration of non-toxigenic Clostridium difficile (CD) for the management of both primary and recurrent CDI. PMID:27025632

  3. Family physicians’ attitude and practice of infertility management at primary care - Suez Canal University, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Eldein, Hebatallah Nour

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The very particular natures of infertility problem and infertility care make them different from other medical problems and services in developing countries. Even after the referral to specialists, the family physicians are expected to provide continuous support for these couples. This place the primary care service at the heart of all issues related to infertility. The aim of the work: to improve family physicians' attitude and practice about the approach to infertility management within primary care setting. Methods This study was conducted in the between June and December 2010. The study sample comprised 100 family physician trainees in the family medicine department and working in family practice centers or primary care units. They were asked to fill a questionnaire about their personal characteristics, attitude, and practice towards support, investigations, and treatment of infertile couples. Results Hundred family physicians were included in the study. They were previously received training in infertility management. Favorable attitude scores were detected among (68%) of physicians and primary care was considered a suitable place for infertility management among (77%) of participants. There was statistically significant difference regarding each of age groups, gender and years of experience with the physicians′ attitude. There was statistically significant difference regarding gender, perceiving PHC as an appropriate place to manage infertility and attitude towards processes of infertility management with the physicians′ practice. Conclusion Favorable attitude and practice were determined among the study sample. Supporting the structure of primary care and evidence-based training regarding infertility management are required to improve family physicians' attitude and practice towards infertility management. PMID:24244792

  4. Parental perspectives regarding primary-care weight-management strategies for school-age children.

    PubMed

    Turer, Christy Boling; Mehta, Megha; Durante, Richard; Wazni, Fatima; Flores, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    To identify parental perspectives regarding weight-management strategies for school-age children, focus groups were conducted of parents of overweight and obese (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) 6-12-year-old children recruited from primary-care clinics. Questions focused on the role of the primary-care provider, effective components of weight-management strategies and feasibility of specific dietary strategies. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed and analysed using margin coding and grounded theory. Six focus groups were held. The mean age (in years) for parents was 32, and for children, eight; 44% of participants were Latino, 33%, African-American and 23%, white. Parents' recommendations on the primary-care provider's role in weight management included monitoring weight, providing guidance regarding health risks and lifestyle changes, consistent follow-up and using discretion during weight discussions. Weight-management components identified as key included emphasising healthy lifestyles and enjoyment, small changes to routines and parental role modelling. Parents prefer guidance regarding healthy dietary practices rather than specific weight-loss diets, but identified principles that could enhance the acceptability of these diets. For dietary guidance to be feasible, parents recommended easy-to-follow instructions and emphasising servings over counting calories. Effective weight-management strategies identified by parents include primary-care provider engagement in weight management, simple instructions regarding healthy lifestyle changes, parental involvement and deemphasising specific weight-loss diets. These findings may prove useful in developing primary-care weight-management strategies for children that maximise parental acceptance. PMID:24720565

  5. Instructional Leadership for Quality Learning: An Assessment of the Impact of the Primary School Management Development Project in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pansiri, Nkobi Owen

    2008-01-01

    A descriptive study using questionnaires was conducted in 2004 to assess the effectiveness of instructional leadership displayed by primary school management teams following the implementation of the Primary School Management Project in Botswana. Leadership skills, Coordination of instructional activities, management of curriculum and quality of

  6. Instructional Leadership for Quality Learning: An Assessment of the Impact of the Primary School Management Development Project in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pansiri, Nkobi Owen

    2008-01-01

    A descriptive study using questionnaires was conducted in 2004 to assess the effectiveness of instructional leadership displayed by primary school management teams following the implementation of the Primary School Management Project in Botswana. Leadership skills, Coordination of instructional activities, management of curriculum and quality of…

  7. Managing tradeoffs in geoengineering through optimal choice of non-uniform radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMartin, D. G.; Keith, D.; Kravitz, B.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-12-01

    Solar radiation management (SRM) could be used to offset some or all anthropogenic radiative forcing, with the goal of reducing some of the associated climatic change. However, the degree of compensation will vary, with residual climate changes larger in some regions than others. Similarly, the insolation reduction that best compensates climate changes in one region may not be the same as for another, leading to concerns about equity. We show that optimizing the latitudinal and seasonal distribution of insolation reduction can improve the fidelity with which SRM offsets anthropogenic climate change. Using the HadCM3L general circulation model, we consider three trade-offs: the trade-off between minimizing global rms climate changes and minimizing residual changes at the worst-off location, the trade-off between minimizing global rms climate changes and the average solar reduction required to do so, and the trade-off between minimizing global rms climate changes and maximizing Northern Hemisphere September sea ice, for a given average solar reduction. First, the residual temperature and precipitation changes in the worst-off region can be reduced by 30% relative to uniform insolation reduction, with only a modest impact on global root-mean-square (rms) changes; this has implications for managing regional inequalities. Second, the same rms residual climate changes can be obtained with up to 30% less insolation reduction than with a uniform distribution, implying that it may be possible to reduce side effects and risks of SRM (e.g., ozone depletion from sulfate). Finally, allowing spatial and temporal variability increases the range of trade-offs to be considered, such as the relative importance of restoring Northern Hemisphere sea ice versus minimizing overall climate impacts, or the relative weighting between temperature and precipitation residuals. This raises the question of how to weight different objectives. In summary, decisions involving SRM do not need to be reduced to a single "global thermostat"The trade-off between minimizing the global-rms normalized temperature and precipitation changes, and minimizing the worst-case change over any grid-cell, both expressed in number of standard deviations of inter-annual variability. Curves are plotted for uniform and non-uniform solar insolation reduction (SIR).

  8. Admission, recruitment, and retention: finding and keeping the generalist-oriented student. SGIM Task Force on Career Choice in Primary Care and Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Linzer, M; Slavin, T; Mutha, S; Takayama, J I; Branda, L; VanEyck, S; McMurray, J E; Rabinowitz, H K

    1994-04-01

    As the country strives to produce larger numbers of generalist physicians, considerable controversy has arisen over whether or not generalist applicants can be identified, recruited, and influenced to keep a generalist-oriented commitment throughout medical training. The authors present new and existing data to show that: 1) preadmission (BA/MD or post-baccalaureate) programs can help to identify generalist-oriented students; 2) characteristics determined at admission to medical school are predictive of future generalist career choice; 3) current inpatient-oriented training programs strongly push students away from a primary care career; 4) women are more likely than men to choose generalist careers, primarily because of those careers' interpersonal orientation; and 5) residency training programs are able to select applicants likely to become generalists. Therefore, to produce more generalists, attempts should be made to encourage generalist-oriented students to enter medical schools and to revise curricula to focus on outpatient settings in which students can establish effective and satisfying relationships with patients. These strategies are most likely to be successful if enacted within the context of governmental and medical school-based changes that allow for more reimbursement and respect for the generalist disciplines. PMID:8014739

  9. Organizational factors and depression management in community-based primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence-based quality improvement models for depression have not been fully implemented in routine primary care settings. To date, few studies have examined the organizational factors associated with depression management in real-world primary care practice. To successfully implement quality improvement models for depression, there must be a better understanding of the relevant organizational structure and processes of the primary care setting. The objective of this study is to describe these organizational features of routine primary care practice, and the organization of depression care, using survey questions derived from an evidence-based framework. Methods We used this framework to implement a survey of 27 practices comprised of 49 unique offices within a large primary care practice network in western Pennsylvania. Survey questions addressed practice structure (e.g., human resources, leadership, information technology (IT) infrastructure, and external incentives) and process features (e.g., staff performance, degree of integrated depression care, and IT performance). Results The results of our survey demonstrated substantial variation across the practice network of organizational factors pertinent to implementation of evidence-based depression management. Notably, quality improvement capability and IT infrastructure were widespread, but specific application to depression care differed between practices, as did coordination and communication tasks surrounding depression treatment. Conclusions The primary care practices in the network that we surveyed are at differing stages in their organization and implementation of evidence-based depression management. Practical surveys such as this may serve to better direct implementation of these quality improvement strategies for depression by improving understanding of the organizational barriers and facilitators that exist within both practices and practice networks. In addition, survey information can inform efforts of individual primary care practices in customizing intervention strategies to improve depression management. PMID:20043838

  10. A study of litter and waste management policies at (primary) eco-schools in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Kayihan, Kutlu Sevinç; Tönük, Seda

    2012-01-01

    In addition to environmental and economic benefits, systematic application of sustainable waste management in elementary education buildings also makes a positive contribution to the education of future generations. This study examines elementary schools in Istanbul, which are part of the Eco-Schools International Programme. This programme was established in 1994 with European Union support and it aims to introduce environmental management systems into primary schools within the scope of ISO 14001/EMAS. A questionnaire study was administered on the theme of litter management and sustainable waste management within elementary schools located in the Asian and European parts of Istanbul city, and the findings of a field survey were examined. Questionnaire findings were gathered under five themes: litter management, composting of organic waste, re-use of school materials, reducing consumption-selection of recycled products, waste management and sorting of recyclable materials. PMID:21159739

  11. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed for all 129 quality indicators from the domains: ‘infrastructure’, ‘information’, ‘finance’, and ‘quality and safety’ to examine changes over time. Results Significant improvements were found in three of four domains: ‘quality and safety’ (F=22.81, p<0.01), ‘information’ (F=27.901, p<0.01) and ‘finance’ (F=4.073, p<0.02). The 129 quality indicators showed a significant improvement within the three points of measurement (F=33.864, p<0.01). Conclusions The European Practice Assessment for primary care practices thus provides a functioning quality management programme, focusing on the sustainable improvement of structural and organisational aspects to promote high quality of primary care. The implementation of a quality management system which also includes a continuous improvement process would give added value to provide good care. PMID:25900466

  12. When Government Is No Longer Employer of Choice: What May the Sector Perceptions of Public Managers Be Like after the Economy Recovers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boardman, Craig; Ponomariov, Branco

    2012-01-01

    In today's economic climate, government is now considered by many to be the "employer of choice." However, employers at all levels of government may eventually lose their recent gains in the war for talent, as the economy improves. Accordingly, it is important to explain how public sector managers viewed the relative advantages and…

  13. Successful childhood obesity management in primary care in Canada: what are the odds?

    PubMed Central

    Kuhle, Stefan; Doucette, Rachel; Piccinini-Vallis, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background. The management of a child presenting with obesity in a primary care setting can be viewed as a multi-step behavioral process with many perceived and actual barriers for families and primary care providers. In order to achieve the goal of behavior change and, ultimately, clinically meaningful weight management outcomes in a child who is considered obese, all steps in this process should ideally be completed. We sought to review the evidence for completing each step, and to estimate the population effect of secondary prevention of childhood obesity in Canada. Methods. Data from the 2009/2010 Canadian Community Health Survey and from a review of the literature were used to estimate the probabilities for completion of each step. A flow chart based on these probabilities was used to determine the proportion of children with obesity that would undergo and achieve clinically meaningful weight management outcomes each year in Canada. Results. We estimated that the probability of a child in Canada who presents with obesity achieving clinically meaningful weight management outcomes through secondary prevention in primary care is around 0.6% per year, with a range from 0.01% to 7.2% per year. The lack of accessible and effective weight management programs appeared to be the most important bottleneck in the process. Conclusions. In order to make progress towards supporting effective pediatric obesity management, efforts should focus on population-based primary prevention and a systems approach to change our obesogenic society, alongside the allocation of resources toward weight management approaches that are comprehensively offered, equitably distributed and robustly evaluated. PMID:26623175

  14. Musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents managed in Australian primary care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary care settings play a vital role in the early detection and appropriate management of musculoskeletal conditions in paediatric populations. However, little data exist regarding these conditions in a primary care context or on the presentation of specific musculoskeletal disorders in children. The aim of this study was to estimate the caseload and describe typical management of musculoskeletal conditions in children and adolescents presenting to primary care in Australia. Methods An analysis of data from the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) study was performed. The BEACH study is a continuous national study of general practice (GP) activity in Australia. We identified all GP encounters with children and adolescents over the past five years and extracted data on demographic details, the problems managed, and GP management of each problem. SAS statistical software was used to calculate robust proportions and after adjustment for the cluster, the 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results From the period April 2006 to March 2011, there were 65,279 encounters with children and adolescents in the BEACH database. Of the 77,830 problems managed at these encounters, 4.9% (95%CI 4.7% to 5.1%) were musculoskeletal problems. The rate of musculoskeletal problems managed increased significantly with age, however there was a significant decrease for girls aged 15–17 years. Upper and lower limb conditions were the most common, followed by spine and trunk conditions. Spine and trunk conditions were significantly more likely to be managed with medication, but less likely to receive imaging, than upper or lower limb problems. Conclusions Musculoskeletal problems in children and adolescents present a significant burden and an important challenge to the primary health care system in Australia. There is variability in rates of presentation between different age groups, gender and affected body region. PMID:24885231

  15. Primary care management of the female patient presenting with nipple discharge.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Hilary S

    2015-03-12

    Nipple discharge is a common primary care finding in female patients. The nurse practitioner must possess the skills and knowledge to correctly and safely manage this clinical finding. The following is a review of the etiology of nipple discharge, the differential diagnoses, and treatment modalities. PMID:25679138

  16. Using a Learning Management System to Personalise Learning for Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Bronwyn; Hartnett, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on one aspect of a descriptive multiple-case study which set out to explore the role of a learning management system (LMS) in personalising learning for students from the perspective of three teachers in one primary school in New Zealand. The intention was to provide insight into the role the LMS could play in classrooms when…

  17. The Perceptions of Senior Management Teams' (SMTs) Dominant Leadership Styles in Selected Botswana Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mhozya, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study, which was funded by the office of research and development (ORD) in the University of Botswana, surveyed 65 primary schools in South Central region in Botswana, which aimed at establishing the perceptions of senior management teams dominant leadership style. The study was done in three phases; the first phase started in June 2008 to

  18. Importance of the Primary Radioactivity Standard Laboratory and Implementation of its Quality Management

    SciTech Connect

    Sahagia, Maria; Razdolescu, Anamaria Cristina; Luca, Aurelian; Ivan, Constantin

    2007-04-23

    The paper presents some specific aspects of the implementation of the quality management in the Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory, from IFIN-HH, the owner of the primary Romanian standard in radioactivity. The description of the accreditation, according to the EN ISO/IEC 17025:2005, is presented.

  19. Managing LSAs: An Evaluation of the Use of Learning Support Assistants in an Urban Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mistry, Malini; Burton, Neil; Brundrett, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The multi-tasking of classroom or learning support assistants (LSAs) is a well-established phenomenon in English primary schools. As their roles have become better defined and specifically funded an element of role specialism has become essential. However, the management and direction of LSAs does not always appear to be clearly or effectively…

  20. The Organizational Strategies of School Management in Japan: Focus on Primary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisse, Makia; Okato, Toshitaka

    2009-01-01

    The study examines the organizational strategies of Japanese principals in school management. One hundred principals of primary schools in Hiroshima Prefecture were surveyed in 2007. The samples comprised of the differences between the two groups aged 51-55 and 56-60 in terms of how competency level should be exerted in school. The study was…

  1. Management of Primary Dysmenorrhea by School Adolescents in ILE-IFE, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunfowokan, Adesola A.; Babatunde, Oluwayemisi A.

    2010-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a problem that girls and women face and often manage themselves with or without support from health professionals. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted among adolescents with dysmenorrhea (N = 150) in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The aims of the study were to determine their knowledge of menstruation and primary dysmenorrhea,

  2. Globalization and Leadership and Management: A Comparative Analysis of Primary Schools in England and Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Rosemary; Vulliamy, Graham; Sarja, Anneli; Hamalainen, Seppo

    2006-01-01

    This article analyses the impact of processes of globalization on both policy and practice in relation to primary school leadership and management in England and Finland. Data are drawn from case study research carried out from 1994-1996 in six schools in Finland and six schools in England and a follow-up study on teacher professionalism…

  3. The Perceptions of Senior Management Teams' (SMTs) Dominant Leadership Styles in Selected Botswana Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mhozya, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    This study, which was funded by the office of research and development (ORD) in the University of Botswana, surveyed 65 primary schools in South Central region in Botswana, which aimed at establishing the perceptions of senior management teams dominant leadership style. The study was done in three phases; the first phase started in June 2008 to…

  4. Management of Primary Dysmenorrhea by School Adolescents in ILE-IFE, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogunfowokan, Adesola A.; Babatunde, Oluwayemisi A.

    2010-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is a problem that girls and women face and often manage themselves with or without support from health professionals. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted among adolescents with dysmenorrhea (N = 150) in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The aims of the study were to determine their knowledge of menstruation and primary dysmenorrhea,…

  5. Surgical management for Hirschsprung disease: A review for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Green, Holly L; Rizzolo, Denise; Austin, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Primary care providers may encounter infants and children with Hirschsprung disease, a congenital colonic defect. Although primarily a surgical problem, the disease requires extensive supportive care and a multidisciplinary approach that often extends beyond surgical correction. This article reviews the management of Hirschsprung disease. PMID:26945276

  6. Prevalence and management of osteoarthritis in primary care: an epidemiologic cohort study from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    Morkem, Rachael; Peat, George; Williamson, Tyler; Green, Michael E.; Khan, Shahriar; Jordan, Kelvin P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a common chronic condition that affects many older Canadians and is a considerable cause of disability. Our objective was to describe the epidemiology of osteoarthritis in patients aged 30 years and older using electronic medical records (EMRs) in a Canadian primary care population. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed the EMRs of 207 610 patients over 30 years of age (extracted on December 31, 2012) who had at least one clinic visit during the preceding 2 years. We calculated the age–sex standardized prevalence of diagnosed osteoarthritis and its association with comorbidities and covariates available in the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network database. Results The estimated prevalence of diagnosed osteoarthritis was 14.2% (15.6% among women, 12.4% among men). The diagnosis of osteoarthritis was associated with several comorbidities: hypertension (prevalence ratio [PR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.18), depression (PR 1.26, 95% CI 1.22–1.3), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (PR 1.16, 95% CI 1.11–1.21) and epilepsy (PR 1.27, 95% CI 1.13–1.43). In addition, 56.6% of patients had received a prescription for a range of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, 45% of which were topical. Opioid medications were prescribed to 33% of patients for pain management. Conclusion Osteoarthritis is a common disease in middle-aged and older Canadians. It is more common in women than in men and is associated with comorbid conditions. Most patients with osteoarthritis received pharmacotherapy for inflammation and pain management. As the Canadian population ages, osteoarthritis will become an increasing burden for individuals and the health care system. PMID:26442224

  7. Randomised controlled trial of educational package on management of menorrhagia in primary care: the Anglia menorrhagia education study

    PubMed Central

    Fender, Guy R K; Prentice, Andrew; Gorst, Tess; Nixon, Richard M; Duffy, Stephen W; Day, Nicholas E; Smith, Stephen K

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an educational package could influence the management of menorrhagia, increase the appropriateness of choice of non-hormonal treatment, and reduce referral rates from primary to secondary care. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting General practices in East Anglia. Subjects 100 practices (348 doctors) in primary care were recruited and randomised to intervention (54) and control (46). Interventions An educational package based on principles of academic detailing with independent academics was given in small practice based interactive groups with a visual presentation, a printed evidence based summary, a graphic management flow chart, and a follow up meeting at 6 months. Outcome measures All practices recorded consultation details, treatments offered, and outcomes for women with regular heavy menstrual loss (menorrhagia) over 1 year. Results 1001 consultation data sheets for menorrhagia were returned. There were significantly fewer referrals (20% v 29%; odds ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.41 to 0.99) and a significantly higher use of tranexamic acid (odds ratio 2.38; 1.61 to 3.49) in the intervention group but no overall difference in norethisterone treatment compared with controls. There were more referrals when tranexamic acid was given with norethisterone than when it was given alone. Those practices reporting fewer than 10 cases showed the highest increase in prescribing of tranexamic acid. Conclusions The educational package positively influenced referral for menorrhagia and treatment with appropriate non-hormonal drugs. Key messagesMenorrhagia (regular excessive menstruation) affects many women and treatment is a considerable use of resourcesAppropriate non-hormonal treatments are not always offered before referral, which often results in therapeutic surgeryAn educational package with independent academics in small informal groups presenting visual, graphic, and written material can positively influence doctors behaviourIncreasing appropriate non-hormonal treatments for menorrhagia results in fewer referrals PMID:10231255

  8. Managing neurogenic bowel dysfunction: what do patients prefer? A discrete choice experiment of patient preferences for transanal irrigation and standard bowel management

    PubMed Central

    Nafees, Beenish; Lloyd, Andrew J; Ballinger, Rachel S; Emmanuel, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Background Most patients with bowel dysfunction secondary to neurological illness are managed by a range of nonsurgical methods, including dietary changes, laxatives, and suppository use to transanal irrigation (TAI). The aim of the present study was to explore individuals’ preferences regarding TAI devices and furthermore investigate willingness to pay (WTP) for attributes in devices in the UK. Methods A discrete choice experiment survey was conducted to evaluate the patients’ perceived value of TAI devices. Attributes were selected based upon a literature review and input from clinicians. Interviews were conducted with three clinicians and the survey was developed and finalized with the input from both patients and professionals. The final attributes were “risk of urinary tract infections” (UTIs), “risk of fecal incontinence” (FI), “frequency of use”, “time spent on toilet”, “ease of use”, “level of control/independence”, and “cost”. Participants were recruited by a patient panel of TAI device users in the UK. Data were analyzed using the conditional logit model whereby the coefficients obtained from the model provided an estimate of the (log) odds ratios (ORs) of preference for attributes. WTP was also estimated for each attribute. Results A total of 129 participants were included in the final analyses. Sixty two percent of the participants had suffered from three UTIs in the preceding year and 58% of patients reported currently experiencing FI using their current device. All attributes were significant predictors of choice. The most important attributes for participants were the “risk of FI”, “frequency of use”, and “risk of UTIs”. Conclusion Participants with bowel dysfunction regarded “risk of FI”, “frequency of use”, and “avoiding UTIs” as the most important features of a TAI device. These preferences are valuable in informing decision makers and clinicians regarding different bowel management solutions as well as for development of future devices. PMID:26937179

  9. Introducing case management for people with dementia in primary care: a mixed-methods study

    PubMed Central

    Iliffe, Steve; Robinson, Louise; Bamford, Claire; Waugh, Amy; Fox, Chris; Livingston, Gill; Manthorpe, Jill; Brown, Pat; Stephens, Barbara; Brittain, Katie; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Katona, Cornelius

    2014-01-01

    Background Case management may be a feasible solution to the problem of service fragmentation for people with dementia. Aim To adapt a US model of primary care-based case management for people with dementia and test it in general practice. Design and setting Mixed-methodology case studies of case management implementation in four general practices: one rural, one inner-city, and two urban practices. Practice nurses undertook the case manager role in the rural and inner-city practices, and were allocated one session per week for case management by their practices. A seconded social worker worked full time for the two urban practices. Method Participants were community-dwelling patients with dementia who were living at home with a family carer, and who were not receiving specialist care coordination. Case study methods included analysis of case loads and interviews with patients, carers, local NHS and other stakeholders, and case managers. Measures included numbers of patients with dementia and their carers, number of unmet needs identified, and actions taken to meet needs. Case manager records were compared with findings from interviews with patients and carers, and with other stakeholders. Results The number of eligible patients was smaller than expected. No practice achieved its recruitment target. Researchers identified more unmet needs than case managers. The practice nurse case managers reported lack of time and found research documentation burdensome. Patients and carers were positive about case management as a first point of contact with the practice, as a ‘safety net’, and for creating a one-to-one therapeutic relationship. Conclusion Further investigation is required before case management for people with dementia and their carers can be implemented in primary care. PMID:25348998

  10. The Chronic Care Model and Diabetes Management in US Primary Care Settings: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Stellefson, Michael; Stopka, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Chronic Care Model (CCM) uses a systematic approach to restructuring medical care to create partnerships between health systems and communities. The objective of this study was to describe how researchers have applied CCM in US primary care settings to provide care for people who have diabetes and to describe outcomes of CCM implementation. Methods We conducted a literature review by using the Cochrane database of systematic reviews, CINAHL, and Health Source: Nursing/Academic Edition and the following search terms: “chronic care model” (and) “diabet*.” We included articles published between January 1999 and October 2011. We summarized details on CCM application and health outcomes for 16 studies. Results The 16 studies included various study designs, including 9 randomized controlled trials, and settings, including academic-affiliated primary care practices and private practices. We found evidence that CCM approaches have been effective in managing diabetes in US primary care settings. Organizational leaders in health care systems initiated system-level reorganizations that improved the coordination of diabetes care. Disease registries and electronic medical records were used to establish patient-centered goals, monitor patient progress, and identify lapses in care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) were trained to deliver evidence-based care, and PCP office–based diabetes self-management education improved patient outcomes. Only 7 studies described strategies for addressing community resources and policies. Conclusion CCM is being used for diabetes care in US primary care settings, and positive outcomes have been reported. Future research on integration of CCM into primary care settings for diabetes management should measure diabetes process indicators, such as self-efficacy for disease management and clinical decision making. PMID:23428085

  11. Changing Climate, Challenging Choices: Identifying and Evaluating Climate Change Adaptation Options for Protected Areas Management in Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemieux, Christopher J.; Scott, Daniel J.

    2011-10-01

    Climate change will pose increasingly significant challenges to managers of parks and other forms of protected areas around the world. Over the past two decades, numerous scientific publications have identified potential adaptations, but their suitability from legal, policy, financial, internal capacity, and other management perspectives has not been evaluated for any protected area agency or organization. In this study, a panel of protected area experts applied a Policy Delphi methodology to identify and evaluate climate change adaptation options across the primary management areas of a protected area agency in Canada. The panel identified and evaluated one hundred and sixty five (165) adaptation options for their perceived desirability and feasibility. While the results revealed a high level of agreement with respect to the desirability of adaptation options and a moderate level of capacity pertaining to policy formulation and management direction, a perception of low capacity for implementation in most other program areas was identified. A separate panel of senior park agency decision-makers used a multiple criterion decision-facilitation matrix to further evaluate the institutional feasibility of the 56 most desirable adaptation options identified by the initial expert panel and to prioritize them for consideration in a climate change action plan. Critically, only two of the 56 adaptation options evaluated by senior decision-makers were deemed definitely implementable, due largely to fiscal and internal capacity limitations. These challenges are common to protected area agencies in developed countries and pervade those in developing countries, revealing that limited adaptive capacity represents a substantive barrier to biodiversity conservation and other protected area management objectives in an era of rapid climate change.

  12. Changing climate, challenging choices: identifying and evaluating climate change adaptation options for protected areas management in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Christopher J; Scott, Daniel J

    2011-10-01

    Climate change will pose increasingly significant challenges to managers of parks and other forms of protected areas around the world. Over the past two decades, numerous scientific publications have identified potential adaptations, but their suitability from legal, policy, financial, internal capacity, and other management perspectives has not been evaluated for any protected area agency or organization. In this study, a panel of protected area experts applied a Policy Delphi methodology to identify and evaluate climate change adaptation options across the primary management areas of a protected area agency in Canada. The panel identified and evaluated one hundred and sixty five (165) adaptation options for their perceived desirability and feasibility. While the results revealed a high level of agreement with respect to the desirability of adaptation options and a moderate level of capacity pertaining to policy formulation and management direction, a perception of low capacity for implementation in most other program areas was identified. A separate panel of senior park agency decision-makers used a multiple criterion decision-facilitation matrix to further evaluate the institutional feasibility of the 56 most desirable adaptation options identified by the initial expert panel and to prioritize them for consideration in a climate change action plan. Critically, only two of the 56 adaptation options evaluated by senior decision-makers were deemed definitely implementable, due largely to fiscal and internal capacity limitations. These challenges are common to protected area agencies in developed countries and pervade those in developing countries, revealing that limited adaptive capacity represents a substantive barrier to biodiversity conservation and other protected area management objectives in an era of rapid climate change. PMID:21850505

  13. Early management and long-term outcomes in primary vesico-ureteric reflux.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Robert

    2011-11-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Despite evolving understanding of pathogenesis and natural history, controversy exists regarding management of childhood vesicoureteric reflux. Surgical correction of the reflux itself may reduce risk of upper tract complications in some but may not in itself constitute appropriate management of lower tract morbidity in many. This review examines the evidence for early management and long term outcomes in primary vesicoureteric reflux. Primary vesico-ureteric reflux is a common condition in childhood associated with bladder dysfunction and an increased risk of urinary tract infection. Recent evidence indicates a lower tract functional abnormality in its pathogenesis. Whilst spontaneous resolution will occur in many, some patients will go on to develop complications in adulthood including reflux nephropathy, hypertension, urinary tract infection, bladder dysfunction and complications of pregnancy. An evolving understanding of the natural history has seen radical changes in management. Evidence for management of the child with primary vesico-ureteric reflux is reviewed with a focus on the implications on long-term outcomes in adulthood. PMID:22085118

  14. "We will not rest." Filipino women want a fertility management program that respects women's dignity, women's bodies and women's choices.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R O

    1993-03-01

    The program officer for the Institute for Social Studies and Action presents 1) her views on women's fertility management under different political administrations in the Philippines, 2) the political postures of influential groups, 3) the goals of women's and health groups, and 4) the actions taken by Filipino women. Under Ferdinand Marcos, the official family planning (FP) program emphasized reduction of population growth and established a quota system and incentives for the number of new acceptors. Women, as a result, became victims; e.g. IUDs were inserted without prior knowledge, and inadequate information and follow-up were provided on oral contraceptive use. Efforts were criticized for treating women as program targets and not as individuals capable of making choices. Under Corazon Aquino, the Roman Catholic hierarchy dominated and would have banned all forms of artificial contraception had women's and health groups not blocked the effort. Only in 1989 did President Aquino finally announce that multiple methods of family planning (FP) would be promoted. There was a transition in program services during the transfer to the Department of Health. Currently the government promotes FP within the safe motherhood and child survival context, but adolescents and unmarried women and couples are excluded from FP services. Population control advocates believe FP is a health issue. The Roman Catholic Church accepts only natural methods and believes artificial methods interfere with the natural processes of procreation. Anti-FP groups promote only natural FP methods and wage campaigns to discredit contraceptive methods. Women's and FP groups contend that it is a woman's right to regulate her own fertility. Safe abortion should be made available to those who need it. Women's networks are mobilizing to talk about the issues, to hold public activities to change laws and policies and to encourage women's involvement in decision making affecting their lives, and to conduct research specific to women's views. Women's organizations will be active until safe, affordable, accessible, and appropriate fertility management is available to all women. PMID:12286371

  15. How do primary health-care practitioners identify and manage communication impairments in preschool children?

    PubMed

    Woolfenden, Sue; Short, Kate; Blackmore, Roger; Pennock, Rene; Moore, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Communication impairments (CIs) in preschool children are common and can have long-term adverse consequences if not detected and treated early. This study investigated the knowledge, training and practice of primary health-care practitioners in the identification and management of CIs in preschool-aged children. A cross-sectional survey of 277 primary health-care practitioners in the Inner West and South West Sydney was undertaken. The majority of practitioners surveyed understood the importance of early identification of CIs. Eight per cent ofpractitioners correctly identified all of the 'red flags' for verbal and non-verbal communication. The majority (80%) correctly described the management of a typical case presentation. Two-thirds of practitioners reported using a tool in their practice for developmental surveillance, but the quality of surveillance tools was variable. One-third felt their training in this area was poor and 90% indicated they would like further training. Barriers to referral included waiting times, availability and cost of services. We concluded that primary health-care practitioners are aware that CIs are significant and they need to be identified early. There are opportunities for further training and promoting high-quality developmental surveillance in primary care. In addition, there are broader health system issues that include promotion of an integrated response to the detection and management of CIs. PMID:26509204

  16. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  17. A taxonomy of primary health care practices: an avenue for informing management and policy implementation.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, John; Gulyas, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Health policy and practice managers often treat primary practices as being homogenous, despite evidence that these organisations vary along multiple dimensions. This treatment can be a barrier to the development of a strong health care system. Therefore, a more sophisticated taxonomy of organisations could inform management and policy to better cater to the diversity of practice contexts, needs and capabilities. The purpose of this study was to categorise primary practices using practice features and characteristics associated with the job satisfaction of GPs. The current study uses data from 3906 GPs from the 2008 wave of the MABEL survey. Seven configurations of primary health care practices emerged from multivariate cluster analyses. The configurations incorporate, yet move beyond, simplistic categorisations such as geographic location and highlight the complexity facing managers and health policy interventions. The multidimensional configurations in the taxonomy are a mechanism for informing health care management and policy. The process of deriving configurations can be applied in a variety of countries and contexts. PMID:22950950

  18. Clinical practice guidelines for the medical and surgical management of primary intracerebral hemorrhage in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Eun; Ko, Sang-Bae; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Seo, Dae-Hee; Park, Sukh-Que; Sheen, Seung Hun; Park, Hyun Sun; Kang, Sung Don; Kim, Jae Min; Oh, Chang Wan; Hong, Keun-Sik; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Heo, Ji Hoe; Kwon, Sun-Uck; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yoon, Byung-Woo; Park, In Sung; Rha, Joung-Ho

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this clinical practice guideline (CPG) is to provide current and comprehensive recommendations for the medical and surgical management of primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Since the release of the first Korean CPGs for stroke, evidence has been accumulated in the management of ICH, such as intracranial pressure control and minimally invasive surgery, and it needs to be reflected in the updated version. The Quality Control Committee at the Korean Society of cerebrovascular Surgeons and the Writing Group at the Clinical Research Center for Stroke (CRCS) systematically reviewed relevant literature and major published guidelines between June 2007 and June 2013. Based on the published evidence, recommendations were synthesized, and the level of evidence and the grade of the recommendation were determined using the methods adapted from CRCS. A draft guideline was scrutinized by expert peer reviewers and also discussed at an expert consensus meeting until final agreement was achieved. CPGs based on scientific evidence are presented for the medical and surgical management of patients presenting with primary ICH. This CPG describes the current pertinent recommendations and suggests Korean recommendations for the medical and surgical management of a patient with primary ICH. PMID:25368758

  19. Dyslipidemia management in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: Current guidelines and strategies

    PubMed Central

    Hendrani, Aditya D; Adesiyun, Tolulope; Quispe, Renato; Jones, Steven R; Stone, Neil J; Blumenthal, Roger S; Martin, Seth S

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In 2010, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that $444 billion was spent on cardiovascular diseases alone, about $1 of every $6 spent on health care. As life expectancy continues to increase, this annual cost will also increase, making cost-effective primary prevention of cardiovascular disease highly desirable. Because of its role in development of atherosclerosis and clinical events, dyslipidemia management is a high priority in cardiovascular prevention. Multiple major dyslipidemia guidelines have been published around the world recently, four of them by independent organizations in the United States alone. They share the goal of providing clinical guidance on optimal dyslipidemia management, but guidelines differ in their emphasis on pharmacotherapy, stratification of groups, emphasis on lifestyle modification, and use of a fixed target or percentage reduction in low density lipoprotein cholesterol. This review summarizes eight major guidelines for dyslipidemia management and considers the basis for their recommendations. Our primary aim is to enhance understanding of dyslipidemia management guidelines in patient care for primary prevention of future cardiovascular risk. PMID:26981215

  20. Initial manifestation of primary hyperoxaluria type I in adults-- recognition, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, J J

    1996-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type I may initially manifest as urolithiasis, renal insufficiency, or symptoms of systemic oxalosis. This hereditary disorder was fatal until effective therapies evolved during the past two decades. Difficulty in recognizing and diagnosing this disorder in adults is illustrated in a report of a patient eventually restored to good health by high-flux dialysis and combined renal and hepatic transplantation. I explore the molecular processes of the genetic defect and discuss clinical indicators of primary hyperoxaluria type I, manifestations of oxalosis, the pathogenesis of chronic oxalate nephropathy, and the diagnosis and management of this disease. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. PMID:8779202

  1. Innovations by primary care health centers: lessons for managers and policy makers.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S A; Hanson, K L

    1995-04-01

    This article highlights results from the evaluation of The Program to Strengthen Primary Care Health Centers, and suggests some directions for public policy. Program participants reported substantial improvements in financial viability, given the relatively small monetary investment. Technical assistance in the development of innovations, however, appears to dampen creativity and ultimately hinder financial gains. Recommendations address improved physician retention, the development of professional expertise, the importance of attention to long-range objectives, the related problems of excess capacity and surplus patient demand, and the integration of primary care health centers into managed care systems and health networks. PMID:10141465

  2. Challenges in interdisciplinary weight management in primary care: lessons learned from the 5As Team study.

    PubMed

    Asselin, J; Osunlana, A M; Ogunleye, A A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D

    2016-04-01

    Increasingly, research is directed at advancing methods to address obesity management in primary care. In this paper we describe the role of interdisciplinary collaboration, or lack thereof, in patient weight management within 12 teams in a large primary care network in Alberta, Canada. Qualitative data for the present analysis were derived from the 5As Team (5AsT) trial, a mixed-method randomized control trial of a 6-month participatory, team-based educational intervention aimed at improving the quality and quantity of obesity management encounters in primary care practice. Participants (n = 29) included in this analysis are healthcare providers supporting chronic disease management in 12 family practice clinics randomized to the intervention arm of the 5AsT trial including mental healthcare workers (n = 7), registered dietitians (n = 7), registered nurses or nurse practitioners (n = 15). Participants were part of a 6-month intervention consisting of 12 biweekly learning sessions aimed at increasing provider knowledge and confidence in addressing patient weight management. Qualitative methods included interviews, structured field notes and logs. Four common themes of importance in the ability of healthcare providers to address weight with patients within an interdisciplinary care team emerged, (i) Availability; (ii) Referrals; (iii) Role perception and (iv) Messaging. However, we find that what was key to our participants was not that these issues be uniformly agreed upon by all team members, but rather that communication and clinic relationships support their continued negotiation. Our study shows that firm clinic relationships and deliberate communication strategies are the foundation of interdisciplinary care in weight management. Furthermore, there is a clear need for shared messaging concerning obesity and its treatment between members of interdisciplinary teams. PMID:26815638

  3. Teacher-reported prevalence and management of child health problems at primary school.

    PubMed

    Leyland, Anna F; Pickett, Kate E; Barber, Sally; McEachan, Rosemary; Wright, John

    2016-06-01

    We explored primary school teacher-reported experiences, prevalence and management of child health and developmental problems and medication administration from one multi-ethnic urban community in England. A survey was delivered to 90 reception class teachers in 45 primary schools, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of eight respondents. Fifty-six percent of teachers completed the questionnaire. Findings suggest that teachers and school staff may represent an underused resource for identifying children with developmental and health conditions and that the connections formed between schools and families could be utilized by other services by delivering interventions in schools where possible. Whilst most schools use a policy to inform the management of child health in school, some key areas such as training and documentation of medication administration may not be followed in practice. Interview findings supported and expanded on survey data by identifying barriers to collaboration between services and families. PMID:25713008

  4. Practical Suicide-Risk Management for the Busy Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    McDowell, Anna K.; Lineberry, Timothy W.; Bostwick, J. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Suicide is a public health problem and a leading cause of death. The number of people thinking seriously about suicide, making plans, and attempting suicide is surprisingly high. In total, primary care clinicians write more prescriptions for antidepressants than mental health clinicians and see patients more often in the month before their death by suicide. Treatment of depression by primary care physicians is improving, but opportunities remain in addressing suicide-related treatment variables. Collaborative care models for treating depression have the potential both to improve depression outcomes and decrease suicide risk. Alcohol use disorders and anxiety symptoms are important comorbid conditions to identify and treat. Management of suicide risk includes understanding the difference between risk factors and warning signs, developing a suicide risk assessment, and practically managing suicidal crises. PMID:21709131

  5. Suicide Risk in Primary Care: Identification and Management in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Raue, Patrick J.; Ghesquiere, Angela R.; Bruce, Martha L.

    2014-01-01

    The National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (2012) has set a goal to reduce suicides by 20% within 5 years. Suicide rates are higher in older adults compared to most other age groups, and the majority of suicide completers have visited their primary care physician in the year before suicide. Primary care is an ideal setting to identify suicide risk and initiate mental health care. We review risk factors for late-life suicide; methods to assess for different levels of suicidality; and recent research developments regarding both effective assessment and management of suicide risk among older primary care patients. We highlight that broader scale screening of suicide risk may be considered in light of findings that suicidality can occur even in the absence of major risk factors like depression. We also highlight collaborative care models targeting suicide risk, and recent innovative interventions that aim to prevent the development of suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior. PMID:25030971

  6. Esthetic management of a primary double tooth using a silicone putty guide: a case report.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ravi; Chaudhry, Kalpna; Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2013-03-01

    The term double tooth is often used to describe fusion and gemination. The development of isolated large or joined teeth is not rare, but the literature is confusing when the appropriate terminology is presented. The objective of this paper is to present a case of a primary double tooth in a 5-year-old girl with a history of trauma. The tooth was endodontically treated and esthetic management was carried out using a silicone putty guide. PMID:23600163

  7. Primary care management of alcohol use disorder and at-risk drinking

    PubMed Central

    Spithoff, Sheryl; Kahan, Meldon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide primary care physicians with evidence-based information and advice on the screening and assessment of at-risk drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). A companion article outlines the management of at-risk drinking and AUD. Sources of information We conducted a nonsystematic literature review, using search terms on primary care, AUD, alcohol dependence, alcohol abuse, alcohol misuse, unhealthy drinking, and primary care screening, identification, and assessment. Main message Family physicians should screen all patients at least yearly for unhealthy drinking with a validated screening test. Screen patients who present with medical or psychosocial problems that might be related to alcohol use. Determine if patients who have positive screening results are at-risk drinkers or have AUD. If patients have AUD, categorize it as mild, moderate, or severe using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, criteria. Share this diagnosis with the patient and offer assistance. Do a further assessment for patients with AUD. Screen for other substance use, concurrent disorders, and trauma. Determine whether there is a need to report to child protection services or the Ministry of Transportation. Determine the need for medical management of alcohol withdrawal. Conduct a brief physical examination and order laboratory tests to assess complete blood count and liver transaminase levels, including γ-glutamyl transpeptidase. Conclusion Primary care is well suited to screening and assessment of alcohol misuse. PMID:26071154

  8. Primary care management of alcohol use disorder and at-risk drinking

    PubMed Central

    Spithoff, Sheryl; Kahan, Meldon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide primary care physicians with evidence-based information and advice on the management of at-risk drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Sources of information We conducted a nonsystematic literature review using search terms that included primary care; screening, interventions, management, and treatment; and at-risk drinking, alcohol use disorders, alcohol dependence, and alcohol abuse; as well as specific medical and counseling interventions of relevance to primary care. Main message For their patients with at-risk drinking and AUD, physicians should counsel and, when indicated (ie, in patients with moderate or severe AUD), prescribe and connect. Counsel: Offer all patients with at-risk drinking a brief counseling session and follow-up. Offer all patients with AUD counseling sessions and ongoing (frequent and regular) follow-up. Prescribe: Offer medications (disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate) to all patients with moderate or severe AUD. Connect: Encourage patients with AUD to attend counseling, day or residential treatment programs, and support groups. If indicated, refer patients to an addiction medicine physician, concurrent mental health and addiction services, or specialized trauma therapy. Conclusion Family physicians can effectively manage patients with at-risk drinking and AUD. PMID:26071155

  9. Designing a complex intervention for dementia case management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-based support will become increasingly important for people with dementia, but currently services are fragmented and the quality of care is variable. Case management is a popular approach to care co-ordination, but evidence to date on its effectiveness in dementia has been equivocal. Case management interventions need to be designed to overcome obstacles to care co-ordination and maximise benefit. A successful case management methodology was adapted from the United States (US) version for use in English primary care, with a view to a definitive trial. Medical Research Council guidance on the development of complex interventions was implemented in the adaptation process, to capture the skill sets, person characteristics and learning needs of primary care based case managers. Methods Co-design of the case manager role in a single NHS provider organisation, with external peer review by professionals and carers, in an iterative technology development process. Results The generic skills and personal attributes were described for practice nurses taking up the case manager role in their workplaces, and for social workers seconded to general practice teams, together with a method of assessing their learning needs. A manual of information material for people with dementia and their family carers was also created using the US intervention as its source. Conclusions Co-design produces rich products that have face validity and map onto the complexities of dementia and of health and care services. The feasibility of the case manager role, as described and defined by this process, needs evaluation in real life settings. PMID:23865537

  10. Management of primary hypothyroidism: statement by the British Thyroid Association Executive Committee.

    PubMed

    Okosieme, Onyebuchi; Gilbert, Jackie; Abraham, Prakash; Boelaert, Kristien; Dayan, Colin; Gurnell, Mark; Leese, Graham; McCabe, Christopher; Perros, Petros; Smith, Vicki; Williams, Graham; Vanderpump, Mark

    2016-06-01

    The management of primary hypothyroidism with levothyroxine (L-T4) is simple, effective and safe, and most patients report improved well-being on initiation of treatment. However, a proportion of individuals continue to suffer with symptoms despite achieving adequate biochemical correction. The management of such individuals has been the subject of controversy and of considerable public interest. The American Thyroid Association (ATA) and the European Thyroid Association (ETA) have recently published guidelines on the diagnosis and management of hypothyroidism. These guidelines have been based on extensive reviews of the medical literature and include sections on the role of combination therapy with L-T4 and liothyronine (L-T3) in individuals who are persistently dissatisfied with L-T4 therapy. This position statement by the British Thyroid Association (BTA) summarises the key points in these guidelines and makes recommendations on the management of primary hypothyroidism based on the current literature, review of the published positions of the ETA and ATA, and in line with best principles of good medical practice. The statement is endorsed by the Association of Clinical Biochemistry, (ACB), British Thyroid Foundation, (BTF), Royal College of Physicians (RCP) and Society for Endocrinology (SFE). PMID:26010808

  11. Management of asymptomatic primary tumours in stage IV colorectal cancer: Review of outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Kate Jessica; Chua, Wei; Ng, Weng; Roohullah, Aflah

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare outcomes for patients presenting with stage IV colorectal cancer and an asymptomatic primary tumour, undergoing primary tumour resection (PTR) plus palliative chemotherapy vs primary chemotherapy up-front. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE and EMBASE. The primary outcome was overall survival. Secondary outcomes included perioperative mortality, morbidity and delayed surgical intervention rates in patients undergoing PTR and subsequent complication rates in patients with an un-resected primary tumour. Tertiary outcomes included impact on systemic treatment and identification of prognostic factors relevant for survival in this cohort. RESULTS: Twenty non-randomised studies met the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies included comparative overall survival data. Three studies showed an overall survival advantage for PTR, 7 studies showed no statistically significant advantage, and 1 study showed a significant worsening in survival in the surgical group. The perioperative mortality rate ranged from 0% to 8.5%, and post-operative morbidity rate from 10% to 35%, mainly minor complications that did not preclude subsequent chemotherapy. The rate of delayed primary-tumour related symptoms, most commonly obstruction, in patients with an un-resected primary tumour ranged from 3% to 46%. The strongest independent poor prognostic factor was extensive hepatic metastases, in addition to poor performance status, M1b stage and non-use of modern chemotherapy agents. CONCLUSION: Based on the current literature, both PTR and up front chemotherapy appear appropriate initial management strategies, with a trend towards an overall survival advantage with PTR. The procedure has a low post-operative mortality, and most complications are transient and minor. The results of recruiting randomised trials are eagerly anticipated. PMID:26691885

  12. Understanding the Intersection of Individual Needs and Choices With Organizational Practices: The Case of Medication Management in Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Carder, Paula C.; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Schumacher, John G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose:?Making choices about everyday activities is a normal event for many adults. However, when an adult moves into an assisted living (AL) community, making choices becomes complicated by perceived needs and community practices. This study examines the relationship between choice and need in the context of practices, using medication administration practices as the case in point. Design and Methods:?A 5-year ethnographic study collected information from 6 AL settings in Maryland. Ethnographic interviews (n = 323) and field notes comprise the data described in this article. Results:?AL organizations used practice rationales based on state regulations, professional responsibility, safety concerns, and social model values to describe and explain their setting-specific practices. The result was varying levels of congruence between the setting's practices and individual resident's needs and choices. That is, in some cases, the resident's needs were lost to the organization's practices, and in other cases, organizations adapted to resident need and choices. These findings suggest that individuals and organizations adapt to each other, resulting in practices that are not bound by state requirement or other practice rationales. Implications:?AL residences vary due to both internal and external forces, not just the public policies that define them. State regulations need to be responsive to both the needs and the choices of individual residents and to the people who work in an AL. PMID:19491359

  13. Adolescence and asthma management: the perspective of adolescents receiving primary health care☆

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Alisson; Rocha, Regina Lunardi; Alvim, Cristina Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of adolescence characteristics on asthma management. Methods: This was a qualitative study conducted in the city of Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, Southeast Brazil. Data were collected through semistructured interviews guided by a questionnaire with seven asthmatic adolescents followed-up in the primary public health care service of the city. Results: Using content analysis, three thematic categories were observed in the adolescents' responses: 1) family relationships in the treatment of asthma in adolescence; 2) the asthmatic adolescents and their peers; and 3) the role of the school for the asthmatic adolescents. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that peers, family, and school should be more valued by health professionals and by health care services when treating asthmatic adolescents, as these social relationships are closely associated with the adolescent and have an important role in asthma management. Attempts to meet the demands of adolescents contribute to improve asthma management. PMID:25479845

  14. Diagnosis and management of primary sclerosing cholangitis-perspectives from a therapeutic endoscopist

    PubMed Central

    Modha, Kunjam; Navaneethan, Udayakumar

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic, cholestatic liver condition characterized by inflammation, fibrosis, and destruction of the intra- and extrahepatic bile ducts. The therapeutic endoscopist plays a key role in the diagnosis and management of PSC. In patients presenting with a cholestatic profile, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is warranted for a definite diagnosis of PSC. Dominant strictures of the bile duct occur in 36%-57% of PSC patients. Endoscopic balloon dilatation with or without stenting have been employed in the management of dominant strictures. In addition, PSC patients are at increased risk of developing cholangiocarcinoma with a 20% lifetime risk. Brush cytology obtained during ERCP and use of fluorescence in situ hybridization forms the initial diagnostic step in the investigation of patients with dominant biliary strictures. Our review aims to summarize the current evidence supporting the role of a therapeutic endoscopist in the management of PSC patients. PMID:25914780

  15. Development of a Knowledge Management Model for the Development of a Quality Public Sector Management System for the Office of the Primary Educational Service Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khotbancha, Wijitra; Chantarasombat, Chalard; Sriampai, Anan

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research were: 1) to study the current situation and problem of Knowledge Management of the office of the primary education service area, 2) to develop a Knowledge Management model, 3) to study the success of the implementation of the Knowledge Management system. There were 25 persons in the target group. There were 2 kinds…

  16. Patient and provider interventions for managing osteoarthritis in primary care: protocols for two randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and knee are among the most common chronic conditions, resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. Adequate management of OA requires a combination of medical and behavioral strategies. However, some recommended therapies are under-utilized in clinical settings, and the majority of patients with hip and knee OA are overweight and physically inactive. Consequently, interventions at the provider-level and patient-level both have potential for improving outcomes. This manuscript describes two ongoing randomized clinical trials being conducted in two different health care systems, examining patient-based and provider-based interventions for managing hip and knee OA in primary care. Methods / Design One study is being conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system and will compare a Combined Patient and Provider intervention relative to usual care among n = 300 patients (10 from each of 30 primary care providers). Another study is being conducted within the Duke Primary Care Research Consortium and will compare Patient Only, Provider Only, and Combined (Patient + Provider) interventions relative to usual care among n = 560 patients across 10 clinics. Participants in these studies have clinical and / or radiographic evidence of hip or knee osteoarthritis, are overweight, and do not meet current physical activity guidelines. The 12-month, telephone-based patient intervention focuses on physical activity, weight management, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involves provision of patient-specific recommendations for care (e.g., referral to physical therapy, knee brace, joint injection), based on evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes are collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function), and secondary outcomes are the Short Physical Performance Test Protocol (objective physical function) and the Patient Health Questionnaire-8 (depressive symptoms). Cost effectiveness of the interventions will also be assessed. Discussion Results of these two studies will further our understanding of the most effective strategies for improving hip and knee OA outcomes in primary care settings. Trial registration NCT01130740 (VA); NCT 01435109 (NIH) PMID:22530979

  17. Translating Atopic Dermatitis Management Guidelines Into Practice for Primary Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Boguniewicz, Mark; Simpson, Eric L; Russell, John J; Block, Julie K; Feldman, Steven R; Clark, Adele R; Tofte, Susan; Dunn, Jeffrey D; Paller, Amy S

    2015-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis affects a substantial number of children, many of whom seek initial treatment from their pediatrician or other primary care provider. Approximately two-thirds of these patients have mild disease and can be adequately managed at the primary care level. However, recent treatment guidelines are written primarily for use by specialists and lack certain elements that would make them more useful to primary care providers. This article evaluates these recent treatment guidelines in terms of evaluation criteria, treatment recommendations, usability, accessibility, and applicability to nonspecialists and integrates them with clinical evidence to present a streamlined severity-based treatment model for the management of a majority of atopic dermatitis cases. Because each patient's situation is unique, individualization of treatment plans is critical as is efficient communication and implementation of the plan with patients and caregivers. Specifically, practical suggestions for individualizing, optimizing, implementing, and communicating treatment plans such as choosing a moisturizer formulation, avoiding common triggers, educating patients/caregivers, providing written treatment plans, and scheduling physician follow-up are provided along with a discussion of available resources for patients/caregivers and providers. PMID:26240216

  18. Management of patients with respiratory infections in primary care: procalcitonin, C-reactive protein or both?

    PubMed

    Meili, Marc; Müller, Beat; Kulkarni, Prasad; Schütz, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    Use of inflammatory biomarkers to guide antibiotic decisions has shown promising results in the risk-adapted management of respiratory tract infections, mainly in the inpatient setting. Several observational and interventional trials have investigated the benefits of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) testing in primary care. Both markers have shown promising results, although CRP is an inflammatory biomarker while PCT is more specific for bacterial infections. For CRP, point-of-care testing is widely established. Recently, sensitive point-of-care testing for PCT has also become available. A high-quality trial comparing these two markers for the management of patients in primary care is currently lacking. The aim of this paper is to review the existing literature investigating the use of PCT and CRP in primary care. The authors compare their performance for guiding antibiotic stewardship and analyze the cut-off values and endpoints to put these parameters into context in a low-acuity environment. PMID:26366806

  19. Educational Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Colleen; And Others

    A comprehensive review of educational choice literature and selected programs compose part 1 of this report. "Educational choice" is a catchall term encompassing a variety of strategies to grant parents the freedom to select schools, educational programs, or sets of courses based on the specific interests and needs of their children. Advocates of

  20. User Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Joy Selby

    In vocational education and training (VET), user choice is a means of achieving a more client-responsive training system by allowing clients to have greater choice over how their training needs are met. Funding arrangements linked in some direct way to the expressed demands of individual clients are essential for effective operation of a user…

  1. Evaluation of computerized health management information system for primary health care in rural India

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Comprehensive Rural Health Services Project Ballabgarh, run by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi has a computerized Health Management Information System (HMIS) since 1988. The HMIS at Ballabgarh has undergone evolution and is currently in its third version which uses generic and open source software. This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a computerized Health Management Information System in rural health system in India. Methods The data for evaluation were collected by in-depth interviews of the stakeholders i.e. program managers (authors) and health workers. Health Workers from AIIMS and Non-AIIMS Primary Health Centers were interviewed to compare the manual with computerized HMIS. A cost comparison between the two methods was carried out based on market costs. The resource utilization for both manual and computerized HMIS was identified based on workers' interviews. Results There have been no major hardware problems in use of computerized HMIS. More than 95% of data was found to be accurate. Health workers acknowledge the usefulness of HMIS in service delivery, data storage, generation of workplans and reports. For program managers, it provides a better tool for monitoring and supervision and data management. The initial cost incurred in computerization of two Primary Health Centers was estimated to be Indian National Rupee (INR) 1674,217 (USD 35,622). Equivalent annual incremental cost of capital items was estimated as INR 198,017 (USD 4213). The annual savings is around INR 894,283 (USD 11,924). Conclusion The major advantage of computerization has been in saving of time of health workers in record keeping and report generation. The initial capital costs of computerization can be recovered within two years of implementation if the system is fully operational. Computerization has enabled implementation of a good system for service delivery, monitoring and supervision. PMID:21078203

  2. Considerations for management of migraine symptoms in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder that affects one in seven US citizens annually. The burden of migraine is substantial, both in economic terms and for individual patients and their close family members. Initial medical consultations for migraine are usually with a primary care physician (PCP), and it is predominantly managed in a primary care setting; therefore, PCPs need a thorough understanding of migraine and the treatment options. This review provides an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, burden, and diagnosis of migraine with a focus on adults. Important aspects of migraine management, such as medication overuse and chronic migraine, are highlighted and insight is provided into factors for consideration when prescribing acute/abortive treatment for migraine to ensure that individual patients receive optimal pharmaceutical management. The effects of associated symptoms, e.g. nausea/vomiting, on treatment efficacy are pertinent in migraine; however, many therapy options, including alternative delivery systems, are available, thus facilitating the selection of optimal treatment for an individual patient. PMID:27078039

  3. Improving cellular therapy for primary immune deficiency diseases: Recognition, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda M.; Cowan, Morton J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Buckley, Rebecca H.; Candotti, Fabio; Conley, Mary Ellen; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Kohn, Donald B.; Ochs, Hans D.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Roifman, Chaim M.; Small, Trudy N.; Shearer, William T.

    2010-01-01

    More than 20 North American academic centers account for the majority of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) procedures for primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs), with smaller numbers performed at additional sites. Given the importance of a timely diagnosis of these rare diseases and the diversity of practice sites, there is a need for guidance as to best practices in management of patients with PIDs before, during, and in follow-up for definitive treatment. In this conference report of immune deficiency experts and HCT physicians who care for patients with PIDs, we present expert guidance for (1) PID diagnoses that are indications for HCT, including severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), combined immunodeficiency disease, and other non-SCID diseases; (2) the critical importance of a high degree of suspicion of the primary care physician and timeliness of diagnosis for PIDs; (3) the need for rapid referral to an immune deficiency expert, center with experience in HCT, or both for patients with PIDs; (4) medical management of a child with suspicion of SCID/combined immunodeficiency disease while confirming the diagnosis, including infectious disease management and workup; (5) the posttransplantation follow-up visit schedule; (6) antimicrobial prophylaxis after transplantation, including gamma globulin administration; and (7) important indications for return to the transplantation center after discharge. Finally, we discuss the role of high-quality databases in treatment of PIDs and HCTas an element of the infrastructure that will be needed for productive multicenter clinical trials in these rare diseases. PMID:20004776

  4. Prescription Practice for Diabetes Management among a Female Population in Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    ALHreashy, Fouzia A.; Mobierek, Abdulelah F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Prescription for diabetes care is an important practice in primary care. Methods. This is a descriptive study carried out on at primary care clinics over a five-month period at Al Imam Medical Complex, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It was cross-sectional study of 160 female diabetic patients, who visited the services between January and May, 2012. Data were collected from the medical records on the clinical characteristics and drugs prescribed for their diabetic management. Results. The majority of the sample population (82%) was older than 40 years old. Half of them had concomitant hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. There were 500 prescriptions for diabetes management. More than 57% of participants were on two or more drugs for hyperglycemia. Metformin was the most common drug prescribed. Metformin and sulphonylurea were the most common combined medications. Most of cases ( 70%) were on a combination of antihypertensive drugs. ACE or ARBs and diuretic was the most common combined prescriptions. Statins and aspirin were used by 41% and 23.8% of the research population, respectively. Conclusion. Polypharmacy is a feature in diabetes care. Most of the prescription practice for diabetic care follows the recommended guidelines for hyperglycemia and hypertension. Management of dyslipidemia among diabetic patients, however, is an area that needs to be developed. PMID:24778876

  5. Noncommunicable disease management in resource-poor settings: a primary care model from rural South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, R.; Gill, G.; Wilkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as hypertension, asthma, diabetes and epilepsy are placing an increasing burden on clinical services in developing countries and innovative strategies are therefore needed to optimize existing services. This article describes the design and implementation of a nurse-led NCD service based on clinical protocols in a resource-poor area of South Africa. Diagnostic and treatment protocols were designed and introduced at all primary care clinics in the district, using only essential drugs and appropriate technology; the convenience of management for the patient was highlighted. The protocols enabled the nurses to control the clinical condition of 68% of patients with hypertension, 82% of those with non-insulin-dependent diabetes, and 84% of those with asthma. The management of NCDs of 79% of patients who came from areas served by village or mobile clinics was transferred from the district hospital to such clinics. Patient-reported adherence to treatment increased from 79% to 87% (P = 0.03) over the 2 years that the service was operating. The use of simple protocols and treatment strategies that were responsive to the local situation enabled the majority of patients to receive convenient and appropriate management of their NCD at their local primary care facility. PMID:10191559

  6. A brief intervention for weight management in primary care: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity affects 25% of the UK adult population but modest weight loss can reduce the incidence of obesity-related chronic disease. Some effective weight loss treatments exist but there is no nationally available National Health Service (NHS) treatment service, and general practitioners (GPs) rarely discuss weight management with patients or support behavior change. Evidence shows that commercial weight management services, that most primary care trusts have 'on prescription', are more effective than primary care treatment. Methods/design We propose a controlled trial where patients will be randomized to receive either the offer of help by referral to a weight management service and follow-up to assess progress, or advice to lose weight on medical grounds. The primary outcome will be weight change at 12-months. Other questions are: what actions do people take to manage their weight in response to the two GP intervention types? How do obese patients feel about GPs opportunistically discussing weight management and how does this vary by intervention type? How do GPs feel about raising the issue opportunistically and giving the two types of brief intervention? What is the cost per kg/m2 lost for each intervention? Research assistants visiting GP practices in England (n = 60) would objectively measure weight and height prior to GP consultations and randomize willing patients (body mass index 30+, excess body fat, 18+ years) using sealed envelopes. Full recruitment (n = 1824) is feasible in 46 weeks, requiring six sessions of advice-giving per GP. Participants will be contacted at 3 months (postintervention) via telephone to identify actions they have taken to manage their weight. We will book appointments for participants to be seen at their GP practice for a 12-month follow-up. Discussion Trial results could make the case for brief interventions for obese people consulting their GP and introduce widespread simple treatments akin to the NHS Stop Smoking Service. Likewise, the intervention could be introduced in the Quality and Outcomes Framework and influence practice worldwide. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN26563137. PMID:24252510

  7. The diagnosis and management of cow milk protein intolerance in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Whitney Merrill; Allen, Patricia Jackson

    2005-01-01

    Cow milk protein intolerance (CMPI) affects 3% of infants under the age of 12 months and is often misdiagnosed as GERD or colic, risking dangerous exposure to antigens. Most infants out grow CMPI by 12 months; however, those with IgE-mediated reactions usually continue to be intolerant to cow's milk proteins and also develop other allergens including environmental allergens that cause asthmatic symptoms. Clinical manifestations of CMPI include diarrhea, bloody stools, vomiting, feeding refusal, eczema, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, allergic rhinitis, coughing, wheezing, failure to thrive, and anaphylaxis. The research and literature showed that CMPI is easily missed in the primary care setting and needs to be considered as a cause of infant distress and clinical symptoms. This article focuses on correctly diagnosing CMPI and managing it in the primary care setting. PMID:16411542

  8. An examination of factors in the withdrawal of managed care plans from the Medicare+Choice program.

    PubMed

    Glavin, Mitchell P V; Tompkins, Christopher P; Wallack, Stanley S; Altman, Stuart H

    Participation of health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the Medicare+Choice program, expected to rise rapidly after passage of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, has gone in just the opposite direction. Because plans have left in such large numbers, Congress has taken remedial measures to remove restrictions and increase payments. To date these efforts have failed. This paper uses plan organizational characteristics, market position, and financial performance to quantify the reasons why some HMOs exited at the end of 1998. The findings suggest HMO participation in Medicare+Choice will continue to fall unless major changes are made to the overall Medicare program and the method of paying HMOs. PMID:12638710

  9. Profiling Resource Use by Primary-Care Practices: Managed Medicare Implications

    PubMed Central

    Parente, Stephen T.; Weiner, Jonathan P.; Garnick, Deborah W.; Fowles, Jinnet; Lawthers, Ann G.; Palmer, R. Heather

    1996-01-01

    Variations in elderly Medicare beneficiaries' health service use are examined using a 100-percent sample of fee-for-service (FFS) claims data from Alabama, Iowa, and Maryland. Provider specialty, group practice type, practice size, and location are found to be significant factors affecting hospital and ambulatory care utilization and cost, after controlling for patient and regional characteristics. These results provide insights into utilization and cost expectations from different types of primary-care gatekeepers as the Medicare managed care market develops. PMID:10165710

  10. Evaluating the integration of chronic disease prevention and management services into primary health care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The increasing number of patients with chronic diseases represents a challenge for health care systems. The Chronic Care Model suggests a multi-component remodelling of chronic disease services to improve patient outcomes. To meet the complex and ongoing needs of patients, chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) has been advocated as a key feature of primary care producing better outcomes, greater effectiveness and improved access to services compared to other sectors. The objective of this study is to evaluate the adaptation and implementation of an intervention involving the integration of chronic disease prevention and management (CDPM) services into primary health care. Methods/Design The implementation of the intervention will be evaluated using descriptive qualitative methods to collect data from various stakeholders (decision-makers, primary care professionals, CDPM professionals and patients) before, during and after the implementation. The evaluation of the effects will be based on a combination of experimental designs: a randomized trial using a delayed intervention arm (n = 326), a before-and-after design with repeated measures (n = 163), and a quasi-experimental design using a comparative cohort (n = 326). This evaluation will utilize self-report questionnaires measuring self-efficacy, empowerment, comorbidity, health behaviour, functional health status, quality of life, psychological well-being, patient characteristics and co-interventions. The study will take place in eight primary care practices of the Saguenay region of Quebec (Canada). To be included, patients will have to be referred by their primary care provider and present at least one of the following conditions (or their risk factors): diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma. Patients presenting serious cognitive problems will be excluded. Discussion In the short-term, improved patient self-efficacy and empowerment are expected. In the mid-term, we expect to observe an improvement in health behaviour, functional health status, quality of life and psychological well-being. At the organizational level, the project should lead to coordinated service delivery, improved patient follow-up mechanisms and enhanced interprofessional collaboration. Integration of CDPM services at the point of care in primary care practices is a promising innovation in care delivery that needs to be thoroughly evaluated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01319656 PMID:23565674

  11. Stress and Primary Headache: Review of the Research and Clinical Management.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R

    2016-07-01

    This review begins with a discussion of the nature of stress and then presents the functional model of primary headache as a framework for conceptualizing the complex relationship between stress and headaches. Research is reviewed on stress as a trigger of headaches and how stress can play a role in the developmental and psychosocial context of headaches. Clinical management of headaches from a stress perspective is considered both at the level of trials of behavioral interventions that broadly fit into the stress management category and the additional strategies that might be useful for individual cases based on the research demonstrating associations between stress and headaches. The review concludes by suggesting that although some researchers have questioned whether stress can trigger headaches, overall, the literature is still supportive of such a link. Advances in methodology are discussed, the recent emphasis on protective factors is welcomed, and directions for future research suggested. PMID:27215628

  12. Managed care and the delivery of primary care to the elderly and the chronically ill.

    PubMed Central

    Wholey, D R; Burns, L R; Lavizzo-Mourey, R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze primary care staffing in HMOs and to review the literature on primary care organization and performance in managed care organizations, with an emphasis on the delivery of primary care to the elderly and chronically ill. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Analysis of primary care staffing: InterStudy HMO census data on primary care (n = 1,956) and specialist (n = 1,777) physician staffing levels from 1991 through 1995. Primary care organization and performance for the chronically ill and elderly were analyzed using a review of published research. STUDY DESIGN: For the staffing-level models, the number of primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees was regressed on HMO characteristics (HMO type [group, staff, network, mixed], HMO enrollment, federal qualification, profit status, national affiliation) and community characteristics (per capita income, population density, service area size, HMO competition). For the review of organization and performance, literature published was summarized in a tabular format. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis of physician staffing shows that group and staff HMOs have fewer primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees than do network and mixed HMOs, which have fewer than IPAs. Larger HMOs use fewer physicians per 100,000 enrollees than smaller HMOs. Federally qualified HMOs have fewer primary care and specialist physicians per 100,000 enrollees. For-profit, nationally affiliated, and Blue Cross HMOs have more primary care and specialist physicians than do local HMOs. HMOs in areas with high per capita income have more PCPs per 100,000 and a greater proportion of PCPs in the panel. HMO penetration decreases the use of specialists, but the number of HMOs increases the use of primary care and specialist physicians in highly competitive markets. Under very competitive conditions, HMOs appear to compete by increasing access to both PCPs and specialists, with a greater emphasis on access to specialists. The review of research on HMO performance suggests that access to PCPs is better in MCOs. But access to specialists and hospitals is lower and more difficult in MCOs than FFS. Data do not suggest that processes of care, given access, are different in MCOs and FFS. MCO enrollees are more satisfied with financial aspects of a health plan and less satisfied with other aspects of health plan organization. There are potential problems with outcomes, with some studies finding greater declines among the chronically ill in MCOs than FFS. We found a variety of innovative care programs for the elderly, based on two fundamentally different approaches: organization around primary care or organizing around specialty care. Differences between the performance of the two approaches cannot be evaluated because of the small amount of research done. It is difficult to say how well particular programs perform and if they can be replicated. The innovative programs described in the literature tend to be benchmark programs developed by HMOs with a strong positive reputation. PMID:9618674

  13. A Comparison of the Quality of Hypertension Management in Primary Care Between Shanghai and Shenzhen

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haitao; Wei, Xiaolin; Wong, Martin C.; Yang, Nan; Wong, Samuel Y.; Lao, Xiangqian; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Strong primary care is in urgent need for the management and control of hypertension. This study aimed to compare the quality of hypertensive care delivered by community health centers (CHCs) in Shanghai and Shenzhen. Multistage random sampling method was used to select 4 CHCs in each city as study settings. A cohort of hypertensive patients under the hypertensive management program in the CHCs was selected from the electronic information system by using a systematic random sampling method. Binary logistic regression models were constructed for comparison between the 2 cities. A total of 3196 patients’ records were assessed. The proportions of hypertensive patients who received advice on smoking cessation (33.8 vs 7.7%, P < 0.001), increasing physical activity (52.4 vs 16.8%, P < 0.001), low-sodium diet (72.0 vs 64.1%, P < 0.001), and regular follow-up (37.8 vs 8.6%, P < 0.001) were higher in Shenzhen than in Shanghai. However, the drug treatment rate in Shenzhen was lower than that in Shanghai (74.2 vs 95.2%, P < 0.001). The hypertension control rate in Shenzhen was lower than that in Shanghai (76.3 vs 83.2%, P < 0.001). Better performance in the process of hypertensive care in terms of increasing physical activity advice, low-sodium diet advice, regular follow-up, and drug prescription was associated with a higher rate of hypertension control. The study indicates that primary care is effective in managing hypertension irrespective of management and operation models of CHCs in urban China. Our study suggests that improvements in the process of hypertensive care may lead to better hypertension control. PMID:25654383

  14. A guide to the management of urologic dilemmas for the primary care physician (PCP).

    PubMed

    Barkin, Jack; Rosenberg, Matt T; Miner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Patients with urologic conditions may present to a primary care physician (PCP) in the emergency department or in the PCP's office. Some conditions are true emergencies that require immediate surgical intervention. Others may require medical treatment or possibly simply reassuring the patient that there is no serious medical problem. Sometimes the diagnosis can be easily made, whereas other times the PCP needs to be able to rule out serious causes for a presenting problem and execute a guideline-recommended patient work up, to make a final diagnosis. Sometimes recommended diagnostic tests may not be readily available. When a PCP believes that a patient may have a serious urologic condition and is unsure of the appropriate patient management strategy, then he or she must quickly refer the patient to a urologist. This article describes common urology-related issues-hematuria, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test interpretation, phimosis and paraphimosis, acute scrotal pain and masses in the child and adult, urinary tract infection, renal colic, and castration-treatment-induced bone loss. It provides insights into decision-making processes for patient management of some urologic conditions, and information about managing sequelae and side effects of long term treatment. It includes practical diagnostic suggestions and patient management strategies based on the authors' years of urologic clinical practice experience. PMID:24978632

  15. The Testimony of Neoliberal Contradiction in Education Choice and Privatisation in a Poor Country: The Case of a Private, Undocumented Rural Primary School in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayengo, Nathaniel; Namusoke, Jane; Dennis, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    With international momentum to achieve "Education for All" by 2015, global attention is being paid to those parts of the world where mass formal primary schooling is relatively new. Uganda is such a place. In the context of ethnographic fieldwork at a poor, undocumented, private primary school in rural Uganda, parents were interviewed in…

  16. Radiotherapy of primary carcinoma of the vagina: management and results of different therapy schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, H.; Langer, M.; Smekal, G.; Weghaupt, K.

    1985-05-01

    Three hundred and sixty-two cases of primary vaginal carcinoma were treated at the Irradiation Department of the University Clinic for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vienna, from 1950 to 1977. As the method of choice an individually dosed, fractioned, and protracted radium-telecobalt therapy was employed. Comparing the last period analyzed (1971-1977) with another period 20 years earlier (1951-1956), a marked increase of advanced stages and older patients can be observed. These changes are reflected in the 5-year remission rate: in the total population it was 39.8%, as compared to 32% for the period from 1971 to 1977. For a group of 99 patients, who were treated between 1971 and 1977, the therapeutic effect of different therapy schemes is reported. The benefit of teletherapy is remarkable for advanced states, whereas for stages I and II an intrauterine application may be of importance. The complication rate amounted to 8% recto- or vesicovaginal fistulas and 41% and 43% cystitis and proctitis. The central importance of gynecological screening, especially for older women, is emphasized.

  17. Evaluability of the Program to Value Primary Healthcare Professionals (PROVAB): management challenges.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Catia Martins; Cruz, Marly Marques da; Kanso, Solange; Reis, Ana Cristina; Lima, Antnio; Torres, Raquel Maria Cardoso; Gonalves, Aline Leal; Carvalho, Silvia Cristina de; Grabois, Victor

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this article is to present the results of a study on the evaluability of the Program to Value Primary Healthcare Professionals (PROVAB in the Portuguese) that was created by the Brazilian Ministry of Health in 2011. The Program is part of the Manage Healthcare Work and Educationstrategy which seeks to invest in a number of measures aimed at improving and valuing the work carried out by primary healthcare teams. The research, which used qualitative methods, was carried out between February and November 2013 and involved five stages: (a) analysis of documents; (b) identification of potential users; (c) strategic analysis; (d) modelling of the intervention; (e) sharing of lessons learned. Data collection took place in three iterative phases: document analysis, key informant interviews and a workshop. The activities of the program were grouped into three areas: functional and working conditions, teaching/learning and management. The results showed that the program can be evaluated, since it was possible to specify its feasibility by means of a logical model. The potential and priority areas were mapped for future evaluations, whose central focus is to address the problem of unequal distribution of Brazilian health professionals. PMID:26465843

  18. Managing obesity in primary care practice: an overview with perspective from the POWER-UP study.

    PubMed

    Wadden, T A; Volger, S; Tsai, A G; Sarwer, D B; Berkowitz, R I; Diewald, L K; Carvajal, R; Moran, C H; Vetter, M

    2013-08-01

    Primary care practitioners (PCPs) have been encouraged to screen all adults for obesity and to offer behavioral weight loss counseling to the affected individuals. However, there is limited research and guidance on how to provide such intervention in primary care settings. This led the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in 2005 to issue a request for applications to investigate the management of obesity in routine clinical care. Three institutions were funded under a cooperative agreement to undertake the practice-based opportunities for weight reduction (POWER) trials. The present article reviews selected randomized controlled trials, published before the initiation of POWER, and then provides a detailed overview of the rationale, methods and results of the POWER trial conducted at the University of Pennsylvania (POWER-UP). POWER-UP's findings are briefly compared with those from the two other POWER trials, conducted at Johns Hopkins University and Harvard University/Washington University. The methods of delivering behavioral weight loss counseling differed markedly across the three trials, as captured by an algorithm presented in the article. Delivery methods ranged from having medical assistants and PCPs from the practices provide counseling to using a commercially available call center, coordinated with an interactive website. Evaluation of the efficacy of primary care-based weight loss interventions must be considered in light of costs, as discussed in relation to the recent treatment model proposed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. PMID:23921779

  19. Role of Uttara Vasti with Trivrit and Lasuna oil in the management of primary dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Shabnam; Sujatha, N.; Neelam

    2010-01-01

    Dysmenorrhea is one of the most common clinical entities encountered in regular practice by the gynecologists. Dysmenorrhea means painful menstruation. Fifty percent of the women suffer from dysmenorrhea. Primary dysmenorrhea is correlated with Udavartini yonivyapad in Ayurveda. No successful advances have been made in the line of management till today by western medicine. Therefore, a complete, comprehensive and holistic approach toward its understanding and treatment is the need of the age. In this series, Uttar Vasti, a unique panchakarma procedure, is studied for its role in yonivyapads. A research study was conductedto evaluate the efficacy of Uttar Vasti with Trivrit and Lasuna oil in Primary dysmenorrhea. Thirty-six diagnosed cases of Udavartini Yonivyapad, viz., primary (spasmodic) dysmenorrhea, were selected and randomly allocated into two groups. The effect of Uttar Vasti was compared with the commonly used non steroidal anti inflammatory drug (control group). Uttar Vasti with Operculina turpethum (Trivrit) and Allium sativum (Lasuna) oil has shown encouraging results in Udavartini yonivyapad. Statistically significant relief was seen in the intensity of pain and the successive cycles were less painful in the treated group as compared to control group. The mode of action can be attributed to anti-inflammatory (vatahara), vasodilatory (ushna virya) antispasmodic and laxative (anulomana) properties of the trial drugs. The present study shows Uttar Vasti as a safe and easy technique to treat dysmenorrhea like conditions without any side effects. PMID:22131715

  20. Infectious diseases in primary care; managing the interface between the person and the community.

    PubMed

    Coenen, Samuel

    2012-06-01

    Respiratory infections are still among the most common new diagnoses in primary care. The most frequent reason for encounter is acute cough. General practitioners have to make antibiotic prescribing decisions in a context of diagnostic uncertainty, patient preferences and antimicrobial resistance. There is a causal link between antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic prescribing in primary care. GRACE observational studies (www.grace-lrti.org), show that variation in clinical presentation does not explain the considerable variation in antibiotic prescribing in Europe for adults presenting in primary care with acute cough and that recovery is similar between those treated with any antibiotic, a particular antibiotic class, or no antibiotic. A GRACE randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the effect of antibiotics for acute cough has recruited more patients than all RCTs combined in the current Cochrane Review and will have the power to identify subgroups of patients who will (not) benefit from amoxicillin. Another multi-country GRACE RCT assessing the effect on antibiotic prescribing of largely web-based versions of successful interventions including a C-reactive protein point-of-care test, a communication skill training and an interactive patient booklet is awaited. Given potential long-term cost-effectiveness, the GRACE suite of observational and interventional studies are enhancing the evidence base for reducing diagnostic uncertainty and managing patient expectations in a patient-centred way to achieve greater evidence-based antibiotic prescribing that is likely to help containing antimicrobial resistance. PMID:22548288

  1. The Development and Evaluation of an Integrated Electronic Prescribing and Drug Management System for Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Tamblyn, Robyn; Huang, Allen; Kawasumi, Yuko; Bartlett, Gillian; Grad, Roland; Jacques, André; Dawes, Martin; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Perreault, Robert; Taylor, Laurel; Winslade, Nancy; Poissant, Lise; Pinsonneault, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To develop and evaluate the acceptability and use of an integrated electronic prescribing and drug management system (MOXXI) for primary care physicians. Design: A 20-month follow-up study of MOXXI (Medical Office of the XXIst Century) implementation in 28 primary care physicians and 13,515 consenting patients. Measurement: MOXXI was developed to enhance patient safety by integrating patient demographics, retrieving active drugs from pharmacy systems, generating an automated problem list, and providing electronic prescription, stop order, automated prescribing problem alerts, and compliance monitoring functions. Evaluation of technical performance, acceptability, and use was conducted using audit trails, questionnaires, standardized tasks, and information from comprehensive health insurance databases. Results: Perceived improvements in continuity of care and professional autonomy were associated with physicians' expected use of MOXXI. Physician speed in using MOXXI improved substantially in the first three months; however, only the represcribing function was faster using MOXXI than by handwritten prescription. Physicians wrote electronic prescriptions in 36.9 per 100 visits and reviewed the patient's drug profile in 12.6 per 100 visits. Physicians rated printed prescriptions, the current drug list, and the represcribing function as the most beneficial aspects of the system. Physicians were more likely to use the drug profile for patients who used more medication, made more emergency department visits, had more prescribing physicians, and lower continuity of care. Conclusion: Primary care physicians believed an integrated electronic prescribing and drug management system would improve continuity of care, and they were more likely to use the system for patients with more complex, fragmented care. PMID:16357357

  2. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    PubMed Central

    Odusola, Aina O.; Stronks, Karien; Hendriks, Marleen E.; Schultsz, Constance; Akande, Tanimola; Osibogun, Akin; van Weert, Henk; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Design Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11) and health insurance managers (n=4). Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Results Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider–insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. Conclusions By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA. PMID:26880152

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as adjunct to primary care management for tennis elbow: pragmatic randomised controlled trial (TATE trial)

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A Martyn; Sim, Julius; Mallen, Christian D; Mason, Elizabeth E; Hay, Elaine M; van der Windt, Daniëlle A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of supplementing information and advice on analgesia and exercise from a general practitioner with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a non-drug form of analgesia to reduce pain intensity in patients with tennis elbow. Design Pragmatic randomised controlled trial in primary care. Setting and 38 general practices in the West Midlands, UK. Participants 241 adults consulting with a first or new (no consultation in previous six months) clinical diagnosis of tennis elbow. Interventions Participants were randomly allocated to either primary care management alone, consisting of a consultation with a general practitioner followed by information and advice on exercises, or primary care management plus TENS to be used once a day for 45 minutes over six weeks (or until symptom resolution) for pain relief. Outcome measures The primary outcome was self reported intensity of elbow pain (0-10 rating scale) at six weeks. Primary and secondary outcomes were measured at baseline and at six weeks, six months, and 12 months by postal questionnaire. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results 121 participants were randomised to primary care management plus TENS and 120 to primary care management only (first episode, n=197 (82%); duration <1-3 months, n=138 (57%)). Adherence to exercise and TENS recommendations reported at six weeks was low; only 42 participants in the primary care management plus TENS group met a priori defined adherence criteria. Both intervention groups showed large improvements in pain and secondary outcomes, especially during the first six weeks of follow-up. However, no clinically or statistically significant differences were seen between groups at any follow-up timepoint. At the primary endpoint (six weeks), the between group difference in improvement of pain was −0.33 (95% confidence interval −0.96 to 0.31; P=0.31) in favour of the primary care management only group, with adjustment for age, sex, and baseline pain score. Conclusions This trial does not provide evidence for additional benefit of TENS as an adjunct to primary care management of tennis elbow. Poor adherence to interventions is evidence of the challenges of implementing self management treatment strategies in primary care. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN87141084. PMID:23999980

  4. Choice Plans: A Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heleen, Owen

    1992-01-01

    Choice plans include private schools (voucher plans, tax credits and deductions, and contract services and charter plans) and public schools (intradistrict choice, interdistrict choice, and statewide choice). Issues spanning both areas are those of curricular choice and residential choice. (SLD)

  5. Long-term Medical Management of the Liver Transplant Recipient: What the Primary Care Physician Needs to Know

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddharth; Watt, Kymberly D.

    2012-01-01

    Recognition, management, and prevention of medical complications and comorbidities after liver transplant is the key to improved long-term outcomes. Beyond allograft-related complications, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction, and malignancies are leading causes of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Primary care physicians have an important role in improving outcomes of liver transplant recipients and are increasingly relied on for managing these complex patients. This review serves to assist the primary care physician in the long-term management issues of liver transplant recipients. PMID:22763347

  6. The Role of Surgery in the Clinical Management of Primary Gastrointestinal Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Ian T; Shannon, Evan M; Dawes, Aaron J; Ostrzega, Nora; Russell, Marcia M; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2015-10-01

    Primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (PGINHL) is a heterogeneous family of tumors, with treatment modalities including chemotherapy, surgery, and radiotherapy. Because the role of surgery in PGINHL remains disputed, this study aims to assess the impact of operative resection on survival. We used a pathology database to identify all cases of PGINHL diagnosed at a single academic-affiliated medical center from 1988 to 2013. Demographic and clinical data were abstracted from the medical record. We summarized the clinical courses of patients with PGINHL and then performed a survival analysis to compare overall and disease-free survival, stratified by demographic and clinical variables. We identified 33 patients diagnosed with PGINHL during the study period. Of 29 who subsequently received treatment at the institution, 15 initially underwent chemotherapy, 10 underwent surgical resection, and 4 underwent surgery for other reasons such as diagnosis without resection or management of disease complications. Three patients suffered surgical complications and two of these patients died. We found no difference in overall survival between patients receiving surgical resection and patients managed initially with chemotherapy. This case series supports a continued role for surgical resection in the management of patients with PGINHL, though anticipated benefits should be weighed against the risk of complications. PMID:26463295

  7. Primary Care Providers' Knowledge and Practices of Diabetes Management During Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mujtaba; Adams, Alexandra; Hossain, Md Anwar; Sutin, David; Han, Benjamin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    There are an estimated 3.5 million Muslims in North America. During the holy month of Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims are to fast from predawn to after sunset. While there are exemptions for older and sick adults, many adults with diabetes fast during Ramadan. However, there are risks associated with fasting and specific management considerations for patients with diabetes. We evaluated provider practices and knowledge regarding the management of patients with diabetes who fast during Ramadan. A 15-question quality improvement survey based on a literature review and the American Diabetes Association guidelines was developed and offered to providers at the outpatient primary care and geriatric clinics at an inner-city hospital in New York City. Forty-five providers completed the survey. Most respondents did not ask their Muslim patients with diabetes if they were fasting during the previous Ramadan. Knowledge of fasting practices during Ramadan was variable, and most felt uncomfortable managing patients with diabetes during Ramadan. There is room for improvement in educating providers about specific cultural and medical issues regarding fasting for patients with diabetes during Ramadan. PMID:26294052

  8. Diabetes Case Management in Primary Care: The New Brunswick Experience and Expanding the Practice of the Certified Diabetes Educator Nurse into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shelley L

    2015-08-01

    The role of the outreach diabetes case manager in New Brunswick, Canada, was first developed in the Moncton Area of Horizon Health Network in response to a physician-identified gap between patients' diagnoses of diabetes and their attendance at the local diabetes education centre. This model of collaborative interprofessional practice increases support for primary care providers and people living with diabetes in that they are being provided the services of certified diabetes educators who can address knowledge gaps with respect to evidence-based guidelines and best practice, promote advancement of diabetes and chronic-disease management therapies and support adherence to treatment plans and self-management practices. This report chronicles a review of the implementation, expansion and evaluation of the outreach diabetes case manager model in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, along with the rationale for development of the role for registered nurses in other jurisdictions. PMID:25797113

  9. The role of public relations activities in hospital choice.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoglu, Dilaver; Yesiltas, Mehmet; Kisa, Adnan; Dziegielewski, Sophia F

    2007-01-01

    Public relations activities for all organizations can have an important effect on consumer decision-making when buying goods or services. This study examines the effect that public relations activities can have regarding consumer decisions and choice. To explore exemplify this relationship a questionnaire was given to 971 patients within public, university and private hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Study results show that public relations activities were a crucial factor in determining consumer hospital choice. The majority of respondents reported that the behaviors and attitude of personnel as public relations activities that support the hospital's reputation within the public were the primary variables in hospital choice. Health care managers can use these findings to further understand how patients make informed choices related to usage of a health care facility and to develop and/or improve public relations activities. PMID:19042526

  10. Input of molecular analysis in medical management of primary brain tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Idbaih, A; Duran-Pea, A; Bonnet, C; Ducray, F

    2015-01-01

    Primary brain tumors comprise a large group of malignant and non-malignant tumors including heterogeneous entities with various biological and clinical behaviors. Up till recently, diagnosis of brain cancers, that drives treatment decision-making, was based on integration of clinical, radiological and pathological features of patients and tumors. Over the last years, practical neuro-oncology has entered an era of molecular-based personalized medicine. Indeed, molecular features of tumors provide critical information to physicians for daily clinical management of patients and for design of relevant clinical research. Sporadic gliomas or glial tumors are the most common primary brain tumors in adults. Recently, their medical management has been revolutionized by molecular data. Indeed, optimal therapeutic management of grade III glioma patients now requires assessment of chromosome arms 1p/19q copy number and IDH mutational statuses as predictive and prognostic biomarkers. Indeed, two large phase III clinical trials have demonstrated that early chemotherapy plus radiotherapy, versus radiotherapy alone, doubles median overall survival of patients suffering from 1p/19q co-deleted and/or IDH mutated anaplastic oligodendroglial tumor. Interestingly, both biomarkers have been identified in a large proportion of WHO grade II gliomas. Their clinical value, in this population, is under investigation through multiple phase III clinical trials. In sporadic WHO grade I gliomas, and specifically in pilocytic astrocytomas, MAPK signaling pathway activation is a frequent event, mainly due to genetic alterations involving BRAF gene. This characteristic opens new therapeutic perspectives using MAPK signaling pathway inhibitors. Finally, in the most aggressive gliomas, WHO grade IV gliomas, two critical biomarkers have been identified: (i) MGMT promoter methylation associated with longer survival and better response to chemotherapy and (ii) IDH mutations predicting better prognosis. Although, further studies are needed, MGMT promoter methylation will undoubtedly be transferred soon to clinical practice. Molecular characteristics are beginning to be valuable and indispensable in neuro-oncology for better management of brain tumors patients. The near future will be marked by identification of novel molecular biomarkers and their validation for clinical practice. PMID:26026669

  11. Severe primary pulmonary lymphangiectasis in a premature infant: management and follow up to early childhood.

    PubMed

    Reiterer, Friedrich; Grossauer, Karin; Pfleger, Andreas; Häusler, Martin; Resch, Bernhard; Eber, Ernst; Popper, Helmut; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2015-02-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphangiectasis (PPL) is a rare congenital developmental abnormality of the lung with a generally poor prognosis. Only a limited number of patients with neonatal-onset PPL have been reported to survive. We present the case of a male preterm infant (gestational age 34 weeks 6 days) with histologically confirmed PPL, complicated by hydrops fetalis, bilateral hydrothorax (treated in utero with pleuro-amniotic shunts), and immediate respiratory distress at birth. He survived after extensive neonatal intensive care therapy and was discharged home at the age of 7 months. At last follow up he was 3 years 7 months old, still requiring assisted ventilation via tracheostomy, having recurrent episodes of wheezing and had mild global developmental delay. This case demonstrates that survival beyond the neonatal period is possible even with severe PPL but long-term morbidity may be relevant, and multidisciplinary management and close follow up are essential. PMID:25711257

  12. Primary HIV infection: a medical and public health emergency requiring rapid specialist management.

    PubMed

    Fidler, Sarah; Fox, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Primary HIV infection (PHI) refers to the first six months following HIV acquisition and represents a unique opportunity for expedited diagnosis, and consideration of rapid antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation to improve immune function, reduce the size of the viral reservoir and limit the risk of onward viral transmission. Failure to diagnose and rapidly treat individuals with PHI has significant individual and public health implications. The Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial recently identified a clinical benefit of immediate ART over deferral of treatment according to CD4 count threshold, and has led to rapid changes in World Health Organization and specialist national guidelines. For all individuals living with HIV, the offer of immediate therapy irrespective of CD4 count is now recommended. This paper summarises the presentation and management of PHI, incorporating current research and guideline changes and discusses the role of PHI in onward transmission. PMID:27037390

  13. Electronic Clinical Decision Support for Management of Depression in Primary Care: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying Xia; Grimes, Angela; Diamond, James J.; Lieberman, Michael I.; Klinkman, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the utility of an electronic clinical decision support tool for management of depression in primary care. Method: This prospective study was conducted in a national network of ambulatory practices over a 1-year period (October 2007–October 2008). A clinical decision support tool was embedded into the electronic health record of 19 primary care practices with 119 providers. The main components included (1) the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), with 9 questions paralleling the 9 DSM-IV criteria for the diagnosis of major depressive disorder; (2) a suicide assessment form; and (3) brief patient and provider education. Use of each component was tracked in the electronic health record. Providers completed baseline and postintervention surveys regarding their depression management practices and their perceptions of the clinical decision support tool. Results: According to electronic health record tracking, the PHQ-9 form was used in 45.6% of the 16,052 adult patients with depression and in 73.7% of the 1,422 patients with new depression. The suicide assessment form was used in 62.0% of patients with possible suicidality. Education modules were rarely used. From before to after the study, providers reported increased use of standardized tools for depression diagnosis (47% to 80%, P < .001) and monitoring (27% to 85%, P < .001). The majority of providers reported often using the PHQ-9 and suicide forms and felt them to be very helpful in patient care, with 85% planning to continue their use after the study. Conclusions: The electronic health record–based clinical decision support tool was extensively used and perceived as very helpful for assessment of patients’ symptoms but not for provider education. These findings can help guide national efforts incorporating clinical decision support for quality improvement. PMID:22690364

  14. Comparison of American and European practices in the management of patients with primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Trujillo, H S; Chapel, H; Lo Re III, V; Notarangelo, L D; Gathmann, B; Grimbacher, B; Boyle, J M; Hernandez-Trujillo, V P; Scalchunes, C; Boyle, M L; Orange, J S

    2012-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs) comprise a heterogeneous group of rare disorders. This study was devised in order to compare management of these diseases in the northern hemisphere, given the variability of practice among clinicians in North America. The members of two international societies for clinical immunologists were asked about their management protocols in relation to their PID practice. An anonymous internet questionnaire, used previously for a survey of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), was offered to all full members of the European Society for Immunodeficiency (ESID). The replies were analysed in three groups, according to the proportion of PID patients in the practice of each respondent; this resulted in two groups from North America and one from Europe. The 123 responses from ESID members (23·7%) were, in the majority, very similar to those of AAAAI respondents, with > 10% of their practice devoted to primary immunodeficiency. There were major differences between the responses of these two groups and those of the general AAAAI respondents whose clinical practice was composed of < 10% of PID patients. These differences included the routine use of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIg) for particular types of PIDs, initial levels of IVIg doses, dosing intervals, routine use of prophylactic antibiotics, perceptions of the usefulness of subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy (SCIg) and of the risk to patients' health of policies adopted by health-care funders. Differences in practice were identified and are discussed in terms of methods of health-care provision, which suggest future studies for ensuring continuation of appropriate levels of immunoglobulin replacement therapies. PMID:22670779

  15. [Discharge planning in which a discharge planning nurse was involved in the choice of nutrition management for an elderly person with dementia].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuko; Ohori, Yoko; Seshimo, Akiyoshi

    2013-12-01

    A discharge planning nurse at an acute care hospital conducted discharge planning for an elderly person with dementia who is in his/her 90s and his/her family. The nurse was involved in the choice of nutrition management method and was able to support the family's decision-making. The family had high expectations for oral ingestion, and there was disparity between those expectations and the actual state of the disease, in which aspiration occurred frequently. The nurse respected the family's wishes, but also helped the family to correctly understand the state of the disease and to make satisfactory choices about future daily life. In order to guarantee safety, the discharge planning nurse held a conference with people related to homecare, such as the home-visiting physician, the home-visiting nurse, and the care manager. As a result of the conference, that family was able to feel satisfied with and choose gastrostomy as the nutrition method. The current situation was better understood because information was shared with the community, and the confidence in the community was strengthened by giving consideration to the family's burden. It was reconfirmed that the cooperation of local staff members is useful in discharge planning. PMID:24712152

  16. Is diabetes management in primary care improving clinical outcomes? A study in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Mochtar, I; Al-Monjed, M F

    2015-04-01

    There has been little research into the effectiveness of primary-care diabetes clinics in the Middle East. This study in Qatar compared patient outcomes at a primary-care facility with a dedicated diabetes clinic and one without. Using a cross-sectional method, data on demographics, diabetes status and 6 clinical outcomes of diabetes care were collected from the records of patients who visited the clinics during 2012. Diabetes management in both facilities improved clinical outcomes over the 1-year observation period. The mean total cholesterol of patients attending the special clinic (n = 102) decreased significantly from 4.66 to 4.27 mmol/dL and LDL cholesterol from 3.42 to 3.22 mmol/dL. The LDL cholesterol of patients receiving standard care (n = 108) reduced significantly from 3.41 to 3.22 mmol/dL and HDL cholesterol increased from 0.83 to 0.87 mmol/dL. Inter-provider comparisons indicated that the outcomes in the facility with a diabetes clinic were not superior to those in the facility with standard care. PMID:26077518

  17. Choice Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Darcy

    2001-01-01

    Describes how the author allows the children to make choices about their art and writing, enabling them to make connections between their own lives and work. Suggests that educators need to provide doorways to the things that give students ideas: books, music, objects, pictures, smells, sounds, and textures. (SG)

  18. Project Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    Project Choice was begun with the goal of increasing the number of inner-city students who graduate on time. Ewing M. Kauffman and his business and foundation associates designed and elected to test a model that used the promise of postsecondary education or training as the incentive to stay in school. This report details the evolution of Project…

  19. School Choice for the Poor? The Limits of Marketisation of Primary Education in Rural India. CREATE Pathways to Access. Research Monograph No. 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harma, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    In recent years India has seen an explosion in low-fee private (LFP) schooling aimed at the poorer strata of society. This marketisation of primary education is a reaction to the well-documented failings of the government system. This paper looks at LFP schooling in one rural district of Uttar Pradesh, and compares government to low cost private…

  20. Practice Characteristics of Graduates of East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine: Factors Related to Career Choices in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Click, Ivy A.

    2013-01-01

    The nation is facing a physician shortage, specifically in relation to primary care and in rural underserved areas. The most basic function of a medical school is to educate physicians to care for the national population. The purpose of this study was to examine the physician practicing characteristics of the graduates of East Tennessee State

  1. Practice Characteristics of Graduates of East Tennessee State University Quillen College of Medicine: Factors Related to Career Choices in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Click, Ivy A.

    2013-01-01

    The nation is facing a physician shortage, specifically in relation to primary care and in rural underserved areas. The most basic function of a medical school is to educate physicians to care for the national population. The purpose of this study was to examine the physician practicing characteristics of the graduates of East Tennessee State…

  2. Managing boundaries in primary care service improvement: A developmental approach to communities of practice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Effective implementation of change in healthcare organisations involves multiple professional and organisational groups and is often impeded by professional and organisational boundaries that present relatively impermeable barriers to sharing knowledge and spreading work practices. Informed by the theory of communities of practice (CoPs), this study explored the effects of intra-organisational and inter-organisational boundaries on the implementation of service improvement within and across primary healthcare settings and on the development of multiprofessional and multi-organisational CoPs during this process. Methods The study was conducted within the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Greater Manchester—a collaborative partnership between the University of Manchester and local National Health Service organisations aiming to undertake applied health research and enhance its implementation in clinical practice. It deployed a qualitative embedded case study design, encompassing semistructured interviews, direct observation and documentary analysis, conducted in 2010–2011. The sample included practice doctors, nurses, managers and members of the CLAHRC implementation team. Findings The study showed that in spite of epistemic and status differences, professional boundaries between general practitioners, practice nurses and practice managers co-located in the same practice over a relatively long period of time could be successfully bridged, leading to the formation of multiprofessional CoPs. While knowledge circulated relatively easily within these CoPs, barriers to knowledge sharing emerged at the boundary separating them from other groups existing in the same primary care setting. The strongest boundaries, however, lay between individual general practices, with inter-organisational knowledge sharing and collaboration between them remaining unequally developed across different areas due to historical factors, competition and strong organisational identification. Manipulated emergence of multi-organisational CoPs in the context of primary care may thus be problematic. Conclusions In cases when manipulated emergence of new CoPs is problematic, boundary issues could be addressed by adopting a developmental perspective on CoPs, which provides an alternative to the analytical and instrumental perspectives previously described in the CoP literature. This perspective implies a pragmatic, situational approach to mapping existing CoPs and their characteristics and potentially modifying them in the process of service improvement through the combination of internal and external facilitation. PMID:23068016

  3. The management of type 1 diabetes in primary school: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marks, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Crisp, Jackie

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic health conditions in childhood. The introduction of intensive insulin therapy and the rising prevalence of diabetes in younger children has increased the need for involvement of diabetes educators and school personnel in school diabetes care. School encompasses a significant proportion of a child's day, therefore diabetes treatment at school needs to be optimal or the child will have poor metabolic control. The aim of this literature review is to examine diabetes management in the early primary school setting. The main areas of diabetes management explored are: type, provision, and location of treatment, the impact on the child, and the role of the credentialed diabetes educator. The review identifies that the majority of children are not receiving intensive diabetes treatment at school. Younger children require more assistance with care and may be disadvantaged due to lack of appropriate school staff support. Most schools do not have nurses to assist with diabetes care, therefore teaching and administration staff are utilized. The use of insulin pump therapy may increase access to insulin at school, as children and teaching staff appear more confident with this method of delivery than injections. Treatment is frequently performed away from the classroom and can impact on class attendance, metabolic control, and emergencies. Diabetes educators need to work in collaboration with children, parents, and school personnel to ensure diabetes care is fully integrated into the school day. PMID:23597278

  4. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  5. Child diet and healthy growth in the context of rural poverty in the peruvian andes: what influences primary caregivers' opportunities and choices?

    PubMed

    Urke, Helga B; Bull, Torill; Mittelmark, Maurice B

    2013-09-01

    This study explored opportunities and choices related to child feeding among women living in a remote and low-income district in the Andean highlands. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with mothers (N = 7) with reputations for providing good child care, and who participated in an NGO-run social and health programme. The aim of this study was to learn about women's positive experience with child feeding, in the context of living in low-income communities. Such knowledge could be of substantial practical value to health promotion practitioners, in illuminating existing local circumstances and practices that produce good child nutrition. The women who were most knowledgeable about child health and diet were better educated and had relatively higher social positions in the community. Regarding contextual factors related to child feeding, numerous references were made to the extensive use of own crops and food stuffs, seen to provide a better diet than that available in cities where people buy their food. In discussing food and meal preparation habits, there were clear references to child welfare and health as motivating factors in the choices that were made. The NGO programme was not mentioned by the interviewer, to avoid prompting, yet the respondents referred to it explicitly, and attributed improved health-related knowledge and skills to the NGO education interventions (e.g. education about nutritious meal preparation, child care skills, and sanitation practices). It is concluded that the women were concerned about providing a good diet to their children, they were aware of the impact of feeding practices on child health, and that education about health and diet helped them to improved feeding practices. PMID:23986377

  6. School Choice: To What End?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Tony

    1996-01-01

    Debunks two fantasies: the feasibility of a free-market educational system and the idea that greater choice automatically means better schools. Public education is too labor-intensive and undercapitalized to be profitable. Communities need "skunk works" schools of choice to do research and development and smaller, collaboratively managed schools…

  7. Managing the entry of new medicines in the National Health Service: health authority experiences and prospects for primary care groups and trusts.

    PubMed

    McDonald, R; Burrill, P; Walley, T

    2001-11-01

    For the most part, the management of new medicines in the NHS has hitherto been a matter for local discretion. The result is that access to medicines is often determined by where a patient lives, as opposed to some nationally agreed clinical criteria. This "postcode prescribing" has led to widespread variations in access to medicines and concerns about the resulting inequalities. Primary care groups and trusts are expected to reduce variations in access to care, whilst at the same time balancing their finances, since any overspends on prescribing must be covered by disinvestment in hospital and community services. We interviewed 21 health authority (HA) prescribing advisers to ascertain how they viewed the managed entry of new medicines in order to identify lessons for PCGs. In addition, we report the views of local prescribing managers on the potential impact of recent government policy changes on the process and speculate on the likely implications of these for primary care groups and trusts. What is clear from the study is that HAs often have no explicit objective in relation to new medicines, but that their desire to act is prompted by fears of overspending on prescribing budgets. The danger of this approach is that patients may be denied cost-effective treatments since all new medicines are seen as a problem. It seems likely that PCG/Ts will face the same dilemmas with which the HA advisers in our study have been wrestling for some time. Recent policy changes in relation to prescribing budgets and new medicines are likely to exacerbate these problems. The tensions between local priority setting, which may mean saying no to new medicines, whilst at the same time eradicating postcode prescribing and balancing budgets means that PCG/Ts face difficult policy choices. PMID:11846812

  8. Comparison of primary care physician payment models in the management of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Karen; Cauch-Dudek, Karen; Chen, Zhongliang

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine primary care physician screening, treatment, and control rates for hypertension and to examine whether type of physician payment model affected these rates. DESIGN A cross-sectional chart abstraction study. SETTING Community health centres (salary), primary care networks (capitation), or traditional fee-for-service practices in Ontario. PARTICIPANTS A total of 135 primary care physicians, 45 from each of the 3 different models of care. Data were abstracted from 28 adult patient charts randomly selected from each physician. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Screening rates were based on the presence of at least 1 blood pressure reading in the past 3 years, treatment rates on the number of patients with hypertension treated with antihypertensive medication, and control rates on the number of patients with hypertension whose most recent blood pressure readings were below 140/90 mm Hg, below 130/80 mm Hg for patients with diabetes, or below 120/75 mm Hg for patients with renal disease. RESULTS Overall, 92.5% of all patients were screened for hypertension, 86.4% of patients with hypertension were treated with antihypertensive medications, and 44.9% of patients with hypertension had their blood pressure controlled. Mean screening rates were 90.6%, 93.5%, and 93.3% (P = .22), and after adjusting for sociodemographic factors and comorbid conditions, mean treatment rates were 90.9%, 81.0%, and 87.4% (P < .05) and mean control rates were 54.5%, 38.6%, and 41.6% (P < .05) for capitation, salary, and fee-for-service physicians, respectively. CONCLUSION Our results showed that although screening rates were similar between all 3 models, there were differences in treatment and control rates, with capitation physicians having the best treatment and control rates. Further investigation into whether this type of payment model results in improved chronic disease management for other chronic diseases and preventative care maneuvers will give support to health care policy makers who are moving toward capitation-type payment models for primary care delivery. PMID:19602662

  9. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, A.M.M.; Guenther, W.M.R.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized. Total waste generation increased 9.8%, but it was possible to reduce the volume of non-recyclable materials (11%) and increase the volume of recyclable materials (4%). It was also possible to segregate organic waste (7%), which was forwarded for production of compost. The rate of infectious waste generation in critical areas decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 kg/procedure. Many improvements have been observed, and now the PHC complies with most of legal requirements, offers periodic training and better biosafety conditions to workers, has reduced the volume of waste sent to sanitary landfills, and has introduced indicators for monitoring its own performance. This evaluation method might subsidize the creation and evaluation of medical waste management plans in similar heath institutions.

  10. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolíbar, Ignasi; Plaza, Vicente; Llauger, Mariantònia; Amado, Ester; Antón, Pedro A; Espinosa, Ana; Domínguez, Leandra; Fraga, Mar; Freixas, Montserrat; de la Fuente, Josep A; Liguerre, Iskra; Medrano, Casimira; Peiro, Meritxell; Pou, Mariantònia; Sanchis, Joaquin; Solanes, Ingrid; Valero, Carles; Valverde, Pepi

    2009-01-01

    Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1) improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2) benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients) and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients). The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of complex cases. PMID:19239679

  11. Need and disparities in primary care management of patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An aging population means that chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, are becoming more prevalent and demands for care are rising. Members of primary care teams should organize and coordinate patient care with a view to improving quality of care and impartial adherence to evidence-based practices for all patients. The aims of the present study were: to ascertain the prevalence of diabetes in an Italian population, stratified by age, gender and citizenship; and to identify the rate of compliance with recommended guidelines for monitoring diabetes, to see whether disparities exist in the quality of diabetes patient management. Methods A population-based analysis was performed on a dataset obtained by processing public health administration databases. The presence of diabetes and compliance with standards of care were estimated using appropriate algorithms. A multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to assess factors affecting compliance with standards of care. Results 1,948,622 Italians aged 16+ were included in the study. In this population, 105,987 subjects were identified as having diabetes on January 1st, 2009. The prevalence of diabetes was 5.43% (95% CI 5.33-5.54) overall, 5.87% (95% CI 5.82-5.92) among males, and 5.05% (95% CI 5.00-5.09) among females. HbA1c levels had been tested in 60.50% of our diabetic subjects, LDL cholesterol levels in 57.50%, and creatinine levels in 63.27%, but only 44.19% of the diabetic individuals had undergone a comprehensive assessment during one year of care. Statistical differences in diabetes care management emerged relating to gender, age, diagnostic latency period, comorbidity and citizenship. Conclusions Process management indicators need to be used not only for the overall assessment of health care processes, but also to monitor disparities in the provision of health care. PMID:25011729

  12. Estimation and Analysis of Gross Primary Production of Soybean Under Various Management Practices and Drought Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, P.; Xiao, X.; Suyker, A.

    2014-12-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) of croplands may be used to quantify crop productivity and evaluate a range of management practices. Eddy flux data from three soybean (Glycine max L.) fields under different management practices (no-till vs till; rainfed vs irrigated) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived vegetation indices (VIs) were used to evaluate the biophysical performance of VIs and crop phenology, and to model GPP using a satellite-based vegetation photosynthesis model (VPM). The VIs tracked soybean phenology well and delineated the growing season length. The results show that the carbon uptake period and seasonal sums of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and GPP can be inferred from the length of the vegetation activity period from satellite remote sensing data. Land surface water index (LSWI) tracked drought-impacted vegetation well. On a seasonal scale, NEE of the soybean sites ranged from -37 to -264 g C m-2. The result suggests that rainfed soybean fields needed about 450-500 mm of well-distributed seasonal rainfall to maximize the net carbon sink. During non-drought conditions, VPM accurately estimated seasonal dynamics and interannual variation of GPP of soybean under different management practices. However, some large discrepancies between GPPVPM and GPPEC were observed under drought conditions as the VI did not reflect the corresponding decrease in GPP. Diurnal GPP dynamics showed a bimodal distribution with a pronounced midday depression at the period of higher water vapor pressure deficit (> 1.2 kPa). A modified Wscalar based on LSWI, to account for the water stress, in VPM helped quantify the reduction in GPP during severe drought and the model's performance improved substantially. The results of this study demonstrate the potential use of remotely sensed VIs for better understanding of carbon dynamics and extrapolation of GPP of soybean croplands.

  13. Improving management of gout in primary care using a customised electronic records template.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Keith; McNab, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the management of chronic gout in relation to serum uric acid (SUA) monitoring, allopurinol dosing, and lifestyle advice is often sub-optimal in primary care.[1] A quality improvement project in the form of a criterion based audit was carried out in an urban general practice to improve the care of patients being treated for gout. Baseline searching of EMIS confirmed that management of patients with gout who were taking allopurinol was not in line with current guidance. 51(40%) had a SUA checked in the past 12 months, 88(25%) had a SUA below target level, and gout lifestyle advice was not being recorded. An audit was performed to measure and improve the following criteria: Monitoring of SUA levels in the past 12 monthsTitration of urate lowering therapy to bring the SUA below target levelLifestyle advice in the past 12 months An audit standard of 60% achievement at 2 months and 80% achievement at 4 months was set. The intervention consisted of a custom electronic template within EMIS which allowed guidance of gout management to be displayed and for data to be entered. All members of the team including GPs and administrative staff were educated regarding the intervention. This resulted in a sustained improvement over a 6 month period in all 3 components of the audit with 112(84%) having a SUA level checked, 79(51%) having a SUA below target level and 76(57%) receiving lifestyle advice. Although the improvement did not reach the audit standard in 2 of the criteria it would be expected that outcomes would continue given the systems changes which have been made. PMID:26734335

  14. Improving management of gout in primary care using a customised electronic records template

    PubMed Central

    Moffat, Keith; McNab, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the management of chronic gout in relation to serum uric acid (SUA) monitoring, allopurinol dosing, and lifestyle advice is often sub-optimal in primary care.[1] A quality improvement project in the form of a criterion based audit was carried out in an urban general practice to improve the care of patients being treated for gout. Baseline searching of EMIS confirmed that management of patients with gout who were taking allopurinol was not in line with current guidance. 51(40%) had a SUA checked in the past 12 months, 88(25%) had a SUA below target level, and gout lifestyle advice was not being recorded. An audit was performed to measure and improve the following criteria: Monitoring of SUA levels in the past 12 monthsTitration of urate lowering therapy to bring the SUA below target levelLifestyle advice in the past 12 months An audit standard of 60% achievement at 2 months and 80% achievement at 4 months was set. The intervention consisted of a custom electronic template within EMIS which allowed guidance of gout management to be displayed and for data to be entered. All members of the team including GPs and administrative staff were educated regarding the intervention. This resulted in a sustained improvement over a 6 month period in all 3 components of the audit with 112(84%) having a SUA level checked, 79(51%) having a SUA below target level and 76(57%) receiving lifestyle advice. Although the improvement did not reach the audit standard in 2 of the criteria it would be expected that outcomes would continue given the systems changes which have been made. PMID:26734335

  15. Care Management Processes Used Less Often For Depression Than For Other Chronic Conditions In US Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Tara F; Ramsay, Patricia P; Casalino, Lawrence P; Bao, Yuhua; Pincus, Harold A; Shortell, Stephen M

    2016-03-01

    Primary care physicians play an important role in the diagnosis and management of depression. Yet little is known about their use of care management processes for depression. Using national survey data for the period 2006-13, we assessed the use of five care management processes for depression and other chronic illnesses among primary care practices in the United States. We found significantly less use for depression than for asthma, congestive heart failure, or diabetes in 2012-13. On average, practices used fewer than one care management process for depression, and this level of use has not changed since 2006-07, regardless of practice size. In contrast, use of diabetes care management processes has increased significantly among larger practices. These findings may indicate that US primary care practices are not well equipped to manage depression as a chronic illness, despite the high proportion of depression care they provide. Policies that incentivize depression care management, including additional quality metrics, should be considered. PMID:26953291

  16. Influence of walking route choice on primary school children's exposure to air pollution--A proof of concept study using simulation.

    PubMed

    Mölter, Anna; Lindley, Sarah

    2015-10-15

    This study developed a walking network for the Greater Manchester area (UK). The walking network allows routes to be calculated either based on the shortest duration or based on the lowest cumulative nitrogen dioxide (NO2) or particulate matter (PM10) exposure. The aim of this study was to analyse the costs and benefits of faster routes versus lower pollution exposure for walking routes to primary schools. Random samples of primary schools and residential addresses were used to generate 100,000 hypothetical school routes. For 60% (59,992) and 40% (40,460) an alternative low NO2 and PM10 route was found, respectively. The median change in travel time (NO2: 4.5s, PM10: 0.5s) and average route exposure (NO2: -0.40 μg/m(3), PM10: -0.03 μg/m(3)) was small. However, quantile regression analysis indicated that for 50% of routes a 1% increase in travel time was associated with a 1.5% decrease in NO2 and PM10 exposure. The results of this study suggest that the relative decrease in pollution exposure on low pollution routes tends to be greater than the relative increase in route length. This supports the idea that a route planning tool identifying less polluted routes to primary schools could help deliver potential health benefits for children. PMID:26047859

  17. Sustainable Forest Management Preferences of Interest Groups in Three Regions with Different Levels of Industrial Forestry: An Exploratory Attribute-Based Choice Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berninger, Kati; Adamowicz, Wiktor; Kneeshaw, Daniel; Messier, Christian

    2010-07-01

    The challenge of sustainable forest management is to integrate diverse and sometimes conflicting management objectives. In order to achieve this goal, we need a better understanding of the aspects influencing the preferences of diverse groups and how these groups make trade-offs between different attributes of SFM. We compare the SFM preferences of interest groups in regions with different forest use histories based on the reasoning that the condition of the forest reflects the forest use history of the area. The condition of the forest also shapes an individual’s forest values and attitudes. These held values and attitudes are thought to influence SFM preferences. We tested whether the SFM preferences vary amongst the different interest groups within and across regions. We collected data from 252 persons using a choice experiment approach, where participants chose multiple times among different options described by a combination of attributes that are assigned different levels. The novelty of our approach was the use of choice experiments in the assessment of regional preference differences. Given the complexity of inter-regional comparison and the small sample size, this was an exploratory study based on a purposive rather than random sample. Nevertheless, our results suggest that the aggregation of preferences of all individuals within a region does not reveal all information necessary for forest management planning since opposing viewpoints could cancel each other out and lead to an interpretation that does not reflect possibly polarised views. Although based on a small sample size, the preferences of interest groups within a region are generally statistically significantly different from each other; however preferences of interest groups across regions are also significantly different. This illustrates the potential importance of assessing heterogeneity by region and by group.

  18. Review of experimental studies in social psychology of small groups when an optimal choice exists and application to operating room management decision-making.

    PubMed

    Prahl, Andrew; Dexter, Franklin; Braun, Michael T; Van Swol, Lyn

    2013-11-01

    Because operating room (OR) management decisions with optimal choices are made with ubiquitous biases, decisions are improved with decision-support systems. We reviewed experimental social-psychology studies to explore what an OR leader can do when working with stakeholders lacking interest in learning the OR management science but expressing opinions about decisions, nonetheless. We considered shared information to include the rules-of-thumb (heuristics) that make intuitive sense and often seem "close enough" (e.g., staffing is planned based on the average workload). We considered unshared information to include the relevant mathematics (e.g., staffing calculations). Multiple studies have shown that group discussions focus more on shared than unshared information. Quality decisions are more likely when all group participants share knowledge (e.g., have taken a course in OR management science). Several biases in OR management are caused by humans' limited abilities to estimate tails of probability distributions in their heads. Groups are more susceptible to analogous biases than are educated individuals. Since optimal solutions are not demonstrable without groups sharing common language, only with education of most group members can a knowledgeable individual influence the group. The appropriate model of decision-making is autocratic, with information obtained from stakeholders. Although such decisions are good quality, the leaders often are disliked and the decisions considered unjust. In conclusion, leaders will find the most success if they do not bring OR management operational decisions to groups, but instead act autocratically while obtaining necessary information in 1:1 conversations. The only known route for the leader making such decisions to be considered likable and for the decisions to be considered fair is through colleagues and subordinates learning the management science. PMID:24108254

  19. Specialized Nursing Practice for Chronic Disease Management in the Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In response to the increasing demand for better chronic disease management and improved health care efficiency in Ontario, nursing roles have expanded in the primary health care setting. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of specialized nurses who have a clinical role in patient care in optimizing chronic disease management among adults in the primary health care setting. Data Sources and Review Methods A literature search was performed using OVID MEDLINE, OVID MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, OVID EMBASE, EBSCO Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database. Results were limited to randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews and were divided into 2 models: Model 1 (nurse alone versus physician alone) and Model 2 (nurse and physician versus physician alone). Effectiveness was determined by comparable outcomes between groups in Model 1, or improved outcomes or efficiency in Model 2. Results Six studies were included. In Model 1, there were no significant differences in health resource use, disease-specific measures, quality of life, or patient satisfaction. In Model 2, there was a reduction in hospitalizations and improved management of blood pressure and lipids among patients with coronary artery disease. Among patients with diabetes, there was a reduction in hemoglobin A1c but no difference in other disease-specific measures. There was a trend toward improved process measures, including medication prescribing and clinical assessments. Results related to quality of life were inconsistent, but patient satisfaction with the nurse-physician team was improved. Overall, there were more and longer visits to the nurse, and physician workload did not change. Limitations There was heterogeneity across patient populations, and in the titles, roles, and scope of practice of the specialized nurses. Conclusions Specialized nurses with an autonomous role in patient care had comparable outcomes to physicians alone (Model 1) based on moderate quality evidence, with consistent results among a subgroup analysis of patients with diabetes based on low quality evidence. Model 2 showed an overall improvement in appropriate process measures, disease-specific measures, and patient satisfaction based on low to moderate quality evidence. There was low quality evidence that nurses working under Model 2 may reduce hospitalizations for patients with coronary artery disease. The specific role of the nurse in supplementing or substituting physician care was unclear, making it difficult to determine the impact on efficiency. Plain Language Summary Nurses with additional skills, training, or scope of practice may help improve the primary care of patients with chronic diseases. This review found that specialized nurses working on their own could achieve health outcomes that were similar to those of doctors. It also found that specialized nurses who worked with doctors could reduce hospital visits and improve certain patient outcomes related to diabetes, coronary artery disease, or heart failure. Patients who had nurse-led care were more satisfied and tended to receive more tests and medications. It is unclear whether specialized nurses improve quality of life or doctor workload. PMID:24194798

  20. Managing patients with multimorbidity: systematic review of interventions in primary care and community settings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve outcomes in patients with multimorbidity in primary care and community settings. Design Systematic review. Data sources Medline, Embase, CINAHL, CAB Health, Cochrane central register of controlled trials, the database of abstracts of reviews of effectiveness, and the Cochrane EPOC (effective practice and organisation of care) register (searches updated in April 2011). Eligibility criteria Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series analyses reporting on interventions to improve outcomes for people with multimorbidity in primary care and community settings. Multimorbidity was defined as two or more chronic conditions in the same individual. Outcomes included any validated measure of physical or mental health and psychosocial status, including quality of life outcomes, wellbeing, and measures of disability or functional status. Also included were measures of patient and provider behaviour, including drug adherence, utilisation of health services, acceptability of services, and costs. Data selection Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility, extracted data, and assessed study quality. As meta-analysis of results was not possible owing to heterogeneity in participants and interventions, a narrative synthesis of the results from the included studies was carried out. Results 10 studies examining a range of complex interventions totalling 3407 patients with multimorbidity were identified. All were randomised controlled trials with a low risk of bias. Two studies described interventions for patients with specific comorbidities. The remaining eight studies focused on multimorbidity, generally in older patients. Consideration of the impact of socioeconomic deprivation was minimal. All studies involved complex interventions with multiple components. In six of the 10 studies the predominant component was a change to the organisation of care delivery, usually through case management or enhanced multidisciplinary team work. In the remaining four studies, intervention components were predominantly patient oriented. Overall the results were mixed, with a trend towards improved prescribing and drug adherence. The results indicated that it is difficult to improve outcomes in this population but that interventions focusing on particular risk factors in comorbid conditions or functional difficulties in multimorbidity may be more effective. No economic analyses were included, although the improvements in prescribing and risk factor management in some studies could provide potentially important cost savings. Conclusions Evidence on the care of patients with multimorbidity is limited, despite the prevalence of multimorbidity and its impact on patients and healthcare systems. Interventions to date have had mixed effects, although are likely to be more effective if targeted at risk factors or specific functional difficulties. A need exists to clearly identify patients with multimorbidity and to develop cost effective and specifically targeted interventions that can improve health outcomes. PMID:22945950

  1. The choices before us.

    PubMed

    Streeten, P P

    1980-01-01

    This introduction is from the 16th World Conference of SID in Colombo, Sri Lanka, August 1979, which addressed the theme of development choices for the 1980's and beyond. Choices may refer to different political, ideological or social systems. Choices may refer to strategies and technical issues, e.g. agriculture vs. industry. A third meaning of choice is implicit in the idea of a Third World, or alternative, method of development. The third meaning implies a rejection of Western institutions, values, and standards. In the past, the transfer of Western or in this case Northern, institutions and standards has disappointed and created obstacles to development. The rapid rate of population growth forces choices of population control and resource management. Common themes of development have emerged from conference discussions: the need to build development efforts on indigenous values; the need for new institutions both at the sub-national and at the super-national level; and, the need to adjust to inevitable changes rationally and with foresight. The nation state is too large for many functions that are better decentralized and left to village or district administrations, yet it is too small to respond to global challenges and environmental risks like harvest failure, credit risks, marketing risks, failure of supplies. The interests of the state are not identical with those of society or particular groups in society. PMID:12336526

  2. The Influence of Individual and Situational Factors on Children's Choice of a Conflict Management Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamm, Anni; Tõugu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of individual and situational factors on nursery school children's conflict management strategies. This observational study of triadic interaction was carried out among 69 children whose mean age was 48 months. The video-recorded data were coded for the type of…

  3. The Influence of Individual and Situational Factors on Children's Choice of a Conflict Management Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamm, Anni; Tugu, Pirko; Tulviste, Tiia

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of individual and situational factors on nursery school children's conflict management strategies. This observational study of triadic interaction was carried out among 69 children whose mean age was 48 months. The video-recorded data were coded for the type of

  4. Intra-annual variation in habitat choice by an endemic woodpecker: Implications for forest management and conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-del-Rey, Eduardo; Fernández-Palacios, José María; Muñoz, Pascual Gil

    2009-09-01

    The Canary Islands great spotted woodpecker Dendrocopos major canariensis is an endemic bird restricted to the Pinus canariensis forests of Tenerife and Gran Canaria. Classification tree models were applied to explore the relationship of the occurrence of this picid and habitat variables between two contrasting periods (breeding vs. non-breeding seasons) and for the entire annual cycle. During the reproductive period the availability of mature trees (DBH > 60 cm), and snags (dead trees), for nesting and roosting, characterize the breeding territory. Outside the breeding season the choice of locations was driven by a tree cover larger than 28.5% and the presence of trees taller than 8.5 m on average, a pattern explained by the availability of pine seeds in the cones of well-developed canopies, and less so by predation risk. Overall, during the annual cycle, well-developed canopy sites influenced the presence of this picidae (tree cover > 38%) and on more open sites (<38%) the presence of mature trees (DBH> 60 cm) became the second most important predictor of occurrence. We suggest that food abundance and availability could be the ultimate factor explaining the intra-annual variation observed, with the availability of snags being an important factor during nesting. In the range of this endemic, we recommend selective cuts in pine plantations, to allow the trees to set seed and improve their crops, minimizing the elimination of snags, and killing some large pine trees if the priority is to expand the distributional range of the woodpecker.

  5. Management of primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma by transcatheter embolization with iodine 125

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, E.K.; Sullivan, J.

    1988-07-15

    The long-term results of the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma by a radioactive interstitial implant seated by a transcatheter embolization technique were evaluated in 85 patients at risk at 2 years and 37 at 5 years. The 2-year survival rate was 33% and the 5-year survival rate was 32%. Patients with isolated skeletal metastases showed the best survival rate (2-year survival rate, 69%; 5-year survival rate, 60%). Isolated pulmonary, other parenchymal, and central nervous system (CNS) metastases showed a lower 2-year survival rate of 15%. Regardless of the site of metastases and the size of the primary, histologic grade appeared to have a substantial impact on the survival of our patients. The beneficial results of interstitial radiation therapy are attributed to reduction of tumor burden and possibly the stimulation of the host immune response that may initiate remission. The noticeably better results in patients with osseous metastases are attributed to the resolute treatment of all osseous metastases by additional interstitial iodine 125 (/sup 125/I) infarct implants. Conversely, the poor results in patients with CNS and other parenchymal metastases may be based on the inability to treat such metastases with /sup 125/I interstitial infarct implants. In addition to clinical observations of weight gain and the cessation of pain and hematuria if present, remissions are heralded by normalization of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, disappearance of tumor markers if present, and rise of beta interferon levels. The technique is advocated for the management of inoperable renal cell carcinoma with distant metastases.

  6. Cost, Utilization, and Quality of Care: An Evaluation of Illinois’ Medicaid Primary Care Case Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Han, Meiying; Petterson, Stephen M.; Makaroff, Laura A.; Liaw, Winston R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE In 2006, Illinois established Illinois Health Connect (IHC), a primary care case management program for Medicaid that offered enhanced fee-for-service, capitation payments, performance incentives, and practice support. Illinois also implemented a complementary disease management program, Your Healthcare Plus (YHP). This external evaluation explored outcomes associated with these programs. METHODS We analyzed Medicaid claims and enrollment data from 2004 to 2010, covering both pre- and post-implementation. The base year was 2006, and 2006–2010 eligibility criteria were applied to 2004–2005 data to allow comparison. We studied costs and utilization trends, overall and by service and setting. We studied quality by incorporating Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures and IHC performance payment criteria. RESULTS Illinois Medicaid expanded considerably between 2006 (2,095,699 full-year equivalents) and 2010 (2,692,123). Annual savings were 6.5% for IHC and 8.6% for YHP by the fourth year, with cumulative Medicaid savings of $1.46 billion. Per-beneficiary annual costs fell in Illinois over this period compared to those in states with similar Medicaid programs. Quality improved for nearly all metrics under IHC, and most prevention measures more than doubled in frequency. Medicaid inpatient costs fell by 30.3%, and outpatient costs rose by 24.9% to 45.7% across programs. Avoidable hospitalizations fell by 16.8% for YHP, and bed-days fell by 15.6% for IHC. Emergency department visits declined by 5% by 2010. CONCLUSIONS The Illinois Medicaid IHC and YHP programs were associated with substantial savings, reductions in inpatient and emergency care, and improvements in quality measures. This experience is not typical of other states implementing some, but not all, of these same policies. Although specific features of the Illinois reforms may have accounted for its better outcomes, the limited evaluation design calls for caution in making causal inferences. PMID:25354404

  7. Practical Approach to Detection and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease for the Primary Care Clinician.

    PubMed

    Vassalotti, Joseph A; Centor, Robert; Turner, Barbara J; Greer, Raquel C; Choi, Michael; Sequist, Thomas D

    2016-02-01

    A panel of internists and nephrologists developed this practical approach for the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative to guide assessment and care of chronic kidney disease (CKD) by primary care clinicians. Chronic kidney disease is defined as a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and/or markers of kidney damage for at least 3 months. In clinical practice the most common tests for CKD include GFR estimated from the serum creatinine concentration (eGFR) and albuminuria from the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Assessment of eGFR and albuminuria should be performed for persons with diabetes and/or hypertension but is not recommended for the general population. Management of CKD includes reducing the patient's risk of CKD progression and risk of associated complications, such as acute kidney injury and cardiovascular disease, anemia, and metabolic acidosis, as well as mineral and bone disorder. Prevention of CKD progression requires blood pressure <140/90 mm Hg, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers for patients with albuminuria and hypertension, hemoglobin A1c ≤7% for patients with diabetes, and correction of CKD-associated metabolic acidosis. To reduce patient safety hazards from medications, the level of eGFR should be considered when prescribing, and nephrotoxins should be avoided, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The main reasons to refer to nephrology specialists are eGFR <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2), severe albuminuria, and acute kidney injury. The ultimate goal of CKD management is to prevent disease progression, minimize complications, and promote quality of life. PMID:26391748

  8. Comparison of primary health-care models in the management of chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M; Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Negative lifestyle habits (potential risks for chronic kidney disease, CKD) are rarely modified by physicians in a conventional health-care model (CHCM). Multidisciplinary strategies may have better results; however, there is no information on their application in the early stages of CKD. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare a multiple intervention model versus CHCM on lifestyle and renal function in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and CKD stage 1–2. In a prospective cohort study, a family medicine unit (FMU) was assigned a multiple intervention model (MIM) and another continued with conventional health-care model (CHCM). MIM patients received an educational intervention guided by a multidisciplinary team (family physician (FP), social worker, dietitian, physical trainer); self-help groups functioned with free activities throughout the study. CHCM patients were managed only by the FP, who decided if patients needed referral to other professionals. Thirty-nine patients were studied in each cohort. According to a lifestyle questionnaire, no baseline differences were found between cohorts, but results reflected an unhealthy lifestyle. After 6 months of follow-up, both cohorts showed significant improvement in their dietary habits. Compared to CHCM diet, exercise, emotional management, knowledge of disease, and adherence to treatment showed greater improvement in the MIM. Blood pressure decreased in both cohorts, but body mass index, waist circumference, and HbA1C significantly decreased only in MIM. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was maintained equally in both cohorts, but albuminuria significantly decreased only in MIM. In conclusion, MIM achieves better control of lifestyle-related variables and CKD risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients with CKD stage 1–2. Broadly, implementation of a MIM in primary health care may produce superior results that might assist in preventing the progression of CKD. PMID:25018986

  9. Effectiveness of Case Management for 'At Risk' Patients in Primary Care: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Jonathan; Panagioti, Maria; Alam, Rahul; Checkland, Kath; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Bower, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background An ageing population with multimorbidity is putting pressure on health systems. A popular method of managing this pressure is identification of patients in primary care ‘at-risk’ of hospitalisation, and delivering case management to improve outcomes and avoid admissions. However, the effectiveness of this model has not been subjected to rigorous quantitative synthesis. Methods and Findings We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of case management for ‘at-risk’ patients in primary care. Six bibliographic databases were searched using terms for ‘case management’, ‘primary care’, and a methodology filter (Cochrane EPOC group). Effectiveness compared to usual care was measured across a number of relevant outcomes: Health – self-assessed health status, mortality; Cost – total cost of care, healthcare utilisation (primary and non-specialist care and secondary care separately), and; Satisfaction – patient satisfaction. We conducted secondary subgroup analyses to assess whether effectiveness was moderated by the particular model of case management, context, and study design. A total of 15,327 titles and abstracts were screened, 36 unique studies were included. Meta-analyses showed no significant differences in total cost, mortality, utilisation of primary or secondary care. A very small significant effect favouring case management was found for self-reported health status in the short-term (0.07, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.14). A small significant effect favouring case management was found for patient satisfaction in the short- (0.26, 0.16 to 0.36) and long-term (0.35, 0.04 to 0.66). Secondary subgroup analyses suggested the effectiveness of case management may be increased when delivered by a multidisciplinary team, when a social worker was involved, and when delivered in a setting rated as low in initial ‘strength’ of primary care. Conclusions This was the first meta-analytic review which examined the effects of case management on a wide range of outcomes and considered also the effects of key moderators. Current results do not support case management as an effective model, especially concerning reduction of secondary care use or total costs. We consider reasons for lack of effect and highlight key research questions for the future. Review Protocol The review protocol is available as part of the PROSPERO database (registration number: CRD42014010824). PMID:26186598

  10. Female genital cutting: an evidence-based approach to clinical management for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Hearst, Adelaide A; Molnar, Alexandra M

    2013-06-01

    The United States has more than 1.5 million immigrants from countries in Africa and the Middle East where female genital cutting (FGC) is known to occur. Often, FGC occurs in infancy and childhood in the countries where it is practiced, but patients of any age can present with complications. Lack of understanding of this common problem can potentially alienate and lower quality of care for this patient population. We provide an introduction to the practice of FGC and practice guidelines for the primary care physician. We reviewed original research, population-based studies, and legal research from PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL plus, PsycINFO, and Legal Trac. The terms searched included female genital cutting, female genital circumcision, and female genital mutilation alone and with the term complications or health consequences; no limit on date published. Legal databases were searched using the above terms, as well as international law and immigration law. Editorials and review articles were excluded. This review discusses the different types of FGC, important cultural considerations for physicians caring for patients with FGC, the common early and late medical complications and their management, and psychosocial issues associated with FGC. Current laws pertaining to FGC are briefly reviewed, as well as implications for patients seeking asylum status in the United States because of FGC. Finally, the article presents evidence-based, culturally sensitive approaches to discussions of FGC with girls and women for whom this is an issue. PMID:23726401

  11. An exploration of opioid medication management for non-malignant pain in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Foell, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore how prescription of opioid medication for chronic non-malignant pain (CNMP) is managed in primary care. We used audit as a research tool, and one general practitioner (GP) practice in West London acted as an exemplar. Of the practice population with CNMP, 1% had repeat prescription of at least 12 months duration for opioid analgesics at the time of data collection. These 1% are on highly controlled opioids. Our study showed the following: (1) long-term opioid prescription appears to follow a fluctuating course as opposed to staying the same; (2) we found that medication reviews were done in most cases (85.7%), but the quality of the process is difficult to assess and ascertain; and (3) we identified two incidences where opioid contract was implemented. In both cases, contracts were used as a last chance warning for patients who were already problematic, suggesting that opioid contracts served as a disciplinary tool rather than a preventative measure. Our findings highlight a need for a more structured and specific review of analgesic medication, and a need for a simple and effective way to identify patients at high risk of developing problematic use, to ensure better monitoring and early presentations. PMID:26516575

  12. Global theory and the nature of risk, Part 2. Towards a choice-based model of managed care.

    PubMed

    Emery, D W

    1999-01-01

    Orthodox managed care depends on top-down, command and control techniques to squeeze efficiency out of the system. But for every unit of economic good this approach produces, two or three bad units come as result. The key to moving to an environment where value and efficiency become self-sustaining is to structurally recognize the medicoeconomic reality of medicine: the episode of care. The episode forms a natural unit of analysis that not only renders costs and outcomes information translucent and accessible, but it also forms the natural conduit through which premium dollars can find their optimal value. By bifurcating probability risk from technical risk and allocating them in the ex ante and ex post markets, respectively, health care insurers and providers return to their rightful economic roles, and to their appropriate fiduciary duties. And patients regain some semblance of reasonable sovereignty in managing their own medical affairs. PMID:10557488

  13. Estimation and analysis of gross primary production of soybean under various management practices and drought conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, Pradeep; Xiao, Xiangming; Suyker, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) of croplands may be used to quantify crop productivity and evaluate a range of management practices. Eddy flux data from three soybean (Glycine max L.) fields under different management practices (no-till vs. till; rainfed vs. irrigated) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived vegetation indices (VIs) were used to test the capabilities of remotely sensed VIs and soybean phenology to estimate the seasonal dynamics of carbon fluxes. The modeled GPP (GPPVPM) using vegetation photosynthesis model (VPM) was compared with the GPP (GPPEC) estimated from eddy covariance measurements. The VIs tracked soybean phenology well and delineated the growing season length (GSL), which was closely related to carbon uptake period (CUP, R2 = 0.84), seasonal sums of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE, R2 = 0.78), and GPPEC (R2 = 0.54). Land surface water index (LSWI) tracked drought-impacted vegetation well, as the LSWI values were positive during non-drought periods and negative during severe droughts within the soybean growing season. On a seasonal scale, NEE of the soybean sites ranged from -37 to -264 g C m-2. The result suggests that rainfed soybean fields needed about 450-500 mm of well-distributed seasonal rainfall to maximize the net carbon sink. During non-drought conditions, VPM accurately estimated seasonal dynamics and interannual variation of GPP of soybean under different management practices. However, some large discrepancies between GPPVPM and GPPEC were observed under drought conditions as the VI did not reflect the corresponding decrease in GPPEC. Diurnal GPPEC dynamics showed a bimodal distribution with a pronounced midday depression at the period of higher water vapor pressure deficit (>1.2 kPa). A modified Wscalar based on LSWI to account for the water stress in VPM helped quantify the reduction in GPP during severe drought and the model's performance improved substantially. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential of integrating vegetation activity through satellite remote sensing with ground-based flux and climate data for a better understanding and upscaling of carbon fluxes of soybean croplands.

  14. Initial management of primary mediastinal seminoma: radiotherapy or cisplatin-based chemotherapy?

    PubMed

    Fizazi, K; Culine, S; Droz, J P; Terrier-Lacombe, M J; Thodore, C; Wibault, P; Rixe, O; Ruffi, P; Le Chevalier, T

    1998-02-01

    Primary mediastinal seminoma is an uncommon neoplasm, the optimal management of which is still debated. Radiotherapy produces a 65% disease-free survival rate. We assess whether these results have been improved with the advent of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Data from 14 patients treated at the Institut Gustave-Roussy were reviewed. 9 had received cisplatin-based chemotherapy (Group 1): their outcome was compared with that of 5 patients treated with radiotherapy without chemotherapy (Group 2). We also reviewed data from the English literature using strict criteria, and report results concerning patients who received cisplatin-based chemotherapy and those who received radiotherapy. 8 of the 9 patients (89%) in Group 1 are long-term disease-free survivors and only 3 of 5 patients in Group 2. The patient who died in Group 1 was the only one who refused surgical resection of residual masses after chemotherapy. The review of the literature revealed that 59 of 68 (87%) patients initially managed with cisplatin- or carboplatin-based chemotherapy and for whom sufficient data are available, are long-term survivors and free of disease. Some of these patients had also received radiotherapy. Only 64 of 103 (62%) treated with thoracic radiotherapy without chemotherapy were long-term disease-free survivors. The disease-free survival rate of 51 patients who received cisplatin-based chemotherapy (excluding those who received carboplatin) was 86%. The difference in survival between patients administered cisplatin-based chemotherapy and those who underwent radiotherapy is apparently not due to unbalanced prognostic factors, the effect of time or non-specific medical management. We conclude that cisplatin-based chemotherapy allows long-term disease-free survival in approximately 85% of patients. These results seem to be higher than those obtained without cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, a randomised study is required for definitive conclusions, but it is very unlikely that such a study will be performed due to the rarity of this neoplasm. Another alternative would be a meta-analysis based on individual data. PMID:9640220

  15. Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money (Revision)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-02-01

    Operating a typical school today is no easy task for facilities managers and business officials. You're expected to deliver increased services with constrained operating budgets. Many schools stay open for longer hours to accommodate community use of the facilities. Dilapidated buildings and systems gobble up energy, yet in many districts, maintenance needs are overshadowed by the need for expansion or new construction to serve growing student populations and changing educational needs.

  16. Challenges to the Implementation of PLAP in Primary Schools: Perceptions of ZOU Bachelor of Educational Management Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercy, Kurebwa; Mabhanda, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    The study explored the challenges that impact on the implementation of PLAP in the Primary schools. The research was conducted with teachers who study towards the BEd Management degree with Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) in the Midlands Region. The study used a qualitative research approach and collected data through open ended questionnaires and…

  17. Conflicts in Schools, Conflict Management Styles and the Role of the School Leader: A Study of Greek Primary School Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Conflict may occur in any organization (and hence school) and, for schools, conflict management style is a joint activity and the degree of its effectiveness determines the type of impact of conflict on school performance. This empirical study investigates the potential sources of conflict in Greek primary schools, determine appropriate approaches…

  18. Hypothetical intertemporal choice and real economic behavior: delay discounting predicts voucher redemptions during contingency-management procedures.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Warren K; Jones, Bryan A; Landes, Reid D; Christensen, Darren R; Jackson, Lisa; Mancino, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Delay discounting rates are predictive of drug use status, the likelihood of becoming abstinent, and a variety of health behaviors. Rates of delay discounting may also be related to other relevant behaviors associated with addiction, such as the frequency at which individuals redeem contingency management voucher earnings. This study examined the discounting rates of 152 participants in a buprenorphine treatment program for opioid abuse. Participants received up to 12 weeks of buprenorphine treatment combined with contingency management. Participant's drug use was measured via urine specimens submitted three times a week. Successive negative urine specimens were reinforced with increasing amounts of money. After each negative urine specimen, a participant could either redeem his or her earnings or accumulate it in an account. Analysis of the frequency of redemptions showed that participants with higher rates of delay discounting at study intake redeemed their earnings significantly more often than participants with lower rates of discounting. Age and income also predicted redemption rates. We suggest that delay discounting rates can be used to predict redemption behaviors in a contingency management treatment program and that these findings are consistent with the recent theory of the competing neurobehavioral decision systems. PMID:21186929

  19. Hypothetical Intertemporal Choice and Real Economic Behavior: Delay Discounting Predicts Voucher Redemptions During Contingency-Management Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Warren K.; Jones, Bryan A.; Landes, Reid D.; Christensen, Darren R.; Jackson, Lisa; Mancino, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting rates are predictive of drug use status, the likelihood of becoming abstinent, and a variety of health behaviors. Rates of delay discounting may also be related to other relevant behaviors associated with addiction, such as the frequency at which individuals redeem contingency management voucher earnings. This study examined the discounting rates of 152 participants in a buprenorphine treatment program for opioid abuse. Participants received up to 12 weeks of buprenorphine treatment combined with contingency management. Participant’s drug use was measured via urine specimens submitted 3 times a week. Successive negative urine specimens were reinforced with increasing amounts of money. After each negative urine specimen, a participant could either redeem his or her earnings or accumulate it in an account. Analysis of the frequency of redemptions showed that participants with higher rates of delay discounting at study intake redeemed their earnings significantly more often than participants with lower rates of discounting. Age and income also predicted redemption rates. We suggest that delay discounting rates can be used to predict redemption behaviors in a contingency management treatment program and that these findings are consistent with the recent theory of the competing neurobehavioral decision systems. PMID:21186929

  20. Depression care management for late-life depression in China primary care: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background As a major public health issue in China and worldwide, late-life depression is associated with physical limitations, greater functional impairment, increased utilization and cost of health care, and suicide. Like other chronic diseases in elders such as hypertension and diabetes, depression is a chronic disease that the new National Health Policy of China indicates should be managed in primary care settings. Collaborative care, linking primary and mental health specialty care, has been shown to be effective for the treatment of late-life depression in primary care settings in Western countries. The primary aim of this project is to implement a depression care management (DCM) intervention, and examine its effectiveness on the depressive symptoms of older patients in Chinese primary care settings. Methods/Design The trial is a multi-site, primary clinic based randomized controlled trial design in Hangzhou, China. Sixteen primary care clinics will be enrolled in and randomly assigned to deliver either DCM or care as usual (CAU) (8 clinics each) to 320 patients (aged ≥ 60 years) with major depression (20/clinic; n = 160 in each treatment condition). In the DCM arm, primary care physicians (PCPs) will prescribe 16 weeks of antidepressant medication according to the treatment guideline protocol. Care managers monitor the progress of treatment and side effects, educate patients/family, and facilitate communication between providers; psychiatrists will provide weekly group psychiatric consultation and CM supervision. Patients in both DCM and CAU arms will be assessed by clinical research coordinators at baseline, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 months. Depressive symptoms, functional status, treatment stigma and clients' satisfaction will be used to assess patients' outcomes; and clinic practices, attitudes/knowledge, and satisfaction will be providers' outcomes. Discussion This will be the first trial of the effectiveness of a collaborative care intervention aiming to the management of late-life depression in China primary care. If effective, its finding will have relevance to policy makers who wish to scale up DCM treatments for late-life depression in national wide primary care across China. Study Registration The DCM project is registered through the National Institutes of Health sponsored by clinical trials registry and has been assigned the identifier: NCT01287494 PMID:21569445

  1. Guideline concordant detection and management of depression among Alaska Native and American Indian people in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Hiratsuka, Vanessa Y.; Smith, Julia J.; Norman, Sara M.; Manson, Spero M.; Dillard, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A tribal health organization in Alaska implemented a primary care depression screening, detection and management initiative amongst 55,000 Alaska Native/American Indian people (AN/AIs). Objectives (a) To describe the proportion of AN/AIs screening positive for depression with depression noted or diagnosed and proportion with guideline concordant management and (b) to assess whether management varied by patient and provider factors. Research design Secondary analysis of electronic and paper medical record information of 400 AN/AIs. Measures Provider variables, patient demographics and patient clinical factors were electronically queried. Manual chart audits assessed depression notation, diagnoses and management within 12 weeks of positive screening. Multilevel ordinal logistic modelling assessed management by patient and provider factors. Results A depression diagnosis was present in 141 (35%) charts and 151 (38%) had depressive symptoms noted. Detection was higher among AN/AIs with moderate and severe depression (p<0.001). In total, 258 patients (66%) received guideline concordant management, 32 (8%) had some management, and 110 (28%) received no management. Younger patient age and increased provider tenure increased odds of management. Conclusions Most AN/AIs screening positive for depression received initial guideline concordant management. Additional outreach to older patients and additional support for providers newer to practices appears warranted. PMID:26519359

  2. Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) contributions to wildlife habitat, management issues, challenges and policy choices--an annotated bibliography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Arthur W.; Vandever, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The following bibliography presents brief summaries of documents relevant to Conservation Reserve Program relations to wildlife habitat, habitat management in agriculturally dominated landscapes, and conservation policies potentially affecting wildlife habitats in agricultural ecosystems. Because the literature summaries furnished provide only sweeping overviews, users are urged to obtain and evaluate those papers appearing useful to obtain a more complete understanding of study findings and their implications to conservation in agricultural ecosystems. The bibliography contains references to reports that reach beyond topics that directly relate to the Conservation Reserve Program. Sections addressing grassland management and landowner surveys/opinions, for example, furnish information useful for enhancing development and administration of conservation policies affecting lands beyond those enrolled in conservation programs. Some sections of the bibliography (for example, agricultural conservation policy, economics, soils) are far from inclusive of all relevant material written on the subject. Hopefully, these sections will serve as fundamental introductions to related issues. In a few instances, references may be presented in more than one section of the bibliography. For example, individual papers specifically addressing both non-game and game birds are included in respective sections of the bibliography. Duplication of citations and associated notes has, however, been kept to a minimum.

  3. A Retrospective Study of 40 Cases of Pilonidal Sinus with Excision of Tract and Z-plasty as Treatment of Choice for Both Primary and Recurrent Cases.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jagdeep; Deora, Harsh; Mandia, Rajendra

    2015-12-01

    Pilonidal sinus is a common chronic disease of the sacrococcygeal region. The treatment varies according to the clinical presentation of the disease. Although many surgical methods have been suggested, an ideal method is still lacking because of high recurrence rates. The aim of this work is to assess the role of Z-plasty in promoting primary healing in pilonidal disease and to evaluate morbidity and recurrence. This study included 40 patients (36 males and 4 females) who underwent excision of sinus and Z-plasty closure for sacrococcygeal pilonidal sinus. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 12 months. There were 36 males and 4 females with a median age of 25 years. The mean hospital stay was 2 days. The mean time to return to work after discharge from the hospital was 14 days. There were no recurrences, and all patients were satisfied with the cosmesis. Two patients (5 %) had numbness over the flap. Necrosis of flaps did not occur in any patient. Only three patients were noticed to have wound infection (7.5 %). Five patients (12.5 %) developed wound seroma. Although requiring some technical expertise, excision of sinus and Z-plasty offer superior results with respect to recurrence in the hospital stay and cosmesis of patients with pilonidal sinus. PMID:26730090

  4. Identification, summary and comparison of tools used to measure organizational attributes associated with chronic disease management within primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Lukewich, Julia; Corbin, Renée; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Edge, Dana S; Williamson, Tyler; Tranmer, Joan E

    2014-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Given the increasing emphasis being placed on managing patients with chronic diseases within primary care, there is a need to better understand which primary care organizational attributes affect the quality of care that patients with chronic diseases receive. This study aimed to identify, summarize and compare data collection tools that describe and measure organizational attributes used within the primary care setting worldwide. Methods Systematic search and review methodology consisting of a comprehensive and exhaustive search that is based on a broad question to identify the best available evidence was employed. Results A total of 30 organizational attribute data collection tools that have been used within the primary care setting were identified. The tools varied with respect to overall focus and level of organizational detail captured, theoretical foundations, administration and completion methods, types of questions asked, and the extent to which psychometric property testing had been performed. The tools utilized within the Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe study and the Canadian Primary Health Care Practice-Based Surveys were the most recently developed tools. Furthermore, of the 30 tools reviewed, the Canadian Primary Health Care Practice-Based Surveys collected the most information on organizational attributes. Conclusions There is a need to collect primary care organizational attribute information at a national level to better understand factors affecting the quality of chronic disease prevention and management across a given country. The data collection tools identified in this review can be used to establish data collection strategies to collect this important information. PMID:24840066

  5. Localized Orbital Mucosa-Associated Lymphoma Tissue Lymphoma Managed With Primary Radiation Therapy: Efficacy and Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Jayant Sastri; Le, Lisa W.; Lapperriere, Normand J.; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Payne, David; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Wells, Woodrow; Hodgson, David C.; Sun, Alexander; Simpson, Rand; Tsang, Richard W.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and late effects of radiation therapy (RT) in localized primary orbital mucosa-associated lymphoma tissue (MALT) lymphoma (POML). Methods and Materials: From 1989 to 2007, 89 patients with Stage IE POML received RT. The median age was 56 years old. Sites involved conjunctiva (59 patients [66%]), lacrimal gland (20 patients [23%]), and soft tissue (10 patients [11%]). Megavoltage beam(s) was used in 91%, electrons in 7%, and orthovoltage in 2% of cases. The dose given was 25 Gy in 97% and 30 Gy in 3% of patients. Lens shielding was possible in 57% of patients. Results: The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Complete response or unconfirmed complete response was seen in 88 patients (99%). Relapse occurred in 22 patients (25%). First relapse sites were local (2 patients [9%]), in the contralateral orbit (5 patients [23%]), and distant (15 patients [68%]). The 7-year overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and local control (LC) rates were 91%, 96%, 64%, and 97%, respectively. Radiation-related late sequelae were documented in 40 patients (45%). Cataracts were observed in 22 patients (Grade 1 in 2 patients; Grade 3 in 20 patients). The incidence of Grade 3 cataract at 7 years was 25%. Other late sequelae (n = 28) were dry eye(s) (22 patients [Grade 1 in 14 patients; Grade 2 in 2 patients; Grade 3 in 2 patients; n/s in 4 patients), keratitis (3 patients), macular degeneration/cystoid edema (2 patients), and vitreous detachment (1 patient). Five patients developed Grade 3 noncataract late effects. Lens shielding reduced the incidence of Grade 3 cataract and all Grade {>=}2 late sequelae. Seventeen patients (16 with cataracts) underwent surgery; 23 patients were treated conservatively. The outcome for managing late effects was generally successful, with 30 patients completely improved, and 9 patients with persisting late sequelae (10%). Conclusions: POML responds favorably to moderate doses of RT but results in significant late morbidity. The majority of late effects were successfully managed. Lens shielding reduced the risk of cataracts and other late sequelae.

  6. Caries management strategies for primary molars: 1-yr randomized control trial results.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, R M; Innes, N P T; Machiulskiene, V; Evans, D J P; Splieth, C H

    2014-11-01

    Minimal invasive approaches to managing caries, such as partial caries removal techniques, are showing increasing evidence of improved outcomes over the conventional complete caries removal. There is also increasing interest in techniques where no caries is removed. We present the 1-yr results of clinical efficacy for 3 caries management options for occlusoproximal cavitated lesions in primary molars: conventional restorations (CR; complete caries removal and compomer restoration), Hall technique (HT; no caries removal, sealing in with stainless steel crowns), and nonrestorative caries treatment (NRCT; no caries removal, opening up the cavity, teaching brushing and fluoride application). In sum, 169 children (3-8 yr old; mean, 5.56 ± 1.45 yr) were enrolled in this secondary care-based, 3-arm, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial. Treatments were carried out by specialist pediatric dentists or postgraduate trainees. One lesion per child received CR, HT, or NRCT. Outcome measures were clinical failure rates, grouped as minor failure (restoration loss/need for replacement, reversible pulpitis, caries progression, etc.) and major failure (irreversible pulpitis, abscess, etc.). There were 148 children (87.6%) with a minimum follow-up of 11 mo (mean, 12.23 ± 0.98 mo). Twenty teeth were recorded as having at least 1 minor failure: NRCT, n = 8 (5%); CR, n = 11 (7%); HT, n = 1 (1%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Only the comparison between NRCT and CR showed no significant difference (p = .79, 95% CI = 0.78 to 0.80). Nine (6%) experienced at least 1 major failure: NRCT, n = 4 (2%); CR, n = 5 (3%); HT, n = 0 (0%) (p = .002, 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.003). Individual comparison of NRCT and CR showed no statistically significant difference in major failures (p = .75, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.76). Success and failure rates were not significantly affected by pediatric dentists' level of experience (p = .13, 95% CI = 0.12 to 0.14). The HT was significantly more successful clinically than NRCT and CR after 1 yr, while pairwise analyses showed comparable results for treatment success between NRCT and CR (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01797458). PMID:25216660

  7. Management of the primary obstructed megaureter (POM) and indication for operative treatment.

    PubMed

    Stehr, M; Metzger, R; Schuster, T; Porn, U; Dietz, H-G

    2002-02-01

    Presented is the diagnostic and therapeutic management of the primary obstructed megaureter (POM). 42 patients presented with 53 ureteral units (UU) of POM (5 females, 37 males, 36 neonates and 6 children aged 3 to 8 years). Of the 53 megaureters 10 UU (19%) were on the right and 27 UU(51 %)were on the left. 8 patients (19%)with 16 UU (30%)showed a bilateral abnormality. In 41% of the patients, hydronephrosis had been discovered by prenatal ultrasound. All patients were evaluated postnatally by ultrasound (US), voiding cysturethrogram (VCUG), intravenous pyelogram (IVP) and diuresis renogram (MAG-3) (DR). Due to the percentage of urinary drainage,the renogram results were classified into different categories:no obstruction, functional obstruction, equivocal and obstruction. A partial renal function was also calculated. Follow-up of the patients ranges between 5 to 48 months (mean: 22.1). All patients underwent serial US and serial DR were obtained in 36 patients. Initially, 9 (17%) UU showed a functional obstruction, 34 (64.2%) an equivocal and 10 (18.8%) an obstructive urinary drainage pattern. 2 kidneys showed a significant decreased partial function of 20, respectively 26%. Surgery was performed in an initial im-paired renal function with an obstructive pattern or in cases with normal function and at least equivocal urinary drainage pattern with no improvement or deterioration of the urinary drainage and/or function in the follow-up. Considering these criteria, 5(9.6%) patients needed surgery. No loss of kidney function has been observed in follow-up. DR is the most valuable diagnostic tool. Criteria interpreting the results are demonstrated in this article. PMID:11967757

  8. Associations between primary care physician satisfaction and self-reported aspects of utilization management.

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, E A; Mittman, B S; Hays, R D; Zemencuk, J K; Pitts, J; Brook, R H

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between physician-reported utilization management (UM) techniques in capitated physician groups and physician satisfaction with capitated care. STUDY SETTING: 1,138 primary care physicians from 89 California capitated physician groups in 1995. STUDY DESIGN: Eighty percent of physicians (N = 910) responded to a mail survey regarding the UM policies in their groups and their satisfaction with the care they deliver. Physician-reported UM strategies measured included group-mandated preauthorization (number of referrals requiring preauthorization, referral denial rate, and referral turnaround time), group-provided explicit practice guidelines, and group-delivered educational programs regarding capitated care. We also measured two key dimensions of satisfaction with capitated care (multi-item scales): (1) satisfaction with capitated care autonomy and quality, and (2) satisfaction with administrative burden for capitated patients. EXTRACTION METHODS: We constructed two multivariate linear regression models to examine associations between physician-reported UM strategies and physician satisfaction, controlling for demographic and practice characteristics and adjusting for clustering. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Physician-reported denial rate and turnaround time were significantly negatively associated with capitated care satisfaction. Physicians who reported that their groups provided more guidelines were more satisfied on both dimensions, while physicians who reported that their groups sponsored more educational programs were more satisfied with administrative burden. The number of clinical decisions requiring preauthorization was not significantly associated with either dimension of satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians who reported that their groups used UM methods that directly affected their autonomy (high denial rates and long turnaround times) were less satisfied with care for capitated patients. However, a preauthorization policy for referrals or tests was not, in and of itself, associated with satisfaction. Indirect control mechanisms such as guidelines and education were positively associated with satisfaction. PMID:10778819

  9. Improving equity in the provision of primary health care: lessons from decentralized planning and management in Namibia.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Ruth; Ithindi, Taathi; Low, Anne

    2002-01-01

    This paper draws lessons from a review of primary health care services in Windhoek, the capital of Namibia, undertaken by a regional health management team. The review was carried out because of perceived increases in workload and inadequate staffing levels, arising from the rapid expansion of the city associated with inward migration. A survey of the utilization of government clinics was used to develop a more equitable allocation of primary health care services between localities. The survey revealed disparities between patterns of utilization of the services and the allocation of staff: the poorer localities were relatively underprovided. Decisions made centrally on resource allocation had reinforced the inequities. On the basis of the results of the review, the regional health management team redistributed nursing and medical staff and argued for a shift in the allocation of capital expenditure towards the poorer communities. The review demonstrates the potential for regional and provincial health management teams to make effective assessments of the needs of their populations and to promote the equitable delivery of primary health care services. In order to achieve this they need not only to become effective managers, but also to develop population-based planning skills and the confidence and authority to influence the allocation of resources between and within their regions and provinces. PMID:12219160

  10. Ayurveda in changing scenario of diabetes management for developing safe and effective treatment choices for the future.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Subhadip; Debnath, Parikshit; Rao, Prasanna N; Tripathy, Tapas Brata; Adhikari, Anjan; Debnath, Pratip K

    2015-06-01

    Ayurveda described diabetes mellitus (DM) as Madhumeha. This ancient evidence-based system of medicine enumerated various herbs and formulations for its management, which needs scientific validation. Whereas translational "bedside to bench" approach in biomedical research is an upcoming concept, its application in traditional and complementary medicine can be interesting. The intersecting concepts in the field Ayurveda and translational research needs "omics" approach. The Ayurvedic biology concepts about DM have its close relations with present systems biology approach. Metabolic changes causing tissue damage connected with genetic and immunological irregularities leading to insulin resistance coincide with ancient knowledge. Combinatorial therapy according to Prakriti type as elucidated by Ayurgenomics should be carried on for further research. "Bedside to bench" approaches in research utilizing metabolomics and pharmacogenomics approach can be a major step towards changing the therapeutic strategy towards diabetes. Prameha which is described as the pre-diabetic state is a novel concept in Ayurvedic etiopathogenesis, while metabolomic parameters like lipid level in urine can be a thrust area of research to have a pre-diabetic screening method in high-risk populations. This tradition-guided research paradigm can open up novel opportunities in traditional knowledge-inspired systems biology and drug discovery against diabetes. PMID:25719345

  11. Drinking water management: health risk perceptions and choices in First Nations and non-First Nations communities in Canada.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Diane; Waldner, Cheryl; Bharadwaj, Lalita; Plummer, Ryan; Carter, Blair; Cave, Kate; Zagozewski, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between tap water and health has been a topic of public concern and calls for better management in Canada since well-publicized contamination events in two provinces (Ontario and Saskatchewan) in 2000-2001. This study reports the perspectives on health risks from tap water and corresponding use of, and spending on, bottled water in a number of different communities in Canada. In 2009-2010, four First Nations communities (three from Ontario and one from Saskatchewan) and a geographically diverse sample of non-First Nations Canadians were surveyed about their beliefs concerning health risks from tap water and their spending practices for bottled water as a substitute. Responses to five identical questions were examined, revealing that survey respondents from Ontario First Nations communities were more likely than non-First Nations Canadians to believe bottled water is safer than tap water (OR 1.6); more likely to report someone became ill from tap water (OR 3.6); more likely to express water and health concerns related to tap water consumption (OR 2.4); and more likely to spend more on bottled water (OR 4.9). On the other hand, participants from one Saskatchewan First Nations community were less likely than non-First Nations Canadians to believe that someone had become ill from drinking tap water (OR 3.8), less likely to believe bottled water is safer than tap (OR 2.0), and less likely to have health concerns with tap water (OR 1.5). These differences, however, did not translate into differences in the likelihood of high bottled water expenditures or being a 100% bottled water consumer. The paper discusses how the differences observed may be related to water supply and regulation, trust, perceived control, cultural background, location, and past experience. PMID:24886757

  12. Drinking Water Management: Health Risk Perceptions and Choices in First Nations and Non-First Nations Communities in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Diane; Waldner, Cheryl; Bharadwaj, Lalita; Plummer, Ryan; Carter, Blair; Cave, Kate; Zagozewski, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between tap water and health has been a topic of public concern and calls for better management in Canada since well-publicized contamination events in two provinces (Ontario and Saskatchewan) in 2000–2001. This study reports the perspectives on health risks from tap water and corresponding use of, and spending on, bottled water in a number of different communities in Canada. In 2009–2010, four First Nations communities (three from Ontario and one from Saskatchewan) and a geographically diverse sample of non-First Nations Canadians were surveyed about their beliefs concerning health risks from tap water and their spending practices for bottled water as a substitute. Responses to five identical questions were examined, revealing that survey respondents from Ontario First Nations communities were more likely than non-First Nations Canadians to believe bottled water is safer than tap water (OR 1.6); more likely to report someone became ill from tap water (OR 3.6); more likely to express water and health concerns related to tap water consumption (OR 2.4); and more likely to spend more on bottled water (OR 4.9). On the other hand, participants from one Saskatchewan First Nations community were less likely than non-First Nations Canadians to believe that someone had become ill from drinking tap water (OR 3.8), less likely to believe bottled water is safer than tap (OR 2.0), and less likely to have health concerns with tap water (OR 1.5). These differences, however, did not translate into differences in the likelihood of high bottled water expenditures or being a 100% bottled water consumer. The paper discusses how the differences observed may be related to water supply and regulation, trust, perceived control, cultural background, location, and past experience. PMID:24886757

  13. Enlightened Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Will

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author has taken a little excursion back in time to illustrate the importance of two vital concepts in the minds of smart IT project managers, when they begin to consider smart-classroom installations and implementations, and the technologies they will choose. Those watchwords are: "standardization" and "boring." Certainly,…

  14. Randomised trial of monitoring, feedback, and management of care by telephone to improve treatment of depression in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gregory E; VonKorff, Michael; Rutter, Carolyn; Wagner, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Objective To test the effectiveness of two programmes to improve the treatment of acute depression in primary care. Design Randomised trial. Setting Primary care clinics in Seattle. Patients 613 patients starting antidepressant treatment. Intervention Patients were randomly assigned to continued usual care or one of two interventions: feedback only and feedback plus care management. Feedback only comprised feedback and algorithm based recommendations to doctors on the basis of data from computerised records of pharmacy and visits. Feedback plus care management included systematic follow up by telephone, sophisticated treatment recommendations, and practice support by a care manager. Main outcome measures Blinded interviews by telephone 3 and 6 months after the initial prescription included a 20 item depression scale from the Hopkins symptom checklist and the structured clinical interview for the current DSM-IV depression module. Visits, antidepressant prescriptions, and overall use of health care were assessed from computerised records. Results Compared with usual care, feedback only had no significant effect on treatment received or patient outcomes. Patients receiving feedback plus care management had a higher probability of both receiving at least moderate doses of antidepressants (odds ratio 1.99, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 3.22) and a 50% improvement in depression scores on the symptom checklist (2.22, 1.31 to 3.75), lower mean depression scores on the symptom checklist at follow up, and a lower probability of major depression at follow up (0.46, 0.24 to 0.86). The incremental cost of feedback plus care management was about $80 (£50) per patient. Conclusions Monitoring and feedback to doctors yielded no significant benefits for patients in primary care starting antidepressant treatment. A programme of systematic follow up and care management by telephone, however, significantly improved outcomes at modest cost. PMID:10688563

  15. The Primary School in Changing Times: The Australian Experience. Educational Management Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Tony, Ed.

    Following substantial changes throughout the Australian education system, primary schools are no longer in the protected position of having a regulated flow of clients, a predetermined curriculum, and marginal levels of staff development. This book reviews the impact of this change on Australian primary schools, the people who are involved with…

  16. Managing the Small Primary School: The Problem Role of the Teaching Head.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunning, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    A former primary headteacher examines problems inherent in the doubly loaded teaching head's role in small (British) primary schools. The demands posed by recent changes have been exacerbated by the headteacher's lack of real freedom to determine an appropriate balance between teaching and managerial responsibilities. Headteachers' special…

  17. Classroom Management: A Study on the Training Needs of Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Warfali, Faida Imhemid Salem; Yusoff, Nik Mohd Rahimi Nik

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the training needs of the in-service primary school teachers in the city of Benghazi, Libya. Data collection involved the administration of a set of questionnaire to 420 teachers and interviews with ten of them. The study found that the most important training needs of the primary school teachers in terms of classroom…

  18. A Self-Study Guide for Managers and Staff of Primary Support Programs for Young People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Joan; Barker, Gary; Pickens, Lisa Marie; Cassaniga, Neide; Merry, Sheila; Falcon, Adrienne

    Identifying the voluntary activities, programs, and services that children and families use during students' out-of-school time as primary supports, this self-study guide provides a framework for developing primary support programs that allow school-aged children and adolescents to develop physical, cognitive, social, and emotional skills. The…

  19. Part-time, e-learning interprofessional pain management education for the primary and community care setting.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M Sue; Bean, W Geinor; Luke, Karl

    2014-02-01

    Chronic pain is a long-term condition, which has a major impact on patients, carers and the health service. Despite the Chief Medical Officer setting chronic pain and its management as a national priority in 2008, the utilisation of health services by patients with long-term conditions is increasing, people with pain-related problems are not seen early enough and pain-related attendances to accident and emergency departments is increasing. Early assessment with appropriate evidence-based intervention and early recognition of when to refer to specialist and specialised services is key to addressing the growing numbers suffering with chronic pain. Pain education is recommended in many guidelines, as part of the process to address pain in these issues. Cardiff University validated an e-learning, master's level pain management module for healthcare professionals working in primary and community care. The learning outcomes revolve around robust early assessment and management of chronic pain in primary and community care and the knowledge when to refer on. The module focuses on the biopsychosocial aspects of pain and its management, using a blog as an online case study assessment for learners to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and application to practice. The module has resulted in learners developing evidence-based recommendations, for pain management in clinical practice. PMID:26516530

  20. Part-time, e-learning interprofessional pain management education for the primary and community care setting

    PubMed Central

    Bean, W Geinor; Luke, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a long-term condition, which has a major impact on patients, carers and the health service. Despite the Chief Medical Officer setting chronic pain and its management as a national priority in 2008, the utilisation of health services by patients with long-term conditions is increasing, people with pain-related problems are not seen early enough and pain-related attendances to accident and emergency departments is increasing. Early assessment with appropriate evidence-based intervention and early recognition of when to refer to specialist and specialised services is key to addressing the growing numbers suffering with chronic pain. Pain education is recommended in many guidelines, as part of the process to address pain in these issues. Cardiff University validated an e-learning, master’s level pain management module for healthcare professionals working in primary and community care. The learning outcomes revolve around robust early assessment and management of chronic pain in primary and community care and the knowledge when to refer on. The module focuses on the biopsychosocial aspects of pain and its management, using a blog as an online case study assessment for learners to demonstrate their knowledge, understanding and application to practice. The module has resulted in learners developing evidence-based recommendations, for pain management in clinical practice. PMID:26516530

  1. The Implementation of a Positive Behaviour Management Programme in a Primary Classroom: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atherley, Carole

    1990-01-01

    Positive behavior management has been recommended as a more acceptable form of classroom management than traditional behavioral modification. This paper discusses the application of stimulus and contingency control methods (positive behavior management) to elicit more socially and academically acceptable behavior from elementary school children.

  2. Role of primary substrate composition and concentration on attenuation of trace organic chemicals in managed aquifer recharge systems.

    PubMed

    Alidina, Mazahirali; Li, Dong; Ouf, Mohamed; Drewes, Jörg E

    2014-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the role of primary substrate composition and concentration on the attenuation of biodegradable emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrCs) in simulated managed aquifer recharge (MAR) systems. Four sets of soil columns were established in the laboratory, each receiving synthetic feed solutions comprising different ratios and concentrations of peptone-yeast and humic acid as the primary substrate to investigate the effect on removal of six TOrCs (atenolol, caffeine, diclofenac, gemfibrozil, primidone, and trimethoprim). Based on abiotic control experiments, adsorption was not identified as a significant attenuation mechanism for primidone, gemfibrozil and diclofenac. Caffeine, atenolol and trimethoprim displayed initial adsorptive losses, however, adsorption coefficients derived from batch tests confirmed that adsorption was limited and in the long-term experiment, biodegradation was the dominant attenuation process. Within a travel time of 16 h, caffeine - an easily degradable compound exhibited removal exceeding 75% regardless of composition or concentration of the primary substrate. Primidone - a poorly degradable compound, showed no removal in any column regardless of the nature of the primary substrate. The composition and concentration of the primary substrate, however, had an effect on attenuation of moderately degradable TOrCs, such as atenolol, gemfibrozil and diclofenac, with the primary substrate composition seeming to have a larger impact on TOrC attenuation than its concentration. When the primary substrate consisted mainly of refractory substrate (humic acid), higher removal of the moderately degradable TOrCs was observed. The microbial communities in the columns receiving more refractory carbon, were noted to be more diverse and hence likely able to express a wider range of enzymes, which were more suitable for TOrC transformation. The effect of the primary substrate on microbial community composition, diversity and gene expression potential confirmed its influence on TOrC degradation. PMID:24921962

  3. Case management and self-management support for frequent users with chronic disease in primary care: a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic diseases represent a major challenge for health care and social services. A number of people with chronic diseases require more services due to characteristics that increase their vulnerability. Given the burden of increasingly vulnerable patients on primary care, a pragmatic intervention in four Family Medicine Groups (primary care practices in Quebec, Canada) has been proposed for individuals with chronic diseases (diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal diseases and/or chronic pain) who are frequent users of hospital services. The intervention combines case management by a nurse with group support meetings encouraging self-management based on the Stanford Chronic Disease Self-Management Program. The goals of this study are to: (1) analyze the implementation of the intervention in the participating practices in order to determine how the various contexts have influenced the implementation and the observed effects; (2) evaluate the proximal (self-efficacy, self-management, health habits, activation and psychological distress) and intermediate (empowerment, quality of life and health care use) effects of the intervention on patients; (3) conduct an economic analysis of the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. Methods/Design The analysis of the implementation will be conducted using realistic evaluation and participatory approaches within four categories of stakeholders (Family Medicine Group and health centre management, Family Medicine Group practitioners, patients and their families, health centre or community partners). The data will be obtained through individual and group interviews, project documentation reviews and by documenting the intervention. Evaluation of the effects on patients will be based on a pragmatic randomized before-after experimental design with a delayed intervention control group (six months). Economic analysis will include cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis. Discussion The integration of a case management intervention delivered by nurses and self-management group support into primary care practices has the potential to positively impact patient empowerment and quality of life and hopefully reduce the burden on health care. Decision-makers, managers and health care professionals will be aware of the factors to consider in promoting the implementation of this intervention into other primary care practices in the region and elsewhere. Trial Registration NCT01719991 PMID:23391214

  4. Model for understanding consumer textural food choice.

    PubMed

    Jeltema, Melissa; Beckley, Jacqueline; Vahalik, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm for developing products that will match the marketing messaging is flawed because the drivers of product choice and satisfaction based on texture are misunderstood. Qualitative research across 10 years has led to the thesis explored in this research that individuals have a preferred way to manipulate food in their mouths (i.e., mouth behavior) and that this behavior is a major driver of food choice, satisfaction, and the desire to repurchase. Texture, which is currently thought to be a major driver of product choice, is a secondary factor, and is important only in that it supports the primary driver-mouth behavior. A model for mouth behavior is proposed and the qualitative research supporting the identification of different mouth behaviors is presented. The development of a trademarked typing tool for characterizing mouth behavior is described along with quantitative substantiation of the tool's ability to group individuals by mouth behavior. The use of these four groups to understand textural preferences and the implications for a variety of areas including product design and weight management are explored. PMID:25987995

  5. Model for understanding consumer textural food choice

    PubMed Central

    Jeltema, Melissa; Beckley, Jacqueline; Vahalik, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The current paradigm for developing products that will match the marketing messaging is flawed because the drivers of product choice and satisfaction based on texture are misunderstood. Qualitative research across 10 years has led to the thesis explored in this research that individuals have a preferred way to manipulate food in their mouths (i.e., mouth behavior) and that this behavior is a major driver of food choice, satisfaction, and the desire to repurchase. Texture, which is currently thought to be a major driver of product choice, is a secondary factor, and is important only in that it supports the primary driver—mouth behavior. A model for mouth behavior is proposed and the qualitative research supporting the identification of different mouth behaviors is presented. The development of a trademarked typing tool for characterizing mouth behavior is described along with quantitative substantiation of the tool's ability to group individuals by mouth behavior. The use of these four groups to understand textural preferences and the implications for a variety of areas including product design and weight management are explored. PMID:25987995

  6. Management Choices in an Uncertain Future: Navigating Snow, Precipitation, and Temperature Projections in the Pacific Northwest U.S. to Assess Water Management Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, C.

    2014-12-01

    Climate and hydrology models are regularly applied to assess potential changes in water resources and to inform adaptation decisions. An increasingly common question is, "What if we are wrong?" While climate models show substantial agreement on metrics such as pressure, temperature, and wind, they are notoriously uncertain in projecting precipitation change. The response to that uncertainty varies depending on the water management context and the nature of the uncertainty. In the southwestern U.S., large storage reservoirs (relative to annual supply) and general expectations of decreasing precipitation have guided extensive discussion on water management towards uncertainties in annual-scale water balances, precipitation, and evapotranspiration. In contrast, smaller reservoirs and little expectation for change in annual precipitation have focused discussions of Pacific Northwest water management toward shifts in runoff seasonality. The relative certainty of temperature impacts on snowpacks compared to the substantial uncertainty in precipitation has yielded a consistent narrative on earlier snowmelt. This narrative has been reinforced by a perception of essentially the same behavior in the historical record. This perception has led to calls in the political arena for more reservoir storage to replace snowpack storage for water supplies. Recent findings on differences in trends in precipitation at high versus low elevations, however, has recalled the uncertainty in precipitation futures and generated questions about alternative water management strategies. An important question with respect to snowpacks is whether the precipitation changes matter in the context of such substantial projections for temperature change. Here we apply an empirical snowpack model to analyze spatial differences in the uncertainty of snowpack responses to temperature and precipitation forcing across the Pacific Northwest U.S. The analysis reveals a strong geographic gradient in uncertainty of snowpack response to future climate, from the coastal regions, where precipitation uncertainty is relatively inconsequential for snowpack changes, to interior mountains where minor uncertainties in precipitation are on par with expected changes relative to temperature.

  7. Are managed care organizations in the United States impeding the delivery of primary care by nurse practitioners? A 2012 update on managed care organization credentialing and reimbursement practices.

    PubMed

    Hansen-Turton, Tine; Ware, Jamie; Bond, Lisa; Doria, Natalie; Cunningham, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    In 2014, the Affordable Care Act will create an estimated 16 million newly insured people. Coupled with an estimated shortage of over 60,000 primary care physicians, the country's public health care system will be at a challenging crossroads, as there will be more patients waiting to see fewer doctors. Nurse practitioners (NPs) can help to ease this crisis. NPs are health care professionals with the capability to provide important and critical access to primary care, particularly for vulnerable populations. However, despite convincing data about the quality of care provided by NPs, many managed care organizations (MCOs) across the country do not credential NPs as primary care providers, limiting the ability of NPs to be reimbursed by private insurers. To assess current credentialing practices of health plans across the United States, a brief telephone survey was administered to 258 of the largest health maintenance organizations (HMOs) in the United States, operated by 98 different MCOs. Results indicated that 74% of these HMOs currently credential NPs as primary care providers. Although this represents progress over prior assessments, findings suggest that just over one fourth of major HMOs still do not recognize NPs as primary care providers. Given the documented shortage of primary care physicians in low-income communities in the United States, these credentialing policies continue to diminish the ability of NPs to deliver primary care to vulnerable populations. Furthermore, these policies could negatively impact access to care for thousands of newly insured Americans who will be seeking a primary care provider in 2014. PMID:23540569

  8. Managing chronic fatigue syndrome in U.K. primary care: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wearden, Alison J; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2006-06-01

    Calls for the treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in primary care have been based largely on considerations of the availability and accessibility of resources rather than with reference to a firm evidence base. Treatments such as cognitive-behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy, which have proven effective for CFS in secondary and specialist care settings, have not been adequately tested in primary care. There are several factors that may affect the generalizability of such treatments. Patients seen in primary care may differ from those seen in secondary care, in terms of both illness beliefs and social characteristics, and these factors need to be taken into account when developing and adapting treatments for primary care. While some primary care physicians experience difficulties in the diagnosis of CFS, we argue that early and authoritative diagnosis and the provision of a tangible explanation for patients' symptoms are likely to be beneficial. Because of the scarcity of qualified specialist therapists, we need to train primary care practitioners to deliver treatments, and we need more research into the feasibility and effectiveness of doing this. Finally, the primary care setting offers opportunities for the guided development of patient self-help approaches. PMID:17175657

  9. A Study of the Outcome of Primary Excision and Closure Technique in the Management of Lip Leukoderma in 30 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shilpa, Kanathur; Sacchidanand, S.; Savitha, Somaiah; Ranjitha, Ramamurthy; Lakshmi, DV; Divya, Gorur

    2016-01-01

    Context: Lips being one of the graceful cosmetic units of the face, any disfigurement, including depigmentation, can be embarrassing, psychologically distressing, and socially stigmatizing. Even with the evolution of various surgical modalities, none of the techniques ensure 100% pigmentation with a good cosmetic appearance. With this background, this study was undertaken to study the efficacy of the technique—primary excision and closure in treatment of lip leukoderma (LL). Aims: To study the efficacy, cosmetic outcome, and recurrence following primary excision and closure technique in the management of LL. Settings and Design: A prospective single-center open-label uncontrolled study. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with LL involving inner margin of the lower lip and those who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. After obtaining consent and physician fitness, patients were posted for primary excision and closure of the vitiliginous area of the lip. Patients were followed up at the immediate postoperative period and 6 months later. Patient satisfaction scale was done by asking the patient to grade the response between one and ten. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and percentiles. Results: Out of 30 patients, 29 patients achieved complete clearance that was cosmetically acceptable. Only one patient showed recurrence at the end of 6 months. Average patient satisfaction scale showed an average of 9.66. Conclusions: Primary excision and closure technique is one of the safe, inexpensive modality in the management of LL involving the inner margin of the lip with immediate result. PMID:27081245

  10. Opportunities and limitations of patient choice: the case of the Russian Federation.

    PubMed

    Sheiman, Igor; Shishkin, Sergey; Markelova, Helen

    2014-01-01

    While many countries have increased the opportunities for patient choice of provider, there is debate to what extent this has had positive effects on efficiency and quality of healthcare provision. First, some conditions should be met to exercise such choice, of which the most important is the provision of reliable data on providers' performance to both patients and physicians as their agents, as well as increasing primary health care (PHC) providers' involvement in realization of patient choice. Second, expanding patient choice does not always lead to efficient allocation of resources in a healthcare system. This article explores these controversial developments by using empirical evidence from the Russian Federation. It shows that choice indeed has value for patients, but there are many areas of inefficient choice, which leads to misallocation of healthcare recourses. Thus, health policy in this area should be designed to ensure a reasonable balance between objectives of expanding choice and promoting more efficient organization of healthcare provision. Political rhetoric about unlimited patient choice may be useless and even risky unless supported by well-balanced programmes of supporting and managing choice. PMID:23619777

  11. Design and Baseline Characteristics from the KAN-QUIT Disease Management Intervention for Rural Smokers in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Lisa Sanderson; Cupertino, Ana-Paula; Mussulman, Laura M.; Nazir, Niaman; Greiner, K. Allen; Mahnken, Jonathan D.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe the design, implementation, baseline data, and feasibility of establishing a disease management program for smoking cessation in rural primary care. Method The study is a randomized clinical trial evaluating a disease management program for smoking cessation. The intervention combined pharmacotherapy, telephone counseling, and physician feedback, and repeated intervention over two years. The program began in 2004 and was implemented in 50 primary care clinics across the State of Kansas. Results Of eligible patients, 73% were interested in study participation. 750 enrolled participants were predominantly Caucasian, female, employed, and averaged 47.2 years of age (SD=13.1). In addition to smoking, 427 (57%) had at least one additional major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, heart disease or stroke). Participants smoked on average 23.7 (SD=10.4) cigarettes per day, were contemplating (61%) or preparing to quit (30%), were highly motivated and confident of their ability to quit smoking, and reported seeing their physicians multiple times in the past twelve months (Median=3.50; Mean=5.48; SD=6.58). Conclusion Initial findings demonstrate the willingness of patients to enroll in a two-year disease management program to address nicotine dependence, even among patients not ready to make a quit attempt. These findings support the feasibility of identifying and enrolling rural smokers within the primary care setting. PMID:18544464

  12. Talking about depression: a qualitative study of barriers to managing depression in people with long term conditions in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The risk of depression is increased in people with long term conditions (LTCs) and is associated with poorer patient outcomes for both the depressive illness and the LTC, but often remains undetected and poorly managed. The aim of this study was to identify and explore barriers to detecting and managing depression in primary care in people with two exemplar LTCs: diabetes and coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with 19 healthcare professionals drawn predominately from primary care, along with 7 service users and 3 carers (n = 29). One focus group was then held with a set of 6 healthcare professionals and a set of 7 service users and 1 carer (n = 14). Interviews and the focus group were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analysed independently. The two data sets were then inspected for commonalities using a constant comparative method, leading to a final thematic framework used in this paper. Results Barriers to detecting and managing depression in people with LTCs in primary care exist: i) when practitioners in partnership with patients conceptualise depression as a common and understandable response to the losses associated with LTCs - depression in the presence of LTCs is normalised, militating against its recognition and treatment; ii) where highly performanced managed consultations under the terms of the Quality and Outcomes Framework encourage reductionist approaches to case-finding in people with CHD and diabetes, and iii) where there is uncertainty among practitioners about how to negotiate labels for depression in people with LTCs in ways that might facilitate shared understanding and future management. Conclusion Depression was often normalised in the presence of LTCs, obviating rather than facilitating further assessment and management. Furthermore, structural constraints imposed by the QOF encouraged reductionist approaches to case-finding for depression in consultations for CHD and diabetes. Future work might focus on how interventions that draw on the principles of the chronic care model, such as collaborative care, could support primary care practitioners to better recognise and manage depression in patients with LTCs. PMID:21426542

  13. School Choice and Ethnic Segregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karsten, Sjoerd; Ledoux, Guuske; Roeleveld, Jaap; Felix, Charles; Elshof, Dorothe

    2003-01-01

    Explores how school choice has influenced ethnic segregation in Dutch primary schools. Shows that native Dutch parents are significantly more interested in a match between their social and cultural background and the pupil composition of schools than ethnic minority parents. Both groups of parents generally reject predominately "non-White"…

  14. Optimising the detection and management of familial hypercholesterolaemia: central role of primary care and its integration with specialist services.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Alistair W; Bell, Damon; Garton-Smith, Jacquie; Kirke, Andrew B; Pang, Jing; Watts, Gerald F

    2014-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is the most common monogenic lipid disorder associated with premature coronary heart disease (CHD). However, the majority of people with FH are undiagnosed or undertreated. Early cholesterol lowering therapy reduces cardiovascular disease mortality in FH. Low awareness and knowledge of FH in specialty and general practice highlights the need for strategies to improve the detection and management of FH. We present an algorithm describing a multidisciplinary approach to FH detection and management. We highlight the role of primary care, and where GPs can work with preventive cardiologists to improve care of FH. Novel strategies to detect index cases with FH are presented including the community laboratory, highlighting patients at high risk of FH, and targeted FH detection through searching the general practice database. General practitioners request over 90% of LDL cholesterol measurements in the community. Once an individual with FH is detected only a small proportion of patients require specialty management with the majority of patients suitably managed in primary care. However, it is crucial to screen family members, as 50% of first-degree family members are expected to have FH due to the autosomal dominant inheritance. PMID:25130889

  15. One Year On: First-Year Primary Teachers' Perceptions of Preparedness to Manage Misbehaviour and Their Confidence in the Strategies They Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Sue; Stephenson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a one-year follow-up study of Australian beginning primary teachers' perceived preparedness to manage a variety of problematic student behaviours, and their confidence and use of behaviour management strategies based on their preservice coursework in classroom behaviour management. A total of 216 primary…

  16. Differential Effectiveness of Depression Disease Management for Rural and Urban Primary Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Scott J.; Xu, Stanley; Dong, Fran; Fortney, John; Rost, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    Context: Federally qualified health centers across the country are adopting depression disease management programs following federally mandated training; however, little is known about the relative effectiveness of depression disease management in rural versus urban patient populations. Purpose: To explore whether a depression disease management…

  17. Whole School Behaviour Management and Perceptions of Behaviour Problems in Australian Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Nobile, John; London, Teola; El Baba, Mariam

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade and a half, whole school behaviour management systems have been implemented in many Australian schools in efforts to reduce undesirable behaviours and improve outcomes for students with behaviour problems. There is evidence in the literature suggesting that whole school approaches are more effective at managing student…

  18. Management of Gastrointestinal Disorders in Central and Eastern Europe: Self-Reported Practice of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    PALKA, Małgorzata; KRZTOŃ-KRÓLEWIECKA, Anna; TOMASIK, Tomasz; SEIFERT, Bohumil; WÓJTOWICZ, Ewa; WINDAK, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal disorders account for 7–10% of all consultations in primary care. General practitioners’ management of digestive disorders in Central and Eastern European countries is largely unknown. Aims To identify and compare variations in the self-perceived responsibilities of general practitioners in the management of digestive disorders in Central and Eastern Europe. Methods A cross-sectional survey of a randomized sample of primary care physicians from 9 countries was conducted. An anonymous questionnaire was sent via post to primary care doctors. Results We received 867 responses; the response rate was 28.9%. Over 70% of respondents reported familiarity with available guidelines for gastrointestinal diseases. For uninvestigated dyspepsia in patients under 45 years, the “test and treat” strategy was twice as popular as “test and scope”. The majority (59.8%) of family physicians would refer patients with rectal bleeding without alarm symptoms to a specialist (from 7.6% of doctors in Slovenia to 85.1% of doctors in Bulgaria; p<0.001). 93.4% of respondents declared their involvement in colorectal cancer screening. In the majority of countries, responding doctors most often reported that they order fecal occult blood tests. The exceptions were Estonia and Hungary, where the majority of family physicians referred patients to a specialist (p<0.001). Conclusions Physicians from Central and Eastern European countries understood the need for the use of guidelines for the care of patients with gastrointestinal problems, but there is broad variation between countries in their management. Numerous efforts should be undertaken to establish and implement international standards for digestive disorders’ management in general practice.

  19. Primary Care Provider Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Two Self-Management Support Programs for Vulnerable Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Bhandari, Vijay K; Handley, Margaret; Rundall, Thomas; Hammer, Hali; Schillinger, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Background Primary care providers (PCPs) in safety net settings face barriers to optimizing care for patients with diabetes. We conducted this study to assess PCPs' perspectives on the effectiveness of two language-concordant diabetes self-management support programs. Methods One year postintervention, we surveyed PCPs whose patients with diabetes participated in a three-arm multiclinic randomized controlled trial comparing usual care (UC), weekly automated telephone self-management (ATSM) support with nurse care management, and monthly group medical visits (GMVs). We compared PCP perspectives on patient activation to create and achieve goals, quality of care, and barriers to care using regression models accounting for within-PCP clustering. Results Of 113 eligible PCPs caring for 330 enrolled patients, 87 PCPs (77%) responded to surveys about 245 (74%) enrolled patients. Intervention patients were more likely to be perceived by PCPs as activated to create and achieve goals for chronic care when compared with UC patients (standardized effect size, ATSM vs UC, +0.41, p = 0.01; GMV vs UC, +0.31, p = 0.05). Primary care providers rated quality of care as higher for patients exposed to ATSM compared to UC (odds ratio 3.6, p < 0.01). Compared with GMV patients, ATSM patients were more likely to be perceived by PCPs as overcoming barriers related to limited English proficiency (82% ATSM vs 44% GMV, p = 0.01) and managing medications (80% ATSM vs 53% GMV, p = 0.01). Conclusions Primary care providers perceived that patients receiving ATSM support had overcome barriers, participated more actively, and received higher quality diabetes care. These views of clinician stakeholders lend additional evidence for the potential to upscale ATSM more broadly to support PCPs in their care of diverse, multilinguistic populations. PMID:22401329

  20. Management of the early and late presentations of rheumatoid arthritis: a survey of Ontario primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Glazier, R H; Dalby, D M; Badley, E M; Hawker, G A; Bell, M J; Buchbinder, R; Lineker, S C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine primary care physicians' management of rheumatoid arthritis, ascertain the determinants of management and compare management with that recommended by a current practice panel. DESIGN: Mail survey (self-administered questionnaire). SETTING: Ontario. PARTICIPANTS: A stratified computer-generated random sample of 798 members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportions of respondents who chose various items in the management of two hypothetical patients, one with early rheumatoid arthritis and one with late rheumatoid arthritis. Scores for investigations, interventions and referrals for each scenario were generated by summing the recommended items chosen by respondents and then dividing by the total number of items recommended in that category. The scores were examined for their association with physician and practice characteristics and physician attitudes. RESULTS: The response rate was 68.3% (529/775 eligible physicians). Recommended investigations were chosen by more than two thirds of the respondents for both scenarios. Referrals to physiotherapy, occupational therapy and rheumatology, all recommended by the panel, were chosen by 206 (38.9%), 72 (13.6%) and 309 (58.4%) physicians respectively for early rheumatoid arthritis. These proportions were significantly higher for late rheumatoid arthritis (p < 0.01). In multiple regression analysis, for early rheumatoid arthritis, internship or residency training in rheumatology was associated with higher investigation and intervention scores, for late rheumatoid arthritis, older physicians had higher intervention scores and female physicians had higher referral scores. CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians' investigation of rheumatoid arthritis was in accord with panel recommendations. However, rates of referral to rheumatologists and other health care professionals were very low, especially for the early presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. More exposure to rheumatology and to the role of physiotherapy, occupational therapy and social work during primary care training is strongly recommended. PMID:8823213

  1. School Choice. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robledo Montecel, Maria, Ed.; Supik, Josie Danini, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains five articles on the implications of school choice for minority and disadvantaged students. "School Choice: Choices for Whom? Promises and Panaceas," by Maria Robledo Montecel, discusses some major problems related to school choice and vouchers, particularly who would have the choice (families or schools), who would pay…

  2. Socialising Multilingualism: Determinants of Codeswitching in Kenyan Primary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Marilyn; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Using ethnographic observations of classroom interaction in three primary schools, determinants of teachers' language choice and codeswitching among English, Swahili, and mother-tongue were explored: official school policy, cognitive concerns, classroom management concerns, values and attitudes about societal multilingualism. (36 references)…

  3. Managing behavioral health needs of veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) in primary care.

    PubMed

    King, Paul R; Wray, Laura O

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a frequent occurrence in the United States, and has been given particular attention in the veteran population. Recent accounts have estimated TBI incidence rates as high as 20 % among US veterans who served in Afghanistan or Iraq, and many of these veterans experience a host of co-morbid concerns, including psychiatric complaints (such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder), sleep disturbance, and substance abuse which may warrant referral to behavioral health specialists working in primary care settings. This paper reviews many common behavioral health concerns co-morbid with TBI, and suggests areas in which behavioral health specialists may assess, intervene, and help to facilitate holistic patient care beyond the acute phase of injury. The primary focus is on sequelae common to mild and moderate TBI which may more readily present in primary care clinics. PMID:23184276

  4. Cinacalcet HCl: a calcimimetic agent for the management of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nora; Joy, Melanie S; Kshirsagar, Abhijit

    2003-08-01

    Cinacalcet HCl (AMG 073) is an investigational oral calcimimetic drug currently being evaluated for the treatment of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT). Calcimimetics bind to the calcium-sensing receptors of the parathyroid glands and lower the sensitivity for receptor activation by extracellular calcium, thereby diminishing parathyroid hormone release. Cinacalcet HCl has demonstrated efficacy in controlling the hypercalcaemia of severe primary HPT and in reducing parathyroid hormone levels in patients with secondary HPT. Asymptomatic dose-dependent hypocalcaemia has occurred in some clinical trials. This drug has a favourable pharmacokinetic profile compared to its precursors and will prove useful as an additional/alternative agent in patients with primary and secondary HPT. PMID:12882626

  5. Primary prostate sarcoma: how to manage following diagnosis at transurethral resection.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Natalie; Gurung, Pratik M S; Deshmukh, Nayneeta; Apakama, Ikechukwu; Patel, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Primary prostate sarcomas are rare, reportedly comprising just 0.7% of all prostate malignancies. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old man who was diagnosed with prostate stromal sarcoma after undergoing a routine transurethral resection of prostate for bladder outflow obstruction. Primary prostate sarcoma can be aggressive even when low-grade, with a high risk of local recurrence and, high malignant potential when high-grade. They require aggressive multimodality treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy for durable survival outcomes. They also require close surveillance with long-term follow-up. PMID:27147716

  6. Initial evaluation and management of infertility by the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Frey, Keith A; Patel, Ketan S

    2004-11-01

    Infertility is a common condition seen in primary care practices. Infertility is defined as 1 year of unprotected intercourse during which a pregnancy is not achieved. in the United States, 15% to 20% of all couples are infertile, with higher rates seen in older couples. The causes of infertility include abnormalities of any portion of the male or female reproductive system. The female partner usually presents initially for an infertilty problem, often in the context of an annual well-women examination. The primary care physician who provides such preventive care can initiate the diagnostic evaluation and can treat some causes of infertility. PMID:15544024

  7. Primary prostate sarcoma: how to manage following diagnosis at transurethral resection

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Natalie; Gurung, Pratik M.S.; Deshmukh, Nayneeta; Apakama, Ikechukwu; Patel, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Primary prostate sarcomas are rare, reportedly comprising just 0.7% of all prostate malignancies. Here, we present the case of a 66-year-old man who was diagnosed with prostate stromal sarcoma after undergoing a routine transurethral resection of prostate for bladder outflow obstruction. Primary prostate sarcoma can be aggressive even when low-grade, with a high risk of local recurrence and, high malignant potential when high-grade. They require aggressive multimodality treatment with surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy for durable survival outcomes. They also require close surveillance with long-term follow-up. PMID:27147716

  8. Using diaries to explore the work experiences of primary health care nursing managers in two South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    Munyewende, Pascalia O.; Rispel, Laetitia C.

    2014-01-01

    Background South Africa is on the brink of another wave of major health system reforms that underscore the centrality of primary health care (PHC). Nursing managers will play a critical role in these reforms. Objective The aim of the study was to explore the work experiences of PHC clinic nursing managers through the use of reflective diaries, a method hitherto under-utilised in health systems research in low- and middle-income countries. Design During 2012, a sub-set of 22 PHC nursing managers was selected randomly from a larger nurses’ survey in two South African provinces. After informed consent, participants were requested to keep individual diaries for a period of 6 weeks, using a clear set of diary entry guidelines. Reminders consisted of weekly short message service reminders and telephone calls. Diary entries were analysed using thematic content analysis. A diary feedback meeting was held with all the participants to validate the findings. Results Fifteen diaries were received, representing a 68% response rate. The majority of respondents (14/15) were female, each with between 5 and 15 years of nursing experience. Most participants made their diary entries at home. Diaries proved to be cathartic for individual nursing managers. Although inter-related and not mutually exclusive, the main themes that emerged from the diary analysis were health system deficiencies; human resource challenges; unsupportive management environment; leadership and governance; and the emotional impact of clinic management. Conclusions Diaries are an innovative method of capturing the work experiences of managers at the PHC level, as they allow for confidentiality and anonymity, often not possible with other qualitative research methods. The expressed concerns of nursing managers must be addressed to ensure the success of South Africa's health sector reforms, particularly at the PHC level. PMID:25537937

  9. School Choice vs. School Choice. Policy Backgrounder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, John C.; Moore, Matt

    This paper recommends replacing the existing U.S. school choice system, which relies on the housing market to ration educational opportunity, with one that creates a level playing field upon which schools compete for students, and students and their parents exercise choice. Section 1 describes the current school choice system, which works well for

  10. Factors Influencing Teaching Choice in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilinc, Ahmet; Watt, Helen M. G.; Richardson, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Why choose to become a teacher in Turkey? The authors examined motivations and perceptions among preservice teachers (N = 1577) encompassing early childhood, primary and secondary education. The Factors Influencing Teaching Choice (FIT-Choice) instrument was translated into Turkish and its construct validity and reliability assessed. Altruistic…

  11. A new approach: oblique excision and primary closure in the management of acute pilonidal disease

    PubMed Central

    Ciftci, Fatih; Abdurrahman, Ibrahim; Tosun, Mirhan; Bas, Gurhan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare incision and drainage with oblique excision and primary closure in the treatment of pilonidal abscesses. Materials and methods: In this prospective study, one of two surgeons at the same hospital performed incision and drainage as the treatment method for patients presenting with pilonidal abscesses. (Group A). The other surgeon performed oblique excision and primary closure (Group B). The rate of development of chronic pilonidal sinus and time to return to active work were assessed using the chi-square and Student’s t-tests to compare the two methods of treatment. Of the 128 patients, incision and simple drainage was applied to 69 patients and primary closure was applied to 59 patients. Results: The rate of development of chronic pilonidal sinus was 78.8% in Group A and 6.0% in Group B (P < 0.001). In Group A, the average healing time and time to return to active work were 18 and 25 days, respectively. In Group B, these times were 22 and 27 days, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Oblique excision and primary closure may be a preferable treatment for acute pilonidal abscesses because of its low rate of chronic sinus development. PMID:25664095

  12. Maintenance Matters: Maintenance and Minor Works in Primary Schools. A Manual for Boards of Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, Dublin (Ireland).

    This manual provides guidance in the maintenance requirements of primary education schools in Ireland, covering: roofing; floors and walls; doors and windows; external and internal finishes; heating, plumbing, and drainage; electrical installations; paved and grassed surfaces; and furniture and loose equipment. The basic considerations are covered…

  13. The Talent Managing Work of the Balaton-Felvideki Szin-Vonal Primary Art School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranyai, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, art education has been recognized as a suitable tool for enhancing emotional intelligence and nurturing a child's creative development. However, it seems that the education of art has lost the race against other primary school subjects, with only a minimal number of lessons being taught. The establishment of the afternoon art…

  14. The Talent Managing Work of the Balaton-Felvideki Szin-Vonal Primary Art School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baranyai, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, art education has been recognized as a suitable tool for enhancing emotional intelligence and nurturing a child's creative development. However, it seems that the education of art has lost the race against other primary school subjects, with only a minimal number of lessons being taught. The establishment of the afternoon art

  15. Construing Systems of Management among Primary Headteachers: Moving Forward from Work Activity Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Norah; Connolly, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A study used a Personal Construct Theory/Repertory Grid approach to examine the work of 12 Welsh primary headteachers. Analysis of thematic work-activity grids suggests principals have a more coherent view of their work (as centered on children and education) than Henry Mintzberg's observational studies portrayed. (Contains 36 references.) (MLH)

  16. Inter-Professional Primary Care Practices Addressing Diabetes Prevention and Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagrie, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a partnership of university and community which addresses the needs of the community to keep its citizens healthy as long as possible. Through a planning exercise to address the community's needs in primary health care and health promotion, the university has developed key strategic directions to help support the needs of the community it…

  17. Investigating Students Misbehavior in Classroom Management in State and Private Primary Schools with a Comparative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durmuscelebi, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The research aims to showing the students misbehaviors in formal and private primary schools according to the perceptions of class teachers working in Kayseri in 2006-2007 academic year The data has been collected with the questionnaire developed by the researcher based on review survey and expert ideas. Questionnaire is applied to 245 teachers in…

  18. Primary care practitioner and patient understanding of the concepts of multimorbidity and self-management: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kenning, Cassandra; Fisher, Louise; Bee, Penny; Bower, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this article is to offer insight into how professionals and patients understand and experience multimorbidity and how these accounts differ, and how they affect attitudes and engagement with self-management. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 primary healthcare practitioners and 20 patients with at least 2 long-term conditions (including coronary heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and depression). Thematic analysis was used, and themes were identified using an open-coding method. Results: Practitioners associated multimorbidity with complexity and uncertainty in the clinic, leading to emotional strain and ‘heart sink’. Patient accounts differed. Some described multimorbidity as problematic when it exacerbated their symptoms and caused emotional and psychological strain. Others did not perceive multimorbidity as problematic. Self-management was seen by practitioners and patients to be a key element of managing multiple conditions, but drivers for prompting and engaging in self-management differed between patients and practitioners. Conclusion: This study suggests that recommendations for clinical practice for multimorbid patients should take into account the gap in perceptions between practitioner and patients about experiences of multimorbidity. Not least, practice would need to reflect the tension between practitioners’ and patients’ accounts about the role and benefits of self-management in the presence of multimorbidity. PMID:26770690

  19. Management of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in UK primary care: a survey of general practitioners

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to existing literature on childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little published adult data are available, particularly outside of the United States. Using General Practitioner (GP) questionnaires from the United Kingdom, this study aimed to examine a number of issues related to ADHD in adults, across three cohorts of patients, adults who received ADHD drug treatment in childhood/adolescence but stopped prior to adulthood; adults who received ADHD drug treatment in childhood/adolescence and continued treatment into adulthood and adults who started ADHD drug treatment in adulthood. Methods Patients with a diagnosis of ADHD and prescribed methylphenidate, dexamfetamine or atomoxetine were identified using data from The Health Improvement Network (THIN). Dates when these drugs started and stopped were used to classify patients into the three cohorts. From each cohort, 50 patients were randomly selected and questionnaires were sent via THIN to their GPs. GPs returned completed questionnaires to THIN who forwarded anonymised copies to the researchers. Datasets were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Overall response rate was 89% (133/150). GPs stated that in 19 cases, the patient did not meet the criteria of that group; the number of valid questionnaires returned was 114 (76%). The following broad trends were observed: 1) GPs were not aware of the reason for treatment cessation in 43% of cases, 2) patient choice was the most common reason for discontinuation (56%), 3) 7% of patients who stopped pharmacological treatment subsequently reported experiencing ADHD symptoms, 4) 58% of patients who started pharmacological treatment for ADHD in adulthood received pharmacological treatment for other mental health conditions prior to the ADHD being diagnosed. Conclusion This study presents some key findings relating to ADHD; GPs were often not aware of the reason for patients stopping ADHD treatment in childhood or adolescence. Patient choice was identified as the most common reason for treatment cessation. For patients who started pharmacological treatment in adulthood, many patients received pharmacological treatment for comorbidities before a diagnosis of ADHD was made. PMID:23432851

  20. Management of primary metastatic breast cancer in elderly patients—An international comparison of oncogeriatric versus standard care

    PubMed Central

    van de Water, Willemien; Bastiaannet, Esther; Egan, Kathleen M.; de Craen, Anton J.M.; Westendorp, Rudi G.J.; Balducci, Lodovico; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; Extermann, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Background An oncogeriatric approach may affect management of elderly patients with breast cancer. However, little is known about oncogeriatric care in the metastatic setting. Therefore, we performed an international comparison of management of elderly patients with primary metastatic disease who were treated in two different care settings. Materials and Methods Patients who were ≥70 years at diagnosis of primary metastatic disease were eligible. The first cohort comprised a population-based cohort of 104 patients (Comprehensive Cancer Center West, The Netherlands), who all received standard care. The second cohort comprised a hospital-based cohort of 42 patients (H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Florida, United States), who all received oncogeriatric care. Results No large differences in patient and tumor characteristics were observed between both cohorts. Most patients in the standard care cohort received systemic therapy as primary therapy, whereas most patients in the oncogeriatric cohort received a combination of systemic and local therapy. Patients in the standard care cohort received fewer lines of treatment (mean number of treatments 2.1 vs. 3.6, p < 0.001), and particularly received less breast surgery, chemotherapy, and trastuzumab. Three-year overall mortality was 71% (95% CI: 61–83%) as compared to 58% (95% CI: 42–75%) among patients in the oncogeriatric care cohort (multivariable HR: 1.59 [95% CI: 0.88–2.87], p = 0.125). Conclusions In primary metastatic breast cancer, oncogeriatric care intensifies treatment and might improve survival in elderly patients. Future studies on a larger scale should investigate the potential for improved survival, and whether this is accompanied by a better (preservation of) quality of life and functional status. PMID:24661770

  1. 5As Team obesity intervention in primary care: development and evaluation of shared decision-making weight management tools.

    PubMed

    Osunlana, A M; Asselin, J; Anderson, R; Ogunleye, A A; Cave, A; Sharma, A M; Campbell-Scherer, D L

    2015-08-01

    Despite several clinical practice guidelines, there remains a considerable gap in prevention and management of obesity in primary care. To address the need for changing provider behaviour, a randomized controlled trial with convergent mixed method evaluation, the 5As Team (5AsT) study, was conducted. As part of the 5AsT intervention, the 5AsT tool kit was developed. This paper describes the development process and evaluation of these tools. Tools were co-developed by the multidisciplinary research team and the 5AsT, which included registered nurses/nurse practitioners (n?=?15), mental health workers (n?=?7) and registered dieticians (n?=?7), who were previously randomized to the 5AsT intervention group at a primary care network in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The 5AsT tool development occurred through a practice/implementation-oriented, need-based, iterative process during learning collaborative sessions of the 5AsT intervention. Feedback during tool development was received through field notes and final provider evaluation was carried out through anonymous questionnaires. Twelve tools were co-developed with 5AsT. All tools were evaluated as either 'most useful' or 'moderately useful' in primary care practice by the 5AsT. Four key findings during 5AsT tool development were the need for: tools that were adaptive, tools to facilitate interdisciplinary practice, tools to help patients understand realistic expectations for weight loss and shared decision-making tools for goal setting and relapse prevention. The 5AsT tools are primary care tools which extend the utility of the 5As of obesity management framework in clinical practice. PMID:26129630

  2. Diabetes Self-Management and Education of People Living with Diabetes: A Survey in Primary Health Care in Muscat Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maniri, Abdullah A.; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed A.; Wahlström, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Oman is high and rising, information on how people were self-managing their disease has been lacking. The objective of this study was therefore to assess diabetes self-management and education (DSME) among people living with type 2 diabetes in Oman. Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted in public primary health care centres in Muscat. Diabetes self-management and education was assessed by asking how patients recognized and responded to hypo- and hyperglycaemia, and if they had developed strategies to maintain stable blood glucose levels. Patients' demographic information, self-treatment behaviours, awareness of potential long-term complications, and attitudes concerning diabetes management were also recorded. Associations between these factors and diabetes self-management and education were analysed. Results In total, 309 patients were surveyed. A quarter (26%, n = 83) were unaware how to recognize hypoglycaemia or respond to it (26%, n = 81). Around half (49%, n = 151), could not recognize hyperglycaemia and more than half could not respond to it (60%, n = 184). Twelve percent (n = 37) of the patients did not have any strategies to stabilize their blood glucose levels. Patients with formal education generally had more diabetes self-management and education than those without (p<0.001), as had patients with longer durations of diabetes (p<0.01). Self-monitoring of blood glucose was practiced by 38% (n = 117) of the patients, and insulin was used by 22% (n = 67), of which about one third independently adjusted dosages. Patients were most often aware of complications concerning loss of vision, renal failure and cardiac problems. Many patients desired further health education. Conclusions Many patients displayed dangerous diabetes self-management and education knowledge gaps. The findings suggest a need for improving knowledge transfer to people living with diabetes in the Omani clinical setting. PMID:23451219

  3. Development and evaluation of an online tool for management of overweight children in primary care: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Hae; Skow, Áine; Puradiredja, Dewi Ismajani; Lucas, Anna; Syrad, Hayley; Sovio, Ulla; White, Billy; Kessel, Anthony S; Taylor, Barry; Saxena, Sonia; Viner, Russell M; Kinra, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the acceptability of implementing an online tool for the assessment and management of childhood obesity (Computer-Assisted Treatment of CHildren, CATCH) in primary care. Design and setting An uncontrolled pilot study with integral process evaluation conducted at three general practices in northwest London, UK (November 2012–April 2013). Participants Families with concerns about excess weight in a child aged 5–18 years (n=14 children). Intervention Families had a consultation with a doctor or nurse using CATCH, which assessed child weight status, cardiometabolic risk and risk of emotional and behavioural difficulties and provided personalised lifestyle advice. Families and practitioners completed questionnaires to assess the acceptability and usefulness of the consultation, and participated in semistructured interviews which explored user experiences. Outcome measures The primary outcome was family satisfaction with the tool-assisted consultation. Secondary outcomes were practitioners’ satisfaction, and acceptability and usefulness of the intervention to families and practitioners. Results The majority of families (86%, n=12) and all practitioners (n=4) were satisfied with the consultation. Participants reported that the tool was easy to use, the personalised lifestyle advice useful and the use of visual aids beneficial. Families and practitioners identified a need for practical, structured support for weight management following the consultation. Conclusions The results of this pilot study indicate that an online tool for assessment and management of childhood obesity can be implemented in primary care, and is acceptable to patients, families and practitioners. Further development and evaluation of the tool is warranted. PMID:26070794

  4. Recognition and management of addictive sexual disorders: guide for the primary care clinician.

    PubMed

    Carnes, P; Schneider, J P

    2000-01-01

    With greater awareness of sexual exploitation, professional sexual misconduct, and the sexual issues of public figures, a growing awareness of the problem of sexual addiction is emerging. As a result of public awareness, more cases will be brought to the attention of primary care providers. When primary care providers are confronted by problematic sexual behavior that fits the parameters of addictive illness, they should know what the implications are in order to make appropriate clinical decisions and to evaluate treatment approaches. The purpose of this article is to summarize the nature of the problem, to review critical issues in assessment, to provide treatment options, and to suggest critical factors for monitoring progress. PMID:11271127

  5. Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcome of 22 Cases of Primary Hypophysitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Mi; Bae, Ji Cheol; Joung, Ji Young; Cho, Yoon Young; Kim, Tae Hun; Jin, Sang-Man; Suh, Sunghwan; Hur, Kyu Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary hypophysitis causes varying degrees of endocrine dysfunction and mass effect. The natural course and best treatment have not been well established. Methods Medical records of 22 patients who had been diagnosed with primary hypophysitis between January 2001 and March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Based on the anatomical location, we classified the cases as adenohypophysitis (AH), infundibuloneurohypophysitis (INH), and panhypophysitis (PH). Clinical presentation, endocrine function, pathologic findings, magnetic resonance imaging findings, and treatment courses were reviewed. Results Among 22 patients with primary hypophysitis, 81.8% (18/22) had involvement of the posterior pituitary lobe. Two patients of the AH (2/3, 66.6%) and three patients of the PH (3/10, 30%) groups initially underwent surgical mass reduction. Five patients, including three of the PH (3/10, 33.3%) group and one from each of the AH (1/3, 33.3%) and INH (1/9, 11.1%) groups, initially received high-dose glucocorticoid treatment. Nearly all of the patients treated with surgery or high-dose steroid treatment (9/11, 82%) required continuous hormone replacement during the follow-up period. Twelve patients received no treatment for mass reduction due to the absence of acute symptoms and signs related to a compressive mass effect. Most of them (11/12, 92%) did not show disease progression, and three patients recovered partially from hormone deficiency. Conclusion Deficits of the posterior pituitary were the most common features in our cases of primary hypophysitis. Pituitary endocrine defects responded less favorably to glucocorticoid treatment and surgery. In the absence of symptoms related to mass effect and with the mild defect of endocrine function, it may not require treatment to reduce mass except hormone replacement. PMID:25325267

  6. Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the most distal rectum: a dilemma in origin and management

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Alexandre Oliveira; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Marques, Vasco; Sousa, Helena Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the rectum is a rare malignant entity that has been classically managed with a surgery-based approach, which included abdominoperineal resection for distal lesions. Recently there have been reports on the favourable outcomes achieved with the non-surgical management of these patients. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman who was diagnosed with a stage IIIa SCC located on the distal rectum. The patient was managed conservatively with a chemoradiation regime with mitomycin and 5-fluorouracil. Complete remission was achieved and she is currently alive, asymptomatic and disease-free after 30 months. This case adds to the existing evidence that supports the role of chemoradiation as a first-line curative treatment for the rare rectal SCC. PMID:24695655

  7. A Primary Care Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) Be able to recognize characteristic symptoms of intermittent claudication (2) Diagnose PAD on the basis of history, physical exam, and simple limb blood pressure measurements (3) Recognize the significance of peripheral artery disease as a marker for coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (4) Provide appropriate medical management of atherosclerosis risk factors-- including use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death (5) Manage symptoms of intermittent claudication with program of smoking cessation, exercise, and medication The diagnosis of intermittent claudication secondary to peripheral artery disease (PAD) can often be made on the basis of history and physical examination. Additional evaluation of PAD is multi-modal and the techniques used will vary depending on the nature and severity of the patient's presenting problem. Most patients can be appropriately managed without referral for specialized diagnostic services or interventions.

  8. Managing an online survey about influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Diana; Aerny, Nicole; Soldevila, Núria; Baricot, Maretva; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Torner, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Domíguez, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used due to their speed and efficiency. The aim of this study was to analyze factors that may have contributed to the quality and speed of response of an online survey on influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers. A multicenter study including family physicians, nurses and pediatricians from primary healthcare teams from seven Spanish Autonomous Communities was designed. The centers were selected by simple random sampling. The survey remained active and accessible for 56 days and four reminders were sent. The odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to assess the association of sociodemographic variables and responding to the survey before the second reminder. Complete, validated information was obtained from 1965 primary healthcare workers. The total response rate was 36.2%. More nurses (46.3%) responded before the second reminder and more family physicians (52.8%) after the second reminder. The adjusted OR shows that family physicians responded later (AOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.2-1.8) than nurses. The responses obtained in the first 24 h after the initial sending and the reminders accounted for 41.7% of the completed surveys, indicating the importance of reminders. PMID:25584421

  9. Electronic clinical records in primary care for estimating disease burden and management. An example of COPD.

    PubMed

    Verde-Remeseiro, Luis; López-Pardo, Estrella; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Gude-Sampedro, Francisco; Castro-Calvo, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant health problem in developed countries. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of COPD in a single Spanish healthcare area. We also aimed to assess if there are any differences in prevalence and spirometry use among primary care services by utilizing already registered information. We designed a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of COPD and the performance of spirometries in each primary care service. A total of 8,444 patients were diagnosed with COPD, with a prevalence of 2.6% for individuals older than 39 years. The prevalence increased with age and was much higher in men. Significant heterogeneity was found in the prevalence of COPD and spirometry use among primary care services. COPD was underdiagnosed and there was wide variability in spirometry use in our area. Greater efforts are needed to diagnose COPD in order to improve its clinical outcomes and to refine registries so that they can be used as reliable sources of information. PMID:25959609

  10. Managing an Online Survey about Influenza Vaccination in Primary Healthcare Workers

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Diana; Aerny, Nicole; Soldevila, Núria; Baricot, Maretva; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Torner, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; González-Candelas, Fernando; Martín, Vicente; Díaz, José; Domíguez, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used due to their speed and efficiency. The aim of this study was to analyze factors that may have contributed to the quality and speed of response of an online survey on influenza vaccination in primary healthcare workers. A multicenter study including family physicians, nurses and pediatricians from primary healthcare teams from seven Spanish Autonomous Communities was designed. The centers were selected by simple random sampling. The survey remained active and accessible for 56 days and four reminders were sent. The odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to assess the association of sociodemographic variables and responding to the survey before the second reminder. Complete, validated information was obtained from 1965 primary healthcare workers. The total response rate was 36.2%. More nurses (46.3%) responded before the second reminder and more family physicians (52.8%) after the second reminder. The adjusted OR shows that family physicians responded later (AOR 1.46, 95% CI 1.2–1.8) than nurses. The responses obtained in the first 24 h after the initial sending and the reminders accounted for 41.7% of the completed surveys, indicating the importance of reminders. PMID:25584421

  11. Advanced Imaging Tools Rather Than Hemodynamics Should Be the Primary Approach for Diagnosing, Following, and Managing Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gerges, Mario; Gerges, Christian; Lang, Irene M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is currently defined based on invasive measurements: a resting pulmonary artery pressure ? 25 mm Hg. For pulmonary arterial hypertension, a pulmonary arterial wedge pressure ? 15 mm Hg and pulmonary vascular resistance > 3 Wood units are also required. Thus, right heart catheterization is inevitable at present. However, the diagnosis, follow-up, and management of PH by noninvasive techniques is progressing. Significant advances have been achieved in the imaging of pulmonary vascular disease and the right ventricle. We review the current sensitivities and specificities of noninvasive imaging of PH and discuss its role and future potential to replace hemodynamics as the primary approach to screening, diagnosing, and following/managing PH. PMID:25840101

  12. SELF-MANAGEMENT COUNSELING IN PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE: PRIMARY RESULTS FROM THE HEART FAILURE ADHERENCE AND RETENTION TRIAL (HART)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Lynda H.; Calvin, James E.; Richardson, Dejuran; Janssen, Imke; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Flynn, Kristin J.; Grady, Kathleen L.; Rucker-Whitaker, Cheryl S.; Eaton, Claudia; Avery, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Context Activating patients with heart failure (HF) to adhere to physician advice has not translated into clinical benefit, but past trials have had methodologic limitations. Objective To determine the value of self-management counseling plus HF education, over HF education alone, on the primary endpoint of death or HF hospitalization. Design, Setting, and Patients A single center behavioral efficacy trial in 902 patients with mild to moderate systolic or diastolic dysfunction, randomized between 2001–2004. Interventions All patients were offered 18 contacts and 18 HF educational tip sheets over the course of 1 year. Patients randomized to education received tip sheets in the mail and phone calls to check comprehension. Patients randomized to self-management received tip sheets in groups and were taught self-management skills to implement the advice. Main Outcome Measure Death or HF hospitalization, blindly adjudicated by cardiologists. Intent-to-treat results were analyzed as time-to-event and accelerated failure time models were used for non-proportional hazards. Results Patients were an average of 63.6 years, 47% female, 40% minority, 52% with family income <$30,000/year, and 23% with diastolic dysfunction. The self-management arm was no different from the education arm on the primary endpoint (Wilcoxon p=0.58). Post-hoc analyses on pre-specified subgroups revealed a significant income x treatment interaction (log-logistic estimate=0.64, p=0.02). Patients with income <$30,000 in self-management had a slower time to event than those in education (p=0.05) and were no different than higher income patients in either treatment arm. Conclusions The addition of self-management counseling to HF education does not reduce death or HF hospitalizations in patients with mild to moderate HF. Future trials should evaluate tailored outpatient HF management featuring ongoing education and comprehension checks for all, augmented by group-based skill development for those more economically disadvantaged. Such an approach may be a cost-effective, timely, and simple option for reducing HF costs. PMID:20858878

  13. The Changing Face of Chronic Illness Management in Primary Care: A Qualitative Study of Underlying Influences and Unintended Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Linda M.; Kreiner, Meta; Brody, Howard

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE Recently, there has been dramatic increase in the diagnosis and pharmaceutical management of common chronic illnesses. Using qualitative data collected in primary care clinics, we assessed how these trends play out in clinical care. METHODS This qualitative study focused on management of type 2 diabetes and hypertension in 44 primary care clinics in Michigan and was based on interviews with 58 clinicians and 70 of their patients, and observations of 107 clinical consultations. We assessed clinicians’ treatment strategies and discussions of factors influencing treatment decisions, and patients’ understandings and experiences in managing these illnesses. RESULTS Clinicians focused on helping patients achieve test results recommended by national guidelines, and most reported combining 2 or more medications per condition to reach targets. Medication selection and management was the central focus of the consultations we observed. Polypharmacy was common among patients, with more than one-half taking 5 or more medications. Patient interviews indicated that heavy reliance on pharmaceuticals presents challenges to patient well-being, including financial costs and experiences of adverse health effects. CONCLUSIONS Factors promoting heavy use of pharmaceuticals include lower diagnostic and treatment thresholds, clinician-auditing and reward systems, and the prescribing cascade, whereby more medications are prescribed to control the effects of already-prescribed medications. We present a conceptual model, the inverse benefit law, to provide insight into the impact of pharmaceutical marketing efforts on the observed trends. We make recommendations about limiting the influence of the pharmaceutical industry on clinical practice, toward improving the well-being of patients with chronic illness. PMID:22966109

  14. Does a Year Make a Difference? The Classroom Management Practices of Primary Student Teachers before and after a One-Year Teacher Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reupert, Andrea; Woodcock, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine primary student teachers' use, confidence and success in various classroom management strategies at the start and at the end of a one-year teaching programme and ascertain any significant differences between the two time periods. One hundred and twenty-four English primary student teachers were surveyed at

  15. Does a Year Make a Difference? The Classroom Management Practices of Primary Student Teachers before and after a One-Year Teacher Education Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reupert, Andrea; Woodcock, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine primary student teachers' use, confidence and success in various classroom management strategies at the start and at the end of a one-year teaching programme and ascertain any significant differences between the two time periods. One hundred and twenty-four English primary student teachers were surveyed at…

  16. Primary School Environment Trend, Class-Ratio and Head Teachers Overcrowded Classrooms Management Strategies in Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babatunde, Ehinola Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Primary school Enrolment Trend, Class-Ratio and Head Teachers overcrowded classrooms management strategies in Northern Senatorial District of Ondo State, Nigeria was investigated. The purpose of the study is to examine the current enrolment trend in public primary schools in northern senatorial District of Ondo State. Also, is to ascertain the…

  17. Integrated palmer amaranth management in glufosinate-resistant cotton: II. primary, secondary, and conservation tillage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate the role of inversion tillage, cover crops and spring tillage methods for Palmer amaranth between-row (BR) and within-row (WR) management in glufosinate-resistant cotton. Main plots were two inversion tillage systems: fall inversion tillage (IT...

  18. Who Really Leads and Manages the Curriculum in Primary Schools? A Hong Kong Case-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John Chi-Kin; Dimmock, Clive; Yeung, Tai-Yuen Au

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the micro-leadership and management of the curriculum within schools. This study first applies a purpose-designed set of research instruments to penetrate the micro-workings of school decision-making in curriculum, teaching and learning. Second, it reports the findings from an application of the instruments in…

  19. Finding the Right Dominoes. Introducing School Development Plans: A Case-Study of Primary School Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Marlene

    1991-01-01

    Discusses a case study connected with research into the introduction of school development plans commissioned by Warwickshire (England) Local Education Authority. Illustrates the time, energies, and tensions experienced by key actors involved in fusing the centrality of pupils' learning with the business of post-Education Reform Act management.

  20. Facilitating Primary Head Teacher Succession in England: The Role of the School Business Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Charlotte; Armstrong, Paul; Pearson, Diana

    2012-01-01

    School leadership is significant for student learning, but increased workload and complexity are believed to be in part responsible for the difficulties internationally in managing succession, with experienced leaders leaving the profession prematurely and potential future leaders reluctant to take on the role. This article draws on a national…

  1. Primary and Secondary Contamination Mechanisms for Consideration in ASR Modeling and Practical Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a useful water resource management option for water storage and reuse. Its increased use is recognized in adaptation to the ever increasing problem of water availability, both in timing and flow. Challenges in the ASR process may arise from...

  2. Who Really Leads and Manages the Curriculum in Primary Schools? A Hong Kong Case-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, John Chi-Kin; Dimmock, Clive; Yeung, Tai-Yuen Au

    2009-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about the micro-leadership and management of the curriculum within schools. This study first applies a purpose-designed set of research instruments to penetrate the micro-workings of school decision-making in curriculum, teaching and learning. Second, it reports the findings from an application of the instruments in

  3. Dietary Management in Hypertension. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molleson, Ann L.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  4. Dietary Management for Alcoholic Patients. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Roberta Smith; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  5. The Hepatitis C Self-Management Program: Sustainability of Primary Outcomes at 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groessl, Erik J.; Ho, Samuel B.; Asch, Steven M.; Stepnowsky, Carl J.; Laurent, Diana; Gifford, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chronic hepatitis C infection afflicts millions of people worldwide. Although antiviral treatments are increasingly effective, many hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients avoid treatment, do not complete or respond to treatment, or have contraindications. Self-management interventions are one option for promoting behavioral changes leading to

  6. Primary and Secondary Contamination Mechanisms in ASR Modeling and Design of Practical Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) is a useful water resource management option for water storage and reuse. Its increased use is recognized in adaptation to the ever increasing problem of water availability, both in timing and flow. Challenges in the ASR process may arise from...

  7. Dietary Management in Gastrointestinal Diseases. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Joan Z.; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  8. Dietary Management in Obesity. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Townley, Nancy A.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  9. Dietary Management in Diabetes Mellitus. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossetti, Brenda; Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  10. The Hepatitis C Self-Management Program: Sustainability of Primary Outcomes at 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groessl, Erik J.; Ho, Samuel B.; Asch, Steven M.; Stepnowsky, Carl J.; Laurent, Diana; Gifford, Allen L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chronic hepatitis C infection afflicts millions of people worldwide. Although antiviral treatments are increasingly effective, many hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients avoid treatment, do not complete or respond to treatment, or have contraindications. Self-management interventions are one option for promoting behavioral changes leading to…

  11. Dietary Management in Hyperlipidemia. Nutrition in Primary Care Series, Number 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher-Allred, Charlette R.; Townley, Nancy A.

    Nutrition is well-recognized as a necessary component of educational programs for physicians. This is to be valued in that of all factors affecting health in the United States, none is more important than nutrition. This can be argued from various perspectives, including health promotion, disease prevention, and therapeutic management. In all…

  12. On Being in Charge: A Guide to Management in Primary Health Care. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Rosemary; And Others

    This revised training guide is designed to help health workers, including nurses, midwives, and medical assistants, improve managerial skills. The book is divided into four main parts, each dealing with a different aspect of management. An opening exercise helps readers diagnose managerial weaknesses and turn to appropriate chapters for study.…

  13. Analysis of benzodiazepine withdrawal program managed by primary care nurses in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzodiazepine (BZD), the long-term treatment of which is harmful for cognitive function, is widely prescribed by General Practitioners in Spain. Based on studies performed in other countries we designed a nurse-led BZD withdrawal program adapted to Spanish Primary Care working conditions. Results A pseudo-experimental (before-after) study took place in two Primary Care Centres in Barcelona. From a sample of 1150 patients, 79 were identified. They were over 44 years old and had been daily users of BZD for a period exceeding six months. Out of the target group 51 patients agreed to participate. BZD dosage was reduced every 2-4 weeks by 25% of the initial dose with the optional support of Hydroxyzine or Valerian. The rating measurements were: reduction of BZD prescription, demographic variables, the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) to measure quality of life, the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Sleep Scale, and the Goldberg Depression and Anxiety Scale. By the end of the six-month intervention, 80.4% of the patients had discontinued BZD and 64% maintained abstinence at one year. An improvement in all parameters of the Goldberg scale (p <0.05) and in the mental component of SF-12 at 3.3 points (p = 0.024), as well as in most components of the MOS scale, was observed in the group that had discontinued BZD. No significant differences in these scales before and after the intervention were observed in the group that had not discontinued. Conclusions At one year approximately 2/3 of the patients had ceased taking BZD. They showed an overall improvement in depression and anxiety scales, and in the mental component of the quality of life scale. There was no apparent reduction in the sleep quality indicators in most of the analysed components. Nurses in a Primary Care setting can successfully implement a BZD withdrawal program. PMID:23237104

  14. The management of wounds following primary lower limb arthroplasty: a prospective, randomised study comparing hydrofibre and central pad dressings.

    PubMed

    Abuzakuk, Tarek M; Coward, Pamela; Shenava, Y; Kumar, V Senthil; Skinner, John A

    2006-06-01

    Wound care following lower limb arthroplasty has not been subject to in-depth clinical research, primarily because such wounds usually heal without complication. However, when prosthetic implants are used, serious wound problems can be disastrous (Whitehouse et al. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2002;23:183-9; Lindwell OM. Clin Orthop Relat Res 1986;211:91-103). We report the results of a prospective, randomised, controlled trial comparing a hydrofibre (Aquacel) and central pad (Mepore) dressing in the management of acute wounds following primary total hip or knee arthroplasty left to heal by primary intention. Dressing performance was measured in 61 patients receiving total hip or knee replacements. There was a significant reduction in the requirement for dressing changes before five postoperative days in the hydrofibre group (43% compared with 77% in the central pad group), and there were fewer blisters amongst patients in the hydrofibre group (13% compared with 26% in the central pad group). We conclude that there is a potential role for hydrofibre dressing in the management of arthroplasty wounds. PMID:17007343

  15. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastrointestinal disease: implications for primary care of a revolution in management of dyspepsia.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, B C

    1995-01-01

    The majority of patients with dyspepsia are managed in general practice. However, most of the literature on Helicobacter pylori and its association with gastrointestinal disease has originated from secondary care. This review summarizes the role of H pylori in dyspepsia from the perspective of primary care and suggests a new strategy for the management of dyspeptic patients in this setting. Recent meta-analyses and consensus statements have supported the use of eradication therapy as first-line treatment of peptic ulceration. Studies from primary care have supported the use of eradication therapy in patients who have H pylori related peptic ulcer disease and require long-term H2-antagonist medication, on both clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness grounds. Of the many regimens proposed for the eradication of H pylori, the best evidence supports a triple combination of bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline. Regimens using proton pump inhibitors may be more acceptable to patients but lack good evidence from trials. Use of a positive serum enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for H pylori antibodies as a criterion for endoscopic investigation has been shown to result in a 23% reduction in endoscopic workload. Further research should answer questions of importance to general practitioners, such as the role of eradication therapy in patients with nonulcer dyspepsia and the effectiveness of eradication of H pylori in the prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:7546874

  16. Diagnosis and Management of Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Community: What is the Role of Primary Care Physician?

    PubMed

    Ambigga, D; Suthahar, A; Ramli, As; Ng, Kk; Radziah, Ar; Marymol, K

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a large and growing problem in the ageing population but often not diagnosed in its earlier stages which is Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). MCI represents the phase between normal ageing and early dementia. About 12% of patients with MCI develop dementia per year, usually Alzheimer's disease. It is a diagnosis given to individuals who have cognitive impairments beyond that is expected for their age and education. However, this condition does not interfere significantly with daily activities as these individuals retain their critical thinking and reasoning skills. Nevertheless, due to its complexity and vague initial presentation, many cases of MCI can be missed. Therefore, it is imperative for primary care physicians to recognise these symptoms as opposed to normal ageing memory changes, and refer these patients to the memory clinic early to confirm the diagnosis. This paper illustrates a common primary care presentation of a patient with MCI. As there is no proven pharmacological treatment for MCI, the mainstay of management is to provide lifestyle intervention and long term support to these patients in the community. Primary care physicians should work as a team with the geriatrician, allied health personnel, support groups and caregivers in providing this care. PMID:25606229

  17. Perceptions of culturally competent diabetes management in a primary care practice.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Julienne K; Hildebrandt, Carol; Davis, Stephen; Crandall, Sonia J; Siciliano, Alissa B; Marion, Gail S

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether clinicians consider the impact of culture on diabetes management, a survey was mailed to 300 randomly selected patients > or = 50 years with type 2 diabetes and 153 surveys were returned. Data were correlated with A1C values. African Americans (AA) and non-Hispanic whites (NHW), (91.9%, 97.0%) respectively, reported clinicians discussed benefits of controlling blood sugar but did not discuss effects of cultural issues on glucose control (< or = 50%). AAs perceived clinicians were more accommodating of their cultural preferences than did NHWs (49.2% versus 30.6%) (P < .05). Females (51.9%) (P < .01) reported that clinicians acknowledged the importance of their cultural beliefs with a slightly higher percentage for African American females (54.8%) versus non-Hispanic White females (48.6%). Understanding the patient's and clinician's views of cultural beliefs as they relate to diabetes self-management can provide perspectives to guide care. PMID:24855811

  18. Managing gout in the primary care setting: what you and your patients need to know.

    PubMed

    Doghramji, Paul P; Edwards, N Lawrence; McTigue, Joan

    2010-08-01

    The US prevalence of gout, a rapidly progressive inflammatory arthritic condition linked to serum uric acid levels, has grown in recent years, in part due to the increasing prevalence and incidence of predisposing factors in the population, such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, and the use of diuretics. Left untreated, gout can be debilitating and cause deformity. Although a definitive diagnosis requires joint aspiration, only approximately 11% of patients with suspected gout undergo this procedure, and a presumptive diagnosis based on patient medical history and presentation with characteristic symptoms and comorbidities is a reasonable guidelines-based approach that has utility in the primary care setting, where approximately 70% of all cases and nearly 3,000,000 visits occur. The therapeutic standard for patients with recurrent gout flares is urate-lowering therapy (ULT), including allopurinol and the recently introduced febuxostat, the first new treatment for gout in 40 years. Although ULT must be taken consistently to sustain benefits, inadequate dosing and patient nonadherence or intolerance to therapy often lead to treatment failure. It is important that primary care clinicians understand gout diagnosis and therapeutic approaches and can communicate effectively with patients to improve treatment adherence. ONLINE ACCESS: http://cmeaccess.com/cme/ajm_gout_program/ This CME Multimedia Activity is also available through the Website of The American Journal of Medicine (www.amjmed.com). Click on the CME Multimedia Activity button in the navigation bar for full access. PMID:20670699

  19. Co-existent thyroid disease in patients treated for primary hyperparathyroidism: implications for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Ryan, S; Courtney, D; Timon, C

    2015-02-01

    Treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism necessitates complete excision of involved parathyroid tissue. Simultaneous thyroidectomy may also be required in order to optimise operative access and/or where suspicion of synchronous abnormal thyroid pathology exists. We sought to determine how often simultaneous removal of thyroid tissue was required during parathyroidectomy and the nature of any associated pathology. Radiology reports were also reviewed to determine how often confirmed thyroid pathology from histological specimens, benign or malignant, had been identified pre-operatively. A retrospective chart review of 135 parathyroidectomy procedures performed between 2003 and 2013 was performed. Of 135 parathyroidectomy procedures, 39 patients (29%) underwent simultaneous partial thyroidectomy of which 36 (27% of total parathyroidectomies) had dual pathology confirmed. Specifically, malignant lesions were identified in 14% (n = 5), Graves' disease 3% (n = 1), thyroiditis 17% (n = 6), multinodular goitre 50% (n = 18), unilateral nodule 6% (n = 2), hyperplasia 8% (n = 3) and intra-thyroid adenoma 3% (n = 1). Reference to these thyroid lesions was made in only 47% of preoperative radiology reports. In conclusion, synchronous thyroid surgery was required in 29% of all parathyroidectomy procedures performed for treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism with malignant thyroid lesions incidentally detected in 14% of cases. Less than half of all confirmed concomitant thyroid pathology had been referred to or recognised on pre-operative radiology studies. These findings highlight the importance of considering the potential need to perform thyroid surgery during parathyroidectomy and obtaining appropriate informed consent. PMID:24633247

  20. Managing Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma - The Role of Lens Extraction in this Era.

    PubMed

    Baig, Nafees; Kam, Ka-Wai; Tham, Clement C Y

    2016-01-01

    Trabeculectomy has been the gold standard in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) in glaucoma patients, no matter it is angle closure or open angle glaucoma. However in primary angle closure glaucoma, no matter the lens is cataractous or not, it is likely to be pathological, this thicker than usual lens, with or without a more anterior position, is often regarded as a strong contributing factor to angle closure. Lens extraction, no matter it is cataractous or clear, can theoretically eliminate this anatomical predisposing factor of angle closure, and thus IOP can be reduced. Based on recent results of a number of clinical trials, lens extraction alone or in combination with other IOP-lowering surgeries, may therefore play a more important role in the treating primary angle closure glaucoma. In cases when greater IOP-lowering effect is needed or if drug dependency has to be minimized, combined procedures, such as phacotrabeculectomy, can be considered, but the surgical risk can be higher than lens extraction alone. PMID:27014390

  1. Autonomy and modernisation: the management of change in an English primary care trust.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ruth; Harrison, Stephen

    2004-05-01

    Recent New Labour policy for the 'modernisation' of Government places a good deal of emphasis on decentralisation. This emphasis is particularly marked in relation to the organisation of primary care. However, like hospitals and other National Health Service institutions, primary care trusts (PCTs) are subject to a substantial raft of centrally established performance targets and indicators, including those which contribute to the public award of between zero and three performance 'stars'. This raises questions about the extent to which employees can exercise autonomy in the context of rigid top-down directives. This paper presents findings from a study using participant observation and interviews to examine the impact of a training course aimed ostensibly at increasing employee autonomy in an English PCT. The suggestion is that attempts to make employees more autonomous can be seen as a strategy for increasing central control based upon the internalisation by the employees of centrally promulgated values. The attraction of such strategies is that they may be potentially more effective and less costly than alternative strategies of direct control. However, the study suggests that the outcome of attempts by such methods as programmes to increase employee autonomy may be very different from those intended. PMID:19777709

  2. Bronchial Artery and Systemic Artery Embolization in the Management of Primary Lung Cancer Patients with Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hong Suk Kim, Young Il; Kim, Hyae Young; Zo, Jae-Ill; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Jin Soo

    2007-07-15

    Purpose. To assess the safety and effectiveness of arterial embolization in lung cancer patients with hemoptysis. Methods. Nineteen primary lung cancer patients with hemoptysis underwent bronchial artery and systemic artery embolization from April 2002 to March 2005. There were 17 men and 2 women, with a mean age of 59 years. Histologic analysis revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 10 patients and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma in 9 patients. The amount of hemoptysis was bleeding of 25-50 ml within 24 hr in 8 patients, recurrent blood-tinged sputum in 6, and bleeding of 100 ml or more per 24 hr in 5. Embolization was done with a superselective technique using a microcatheter and polyvinyl alcohol particles to occlude the affected vessels. Results. Arterial embolization was technically successful in all patients and clinically successful in 15 patients (79%). The average number of arteries embolized was 1.2. Bronchial arteriography revealed staining (all patients), dilatation of the artery or hypervascularity (10 patients), and bronchopulmonary shunt (6 patients). The recurrence rate was 33% (5/15) and 11 patients were alive with a mean follow-up time of 148 days (30-349 days). Conclusion. Arterial embolotherapy for hemoptysis in patients with primary lung cancer is an effective, safe therapeutic modality despite the fact the vascular changes are subtle on angiography.

  3. Managing Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma – The Role of Lens Extraction in this Era

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Nafees; Kam, Ka-Wai; Tham, Clement C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Trabeculectomy has been the gold standard in reducing intraocular pressure (IOP) in glaucoma patients, no matter it is angle closure or open angle glaucoma. However in primary angle closure glaucoma, no matter the lens is cataractous or not, it is likely to be pathological, this thicker than usual lens, with or without a more anterior position, is often regarded as a strong contributing factor to angle closure. Lens extraction, no matter it is cataractous or clear, can theoretically eliminate this anatomical predisposing factor of angle closure, and thus IOP can be reduced. Based on recent results of a number of clinical trials, lens extraction alone or in combination with other IOP-lowering surgeries, may therefore play a more important role in the treating primary angle closure glaucoma. In cases when greater IOP-lowering effect is needed or if drug dependency has to be minimized, combined procedures, such as phacotrabeculectomy, can be considered, but the surgical risk can be higher than lens extraction alone. PMID:27014390

  4. Self-management support in primary care: enactments, disruptions, and conversational consequences.

    PubMed

    Thille, Patricia; Ward, Natalie; Russell, Grant

    2014-05-01

    A common refrain in chronic disease management is that patients and clinicians need to enact new roles: patients as their own caregivers; clinicians as professional supporters of patient self-management activities. These roles are central to self-management support (SMS), an approach that emphasizes a clinical partnership, and promotes patient identification and achievement of realistic and short-term behavioral goals. With SMS, behavior change is the desired end, not the means to a desired biomedical end. Shifting SMS concepts into clinical practice has proven to be difficult and inconsistent, creating potential, unknown risks or harms to patients. We completed a discourse analysis of 16 clinical dialogues between diabetic patients and clinicians, collected during a study of six Ontario Family Health Teams, to explore the questions of risks and harms relating to SMS implementation. We observed varying degrees of incomplete implementation of SMS, as well as interactions that actively negated the core principles. Contrary to SMS principles, clinicians tended to emphasize behavioral changes as means to achieve biomedical ends, though to varying degrees. We present two appointments in detail, highlighting how linking behavior change closely with biomedical measures often elicited face-saving defenses from patients. The subsequent dialogue shifted attention away from problem solving and behavior change into active negotiation of responsibility and identity. Interactions that oriented more to SMS concepts elicited fewer defensive maneuvers from patients. Our analysis helps explicate one additional mechanism by which self-management talk threatens the clinical relationship, and highlights a promising method to mitigate this threat. PMID:24632054

  5. Association of practice size and pay-for-performance incentives with the quality of diabetes management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Vamos, Eszter P.; Pape, Utz J.; Bottle, Alex; Hamilton, Fiona Louise; Curcin, Vasa; Ng, Anthea; Molokhia, Mariam; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Background: Not enough is known about the association between practice size and clinical outcomes in primary care. We examined this association between 1997 and 2005, in addition to the impact of the Quality and Outcomes Framework, a pay-for-performance incentive scheme introduced in the United Kingdom in 2004, on diabetes management. Methods: We conducted a retrospective open-cohort study using data from the General Practice Research Database. We enrolled 422 general practices providing care for 154 945 patients with diabetes. Our primary outcome measures were the achievement of national treatment targets for blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and total cholesterol. Results: We saw improvements in the recording of process of care measures, prescribing and achieving intermediate outcomes in all practice sizes during the study period. We saw improvement in reaching national targets after the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. These improvements significantly exceeded the underlying trends in all practice sizes for achieving targets for cholesterol level and blood pressure, but not for HbA1c level. In 1997 and 2005, there were no significant differences between the smallest and largest practices in achieving targets for blood pressure (1997 odds ratio [OR] 0.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82 to 1.16; 2005 OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.06 in 2005), cholesterol level (1997 OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.76 to 1.16; 2005 OR 1.1, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.40) and glycated hemoglobin level (1997 OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.55 to 1.14; 2005 OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.19). Interpretation: We found no evidence that size of practice is associated with the quality of diabetes management in primary care. Pay-for-performance programs appear to benefit both large and small practices to a similar extent. PMID:21810950

  6. The management of dental caries in primary teeth - involving service providers and users in the design of a trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a lack of evidence for the effective management of dental caries in children’s primary teeth. The trial entitled ‘Filling Children’s Teeth: Indicated Or Not?’ (FiCTION) was designed to examine the clinical and cost effectiveness, in primary dental care, of three different approaches to the management of caries in primary teeth. However, before the FiCTION main trial commenced, a pilot trial was designed. Service provider (dentists and other members of the team including dental nurses and practice managers) and participant (child participants and their parents) involvement was incorporated into the pilot trial. The aim of this study is to describe service providers’ and users’ perspectives on the pilot trial to identify improvements to the conduct and design of the FiCTION main trial. Methods Qualitative interviews (individual and group) were held with dentists, dental team members, children and parents involved in the FiCTION pilot trial. Individual interviews were held with four dentists and a group interview was held with 17 dental team members. Face-to-face interviews were held with four parents and children (four- to eight-years old) representing the three arms of the trial and five telephone interviews were conducted with parents. All interviews were transcribed verbatim. Framework analysis was used. Results Overall, service providers, children and parents found the pilot trial to be well conducted and an interesting experience. Service providers highlighted the challenges of adhering to research protocols, especially managing the documentation and undertaking new clinical techniques. They indicated that the time and financial commitments were greater than they had anticipated. Particular difficulties were found recruiting suitable patients within the timeframe. For parents recruitment was apparently more related to trusting their dentist than the content of information packs. While some of the older children understood what a study was, others did not understand or were not aware they were enrolled. Conclusions The findings provided valuable recommendations to improve the method of recruitment of dental practices and patients, the timing and content of the training, the type of support dentists would value and ways to further engage children and parents in the FiCTION main trial. Trial registration ISRCTN77044005 PMID:22913464

  7. Does patient experience of multimorbidity predict self-management and health outcomes in a prospective study in primary care?

    PubMed Central

    Kenning, Cassandra; Coventry, Peter A; Gibbons, Chris; Bee, Penny; Fisher, Louise; Bower, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background. There is a need to better understand the mechanisms which lead to poor outcomes in patients with multimorbidity, especially those factors that might be amenable to intervention. Objective. This research aims to explore what factors predict self-management behaviour and health outcomes in patients with multimorbidity in primary care in the UK. Methods. A prospective study design was used. Questionnaires were mailed out to 1460 patients with multimorbidity. Patients were asked to complete a range of self-report measures including measures of multimorbidity, measures of their experience of multimorbidity and service delivery and outcomes (three measures of self-management: behaviours, Self-monitoring and Insight and medication adherence; and a measure of self-reported health). Results. In total, 36% (n = 499) of patients responded to the baseline survey and 80% of those respondents completed follow-up. Self-management behaviour at 4 months was predicted by illness perceptions around the consequences of individual conditions. Self-monitoring and Insight at 4 months was predicted by patient experience of ‘Hassles’ in health services. Self-reported medication adherence at 4 months was predicted by health status, Self-monitoring and Insight and ‘Hassles’ in health services. Perceived health status at 4 months was predicted by age and patient experience of multimorbidity. Conclusions. This research shows that different factors, particularly around patients’ experiences of health care and control over their treatment, impact on various types of self-management. Patient experience of multimorbidity was not a critical predictor of self-management but did predict health status in the short term. The findings can help to develop and target interventions that might improve outcomes in patients with multimorbidity. PMID:25715962

  8. Knowledge about bronchial asthma management in primary health care physicians in Al-Khobar City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Haneen A.; Koura, Manal; Yousef, Abdullah A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The prevalence of bronchial asthma (BA) is increasing in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Primary health care (PHC) centers follow the national protocol, which is based on the severity of the disease for the management of asthma. The Saudi initiative for asthma (SINA) management adopted from the global initiative for asthma guidelines, which was recommended by several recent studies, is based on the control level of asthma. Aims: To assess the knowledge of PHC physicians and family medicine (FM) residents in Al-Khobar, about the management of BA. Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted in all PHC centers and the university FM clinic in Al-Khobar. All PHC physicians and 3rd and 4th year FM residents were included in the study. A self-administered questionnaire developed according to SINA guidelines was used to assess theoretical knowledge of BA, and a predesigned checklist was used to assess the different inhaler techniques. Scoring was established and collected data were analyzed. Results: Only 8% of the sample had good theoretical knowledge of BA; 41% had poor knowledge. The knowledge of the residents was better than that of the PHC physicians. The mean knowledge score was significantly better among those using guidelines compared to the rest. About 23% had good knowledge of inhaler techniques. Knowledge of PHC physicians and FM residents about dry powder inhalers was deficient, and PHC physicians had little knowledge of metered dose inhalers with spacers. Conclusion: The knowledge of physicians about the management of BA was deficient. The national guidelines based on the level of control for asthma management should be updated and physicians given periodic training. PMID:25657604

  9. Managing Mental Health Problems Among Immigrant Women Attending Primary Health Care Services.

    PubMed

    Straiton, Melanie L; Powell, Kathryn; Reneflot, Anne; Diaz, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    Researchers in Norway explore treatment options in primary care for immigrant women with mental health problems compared with nonimmigrant women. Three national registers were linked together for 2008. Immigrant women from Sweden, Poland, the Philippines, Thailand, Pakistan, and Russia were selected for analysis and compared with Norwegian women. Using logistic regression, we investigated whether treatment type varied by country of origin. Rates of sickness leave and psychiatric referrals were similar across all groups. Conversational therapy and use of antidepressants and anxiolytics were lower among Filipina, Thai, Pakistani, and Russian women than among Norwegians. Using the broad term "immigrants" masks important differences in treatment and health service use. By closely examining mental health treatment differences by country of origin, gaps in service provision and treatment uptake may be identified and addressed with more success. PMID:26251953

  10. Antiphospholipase A2 Receptor Autoantibodies: A Step Forward in the Management of Primary Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Obrisca, Bogdan; Ismail, Gener; Jurubita, Roxana; Baston, Catalin; Andronesi, Andreea; Mircescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Since the identification of PLA2R (M-type phospholipase A2 receptor) as the first human antigenic target in primary membranous nephropathy (MN), perpetual progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. Accumulating clinical data support a pathogenic role for the anti-PLA2R antibodies (PLA2R ABs), but confirmation in an animal model is still lacking. However, PLA2R ABs were related to disease activity and outcome, as well as to response therapy. Accordingly, PLA2R ABs assay seems to be promising tool not only to diagnose MN but also to predict the course of the disease and could open the way to personalize therapy. Nevertheless, validation of a universal assay with high precision and definition of cut-off levels, followed by larger studies with a prolonged follow-up period, are needed to confirm these prospects. PMID:26576418

  11. Pathogenesis of Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis and Advances in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, John E.; Talwalkar, Jayant A.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Gores, Gregory J.; Lindor, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), first described in the mid-1850’s, is a complex liver that is heterogeneous in its presentation. PSC is characterized by chronic cholestasis, associated with chronic inflammation of the biliary epithelium, resulting in multi-focal bile duct strictures that can affect the entire biliary tree. Chronic inflammation leads to fibrosis involving the hepatic parenchyma and biliary tree, which can lead to cirrhosis and malignancy. The etiology of PSC is not fully understood which in part explains a lack of effective medical therapy for this condition. However, we have begun to better understand the molecular pathogenesis of PSC. The recognition of specific clinical subtypes and their pattern of progression could improve phenotypic and genotypic classification of the disease. We review our current understanding of this enigmatic disorder and discuss important topics for future studies. PMID:23827861

  12. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy for the initial management of primary epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jaaback, Kenneth; Johnson, Nick; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer tends to be chemosensitive and confine itself to the surface of the peritoneal cavity for much of its natural history. These features have made it an obvious target for intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy. Chemotherapy for ovarian cancer is usually given as an intravenous (IV) infusion repeatedly over five to eight cycles. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy is given by infusion of the chemotherapeutic agent directly into the peritoneal cavity. There are biological reasons why this might increase the anticancer effect and reduce some systemic adverse effects in comparison to IV therapy. Objectives To determine if adding a component of the chemotherapy regime into the peritoneal cavity affects overall survival, progression-free survival, quality of life (QOL) and toxicity in the primary treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer. Search methods We searched the Gynaecological Cancer Review Group’s Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2011, MEDLINE (1951 to May 2011) and EMBASE (1974 to May 2011). We updated these searches in February 2007, August 2010 and May 2011. In addition, we handsearched and cascade searched the major gynaecological oncology journals. Selection criteria The analysis was restricted to randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing women with a new diagnosis of primary epithelial ovarian cancer, of any FIGO stage, following primary cytoreductive surgery. Standard IV chemotherapy was compared with chemotherapy that included a component of IP administration. Data collection and analysis We extracted data on overall survival, disease-free survival, adverse events and QOL and performed meta-analyses of hazard ratios (HR) for time-to-event variables and relative risks (RR) for dichotomous outcomes using RevMan software. Main results Nine randomised trials studied 2119 women receiving primary treatment for ovarian cancer. We considered six trials to be of high quality. Women were less likely to die if they received an IP component to chemotherapy (eight studies, 2026 women; HR = 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.72 to 0.90). Intraperitoneal component chemotherapy prolonged the disease-free interval (five studies, 1311 women; HR = 0.78; 95% CI: 0.70 to 0.86). There was greater serious toxicity with regard to gastrointestinal effects, pain, fever and infection but less ototoxicity with the IP than the IV route. Authors’ conclusions Intraperitoneal chemotherapy increases overall survival and progression-free survival from advanced ovarian cancer. The results of this meta-analysis provide the most reliable estimates of the relative survival benefits of IP over IV therapy and should be used as part of the decision making process. However, the potential for catheter related complications and toxicity needs to be considered when deciding on the most appropriate treatment for each individual woman. The optimal dose, timing and mechanism of administration cannot be addressed from this meta-analysis. This needs to be addressed in the next phase of clinical trials. PMID:22071822

  13. The Influence of Adult Attachment on Patient Self-Management in Primary Care - The Need for a Personalized Approach and Patient-Centred Care

    PubMed Central

    Brenk-Franz, Katja; Strauss, Bernhard; Tiesler, Fabian; Fleischhauer, Christian; Ciechanowski, Paul; Schneider, Nico; Gensichen, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Self-management strategies are essential elements of evidence-based treatment in patients with chronic conditions in primary care. Our objective was to analyse different self-management skills and behaviours and their association to adult attachment in primary care patients with multiple chronic conditions. Methods In the apricare study (Adult Attachment in Primary Care) we used a prospective longitudinal design to examine the association between adult attachment and self-management in primary care patients with multimorbidity. The attachment dimensions avoidance and anxiety were measured using the ECR-RD. Self-management skills were measured by the FERUS (motivation to change, coping, self-efficacy, hope, social support) and self-management-behaviour by the DSMQ (glucose management, dietary control, physical activity, health-care use). Clinical diagnosis and severity of disease were assessed by the patients’ GPs. Multivariate analyses (GLM) were used to assess the relationship between the dimensions of adult attachment and patient self-management. Results 219 patients in primary care with multiple chronic conditions (type II diabetes, hypertension and at least one other chronic condition) between the ages of 50 and 85 were included in the study. The attachment dimension anxiety was positively associated with motivation to change and negatively associated with coping, self-efficacy and hope, dietary control and physical activity. Avoidance was negatively associated with coping, self-efficacy, social support and health care use. Conclusion The two attachment dimensions anxiety and avoidance are associated with different components of self-management. A personalized, attachment-based view on patients with chronic diseases could be the key to effective, individual self-management approaches in primary care. PMID:26381140

  14. Investigation of infertility management in primary care with open access hysterosalpingography (HSG): a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Scott; Murdoch, Alison; Rubin, Greg; Chinn, David; Wilsdon, John

    2006-03-01

    Infertility affects one in seven couples in the United Kingdom. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) issued guidance on the management of the infertile couple in February 2004, which included the statement "for the assessment of tubal damage, women not known to have co-morbidities (pelvic inflammatory disease, endometriosis or previous ectopic pregnancy) should be offered hysterosalpingography (HSG)". We made HSG available to six general practices in Newcastle upon Tyne as an open access investigation. Our aim was to evaluate the uptake of open access HSG, speed of access to specialist services and the quality of the information recorded in the referral letter. Using hospital clinical records we tracked the outcome of all infertile couples from the six pilot practices over a nine-month period. Of the 39 referrals identified, 10 women were eligible for open access HSG, of which six HSGs were organized by GPs. Couples who had open access HSG reached a diagnosis and management plan four weeks earlier than those who were referred directly (mean difference 4.0 weeks, 95% confidence interval (CI) -8.8 to 0.4 weeks). The information recorded in the referral letter was generally poor. However, all referrals made via the open access HSG service had the prerequisite tests done. Open access HSG allowed prompter access to specialist services with more complete information passed on in the referral letter. Open access HSG was used in 15% of all infertile couples and 60% of those who fitted the criteria for its use. Open access HSG together with semen analysis and endocrine blood tests may allow GPs to manage the initial stages of the infertile couple and make a diagnosis. PMID:16581721

  15. KEY ITEMS OF INNOVATION MANAGEMENT IN THE PRIMARY HEALTHCARE CENTRES CASE STUDY: FINLAND.

    PubMed

    Aslani, Alireza; Zolfagharzadeh, Mohammad Mahdi; Naaranoja, Marja

    2015-09-01

    Trends such as aging populations, excess costs, rising public expectations, and progress in medical science and technologies point out the necessity of adaptation and development of innovation in the healthcare systems particularly in developed countries. The main objective of this article is to review diffusion of innovation in the healthcare sector. Different types of innovation, diffusion characteristics, and adoption mechanisms are the subjects that are discussed in the selected case study, Finland. Finally, the key items of innovation management in the Finnish health system are introduced. The results can be implemented in other countries as well. PMID:26615647

  16. Management of patients during and after exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the role of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Thomashow, Byron

    2011-01-01

    Current treatments have failed to stem the continuing rise in health care resource use and fatalities associated with exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Reduction of severity and prevention of new exacerbations are therefore important in disease management, especially for patients with frequent exacerbations. Acute exacerbation treatment includes short-acting bronchodilators, systemic corticosteroids, and antibiotics if bacterial infections are present. Oxygen and/or ventilatory support may be necessary for life-threatening conditions. Rising health care costs have provided added impetus to find novel therapeutic approaches in the primary care setting to prevent and rapidly treat exacerbations before hospitalization is required. Proactive interventions may include risk reduction measures (eg, smoking cessation and vaccinations) to reduce triggers and supplemental pulmonary rehabilitation to prevent or delay exacerbation recurrence. Long-term treatment strategies should include individualized management, addressing coexisting nonpulmonary conditions, and the use of maintenance pharmacotherapies, eg, long-acting bronchodilators as monotherapy or in combination with inhaled corticosteroids to reduce exacerbations. Self-management plans that help patients recognize their symptoms and promptly access treatments have the potential to prevent exacerbations from reaching the stage that requires hospitalization. PMID:21941453

  17. Case management for dementia in primary health care: a systematic mixed studies review based on the diffusion of innovation model

    PubMed Central

    Khanassov, Vladimir; Vedel, Isabelle; Pluye, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with the implementation of case management (CM) interventions in primary health care (PHC) and to develop strategies to enhance its adoption by PHC practices. Methods This study was designed as a systematic mixed studies review (including quantitative and qualitative studies) with synthesis based on the diffusion of innovation model. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database (1995 to August 2012) to identify quantitative (randomized controlled and nonrandomized) and qualitative studies describing the conditions limiting and facilitating successful CM implementation in PHC. The methodological quality of each included study was assessed using the validated Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Results Twenty-three studies (eleven quantitative and 12 qualitative) were included. The characteristics of CM that negatively influence implementation are low CM intensity (eg, infrequent follow-up), large caseload (more than 60 patients per full-time case manager), and approach, ie, reactive rather than proactive. Case managers need specific skills to perform their role (eg, good communication skills) and their responsibilities in PHC need to be clearly delineated. Conclusion Our systematic review supports a better understanding of factors that can explain inconsistent evidence with regard to the outcomes of dementia CM in PHC. Lastly, strategies are proposed to enhance implementation of dementia CM in PHC. PMID:24959072

  18. An eHealth Platform to Manage Chronic Disease in Primary Care: An Innovative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Verdijk, Noortje A; Harmans, Lara M; Numans, Mattijs E; Chavannes, Niels H

    2016-01-01

    The number of individuals with chronic illness and multimorbidity is growing due to the rapid ageing of the population and the greater longevity of individuals. This causes an increasing workload in care, which results in a growing need for structural changes of the health care system. In recent years this led to a strong focus on promoting “self-management” in chronically ill patients. Research showed that patients who understand more about their disease, health, and lifestyle have better experiences and health outcomes, and often use less health care resources; the effect is even more when these patients are empowered to and responsible for managing their health and disease. In addition to the skills of patients, health care professionals need to shift to a role of teacher, partner, and professional supervisor of their patients. One way of supervising patients is by the use of electronic health (eHealth), which helps patients manage and control their disease. The application of eHealth solutions can provide chronically ill patients high-quality care, to the satisfaction of both patients and health care professionals, alongside a reduction in health care consumption and costs. PMID:26860333

  19. The timely diagnosis of breast cancer. Principles of risk management for primary care providers and surgeons.

    PubMed

    Osuch, J R; Bonham, V L

    1994-07-01

    Alleged delay in the diagnosis of breast cancer is one of the most common reasons for medical malpractice claims in the United States, accounting for the largest indemnity payments of any single medical condition. Although the diagnosis of breast cancer can be challenging and sometimes difficult, principles of management exist to assist health providers in pursuing a resolution of any breast complaint. Studies have shown that when litigation is pursued for alleged failure to diagnose breast cancer, multiple specialists are named in the suit. In most cases, patients filing claims of alleged failure to diagnose breast cancer are premenopausal, while the majority of women diagnosed with breast cancer are postmenopausal. This reflects, in part, the challenge of diagnosing the disease in women who have difficult clinical exams to interpret, as well as dense parenchyma on mammograms, which decreases the sensitivity of the radiograph interpretation. Principles of risk management to avoid a delay in diagnosis include (1) pursuing every breast complaint to resolution, (2) following breast cancer screening guidelines, (3) establishing an office tracking system for breast cancer screening reminders, (4) tracking results of all mammograms and follow-up studies ordered, (5) referring premenopausal women for the evaluation of any breast mass that persists through a menstrual cycle, (6) considering any asymmetrical breast finding as a cause for concern, (7) referring every woman with a breast finding on physical examination for consultation, regardless of the mammogram report, and (8) carefully documenting patient history, physical exam findings, clinical impression, and follow-up plans. PMID:8004597

  20. Management of Normal Tissue Toxicity Associated With Chemoradiation (Primary Skin, Esophagus, and Lung)

    PubMed Central

    Yazbeck, Victor Y.; Villaruz, Liza; Haley, Marsha; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly one quarter of patients with lung cancer present with locally advanced disease where concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care for patients with good performance status. Cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy consistently showed an improvement in survival compared with sequential chemoradiotherapy, at the expense of an increase in the toxicity profile. Over the past decades, several encouraging biomarkers such as transforming growth factor-beta and radioprotective agents such as amifostine were studied but without reaching approval for patient care. We reviewed the prevalence and risk factors for different adverse effects associated with the combined chemoradiotherapy modality, especially dermatitis, mucositis, esophagitis, and pneumonitis. These adverse effects can further be divided into acute, subacute, and chronic. Dermatitis is usually rare and responds well to topical steroids and usual skin care. Acute esophagitis occurs in 30% of patients and is treated with proton pump inhibitors, promotility agents, local anesthetic, and dietary changes. Radiation pneumonitis is a subacute complication seen in 15% of patients and is usually managed with steroids. Chronic adverse effects such as radiation fibrosis and esophageal stricture occur approximately 6 months after completion of radiation therapy and are usually permanent. In this review, complications of chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced lung cancer are delineated, and approaches to their management are described. Given that treatment interruption is associated with a worse outcome, patients are aggressively treated with a curative intent. Therefore, planning for treatment adverse effects improves patient tolerance, compliance, and outcome. PMID:23708070

  1. Kidney disease management in UK primary care: guidelines, incentives and information technology.

    PubMed

    Klebe, Bernhard; Farmer, Chris; Cooley, Roger; de Lusignan, Simon; Middleton, Rachel; O'Donoghue, Donal; New, John; Stevens, Paul

    2007-09-01

    The last few years have seen new developments to understand and tackle the significant public health issue posed by chronic kidney disease (CKD). Established renal disease currently consumes 2% of the UK National Health Service budget and predictions are that this figure will increase significantly due to the rising number of people requiring renal replacement therapy fuelled by the ageing population and the diabetes mellitus epidemic. This paper reviews the scale of CKD and discusses the new developments such as staging, referral guidelines and new Department of Health incentives brought about to improve awareness. The importance of Information Technology in assisting the management of renal disease is also outlined. We identify various types of intervention which might be used to do this: feedback in an educational context, the establishment of computerized decision support and enhancement of the patient journey. Many principles may be extended to the management of any chronic disease. While new developments are necessary to improve care, wider implementation is required to be able to see if improved outcomes are achieved. PMID:17591605

  2. The prescription of addiction medications after implementation of chronic care management for substance dependence in primary care.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae Woo; Samet, Jeffrey H; Cheng, Debbie M; Winter, Michael R; Kim, Theresa W; Fitzgerald, Anna; Saitz, Richard

    2015-05-01

    People with addictive disorders commonly do not receive efficacious medications. Chronic care management (CCM) is designed to facilitate delivery of effective therapies. Using data from the CCM group in a trial testing its effectiveness for addiction (N=282), we examined factors associated with the prescription of addiction medications. Among participants with alcohol dependence, 17% (95% CI 12.0-22.1%) were prescribed alcohol dependence medications. Among those with drug dependence, 9% (95% CI 5.5-12.6%) were prescribed drug dependence medications. Among those with opioids as a substance of choice, 15% (95% CI 9.3-20.9%) were prescribed opioid agonist therapy. In contrast, psychiatric medications were prescribed to 64% (95% CI 58.2-69.4%). Absence of co-morbid drug dependence was associated with prescription of alcohol dependence medications. Lower alcohol addiction severity and recent opioid use were associated with prescription of drug dependence medications. Better understanding of infrequent prescription of addiction medications, despite a supportive clinical setting, might inform optimal approaches to delivering addiction medications. PMID:25524751

  3. Investigations with large-scale forest lysimeter research of the lowlands of Northeast Germany - Results and consequences for the choice of tree species and forest management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, J.

    2009-04-01

    Investigations with large-scale forest lysimeter research of the lowlands of Northeast Germany - Results and consequences for the choice of tree species and forest management Introduction At present about 28 % - i.e. 1.9 million hectares - of the Northeast German Lowlands are covered with forests. The Lowlands are among the driest and at the same time the most densely wooded regions in Germany. The low annual precipitation between 500 and 600 mm and the light sandy soils with their low water storage capacity and a high porosity lead to a limited water availability. Therefore the hydrological functions of forests play an important role in the fields of regional water budget, water supply and water distribution. Experimental sites Lysimeters are suitable measuring instruments in the fields of granular soils and loose rocks to investgate evaporation and seepage water. The usage of lysimeter of different construction has a tradition of more than 100 years in this region. To investigate the water consumption of different tree species, lysimeters were installed at Britz near Eberswalde under comparable site conditions. In the early 1970s nine large-scale lysimeters were built with an area of 100 m2 and a depth of 5 m each. In 1974 the lysimeters were planted, together with their environment, with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L), common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.), larch (Larix decidua L.) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii [Mirb.] FRANCO) as experimental stands of 0.5 ha each according to the usual management practices. Therefore the "Large-scale lysimeters of Britz" are unparalleled in Europe. It was the initial aim of the experiment to find out the influence of the species and age of the growing stock growing on identical sandy soil under comparable weather conditions on both natural groundwater recharge and evaporation. Future forests in the north-eastern lowlands of Germany shall be mixed stands with as large a number of different species as possible. And this is also the aim of forest conversion in Land Brandenburg. The programme requires scientific attendance and foundation. In particular it shall be examined how the hydro-ecological conditions - which often are the limiting factor for forest growth in this area - would change with underplanted pine and larch and how these conditions may benefit from stand-structural and forestry measures. This is why several lysimeter stands were changed as follows: Ø Larch underplanted with beech Ø Scots pine underplanted with beech Ø Scots pine underplanted with oak Results Forests with their special hydrological properties have a substantial influence on the water budget, water supply and water distribution of entire landscapes. The tree species is of outstanding importance for deep seepage under forest stands. The sum of transpiration gives a rough overview about the water budget of the forest stand. More important for the detection of interactions between the compartments is the partitioning of the whole evaporation into individual evaporation components. Under the given precipitation and soil conditions, the course of interception and hence, the amount of seepage water depend on the crown structure in the stand. Depending on the amount of interception of the tree canopy and the duration of the leaching phase in spring, the mixed stands range between pure pine and pure beech. Making use of silvicultural methods and adequate stand treatment, forestry is able to control the water budget of landscapes.

  4. Choosing Choice: School Choice in International Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, David N., Ed.; Sykes, Gary, Ed.

    The chapters in this book originated as papers for a conference, School Choice and Educational Change, held in March 2000 at Michigan State University. An introductory chapter provides a comparative analysis of the lessons learned from international experience with school-choice policies, based on a review of case studies in several countries. The

  5. [Promoting Self-Management in Primary Care - the Association of Motivation for Change, Self-Efficacy and Psychological Distress Prior to the Onset of Intervention].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Thomas; Puschmann, Egina; Porzelt, Sarah; Ebersbach, Martin; Ernst, Annette; Thomsen, Patricia; Scherer, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety, depressive and somatoform disorders are highly prevalent in primary care. Managing these disorders is time-consuming and requires strong commitment on behalf of the general practitioners (GPs). Furthermore, the resources for the management of these patients are limited by the increasing workload in primary care practices, especially in the German health care system. In order to address the SMADS-study within psychenet - the Hamburg Network for Mental Health (NCT01726387) implements and evaluates a complex, low-threshold, nurse-led intervention using a goal-oriented set of case management and counseling techniques to promote self-management in these patients. This paper investigates the association of the patients' motivation for change and their perceived self-efficacy, the primary outcome - to get to know whether the intervention will target the appropriate population. PMID:26135280

  6. Primary Care Management of Chronic Constipation in Asia: The ANMA Chronic Constipation Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Gonlachanvit, Sutep; Chua, Andrew Seng Boon; Myung, Seung-Jae; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Patcharatrakul, Tanisa; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Wu, Justin C Y; Chen, Min-Hu; Gong, Xiao-Rong; Lu, Ching-Liang; Chen, Chien-Lin; Pratap, Nitesh; Abraham, Philip; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Ke, Meiyun; Ricaforte-Campos, Jane D; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Abdullah, Murdani

    2013-01-01

    Chronic constipation (CC) may impact on quality of life. There is substantial patient dissatisfaction; possible reasons are failure to recognize underlying constipation, inappropriate dietary advice and inadequate treatment. The aim of these practical guidelines intended for primary care physicians, and which are based on Asian perspectives, is to provide an approach to CC that is relevant to the existing health-care infrastructure. Physicians should not rely on infrequent bowel movements to diagnose CC as many patients have one or more bowel movement a day. More commonly, patients present with hard stool, straining, incomplete feeling, bloating and other dyspeptic symptoms. Physicians should consider CC in these situations and when patients are found to use laxative containing supplements. In the absence of alarm features physicians may start with a 2-4 week therapeutic trial of available pharmacological agents including osmotic, stimulant and enterokinetic agents. Where safe to do so, physicians should consider regular (as opposed to on demand dosing), combination treatment and continuous treatment for at least 4 weeks. If patients do not achieve satisfactory response, they should be referred to tertiary centers for physiological evaluation of colonic transit and pelvic floor function. Surgical referral is a last resort, which should be considered only after a thorough physiological and psychological evaluation. PMID:23667746

  7. Management of locally advanced carcinoma of the breast by primary radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.R.; Sawicka, J.; Gelman, R.; Hellman, S.

    1983-03-01

    A retrospective review of 137 patients with locally advanced breast cancer, but without distant metastases, who were treated with radical radiation therapy is presented. Ninety percent of patients had an initial complete response to their radiation therapy. The 5 year rates of local tumor control, survival free of distant failure, and overall survival were 54% 28% and 30%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following features were associated with improved local tumor control: clinically negative axillary nodes, excisional biopsy, radiation dose greater than 6000 rad, and the use of adjuvant systemic therapy. Improved freedom from distant relapse was seen in patients with small primaries and non-inflammatory carcinoma, as well as clinically negative axillary nodes, excisional biopsy, radiation dose greater than 6000 rad, and the use of adjuvant systemic therapy. The results suggest that adequate levels of radiation therapy can provide local tumor control in a significant proportion of patients with locally advanced breast cancer and that adjuvant systemic therapy is useful in improving both local tumor control and freedom from distant relapse in these patients.

  8. [Telecardiology: a new way to manage the relation between hospital and primary care].

    PubMed

    Scalvini, S; Giordano, A; Glisenti, F

    2002-09-01

    In medicine, computer-applied technology enables the performance of many diagnostic investigations with their transfer to a receiving station for referral. The use of telemedicine appears particularly promising in cardiovascular disease, because the cost/effectiveness ratio of an early, tailored intervention, in terms of life-saving and functional recovery, is demonstrated. The development of telemedicine represents an advantage for the individual patient in terms of the interaction between primary and secondary care. In addition, general practitioners can gain educationally and so be equipped to handle more advanced medical problems, thus reducing the number of hospital follow-up appointments. Economic savings for the health service are a driving force. Evidence to date is that the patient seems satisfied and the general practitioner gains competence, but the extent to which telemedicine results in reduced follow-up appointments and economic savings is not yet established. The findings of studies, even if preliminary, have important implications for the design and implementation of the telemedicine service center within the health care system. Selection of patients, significant service reorganization and provision of logistic support for the setting up and functioning of the telemedicine center will be required for it to operate efficiently. Future research in this subject needs to be more scientifically organized, in order to achieve informed decisions about the appropriate use of this technology. PMID:12418427

  9. Primary effusion lymphoma in the absence of HIV infection--clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed

    Klepfish, A; Zuckermann, B; Schattner, A

    2015-06-01

    Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) is a rare type of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma caused by human herpesvirus type 8, also termed Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. It usually occurs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. A subset of patients is not infected with HIV and their treatment remains poorly defined. To clarify treatment issues in HIV-negative PEL patients, we report on two such patients who represent two opposing ends in the spectrum of treatment and review the literature regarding treatment options and patient outcomes. Either repeated cycles of chemotherapy or, surprisingly, drainage of the malignant effusions alone, proved very effective in our patients. The literature reveals additional treatment options which may be effective including immunochemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, antiviral treatment and immunomodulatory and targeted biological therapy. However, no controlled trials were found due to the rarity of the condition. In the absence of controlled trials, treatment decisions in PEL not associated with HIV must remain individual and patient-tailored. PMID:25413797

  10. Playing cards on asthma management: A new interactive method for knowledge transfer to primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Borduas, Francine; Bouchard, Jacques; Blais, Johanne; Hargreave, Frederick E; Rouleau, Michel

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe an interactive playing card workshop in the communication of asthma guidelines recommendations, and to assess the initial evaluation of this educational tool by family physicians. DESIGN: Family physicians were invited to participate in the workshop by advertisements or personal contacts. Each physician completed a standardized questionnaire on his or her perception of the rules, content and properties of the card game. SETTING: A university-based continuing medical education initiative. PARTICIPANTS: Primary care physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Physicians’ evaluation of the rules, content and usefulness of the program. RESULTS: The game allowed the communication of relevant asthma-related content, as well as experimentation with a different learning format. It also stimulated interaction in a climate of friendly competition. Participating physicians considered the method to be an innovative tool that facilitated reflection, interaction and learning. It generated relevant discussions on how to apply guideline recommendations to current asthma care. CONCLUSIONS: This new, interactive, educational intervention, integrating play and scientific components, was well received by participants. This method may be of value to help integrate current guidelines into current practice, thus facilitating knowledge transfer to caregivers. PMID:18060093

  11. Understanding and managing children’s recurrent pain in primary care: A biopsychosocial perspective

    PubMed Central

    von Baeyer, Carl L

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent pains in childhood are those that occur at least three times within three months and interfere with daily activities. The most common reasons for pain are headaches and abdominal pain, and the great majority of these have no serious or treatable physical cause. Instead, a functional analysis of the antecedents and consequences of the pain for the child is needed. This requires time, trust, rapport and acceptance, as well as the development of a shared biopsychosocial understanding of the pain. Some interview questions are suggested for this purpose. These include questions about the physical and social triggers of pain episodes, such as stress at school or at home, and modelling of pain behaviour by family members. Also included are questions about the adverse consequences of pain, such as sleep problems, difficulty in concentration, avoidance of responsibility and of feared situations, and inadvertent reinforcement of pain behaviour by solicitous behaviour on the part of parents. Among the numerous interventions for recurrent pain, those that promote learning of relaxation skills are the best established. A cognitive-behavioural, biopsychosocial approach to treating recurrent pain is well supported by research evidence. Primary care physicians and paediatric consultants can help to prevent and relieve children’s recurrent pain. PMID:19030351

  12. Managing bleeding and emergency reversal of newer oral anticoagulants: a review for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Peacock, W Frank

    2014-10-01

    The therapeutic landscape for anticoagulation management is undergoing a shift from the use of traditional anticlotting agents such as heparins and warfarin as the only options to the growing adoption of newer target-specific oral anticoagulants (TSOACs) with novel mechanisms of action. Dabigatran, the first TSOAC approved for use in the United States, is a direct competitive inhibitor of thrombin. It has predictable kinetics, with an elimination half-life of 12 to 17 hours in healthy volunteers. Apixaban and rivaroxaban are selective inhibitors of factor Xa, and also display first-order kinetics. In younger healthy individuals, apixaban has an apparent half-life of approximately 12 hours, whereas rivaroxaban has an elimination half-life of 5 to 9 hours. Understanding the pharmacologic properties of these newer drugs can lead to better insights regarding their respective safety and efficacy profiles and their application in clinical practice. Laboratory assessments have been developed to measure the anticoagulant efficacy of these newer agents. However, the results of these tests can be highly variable, and are therefore not always useful for monitoring the anticoagulation effects of these agents. In addition, several strategies have been documented for the potential reversal of the anticoagulant effects of these drugs, from the temporary discontinuation of an agent before elective surgery to suggested emergency procedures in the case of major bleeding events. New, specific reversal agents for dabigatran, apixaban, and rivaroxaban are currently being developed, and dabigatran has received fast-track designation from the US Food and Drug Administration. Until comprehensive clinical guidelines are developed, institutions involved in emergency care should establish their own procedures for the management of patients undergoing anticoagulation who require emergency treatment. These protocols should include appropriate laboratory testing to assess anticoagulant activity as part of the inpatient workup if time allows, and the potential use of hemodialysis, prohemostatic agents, and reversal agents when available. PMID:25502131

  13. Preventing and managing aberrant drug-related behavior in primary care: systematic review of outcomes evidence.

    PubMed

    Argoff, Charles E; Kahan, Meldon; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-01-01

    Several strategies for preventing, identifying, and responding to aberrant opioid-related behaviors are recommended in pain management guidelines. This systematic review evaluated data supporting basic strategies for addressing aberrant opioid-related behaviors. Risk reduction strategies were identified via a review of available guidelines. Systematic literature searches of PubMed (May 1, 2007-January 18, 2013) identified articles with evidence relevant to nine basic strategies. Reference lists from relevant articles were reviewed for additional references of interest. Levels of evidence for articles identified were graded on a four-point scale (strongest evidence = level 1; weakest evidence = level 4) using Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence criteria. Weak to moderate evidence supports the value of thorough patient assessment, risk-screening tools, controlled-substance agreements, careful dose titration, opioid dose ceilings, compliance monitoring, and adherence to practice guidelines. Moderate to strong evidence suggests that prescribing tamper-resistant opioids may help prevent misuse but may also have the unintended consequence of prompting a migration of users to other marketed opioids, heroin, or other substances. Similarly, preliminary evidence suggests that although recent regulatory and legal efforts may reduce misuse, they also impose barriers to the legitimate treatment of pain. Despite an absence of consistent, strong supporting evidence, clinicians are advised to use each of the available risk-mitigation strategies in combination in an attempt to minimize the risk of abuse in opioid treatment patients. Physicians must critically evaluate their opioid prescribing and not only increase their efforts to prevent substance abuse but also not compromise pain management in patients who benefit from it. PMID:24715667

  14. Peer Support for Diabetes Management in Primary Care and Community Settings in Anhui Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xuefeng; Wang, Zhimin; Fisher, Edwin B.; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We evaluated a peer leader–support program (PLSP) for diabetes self-management in China in terms of acceptability and feasibility; implementation; perceived advantages; disadvantages and barriers; reach and recruitment; effectiveness in terms of diabetes knowledge and clinical impacts; adoption; and sustainability. METHODS Within each of 3 cities in Anhui Province, 2 subcommunities were randomly assigned to usual care or PLSP. Peer leaders and staff of Community Health Service Centers (CHSCs) co-led biweekly educational meetings. Peer leaders also led biweekly discussion meetings, promoted regular care through the CHSCs, organized informal health promotion activities (eg, walking and tai chi groups), and provided informal individual support to participants through casual contact. RESULTS Qualitative evaluations indicated acceptance of and positive responses to the program among patients, peer leaders, and CHSC staff. Implementation was successful in 2 of 3 subcommunities, the third failing for lack of staff resources. Reported advantages included peer support as a bridge between CHSCs and their patients. In 2 sites where the PLSP was implemented, analyses controlling for baseline differences and site showed significant benefits for PLSP relative to controls (P <0.05) for knowledge, self-efficacy, BMI, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and both fasting and 2-hour post-prandial blood glucose. The Anhui Provincial Health Bureau has extended the PLSP model to other communities and to cardiovascular disease prevention and management. CONCLUSION The PLSP was well accepted, feasible given sufficient administrative and staff resources, effective for those who participated, and generalizable to other sites and health problems. PMID:26304972

  15. Managerial Leadership Behaviors: A Model of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, William F.; Bailey, Gerald D.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses leadership behavior of managers and presents a model for leadership choice that dichotomizes bureaucratic and non-bureaucratic leadership behaviors. The power of managers is described in terms of both position status and personal influence, and the relationship between the manager's role and the needs of employees is discussed. (LRW)

  16. Trends in management and outcomes of COPD patients in primary care, 2000–2009: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    James, Gareth D; Donaldson, Gavin C; Wedzicha, Jadwiga A; Nazareth, Irwin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes framework, there has been some evidence of improvement in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients in the United Kingdom through increasing rates of smoking cessation advice and immunisations against influenza. However, it is unknown whether disease-specific management criteria, disease outcomes and diagnosis have improved. Aims: To describe changes in the management and outcomes of patients with COPD in UK general practice between 2000 and 2009. Methods: The study was done on a retrospective cohort using data from The Health Improvement Network UK primary care database. We calculated age at diagnosis of COPD and death, total number of short-term oral corticosteroid courses and consultations, and proportion of patients with very severe COPD and on triple inhaled therapy for each year between 2000 and 2009. Results: We identified 92,576 patients with COPD. The mean age at COPD diagnosis decreased from 68.1 years in 2000 to 66.7 years in 2009. The mean age at death increased from 78.2 years in 2000 to 78.8 years in 2009. The number of prescribed courses of oral corticosteroids increased from 0.6 in 2000 to 0.8 in 2009. The number of consultations increased from 9.4 in 2004 to 11.3 in 2009. The risk of having very severe COPD decreased from 9.4% in 2004 to 6.8% in 2009. The likelihood of patients with very severe COPD receiving triple therapy increased from 25% in 2004 to 59% in 2009. Conclusions: The trends suggest that management and outcomes observed in patients with COPD may have improved since the year 2000. PMID:24990313

  17. Critical appraisal of laropiprant and extended-release niacin combination in the management of mixed dyslipidemias and primary hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Ayman A; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Niacin is a B-complex vitamin which has been used for decades for the management of mixed dyslipidemias and primary hypercholesterolemia. It decreases the risk of cardiovascular events either when used as a monotherapy or in combination with other lipid lowering medications. However, a major limitation to its use is niacin-induced flushing occurring even with the extended-release formulations. Laropiprant, a selective prostaglandin-2 receptor inhibitor, specifically targets the cascade of events causing the flushing. It has been recently used in combination with extended-release niacin. This article will review the early experience with this combination with focus on efficacy, safety, tolerability and current place in therapy. Early data are promising and suggest that more patients in clinical practice will benefit from niacin combined with laropiprant. Ongoing clinical trials will provide a better insight on the long-term safety of the drug and its efficacy for reducing cardiovascular events. PMID:20421916

  18. Avatar-based simulation in the evaluation of diagnosis and management of mental health disorders in primary care.

    PubMed

    Satter, Rachel M; Cohen, Trevor; Ortiz, Pierina; Kahol, Kanav; Mackenzie, James; Olson, Carol; Johnson, Mina; Patel, Vimla L

    2012-12-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are highly prevalent illnesses, but the literature suggests they are under-detected and suboptimally managed by primary care practitioners (PCPs). In this paper, we propose and use an evaluation method, using digitally simulated patients (avatars) to evaluate the diagnostic and therapeutic reasoning of PCPs and compared it to the traditional use of paper-based cases. Verbal (think-aloud) protocols were captured in the context of a diagnostic and therapeutic reasoning task. Propositional and semantic representational analysis of simulation data during evaluation, showed specific deficiencies in PCP reasoning, suggesting a promise of this technology in training and evaluation in mental health. Avatars are flexible and easily modifiable and are also a cost-effective and easy-to-disseminate educational tool. PMID:22884757

  19. The management of breast carcinoma by primary radiotherapy of Mount Sinai hospital from 1962-1979. [/sup 60/Co; Betatron

    SciTech Connect

    Balawajder, I.; Antich, P.P.; Boland, J.

    1982-04-15

    Two-hundred eight patients with carcinoma of the breast were treated with megavoltage irradiation as the primary method of local management at Mount Sinai Hospital between 1962-1979. The effects of treatment volume, technique, and other parameters are discussed for the Stage I and II patients, together with the importance of tumor size and nodal status in control of local disease and distant metastases. In this series the cumulative probability of freedom from metastases is 93 +/- 5% when the irradiation is confined to the breast and axilla as compared with 72 +/- 9% when extended fields are used, with no difference in local control. Based on these results it was decided to confine irradiation to the breast and axilla alone in the majority of early stage cancer patients. Recommendations are made for radiation techniques and dosages to optimize control of the disease, minimize complications, and facilitate systemic therapy in patients with positive nodes.

  20. Surgical Management of the Primary Tumor in Stage IV Colorectal Cancer: A Confirmatory Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shahid; Leis, Anne; Chandra-Kanthan, Selliah; Fields, Anthony; Reeder, Bruce; Iqbal, Nayyer; Haider, Kamal; Le, Duc; Pahwa, Punam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have suggested that patients with stage IV colorectal cancer who undergo surgical resection of the primary tumor (SRPT) have better survival. Yet the results are not confirmed in the setting of a randomized controlled trial. Lack of randomization and failure to control prognostic variables such as performance status are major critiques to the findings of the observational studies. We previously have shown that SRPT, independent of chemotherapy and performance status, improves survival of stage IV CRC patients. The current study aims to validate our findings in patients with stage IV CRC who were diagnosed during the period of modern chemotherapy. Methods: A cohort of 569 patients with stage IV CRC diagnosed during 2006-2010 in the province of Saskatchewan was evaluated. Cox regression model was used for the adjustment of prognostic variables. Results: Median age was 69 years (59-95) and M: F was 1.4:1. Fifty-seven percent received chemotherapy, 91.4% received FOLFIRI or FOLFOX & 67% received a biologic agent. Median overall survival (OS) of patients who underwent SRPT and received chemotherapy was 27 months compared with 14 months of the non-resection group (p<0.0001). Median OS of patients who received all active agents and had SRPT was 39 months (95%CI: 25.1-52.9). On multivariate analysis, SRPT, hazard ratio (HR):0.44 (95%CI: 0.35-0.56), use of chemotherapy, HR: 0.33 (95%CI: 0.26-0.43), metastasectomy, HR: 0.43 (95%CI: 0.31-0.58), second line therapy, HR: 0.50 (95%CI: 0.35-0.70), and third line therapy, HR: 0.58 (95%CI: 0.41-0.83) were correlated with superior survival. Conclusions: This study confirms our findings and supports a favorable association between SRPT and survival in patients with stage IV CRC who are treated with modern therapy. PMID:27162543

  1. [Diagnosis and management of acute pharyngotonsillitis in the primary care pediatrician's office].

    PubMed

    Vicedomini, D; Lalinga, G; Lugli, N; D'Avino, A

    2014-02-01

    Acute pharyngotonsillitis is one of the most frequent causes of visits in the primary care pediatrician'office. Group A b-hemolytic streptococci (GABHS) or Streptococcus pyogenes causes 15-30% of cases of acute pharyngotonsillitis in pediatric age. Children with pharyngotonsillitis due to GABHS commonly present sore throat, fever more than 38 °C, tonsillar exudate, and tender cervical adenopathy, but the severity of illness ranges from mild throat pain to classic exudative tonsillitis with high fever. The McIsaac criteria is a clinical scoring system to predict the likelihood of streptococcal infection among children. This score is based on 5 clinical criteria: age 3-14 years, fever more than 38°C, tonsillar swelling or exudate, tender and enlarged anterior cervical lymph nodes, and absence of cough, but none of these findings is specific for GABHS pharyngotonsillitis. Culture of a throat swab on a blood agar plate (BAP) remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis. Because of the major disadvantage of culturing throat swabs on BAP culture is the delay in obtaining the results (at least 1 day), in the past decades rapid antigen detection test (RAD) were introduced for the rapid identification of GABHS directly from throat swabs. Accurate diagnosis and treatment of GABHS pharyngotonsillitis provides positive benefits, including prevention of complications, such as acute rheumatic fever and peritonsillar abscess and reduce the acute morbidity associated with the illness. Conversely, improper diagnosis may result in negative consequences, including unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions that confer increased health care costs and contibute to the development of bacterial resistance. PMID:24608583

  2. Pediatricians’ and health visitors’ views towards detection and management of maternal depression in the context of a weak primary health care system: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study’s aim has been to investigate, identify and interpret the views of pediatric primary healthcare providers on the recognition and management of maternal depression in the context of a weak primary healthcare system. Methods Twenty six pediatricians and health visitors were selected by using purposive sampling. Face to face in-depth interviews of approximately 45 minutes duration were conducted. The data were analyzed by using the framework analysis approach which includes five main steps: familiarization, identifying a thematic framework, indexing, charting, mapping and interpretation. Results Fear of stigmatization came across as a key barrier for detection and management of maternal depression. Pediatric primary health care providers linked their hesitation to start a conversation about depression with stigma. They highlighted that mothers were not receptive to discussing depression and accepting a referral. It was also revealed that the fragmented primary health care system and the lack of collaboration between health and mental health services have resulted in an unfavorable situation towards maternal mental health. Conclusions Even though pediatricians and health visitors are aware about maternal depression and the importance of maternal mental health, however they fail to implement detection and management practices successfully. The inefficiently decentralized psychiatric services but also stigmatization and misconceptions about maternal depression have impeded the integration of maternal mental health into primary care and prevent pediatric primary health care providers from implementing detection and management practices. PMID:24725738

  3. The importance of study design strategies in gender bias research: the case of respiratory disease management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz?Cantero, Maria Teresa; Ronda, Elena; lvarez?Dardet, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Background Most research on gender bias has been carried out in hospitals and focuses mainly on severe diseases. Consequently, little is known about gender bias in relation to other illnesses and healthcare settings. Aim To explore the existence of gender bias in the management of patients seeking primary care for respiratory complaints. Method An observational, prospective blind follow?up study was performed in a primary care centre in Alicante, Spain. 830 patients were monitored from first visit to their general practitioner with a respiratory complaint until final diagnosis. Information was obtained about the diagnostic process (anamnesis, clinical examination and diagnostic tests) and therapeutic procedures (concession of unfit to work status and the patient's destination following the visit). Logistic regression was used to compare the diagnostic/therapeutic procedures in men and women. Results Although men (318) and women (512) had similar respiratory complaints, after adjustment by age, marital status, employment, education, comorbidity and severity, men were more likely to be asked about smoking habits: RRa: 2.41 (95% CI: 1.57 to 3.70), auscultated: RRa: 1.30 (0.90 to 1.75), provided with a defined diagnosis: RRa: 1.77 (0.98 to 3.32) and considered unfit to work: RRa: 5.43 (1.64 to 9.96). Women were more likely to receive a pharyngotonsillar exploration: RRa: 0.63 (0.41 to 0.97). Conclusions Despite having the same respiratory symptoms, women were less likely to undergo diagnostic procedures and doctors tended to classify women in the category of undefined diagnosis more often. It should be considered that gender bias in the diagnosis could contribute to an erroneous estimation of respiratory disease prevalence, which could lead to unequal management of one sex related to the other. PMID:18000108

  4. [Community resources prescription for self-care improvement in chronic illnesses. Clinical case management in Primary Health Care].

    PubMed

    Prez-Vico-Daz de Rada, Luca; Gonzlez-Surez, Miriam; Duarte-Clments, Gonzalo; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymn

    2014-01-01

    A case is presented of a 52 year-old male seen in a Primary Care nursing clinic for a type 2 diabetes mellitus metabolic control. The frequency of the visits increased due to perceived difficulties caused by changing the medical treatment. A focused interview was conducted under functional health patterns framework. The patient was unable to write or read, had not worked for the last 25 years, and expressed a lack of control over his self-care. An action plan was prepared, prioritizing Ineffective Health Maintenance, Powerlessness, and Impaired Social Interaction NANDA-I nursing diagnoses. The goals were set at improving knowledge and control over his disease and participating in leisure activities. To achieve these, the social health resources in the area were contacted, and agreed that the patient could attend activities that could improve his self-care and his quality of life. An improvement in his diabetes control was observed in the following evaluations, with an increase in his level of knowledge and self-care. The Primary Health care nurse should consider available community resources by using a comprehensive approach to chronic diseases for their therapeutic benefit and management, especially in those patients with adverse sociocultural conditions. PMID:24786984

  5. [Primary Healthcare Reform in Portugal on two fronts: autonomous family healthcare units and management of groupings of Health Centers].

    PubMed

    Pisco, Luis

    2011-06-01

    In 2005, Portugal began a reform of Primary Health Care. This reform process through to April 2010 is described and analyzed. During this period the Mission for Primary Health Care was responsible for conducting a profound reconfiguration. The main objectives for this reform were to improve accessibility, efficiency, quality and continuity of care and increase the satisfaction of professionals and citizens. The main features are voluntary adhesion, teamwork, mandatory information system, performance-sensitive payment, contracting and evaluation. The reconfiguration of health centers was two pronged. First, there was the formation of small autonomous functional units, known as Family Health Units (USF) providing services with proximity and quality. The second measure involved the aggregation of resources and management structures, groups of health centers (ACES), seeking to achieve efficiency and economies of scale. The FHU proved to offer simultaneously more efficiency, accessibility, better working environment, greater citizen satisfaction, namely better quality. The importance of strong political support, the creation of a structure responsible for the design and implementation of reform and good liaison with the media are stressed. PMID:21709981

  6. Stage of change and other predictors of participant retention in a behavioral weight management program in primary care.

    PubMed

    Toth-Capelli, Katie M; Brawer, Rickie; Plumb, James; Daskalakis, Constantine

    2013-05-01

    High attrition often limits the efficacy of weight management programs, particularly those that serve primary care patients. We investigated stage of change and other predictors of retention in a behavioral intervention program that enrolled adult obese patients at three primary care sites. The program included practice improvements and provider training, as well as individual lifestyle counseling and educational group classes for participants. We analyzed predictors of whether participants returned for counseling visits and whether they attended group classes. The 461 participants were mainly women (84%) and minorities (87%), and most of them were in the preparation stage for dietary and physical activity changes. A total of 134 (29%) participants returned for at least one follow-up visit with their counselor and 85 (18%) attended at least one class. Baseline stage of change was not significantly associated with either return visits or class attendance (p = .875 and .182, respectively). Men and participants with children in the household were less likely to return for subsequent counseling sessions (p = .012 and .027, respectively). Age and employment were associated with class attendance (p = .099 and .034, respectively). Focus groups with participants confirmed that reasons for dropout included physical limitations or health issues, family issues, stress, and lack of social support. We conclude that prescreening of patients for readiness to participate and attention to personal barriers related to family and work might improve program retention. More frequent contacts between visits and stronger provider engagement might also strengthen the intervention. PMID:23091300

  7. Management of opioid painkiller dependence in primary care: ongoing recovery with buprenorphine/naloxone.

    PubMed

    Hard, Bernadette

    2014-01-01

    Opioid painkiller dependence is a growing problem and best-practice management is not well defined. We report a case of a young woman exhibiting dependence on codeine, originally prescribed for myalgic encephalopathy, after escalating use over a 10-year period. In 2012, a consultation with a new general practitioner, who had extensive experience of patients with substance abuse, revealed the underlying dependence. After building trust for 6 months, she was able to admit to medication abuse, and was referred to the community drug and alcohol team. On presentation to the team, the patient had no pain issues and the dihydrocodeine use--600 tablets/week--solely reflected her dependence. The patient successfully underwent rapid induction with buprenorphine/naloxone as opioid substitution treatment over 2 days. She is currently stable, engaged with recovery support services and psychosocial counselling, and has just returned to work. She is maintained on a therapeutic dose of buprenorphine 10 mg/naloxone 2.5 mg. PMID:25432908

  8. Diagnosis and management of von Willebrand disease: guidelines for primary care.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara; Nichols, William L; Rick, Margaret E

    2009-12-01

    Von Willebrand disease is an inherited condition characterized by deficiency of von Willebrand factor, which is essential in hemostasis. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has released new evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and management of the disease. There are three major subtypes of von Willebrand disease, classified as partial quantitative deficiency (low levels) of von Willebrand factor (type 1), qualitative deficiency (type 2), or virtually complete deficiency (type 3). Diagnosis is usually made by reviewing the patient's personal and family history of bleeding and by clinical evaluation for more common reasons for bleeding, supplemented with laboratory tests. Assessment may be used to determine bleeding risk before surgery and other invasive procedures, and to diagnose reasons for unexplained hemorrhaging. Von Willebrand factor levels of 30 IU per dL or lower are required for the definite diagnosis of inherited von Willebrand disease. Persons with levels of 30 to 50 IU per dL may not have the disease, but may need agents to increase von Willebrand factor levels during invasive procedures or childbirth. Treatment is tailored to the subtype of the disease: increasing plasma concentration of von Willebrand factor by releasing endogenous stores with desmopressin or replacing nonexistent or ineffective von Willebrand factor by using human plasma-derived, viral-inactivated concentrates; treatment is often combined with hemostatic agents that have mechanisms other than increasing von Willebrand factor. Regular prophylaxis is seldom required, and treatment is initiated before planned invasive procedures or in response to bleeding. PMID:19961139

  9. [Volume and demand of rheumatologic problems and their management at a primary health care center].

    PubMed

    Fernández Crespo, A; Fraguela Fraga, F; Sáez-Torres Viso, J; Martín García, M

    1989-01-01

    The present study was carried out as a part of the elaboration process of the Program of Rheumatologic Diseases of the health center of Chapela. The following rates are reported: the volume of patients affected by these problems (14.5%), the generated care demand (6.9% of the overall demand), the age and sex distribution, their importance as a reason of disability (14.4% of the overall number of sick leaves), and the different specific diagnoses. To evaluate how these patients were managed by the team, a series of indicators were used, such as the number of identified patients, the quality of the documentation, the types of complementary investigations, the referral of patients to the secondary level, and the adequacy of therapies. As conclusions, a significant volume of rheumatologic consultations and work disabilities was found, with a high use rate of radiological studies and a low use rate of laboratory investigations, the use of basically NSAI drugs in the therapy, and the need for a specifically oriented clinical record to be used in the diagnosis and follow up of these conditions. PMID:2518877

  10. Making Smart Food Choices

    MedlinePlus

    ... Free Stuff Be a Partner Making Smart Food Choices Regular physical activity and a healthy diet go ... in hand. Go4Life points you to wise food choices important for good health: eat a variety of ...

  11. Primary care management of acute herpes zoster: systematic review of evidence from randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, T; Silagy, C; Gray, S

    1995-01-01

    Although a number of randomized controlled trials of treatment for herpes zoster have been performed, there is no consensus on how it should be managed in general practice. A systematic review of existing trials, including meta-analysis, was performed to determine the efficacy of available therapies in reducing the incidence of postherpetic neuralgia. The treatments studied included antiviral agents, corticosteroids and other drugs which had been studied in randomized trials. Trials were included if the subjects were immunocompetent adults and the intervention was feasible in general practice. The main outcome measure was prevalence of pain at one, three and six months after onset of the acute herpetic rash. Data for each time point were not available for all trials. The quality of studies was also assessed. Pooled analyses of trials with acyclovir failed to detect a significant reduction of pain in the treatment group at one or six months, but found a 35% reduction at three months. Confidence limits were wide, and a modest benefit of treatment cannot be ruled out at one and six months. Pooled analyses were not possible for other treatments, either because too few trials had been performed, or because completed trials demonstrated significant heterogeneity. Many clinical trials in this area have been too small to give reliable results. Variations in the definition and reporting of postherpetic neuralgia create difficulties in combining data from different studies. Firm recommendations for clinical practice are not possible because existing evidence neither confirms nor refutes the hypothesis that treatment during the acute phase of herpes zoster reduces pain later. PMID:7779475

  12. Practical aspects of inhaler use in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Yawn, Barbara P; Colice, Gene L; Hodder, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Sustained bronchodilation using inhaled medications in moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) grades 2 and 3 (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines) has been shown to have clinical benefits on long-term symptom control and quality of life, with possible additional benefits on disease progression and longevity. Aggressive diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic COPD is an integral and pivotal part of COPD management, which usually begins with primary care physicians. The current standard of care involves the use of one or more inhaled bronchodilators, and depending on COPD severity and phenotype, inhaled corticosteroids. There is a wide range of inhaler devices available for delivery of inhaled medications, but suboptimal inhaler use is a common problem that can limit the clinical effectiveness of inhaled therapies in the real-world setting. Patients' comorbidities, other physical or mental limitations, and the level of inhaler technique instruction may limit proper inhaler use. This paper presents information that can overcome barriers to proper inhaler use, including issues in device selection, steps in correct technique for various inhaler devices, and suggestions for assessing and monitoring inhaler techniques. Ensuring proper inhaler technique can maximize drug effectiveness and aid clinical management at all grades of COPD. PMID:22888221

  13. People and Teams Matter in Organizational Change: Professionals and Managers Experiences of Changing Governance and Incentives in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Helen T; Brearley, Sally; Byng, Richard; Christian, Sara; Clayton, Julie; Mackintosh, Maureen; Price, Linnie; Smith, Pam; Ross, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    ObjectivesTo explore the experiences of governance and incentives during organizational change for managers and clinical staff. Study SettingThree primary care settings in England in 20062008. Study DesignData collection involved three group interviews with 32 service users, individual interviews with 32 managers, and 56 frontline professionals in three sites. The Realistic Evaluation framework was used in analysis to examine the effects of new policies and their implementation. Principal FindingsIntegrating new interprofessional teams to work effectively is a slow process, especially if structures in place do not acknowledge the painful feelings involved in change and do not support staff during periods of uncertainty. ConclusionsEliciting multiple perspectives, often dependent on individual occupational positioning or place in new team configurations, illuminates the need to incorporate the emotional as well as technocratic and system factors when implementing change. Some suggestions are made for facilitating change in health care systems. These are discussed in the context of similar health care reform initiatives in the United States. PMID:23829292

  14. Myths of Educational Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Judith

    This book presents concerns and raises questions about the choice programs being proposed and implemented around the United States. It argues that poorly conceived, hastily enacted choice programs may do more harm than good. The demand for educational choice may result in lost opportunities for students (some groups more than others), weakened…

  15. Privatization and Educational Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Myron

    This book describes how and why educational choice movements will affect public education. It uses a public-choice approach to argue that both the supporters and opponents of private and school choice have failed to address several critical issues. Following an introductory chapter, chapter 2 is devoted to the rationale for contracting out…

  16. Choice and Desegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, David A.

    This document comprises a report on the architectural elements of choice in the desegregation process, a review of the choice process based on Minnesota's experience, and a statement of implications for state policymakers. The following organizational principles of the choice process are discussed: (1) enrollment based on a "first come, first…

  17. Primary care randomised controlled trial of a tailored interactive website for the self-management of respiratory infections (Internet Doctor)

    PubMed Central

    Little, Paul; Stuart, Beth; Andreou, Panayiota; McDermott, Lisa; Joseph, Judith; Mullee, Mark; Moore, Mike; Broomfield, Sue; Thomas, Tammy; Yardley, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess an internet-delivered intervention providing advice to manage respiratory tract infections (RTIs). Design Open pragmatic parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting Primary care in UK. Participants Adults (aged ≥18) registered with general practitioners, recruited by postal invitation. Intervention Patients were randomised with computer-generated random numbers to access the intervention website (intervention) or not (control). The intervention tailored advice about the diagnosis, natural history, symptom management (particularly paracetamol/ibuprofen use) and when to seek further help. Outcomes Primary: National Health Service (NHS) contacts for those reporting RTIs from monthly online questionnaires for 20 weeks. Secondary: hospitalisations; symptom duration/severity. Results 3044 participants were recruited. 852 in the intervention group and 920 in the control group reported 1 or more RTIs, among whom there was a modest increase in NHS direct contacts in the intervention group (intervention 37/1574 (2.4%) versus control 20/1661 (1.2%); multivariate risk ratio (RR) 2.25 (95% CI 1.00 to 5.07, p=0.048)). Conversely, reduced contact with doctors occurred (239/1574 (15.2%) vs 304/1664 (18.3%); RR 0.71, 0.52 to 0.98, p=0.037). Reduction in contacts occurred despite slightly longer illness duration (11.3 days vs 10.7 days, respectively; multivariate estimate 0.60 days longer (−0.15 to 1.36, p=0.118) and more days of illness rated moderately bad or worse illness (0.52 days; 0.06 to 0.97, p=0.026). The estimate of slower symptom resolution in the intervention group was attenuated when controlling for whether individuals had used web pages which advocated ibuprofen use (length of illness 0.22 days, −0.51 to 0.95, p=0.551; moderately bad or worse symptoms 0.36 days, −0.08 to 0.80, p=0.105). There was no evidence of increased hospitalisations (risk ratio 0.25; 0.05 to 1.12; p=0.069). Conclusions An internet-delivered intervention for the self-management of RTIs modifies help-seeking behaviour, and does not result in more hospital admissions due to delayed help seeking. Advising the use of ibuprofen may not be helpful. Trial registration number ISRCTN91518452. PMID:27098821

  18. Developing an educational intervention on dementia diagnosis and management in primary care for the EVIDEM-ED trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dementia syndromes are under-diagnosed and under-treated in primary care. Earlier recognition of and response to dementia syndrome is likely to enhance the quality of life of people with dementia, but general practitioners consistently report limited skills and confidence in diagnosis and management of this condition. Changing clinical practice is difficult, and the challenge for those seeking change it is to find ways of working with the grain of professional knowledge and practice. Assessment of educational needs in a practice has the potential to accommodate variations in individual understanding and competence, learning preferences and skill mix. Educational prescriptions identify questions that need to be answered in order to address a clinical problem. This paper reports the development of an educational needs assessment tool to guide tailored educational interventions designed to enhance early diagnosis and management of dementia in primary care, in the Evidence Based Interventions in Dementia in the Community – Early Diagnosis trial. Methods A multidisciplinary team, including a lay researcher, used an iterative technology development approach to create an educational needs assessment tool, from which educational prescriptions could be written. Workplace learning was tailored to each practice using the educational prescription, and the method was field-tested in five pilot practices. Results The educational prescriptions appeared acceptable and useful in volunteer practices. The time commitment (no more than four hours, spread out at the practice’s discretion) appeared manageable. The pilot group of practices prioritised diagnosis, assessment of carers’ needs, quality markers for dementia care in general practice, and the implications of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) for their clinical practice. The content of the educational needs assessment tool seemed to be comprehensive, in that no new topics were identified by practices in the field trial. Conclusions The educational needs assessment tool took into account practitioners’ knowledge of the local health and social care systems, reflected the complexity of the diagnostic and care processes for people with dementia, and acknowledged the complexity of the disease process itself. PMID:22913431

  19. Engagement with eHealth Self-Monitoring in a Primary Care-Based Weight Management Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Steinberg, Dori M.; Lane, Ilana B.; Askew, Sandy; Greaney, Mary L.; Colditz, Graham A.; Bennett, Gary G.

    2015-01-01

    Background While eHealth approaches hold promise for improving the reach and cost-effectiveness of behavior change interventions, they have been challenged by declining participant engagement over time, particularly for self-monitoring behaviors. These are significant concerns in the context of chronic disease prevention and management where durable effects are important for driving meaningful changes. Purpose “Be Fit, Be Well” was an eHealth weight loss intervention that allowed participants to self-select a self-monitoring modality (web or interactive voice response (IVR)). Participants could change their modality. As such, this study provides a unique opportunity to examine the effects of intervention modality choice and changing modalities on intervention engagement and outcomes. Methods Intervention participants, who were recruited from community health centers, (n = 180) were expected to self-monitor health behaviors weekly over the course of the 24-month intervention. We examined trends in intervention engagement by modality (web, IVR, or changed modality) among participants in the intervention arm. Results The majority (61%) of participants chose IVR self-monitoring, while 39% chose web. 56% of those who selected web monitoring changed to IVR during the study versus no change in those who initially selected IVR. Self-monitoring declined in both modalities, but completion rates were higher in those who selected IVR. There were no associations between self-monitoring modality and weight or blood pressure outcomes. Conclusions This is the first study to compare web and IVR self-monitoring in an eHealth intervention where participants could select and change their self-monitoring modality. IVR shows promise for achieving consistent engagement. PMID:26469065

  20. Using an internet intervention to support self-management of low back pain in primary care: protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial (SupportBack)

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Adam W A; Stanford, Rosie; Little, Paul; Roberts, Lisa; Foster, Nadine E; Hill, Jonathan C; Hay, Elaine; Stuart, Beth; Turner, David; Yardley, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. The majority of patients experiencing LBP are managed in primary care, where first-line care recommendations consist of advice to self-manage and remain active. Internet interventions present a potential means of providing patients with tailored self-management advice and evidence-based support for increasing physical activity. Methods/analysis This protocol describes a single-blind, randomised controlled feasibility trial of an internet intervention developed to support the self-management of LBP in primary care. Patients are being randomised to 1 of 3 groups receiving either usual primary care, usual primary care with the addition of an internet intervention or an internet intervention with physiotherapist telephone support. Patients are followed up at 3 months. Primary outcomes are the feasibility of (1) the trial design/methods, (2) the delivery of the internet intervention and (3) the provision of telephone support by physiotherapists. Secondary outcomes will include exploratory analysis of estimates and variation in clinical outcomes of pain and disability, in order to inform a future main trial. Ethics/dissemination This feasibility trial has undergone ethical scrutiny and been approved by the National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee, REC Reference 13/SC/0202. The feasibility findings will be disseminated to the research community through presentations at conferences and publication in peer review journals. Broader dissemination will come following a definitive trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN 31034004. PMID:26399575