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Sample records for primary mouse bone

  1. Primary Lymphoma of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Hahn, Jee Sook; Suh, Chang Ok; Yang, Woo Ick

    2002-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There is yet no systematical evaluation of primary lymphoma of bone in Korea. Here we report our experience of sixteen cases with primary lymphoma of bone focusing on the survival. Methods: Sixteen cases, collected for 13 years, were evaluated on the clinical presentation, histologic subtype, stage and treatment outcomes of the primary bone lymphoma. Results: The most common presenting complaint was bone pain. Malignant lymphoma of bone involved a wide variety of sites, the most prevalent site of which in this study was the spine. Most of the cases were in the diffuse large B-cell category. The clinical stage of lymphoma was IEA in two cases, IIEA in three cases, IVEA in five cases and IVEB in three cases. All treated cases received systemic chemotherapy and ten cases among them were treated with combined modality therapy. Median overall survival was not reached after median follow-up period of 28 months and five-year overall survival rate was 54%. Conclusion: More promising therapeutic strategies are needed for survival improvement on more accumulated cases. PMID:12298430

  2. [Primary liposarcoma of bone].

    PubMed

    Tatić, V; Cerović, S; Skaro-Milić, A; Jovanović, Z

    2001-01-01

    A case of 75-year-old man with extremely rare primary liposarcoma of the bone was presented. Stains for lipid, Sudan III, Sudan IV, and Oil Red "O", demonstrated the presence of intracellular lipid in the lipoblasts. Similarly, the S-100 immunoreactivity and electron microscopic findings of tumor cells confirmed the diagnosis of liposarcoma. Histochemical stains for PAS, Alcian-blue, mucikarmin, Toluidin-blue and Coloidal Iron were negative. PMID:11419292

  3. Bone disease in primary hypercalciuria

    PubMed Central

    Sella, Stefania; Cattelan, Catia; Realdi, Giuseppe; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Primary Hypercalciuria (PH) is very often accompanied with some degrees of bone demineralization. The most frequent clinical condition in which this association has been observed is calcium nephrolithiasis. In patients affected by this disorder bone density is very frequently low and increased susceptibility to fragility fractures is reported. The very poor definition of this bone disease from a histomorphometric point of view is a crucial aspect. At present, the most common finding seems to be a low bone turnover condition. Many factors are involved in the complex relationships between bone loss and PH. Since bone loss was mainly reported in patients with fasting hypercalciuria, a primary alteration in bone metabolism was proposed as a cause of both hypercalciuria and bone demineralization. This hypothesis was strengthened by the observation that some bone resorbing-cytokines, such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α are high in hypercalciuric patients. The effect of an excessive response to the acid load induced by dietary protein intake seems an additional factor explaining a primitive alteration of bone. The intestine plays a major role in the clinical course of bone disease in PH. Patients with absorptive hypercalciuria less frequently show bone disease and a reduction in dietary calcium greatly increases the probability of bone loss in PH subjects. It has recently been reported that greater bone loss is associated with a larger increase in intestinal calcium absorption in PH patients. Considering the absence of PTH alterations, it was proposed that this is not a compensatory phenomenon, but probably the marker of disturbed cell calcium transport, involving both intestinal and bone tissues. While renal hypercalciuria is rather uncommon, the kidney still seems to play a role in the pathogenesis of bone loss of PH patients, possibly via the effect of mild to moderate urinary phosphate loss with secondary hypophosphatemia. In conclusion, bone loss is very common in PH

  4. Primary bone marrow oedema syndromes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    MRI scanning in patients with rheumatological conditions often shows bone marrow oedema, which can be secondary to inflammatory, degenerative, infective or malignant conditions but can also be primary. The latter condition is of uncertain aetiology and it is also uncertain whether it represents a stage in the progression to osteonecrosis in some patients. Patients with primary bone marrow oedema usually have lower limb pain, commonly the hip, knee, ankle or feet. The diagnosis is one of exclusion with the presence of typical MRI findings. Treatment is usually conservative and includes analgesics and staying off the affected limb. The natural history is that of gradual resolution of symptoms over a number of months. Evidence for medical treatment is limited, but open-label studies suggest bisphosphonates may help in the resolution of pain and improve radiological findings. Surgical decompression is usually used as a last resort. PMID:24080251

  5. Isolation of Mouse Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Boregowda, Siddaraju V; Krishnappa, Veena; Phinney, Donald G

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were initially characterized as connective tissue progenitors resident in bone marrow, but have now been isolated from a variety of tissues and organs and shown to also exhibit potent tissue regenerative properties mediated largely via paracrine actions. These findings have spurred the development of MSC-based therapies for treating a diverse array of nonskeletal diseases. Although genetic and experimental rodent models of disease represent important tools for developing efficacious MSC-based therapies, development of reliable methods to isolate MSCs from mouse bone marrow has been hampered by the unique biological properties of these cells. Indeed, few isolation schemes afford high yields and purity while maintaining the genomic integrity of cells. We recently demonstrated that mouse MSCs are highly sensitive to oxidative stress, and long-term expansion of these cells in atmospheric oxygen selects for immortalized clones that lack a functional p53 protein. Herein, we describe a protocol for the isolation of primary MSCs from mouse bone marrow that couples immunodepletion with culture in a low-oxygen environment and affords high purity and yield while preserving p53 function. PMID:27236673

  6. Ultrasound of Primary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Glazebrook, Katrina N.; Keeney, Gary L.; Rock, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABC) are rare, benign, expansile lesions of bone often found in the metaphyses of long bones in pediatric and young adult population. Multiple fluid levels are typically seen on imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). We describe a case of a primary ABC in the fibula of a 34-year-old man diagnosed on ultrasound with a mobile fluid level demonstrated sonographically. PMID:24587935

  7. [Classification of primary bone tumors].

    PubMed

    Dominok, G W; Frege, J

    1986-01-01

    An expanded classification for bone tumors is presented based on the well known international classification as well as earlier systems. The current status and future trends in this area are discussed. PMID:3461626

  8. Metabolic Bone Disease in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Glass, Lisa M; Su, Grace Li-Chun

    2016-06-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a liver-specific autoimmune disease that primarily affects women (female-to-male ratio, 10:1) between 40 and 60 years of age. Metabolic bone disease is a common complication of PBC, affecting 14% to 52% of patients, depending on the duration and severity of liver disease. The osteoporosis seen in PBC seems mainly due to low bone formation, although increased bone resorption may contribute. Treatment of osteoporosis consists primarily of antiresorptive agents. Additional large prospective, long-term studies in patients with PBC are needed to determine efficacy in improving bone density as well as reducing fracture risk. PMID:27261902

  9. Primary Pseudomyogenic Hemangioendothelioma of Bone.

    PubMed

    Inyang, Alero; Mertens, Fredrik; Puls, Florian; Sumathi, Vaiyapuri; Inwards, Carrie; Folpe, Andrew; Lee, Cheng-Han; Zhang, Yaxia; Symmans, Pennie; Rubin, Brian; Nielsen, Gunnlaugur P; Nguyen, Van-Hung; Rosenberg, Andrew E

    2016-05-01

    Pseudomyogenic hemangioendothelioma (PMH) is a well-recognized neoplasm that usually arises in the soft tissue; concurrent bone involvement occurs in 24% of cases. PMH of bone without soft tissue involvement is rare. We describe the clinicopathologic findings of 10 such cases, the largest series reported to date. The study included 9 male and 1 female patient; their ages ranged from 12 to 74 years (mean 36.7 y). All patients had multiple tumors with a distinct regional distribution: 45% restricted to the lower extremity; 25% to the spine and pelvis; and 15% to the upper extremity. On imaging studies the tumors were well circumscribed and lytic. The neoplasms were composed of spindled cells arranged in intersecting fascicles with scattered epithelioid cells; epithelioid cells predominated in 3 cases. The neoplastic cells contained abundant densely eosinophilic cytoplasm and vesicular nuclei. There was limited cytologic atypia and necrosis, few mitoses (0 to 2/10 high-power fields), and inconspicuous stroma. Unique findings included abundant intratumoral reactive woven bone and hemorrhage with numerous osteoclast-like giant cells. Immunohistochemically, most tumors were positive for keratin, ERG, and CD31; CD34 was negative. The balanced t(7:19)(q22;13) translocation was documented in 3 cases. Follow-up is limited, but no patient developed documented visceral dissemination, and all have stable or progressive osseous disease. PMH exclusively involving bone is rare. It is multicentric, often involves the lower extremity, and has unusual morphology. The differential diagnosis includes epithelioid vascular neoplasms, giant cell tumor, bone forming neoplasms, and metastatic carcinoma. Because of its rarity, unusual presentation, and morphology, accurate diagnosis can be challenging. PMID:26872012

  10. [Primary bone lymphoma with multicentric involvement].

    PubMed

    Graziadio, Marcelo; Medina, Natalia; Amato, Marcelo; Ardaiz, María Del Carmen; Ilutovich, Santiago; Torino, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Primary bone lymphoma is a rare disease, which usually has a different presentation and evolution than lymphomas of other locations. We are presenting a case of primary bone lymphoma of rapid growth, in cranial and sternal locations. In its evolution, once the excision of the primary lesion of the skull was performed, the patient presented new lesions of rapid growth at the skull and femur level, and progression of pre-sternal lesion. With large B-cell diffuse non-Hodgkin lymphoma pathology, the patient initiated R-CHOPP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone and rituximab) with rapid reduction of all lesions without evidence of progression after the six cycles. PMID:23089121

  11. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    PubMed

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts. PMID:26917429

  12. Europium-doped Gd2O3 nanotubes cause the necrosis of primary mouse bone marrow stromal cells through lysosome and mitochondrion damage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Chen, Shizhu; Duan, Jianlei; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2015-05-01

    With the wide applications of europium-doped Gd2O3 nanoparticles (Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs) in biomedical fields, it will inevitably increase the chance of human exposure. It was reported that Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs could accumulate in bone. However, there have been few reports about the potential effect of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). In this study, the Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes were prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cytotoxicity of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes on BMSCs and the associated mechanisms were further studied. The results indicated that they could be uptaken into BMSCs by an energy-dependent and macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis process, and primarily localized in lysosome. Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes effectively inhibited the viability of BMSCs in concentration and time-dependent manners. A significant increase in the percentage of late apoptotic/necrotic cells, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and the number of PI-stained cells was found after BMSCs were treated by 10, 20, and 40μg/mL of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes for 12h. No obvious DNA ladders were detected, but a dispersed band was observed. The above results revealed that Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes could trigger cell death by necrosis instead of apoptosis. Two mechanisms were involved in Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotube-induced BMSCs necrosis: lysosomal rupture and release of cathepsins B; and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) injury to the mitochondria and DNA. The study provides novel evidence to elucidate the toxicity mechanisms and may be beneficial to more rational applications of these nanomaterials in the future. PMID:25725393

  13. Is miniscrew primary stability influenced by bone density?

    PubMed

    Marquezan, Mariana; Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes de; Araújo, Mônica Tirre de Souza; Nojima, Lincoln Issamu; Nojima, Matilde da Cunha Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Primary stability is absence of mobility in the bone bed after mini-implant placement and depends on bone quality among other factors. Bone quality is a subjective term frequently considered as bone density. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate bone density in two bovine pelvic regions and verify the primary stability of miniscrews inserted into them. Forty bone blocks were extracted from bovine pelvic bones, 20 from iliac and 20 from pubic bone, all of them containing cortical bone about 1 mm thick. Half of the sections extracted from each bone were designated for histological evaluation of bone density (trabecular bone area - TBA) and the other half for bone mineral density (BMD) evaluation by means of central dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Then, twenty self-drilling miniscrews (INP®, São Paulo, Brazil) 1.4 mm in diameter and 6 mm long were inserted into the bone blocks used for BMD evaluation. Peak implant insertion torque (IT) and pull-out strength (PS) were used for primary stability evaluation. It was found that iliac and pubic bones present different bone densities, iliac bone being less dense considering BMD and TBA values (P > 0.05). However, the miniscrew primary stability was not different when varying the bone type (P < 0.05). IT and PS were not influenced by these differences in bone density when cortical thickness was about 1 mm thick. PMID:22031056

  14. Primary Culture of Mouse Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gaven, Florence; Marin, Philippe; Claeysen, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons represent less than 1% of the total number of neurons in the brain. This low amount of neurons regulates important brain functions such as motor control, motivation, and working memory. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). This progressive neuronal loss is unequivocally associated with the motors symptoms of the pathology (bradykinesia, resting tremor, and muscular rigidity). The main agent responsible of dopaminergic neuron degeneration is still unknown. However, these neurons appear to be extremely vulnerable in diverse conditions. Primary cultures constitute one of the most relevant models to investigate properties and characteristics of dopaminergic neurons. These cultures can be submitted to various stress agents that mimic PD pathology and to neuroprotective compounds in order to stop or slow down neuronal degeneration. The numerous transgenic mouse models of PD that have been generated during the last decade further increased the interest of researchers for dopaminergic neuron cultures. Here, the video protocol focuses on the delicate dissection of embryonic mouse brains. Precise excision of ventral mesencephalon is crucial to obtain neuronal cultures sufficiently rich in dopaminergic cells to allow subsequent studies. This protocol can be realized with embryonic transgenic mice and is suitable for immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, second messenger quantification, or neuronal death/survival assessment. PMID:25226064

  15. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter; Abu Dawud, Raed; Adjaye, James; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and prospective isolation of BMSCs and committed progenitors are lacking. Here, we compared the transcriptome profile of CD markers expressed at baseline and during the course of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of two well-characterized osteogenic-committed murine BMSCs (mBMSC(Bone)) and adipogenic-committed mBMSCs (mBMSC(Adipo)), respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of a core set of canonical mBMSC CD markers with comparable expression levels in mBMSC(Bone) and mBMSC(Adipo) at baseline and during their differentiation. We identified 11 CD markers that are differentially expressed between mBMSC(Adipo) and mBMSC(Bone). Among these, we identified osteoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSC(Bone): CD34, CD54, CD73, CD132, CD200, CD227 and adipoprogenitor-associated CD markers expressed only in mBMSC(Adipo): CD53, CD80, CD134, CD141 and CD212. FACS analysis confirmed these results. We selected CD34 for further analysis. CD34 was expressed at baseline of mouse stromal cell line ST2, primary mBMSCs, mBMSC(Bone) and its expression decreased during osteoblast differentiation. FACS-sorted CD34(+) primary mBMSCs exhibited higher expression of 70% osteoblast-associated genes, and formed significantly higher heterotopic bone in vivo when implanted subcutaneously in immune-deficient mice compared with CD34(-) primary mBMSCs. Our results demonstrate that a set of CD markers can distinguish osteoprogenitor versus adipoprogenitor populations of mBMSCs. CD34 is suitable for prospective isolation of mouse bone marrow osteoprogenitors. PMID:26413784

  16. Cilia/Ift protein and motor-related bone diseases and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xue; Yang, Shuying

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential cellular organelles projecting from the cell surface to sense and transduce developmental signaling. They are tiny but have complicated structures containing microtubule (MT)-based internal structures (the axoneme) and mother centriole formed basal body. Intraflagellar transport (Ift) operated by Ift proteins and motors are indispensable for cilia formation and function. Mutations in Ift proteins or Ift motors cause various human diseases, some of which have severe bone defects. Over the last few decades, major advances have occurred in understanding the roles of these proteins and cilia in bone development and remodeling by examining cilia/Ift protein-related human diseases and establishing mouse transgenic models. In this review, we describe current advances in the understanding of the cilia/Ift structure and function. We further summarize cilia/Ift-related human diseases and current mouse models with an emphasis on bone-related phenotypes, cilia morphology, and signaling pathways. PMID:25553465

  17. Glycosphingolipid patterns in primary mouse kidney cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Lyerla, T.A.; Gross, S.K.; McCluer, R.H.

    1986-12-01

    Primary kidney cultures from C57BL/6J mice, 6 weeks of age or older, were produced using D-valine medium to select for epithelial cell growth. After allowing the cells to attach and proliferate for 1 week following plating, medium was changed once per week. Cells formed nearly confluent monolayers during the second week of culture. The cultured cells contained all of the glycosphingolipids seen in the adult kidney, analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography as their perbenzoyl derivatives. Glucosylceramide, however, was highly predominant in the cultured cells, whereas dihexosyl- and trihexosylceramides predominate in the intact kidney. Sex differences in glycolipid contents found in the intact kidney were also apparent in these cultured cells: The concentration of neutral glycolipids, in general, was higher in male cells than in those derived from females, and the male-specific glycolipid nonhydroxy fatty acid digalactosylceramide was high in male cells but very low in female cells. Neutral glycosphingolipids were labeled in 2-week-old cultures using (/sup 3/H)palmitate. The (/sup 3/H)palmitate was incorporated into all of the glycolipids within 2 hr of labeling. Hence, adult mouse kidney cells in D-valine medium retain their differentiated characteristics for a sufficient period of time to allow investigation of glycolipid syntheses in monolayer cultures of epithelial cells derived from this organ.

  18. Cellular lead toxicity and metabolism in primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells

    SciTech Connect

    Long, G.J.; Rosen, J.F.; Pounds, J.G. )

    1990-02-01

    A knowledge of bone lead metabolism is critical for understanding the toxicological importance of bone lead, as a toxicant both to bone cells and to soft tissues of the body, as lead is mobilized from large reservoirs in hard tissues. To further understand the processes that mediate metabolism of lead in bone, it is necessary to determine lead metabolism at the cellular level. Experiments were conducted to determine the intracellular steady-state {sup 210}Pb kinetics in cultures of primary and clonal osteoblastic bone cells. Osteoblastic bone cells obtained by sequential collagenase digestion of mouse calvaria or rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells were labeled with {sup 210}Pb as 5 microM lead acetate for 20 hr, and kinetic parameters were determined by measuring the efflux of {sup 210}Pb from the cells over a {sup 210}-min period. The intracellular metabolism of {sup 210}Pb was characterized by three kinetic pools of {sup 210}Pb in both cell types. Although the values of these parameters differed between the primary osteoblastic cells and ROS cells, the profile of {sup 210}Pb was remarkably similar in both cell types. Both types exhibited one large, slowly exchanging pool (S3), indicative of mitochondrial lead. These data show that primary osteoblastic bone cells and ROS cells exhibit similar steady-state lead kinetics, and intracellular lead distribution. These data also establish a working model of lead kinetics in osteoblastic bone cells and now permit an integrated view of lead kinetics in bone.

  19. Age-related changes in mouse bone permeability.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Oyen, Michelle L; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-03-21

    The determination of lacunar-canalicular permeability is essential for understanding local fluid flow in bone, which may indicate how bone senses changes in the mechanical environment to regulate mechano-adaptation. The estimates of lacunar-canalicular permeability found in the literature vary by up to eight orders of magnitude, and age-related permeability changes have not been measured in non-osteonal mouse bone. The objective of this study is to use a poroelastic approach based on nanoindentation data to characterize lacunar-canalicular permeability in murine bone as a function of age. Nine wild type C57BL/6 mice of different ages (2, 7 and 12 months) were used. Three tibiae from each age group were embedded in epoxy resin, cut in half and indented in the longitudinal direction in the mid-cortex using two spherical fluid indenter tips (R=238 μm and 500 μm). Results suggest that the lacunar-canalicular intrinsic permeability of mouse bone decreases from 2 to 7 months, with no significant changes from 7 to 12 months. The large indenter tip imposed larger contact sizes and sampled larger ranges of permeabilities, particularly for the old bone. This age-related difference in the distribution was not seen for indents with the smaller radius tip. We conclude that the small tip effectively measured lacunar-canalicular permeability, while larger tip indents were influenced by vascular permeability. Exploring the age-related changes in permeability of bone measured by nanoindentation will lead to a better understanding of the role of fluid flow in mechano-transduction. This understanding may help indicate alterations in bone adaptation and remodeling. PMID:24433671

  20. Immune Cell Isolation from Mouse Femur Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Quan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The bone marrow is the site of hematopoesis and contains mixed population of blood cells including erythrocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and hematopoietic stem cells. The following protocol provides a simple and fast method for isolation of bone marrow immune cells (no erythrocytes) from mouse femurs with a yield of approximate 8 × 107 cells in 5 ml culture media (1.6 × 104 cells/μl). Further isolation or flow cytometric analysis might be required for study of specific immune cell types.

  1. New mouse primary retinal degeneration (rd-3)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.; Hawes, N.L.; Roderick, T.H. ); Heckenlively, J.R. )

    1993-04-01

    A new mouse retinal degeneration that appears to be an excellent candidate for modeling human retinitis pigmentosa is reported. In this degeneration, called rd-3, differentiation proceeds postnatally through 2 weeks, and photoreceptor degeneration starts by 3 weeks. The rod photoreceptor loss is essentially complete by 5 weeks, whereas remnant cone cells are seen through 7 weeks. This is the only mouse homozygous retinal degeneration reported to date in which photoreceptors are initially normal. Crosses with known mouse retinal degenerations rd, Rds, nr, and pcd are negative for retinal degeneration in offspring, and linkage analysis places rd-3 on mouse chromosome 1 at 10 [+-]2.5 cM distal to Akp-1. Homology mapping suggests that the homologous human locus should be on chromosome 1q. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Quercetin inhibits inflammatory bone resorption in a mouse periodontitis model.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo H; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana T; Macedo, Cristina G; Freitas, Fabiana F; Stipp, Rafael N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2013-12-27

    Periodontitis is a disease that leads to bone destruction and represents the main cause of tooth loss in adults. The development of aggressive periodontitis has been associated with increased inflammatory response that is induced by the presence of a subgingival biofilm containing Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. The flavonoid quercetin (1) is widespread in vegetables and fruits and exhibits many biological properties for possible medical and clinical applications such as its anti-inflamatory and antioxidant effects. Thus, in the present study, the properties of 1 have been evaluated in bone loss and inflammation using a mouse periodontitis model induced by A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. Subcutaneous treatment with 1 reduced A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced bone loss and IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-17, RANKL, and ICAM-1 production in the gingival tissue without affecting bacterial counts. These results demonstrated that quercetin exhibits protective effects in A. actinomycetemcomitans-induced periodontitis in mice by modulating cytokine and ICAM-1 production. PMID:24246038

  3. Effects of suspension-induced osteopenia on the mechanical behaviour of mouse long bones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, S. J.; Greenberg, A. R.; Luttges, M. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    Whereas most studies of tail-suspension induced osteopenia have utilized rat femora, the present study investigated the effects of a 14 day tail-suspension on the mechanical behaviour of mice femora, tibiae and humeri. Force-deflection properties were obtained via three-point bending for long bones from suspended and control mice. Whole bone behaviour was characterized by converting the force-deflection values to stiffness, strength, ductility and energy parameters which were not normalized for specimen geometry. The effects of a systematic variation in the deflection rate over the range 0.1-10 mm min-1 were also evaluated. Statistical analysis indicated that the primary effect of the tail-suspension period was lowered bone mass which was manifested mechanically through lower values of the bone strength parameters. These effects were similar in the bones of both the fore and hind limbs. The results also demonstrated that the stiffness, ductility and energy characteristics were much less influenced by the tail-suspension. Whereas a significant dependence of the bone strength values upon deflection rate was observed for the femora and humeri, the other mechanical parameters were less sensitive. Based upon the nature of the physical and mechanical changes observed in the long bones following tail-suspension, the mouse appears to be a suitable animal model for the study of osteopenia.

  4. A Computational Analysis of Bone Formation in the Cranial Vault in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanyoung; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2015-01-01

    Bones of the cranial vault are formed by the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts on a surface that surrounds the brain, eventually forming mineralized bone. Signaling pathways causative for cell differentiation include the actions of extracellular proteins driven by information from genes. We assume that the interaction of cells and extracellular molecules, which are associated with cell differentiation, can be modeled using Turing’s reaction–diffusion model, a mathematical model for pattern formation controlled by two interacting molecules (activator and inhibitor). In this study, we hypothesize that regions of high concentration of an activator develop into primary centers of ossification, the earliest sites of cranial vault bone. In addition to the Turing model, we use another diffusion equation to model a morphogen (potentially the same as the morphogen associated with formation of ossification centers) associated with bone growth. These mathematical models were solved using the finite volume method. The computational domain and model parameters are determined using a large collection of experimental data showing skull bone formation in mouse at different embryonic days in mice carrying disease causing mutations and their unaffected littermates. The results show that the relative locations of the five ossification centers that form in our model occur at the same position as those identified in experimental data. As bone grows from these ossification centers, sutures form between the bones. PMID:25853124

  5. Isolation and characterization of primary bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongzhe; Ghazanfari, Roshanak; Zacharaki, Dimitra; Lim, Hooi Ching; Scheding, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow (BM) contains a rare population of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which have been characterized as nonhematopoietic skeletal progenitor cells with central importance for the hematopoietic microenvironment. Classically, MSCs are isolated by plastic adherence and subsequent culture. However, as cultured stromal cells differ from their in vivo progenitors, it is important to identify the phenotype of the primary MSCs to study these cells in more detail. In the past years, several surface markers have been reported to be suitable for effective enrichment of BM-MSCs, and recent data indicate that the putative MSC stem/progenitor cell population in human adult BM is highly enriched in Lin(-) CD45(-) CD271(+) CD140a (PDGFRα)(low/-) cells. Moreover, surface marker combinations have been described for the isolation of MSCs from murine BM. On the basis of these findings, the role of primary MSCs can now be studied in normal and, importantly, diseased BM. Furthermore, genetically engineered mouse models have been developed as powerful tools to investigate well-defined BM stromal cell populations in vivo. Our discussion aims to provide a concise overview of the current state of the art in BM-MSC isolation in humans and briefly present murine MSC isolation approaches and genetic models. PMID:27270495

  6. Pathways of retinoid synthesis in mouse macrophages and bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Haixia; Hadwiger, Gayla; Fujiwara, Hideji; Welch, John S

    2016-06-01

    In vivo pathways of natural retinoid metabolism and elimination have not been well characterized in primary myeloid cells, even though retinoids and retinoid receptors have been strongly implicated in regulating myeloid maturation. With the use of a upstream activation sequence-GFP reporter transgene and retrovirally expressed Gal4-retinoic acid receptor α in primary mouse bone marrow cells, we identified 2 distinct enzymatic pathways used by mouse myeloid cells ex vivo to synthesize retinoic acid receptor α ligands from free vitamin A metabolites (retinyl acetate, retinol, and retinal). Bulk Kit(+) bone marrow progenitor cells use diethylaminobenzaldehyde-sensitive enzymes, whereas bone marrow-derived macrophages use diethylaminobenzaldehyde-insensitive enzymes to synthesize natural retinoic acid receptor α-activating retinoids (all-trans retinoic acid). Bone marrow-derived macrophages do not express the diethylaminobenzaldehyde-sensitive enzymes Aldh1a1, Aldh1a2, or Aldh1a3 but instead, express Aldh3b1, which we found is capable of diethylaminobenzaldehyde-insensitive synthesis of all trans-retinoic acid. However, under steady-state and stimulated conditions in vivo, diverse bone marrow cells and peritoneal macrophages showed no evidence of intracellular retinoic acid receptor α-activating retinoids, despite expression of these enzymes and a vitamin A-sufficient diet, suggesting that the enzymatic conversion of retinal is not the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of intracellular retinoic acid receptor α-activating retinoids in myeloid bone marrow cells and that retinoic acid receptor α remains in an unliganded configuration during adult hematopoiesis. PMID:26768478

  7. Resorption of monetite calcium phosphate cement by mouse bone marrow derived osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Montazerolghaem, M; Karlsson Ott, M; Engqvist, H; Melhus, H; Rasmusson, A J

    2015-01-01

    Recently the interest for monetite based biomaterials as bone grafts has increased; since in vivo studies have demonstrated that they are degradable, osteoconductive and improve bone healing. So far osteoclastic resorption of monetite has received little attention. The current study focuses on the osteoclastic resorption of monetite cement using primary mouse bone marrow macrophages, which have the potential to differentiate into resorbing osteoclasts when treated with receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL). The osteoclast viability and differentiation were analysed on monetite cement and compared to cortical bovine bone discs. After seven days live/dead stain results showed no significant difference in viability between the two materials. However, the differentiation was significantly higher on the bone discs, as shown by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity and Cathepsin K gene expression. Moreover monetite samples with differentiated osteoclasts had a 1.4 fold elevated calcium ion concentration in their culture media compared to monetite samples with undifferentiated cells. This indicates active resorption of monetite in the presence of osteoclasts. In conclusion, this study suggests that osteoclasts have a crucial role in the resorption of monetite based biomaterials. It also provides a useful model for studying in vitro resorption of acidic calcium phosphate cements by primary murine cells. PMID:25953560

  8. A methodology for the investigation of toughness and crack propagation in mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Alessandra; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A; Shefelbine, Sandra J; Ritchie, Robert O

    2014-11-01

    Bone fracture is a health concern for those with aged bone and brittle bone diseases. Mouse bone is widely used as a model of human bone, especially to investigate preclinical treatment strategies. However, little is known about the mechanisms of mouse bone fracture and its similarities and differences from fracture in human bone. In this work we present a methodology to investigate the fracture toughness during crack initiation and crack propagation for mouse bone. Mouse femora were dissected, polished on their periosteal surface, notched on the posterior surface at their mid-diaphysis, and tested in three-point bending under displacement control at a rate of 0.1mm/min using an in situ loading stage within an environmental scanning electron microscope. We obtained high-resolution real-time imaging of the crack initiation and propagation in mouse bone. From the images we can measure the crack extension at each step of the crack growth and calculate the toughness of the bone (in terms of stress intensity factor (K) and work to fracture (Wf)) as a function of stable crack length (Δa), thus generating a resistance curve for the mouse bone. The technique presented here provides insight into the evolution of microdamage and the toughening mechanisms that resist crack propagation, which are essential for preclinical development of treatments to enhance bone quality and combat fracture risk. PMID:25084121

  9. Bone and bone-marrow blood flow in chronic granulocytic leukemia and primary myelofibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lahtinen, R.; Lahtinen, T.; Romppanen, T.

    1982-03-01

    Blood flow in hematopoietic bone marrow and in nonhematopoietic bone has been measured with a Xe-133 washout method in 20 patients with chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) and in seven with primary myelofibrosis. Age-matched healthy persons served as controls. Bone-marrow blood flow in CGL was dependent upon the phase of the disease. In the metamorphosis phase, bone-marrow blood flow was high compared with that in the well-controlled phase. Apart from the initial phase, the mean values for bone blood flow in CGL were increased compared with the values of the healthy controls. In myelofibrosis the bone blood flow was also increased. Bone-marrow blood flow in these diseases was dependent upon the cellularity of bone marrow as measured morphometrically.

  10. Primary Epiphyseal Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Of Distal Ulna

    PubMed Central

    Kapila, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh; Sohal, Yadwinder Singh; Singh, Dhalwinder; Singh, Sukhpal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Aneurysmal Bone Cyst (ABC) is a benign expansile cystic blood filled reactive lesion of the bone, most common in the first 2 decades of life. Though it can involve any bone in the body but tibia, humerus, femur and posterior elements of spine are most commonly affected. They most commonly involve metaphysis or metaphysio-diaphyseal part of the bone. Primary involvement of epiphysis is rarely reported. Here we present a case of 6 year old male child with an epiphyseal ABC of distal ulna. Its diagnosis, surgical management, clinical outcome with review of literature is discussed. PMID:27299110

  11. Primary aneurysmal bone cyst of coronoid process

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Amit; Tyagi, Isha; Syal, Rajan; Agrawal, Tanu; Jain, Manoj

    2006-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal bone cysts are relatively uncommon in the facial skeleton. These usually affect the mandible but origin from the coronoid process is even rarer. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a coronoid process aneurysmal bone cyst presenting as temporal fossa swelling. Case presentation A 17 year old boy presented with a progressively increasing swelling in the left temporal region developed over the previous 8 months. An expansile lytic cystic lesion originating from the coronoid process of the left mandible and extending into the infratemporal and temporal fossa regions was found on CT scan. It was removed by a superior approach to the infratemporal fossa. Conclusion Aneurysmal bone cyst of the coronoid process can attain enormous dimensions until the temporal region is also involved. A superior approach to the infratemporal fossa is a reasonable approach for such cases, providing wide exposure and access to all parts of the lesion and ensuring better control and complete excision. PMID:16533409

  12. Primary bone lymphomas—Clinical cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anshu; Alam, Kiran; Maheshwari, Veena; Khan, Roobina; Nobin, Hage; Narula, Varsha

    2013-01-01

    Primary bone lymphoma (PBL) is an uncommon clinical entity and a rare presentation of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PBL accounts for less than 5% of malignant bone tumors, 4–5% of extra nodal lymphoma and less than 1% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) accounts for the majority of cases of PBL. The incidence of PBL is so rare that many of its aspects remain unknown. A number of studies have been reported from western countries but only a few reports are available from Asia. Out of 20,000 bone lesions received in our department over 5 years, only 5 cases were primary bone lymphoma; all of which were DLBCL. We report our experience on PBLs with main emphasis on two unusual presentations of this rare tumor. PMID:26909283

  13. Analysis of primary cilia in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paridaen, Judith T M L; Huttner, Wieland B; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells in the developing mammalian brain are highly polarized cells that carry a primary cilium protruding into the brain ventricles. Here, cilia detect signals present in the cerebrospinal fluid that fills the ventricles. Recently, striking observations have been made regarding the dynamics of primary cilia in mitosis and cilium reformation after cell division. In neural progenitors, primary cilia are not completely disassembled during cell division, and some ciliary membrane remnant can be inherited by one daughter cell that tends to maintain a progenitor fate. Furthermore, newborn differentiating cells grow a primary cilium on their basolateral plasma membrane, in spite of them possessing apical membrane and adherens junctions, and thus change the environment to which the primary cilium is exposed. These phenomena are proposed to be involved in cell fate determination and delamination of daughter cells in conjunction with the production of neurons. Here, we describe several methods that can be used to study the structure, localization, and dynamics of primary cilia in the developing mouse brain; these include time-lapse imaging of live mouse embryonic brain tissues, and analysis of primary cilia structure and localization using correlative light- and electron- and serial-block-face scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25837388

  14. Biomechanical properties of bone in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Bushra; Russell, David; Payne, Anthony; Constante, Diogo; Tanner, K. Elizabeth; Isaksson, Hanna; Mathavan, Neashan; Cobb, Stuart R.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X-linked genetic disorder and a major cause of intellectual disability in girls. Mutations in the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene are the primary cause of the disorder. Despite the dominant neurological phenotypes, MECP2 is expressed ubiquitously throughout the body and a number of peripheral phenotypes such as scoliosis, reduced bone mineral density and skeletal fractures are also common and important clinical features of the disorder. In order to explore whether MeCP2 protein deficiency results in altered structural and functional properties of bone and to test the potential reversibility of any defects, we have conducted a series of histological, imaging and biomechanical tests of bone in a functional knockout mouse model of RTT. Both hemizygous Mecp2stop/y male mice in which Mecp2 is silenced in all cells and female Mecp2stop/+ mice in which Mecp2 is silenced in ~ 50% of cells as a consequence of random X-chromosome inactivation, revealed significant reductions in cortical bone stiffness, microhardness and tensile modulus. Microstructural analysis also revealed alterations in both cortical and cancellous femoral bone between wild-type and MeCP2-deficient mice. Furthermore, unsilencing of Mecp2 in adult mice cre-mediated stop cassette deletion resulted in a restoration of biomechanical properties (stiffness, microhardness) towards wild-type levels. These results show that MeCP2-deficiency results in overt, but potentially reversible, alterations in the biomechanical integrity of bone and highlights the importance of targeting skeletal phenotypes in considering the development of pharmacological and gene-based therapies. PMID:25445449

  15. Mouse models of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Cha, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by immune cell infiltration and progressive injury to the salivary and lacrimal glands. As a consequence, patients with SjS develop xerostomia (dry mouth) and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eyes). SjS is the third most common rheumatic autoimmune disorder, affecting 4 million Americans with over 90% of patients being female. Current diagnostic criteria for SjS frequently utilize histological examinations of minor salivary glands for immune cell foci, serology for autoantibodies, and dry eye evaluation by corneal or conjunctival staining. SjS can be classified as primary or secondary SjS, depending on whether it occurs alone or in association with other systemic rheumatic conditions, respectively. Clinical manifestations typically become apparent when the disease is relatively advanced in SjS patients, which poses a challenge for early diagnosis and treatment of SjS. Therefore, SjS mouse models, because of their close resemblance to the human SjS, have been extremely valuable to identify early disease markers and to investigate underlying biological and immunological dysregulations. However, it is important to bear in mind that no single mouse model has duplicated all aspects of SjS pathogenesis and clinical features, mainly due to the multifactorial etiology of SjS that includes numerous susceptibility genes and environmental factors. As such, various mouse models have been developed in the field to try to recapitulate SjS. In this review, we focus on recent mouse models of primary SjS and describe them under three categories of spontaneous, genetically engineered, and experimentally induced development of SjS-like disease. In addition, we discuss future perspectives of SjS mouse models highlighting pros and cons of utilizing mouse models and demands for improved models. PMID:25777752

  16. Spatial clustering of tuning in mouse primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Ringach, Dario L; Mineault, Patrick J; Tring, Elaine; Olivas, Nicholas D; Garcia-Junco-Clemente, Pablo; Trachtenberg, Joshua T

    2016-01-01

    The primary visual cortex of higher mammals is organized into two-dimensional maps, where the preference of cells for stimulus parameters is arranged regularly on the cortical surface. In contrast, the preference of neurons in the rodent appears to be arranged randomly, in what is termed a salt-and-pepper map. Here we revisited the spatial organization of receptive fields in mouse primary visual cortex by measuring the tuning of pyramidal neurons in the joint orientation and spatial frequency domain. We found that the similarity of tuning decreases as a function of cortical distance, revealing a weak but statistically significant spatial clustering. Clustering was also observed across different cortical depths, consistent with a columnar organization. Thus, the mouse visual cortex is not strictly a salt-and-pepper map. At least on a local scale, it resembles a degraded version of the organization seen in higher mammals, hinting at a possible common origin. PMID:27481398

  17. Spatial clustering of tuning in mouse primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ringach, Dario L.; Mineault, Patrick J.; Tring, Elaine; Olivas, Nicholas D.; Garcia-Junco-Clemente, Pablo; Trachtenberg, Joshua T.

    2016-01-01

    The primary visual cortex of higher mammals is organized into two-dimensional maps, where the preference of cells for stimulus parameters is arranged regularly on the cortical surface. In contrast, the preference of neurons in the rodent appears to be arranged randomly, in what is termed a salt-and-pepper map. Here we revisited the spatial organization of receptive fields in mouse primary visual cortex by measuring the tuning of pyramidal neurons in the joint orientation and spatial frequency domain. We found that the similarity of tuning decreases as a function of cortical distance, revealing a weak but statistically significant spatial clustering. Clustering was also observed across different cortical depths, consistent with a columnar organization. Thus, the mouse visual cortex is not strictly a salt-and-pepper map. At least on a local scale, it resembles a degraded version of the organization seen in higher mammals, hinting at a possible common origin. PMID:27481398

  18. Imaging of primary bone tumors in veterinary medicine: which differences?

    PubMed

    Vanel, Maïa; Blond, Laurent; Vanel, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Veterinary medicine is most often a mysterious world for the human doctors. However, animals are important for human medicine thanks to the numerous biological similarities. Primary bone tumors are not uncommon in veterinary medicine and especially in small domestic animals as dogs and cats. As in human medicine, osteosarcoma is the most common one and especially in the long bones extremities. In the malignant bone tumor family, chondrosarcoma, fibrosarcoma and hemangiosarcoma are following. Benign bone tumors as osteoma, osteochondroma and bone cysts do exist but are rare and of little clinical significance. Diagnostic modalities used depend widely on the owner willing to treat his animal. Radiographs and bone biopsy are the standard to make a diagnosis but CT, nuclear medicine and MRI are more an more used. As amputation is treatment number one in appendicular bone tumor in veterinary medicine, this explains on the one hand why more recent imaging modalities are not always necessary and on the other hand, that prognostic on large animals is so poor that it is not much studied. Chemotherapy is sometimes associated with the surgery procedure, depending on the aggressivity of the tumor. Although, the strakes differs a lot between veterinary and human medicine, biological behavior are almost the same and should led to a beneficial team work between all. PMID:22197093

  19. Development, validation and characterization of a novel mouse model of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD).

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Willett, Thomas L; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2014-11-01

    The etiology of Adynamic Bone Disease (ABD) is poorly understood but the hallmark of ABD is a lack of bone turnover. ABD occurs in renal osteodystrophy (ROD) and is suspected to occur in elderly patients on long-term anti-resorptive therapy. A major clinical concern of ABD is diminished bone quality and an increased fracture risk. To our knowledge, experimental animal models for ABD other than ROD-ABD have not been developed or studied. The objectives of this study were to develop a mouse model of ABD without the complications of renal ablation, and to characterize changes in bone quality in ABD relative to controls. To re-create the adynamic bone condition, 4-month old female Col2.3Δtk mice were treated with ganciclovir to specifically ablate osteoblasts, and pamidronate was used to inhibit osteoclastic resorption. Four groups of animals were used to characterize bone quality in ABD: Normal bone controls, No Formation controls, No Resorption controls, and an Adynamic group. After a 6-week treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and the bones were harvested for analyses. Bone quality assessments were conducted using established techniques including bone histology, quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), microcomputed tomography (microCT), and biomechanical testing. Histomorphometry confirmed osteoblast-related hallmarks of ABD in our mouse model. Bone formation was near complete suppression in the No Formation and Adynamic specimens. Inhibition of bone resorption in the Adynamic group was confirmed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stain. Normal bone mineral density and architecture were maintained in the Adynamic group, whereas the No Formation group showed a reduction in bone mineral content and trabecular thickness relative to the Adynamic group. As expected, the No Formation group had a more hypomineralized profile and the Adynamic group had a higher mean mineralization profile that is

  20. Reference point indentation is not indicative of whole mouse bone measures of stress intensity fracture toughness

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, Alessandra; Bruse, Jan L.; Oldknow, Karla J.; Millán, José Luis; Farquharson, Colin; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2014-01-01

    Bone fragility is a concern for aged and diseased bone. Measuring bone toughness and understanding fracture properties of the bone are critical for predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease and for preclinical testing of therapies. A reference point indentation technique (BioDent) has recently been developed to determine bone's resistance to fracture in a minimally invasive way by measuring the indentation distance increase (IDI) between the first and last indentations over cyclic indentations in the same position. In this study, we investigate the relationship between fracture toughness KC and reference point indentation parameters (i.e. IDI, total indentation distance (TID) and creep indentation distance (CID)) in bones from 38 mice from six types (C57Bl/6, Balb, oim/oim, oim/+, Phospho1−/− and Phospho1 wild type counterpart). These mice bone are models of healthy and diseased bone spanning a range of fracture toughness from very brittle (oim/oim) to ductile (Phospho1−/−). Left femora were dissected, notched and tested in 3-point bending until complete failure. Contralateral femora were dissected and indented in 10 sites of their anterior and posterior shaft surface over 10 indentation cycles. IDI, TID and CID were measured. Results from this study suggest that reference point indentation parameters are not indicative of stress intensity fracture toughness in mouse bone. In particular, the IDI values at the anterior mid-diaphysis across mouse types overlapped, making it difficult to discern differences between mouse types, despite having extreme differences in stress intensity based toughness measures. When more locations of indentation were considered, the normalised IDIs could distinguish between mouse types. Future studies should investigate the relationship of the reference point indentation parameters for mouse bone in other material properties of the bone tissue in order to determine their use for measuring bone quality. PMID:25280470

  1. Cross-talk between the mitogen activated protein kinase and bone morphogenetic protein/hemojuvelin pathways is required for the induction of hepcidin by holotransferrin in primary mouse hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ramey, Guillemette; Deschemin, Jean-Christophe; Vaulont, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Background The circulating hormone hepcidin plays a central role in iron homeostasis. Our goal was to establish an ex vivo iron-sensing model and to characterize the molecular mechanisms linking iron to hepcidin. Design and Methods Murine hepatocytes were isolated by the collagenase method, either from wild type or HFE knockout mice, and cultured 42 h without serum before treatments. Results After 42 h of serum-free culture, hepcidin gene expression was undetectable in the hepatocytes. Hepcidin gene expression could, however, be re-activated by an additional 24 h of incubation with 10% serum. Interestingly, addition of 30 μM holotransferrin consistently increased serum-dependent hepcidin levels 3- to 5-fold. The effects of serum and serum+holotransferrin were direct, transcriptional, independent of de novo protein synthesis and required the presence of bone morphogenetic protein. Transferrin receptor-2 activation by its ligand holotransferrin led to extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase pathway stimulation and the ERK specific inhibitor U0-126 blunted holotransferrin-mediated induction of hepcidin. ERK activation by holotransferrin provoked increased levels of phospho-Smad1/5/8 highlighting cross-talk between the bone morphogenetic protein/hemojuvelin and ERK1/2 pathways. Finally, we demonstrated, using hepatocytes isolated from Hfe−/− mice, that HFE was not critical for the hepcidin response to holotransferrin but important for basal hepcidin expression. Conclusions We demonstrate that hepatocytes are liver iron-sensor cells and that transferrin receptor-2, by signaling through the ERK1/2 pathway, and bone morphogenetic protein/hemojuvelin, by signaling through the Smad pathways, coordinately regulate the iron-sensing machinery linking holotransferrin to hepcidin. PMID:19454495

  2. Preoperative embolization of primary bone tumors: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Roushan; Sharma, Raju; Rastogi, Shishir; Khan, Shah Alam; Jayaswal, Arvind; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety and effectiveness of preoperative embolization of primary bone tumors in relation to intraoperative blood loss, intraoperative blood transfusion volume and surgical time. METHODS: Thirty-three patients underwent preoperative embolization of primary tumors of extremities, hip or vertebrae before resection and stabilization. The primary osseous tumors included giant cell tumors, aneurysmal bone cyst, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and chondrosarcoma. Twenty-six patients were included for the statistical analysis (embolization group) as they were operated within 0-48 h within preoperative embolization. A control group (non-embolization group, n = 28) with bone tumor having similar histological diagnosis and operated without embolization was retrieved from hospital record for statistical comparison. RESULTS: The mean intraoperative blood loss was 1300 mL (250-2900 mL), the mean intraoperative blood transfusion was 700 mL (0-1400 mL) and the mean surgical time was 221 ± 76.7 min for embolization group (group I, n = 26). Non-embolization group (group II, n = 28), the mean intraoperative blood loss was 1800 mL (800-6000 mL), the mean intraoperative blood transfusion was 1400 mL (700-8400 mL) and the mean surgical time was 250 ± 69.7 min. On comparison, statistically significant (P < 0.001) difference was found between embolisation group and non-embolisation group for the amount of blood loss and requirement of blood transfusion. There was no statistical difference between the two groups for the surgical time. No patients developed any angiography or embolization related complications. CONCLUSION: Preoperative embolization of bone tumors is a safe and effective adjunct to the surgical management of primary bone tumors that leads to reduction in intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion volume. PMID:27158424

  3. MRI detection of early bone metastases in B16 mouse melanoma models

    PubMed Central

    Gauvain, Karen M.; Garbow, Joel R.; Song, Sheng-Kwei; Hirbe, Angela C.; Weilbaecher, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Bone metastasis causes significant morbidity in cancer patients, including bone pain, pathologic fractures, nerve compression syndrome, and hypercalcemia. Animal models are utilized to study the pathogenesis of skeletal metastases and to evaluate potential therapeutic agents. Previously published methods for imaging bone metastasis in rodent models have focused on identifying advanced stage metastasis using simple X-rays. Here we report MRI as a method for detecting early bone metastases in mouse models in vivo. B16 mouse melanoma cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of C57BL/6 mice and magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained of the left leg following the development of metastatic disease, when tumor associated bone destruction was histologically present but not visible by X-ray. T1 and T2 relaxation times of bone marrow were measured in healthy control mice and B16 melanoma tumor-bearing mice. Mean T2 values for normal marrow were 28 ms (SD 5) and for diseased bone marrow were 41 ms (SD 3). T2 relaxation time of diseased bone marrow is significantly longer than that of normal bone marrow (P < 0.0001) and can be used as a marker of early bone metastases. These studies demonstrate that MR imaging can detect bone marrow metastases in small animals prior to development of cortical bone loss identified by X-ray. PMID:16283483

  4. Short-term effects of fluoride and strontium on bone formation and resorption in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Marie, P J; Hott, M

    1986-06-01

    The early effects of sodium fluoride (0.80 mg/kg/d) and strontium chloride (0.27%) given alone, or in combination in drinking water, on bone metabolism were examined in the mouse using dynamic histomorphometric methods. Four weeks of oral strontium supplementation increased the osteoid surface and reduced the number of acid phosphatase-stained osteoclasts. However the trabecular calcified bone volume was not augmented. By contrast, short-term treatment with fluoride produced a rapid stimulatory effect on bone formation at a dose that did not affect the bone mineralization rate. Four weeks of fluoride supplementation induced a rapid 21.1% increase in the osteoblastic surface and a 26.3% stimulation of the bone matrix apposition rate evaluated by the double tritiated proline labelling method, which resulted in a 29% increase in the amount of osteoid. This rapid stimulation of the bone formation rate without detectable change in osteoclastic bone resorption led to a 12% increase in the trabecular calcified bone density. This study shows that fluoride and strontium produce distinct early effects on bone formation and resorption in the mouse and that fluoride exerts a rapid stimulatory effect on the bone matrix synthesis rate through an augmentation of the number of bone-forming cells. PMID:3713515

  5. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  6. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  7. Abnormal bone mineral density and bone turnover marker expression profiles in patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lixin; Hou, Shengcai; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Liqiang; Miao, Jinbai; Wang, Yang; Li, Tong; Zhang, Zhenkui; You, Bin; Pang, Baosen; Liang, Yufang; Zhao, Yi; Hao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background To examine the bone mineral density (BMD) and the role of bone biomarkers, including bone formation marker procollagen type I aminoterminal propeptide (PINP) and N-terminal midmolecule fragment osteocalcin (N-MID), bone resorption marker b-C-telopeptides of type I collagen (b-CTX) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) in the pathogenesis of PSP. Methods Eighty-three consecutive primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) patients (PSP group) and 87 healthy individuals (control group) were enrolled in this study. General data, including gender, age, height, weight, and body mass index (BMI), were recorded. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ECLIA), and ELISA were used to evaluate bone mineral density and expression levels of bone metabolism markers, including PINP, b-CTX, TRACP5b, N-MID, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH VD). Results Mean height was significantly greater in the PSP group compared with the control group, whereas weight and BMI were lower. Patients in the PSP group had significantly lower average bone mineral density, which mainly manifested as osteopenia (11/12, 91.7%); however, only one patient (8.3%) developed osteoporosis. Serum overexpression of PINP, b-CTX, TRACP5b, and N-MID were found in PSP patients. Expression of 25-OH VD was low in PSP patients. Bone resorption markers showed positive linear relationships with bone formation markers in all participants; whereas only TRACP5b expression negatively correlated with 25-OH VD. Expression levels of all bone turnover markers negatively correlated with BMI. Regression analysis identified risk factors of PSP as age, height, weight, and TRACP5b and 25-OH VD expression levels; whereas gender and PINP, b-CTX, and N-MID expression levels were not significantly associated with the onset of PSP. Conclusions It had lower bone mineral density in PSP patients. Bone formation marker PINP, N-MID and bone resorption marker b-CTX, TRACP5b were upregulated in

  8. Mechanical loading, damping, and load-driven bone formation in mouse tibiae.

    PubMed

    Dodge, Todd; Wanis, Mina; Ayoub, Ramez; Zhao, Liming; Watts, Nelson B; Bhattacharya, Amit; Akkus, Ozan; Robling, Alexander; Yokota, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical loads play a pivotal role in the growth and maintenance of bone and joints. Although loading can activate anabolic genes and induce bone remodeling, damping is essential for preventing traumatic bone injury and fracture. In this study we investigated the damping capacity of bone, joint tissue, muscle, and skin using a mouse hindlimb model of enhanced loading in conjunction with finite element modeling to model bone curvature. Our hypothesis was that loads were primarily absorbed by the joints and muscle tissue, but that bone also contributed to damping through its compression and natural bending. To test this hypothesis, fresh mouse distal lower limb segments were cyclically loaded in axial compression in sequential bouts, with each subsequent bout having less surrounding tissue. A finite element model was generated to model effects of bone curvature in silico. Two damping-related parameters (phase shift angle and energy loss) were determined from the output of the loading experiments. Interestingly, the experimental results revealed that the knee joint contributed to the largest portion of the damping capacity of the limb, and bone itself accounted for approximately 38% of the total phase shift angle. Computational results showed that normal bone curvature enhanced the damping capacity of the bone by approximately 40%, and the damping effect grew at an accelerated pace as curvature was increased. Although structural curvature reduces critical loads for buckling in beam theory, evolution apparently favors maintaining curvature in the tibia. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia revealed that in response to axial loading, bone formation was significantly enhanced in the regions that were predicted to receive a curvature-induced bending moment. These results suggest that in addition to bone's compressive damping capacity, surrounding tissues, as well as naturally-occurring bone curvature, also contribute to mechanical damping, which may ultimately affect

  9. Bone marrow fibrosis in primary myelofibrosis: pathogenic mechanisms and the role of TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Archana; Morrone, Kerry; Bartenstein, Matthias; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe

    2016-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) with adverse prognosis and is associated with bone marrow fibrosis and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Even though the discovery of the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), thrombopoietin receptor (MPL) and calreticulin (CALR) mutations have brought new insights into the complex pathogenesis of MPNs, the etiology of fibrosis is not well understood. Furthermore, since JAK2 inhibitors do not lead to reversal of fibrosis further understanding of the biology of fibrotic process is needed for future therapeutic discovery. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is implicated as an important cytokine in pathogenesis of bone marrow fibrosis. Various mouse models have been developed and have established the role of TGF-β in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. Understanding the molecular alterations that lead to TGF-β mediated effects on bone marrow microenvironment can uncover newer therapeutic targets against myelofibrosis. Inhibition of the TGF-β pathway in conjunction with other therapies might prove useful in the reversal of bone marrow fibrosis in PMF. PMID:27358897

  10. Probiotic L. reuteri treatment prevents bone loss in a menopausal ovariectomized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Britton, Robert A; Irwin, Regina; Quach, Darin; Schaefer, Laura; Zhang, Jing; Lee, Taehyung; Parameswaran, Narayanan; McCabe, Laura R

    2014-11-01

    Estrogen deficiency is a major risk factor for osteoporosis that is associated with bone inflammation and resorption. Half of women over the age of 50 will experience an osteoporosis related fracture in their lifetime, thus novel therapies are needed to combat post-menopausal bone loss. Recent studies suggest an important role for gut-bone signaling pathways and the microbiota in regulating bone health. Given that the bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 (L. reuteri) secretes beneficial immunomodulatory factors, we examined if this candidate probiotic could reduce bone loss associated with estrogen deficiency in an ovariectomized (Ovx) mouse menopausal model. Strikingly, L. reuteri treatment significantly protected Ovx mice from bone loss. Osteoclast bone resorption markers and activators (Trap5 and RANKL) as well as osteoclastogenesis are significantly decreased in L. reuteri-treated mice. Consistent with this, L. reuteri suppressed Ovx-induced increases in bone marrow CD4+ T-lymphocytes (which promote osteoclastogenesis) and directly suppressed osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We also identified that L. reuteri treatment modifies microbial communities in the Ovx mouse gut. Together, our studies demonstrate that L. reuteri treatment suppresses bone resorption and loss associated with estrogen deficiency. Thus, L. reuteri treatment may be a straightforward and cost-effective approach to reduce post-menopausal bone loss. PMID:24677054

  11. Probiotic L. reuteri treatment prevents bone loss in a menopausal ovariectomized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Robert A.; Irwin, Regina; Quach, Darin; Schaefer, Laura; Zhang, Jing; Lee, Taehyung; Parameswaran, Narayanan; McCabe, Laura R.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen deficiency is a major risk factor for osteoporosis that is associated with bone inflammation and resorption. Half of women over the age of 50 will experience an osteoporosis related fracture in their lifetime, thus novel therapies are needed to combat post-menopausal bone loss. Recent studies suggest an important role for gut-bone signaling pathways and the microbiota in regulating bone health. Given that the bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 (L. reuteri) secretes beneficial immunomodulatory factors, we examined if this candidate probiotic could reduce bone loss associated with estrogen deficiency in an ovariectomized (Ovx) mouse menopausal model. Strikingly, L. reuteri treatment significantly protected Ovx mice from bone loss. Osteoclast bone resorption markers and activators (Trap5 and RANKL) as well as osteoclastogenesis are significantly decreased in L. reuteri treated mice. Consistent with this, L. reuteri suppressed Ovx-induced increases in bone marrow CD4+ T-lymphocytes (which promote osteoclastogenesis) and directly suppressed osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We also identif ied that L. reuteri treatment modifies microbial communities in the Ovx mouse gut. Together, our studies demonstrate that L. reuteri treatment suppresses bone resorption and loss associated with estrogen deficiency. Thus, L. reuteri treatment may be a straightforward and cost-effective approach to reduce post-menopausal bone loss. PMID:24677054

  12. Application of retinoic acid to obtain osteocytes cultures from primary mouse osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Mattinzoli, Deborah; Messa, Piergiorgio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Ikehata, Masami; Mondini, Anna; Zennaro, Cristina; Armelloni, Silvia; Li, Min; Giardino, Laura; Rastaldi, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    The need for osteocyte cultures is well known to the community of bone researchers; isolation of primary osteocytes is difficult and produces low cell numbers. Therefore, the most widely used cellular system is the osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cell line. The method here described refers to the use of retinoic acid to generate a homogeneous population of ramified cells with morphological and molecular osteocyte features. After isolation of osteoblasts from mouse calvaria, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is added to cell medium, and cell monitoring is conducted daily under an inverted microscope. First morphological changes are detectable after 2 days of treatment and differentiation is generally complete in 5 days, with progressive development of dendrites, loss of the ability to produce extracellular matrix, down-regulation of osteoblast markers and up-regulation of osteocyte-specific molecules. Daily cell monitoring is needed because of the inherent variability of primary cells, and the protocol can be adapted with minimal variation to cells obtained from different mouse strains and applied to transgenic models. The method is easy to perform and does not require special instrumentation, it is highly reproducible, and rapidly generates a mature osteocyte population in complete absence of extracellular matrix, allowing the use of these cells for unlimited biological applications. PMID:24894124

  13. Immortalized Mouse Floxed Fam20c Dental Papillar Mesenchymal and Osteoblast Cell Lines Retain Their Primary Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Hua; Xie, Xiaohua; Liu, Peihong; Liu, Ying; Jani, Priyam H; Lu, Yongbo; Chen, Shuo; Qin, Chunlin

    2015-11-01

    Fam20c is essential for the normal mineralization of dentin and bone. The generation of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines carrying floxed Fam20c allele can offer valuable tools for the study of the roles of Fam20c in the mineralization of dentin and bone. The limited capability of the primary odontoblasts and osteoblasts to proliferate necessitates the development of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines serving as substitutes for the study of differentiation and mineralization of the odontoblasts and osteoblasts. In this study, we established and characterized immortalized mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. The isolated primary mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts were immortalized by the infection of lentivirus containing Simian Virus 40 T-antigen (SV40 T-Ag). The immortalization of floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts was verified by the long-term passages and genomic integration of SV40 T-Ag. The immortalized floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines not only proliferated at a high rate and retained the morphology of their primary counterparts, but also preserved the dentin and bone specific gene expression as the primary dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts did. Consistently, the capability of the primary floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts to mineralize was also inherited by the immortalized dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. Thus, we have successfully generated the immortalized mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. PMID:25833681

  14. Immortalized Mouse Floxed Fam20c Dental Papillar Mesenchymal and Osteoblast Cell Lines Retain Their Primary Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Hua; Xie, Xiaohua; Liu, Peihong; Liu, Ying; Jani, Priyam H.; Lu, Yongbo; Chen, Shuo; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Fam20c is essential for the normal mineralization of dentin and bone. The generation of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines carrying floxed Fam20c allele can offer valuable tools for the study of the roles of Fam20c in the mineralization of dentin and bone. The limited capability of the primary odontoblasts and osteoblasts to proliferate necessitates the development of odontoblast and osteoblast cell lines serving as substitutes for the study of differentiation and mineralization of the odontoblasts and osteoblasts. In this study, we established and characterized immortalized mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. The isolated primary mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts were immortalized by the infection of lentivirus containing Simian Virus 40 T-antigen (SV40 T-Ag). The immortalization of floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts was verified by the long-term passages and genomic integration of SV40 T-Ag. The immortalized floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines not only proliferated at a high rate and retained the morphology of their primary counterparts, but also preserved the dentin and bone specific gene expression as the primary dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts did. Consistently, the capability of the primary floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal cells and osteoblasts to mineralize was also inherited by the immortalized dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. Thus, we have successfully generated the immortalized mouse floxed Fam20c dental papilla mesenchymal and osteoblast cell lines. PMID:25833681

  15. Endochondral bone formation in embryonic mouse pre-metatarsals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    Long term exposure to a reduced gravitational environment has a deleterious effect on bone. The developmental events which occur prior to initial bone deposition will provide insight into the regulation of mature bone physiology. We have characterized a system in which the events preceding bone formation take place in an isolated in vitro organ culture environment. We show that cultured pre-metatarsal tissue parallels development of pre-metatarsal tissue in the embryo. Both undergo mesenchyme differentiation and morphogenesis to form a cartilage rod, which resembles the future bone, followed by terminal chondrocyte differentiation in a definite morphogenetic pattern. These sequential steps occur prior to osteoblast maturation and bone matrix deposition in the developing organism. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity is a distinctive enzymatic marker for mineralizing tissues. We have measured this activity throughout pre-metatarsal development and show (a) where in the tissue it is predominantly found, and (b) that this is indeed the mineralizing isoform of the enzyme.

  16. Genetics of primary and timing effects in the mnd mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, A.; Plummer, J.; MacMillen, M.C.

    1995-06-05

    The mnd mouse shows a spontaneous adult-onset hereditary neurological disease, with motor abnormality by 6 months of age, progressing to severe spastic paralysis and premature death. The disease is autosomal recessive, with heterozygote effects seen under stress. It maps to mouse chromosome (chr) 8. Histopathology with Nissl stains documents substantial abnormalities of upper and lower motor neurons, and there is retinal degeneration beginning in the first month, even without light exposure. Increasing levels of autofluorescent lipopigment are found in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues as the mnd mice age. Recently, NCL-like inclusions and accumulating subunit c have also been described. When mnd is outcrossed to the AKR/J genetic background, ca. 40% of the mnd/mnd F2 progeny show early onset (onset by 4.5-5 months and death by 7 months). This accelerated timing effect seems to be strain-specific, and unlinked to the mnd gene itself. Our current working hypothesis is that the timing effect is due to 2 or 3 unlinked dominant genes with incomplete penetrance at any single locus. In a combined RFLP/PCR fragment genetic analysis, the strongest deviation from the expected ratio of AKR vs B6 alleles occurs with markers on proximal half of chr 1. Additional loci on chrs 5 and 10 may also be involved. The mechanism of interaction of these modifying genes with the primary mnd gene may offer new therapeutic avenues. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Wnt inhibition enhances browning of mouse primary white adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Kinyui Alice; Ng, Pei Yi; Kabiri, Zahra; Virshup, David; Sun, Lei

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The global epidemic in obesity and metabolic syndrome requires novel approaches to tackle. White adipose tissue, traditionally seen as a passive energy-storage organ, can be induced to take on certain characteristics of brown fat in a process called browning. The “browned” white adipose tissue, or beige fat, is a potential anti-obesity target. Various signaling pathways can enhance browning. Wnt is a key regulator of adipocyte biology, but its role in browning has not been explored. In this study, we found that in primary mouse adipocytes derived from the inguinal depot, Wnt inhibition by both chemical and genetic methods significantly enhanced browning. The effect of Wnt inhibition on browning most likely targets the beige precursor cells in selected adipose depots. PMID:27386162

  18. Primary Osteosarcoma of the Rib Identified on Bone Scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Peng; Huang, Jianmin

    2016-05-01

    Osteosarcomas generally arise in appendicular skeletons, but rarely in the ribs. We described Tc-MDP bone scan findings from a 23-year-old man with right back pain. The images demonstrated elevated activity in the region overlapping the posterior 8th to 10th ribs and in the L9-10 vertebral bodies. CT showed an 8.8 × 8.3 cm mildly peripherally calcified mass arising from the right 10th rib involving the 9th and 10th thoracic vertebrae. Pathological examination confirmed primary osteosarcoma of the rib. PMID:26704734

  19. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  20. Mineral metabolism in isolated mouse long bones: Opposite effects of microgravity on mineralization and resorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuijzen, Jean Paul; Vanloon, Jack J. W. A.

    1994-01-01

    An experiment using isolated skeletal tissues under microgravity, is reported. Fetal mouse long bones (metatarsals) were cultured for 4 days in the Biorack facility of Spacelab during the IML-1 (International Microgravity Laboratory) mission of the Space Shuttle. Overall growth was not affected, however glucose consumption was significantly reduced under microgravity. Mineralization of the diaphysis was also strongly reduced under microgravity as compared to the on-board 1 g group. In contrast, mineral resorption by osteoclasts was signficantly increased. These results indicate that these fetal mouse long bones are a sensitive and useful model to further study the cellular mechanisms involved in the changed mineral metabolism of skeletal tissues under microgravity.

  1. Decreased osteoclastogenesis, osteoblastogenesis and low bone mass in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Dong, Yonghui; Huang, Xin; Li, Mi; Qin, Liang; Ren, Ye; Guo, Fengjing; Chen, Anmin; Huang, Shilong

    2014-10-01

    The effect of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on bone is controversial. Therefore, the present study investigated whether T2DM causes osteoporosis and explored the underlying mechanisms involved in this process. The effects of T2DM on bone physiology were analyzed in a mouse model of T2DM; KK/Upj‑Ay/J (KK‑Ay) mice develop diabetes after 8 weeks and exhibit stable diabetes symptoms and signs after 10 weeks when fed a KK‑Ay mouse maintenance fodder. Diabetic mice exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and increased body and fat pad weight in comparison with C57BL/6 non-diabetic mice. Furthermore, diabetic mice demonstrated low bone weight and bone mineral density in the femur, tibia and fifth lumbar vertebra. Using von Kossa and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, alkaline phosphatase and TRAP activity analyses and gene profiling it was demonstrated that osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis were impaired in diabetic mice. To evaluate the bone biomechanics, the ultimate load of the bone was analyzed. It was found that the ultimate load of the tibia in diabetic mice was lower than that in the controls. The results from the present study suggest that bone metabolism is impaired in T2DM, resulting in decreased osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis and bone mass. PMID:25109926

  2. Hormone Treatment Restores Bone Density for Young Women with Menopause-Like Condition (Primary Ovarian Insufficiency)

    MedlinePlus

    ... determine the effects of hormone treatment on bone mineral density of women with primary ovarian insufficiency. Researchers ... insufficiency (POI) led to increases in their bone mineral density, restoring levels to normal. The study was ...

  3. Primary sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of bone: analysis of a series.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, John B; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Dal Cin, Paola; Bredella, Miriam A; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornicek, Francis J; Deshpande, Vikram; Hornick, Jason L; Nielsen, G Petur

    2014-11-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare, aggressive malignant neoplasm characterized by small nests and linear arrays of epithelioid cells embedded in a dense collagenous matrix. Very few primary SEFs of bone have been reported. Recognition is critical, as the dense extracellular collagenous matrix can be interpreted as osteoid, leading to misdiagnosis as-osteosarcoma. MUC4 and SATB2 are 2 recently characterized immunohistochemical markers for SEF and osteosarcoma, respectively. In reports to date, osteosarcomas are positive for SATB2 and negative for MUC4, whereas soft tissue SEFs have shown the opposite immunohistochemical profile (SATB2-/MUC4+). The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of 8 primary SEFs of bone. The patients presented at a wide range of ages (25 to 73 y; median 52 y). Tumors mostly involved long bones of the extremities, with 3 cases involving the femur, 2 involving the ulna, and 1 involving the humerus. Other sites of involvement included the second rib (1) and the C6 vertebra (1). Follow-up information was available for 7 patients, 3 of whom developed metastases within 2 years of diagnosis. The other 4 patients were free of local recurrence or metastases at 1, 5, 12, and >84 months of follow-up, respectively. Radiographically, the tumors were predominantly lytic and poorly marginated. Histologically, 6 tumors showed pure SEF morphology, and 2 showed hybrid SEF/low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma morphology. Focal dystrophic mineralization was seen in 1 case but was limited to areas of necrosis. None of the tumors showed the lace-like pattern of mineralization typical of osteosarcoma. The majority (6/8) of the tumors strongly expressed MUC4. SATB2 was negative in all but 1 case, which showed variable weak to moderate staining in ∼50% of nuclei. In general, the combination of morphology, MUC4 expression, and the absence of SATB2 expression was highly useful in arriving at the

  4. Polarization in Raman spectroscopy helps explain bone brittleness in genetic mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Pence, Isaac J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Huszagh, Meredith C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been extensively used to characterize bone composition. However, the link between bone biomechanics and RS measures is not well established. Here, we leveraged the sensitivity of RS polarization to organization, thereby assessing whether RS can explain differences in bone toughness in genetic mouse models for which traditional RS peak ratios are not informative. In the selected mutant mice-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) knock-outs-toughness is reduced but differences in bone strength do not exist between knock-out and corresponding wild-type controls. To incorporate differences in the RS of bone occurring at peak shoulders, a multivariate approach was used. Full spectrum principal components analysis of two paired, orthogonal bone orientations (relative to laser polarization) improved genotype classification and correlation to bone toughness when compared to traditional peak ratios. When applied to femurs from wild-type mice at 8 and 20 weeks of age, the principal components of orthogonal bone orientations improved age classification but not the explanation of the maturation-related increase in strength. Overall, increasing polarization information by collecting spectra from two bone orientations improves the ability of multivariate RS to explain variance in bone toughness, likely due to polarization sensitivity to organizational changes in both mineral and collagen.

  5. How tough is Brittle Bone? Investigating Osteogenesis Imperfecta in Mouse Bone††

    PubMed Central

    Carriero, A.; Zimmermann, E. A.; Paluszny, A.; Tang, S. Y.; Bale, H.; Busse, B.; Alliston, T.; Kazakia, G.

    2015-01-01

    The multiscale hierarchical structure of bone is naturally optimized to resist fractures. In osteogenesis imperfecta, or brittle bone disease, genetic mutations affect the quality and/or quantity of collagen, dramatically increasing bone fracture risk. Here we reveal how the collagen defect results in bone fragility in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta (oim), which has homotrimeric α1(I) collagen. At the molecular level we attribute the loss in toughness to a decrease in the stabilizing enzymatic crosslinks and an increase in non-enzymatic crosslinks, which may break prematurely inhibiting plasticity. At the tissue level, high vascular canal density reduces the stable crack growth, and extensive woven bone limits the crack-deflection toughening during crack growth. This demonstrates how modifications at the bone molecular level have ramifications at larger length scales affecting the overall mechanical integrity of the bone; thus, treatment strategies have to address multiscale properties in order to regain bone toughness. In this regard, findings from the heterozygous oim bone, where defective as well as normal collagen are present, suggest that increasing the quantity of healthy collagen in these bones helps to recover toughness at the multiple length scales. PMID:24420672

  6. Polarization in Raman spectroscopy helps explain bone brittleness in genetic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Pence, Isaac J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Huszagh, Meredith C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been extensively used to characterize bone composition. However, the link between bone biomechanics and RS measures is not well established. Here, we leveraged the sensitivity of RS polarization to organization, thereby assessing whether RS can explain differences in bone toughness in genetic mouse models for which traditional RS peak ratios are not informative. In the selected mutant mice—activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) knock-outs—toughness is reduced but differences in bone strength do not exist between knock-out and corresponding wild-type controls. To incorporate differences in the RS of bone occurring at peak shoulders, a multivariate approach was used. Full spectrum principal components analysis of two paired, orthogonal bone orientations (relative to laser polarization) improved genotype classification and correlation to bone toughness when compared to traditional peak ratios. When applied to femurs from wild-type mice at 8 and 20 weeks of age, the principal components of orthogonal bone orientations improved age classification but not the explanation of the maturation-related increase in strength. Overall, increasing polarization information by collecting spectra from two bone orientations improves the ability of multivariate RS to explain variance in bone toughness, likely due to polarization sensitivity to organizational changes in both mineral and collagen. PMID:25402627

  7. Bradykinin stimulates bone resorption and lysosomal-enzyme release in cultured mouse calvaria.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, G T; Lerner, U

    1984-01-01

    The effect of bradykinin on bone resorption was studied in cultures of newborn-mouse calvaria. Bradykinin (0.03 microM, 1 microM) stimulated the release of 45Ca2+ from bones dissected out from mice prelabelled in vivo with 45Ca. Bradykinin (1 microM) also augmented the release of stable calcium ( 40Ca ), Pi and the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase. The stimulatory effect of bradykinin on mineral mobilization and lysosmal -enzyme release could be blocked by indomethacin. It is speculated that concomitant generation of thrombin and bradykinin in areas of trauma and inflammation may induce resorption of nearby bone tissue. PMID:6721862

  8. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  9. Decreased Bone Formation Explains Osteoporosis in a Genetic Mouse Model of Hemochromatosiss

    PubMed Central

    Doyard, Mathilde; Chappard, Daniel; Leroyer, Patricia; Roth, Marie-Paule; Loréal, Olivier; Guggenbuhl, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis may complicate iron overload diseases such as genetic hemochromatosis. However, molecular mechanisms involved in the iron-related osteoporosis remains poorly understood. Recent in vitro studies support a role of osteoblast impairment in iron-related osteoporosis. Our aim was to analyse the impact of excess iron in Hfe-/- mice on osteoblast activity and on bone microarchitecture. We studied the bone formation rate, a dynamic parameter reflecting osteoblast activity, and the bone phenotype of Hfe−/− male mice, a mouse model of human hemochromatosis, by using histomorphometry. Hfe−/− animals were sacrificed at 6 months and compared to controls. We found that bone contains excess iron associated with increased hepatic iron concentration in Hfe−/− mice. We have shown that animals with iron overload have decreased bone formation rate, suggesting a direct impact of iron excess on active osteoblasts number. For bone mass parameters, we showed that iron deposition was associated with bone loss by producing microarchitectural impairment with a decreased tendency in bone trabecular volume and trabecular number. A disorganization of trabecular network was found with marrow spaces increased, which was confirmed by enhanced trabecular separation and star volume of marrow spaces. These microarchitectural changes led to a loss of connectivity and complexity in the trabecular network, which was confirmed by decreased interconnectivity index and increased Minkowski’s fractal dimension. Our results suggest for the first time in a genetic hemochromatosis mouse model, that iron overload decreases bone formation and leads to alterations in bone mass and microarchitecture. These observations support a negative effect of iron on osteoblast recruitment and/or function, which may contribute to iron-related osteoporosis. PMID:26829642

  10. Hajdu Cheney Mouse Mutants Exhibit Osteopenia, Increased Osteoclastogenesis, and Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Canalis, Ernesto; Schilling, Lauren; Yee, Siu-Pok; Lee, Sun-Kyeong; Zanotti, Stefano

    2016-01-22

    Notch receptors are determinants of cell fate and function and play a central role in skeletal development and bone remodeling. Hajdu Cheney syndrome, a disease characterized by osteoporosis and fractures, is associated with NOTCH2 mutations resulting in a truncated stable protein and gain-of-function. We created a mouse model reproducing the Hajdu Cheney syndrome by introducing a 6955C→T mutation in the Notch2 locus leading to a Q2319X change at the amino acid level. Notch2(Q2319X) heterozygous mutants were smaller and had shorter femurs than controls; and at 1 month of age they exhibited cancellous and cortical bone osteopenia. As the mice matured, cancellous bone volume was restored partially in male but not female mice, whereas cortical osteopenia persisted in both sexes. Cancellous bone histomorphometry revealed an increased number of osteoclasts and bone resorption, without a decrease in osteoblast number or bone formation. Osteoblast differentiation and function were not affected in Notch2(Q2319X) cells. The pre-osteoclast cell pool, osteoclast differentiation, and bone resorption in response to receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand in vitro were increased in Notch2(Q2319X) mutants. These effects were suppressed by the γ-secretase inhibitor LY450139. In conclusion, Notch2(Q2319X) mice exhibit cancellous and cortical bone osteopenia, enhanced osteoclastogenesis, and increased bone resorption. PMID:26627824

  11. Effects of 810 nm laser on mouse primary cortical neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkwal, Gitika B.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Huang, Ying-Ying; De Taboada, Luis; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2011-03-01

    In the past four decades numerous studies have reported the efficacy of low level light (laser) therapy (LLLT) as a treatment for diverse diseases and injuries. Recent studies have shown that LLLT can biomodulate processes in the central nervous system and has been extensively studied as a stroke treatment. However there is still a lack of knowledge on the effects of LLLT at the cellular level in neurons. The present study aimed to study the effect of 810 nm laser on several cellular processes in primary cortical neurons cultured from mouse embryonic brains. Neurons were irradiated with light dose of 0.03, 0.3, 3, 10 and 30 J/cm2 and intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and calcium were measured. The changes in mitochondrial function in response to light were studied in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Light induced a significant increase in calcium, ATP and MMP at lower fluences and a decrease at higher fluence. ROS was induced significantly by light at all light doses. Nitric oxide levels also showed an increase on treatment with light. The results of the present study suggest that LLLT at lower fluences is capable of inducing mediators of cell signaling process which in turn may be responsible for the biomodulatory effects of the low level laser. At higher fluences beneficial mediators are reduced but potentially harmful mediators are increased thus offering an explanation for the biphasic dose response.

  12. Effects of mouse genotype on bone wound healing and irradiation-induced delay of healing.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Julie; Mizuno, Shuichi; Kung, Jason; Goff, Julie; Epperly, Michael; Dixon, Tracy; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    We tested the effects of mouse genotype (C57BL/6NHsd, NOD/SCID, SAMR1, and SAMP6) and ionizing irradiation on bone wound healing. Unicortical wounds were made in the proximal tibiae, and the time course of spontaneous healing and effects of irradiation were monitored radiographically and histologically. There was reproducible healing beginning with intramedullary osteogenesis, subsequent bone resorption by osteoclasts, gradual bridging of the cortical wound, and re-population of medullary hematopoietic cells. The most rapid wound closure was noted in SAMR1 mice, followed by SAMP6, C57BL/6NHsd, and NOD/SCID. Ionizing irradiation (20 Gy) to the leg significantly delayed bone wound healing in mice of all four genotypes. Mice with genetically-determined predisposition to early osteopenia (SAMP6) or with immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) had impairments in bone wound healing. These mouse models should be valuable for determining the effects of irradiation on bone healing and also for the design and testing of novel bone growth-enhancing drugs and mitigators of ionizing irradiation. PMID:24632972

  13. Myricetin Prevents Alveolar Bone Loss in an Experimental Ovariectomized Mouse Model of Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jialiang; Wu, Chuanlong; Tian, Bo; Zhou, Xiao; Ma, Nian; Qian, Yufen

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a common chronic inflammatory disease, which leads to alveolar bone resorption. Healthy and functional alveolar bone, which can support the teeth and enable their movement, is very important for orthodontic treatment. Myricetin inhibited osteoclastogenesis by suppressing the expression of some genes, signaling pathways, and cytokines. This study aimed to investigate the effects of myricetin on alveolar bone loss in an ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model of periodontitis as well as in vitro osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Twenty-four healthy eight-week-old C57BL/J6 female mice were assigned randomly to four groups: phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control (sham) OVX + ligature + PBS (vehicle), and OVX + ligature + low or high (2 or 5 mg∙kg−1∙day−1, respectively) doses of myricetin. Myricetin or PBS was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) every other day for 30 days. The maxillae were collected and subjected to further examination, including micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining; a resorption pit assay was also performed in vitro to evaluate the effects of myricetin on receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis. Myricetin, at both high and low doses, prevented alveolar bone resorption and increased alveolar crest height in the mouse model and inhibited osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vitro. However, myricetin was more effective at high dose than at low dose. Our study demonstrated that myricetin had a positive effect on alveolar bone resorption in an OVX mouse model of periodontitis and, therefore, may be a potential agent for the treatment of periodontitis and osteoporosis. PMID:27011174

  14. Inhibiting and stimulating effects of TGF-. beta. 1 on osteoclastic bone resorption in fetal mouse bone organ cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Dieudonne, S.C.; Foo, P.; van Zoelen, E.J.; Burger, E.H. )

    1991-05-01

    The effects of TGF-{beta} 1 on osteoclastic resorption of fetal mouse calvaria and long bones at various stages of development was studied in organ culture. In resorbing calvariae and long bones with an established marrow cavity TGF-beta 1 (4-10 ng/ml) had a stimulating effect on 45Ca release that was partially inhibited by indomethacin. In primitive long bones, however, which were explanted before osteoclast invasion and excavation of a marrow cavity had started, TGF-beta 1 (1-4 ng/ml) inhibited 45Ca release by an indomethacin-insensitive mechanism. Histomorphometry of long bones after staining for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) revealed that TGF-beta 1 treatment inhibited the migration of TRAP-positive cells from periosteum to developing marrow cavity and inhibited cell fusion. However, the formation of (mononuclear) TRAP-positive cells in the periosteum-perichondrium was strongly enhanced. These data suggest that TGF-beta 1 modulates various steps in the cascade of osteoclast development, recruitment, and activation in different ways, involving both prostaglandin-mediated and prostaglandin-independent pathways. Therefore the net effect of exogenous TGF-beta 1 on osteoclastic resorption in bone organ cultures depends on the relative prevalence of osteoclast progenitors, precursors, and mature osteoclasts in the tissue under study.

  15. Primary cilia act as mechanosensors during bone healing around an implant.

    PubMed

    Leucht, P; Monica, S D; Temiyasathit, S; Lenton, K; Manu, A; Longaker, M T; Jacobs, C R; Spilker, R L; Guo, H; Brunski, J B; Helms, J A

    2013-03-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle that senses cues in a cell's local environment. Some of these cues constitute molecular signals; here, we investigate the extent to which primary cilia can also sense mechanical stimuli. We used a conditional approach to delete Kif3a in pre-osteoblasts and then employed a motion device that generated a spatial distribution of strain around an intra-osseous implant positioned in the mouse tibia. We correlated interfacial strain fields with cell behaviors ranging from proliferation through all stages of osteogenic differentiation. We found that peri-implant cells in the Col1Cre;Kif3a(fl/fl) mice were unable to proliferate in response to a mechanical stimulus, failed to deposit and then orient collagen fibers to the strain fields caused by implant displacement, and failed to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the lack of a functioning primary cilium blunts the normal response of a cell to a defined mechanical stimulus. The ability to manipulate the genetic background of peri-implant cells within the context of a whole, living tissue provides a rare opportunity to explore mechanotransduction from a multi-scale perspective. PMID:22784673

  16. Primary cilia act as mechanosensors during bone healing around an implant

    PubMed Central

    Leucht, P.; Monica, S.D.; Temiyasathit, S.; Lenton, K.; Manu, A.; Longaker, M.T.; Jacobs, C.R.; Spilker, R.L.; Guo, H.; Brunski, J.B.; Helms, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The primary cilium is an organelle that senses cues in a cell’s local environment. Some of these cues constitute molecular signals; here, we investigate the extent to which primary cilia can also sense mechanical stimuli. We used a conditional approach to delete Kif3a in pre-osteoblasts and then employed a motion device that generated a spatial distribution of strain around an intra-osseous implant positioned in the mouse tibia. We correlated interfacial strain fields with cell behaviors ranging from proliferation through all stages of osteogenic differentiation. We found that peri-implant cells in the Col1Cre;Kif3afl/fl mice were unable to proliferate in response to a mechanical stimulus, failed to deposit and then orient collagen fibers to the strain fields caused by implant displacement, and failed to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the lack of a functioning primary cilium blunts the normal response of a cell to a defined mechanical stimulus. The ability to manipulate the genetic background of peri-implant cells within the context of a whole, living tissue provides a rare opportunity to explore mechanotransduction from a multi-scale perspective. PMID:22784673

  17. Effect of cyclophosphamide and electromagnetic fields on mouse bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Cadossi, R.; Zucchini, P.; Emilia, G.; Torelli, G. )

    1990-02-26

    The authors have previously shown that the exposure to low frequency pulsing electromagnetic fields (PEMF) of mice X-ray irradiated resulted in an increased damage to the bone marrow. The series of experiments here reported were designed to investigate the effect of PEMF exposure after intraperitoneum injection of 200mg/kg of cyclophosphamide (CY). Control mice were CY injected only; experimental mice were CY injected and then exposed to PEMF. Exposure to PEMF (24 hours/day) increased the rate of decline of white blood cells in peripheral blood. Spleen weight was statistically higher among control mice than among mice exposed to PEMF at day 6, 8 and 10 after CY injection. Spleen autoradiography proved to be higher among PEMF exposed mice than among controls at day 8 and 9 after CY injection. The grafting efficiency of the bone marrow obtained from control mice was higher than the grafting efficiency of the bone marrow recovered from mice exposed to PEMF. All these data indicate that the exposure to PEMF increases the cytotoxic effect of CY.

  18. The construction of an in vitro three-dimensional hematopoietic microenvironment for mouse bone marrow cells employing porous carriers.

    PubMed

    Tomimori, Y; Takagi, M; Yoshida, T

    2000-10-01

    Spatial development of mouse bone marrow cellsemploying porous carriers was investigated in order todesign a bioreactor with a three-dimensionalhematopoietic microenvironment. Three types of porouscarriers were used for examining the spatialdevelopment of anchorage-dependent primary stromalcells as feeder cells. Stromal cells were found tospread well at a high density on a polyester nonwovendisc carrier (Fibra cel (FC)) under a scanningelectron microscope, while cells on porous cellulosebeads (Microcube (MC), 500 mum pore diameter)spread at a low density; cells on another type ofcellulose porous beads (CPB, 100 mum pore diameter)were globular. Mouse bone marrow cells wereinoculated to dishes containing three types of porouscarriers which shared more than 30% of the bottomsurface in a dish. The concentration of stromal cellsin the well containing FC was lower than that on theother two carriers. However, the weekly output oftotal hematopoietic cell (suspension cells) increasedbetween day 21 and 28 in the culture using FC while itdecreased monotonously in the cultures by use of theother two carriers. The proportion of progenitorcells (BFU-E, CFU-GM) in the total hematopoietic cellpopulation, after showing an initial decrease,increased after 1 week in the culture using FC whilethe proportion decreased monotonously to zero in thecultures using MC and CPB. PMID:19003386

  19. Neuronal Representation of Ultraviolet Visual Stimuli in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhongchao; Sun, Wenzhi; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Kim, Douglas; Ji, Na

    2015-01-01

    The mouse has become an important model for understanding the neural basis of visual perception. Although it has long been known that mouse lens transmits ultraviolet (UV) light and mouse opsins have absorption in the UV band, little is known about how UV visual information is processed in the mouse brain. Using a custom UV stimulation system and in vivo calcium imaging, we characterized the feature selectivity of layer 2/3 neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1). In adult mice, a comparable percentage of the neuronal population responds to UV and visible stimuli, with similar pattern selectivity and receptive field properties. In young mice, the orientation selectivity for UV stimuli increased steadily during development, but not direction selectivity. Our results suggest that, by expanding the spectral window through which the mouse can acquire visual information, UV sensitivity provides an important component for mouse vision. PMID:26219604

  20. Neuronal Representation of Ultraviolet Visual Stimuli in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhongchao; Sun, Wenzhi; Chen, Tsai-Wen; Kim, Douglas; Ji, Na

    2015-01-01

    The mouse has become an important model for understanding the neural basis of visual perception. Although it has long been known that mouse lens transmits ultraviolet (UV) light and mouse opsins have absorption in the UV band, little is known about how UV visual information is processed in the mouse brain. Using a custom UV stimulation system and in vivo calcium imaging, we characterized the feature selectivity of layer 2/3 neurons in mouse primary visual cortex (V1). In adult mice, a comparable percentage of the neuronal population responds to UV and visible stimuli, with similar pattern selectivity and receptive field properties. In young mice, the orientation selectivity for UV stimuli increased steadily during development, but not direction selectivity. Our results suggest that, by expanding the spectral window through which the mouse can acquire visual information, UV sensitivity provides an important component for mouse vision. PMID:26219604

  1. Bone health as a primary target in the pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, P; Rigante, D

    2009-01-01

    Bone tissue is constantly renewed during childhood and adolescence to assure skeleton growth both in size and mineral density: up to 90 percent of peak bone mass is acquired by age 18 in girls and age 20 in boys, which makes youth the best time to "invest" in bone health. The reduction in bone mineral density leading to compromised strength and microarchitecture of bone tissue can favour the occurrence of fragility fractures in the pediatric age. Assessing the normality of bone density measurements in childhood by current methods is hampered by the lack of normative control data. The understanding of factors useful for maximizing peak bone mass, as well as the knowledge of diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies for managing a state of reduced bone mineral density are crucial to prevent fractures throughout lifetime. PMID:19499847

  2. Primary Hyperparathyroidism: The Influence of Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue on Bone Loss and of Osteocalcin on Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Maira L.; Batista, Sérgio L.; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H.; Salmon, Carlos E.G.; de Paula, Francisco J.A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Bone marrow adipose tissue has been associated with low bone mineral density. However, no data exist regarding marrow adipose tissue in primary hyperparathyroidism, a disorder associated with bone loss in conditions of high bone turnover. The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between marrow adipose tissue, bone mass and parathyroid hormone. The influence of osteocalcin on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was also evaluated. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at a university hospital, involving 18 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and 21 controls (CG). Bone mass was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and marrow adipose tissue was assessed by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The biochemical evaluation included the determination of parathyroid hormone, osteocalcin, glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS: A negative association was found between the bone mass at the 1/3 radius and parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.69; p<0.01). Marrow adipose tissue was not significantly increased in patients (CG = 32.8±11.2% vs PHPT = 38.6±12%). The serum levels of osteocalcin were higher in patients (CG = 8.6±3.6 ng/mL vs PHPT = 36.5±38.4 ng/mL; p<0.005), but no associations were observed between osteocalcin and insulin or between insulin and both marrow adipose tissue and bone mass. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the increment of adipogenesis in the bone marrow microenvironment under conditions of high bone turnover due to primary hyperparathyroidism is limited. Despite the increased serum levels of osteocalcin due to primary hyperparathyroidism, these patients tend to have impaired insulin sensitivity.

  3. Ex vivo determination of bone tissue strains for an in vivo mouse tibial loading model.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Alessandra; Abela, Lisa; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-07-18

    Previous studies introduced the digital image correlation (DIC) as a viable technique for measuring bone strain during loading. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of a DIC system in determining surface strains in a mouse tibia while loaded in compression through the knee joint. Specifically, we examined the effect of speckle distribution, facet size and overlap, initial vertical alignment of the bone into the loading cups, rotation with respect to cameras, and ex vivo loading configurations on the strain contour maps measured with a DIC system. We loaded tibiae of C57BL/6 mice (12 and 18 weeks old male) up to 12 N at 8 N/min. Images of speckles on the bone surface were recorded at 1N intervals and DIC was used to compute strains. Results showed that speckles must have the correct size and density with respect to the facet size of choice for the strain distribution to be computed and reproducible. Initial alignment of the bone within the loading cups does not influence the strain distribution measured during peak loading, but bones must be placed in front of the camera with the same orientation in order for strains to be comparable. Finally, the ex vivo loading configurations with the tibia attached to the entire mouse, or to the femur and foot, or only to the foot, showed different strain contour maps. This work provides a better understanding of parameters affecting full field strain measurements from DIC in ex vivo murine tibial loading tests. PMID:24835472

  4. Predicting cortical bone adaptation to axial loading in the mouse tibia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, A. F.; Javaheri, B.; Pitsillides, A. A.; Shefelbine, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of predictive mathematical models can contribute to a deeper understanding of the specific stages of bone mechanobiology and the process by which bone adapts to mechanical forces. The objective of this work was to predict, with spatial accuracy, cortical bone adaptation to mechanical load, in order to better understand the mechanical cues that might be driving adaptation. The axial tibial loading model was used to trigger cortical bone adaptation in C57BL/6 mice and provide relevant biological and biomechanical information. A method for mapping cortical thickness in the mouse tibia diaphysis was developed, allowing for a thorough spatial description of where bone adaptation occurs. Poroelastic finite-element (FE) models were used to determine the structural response of the tibia upon axial loading and interstitial fluid velocity as the mechanical stimulus. FE models were coupled with mechanobiological governing equations, which accounted for non-static loads and assumed that bone responds instantly to local mechanical cues in an on–off manner. The presented formulation was able to simulate the areas of adaptation and accurately reproduce the distributions of cortical thickening observed in the experimental data with a statistically significant positive correlation (Kendall's τ rank coefficient τ = 0.51, p < 0.001). This work demonstrates that computational models can spatially predict cortical bone mechanoadaptation to a time variant stimulus. Such models could be used in the design of more efficient loading protocols and drug therapies that target the relevant physiological mechanisms. PMID:26311315

  5. Abnormal bone formation induced by implantation of osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance in the X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, H.; Masuhara, K.; Takaoka, K.; Ono, K.; Tanaka, H.; Seino, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The X-linked hypophosphatemic mouse (Hyp) has been proposed as a model for the human familial hypophosphatemia (the most common form of vitamin D-resistant rickets). An osteosarcoma-derived bone-inducing substance was subcutaneously implanted into the Hyp mouse. The implant was consistently replaced by cartilage tissue at 2 weeks after implantation. The cartilage matrix seemed to be normal, according to the histological examination, and 35sulphur (TVS) uptake was also normal. Up to 4 weeks after implantation the cartilage matrix was completely replaced by unmineralized bone matrix and hematopoietic bone marrow. Osteoid tissue arising from the implantation of bone inducing substance in the Hyp mouse showed no radiologic or histologic sign of calcification. These findings suggest that the abnormalities of endochondral ossification in the Hyp mouse might be characterized by the failure of mineralization in cartilage and bone matrix. Analysis of the effects of bone-inducing substance on the Hyp mouse may help to give greater insight into the mechanism and treatment of human familial hypophosphatemia.

  6. Generation and Identification of GM-CSF Derived Alveolar-like Macrophages and Dendritic Cells From Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yifei; Arif, Arif A; Poon, Grace F T; Hardman, Blair; Dosanjh, Manisha; Johnson, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are innate immune cells found in tissues and lymphoid organs that play a key role in the defense against pathogens. However, they are difficult to isolate in sufficient numbers to study them in detail, therefore, in vitro models have been developed. In vitro cultures of bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells are well-established and valuable methods for immunological studies. Here, a method for culturing and identifying both DCs and macrophages from a single culture of primary mouse bone marrow cells using the cytokine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is described. This protocol is based on the established procedure first developed by Lutz et al. in 1999 for bone marrow-derived DCs. The culture is heterogeneous, and MHCII and fluoresceinated hyaluronan (FL-HA) are used to distinguish macrophages from immature and mature DCs. These GM-CSF derived macrophages provide a convenient source of in vitro derived macrophages that closely resemble alveolar macrophages in both phenotype and function. PMID:27404290

  7. Automated Cell Detection and Morphometry on Growth Plate Images of Mouse Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Du, Xia; Harding, James I; Beylerian, Emily N; de Silva, Brian M; Gross, Ben J; Kastein, Hannah K; Wang, Weiguang; Lyons, Karen M; Schaeffer, Hayden

    2014-01-01

    Microscopy imaging of mouse growth plates is extensively used in biology to understand the effect of specific molecules on various stages of normal bone development and on bone disease. Until now, such image analysis has been conducted by manual detection. In fact, when existing automated detection techniques were applied, morphological variations across the growth plate and heterogeneity of image background color, including the faint presence of cells (chondrocytes) located deeper in tissue away from the image’s plane of focus, and lack of cell-specific features, interfered with identification of cell. We propose the first method of automated detection and morphometry applicable to images of cells in the growth plate of long bone. Through ad hoc sequential application of the Retinex method, anisotropic diffusion and thresholding, our new cell detection algorithm (CDA) addresses these challenges on bright-field microscopy images of mouse growth plates. Five parameters, chosen by the user in respect of image characteristics, regulate our CDA. Our results demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed numerical method relative to manual methods. Our CDA confirms previously established results regarding chondrocytes’ number, area, orientation, height and shape of normal growth plates. Our CDA also confirms differences previously found between the genetic mutated mouse Smad1/5CKO and its control mouse on fluorescence images. The CDA aims to aid biomedical research by increasing efficiency and consistency of data collection regarding arrangement and characteristics of chondrocytes. Our results suggest that automated extraction of data from microscopy imaging of growth plates can assist in unlocking information on normal and pathological development, key to the underlying biological mechanisms of bone growth. PMID:25525552

  8. Novel mouse mammary cell lines for in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tumor cell lines that can be tracked in vivo during tumorigenesis and metastasis provide vital tools for studying the specific cellular mechanisms that mediate these processes as well as investigating therapeutic targets to inhibit them. The goal of this study was to engineer imageable mouse mammary tumor cell lines with discrete propensities to metastasize to bone in vivo. Two novel luciferase expressing cell lines were developed and characterized for use in the study of breast cancer metastasis to bone in a syngeneic mouse model. Results The 4 T1.2 luc3 and 66c14 luc2 cell lines were shown to have high levels of bioluminescence intensity in vitro and in vivo after orthotopic injection into mouse mammary fat pads. The 4 T1.2 luc3 cell line was found to closely model the sites of metastases seen in human patients including lung, liver, and bone. Specifically, 4 T1.2 luc3 cells demonstrated a high incidence of metastasis to spine, with an ex-vivo BLI intensity three orders of magnitude above the commercially available 4 T1 luc2 cells. 66c14 luc2 cells also demonstrated metastasis to spine, which was lower than that of 4 T1.2 luc3 cells but higher than 4 T1 luc2 cells, in addition to previously unreported metastases in the liver. High osteolytic activity of the 4 T1.2 luc3 cells in vivo in the bone microenvironment was also detected. Conclusions The engineered 4 T1.2 luc3 and 66c14 luc2 cell lines described in this study are valuable tools for studying the cellular events moderating the metastasis of breast tumor cells to bone. PMID:22510147

  9. An investigation of the mineral in ductile and brittle cortical mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter, and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone's mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone's mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta model, oim(-/-) , mice have a defect in the collagen, which leads to brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants, Phospho1(-/-) , have ductile bone resulting from altered mineralization. Oim(-/-) and Phospho1(-/-) were compared with their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (BSE SEM). Results revealed that although both pathology models had extremely different whole-bone mechanics, they both had smaller apatite crystals, lower bulk mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. In contrast, the degree of mineralization of bone matrix was different for each strain: brittle oim(-/-) were hypermineralized, whereas ductile Phospho1(-/-) were hypomineralized. Despite differences in the mineralization, nanoscale alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results indicated that alterations from normal crystal size

  10. Dendritic Cells Cause Bone Lesions in a New Mouse Model of Histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Grosjean, Frédéric; Nasi, Sonia; Schneider, Pascal; Chobaz, Véronique; Liu, Alexandra; Mordasini, Vanessa; Moullec, Kristell; Vezzoni, Paolo; Lavanchy, Christine; Busso, Nathalie; Acha-Orbea, Hans; Ehirchiou, Driss

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare disease caused by the clonal accumulation of dendritic Langerhans cells, which is often accompanied by osteolytic lesions. It has been reported that osteoclast-like cells play a major role in the pathogenic bone destruction seen in patients with LCH and these cells are postulated to originate from the fusion of DCs. However, due to the lack of reliable animal models the pathogenesis of LCH is still poorly understood. In this study, we have established a mouse model of histiocytosis- recapitulating human disease for osteolytic lesions seen in LCH patients. At 12 weeks after birth, severe bone lesions were observed in our multisystem histiocytosis (Mushi) model, when CD8α conventional dendritic cells (DCs) are transformed (MuTuDC) and accumulate. Most importantly, our study demonstrates that bone loss in LCH can be accounted for the transdifferentiation of MuTuDCs into functional osteoclasts both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, we have shown that injected MuTuDCs reverse the osteopetrotic phenotype of oc/oc mice in vivo. In conclusion, our results support a crucial role of DCs in bone lesions in histiocytosis patients. Furthermore, our new model of LCH based on adoptive transfer of MuTuDC lines, leading to bone lesions within 1–2 weeks, will be an important tool for investigating the pathophysiology of this disease and ultimately for evaluating the potential of anti-resorptive drugs for the treatment of bone lesions. PMID:26247358

  11. Magnetic assembly-mediated enhancement of differentiation of mouse bone marrow cells cultured on magnetic colloidal assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jianfei; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Jiqing; Song, Lina; Chen, Zihao; Liu, Haoyu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2014-05-01

    Here we reported an interesting phenomenon that the field-induced assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles can promote the differentiation of primary mouse bone marrow cells into osteoblasts. The reason was thought to lie in the remnant magnetic interaction inside the assemblies which resulted from the magnetic field-directed assembly. Influence of the assemblies on the cells was realized by means of interface effect rather than the internalization effect. We fabricated a stripe-like assemblies array on the glass plate and cultured cells on this surface. We characterized the morphology of assemblies and measured the mechanic property as well as the magnetic property. The cellular differentiation was measured by staining and quantitative PCR. Finally, Fe uptake was excluded as the reason to cause the phenomenon.

  12. Magnetic assembly-mediated enhancement of differentiation of mouse bone marrow cells cultured on magnetic colloidal assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianfei; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Jiqing; Song, Lina; Chen, Zihao; Liu, Haoyu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Here we reported an interesting phenomenon that the field-induced assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles can promote the differentiation of primary mouse bone marrow cells into osteoblasts. The reason was thought to lie in the remnant magnetic interaction inside the assemblies which resulted from the magnetic field-directed assembly. Influence of the assemblies on the cells was realized by means of interface effect rather than the internalization effect. We fabricated a stripe-like assemblies array on the glass plate and cultured cells on this surface. We characterized the morphology of assemblies and measured the mechanic property as well as the magnetic property. The cellular differentiation was measured by staining and quantitative PCR. Finally, Fe uptake was excluded as the reason to cause the phenomenon. PMID:24874764

  13. Inhibitory effect of CGRP on osteoclast formation by mouse bone marrow cells treated with isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Kyoko; Hirukawa, Koji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Togari, Akifumi

    2005-04-29

    The present study was designed to elucidate the mode of action of isoproterenol (Isp; adrenergic beta-agonist) and to characterize the effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory neuropeptide) on osteoclast formation induced by Isp in a mouse bone marrow culture system. Treatment of mouse bone marrow cells with Isp generated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells (MNCs) capable of excavating resorptive pits on dentine slices, and caused an increase in receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and a decrease in osteoprotegerin (OPG) production by the marrow cells. The osteoclast formation was significantly inhibited by OPG, suggesting the involvement of the RANKL-RANK system. CGRP inhibited the osteoclast formation caused by Isp or soluble RANKL (s-RANKL) but had no influence on RANKL or OPG production by the bone marrow cells treated with Isp, suggesting that CGRP inhibited the osteoclast formation by interfering with the action of RANKL produced by the Isp-treated bone marrow cells without affecting RANKL or OPG production. This in vitro data suggest the physiological interaction of sympathetic and sensory nerves in osteoclastogenesis in vivo. PMID:15814197

  14. COLLAGEN MUTATION CAUSES CHANGES OF THE MICRODAMAGE MORPHOLOGY IN BONE OF AN OI MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Dong, X. Neil; Zoghi, Mahyar; Ran, Qitao; Wang, Xiaodu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have postulated that ultrastructural changes may alter the pattern and capacity of microdamage accumulation in bone. Using an osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) mouse model, this study was performed to investigate the correlation of collagen mutation with the microdamage morphology and the associated brittleness of bone. In this study, femurs from mild OI and wild type mice were fatigued under four-point bending to create microdamage in the specimens. Then, the microdamage morphology of these specimens was examined using the bulk-staining technique with basic fuchsin. Similar with the results of previous studies, it was observed that linear microcracks were formed more easily in compression, whereas diffuse damage was induced more readily in tension for both wild-type and mild-type mice. However, less diffuse damage was found in the tensile side of mild OI mouse femurs (collagen mutation) compared with those of wild type mice, showing that the microdamage morphology is correlated to the brittleness of bone. The results of this study provide direct evidence that supports the prediction made by the previous numerical simulation studies, suggesting that microdamage morphology in bone is significantly correlated with the integrity of the collagen phase. PMID:20736092

  15. Collagen mutation causes changes of the microdamage morphology in bone of an OI mouse model.

    PubMed

    Dong, X Neil; Zoghi, Mahyar; Ran, Qitao; Wang, Xiaodu

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have postulated that ultrastructural changes may alter the pattern and capacity of microdamage accumulation in bone. Using an osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) mouse model, this study was performed to investigate the correlation of collagen mutation with the microdamage morphology and the associated brittleness of bone. In this study, femurs from mild OI and wild type mice were fatigued under four-point bending to create microdamage in the specimens. Then, the microdamage morphology of these specimens was examined using the bulk-staining technique with basic fuchsin. Similar with the results of previous studies, it was observed that linear microcracks were formed more easily in compression, whereas diffuse damage was induced more readily in tension for both wild-type and mild-type mice. However, less diffuse damage was found in the tensile side of mild OI mouse femurs (collagen mutation) compared with those of wild type mice, showing that the microdamage morphology is correlated to the brittleness of bone. The results of this study provide direct evidence that supports the prediction made by the previous numerical simulation studies, suggesting that microdamage morphology in bone is significantly correlated with the integrity of the collagen phase. PMID:20736092

  16. Evaluation of an in vitro muscle contraction model in mouse primary cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Ogino, Shinya; Ito, Miyuki; Furuichi, Yasuro; Takagi, Mayumi; Yamada, Mio; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Ono, Yusuke; Fujii, Nobuharu L

    2016-03-15

    To construct an in vitro contraction model with the primary cultured myotubes, we isolated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus. Differentiated myotubes possessed a greater number of sarcomere assemblies and higher expression levels of myosin heavy chain, cytochrome c oxidase IV, and myoglobin than in C2C12 myotubes. In agreement with these results regarding the sarcomere assemblies and protein expressions, the primary myotubes showed higher contractile activity stimulated by the electric pulses than that in the C2C12 myotubes. These data suggest that mouse primary myotubes will be a valuable research tool as an in vitro muscle contraction model. PMID:26548957

  17. Osteoclasts are not the major source of interleukin-6 in mouse parietal bones.

    PubMed

    Holt, I; Davie, M W; Marshall, M J

    1996-03-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is produced by bone cells and has been shown to stimulate the proliferation of osteoclast progenitors. Which cells in bone produce IL-6 is controversial. This article tests the hypothesis that tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts (TRAP + OC) in neonatal mouse parietal bones are the major source of IL-6. Bones were preincubated with indomethacin to decrease the number of TRAP + OC and the amount of IL-6 produced. Incubation with parathyroid hormone or prostaglandin E2 increased the number of TRAP + OC and the amount of IL-6 produced. Calcitonin and 17 beta-estradiol inhibited this increase in TRAP + OC but had no effect on IL-6 production. 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 also stimulated an increase in TRAP + OC number but did not cause increased IL-6 production. Both the endocranial and ectocranial membranes of these bones produced large amounts of IL-6. TRAP activity in extracts of endocranial membranes was 14-fold that of the ectocranial membrane and, histochemically, some TRAP + cells could be detected here. However, the ectocranial membranes produced more IL-6 than the endocranial membranes. We conclude that TRAP + OC are not a major source of IL-6 in this system. PMID:8703576

  18. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts: a model of mesenchymal cartilage formation.

    PubMed

    Lengner, Christopher J; Lepper, Christoph; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B

    2004-09-01

    Cartilage formation is an intricate process that requires temporal and spatial organization of regulatory factors in order for a mesenchymal progenitor cell to differentiate through the distinct stages of chondrogenesis. Gene function during this process has best been studied by analysis of in vivo cartilage formation in genetically altered mouse models. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from such mouse models have been widely used for the study of growth control and DNA damage response. Here, we address the potential of MEFs to undergo chondrogenic differentiation. We demonstrate for the first time that MEFs can enter and complete the program of chondrogenic differentiation ex vivo, from undifferentiated progenitor cells to mature, hypertrophic chondrocytes. We show that chondrogenic differentiation can be induced by cell-cell contact or BMP-2 treatment, while in combination, these conditions synergistically enhance chondrocyte differentiation resulting in the formation of 3-dimensional (3-D) cartilaginous tissue ex vivo. Temporal expression profiles of pro-chondrogenic transcription factors Bapx1 and Sox9 and cartilaginous extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins Collagen Type II and X (Coll II and Coll X) demonstrate that the in vivo progression of chondrocyte maturation is recapitulated in the MEF model system. Our findings establish the MEF as a powerful tool for the generation of cartilaginous tissue ex vivo and for the study of gene function during chondrogenesis. PMID:15254959

  19. A Method for Generation of Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages from Cryopreserved Mouse Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Djalma S.; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2010-01-01

    The broad use of transgenic and gene-targeted mice has established bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) as important mammalian host cells for investigation of the macrophages biology. Over the last decade, extensive research has been done to determine how to freeze and store viable hematopoietic human cells; however, there is no information regarding generation of BMDM from frozen murine bone marrow (BM) cells. Here, we establish a highly efficient protocol to freeze murine BM cells and further generate BMDM. Cryopreserved murine BM cells maintain their potential for BMDM differentiation for more than 6 years. We compared BMDM obtained from fresh and frozen BM cells and found that both are similarly able to trigger the expression of CD80 and CD86 in response to LPS or infection with the intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila. Additionally, BMDM obtained from fresh or frozen BM cells equally restrict or support the intracellular multiplication of pathogens such as L. pneumophila and the protozoan parasite Leishmania (L.) amazonensis. Although further investigation are required to support the use of the method for generation of dendritic cells, preliminary experiments indicate that bone marrow-derived dendritic cells can also be generated from cryopreserved BM cells. Overall, the method described and validated herein represents a technical advance as it allows ready and easy generation of BMDM from a stock of frozen BM cells. PMID:21179419

  20. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    PubMed

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji; Serafini, Marta

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  1. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  2. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Da; Baik, Andrew D.; Lu, X. Lucas; Zhou, Bin; Lai, Xiaohan; Wang, Liyun; Luo, Erping; Guo, X. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Osteocytes have been hypothesized to be the major mechanosensors in bone. How in situ osteocytes respond to mechanical stimuli is still unclear because of technical difficulties. In vitro studies have shown that osteocytes exhibited unique calcium (Ca2+) oscillations to fluid shear. However, whether this mechanotransduction phenomenon holds for in situ osteocytes embedded within a mineralized bone matrix under dynamic loading remains unknown. Using a novel synchronized loading/imaging technique, we successfully visualized in real time and quantified Ca2+ responses in osteocytes and bone surface cells in situ under controlled dynamic loading on intact mouse tibia. The resultant fluid-induced shear stress on the osteocyte in the lacunocanalicular system (LCS) was also quantified. Osteocytes, but not surface cells, displayed repetitive Ca2+ spikes in response to dynamic loading, with spike frequency and magnitude dependent on load magnitude, tissue strain, and shear stress in the LCS. The Ca2+ oscillations were significantly reduced by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) depletion and P2 purinergic receptor (P2R)/phospholipase C (PLC) inhibition. This study provides direct evidence that osteocytes respond to in situ mechanical loading by Ca2+ oscillations, which are dependent on the P2R/PLC/inositol trisphosphate/ER pathway. This study develops a novel approach in skeletal mechanobiology and also advances our fundamental knowledge of bone mechanotransduction.—Jing, D., Baik, A. D., Lu, X. L., Zhou, B., Lai, X., Wang, L., Luo, E., Guo, X. E. In situ intracellular calcium oscillations in osteocytes in intact mouse long bones under dynamic mechanical loading. PMID:24347610

  3. miRNA-29b improves bone healing in mouse fracture model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wayne Y; Li, Nan; Lin, Sien; Wang, Bin; Lan, Hui Y; Li, Gang

    2016-07-15

    A number of miRNAs regulates bone remodeling and their levels in circulation were associated with bone fracture, however no miRNAs have yet been shown to improve fracture healing directly. This study aimed to investigate the effect of miR-29b-3p on mice femoral fracture healing through site-specific delivery with microbubble-ultrasound system. miR-29b-3p promoted osteogenesis of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as indicated with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Alizarin red S staining. Animal study showed that single injection of miR-29b-3p at week 2 post fracture improved healing outcome as indicated by significant decrease of callus width and area with radiographic analysis without causing significant weight loss. Static bone histomorphometry analysis showed that miR-29b-3p increased bone volume fraction (BV/TV), and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) measurement showed increased BV/TV of high density bone and bone mineral density (BMD) of the callus. 3 point bending mechanical test showed improved relative stiffness. However, repeated injection of miR-29b-3p at weeks 2 and 3 did not result in additive therapeutic outcome, and caused increased total tissue volume and reduced BMD of the callus. This is the first report showing significant therapeutic effect of miR-29b-3p on femoral fracture healing through site-specific delivery with microbubble-ultrasound system. Further studies are warranted to investigate the underlying mechanisms and to refine the treatment protocol. PMID:27113026

  4. Establishing Biomechanical Mechanisms in Mouse Models: Practical Guidelines for Systematically Evaluating Phenotypic Changes in the Diaphyses of Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Karl J; Silva, Matthew J; Vashishth, Deepak; Guo, X Edward; van der Meulen, Marjolein CH

    2016-01-01

    Mice are widely used in studies of skeletal biology, and assessment of their bones by mechanical testing is a critical step when evaluating the functional effects of an experimental perturbation. For example, a gene knockout may target a pathway important in bone formation and result in a “low bone mass” phenotype. But how well does the skeleton bear functional loads; eg, how much do bones deform during loading and how resistant are bones to fracture? By systematic evaluation of bone morphological, densitometric, and mechanical properties, investigators can establish the “biomechanical mechanisms” whereby an experimental perturbation alters whole-bone mechanical function. The goal of this review is to clarify these biomechanical mechanisms and to make recommendations for systematically evaluating phenotypic changes in mouse bones, with a focus on long-bone diaphyses and cortical bone. Further, minimum reportable standards for testing conditions and outcome variables are suggested that will improve the comparison of data across studies. Basic biomechanical principles are reviewed, followed by a description of the cross-sectional morphological properties that best inform the net cellular effects of a given experimental perturbation and are most relevant to biomechanical function. Although morphology is critical, whole-bone mechanical properties can only be determined accurately by a mechanical test. The functional importance of stiffness, maximum load, postyield displacement, and work-to-fracture are reviewed. Because bone and body size are often strongly related, strategies to adjust whole-bone properties for body mass are detailed. Finally, a comprehensive framework is presented using real data, and several examples from the literature are reviewed to illustrate how to synthesize morphological, tissue-level, and whole-bone mechanical properties of mouse long bones. PMID:25917136

  5. Near IR fluorescent conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)bisphosphonate nanoparticles for in vivo bone targeting in a young mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rudnick-Glick, S; Corem-Salkmon, E; Grinberg, I; Yehuda, R; Margel, S

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonate (BP) compounds are widely used in the treatment of bone disorders. This group of drugs with a high affinity to Ca(+2) ions is rapidly attracted to bone mineral, especially in areas of high resorption. We have engineered unique biodegradable BP nanoparticles (NPs) by dispersion co-polymerization of the monomers methacrylate-PEG-BP) and (3-Aminopropyl)mathacrylamide) with the crosslinker monomer tetra ethylene glycol diacrylate. These NPs possess a dual functionality: (1) covalent attachment of a dye (e.g. near IR dye) or a drug to the nanoparticles through the primary amine groups on the surface of the NPs; (2) chelation to the bone mineral hydroxyapatite through the BP on the surface of the NPs. This study describes the uptake of the unique near IR fluorescent Cy 7-conjugated BP NPs in bone of a young mouse model. Blood half-life studies revealed a relatively long half-life (approximately 5 h) due to a high concentration of PEG in the BP NPs as well as a relatively long whole body clearance (approximately 2 weeks). Body distribution studies showed a specific uptake of the BP NPs in bone. These unique engineered BP NPs are planned to be utilized in future work for diagnostic and drug delivery systems that are targeted to bone disorders. PMID:26577112

  6. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction in the Osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model Aga2 and human patients are caused by bone-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Frank; Cohrs, Christian M.; Flor, Armando; Lisse, Thomas S.; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; Horsch, Marion; Schrewe, Anja; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Ivandic, Boris; Katus, Hugo A.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Reisenberg, Catherine; Chaney, Hollis; Fuchs, Helmut; Hans, Wolfgang; Beckers, Johannes; Marini, Joan C.; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder with skeletal dysplasia of varying severity, predominantly caused by mutations in the collagen I genes (COL1A1/COL1A2). Extraskeletal findings such as cardiac and pulmonary complications are generally considered to be significant secondary features. Aga2, a murine model for human OI, was systemically analyzed in the German Mouse Clinic by means of in vivo and in vitro examinations of the cardiopulmonary system, to identify novel mechanisms accounting for perinatal lethality. Pulmonary and, especially, cardiac fibroblast of perinatal lethal Aga2/+ animals display a strong down-regulation of Col1a1 transcripts in vivo and in vitro, resulting in a loss of extracellular matrix integrity. In addition, dysregulated gene expression of Nppa, different types of collagen and Agt in heart and lung tissue support a bone-independent vicious cycle of heart dysfunction, including hypertrophy, loss of myocardial matrix integrity, pulmonary hypertension, pneumonia and hypoxia leading to death in Aga2. These murine findings are corroborated by a pediatric OI cohort study, displaying significant progressive decline in pulmonary function and restrictive pulmonary disease independent of scoliosis. Most participants show mild cardiac valvular regurgitation, independent of pulmonary and skeletal findings. Data obtained from human OI patients and the mouse model Aga2 provide novel evidence for primary effects of type I collagen mutations on the heart and lung. The findings will have potential benefits of anticipatory clinical exams and early intervention in OI patients. PMID:22589248

  7. Isolation, culture and characterization of primary mouse RPE cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Godino, Rosario; Garland, Donita L; Pierce, Eric A

    2016-07-01

    Mouse models are powerful tools for the study of ocular diseases. Alterations in the morphology and function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are common features shared by many ocular disorders. We report a detailed protocol to collect, seed, culture and characterize RPE cells from mice. We describe a reproducible method that we previously developed to collect and culture murine RPE cells on Transwells as functional polarized monolayers. The collection of RPE cells takes ∼3 h, and the cultures mimic in vivo RPE cell features within 1 week. This protocol also describes methods to characterize the cells on Transwells within 1-2 weeks by transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively), immunostaining of vibratome sections and flat mounts, and measurement of transepithelial electrical resistance. The RPE cell cultures are suitable to study the biology of the RPE from wild-type and genetically modified strains of mice between the ages of 10 d and 12 months. The RPE cells can also be manipulated to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the RPE pathology in the numerous mouse models of ocular disorders. Furthermore, modeling the RPE pathology in vitro represents a new approach to testing drugs that will help accelerate the development of therapies for vision-threatening disorders such as macular degeneration (MD). PMID:27281648

  8. Decreased cortical and increased cancellous bone in two children with primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Boechat, M I; Westra, S J; Van Dop, C; Kaufman, F; Gilsanz, V; Roe, T F

    1996-01-01

    The basis for this study is two children with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) who radiographically manifested both marked subperiosteal resorption and prominent osteosclerosis. We hypothesize that the parathyroid hormone (PTH) elevation not only increased osteoclastic resorption of cortical bone but also simultaneously enhanced cancellous bone formation, giving rise to osteosclerosis. In this report, we describe the changes in trabecular and cortical bone density, as measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT), in these two young patients with severe PHPT, before and after removal of a parathyroid adenoma. Before surgery, the radiographic findings of subperiosteal resorption and osteosclerosis were associated with low cortical and high cancellous bone density values in both children. Within 1 week of surgery, both cortical and cancellous bone density values increased and serum concentrations of calcium and, to a lesser degree, phosphorus decreased due to the "hungry bone syndrome." Twelve weeks after parathyroidectomy, QCT bone density values and skeletal radiographs were normal in both patients. The findings suggest that in patients with severe PHPT, the catabolic effect of PTH on cortical bone may be associated with a simultaneous anabolic effect on cancellous bone, and PTH may cause a significant redistribution of bone mineral from cortical to cancellous bone. PMID:8544781

  9. Genetically engineered mouse models to evaluate the role of Wnt secretion in bone development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bart O

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in components of the Wnt signaling pathway are associated with altered bone development and homeostasis in several human diseases. We created genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) that mimic the cellular defect associated with the Porcupine mutations in patients with Goltz Syndrome/Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. These GEMMs were established by utilizing mice containing a conditionally inactivatable allele of Wntless/GPR177 (a gene encoding a protein required for the transport of Porcupine-modified ligand to the plasma membrane for secretion). We crossed this strain to another which drives cre-mediated gene deletion in mature osteoblasts (Osteocalcin-cre) resulted in mice lacking the ability to secrete Wnt ligands in this cell type. These mice displayed severely reduced bone mass and provide a model to understand the effects of disrupting the ability to secrete Wnt ligands on the skeletal system. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26818176

  10. A rare case report of primary bone lymphoma and a brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Fan, Shouren; Liu, Jie; Song, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Primary bone lymphoma is a rare and peculiar extranodal presentation of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which threatens human health. It can be defined as a lymphoma that occurs in the bone, consisting of a single bone lesion with or without regional lymphadenopathies, and its underlying causes are largely unknown. In this case report, we describe a male who presented with left-sided distal forearm pain, swelling of 2 months duration, and progressive limited wrist motion for about 1 month. The patient had no significant medical history except diabetes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging demonstrated a sheet-like bone destruction area in the left-sided radius, localized discontinuous bone cortex, and adjacent soft tissue masses. Finally, a bone biopsy examined by histopathological and immunochemical methods confirmed a diagnosis of primary bone diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Due to the rarity of this disease, the level of evidence supporting some diagnostic and therapeutic decisions remains low, and therefore, the details of the rare case may facilitate treatment of similar diseases and provide insight about this obscure lymphoproliferative malignancy. Also, related recent literature reports of primary bone lymphoma are reviewed. PMID:27563248

  11. Geniposide, from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, inhibits the inflammatory response in the primary mouse macrophages and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Liu, Bo; Liu, Jinhua; Liu, Zhicheng; Liang, Dejie; Li, Fengyang; Li, Depeng; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Xichen; Zhang, Naisheng; Yang, Zhengtao

    2012-12-01

    Geniposide, a main iridoid glucoside component of gardenia fruit, has been known to exhibit antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and other important therapeutic activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effects of geniposide on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated primary mouse macrophages in vitro and LPS induced lung injury model in vivo. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were determined by Western blot. Further analysis was carried out in mTLR4 and mMD-2 co-transfected HEK293 cells. The results showed that geniposide markedly inhibited the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production both in vitro and in vivo. Geniposide blocked the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, ERK and JNK in LPS stimulated primary mouse macrophages. Furthermore, geniposide inhibited the expression of TLR4 in LPS stimulated primary mouse macrophages and inhibited the LPS-induced IL-8 production in HEK293-mTLR4/MD-2 cells. In vivo study, it was also observed that geniposide attenuated lung histopathologic changes in the mouse models. These results suggest that geniposide exerts an anti-inflammatory property by down-regulating the expression of TLR4 up-regulated by LPS. Geniposide is highly effective in inhibiting acute lung injury and may be a promising potential therapeutic reagent for acute lung injury treatment. PMID:22878137

  12. MicroCT Morphometry Analysis of Mouse Cancellous Bone: Intra- and Inter-system Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Verdelis, K.; Lukashova, L.; Atti, E.; Mayer-Kuckuk, P.; Peterson, M.G.E.; Tetradis, S.; Boskey, A.L.; van der Meulen, M.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    The agreement between measurements and the relative performance reproducibility among different microcomputed tomography (microCT) systems, especially at voxel sizes close to the limit of the instruments, is not known. To compare this reproducibility 3D morphometric analyses of mouse cancellous bone from distal femoral epiphyses were performed using three different ex vivo microCT systems: GE eXplore Locus SP, Scanco μCT35 and Skyscan 1172. Scans were completed in triplicate at 12μm and 8μm voxel sizes and morphometry measurements, from which relative values and dependence on voxel size were examined. Global and individual visually assessed thresholds were compared. Variability from repeated scans at 12μm voxel size was also examined. Bone volume fraction and trabecular separation values were similar, while values for relative bone surface, trabecular thickness and number varied significantly across the three systems. The greatest differences were measured in trabecular thickness (up to 236%) and number (up to 218%). The relative dependence of measurements on voxel size was highly variable for the trabecular number (from 0% to 20% relative difference between measurements from 12μm and 8μm voxel size scans, depending on the system). The intra-system reproducibility of all trabecular measurements was also highly variable across the systems and improved for BV/TV in all the systems when a smaller voxel size was used. It improved using a smaller voxel size in all the other parameters examined for the Scanco system, but not consistently so for the GE or the Skyscan system. Our results indicate trabecular morphometry measurements should not be directly compared across microCT systems. In addition, the conditions, including voxel size, for trabecular morphometry studies in mouse bone should be chosen based on the specific microCT system and the measurements of main interest. PMID:21621659

  13. Effect of oral calcium and calcium + fluoride treatments on mouse bone properties during suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, S. J.; Luttges, M. W.; Allen, K. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The bone effects of oral dosages of calcium chloride with or without supplementary sodium fluoride were assessed in antiorthostatically suspended mice. Two calcium dosages were used to replace half (3.1 mM) or all(6.3 mM) of the dietary calcium lost due to reduced food intake by the suspended mice. Two groups of 6.3 mM CaCl2-treated mice were additionally treated with 0.25 or 2.5 mM NaF. The results indicate that supplementation of the mouse drinking water with calcium salts prevents bone changes induced by short-term suspension, while calcium salts in combination with fluoride are less effective as fluoride dosage increases. However, the calcium supplements change the relationship between the femur mechanical properties and the mineral composition of the bone. Because of this, it appears that oral calcium supplements are effective through a mechanism other than simple dietary supplementation and may indicate a dependence of bone consistency on systemic and local fluid conditions.

  14. Unusual Localization of a Primary Hydatid Cyst: Scaphoid Bone

    PubMed Central

    Serbest, Sancar; Tiftikci, Ugur; Uludag, Abuzer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Because hydatidosis of the bone (echinococcus infection) is a rare parasitic infection, its diagnosis and treatment poses great difficulties. Radiologic imaging findings are generally helpful to make the diagnosis. But occurrence of disease in atypical places and lack of specific radiological findings may complicate differential diagnosis. Nevertheless, familiarity with imaging findings in patients living at endemic areas provides advantages for diagnosis and treatment. We present a cyst hydatic case in scaphoid bone which has been reported in the literature only once previously. PMID:27124019

  15. Homing of chloromethylbenzoyl ammonia-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in an immune-mediated bone marrow failure mouse model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Wang, Y; Li, L; Li, Y H; Pang, Y; Song, J Y; Jiang, Z J

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is an abnormal immune reaction disease in which T lymphocytes destroy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells because of immune hyperactivity. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have hematopoietic supporting and immune regulation functions. This study investigated BMSCs homing in mice transplantation models after bone marrow failure. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three groups: normal control, bone marrow failure model, and BMSC transplantation group. Chloromethyl benzamido-labeled BMSCs of BALB/c mice were transplanted through tail vein injection in mouse models with bone marrow failure. Flow cytometry and histological fluorescence microscopy were used to observe the dynamic distribution of labeled cells in different tissues. Average survival time, peripheral blood, and bone marrow morphological features were observed in mice from each group. Twenty-four hours after tail vein infusion of BMSCs, positively labeled cells were observed in the bone marrows of recipient mice, and the number of positive cells increased significantly at 72 h (P < 0.05). In dead or dying mice, white blood cells, hemoglobin, platelets, and bone marrow mononuclear cells were all significantly higher in the BMSC transplantation group than in the BMSCs of the model group (P < 0.01). Mean survival time was significantly shorter in the bone marrow failure model group than in the transplantation group (P < 0.05). These results confirmed that the major of BMSCs injected via tail vein could migrate to injured bone marrow tissues within 24-72 h in a mouse model of bone marrow failure. Furthermore, BMSCs can promote hematopoietic recovery, reduce the degree of bone marrow failure, and significantly prolong survival time. PMID:24421151

  16. Primary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in the Iliac Bone: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chae Geun

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic aneurysmal bone cysts with expansible lesions in the pelvis are rare in children. The management of an aggressive vascular lesion in a female child is challenging. The standard treatment for aneurysmal bone cysts is accompanied by a high risk of local recurrence. A 12-year-old female presented with a history of pelvic pain for 5 months. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed a very large expansile lytic lesion arising from the right iliac bone. Intralesional curettage, electric cauterization, chemical sclerotherapy and allogeneic bone graft were performed through the window of the iliac crest. At a follow-up consultation 3.5 years post-surgery, the child had painless full-range movement in the hip joint with no recurrence. Although many treatment options are described, our patient was treated successfully using curettage and allogeneic bone graft without recurrence.

  17. A NEW APPROACH TO PARTIALKNEE ENDOPROSTHESIS IN PRIMARY BONE SARCOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Penna, Valter; Toller, Eduardo Areas; Pinheiro, Carla; Becker, Ricardo Gehrke

    2015-01-01

    Partial knee endoprosthesis to bone sarcomas resections seems to be a good solution to treat this immature skeletal patients. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional score in fourteen patients, advantages and the technique indications. Methods: Retrospective analysis was done to assess in this group of patients the functional evolution and the possible complications of the procedure. 14 patients between 10 and 22 years functionally evaluated in Ennekin/ISOLS (International Society of Limb Salvage) criteria, being all of them operated in the same institution by the same surgeon. Were used distal femur and proximal tibia partial endoprosthesis. Results: General analysis demonstrated that the functional results were over than 67 percent (ISOLS criteria) in 78,6 percent of the patients, being considered excellent. 21,4 percent were considered good results, being between 50 and 66 percent. Bone storage was preserved when avoiding the adjacent segment resection. Surgery time was not prolonged in ligament reconstruction. Conclusion: Knee partial endoprosthesis are less damage to bone storage in young patients. The critics about the bad functional results are being supplied by new surgical techniques, excellent rehabilitation protocols, implants technology and the consequent learning curve. This option of treatment permits the preservation of healthy bone and provides the possibility of a revision replacement less aggressive. PMID:26998452

  18. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  19. [Isolation and purification of primary Kupffer cells from mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Luo, Qingbo; Lu, Xiuxian; Zheng, Daofeng; He, Diao; Wu, Zhongjun

    2016-08-01

    Objective To isolate and purify Kupffer cells (KCs) from BALB/c mice by an efficient method of low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherence. Methods The mouse liver tissue was perfused in situ and digested with 0.5 g/L collagenase type IV in vitro by water bath. Then, through the low-speed centrifugation, KCs were separated from the mixed hepatocytes, and purified by rapid adherent characteristics. Finally, the production and activity of KCs obtained by this modified method were compared with those isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. We used F4/80 antibody immunofluorescence technique to observe morphological features of KCs, flow cytometry (FCM) to detect the expression of F4/80 antibody and the ink uptake test to observe the phagocytic activity. Moreover, using FCM, we evaluated the expressions of molecules associated with antigen presentation, including major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD40, CD86 and CD68 on the surface of KCs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) modeling. And, ELISA was conducted to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production of the cultured KCs following H/R. Results The yield of KCs was (5.83±0.54)×10(6) per mouse liver and the survival rate of KCs was up to 92% by low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherent method. Compared with Percoll density gradient centrifugation [the yield of KCs was (2.19±0.43)×10(6) per liver], this new method significantly improved the yield of KCs. F4/80 immunofluorescence showed typical morphologic features of KCs such as spindle or polygon shapes and FCM identified nearly 90% F4/80 positive cells. The phagocytic assay showed that lots of ink particles were phagocytosed into the isolated cells. KC H/R models expressed more MHC II, CD40 and CD86 and produced more TNF-α participating in inflammation. Conclusion The efficient method to isolate and purify KCs from BALB /c mice has been successfully established. PMID:27412929

  20. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE MINERAL IN DUCTILE AND BRITTLE CORTICAL MOUSE BONE

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Garcia-Tunon, Esther; Mukadam, Quresh; Saiz, Eduardo; Oldknow, Karla J.; Farquharson, Colin; Millán, José Luis; Boyde, Alan; Shefelbine, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a strong and tough material composed of apatite mineral, organic matter and water. Changes in composition and organization of these building blocks affect bone’s mechanical integrity. Skeletal disorders often affect bone’s mineral phase, either by variations in the collagen or directly altering mineralization. The aim of the current study was to explore the differences in the mineral of brittle and ductile cortical bone at the mineral (nm) and tissue (µm) levels using two mouse phenotypes. Osteogenesis imperfecta murine (oim−/−) mice were used to model brittle bone; PHOSPHO1 mutants (Phospho1−/−) had ductile bone. They were compared to their respective wild-type controls. Femora were defatted and ground to powder to measure average mineral crystal size using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and to monitor the bulk mineral to matrix ratio via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). XRD scans were run after TGA for phase identification, to assess the fractions of hydroxyapatite and β-tricalcium phosphate. Tibiae were embedded to measure elastic properties with nanoindentation and the extent of mineralization with backscattered electron microscopy (qbSEM). Interestingly, the mineral of brittle oim−/− and ductile Phospho1−/− bones had many similar characteristics. Both pathology models had smaller apatite crystals, lower mineral to matrix ratio, and showed more thermal conversion to β-tricalcium phosphate than their wild-types, indicating deviations from stoichiometric hydroxyapatite in the original mineral. The degree of mineralization of the bone matrix was different for each strain: oim−/− were hypermineralized, while Phospho1−/− were hypomineralized. However, alterations in the mineral were associated with reduced tissue elastic moduli in both pathologies. Results revealed that despite having extremely different whole bone mechanics, the mineral of oim−/− and Phospho1−/− has several similar trends at smaller length scales. This

  1. Cell wounding activates phospholipase D in primary mouse keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Senthil N.; Xie, Ding; Howard, Amber C.; Zhong, Quincy; Zhong, Xiaofeng; McNeil, Paul L.; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2013-01-01

    Plasma membrane disruptions occur in mechanically active tissues such as the epidermis and can lead to cell death if the damage remains unrepaired. Repair occurs through fusion of vesicle patches to the damaged membrane region. The enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in membrane traffickiing; therefore, the role of PLD in membrane repair was investigated. Generation of membrane disruptions by lifting epidermal keratinocytes from the substratum induced PLD activation, whereas removal of cells from the substratum via trypsinization had no effect. Pretreatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, previously shown to increase PLD1 expression and activity, had no effect on, and a PLD2-selective (but not a PLD1-selective) inhibitor decreased, cell lifting-induced PLD activation, suggesting PLD2 as the isoform activated. PLD2 interacts functionally with the glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) to produce phosphatidylglycerol (PG); however, wounding resulted in decreased PG production, suggesting a potential PG deficiency in wounded cells. Cell lifting-induced PLD activation was transient, consistent with a possible role in membrane repair, and PLD inhibitors inhibited membrane resealing upon laser injury. In an in vivo full-thickness mouse skin wound model, PG accelerated wound healing. These results suggest that PLD and the PLD2/AQP3 signaling module may be involved in membrane repair and wound healing. PMID:23288946

  2. Cell wounding activates phospholipase D in primary mouse keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Arun, Senthil N; Xie, Ding; Howard, Amber C; Zhong, Quincy; Zhong, Xiaofeng; McNeil, Paul L; Bollag, Wendy B

    2013-03-01

    Plasma membrane disruptions occur in mechanically active tissues such as the epidermis and can lead to cell death if the damage remains unrepaired. Repair occurs through fusion of vesicle patches to the damaged membrane region. The enzyme phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in membrane traffickiing; therefore, the role of PLD in membrane repair was investigated. Generation of membrane disruptions by lifting epidermal keratinocytes from the substratum induced PLD activation, whereas removal of cells from the substratum via trypsinization had no effect. Pretreatment with 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃, previously shown to increase PLD1 expression and activity, had no effect on, and a PLD2-selective (but not a PLD1-selective) inhibitor decreased, cell lifting-induced PLD activation, suggesting PLD2 as the isoform activated. PLD2 interacts functionally with the glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) to produce phosphatidylglycerol (PG); however, wounding resulted in decreased PG production, suggesting a potential PG deficiency in wounded cells. Cell lifting-induced PLD activation was transient, consistent with a possible role in membrane repair, and PLD inhibitors inhibited membrane resealing upon laser injury. In an in vivo full-thickness mouse skin wound model, PG accelerated wound healing. These results suggest that PLD and the PLD2/AQP3 signaling module may be involved in membrane repair and wound healing. PMID:23288946

  3. Primary pericranial Ewing's sarcoma on the temporal bone: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Hiroto; Nitta, Naoki; Ishida, Mitsuaki; Fukami, Tadateru; Nozaki, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary Ewing's sarcoma originating in the pericranium is an extremely rare disease entity. Case Description: A 9-year-old female patient was admitted to our department due to a left temporal subcutaneous mass. The mass was localized under the left temporal muscle and attached to the surface of the temporal bone. Head computed tomography revealed a mass with bony spicule formation on the temporal bone, however, it did not show bone destruction or intracranial invasion. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed no lesions other than the mass on the temporal bone. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the mass was located between the temporal bone and the pericranium. The mass was completely resected with the underlying temporal bone and the overlying deep layer of temporal muscle, and was diagnosed as primary Ewing's sarcoma. Because the tumor was located in the subpericranium, we created a new classification, “pericranial Ewing's sarcoma,” and diagnosed the present tumor as pericranial Ewing's sarcoma. Conclusion: We herein present an extremely rare case of primary pericranial Ewing's sarcoma that developed on the temporal bone. PMID:27308095

  4. Compartmental bone morphometry in the mouse femur: reproducibility and resolution dependence of microtomographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Kohler, T; Beyeler, M; Webster, D; Müller, R

    2005-11-01

    Microcomputed tomography (microCT) is widely used for nondestructive bone phenotyping in small animals, especially in the mouse. Here, we investigated the reproducibility and resolution dependence of microCT analysis of microstructural parameters in three different compartments in the mouse femur. Reproducibility was assessed with respect to precision error (PE%CV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). We examined 14 left femurs isolated postmortem from two strains of mice (seven per group). Measurements and analyses were repeated five times on different days. In a second step, analysis was repeated again five times for a single measurement. Resolution dependence was assessed by high-resolution measurements (10 microm) in one strain and subsequent image degrading. Reproducibility was better in full bone compartment and in cortical bone compartment in the diaphysis (PE%CV = 0.06-2.16%) than in trabecular compartment in the distal metaphysis (PE(%CV) = 0.59-5.24%). Nevertheless, ICC (0.92-1.00) showed a very high reliability of the assessed parameters in all regions, indicating very small variances within repeated measurements compared to the population variances. Morphometric indices computed from lower- and higher-resolution images displayed in general only weak dependence and were highly correlated with each other (R2 = 0.91-0.99). The results show that parameters in the full and cortical compartments were very reproducible, whereas precision in the trabecular compartment was somewhat lower. Nevertheless, all compartmental analysis methods were very robust, as shown by the high ICC values, demonstrating high suitability for application in inbred strains, where highest precision is needed due to small population variances. PMID:16283571

  5. Therapeutic effects of mouse bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Yi, Tac-Ghee; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young Min; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Seon Ji; Lee, Kyuheon; Lee, Youn Sook; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Song, Sun U; Park, Seok Hee

    2015-11-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells (mcMSCs), which were originated from a single cell by a subfractionation culturing method, are recognized as new paradigm for stem cell therapy featured with its homogenous cell population. Next to proven therapeutic effects against pancreatitis, in the current study we demonstrated that mcMSCs showed significant therapeutic effects in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis model supported with anti-inflammatory and restorative activities. mcMSCs significantly reduced the disease activity index (DAI) score, including weight loss, stool consistency, and intestinal bleeding and significantly increased survival rates. The pathological scores were also significantly improved with mcMSC. We have demonstrated that especial mucosal regeneration activity accompanied with significantly lowered level of apoptosis as beneficiary actions of mcMSCs in UC models. The levels of inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-17 were all significantly concurrent with significantly repressed NF-κB activation compared to the control group and significantly decreased infiltrations of responsible macrophage and neutrophil. Conclusively, our findings provide the rationale that mcMSCs are applicable as a potential source of cell-based therapy in inflammatory bowel diseases, especially contributing either to prevent relapse or to accelerate healing as solution to unmet medical needs in IBD therapy. PMID:26566304

  6. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  7. Guidelines for histopathological specimen examination and diagnostic reporting of primary bone tumours

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This review is intended to provide histopathologists with guidelines for clinical assessment, specimen handling and diagnostic reporting of benign and malignant primary bone tumours. Information from radiology, surgical, oncology and other clinical colleagues involved in the diagnosis and treatment of primary bone tumours should be properly assessed before undertaking a structured approach to specimen handling and histological reporting. This ensures that the information needed for planning appropriate treatment of these complex tumours is provided. Consistency in diagnostic evaluation with respect to both terminology and report content facilitates liaison at multidisciplinary bone tumour meetings and collaboration between cancer units and networks, as well as providing a common database for audit of the clinical, radiological and pathological aspects of bone tumours. PMID:22613930

  8. Tenofovir treatment of primary osteoblasts alters gene expression profiles: implications for bone mineral density loss

    PubMed Central

    Grigsby, Iwen F.; Pham, Lan; Mansky, Louis M.; Gopalakrishnan, Raj; Carlson, Ann E.; Mansky, Kim C.

    2010-01-01

    There is strong clinical evidence that implicates tenofovir in the loss of bone mineral density during treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that tenofovir treatment of osteoblasts causes changes in the gene expression profile that would impact osteoblast function during bone formation. Primary osteoblasts were isolated and then treated with the tenofovir prodrug, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). Total RNA from TDF-treated and untreated osteoblasts were extracted and used for microarray analysis to assess TDF-associated changes in the gene expression profile. Strikingly, the changes in gene expression profiles involved in cell signaling, cell cycle and amino acid metabolism, which would likely impact osteoblast function in bone formation. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that tenofovir treatment of primary osteoblasts results in gene expression changes that implicate loss of osteoblast function in tenofovir-associated bone mineral density loss. PMID:20171173

  9. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R inhibits human prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis in mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Toneri, Makoto; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Yong; Hu, Cameron; Yano, Shuya; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Bouvet, Michael; Nakanishi, Hayao; Hoffman, Robert M.; Zhao, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent occurrence in prostate cancer patients and often is lethal. Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is often used for bone metastasis with limited efficacy. More effective models and treatment methods are required to improve the outcome of prostate cancer patients. In the present study, the effects of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R were analyzed in vitro and in vivo on prostate cancer cells and experimental bone metastasis. Both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of PC-3 cells expressing red fluorescent protien in vitro. To investigate the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R on prostate cancer experimental bone metastasis, we established models of both early and advanced stage bone metastasis. The mice were treated with ZOL, S. typhimurium A1-R, and combination therapy of both ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R. ZOL and S. typhimurium A1-R inhibited the growth of solitary bone metastases. S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly decreased bone metastasis and delayed the appearance of PC-3 bone metastases of multiple mouse models. Additionally, S. typhimurium A1-R treatment significantly improved the overall survival of the mice with multiple bone metastases. The results of the present study indicate that S. typhimurium A1-R is useful to prevent and inhibit prostate cancer bone metastasis and has potential for future clinical use in the adjuvant setting. PMID:26431498

  10. Generation of competent bone marrow-derived antigen presenting cells from the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Bennett J; Willis, Derall G; Prescott, Joseph; Farrell, Regina M; Coons, Teresa A; Schountz, Tony

    2004-01-01

    Background Human infections with Sin Nombre virus (SNV) and related New World hantaviruses often lead to hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS), a sometimes fatal illness. Lungs of patients who die from HCPS exhibit cytokine-producing mononuclear infiltrates and pronounced pulmonary inflammation. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the principal natural hosts of SNV, in which the virus establishes life-long persistence without conspicuous pathology. Little is known about the mechanisms SNV employs to evade the immune response of deer mice, and experimental examination of this question has been difficult because of a lack of methodologies for examining such responses during infection. One such deficiency is our inability to characterize T cell responses because susceptible syngeneic deer mice are not available. Results To solve this problem, we have developed an in vitro method of expanding and generating competent antigen presenting cells (APC) from deer mouse bone marrow using commercially-available house mouse (Mus musculus) granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor. These cells are capable of processing and presenting soluble protein to antigen-specific autologous helper T cells in vitro. Inclusion of antigen-specific deer mouse antibody augments T cell stimulation, presumably through Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis. Conclusions The use of these APC has allowed us to dramatically expand deer mouse helper T cells in culture and should permit extensive characterization of T cell epitopes. Considering the evolutionary divergence between deer mice and house mice, it is probable that this method will be useful to other investigators using unconventional models of rodent-borne diseases. PMID:15458574

  11. Lack of prolidase causes a bone phenotype both in human and in mouse.

    PubMed

    Besio, Roberta; Maruelli, Silvia; Gioia, Roberta; Villa, Isabella; Grabowski, Peter; Gallagher, Orla; Bishop, Nicholas J; Foster, Sarah; De Lorenzi, Ersilia; Colombo, Raffaella; Diaz, Josè Luis Dapena; Moore-Barton, Haether; Deshpande, Charu; Aydin, Halil Ibrahim; Tokatli, Aysegul; Kwiek, Bartlomiej; Kasapkara, Cigdem Seher; Adisen, Esra Ozsoy; Gurer, Mehmet Ali; Di Rocco, Maja; Phang, James M; Gunn, Teresa M; Tenni, Ruggero; Rossi, Antonio; Forlino, Antonella

    2015-03-01

    The degradation of the main fibrillar collagens, collagens I and II, is a crucial process for skeletal development. The most abundant dipeptides generated from the catabolism of collagens contain proline and hydroxyproline. In humans, prolidase is the only enzyme able to hydrolyze dipeptides containing these amino acids at their C-terminal end, thus being a key player in collagen synthesis and turnover. Mutations in the prolidase gene cause prolidase deficiency (PD), a rare recessive disorder. Here we describe 12 PD patients, 9 of whom were molecularly characterized in this study. Following a retrospective analysis of all of them a skeletal phenotype associated with short stature, hypertelorism, nose abnormalities, microcephaly, osteopenia and genu valgum, independent of both the type of mutation and the presence of the mutant protein was identified. In order to understand the molecular basis of the bone phenotype associated with PD, we analyzed a recently identified mouse model for the disease, the dark-like (dal) mutant. The dal/dal mice showed a short snout, they were smaller than controls, their femurs were significantly shorter and pQCT and μCT analyses of long bones revealed compromised bone properties at the cortical and at the trabecular level in both male and female animals. The differences were more pronounce at 1 month being the most parameters normalized by 2 months of age. A delay in the formation of the second ossification center was evident at postnatal day 10. Our work reveals that reduced bone growth was due to impaired chondrocyte proliferation and increased apoptosis rate in the proliferative zone associated with reduced hyperthrophic zone height. These data suggest that lack of prolidase, a cytosolic enzyme involved in the final stage of protein catabolism, is required for normal skeletogenesis especially at early age when the requirement for collagen synthesis and degradation is the highest. PMID:25460580

  12. The mouse fibula as a suitable bone for the study of functional adaptation to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Alaa; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Saxon, Leanne K.; Zaman, Gul; Sunters, Andrew; Armstrong, Victoria J.; Javaheri, Behzad; Lanyon, Lance E.; Price, Joanna S.

    2009-01-01

    Bones' functionally adaptive responses to mechanical loading can usefully be studied in the tibia by the application of loads between the knee and ankle in normal and genetically modified mice. Such loading also deforms the fibula. Our present study was designed to ascertain whether the fibula adapts to loading in a similar way to the tibia and could thus provide an additional bone in which to study functional adaptation. The right tibiae/fibulae in C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a single period of axial loading (40 cycles at 10 Hz with 10-second intervals between each cycle; approximately 7 min/day, 3 alternate days/week, 2 weeks). The left tibiae/fibulae were used as non-loaded, internal controls. Both left and right fibulae and tibiae were analyzed by micro-computed tomography at the levels of the mid-shaft of the fibula and 25% from its proximal and distal ends. We also investigated the effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH) on the (re)modelling response to 2-weeks of loading and the effect of 2-consecutive days of loading on osteocytes' sclerostin expression. These in vivo experiments confirmed that the fibula showed similar loading-related (re)modelling responses to those previously documented in the tibia and similar synergistic increases in osteogenesis between loading and iPTH. The numbers of sclerostin-positive osteocytes at the proximal and middle fibulae were markedly decreased by loading. Collectively, these data suggest that the mouse fibula, as well as the tibia and ulna, is a useful bone in which to assess bone cells' early responses to mechanical loading and the adaptive (re)modelling that this engenders. PMID:19442626

  13. A Mouse Model for Studying Nutritional Programming: Effects of Early Life Exposure to Soy Isoflavones on Bone and Reproductive Health

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Wendy E.; Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Dinsdale, Elsa C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, our research group has characterized and used a mouse model to demonstrate that “nutritional programming” of bone development occurs when mice receive soy isoflavones (ISO) during the first days of life. Nutritional programming of bone development can be defined as the ability for diet during early life to set a trajectory for better or compromised bone health at adulthood. We have shown that CD-1 mice exposed to soy ISO during early neonatal life have higher bone mineral density (BMD) and greater trabecular inter-connectivity in long bones and lumbar spine at young adulthood. These skeletal sites also withstand greater forces before fracture. Because the chemical structure of ISO resembles that of 17-β-estradiol and can bind to estrogen receptors in reproductive tissues, it was prudent to expand analyses to include measures of reproductive health. This review highlights aspects of our studies in CD-1 mice to understand the early life programming effects of soy ISO on bone and reproductive health. Preclinical mouse models can provide useful data to help develop and guide the design of studies in human cohorts, which may, depending on findings and considerations of safety, lead to dietary interventions that optimize bone health. PMID:27187422

  14. A Mouse Model for Studying Nutritional Programming: Effects of Early Life Exposure to Soy Isoflavones on Bone and Reproductive Health.

    PubMed

    Ward, Wendy E; Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Dinsdale, Elsa C

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, our research group has characterized and used a mouse model to demonstrate that "nutritional programming" of bone development occurs when mice receive soy isoflavones (ISO) during the first days of life. Nutritional programming of bone development can be defined as the ability for diet during early life to set a trajectory for better or compromised bone health at adulthood. We have shown that CD-1 mice exposed to soy ISO during early neonatal life have higher bone mineral density (BMD) and greater trabecular inter-connectivity in long bones and lumbar spine at young adulthood. These skeletal sites also withstand greater forces before fracture. Because the chemical structure of ISO resembles that of 17-β-estradiol and can bind to estrogen receptors in reproductive tissues, it was prudent to expand analyses to include measures of reproductive health. This review highlights aspects of our studies in CD-1 mice to understand the early life programming effects of soy ISO on bone and reproductive health. Preclinical mouse models can provide useful data to help develop and guide the design of studies in human cohorts, which may, depending on findings and considerations of safety, lead to dietary interventions that optimize bone health. PMID:27187422

  15. Radiation sensitivity and cycling status of mouse bone marrow prothymocytes and day 8 colony forming units spleen (CFUs)

    SciTech Connect

    Boersma, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Mouse bone marrow prothymocytes as determined in an in vivo thymus regeneration assay have an in vitro gamma radiation sensitivity which is different from that of spleen colony forming cells (CFUs). Determination of Do according to in vivo irradiation revealed similar but insignificant differences. Prothymocytes in normal bone marrow maintain a low but slightly different proliferative state as compared to CFUs, according to determinations using the /sup 3/H-TdR suicide technique. In regenerating bone marrow prothymocytes were found to be sensitive to an inhibitory effect of in vitro incubation with cold thymidine. CFUs and normal bone marrow prothymocytes were not affected by cold thymidine. Taking into account the cold thymidine effect it can be concluded that prothymocytes and CFUs in regenerating bone marrow are fully in cycle. These results are best explained when prothymocytes and CFUs are considered to be different cells.

  16. The role of the SIBLING, Bone Sialoprotein in skeletal biology - Contribution of mouse experimental genetics.

    PubMed

    Bouleftour, Wafa; Juignet, Laura; Bouet, Guenaelle; Granito, Renata Neves; Vanden-Bossche, Arnaud; Laroche, Norbert; Aubin, Jane E; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Vico, Laurence; Malaval, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Bone Sialoprotein (BSP) is a member of the "Small Integrin-Binding Ligand N-linked Glycoproteins" (SIBLING) extracellular matrix protein family of mineralized tissues. BSP has been less studied than other SIBLING proteins such as Osteopontin (OPN), which is coexpressed with it in several skeletal cell types. Here we review the contribution of genetically engineered mice (BSP gene knockout and overexpression) to the understanding of the role of BSP in the bone organ. The studies made so far highlight the role of BSP in skeletal mineralization, as well as its importance for proper osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and activity, most prominently in primary/repair bone. The absence of BSP also affects the local environment of the bone tissue, in particular hematopoiesis and vascularization. Interestingly, lack of BSP induces an overexpression of OPN, and the cognate protein could be responsible for some aspects of the BSP gene knockout skeletal phenotype, while replacing BSP for some of its functions. Such interplay between the partly overlapping functions of SIBLING proteins, as well as the network of cross-regulations in which they are involved should now be the focus of further work. PMID:26763578

  17. Primary hyperparathyroidism presenting with acute pancreatitis and asymptomatic bone involvement

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Aasem

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 15-year-old female patient presented to the emergency room with vomiting and abdominal pain. She had two similar attacks in the previous three months both of them were diagnosed as pancreatitis in two different hospitals. On admission, her serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels were very high. CT scan revealed left inferior parathyroid adenoma. Investigations to rule out possible multiple endocrine neoplasia were all negative. The patient was managed by intravenous fluids and furosemide to lower her serum calcium level. Then, left inferior parathyroidectomy was done. Postoperatively, the patient had hungry bone syndrome with severe hypocalcaemia and was managed by intravenous calcium infusion for five days in the intensive care unit. Later, she was kept on oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation. She became symptom-free and her serum calcium improved gradually. PMID:26604950

  18. Induction of bone formation in biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by bone morphogenetic protein-2 and primary osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Strobel, L A; Rath, S N; Maier, A K; Beier, J P; Arkudas, A; Greil, P; Horch, R E; Kneser, U

    2014-03-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies mainly depend on porous scaffold materials. In this study, novel biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) matrices were generated by 3D-printing. High porosity was achieved by starch consolidation. This study aimed to characterise the porous BCP-scaffold properties and interactions of osteogenic cells and growth factors under in vivo conditions. Five differently treated constructs were implanted subcutaneously in syngeneic rats: plain BCP constructs (group A), constructs pre-treated with BMP-2 (group B; 1.6 µg BMP-2 per scaffold), seeded with primary osteoblasts (OB) (group C), seeded with OB and BMP-2 (group D) and constructs seeded with OB and pre-cultivated in a flow bioreactor for 6 weeks (group E). After 2, 4 and 6 weeks, specimens were explanted and subjected to histological and molecular biological analyses. Explanted scaffolds were invaded by fibrovascular tissue without significant foreign body reactions. Morphometric analysis demonstrated significantly increased bone formation in samples from group D (OB + BMP-2) compared to all other groups. Samples from groups B-E displayed significant mRNA expression of bone-specific genes after 6 weeks. Pre-cultivation in the flow bioreactor (group E) induced bone formation comparable with group B. In this study, differences in bone distribution between samples with BMP-2 or osteoblasts could be observed. In conclusion, combination of osteoblasts and BMP-2 synergistically enhanced bone formation in novel ceramic scaffolds. These results provide the basis for further experiments in orthotopic defect models with a focus on future applications in orthopaedic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:22740314

  19. Primary bone microanatomy records developmental aspects of life history in catarrhine primates.

    PubMed

    McFarlin, Shannon C; Terranova, Carl J; Zihlman, Adrienne L; Bromage, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    A central challenge in human origins research is to understand how evolution has shaped modern human life history. As fossilized remains of our ancestors provide the only direct evidence for life history evolution, efforts to reconstruct life history in paleontological contexts have focused on hard tissues, particularly on dental development. However, among investigators of other vertebrate groups, there is a long tradition of examining primary bone microstructure to decipher growth rates and maturational timing, based on an empirical relationship between the microanatomy of primary bone and the rate at which it is deposited. We examined ontogenetic variation in primary bone microstructure at the midshaft femur of Chlorocebus aethiops, Hylobates lar, and Pan troglodytes to test whether tissue type proportions vary in accordance with predictions based on body mass growth patterns described previously. In all taxa, younger age classes were characterized by significantly higher percent areas of fibro-lamellar and/or parallel-fibered tissues, while older age classes showed significantly higher proportions of lamellar bone. In prior experimental studies, fibro-lamellar and parallel-fibered tissue types have been associated with faster depositional rates than lamellar bone. Principal components analysis revealed differences among taxa in the timing of this transition, and in the particular tissue types observed among individuals of similar dental emergence status. Among M1 and M2 age classes, higher proportions of parallel-fibered and fibro-lamellar tissues were observed in those taxa characterized by reportedly faster body mass growth rates. Further, persistence of fibro-lamellar tissue throughout DECID, M1 and M2 age classes in chimpanzees contrasts with the pattern reported previously for modern humans. Despite the necessary limitations of our cross-sectional study design and the secondary remodeling of bone in primates, large areas of primary bone remain intact and

  20. Induction of lacZ Mutations in Muta™Mouse Primary Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guosheng; Gingerich, John; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R; White, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro mutation assay using primary hepatocytes from the transgenic Muta™Mouse. Primary hepatocytes were isolated using a two-step perfusion method with purification by Percoll, cultured, and treated with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl- imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), 3-nitrobenzoanthrone (3-NBA), and cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). The mean lacZ mutant frequency (MF) for the solvent control was approximately twofold greater than the spontaneous MF observed in liver tissue. A concentration-dependent increase in MF (up to 3.7-fold above control) was observed following exposure to BaP. Fourfold and twofold increases in mutant frequency were observed for 3-NBA and PhIP exposures, respectively, without the addition of any exogenous metabolic activation. A slight but statistically significant increase in lacZ MF was observed for CSC, but only at the lowest concentration. This is the first report demonstrating that mutations can be detected in cultured primary hepatocytes from Muta™Mouse. The preliminary results presented suggest that the Muta™Mouse primary hepatocyte mutagenicity assay can be used as a cost-effective tool for screening of environmental mutagens and therapeutic products. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 51:330–337, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19953605

  1. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    unloading in spaceflight, we conducted genome wide microarray analysis of total RNA isolated from the mouse pelvis. Specifically, 16 week old mice were subjected to 15 days spaceflight onboard NASA's STS-131 space shuttle mission. The pelvis of the mice was dissected, the bone marrow was flushed and the bones were briefly stored in RNAlater. The pelvii were then homogenized, and RNA was isolated using TRIzol. RNA concentration and quality was measured using a Nanodrop spectrometer, and 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis. Samples of cDNA were analyzed using an Affymetrix GeneChip\\S Gene 1.0 ST (Sense Target) Array System for Mouse and GenePattern Software. We normalized the ST gene arrays using Robust Multichip Average (RMA) normalization, which summarizes perfectly matched spots on the array through the median polish algorithm, rather than normalizing according to mismatched spots. We also used Limma for statistical analysis, using the BioConductor Limma Library by Gordon Smyth, and differential expression analysis to identify genes with significant changes in expression between the two experimental conditions. Finally we used GSEApreRanked for Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA), with Kolmogorov-Smirnov style statistics to identify groups of genes that are regulated together using the t-statistics derived from Limma. Preliminary results show that 6,603 genes expressed in pelvic bone had statistically significant alterations in spaceflight compared to ground controls. These prominently included cell cycle arrest molecules p21, and p18, cell survival molecule Crbp1, and cell cycle molecules cyclin D1, and Cdk1. Additionally, GSEA results indicated alterations in molecular targets of cyclin D1 and Cdk4, senescence pathways resulting from abnormal laminin maturation, cell-cell contacts via E-cadherin, and several pathways relating to protein translation and metabolism. In total 111 gene sets out of 2,488, about 4%, showed statistically significant set alterations. These

  2. PULSED FOCUSED ULTRASOUND TREATMENT OF MUSCLE MITIGATES PARALYSIS-INDUCED BONE LOSS IN THE ADJACENT BONE: A STUDY IN A MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Poliachik, Sandra L.; Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Wang, Yak-Nam; Simon, Julianna C.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Bone loss can result from bed rest, space flight, spinal cord injury or age-related hormonal changes. Current bone loss mitigation techniques include pharmaceutical interventions, exercise, pulsed ultrasound targeted to bone and whole body vibration. In this study, we attempted to mitigate paralysis-induced bone loss by applying focused ultrasound to the midbelly of a paralyzed muscle. We employed a mouse model of disuse that uses onabotulinumtoxinA-induced paralysis, which causes rapid bone loss in 5 d. A focused 2 MHz transducer applied pulsed exposures with pulse repetition frequency mimicking that of motor neuron firing during walking (80 Hz), standing (20 Hz), or the standard pulsed ultrasound frequency used in fracture healing (1 kHz). Exposures were applied daily to calf muscle for 4 consecutive d. Trabecular bone changes were characterized using micro-computed tomography. Our results indicated that application of certain focused pulsed ultrasound parameters was able to mitigate some of the paralysis-induced bone loss. PMID:24857416

  3. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibition attenuates mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell degranulation induced by beta-1,3-glucan

    PubMed Central

    Cuong, Dang Van; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Marquez, Jubert; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are primary mediators of allergic inflammation. Beta-1,3-glucan (BG) protects against infection and shock by activating immune cells. Activation of the BG receptor induces an increase in intracellular Ca2+, which may induce exocytosis. However, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying BG activation of immune cells and the possible role of mitochondria in this process. The present study examined whether BG induced mast cell degranulation, and evaluated the role of calcium transients during mast cell activation. Our investigation focused on the role of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in BG-induced degranulation. Black mouse (C57) bone marrow-derived mast cells were stimulated with 0.5 µg/ml BG, 100 µg/ml peptidoglycan (PGN), or 10 µM A23187 (calcium ionophore), and dynamic changes in cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium and membrane potential were monitored. BG-induced mast cell degranulation occurred in a time-dependent manner, and was significantly reduced under calcium-free conditions. Ruthenium red, a mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter blocker, significantly reduced mast cell degranulation induced by BG, PGN, and A23187. These results suggest that the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter has an important regulatory role in BG-induced mast cell degranulation. PMID:26937218

  4. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibition attenuates mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell degranulation induced by beta-1,3-glucan.

    PubMed

    Cuong, Dang Van; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Marquez, Jubert; Kim, Nari; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Han, Jin

    2016-03-01

    Mast cells are primary mediators of allergic inflammation. Beta-1,3-glucan (BG) protects against infection and shock by activating immune cells. Activation of the BG receptor induces an increase in intracellular Ca(2+), which may induce exocytosis. However, little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying BG activation of immune cells and the possible role of mitochondria in this process. The present study examined whether BG induced mast cell degranulation, and evaluated the role of calcium transients during mast cell activation. Our investigation focused on the role of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) in BG-induced degranulation. Black mouse (C57) bone marrow-derived mast cells were stimulated with 0.5 µg/ml BG, 100 µg/ml peptidoglycan (PGN), or 10 µM A23187 (calcium ionophore), and dynamic changes in cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium and membrane potential were monitored. BG-induced mast cell degranulation occurred in a time-dependent manner, and was significantly reduced under calcium-free conditions. Ruthenium red, a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter blocker, significantly reduced mast cell degranulation induced by BG, PGN, and A23187. These results suggest that the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter has an important regulatory role in BG-induced mast cell degranulation. PMID:26937218

  5. In Vitro Assessment of Primary Stability of BoneTrust Sinus Implant Design.

    PubMed

    Gülses, Aydin; Ayna, Mustafa; Güçlü, Hakan; Sencimen, Metin; Basiry, M Nabi; Gierloff, Matthias; Açil, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the primary stability of BoneTrust Sinus implants (BTSIs), which are intended to enable higher primary stability by their special design with reduced thread section in cases of reduced vertical bone availability, in comparison with standard BoneTrust implants (SBTIs) in vitro. A bone window 3 cm in length, 4 cm in width, and 3 cm in depth, resembling the maxillary bone window of the lateral sinus wall with 4 mm of residual bone height, was prepared at the dorsal side of freshly slaughtered bovine ribs. One single BTSI and a single SBTI with the same diameter (4 or 5 mm) were placed in each window. After implant placement, the implant stability quotient (ISQ) was measured by using resonance frequency analysis with an Osstell device. A total of 88 implants were placed. ISQ values varied between 63 and 84. Among the implants with 4-mm diameter, all BTSIs showed higher ISQ values compared with SBTIs. One-way analysis of variance showed a significant difference between BTSIs/SBTIs (P < .05). BTSIs with 4-mm diameter showed statistically higher values compared to BTSIs with 5-mm diameter (P < .05). Among the implants with 5-mm diameter, all SBTIs showed higher ISQ values compared to BTSIs but there was no significant difference. The use of 4-mm-diameter BTSIs could present higher ISQ values during simultaneous implant placement in conjunction with lateral sinus floor augmentation. PMID:27560678

  6. MicroRNAs Regulate Osteogenesis and Chondrogenesis of Mouse Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suomi, Salla; Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Seppänen, Anne; Ripatti, Tommi; Väänänen, Kalervo; Hentunen, Teuvo; Säämänen, Anna-Marja; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that bind to target mRNA leading to translational arrest or mRNA degradation. To study miRNA-mediated regulation of osteogenesis and chondrogenesis, we compared the expression of 35 miRNAs in osteoblasts and chondroblasts derived from mouse marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Differentiation of MSCs resulted in up- or downregulation of several miRNAs, with miR-199a expression being over 10-fold higher in chondroblasts than in undifferentiated MSCs. In addition, miR-124a was strongly upregulated during chondrogenesis while the expression of miR-96 was substantially suppressed. A systems biological analysis of the potential miRNA target genes and their interaction networks was combined with promoter analysis. These studies link the differentially expressed miRNAs to collagen synthesis and hypoxia, key pathways related to bone and cartilage physiology. The global regulatory networks described here suggest for the first time how miRNAs and transcription factors are capable of fine-tuning the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of mouse MSCs. PMID:19787082

  7. A primary culture system of mouse thick ascending limb cells with preserved function and uromodulin processing.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, Bob; Terryn, Sara; Gölz, Nadine; Brunati, Martina; Cattaneo, Angela; Bachi, Angela; Al-Qusairi, Lama; Ziegler, Urs; Staub, Olivier; Rampoldi, Luca; Devuyst, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    The epithelial cells lining the thick ascending limb (TAL) of the loop of Henle perform essential transport processes and secrete uromodulin, the most abundant protein in normal urine. The lack of differentiated cell culture systems has hampered studies of TAL functions. Here, we report a method to generate differentiated primary cultures of TAL cells, developed from microdissected tubules obtained in mouse kidneys. The TAL tubules cultured on permeable filters formed polarized confluent monolayers in ∼12 days. The TAL cells remain differentiated and express functional markers such as uromodulin, NKCC2, and ROMK at the apical membrane. Electrophysiological measurements on primary TAL monolayers showed a lumen-positive transepithelial potential (+9.4 ± 0.8 mV/cm(2)) and transepithelial resistance similar to that recorded in vivo. The transepithelial potential is abolished by apical bumetanide and in primary cultures obtained from ROMK knockout mice. The processing, maturation and apical secretion of uromodulin by primary TAL cells is identical to that observed in vivo. The primary TAL cells respond appropriately to hypoxia, hypertonicity, and stimulation by desmopressin, and they can be transfected. The establishment of this primary culture system will allow the investigation of TAL cells obtained from genetically modified mouse models, providing a critical tool for understanding the role of that segment in health and disease. PMID:23887378

  8. RAMAN AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES CORRELATE AT WHOLE BONE- AND TISSUE- LEVELS IN A GENETIC MOUSE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xiaohong; Patil, Chetan A.; Lynch, Conor C.; Pharr, George M.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2010-01-01

    The fracture resistance of bone arises from the composition, orientation, and distribution of the primary constituents at each hierarchical level of organization. Therefore, to establish the relevance of Raman Spectroscopy (RS) in identifying differences between strong or tough bone and weak or brittle bone, we investigated whether Raman-derived properties could explain the variance in biomechanical properties at both the whole bone and the tissue-level, and do so independently of traditional measurements of mineralization. We harvested femurs from wild-type mice and mice lacking matrix metalloproteinase 2 because the mutant mice have a known reduction in mineralization. Next, RS quantified compositional properties directly from the intact diaphysis followed by micro-computed tomography to quantify mineralization density (Ct.TMD). Correlations were then tested for significance between these properties and the biomechanical properties as determined by the three point bending test on the same femurs. Harvested tibia were embedded in plastic, sectioned transversely, and polished in order to acquire average Raman properties per specimen that were then correlated with average nanoindentation properties per specimen. Dividing the ν1 phosphate by the proline peak intensity provided the strongest correlation between the mineral-to-collagen ratio and the biomechanical properties (whole bone modulus, strength and post-yield deflection plus nanoindentation modulus). Moreover, the linear combination of ν1 phosphate/proline and Ct.TMD provided the best explanation of the variance in strength between the genotypes, and it alone was the best explanatory variable for brittleness. Causal relationships between Raman and fracture resistance need to be investigated, but Raman has the potential to assess fracture risk. PMID:21035119

  9. Establishment and characterization of mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell hybridomas

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Takeshi

    2012-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) are an important model for studying the function of mucosal-type mast cells. In the present study, BMMCs were successfully immortalized by cell fusion using a hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine medium-sensitive variant of P815 mouse mastocytoma (P815-6TgR) as a partner cell line. The established mouse mast cell hybridomas (MMCHs) expressed {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} subunits of high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor (Fc{epsilon}RI) and possessed cytoplasmic granules devoid of or partially filled with electron-dense material. Four independent MMCH clones continuously proliferated without supplemental exogenous IL-3 and showed a degranulation response on stimulation with IgE+antigen. Furthermore, histamine synthesis and release by degranulation were confirmed in MMCH-D5, a MMCH clone that showed the strongest degranulation response. MMCH-D5 exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, IL-13, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, and cyclooxygenase 2, and production of prostaglandin D{sub 2} and leukotriene C{sub 4} in response to IgE-induced stimulation. MMCH clones also expressed Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 1, 2, 4, and 6 and showed elevated levels of TNF-{alpha} expression in response to stimulation with TLR2 and TLR4 ligands. The MMCHs established using this method should be suitable for studies on Fc{epsilon}RI- and TLR-mediated effector functions of mast cells.

  10. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takehito Kondo, Eri; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inamoto, Masataka; Kiyosu, Chiyo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2008-11-07

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification.

  11. Cadmium chloride strongly enhances cyclophosphamide-induced chromosome aberrations in mouse bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pandurangarao, V.L.; Blazina, S.; Bherje, R.

    1997-10-01

    Earlier we reported that a single 5 mg cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2})/kg ip dose enhanced chromosome aberrations (ca) with 50 mg/kg cyclophosphamide (CP) in mouse bone marrow cells. In this report groups of 4 mice were injected ip with saline, 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg CdCl{sub 2}, followed by saline injections at 24 h. Other mice similarly uninjected at 0 h were injected with 50 mg/kg CP at 24 h. All the mice were injected ip with 4 mg colchicine/kg at 44 h. At 48 h the bone marrow cells were processed for chromosome spreads. After dissection, visual examination revealed obvious internal hemorrhaging of the testes at 1.25 CdCl{sub 2} mg/kg and higher doses. This effect was not further increased by CP treatment. The lowest ca enhancing dose of CdCl{sub 2} on CP was 0.625 mg/kg. Our hypothesis is that Cd replaces zinc presents in numerous DNA repair enzymes and proteins resulting in diminished repair. Subsequently, the excess of unrepaired DNA damage is seen as chromatid breaks, deletions, fragments and exchanges.

  12. Raman spectroscopy detects deterioration in biomechanical properties of bone in a glucocorticoid-treated mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maher, Jason R.; Takahata, Masahiko; Awad, Hani A.; Berger, Andrew J.

    2011-08-01

    Although glucocorticoids are frequently prescribed for the symptomatic management of inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, extended glucocorticoid exposure is the leading cause of physician-induced osteoporosis and leaves patients at a high risk of fracture. To study the biochemical effects of glucocorticoid exposure and how they might affect biomechanical properties of the bone, Raman spectra were acquired from ex vivo tibiae of glucocorticoid- and placebo-treated wild-type mice and a transgenic mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis. Statistically significant spectral differences were observed due to both treatment regimen and mouse genotype. These differences are attributed to changes in the overall bone mineral composition, as well as the degree of phosphate mineralization in tibial cortical bone. In addition, partial least squares regression was used to generate a Raman-based prediction of each tibia's biomechanical strength as quantified by a torsion test. The Raman-based predictions were as accurate as those produced by microcomputed tomography derived parameters, and more accurate than the clinically-used parameter of bone mineral density. These results suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for monitoring bone biochemistry in studies of bone diseases such as osteoporosis, including tests of drugs being developed to combat these diseases.

  13. Effect of glucocorticoids on osteoclast function in a mouse model of bone necrosis.

    PubMed

    He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi; Wang, Guangbin; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Linlin; Ren, Zhaozhou; Qiu, Chuang; Fu, Qin

    2016-08-01

    Osteonecrosis, also termed aseptic necrosis, is the cellular death of bone components due to interruption of the blood supply. Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is a common non-traumatic cause of osteonecrosis. However, the mechanism by which GCs induce osteonecrosis remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of GCs on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and function in a GC‑induced osteonecrosis mouse model. BALB/c male mice (n=40; 4‑weeks‑old) were treated with dexamethasone and asparaginase for 8 weeks. The control group (n=20) was administered normal saline. The results demonstrated that the GC-treated group had a lower mean weight compared with the control group. Morphologically, 16/37 (43%) mice demonstrated significant osteonecrotic lesions in the GC‑treated group. However, osteonecrotic lesions were not observed in the mice of the control group. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the GC‑treated group had a higher level of osteoprotegerin compared with the control group, without any change in the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor‑κB ligand. In addition, tartarate‑resistant acid-phosphatase staining demonstrated significantly decreased osteoclasts in the areas of bone destruction in the GCs-treated group. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that GCs increased expression levels of osterix and osteocalcin, and decreased expression of matrix metallopeptidase‑9 to regulate the differentiation and function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The results of the present study suggested that GCs influence bone remolding resulting in decreased osteoclasts formation/differentiation. Therefore, regulating the differentiation and activity of the osteoclasts may be beneficial to the control and treatment of osteonecrosis. PMID:27277157

  14. Effect of glucocorticoids on osteoclast function in a mouse model of bone necrosis

    PubMed Central

    He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi; Wang, Guangbin; Tian, Ye; Jiang, Linlin; Ren, Zhaozhou; Qiu, Chuang; Fu, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis, also termed aseptic necrosis, is the cellular death of bone components due to interruption of the blood supply. Glucocorticoid (GC) therapy is a common non-traumatic cause of osteonecrosis. However, the mechanism by which GCs induce osteonecrosis remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of GCs on osteoclast and osteoblast differentiation and function in a GC-induced osteonecrosis mouse model. BALB/c male mice (n=40; 4-weeks-old) were treated with dexamethasone and asparaginase for 8 weeks. The control group (n=20) was administered normal saline. The results demonstrated that the GC-treated group had a lower mean weight compared with the control group. Morphologically, 16/37 (43%) mice demonstrated significant osteonecrotic lesions in the GC-treated group. However, osteonecrotic lesions were not observed in the mice of the control group. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the GC-treated group had a higher level of osteoprotegerin compared with the control group, without any change in the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand. In addition, tartarate-resistant acid-phosphatase staining demonstrated significantly decreased osteoclasts in the areas of bone destruction in the GCs-treated group. Furthermore, the present study demonstrated that GCs increased expression levels of osterix and osteocalcin, and decreased expression of matrix metallopeptidase-9 to regulate the differentiation and function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The results of the present study suggested that GCs influence bone remolding resulting in decreased osteoclasts formation/differentiation. Therefore, regulating the differentiation and activity of the osteoclasts may be beneficial to the control and treatment of osteonecrosis. PMID:27277157

  15. Inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis leads to a change in adherence of mouse osteoclasts from bone to periosteum.

    PubMed

    Marshall, M J; Holt, I; Davie, M W

    1996-09-01

    When mouse parietal bones were incubated for 1 day in medium containing indomethacin (Ind), the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts (TRAP+OC) counted on the bone surface was drastically reduced. This reduction did not occur with calcitonin or if the endocranial membrane (periosteum) was removed prior to incubation with Ind. The aim of this work was to determine the mechanism involved. TRAP+OC were found to be increased on the endocranial membrane adjacent to the resorbing surface after Ind treatment, compared with cultures supplemented with parathyroid hormone (PTH) or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). However, this increase accounted for only half of those lost from the bone surface. TRAP negative osteoclasts were also seen on the membrane and, to a lesser extent, on the bone. Increased TRAP specific activity could be extracted from the endocranial membranes of bones incubated with Ind compared with PGE2 controls. When bones that had been exposed to Ind were then cultured for 1 day in PGE2, an increase in TRAP+OC occurred. This increase was blocked by the removal of the endocranial membrane prior to incubation with PGE2. We conclude that when prostaglandin production ceases, TRAP+OC become less adherent to bone and more adherent to the endocranial membrane. Stimulators of bone resorption appear to reverse this process. PMID:8694899

  16. Lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Ko; Kasahara, Kyosuke; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato

    2009-10-30

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of lithium, a first-line antimanic mood stabilizer, have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of the algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with lithium has been shown to induce elongation of their flagella, which are analogous structures to vertebrate cilia. In the mouse brain, adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3) and certain neuropeptide receptors colocalize to the primary cilium of neuronal cells, suggesting a chemosensory function for the primary cilium in the nervous system. Here we show that lithium treatment elongates primary cilia in the mouse brain and in cultured cells. Brain sections from mice chronically fed with Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were subjected to immunofluorescence study. Primary cilia carrying both AC3 and the receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were elongated in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens of lithium-fed mice, as compared to those of control animals. Moreover, lithium-treated NIH3T3 cells and cultured striatal neurons exhibited elongation of the primary cilia. The present results provide initial evidence that a psychotropic agent can affect ciliary length in the central nervous system, and furthermore suggest that lithium exerts its therapeutic effects via the upregulation of cilia-mediated MCH sensing. These findings thus contribute novel insights into the pathophysiology of bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric diseases.

  17. Multiple soft tissue aneurysmal cysts: An occurrence after resection of primary aneurysmal bone cyst of fibula

    PubMed Central

    Karkuzhali, P; Bhattacharyya, Mahuya; Sumitha, P

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of multiple extraosseous aneurysmal cysts occurring in the muscle and subcutaneous plane of postero-lateral aspects of the upper right leg. They appeared about 15 months after resection of aneurysmal bone cyst of the upper end of the fibula. They varied in size from 2 cm to 5 cm. Radiologically they were well-defined lesions with central septate areas surrounded by a rim of calcification. Histologically they showed central cystic spaces separated by septa consisting of fibroblasts, osteoclast type of giant cells and reactive woven bone. Thus they showed histological similarity with aneurysmal bone cysts, but did not show any connection with the bone. Only very few examples of aneurysmal cysts of soft tissue had been described in the past one decade and they were reported in various locations including rare sites such as arterial wall and larynx. Recent cytogenetic analyses have shown abnormalities involving 17p11-13 and/or 16q22 in both osseous and extraosseous aneurysmal cysts indicating its probable neoplastic nature. Our case had unique features like multiplicity and occurrence after resection of primary aneurysmal bone cyst of the underlying bone. PMID:21139755

  18. Osseous and dental outcomes of primary gingivoperiosteoplasty with iliac bone graft: A radiological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Touzet-Roumazeille, Sandrine; Vi-Fane, Brigitte; Kadlub, Natacha; Genin, Michaël; Dissaux, Caroline; Raoul, Gwenaël; Ferri, Joël; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Picard, Arnaud

    2015-07-01

    Primary alveolar cleft repair has two main purposes: to restore normal morphology and normal function. Gingivoperiosteoplasty with bone grafting in mixed dentition has been a well-established procedure. We hypothesized that 1) performance of this surgery in deciduous dentition would provide favorable bone graft osseointegration, and 2) would improve the support of incisor teeth eruption, thereby avoiding maxillary growth disturbances. We conducted a retrospective study of clinical and tridimensional radiological data for 73 patients with alveolar clefts (with or without lip and palate clefts) who underwent gingivoperiosteoplasty with iliac bone graft in deciduous dentition. Pre- and post-operative Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) comparison allowed evaluation of the ratio between bone graft volume and initial cleft volume (BGV/ICV ratio), and measurement of central incisor teeth movements. This series of 73 patients included 44 males and 29 females, with a mean age of 5.5 years. Few complications were observed. Post-operative CBCT was performed at 7.4 months. The mean BGV/ICV ratio was 0.62. Axial rotation was significantly improved post-operatively (p = 0.004). Gingivoperiosteoplasty with iliac bone graft is safe when performed in deciduous dentition and results in a sufficient bone graft volume to support lateral incisor eruption and upper central incisor tooth position improvement. PMID:26004807

  19. Human prostate cancer metastases target the hematopoietic stem cell niche to establish footholds in mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Pedersen, Elisabeth A.; Havens, Aaron M.; Jung, Younghun; Mishra, Anjali; Joseph, Jeena; Kim, Jin Koo; Patel, Lalit R.; Ying, Chi; Ziegler, Anne M.; Pienta, Michael J.; Song, Junhui; Wang, Jingcheng; Loberg, Robert D.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2011-01-01

    HSC homing, quiescence, and self-renewal depend on the bone marrow HSC niche. A large proportion of solid tumor metastases are bone metastases, known to usurp HSC homing pathways to establish footholds in the bone marrow. However, it is not clear whether tumors target the HSC niche during metastasis. Here we have shown in a mouse model of metastasis that human prostate cancer (PCa) cells directly compete with HSCs for occupancy of the mouse HSC niche. Importantly, increasing the niche size promoted metastasis, whereas decreasing the niche size compromised dissemination. Furthermore, disseminated PCa cells could be mobilized out of the niche and back into the circulation using HSC mobilization protocols. Finally, once in the niche, tumor cells reduced HSC numbers by driving their terminal differentiation. These data provide what we believe to be the first evidence that the HSC niche serves as a direct target for PCa during dissemination and plays a central role in bone metastases. Our work may lead to better understanding of the molecular events involved in bone metastases and new therapeutic avenues for an incurable disease. PMID:21436587

  20. Lamin B1 protein is required for dendrite development in primary mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Caterina; Mahajani, Sameehan; Ruffilli, Roberta; Marotta, Roberto; Gasparini, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lamin B1, a key component of the nuclear lamina, plays an important role in brain development and function. A duplication of the human lamin B1 (LMNB1) gene has been linked to adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, and mouse and human loss-of-function mutations in lamin B1 are susceptibility factors for neural tube defects. In the mouse, experimental ablation of endogenous lamin B1 (Lmnb1) severely impairs embryonic corticogenesis. Here we report that in primary mouse cortical neurons, LMNB1 overexpression reduces axonal outgrowth, whereas deficiency of endogenous Lmnb1 results in aberrant dendritic development. In the absence of Lmnb1, both the length and complexity of dendrites are reduced, and their growth is unresponsive to KCl stimulation. This defective dendritic outgrowth stems from impaired ERK signaling. In Lmnb1-null neurons, ERK is correctly phosphorylated, but phospho-ERK fails to translocate to the nucleus, possibly due to delocalization of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data highlight a previously unrecognized role of lamin B1 in dendrite development of mouse cortical neurons through regulation of nuclear shuttling of specific signaling molecules and NPC distribution. PMID:26510501

  1. Optimisation of the differing conditions required for bone formation in vitro by primary osteoblasts from mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Orriss, Isabel R; Hajjawi, Mark O R; Huesa, Carmen; MacRae, Vicky E; Arnett, Timothy R

    2014-11-01

    The in vitro culture of calvarial osteoblasts from neonatal rodents remains an important method for studying the regulation of bone formation. The widespread use of transgenic mice has created a particular need for a reliable, simple method that allows the differentiation and bone‑forming activity of murine osteoblasts to be studied. In the present study, we established such a method and identified key differences in optimal culture conditions between mouse and rat osteoblasts. Cells isolated from neonatal rodent calvariae by collagenase digestion were cultured for 14‑28 days before staining for tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and bone mineralisation (alizarin red). The reliable differentiation of mouse osteoblasts, resulting in abundant TNAP expression and the formation of mineralised 'trabecular‑shaped' bone nodules, occurred only following culture in α minimum essential medium (αMEM) and took 21‑28 days. Dexamethasone (10 nM) inhibited bone mineralisation in the mouse osteoblasts. By contrast, TNAP expression and bone formation by rat osteoblasts were observed following culture in both αMEM and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) after approximately 14 days (although ~3‑fold more effectively in αMEM) and was strongly dependent on dexamethasone. Both the mouse and rat osteoblasts required ascorbate (50 µg/ml) for osteogenic differentiation and β‑glycerophosphate (2 mM) for mineralisation. The rat and mouse osteoblasts showed similar sensitivity to the well‑established inhibitors of mineralisation, inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP; 1‑100 µM). The high efficiency of osteogenic differentiation observed following culture in αMEM, compared with culture in DMEM possibly reflects the richer formulation of the former. These findings offer a reliable technique for inducing mouse osteoblasts to form bone in vitro and a more effective method for culturing bone‑forming rat osteoblasts. PMID:25200658

  2. Automatic detection and quantitative analysis of cells in the mouse primary motor cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yunlong; He, Yong; Wu, Jingpeng; Chen, Shangbin; Li, Anan; Gong, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Neuronal cells play very important role on metabolism regulation and mechanism control, so cell number is a fundamental determinant of brain function. Combined suitable cell-labeling approaches with recently proposed three-dimensional optical imaging techniques, whole mouse brain coronal sections can be acquired with 1-μm voxel resolution. We have developed a completely automatic pipeline to perform cell centroids detection, and provided three-dimensional quantitative information of cells in the primary motor cortex of C57BL/6 mouse. It involves four principal steps: i) preprocessing; ii) image binarization; iii) cell centroids extraction and contour segmentation; iv) laminar density estimation. Investigations on the presented method reveal promising detection accuracy in terms of recall and precision, with average recall rate 92.1% and average precision rate 86.2%. We also analyze laminar density distribution of cells from pial surface to corpus callosum from the output vectorizations of detected cell centroids in mouse primary motor cortex, and find significant cellular density distribution variations in different layers. This automatic cell centroids detection approach will be beneficial for fast cell-counting and accurate density estimation, as time-consuming and error-prone manual identification is avoided.

  3. Fever and arthralgia as the initial symptoms of primary bone marrow diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    REN, SAISAI; TAO, YANLING; JIA, LU; CHENG, PANPAN; ZHANG, JILEI; ZHANG, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Primary bone marrow diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is rare, and only a few cases have been reported. Fever and arthralgia as the initial symptom are extremely rare; however, awareness must be made of this presentation. The current study describes the clinical and pathological findings of a 41-year-old man affected by fever and arthralgia. Blood tests revealed leukopenia and anemia. Multiple bone marrow biopsies were conducted and confirmed the diagnosis of primary bone marrow DLBCL. Primary bone marrow DLBCL is a rare and frequently misdiagnosed subset of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The current case demonstrates that utility of bone marrow biopsy for diagnosis should not be ignored, and that repeated bone marrow punctures in multiple locations may be necessary. PMID:27123129

  4. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Mitochondria Damage Induced by Hypoxia in Mouse Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingjuan; Xu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to observe the change of mitochondrial function and structure as well as the cell function induced by hypoxia in mouse trophoblasts, and moreover, to validate the restoration of these changes after co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hereinafter referred to as “MSCs”). Further, we explored the mechanism of MSCs attenuating the functional damage of trophoblasts caused by hypoxia. Methods Cells were divided into two groups, trophoblasts and MSCs+trophoblasts respectively, and the two groups of cells were incubated with normoxia or hypoxia. Chemiluminescence was used to assay the β-HCG and progesterone in cell culture supernatants quantitatively. Western blotting and PCR were applied to detect the expression of Mfn2, MMP-2, MMP-9 and integrin β1 in the two groups. The mitochondrial membrane potential of each group of cells was detected with JC-1 dye and the ATP content was measured by the phosphomolybdic acid colorimetric method. We utilized transmission electron microscopy for observing the ultrastructure of mitochondria in trophoblasts. Finally, we assessed the cell apoptosis with flow cytometry (FCM) and analyzed the expression of the apoptosis related genes—Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase3 and Caspase9 by western blotting. Results The results showed that the Mfn2 expression was reduced after 4 h in hypoxia compared with that in normoxia, but increased in the co-culture group when compared with that in the separated-culture group (p<0.05). In addition, compared with the separated-culture group, theβ-HCG and progesterone levels in the co-culture group were significantly enhanced (p<0.05), and so were the expressions of MMP-2, MMP-9 and integrin β1 (p<0.05). Moreover, it exhibited significantly higher in ATP levels and intensified about the mitochondrial membrane potential in the co-culture group. TEM revealed disorders of the mitochondrial cristae and presented short rod-like structure and spheroids in hypoxia, however, in the co

  5. A Systems Biology Study on NFκB Signaling in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Federico; Sahle, Sven; Beuke, Katharina; Bissinger, Michaela; Tuncay, Selcan; D’Alessandro, Lorenza A.; Gauges, Ralph; Raue, Andreas; Timmer, Jens; Klingmüller, Ursula; Schirmacher, Peter; Kummer, Ursula; Breuhahn, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) is one of the key factors during the priming phase of liver regeneration as well as in hepatocarcinogenesis. TNFα activates the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling pathway and contributes to the conversion of quiescent hepatocytes to activated hepatocytes that are able to proliferate in response to growth factor stimulation. Different mathematical models have been previously established for TNFα/NFκB signaling in the context of tumor cells. Combining these mathematical models with time-resolved measurements of expression and phosphorylation of TNFα/NFκB pathway constituents in primary mouse hepatocytes revealed that an additional phosphorylation step of the NFκB isoform p65 has to be considered in the mathematical model in order to sufficiently describe the dynamics of pathway activation in the primary cells. Also, we addressed the role of basal protein turnover by experimentally measuring the degradation rate of pivotal players in the absence of TNFα and including this information in the model. To elucidate the impact of variations in the protein degradation rates on TNFα/NFκB signaling on the overall dynamic behavior we used global sensitivity analysis that accounts for parameter uncertainties and showed that degradation and translation of p65 had a major impact on the amplitude and the integral of p65 phosphorylation. Finally, our mathematical model of TNFα/NFκB signaling was able to predict the time-course of the complex formation of p65 and of the inhibitor of NFκB (IκB) in primary mouse hepatocytes, which was experimentally verified. Hence, we here present a mathematical model for TNFα/NFκB signaling in primary mouse hepatocytes that provides an important basis to quantitatively disentangle the complex interplay of multiple factors in liver regeneration and tumorigenesis. PMID:23293603

  6. Analgesic effects of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor NB001 on bone cancer pain in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-bo; Yang, Qi; Guo, Yan-yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Dong-sheng; Cheng, Qiang; Li, Xiao-ming; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Jian-ning; Liu, Gang; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer pain, especially the one caused by metastasis in bones, is a severe type of pain. Pain becomes chronic unless its causes and consequences are resolved. With improvements in cancer detection and survival among patients, pain has been considered as a great challenge because traditional therapies are partially effective in terms of providing relief. Cancer pain mechanisms are more poorly understood than neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. Chronic inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain are influenced by NB001, an adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1)-specific inhibitor with analgesic effects. In this study, the analgesic effects of NB001 on cancer pain were evaluated. Results Pain was induced by injecting osteolytic murine sarcoma cell NCTC 2472 into the intramedullary cavity of the femur of mice. The mice injected with sarcoma cells for four weeks exhibited significant spontaneous pain behavior and mechanical allodynia. The continuous systemic application of NB001 (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, twice daily for three days) markedly decreased the number of spontaneous lifting but increased the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold. NB001 decreased the concentrations of cAMP and the levels of GluN2A, GluN2B, p-GluA1 (831), and p-GluA1 (845) in the anterior cingulate cortex, and inhibited the frequency of presynaptic neurotransmitter release in the anterior cingulate cortex of the mouse models. Conclusions NB001 may serve as a novel analgesic to treat bone cancer pain. Its analgesic effect is at least partially due to the inhibition of AC1 in anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:27612915

  7. A Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Model to Study Primary Human Bone Marrow and its Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Mukti R.; Belch, Andrew R.; Pilarski, Linda M; Kirshner, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Tissue culture has been an invaluable tool to study many aspects of cell function, from normal development to disease. Conventional cell culture methods rely on the ability of cells either to attach to a solid substratum of a tissue culture dish or to grow in suspension in liquid medium. Multiple immortal cell lines have been created and grown using such approaches, however, these methods frequently fail when primary cells need to be grown ex vivo. Such failure has been attributed to the absence of the appropriate extracellular matrix components of the tissue microenvironment from the standard systems where tissue culture plastic is used as a surface for cell growth. Extracellular matrix is an integral component of the tissue microenvironment and its presence is crucial for the maintenance of physiological functions such as cell polarization, survival, and proliferation. Here we present a 3-dimensional tissue culture method where primary bone marrow cells are grown in extracellular matrix formulated to recapitulate the microenvironment of the human bone (rBM system). Embedded in the extracellular matrix, cells are supplied with nutrients through the medium supplemented with human plasma, thus providing a comprehensive system where cell survival and proliferation can be sustained for up to 30 days while maintaining the cellular composition of the primary tissue. Using the rBM system we have successfully grown primary bone marrow cells from normal donors and patients with amyloidosis, and various hematological malignancies. The rBM system allows for direct, in-matrix real time visualization of the cell behavior and evaluation of preclinical efficacy of novel therapeutics. Moreover, cells can be isolated from the rBM and subsequently used for in vivo transplantation, cell sorting, flow cytometry, and nucleic acid and protein analysis. Taken together, the rBM method provides a reliable system for the growth of primary bone marrow cells under physiological conditions

  8. Variable Bone Fragility Associated With an Amish COL1A2 Variant and a Knock-in Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Ethan; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Sorkin, John D; Kuznetsova, Natalia; Shapses, Sue A; Carleton, Stephanie M; Shuldiner, Alan R; Marini, Joan C; Phillips, Charlotte L; Goldstein, Steven A; Leikin, Sergey; McBride, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heritable form of bone fragility typically associated with a dominant COL1A1 or COL1A2 mutation. Variable phenotype for OI patients with identical collagen mutations is well established, but phenotype variability is described using the qualitative Sillence classification. Patterning a new OI mouse model on a specific collagen mutation therefore has been hindered by the absence of an appropriate kindred with extensive quantitative phenotype data. We benefited from the large sibships of the Old Order Amish (OOA) to define a wide range of OI phenotypes in 64 individuals with the identical COL1A2 mutation. Stratification of carrier spine (L1–4) areal bone mineral density (aBMD) Z-scores demonstrated that 73% had moderate to severe disease (less than −2), 23% had mild disease (−1 to −2), and 4% were in the unaffected range (greater than −1). A line of knock-in mice was patterned on the OOA mutation. Bone phenotype was evaluated in four F1 lines of knock-in mice that each shared approximately 50% of their genetic background. Consistent with the human pedigree, these mice had reduced body mass, aBMD, and bone strength. Whole-bone fracture susceptibility was influenced by individual genomic factors that were reflected in size, shape, and possibly bone metabolic regulation. The results indicate that the G610C OI (Amish) knock-in mouse is a novel translational model to identify modifying genes that influence phenotype and for testing potential therapies for OI. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research PMID:19594296

  9. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bone Disease cont. Page ( 4 ) MBD vs. Primary Bone Cancer The diagnosis of metastatic bone disease should not ... from an unknown primary carcinoma or a primary bone cancer (sarcoma). For example, if an area of bone ...

  10. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simske, Steven J.; Bateman, Ted A.; Smith, Erin E.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Chapes, Stephen K.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls.

  11. Tough and Cell-Compatible Chitosan Physical Hydrogels for Mouse Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Beibei; Gao, Huichang; Song, Jianhui; Li, Yaya; Zhang, Lina; Cao, Xiaodong; Xu, Min; Cai, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Most hydrogels involve synthetic polymers and organic cross-linkers that cannot simultaneously fulfill the mechanical and cell-compatibility requirements of biomedical applications. We prepared a new type of chitosan physical hydrogel with various degrees of deacetylation (DDs) via the heterogeneous deacetylation of nanoporous chitin hydrogels under mild conditions. The DD of the chitosan physical hydrogels ranged from 56 to 99%, and the hydrogels were transparent and mechanically strong because of the extra intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions between the amino and hydroxyl groups on the nearby chitosan nanofibrils. The tensile strength and Young's modulus of the chitosan physical hydrogels were 3.6 and 7.9 MPa, respectively, for a DD of 56% and increased to 12.1 and 92.0 MPa for a DD of 99% in a swelling equilibrium state. In vitro studies demonstrated that mouse bone mesenchymal stem cells (mBMSCs) cultured on chitosan physical hydrogels had better adhesion and proliferation than those cultured on chitin hydrogels. In particular, the chitosan physical hydrogels promoted the differentiation of the mBMSCs into epidermal cells in vitro. These materials are promising candidates for applications such as stem cell research, cell therapy, and tissue engineering. PMID:27410199

  12. Effects of major histocompatibility complex class II knockout on mouse bone mechanical properties during development.

    PubMed

    Simske, Steven J; Bateman, Ted A; Smith, Erin E; Ferguson, Virginia L; Chapes, Stephen K

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effect of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) knockout on the development of the mouse peripheral skeleton. These C2D mice had less skeletal development at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age compared to wild-type C57BL/6J (B6) male mice. The C2D mice had decreased femur mechanical, geometric and compositional measurements compared to wild type mice at each of these ages. C2D femur stiffness (S), peak force in 3-pt bending (Pm), and mineral mass (Min-M) were 74%, 64% and 66%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values at 8 weeks of age. Similar differences were measured at 12 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 71%, 72% and 73%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values) and at 16 weeks (for which C2D femoral S, Pm and Min-M were 80%, 66% and 61%, respectively, of corresponding B6 values). MHC II knockout delays the development of adult bone properties and is accompanied by lower body mass compared to wild-type controls. PMID:12085652

  13. The Pathophysiology of Primary Hip Osteoarthritis may Originate from Bone Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Mikio; Nakamura, Yukio; Ikegami, Shota; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether bone alterations detected by hip magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were associated with subsequent primary hip OA. Methods: We enrolled 7 patients with hip joint pain from their first visit, at which hip joints were classified as grade 0 or I on the Kellgren-Lawrence grading scale. Plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed on all cases, and pain was assessed with the Denis pain scale. Average age, height, weight, body mass index, bone mineral density (L1-4), central edge angle, Sharp’s angle, and acetabular hip index were calculated. Results: Within two months of the onset of pain, 4 of the 7 cases showed broad bone signal changes, while 3 cases showed local signal changes in the proximal femur on hip MRI. Three to 6 months after the onset of pain, in all patients whose pain was much improved, plain radiographs showed progression to further-stage OA. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that bone abnormalities in the proximal femur might be involved in the pathogenesis of primary hip OA. PMID:24358070

  14. Forearm bone mineral density in familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and primary hyperparathyroidism: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Troels; Nielsen, Christian Stoltz; Christensen, Signe Engkjær; Nissen, Peter H; Heickendorff, Lene; Mosekilde, Leif

    2011-10-01

    Studies have shown that cancellous bone is relatively preserved in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT), whereas bone loss is seen in cortical bone. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) patients seem to preserve bone mineral in spite of hypercalcemia and often elevated plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH). The objective of this study was to compare total and regional forearm bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with PHPT and FHH and to examine if differences can be used to separate the two disorders. We included 63 FHH, and 121 PHPT patients in a cross-sectional study. We performed dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans of the forearm, hip and lumbar spine and measured a number of biochemical variables. PTH patients had significantly lower Z-scores in all parts of the forearm compared to FHH. This was also the case after adjustment for body mass index. When stratifying for age, gender and PTH, T-scores were still significantly lower in PHPT patients than in FHH patients at the total, the mid and the ultradistal forearm, but not at the proximal 1/3 forearm. In a multiple regression analysis BMD Z-score was lower in PHPT compared to FHH at the total forearm, the mid forearm and the ultradistal forearm but not the proximal forearm when adjusting for biochemical variables including PTH, 1,25(OH)(2)D and Ca(2+). These observations support that inactivating mutations in the CASR gene in bone cells in FHH may protect against forearm bone loss. Differences between the two groups in total or regional forearm BMD were inferior to the calcium/creatinine clearance ratio as a diagnostic tool to separate FHH from PHPT. PMID:21785908

  15. Primary bone osteosarcoma in the pediatric age: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Longhi, Alessandra; Errani, Costantino; De Paolis, Massimiliano; Mercuri, Mario; Bacci, Gaetano

    2006-10-01

    The current combination treatment, chemotherapy and surgery, has significantly improved the cure rate and the survival rate of primary bone osteosarcoma. The 5-year survival rate has increased in the last 30 years from 10% to 70%. Even in patients with poor prognosis, such as those with metastases at diagnosis, the 5-year survival rate has reached 20-30% due to chemotherapy and the surgical removal of metastases and primary tumor. However, the most effective drugs are still the same as those employed over the last 20 years as front line neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy: Doxorubicin, Cisplatin, Methotrexate, Ifosfamide. No standard, second line therapy exists for those who relapse. At relapse, due to the lack of new non-cross-resistant drugs, surgery is still the main option when feasible. Other drugs have been employed in relapsed patients with poor results. This article reviews the state of the art of treatment for bone osteosarcoma in the pediatric age. PMID:16860938

  16. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Kyle C.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P.; Ferrer, Jorge M.; Kim, Yongbaek; Lee, W. David; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Brigman, Brian E.; Kirsch, David G.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  17. Primary Neoplasms of Bones in Mice: Retrospective Study and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kavirayani, A. M.; Sundberg, J. P.; Foreman, O.

    2011-01-01

    To compare and summarize the mechanisms, frequencies of occurrence, and classification schemes of spontaneous, experimental, and genetically engineered, mouse skeletal neoplasms, the literature was reviewed and archived case material at The Jackson Laboratory examined. The frequency of occurrence of spontaneous bone neoplasms was less than 1% for most strains, with the exceptions of osteomas in CF-1 (5.5% and 10% in two studies) and OF-1 outbred strains (35%), and osteosarcomas in NOD/ShiLtJ (11.5%) and NOD derived (7.1%) mice. The frequency was 100% for osteochondromas induced by conditional inactivation of exostoses (multiple) 1 (Ext1) in chondrocytes, osteosarcomas induced by tibial intramedullary inoculation of Moloney’s murine sarcoma virus, and osteosarcomas induced by conditional inactivation of Trp53-with or without inactivation of Rb1-in osteoblast precursors. Spontaneous osteogenic neoplasms were more frequent than spontaneous cartilaginous and vascular types. Malignant neoplasms were more frequent than benign ones. The age of occurrence for spontaneous neoplasms ranged from 37 to 720 (Mean 316.35) days for benign, and 35 to 990 (Mean 299.28) days for malignant neoplasms. In genetically engineered mice, the average age of occurrence ranged from 28 to 70 days for benign, and from 35 to 690 days for malignant neoplasms. Histologically, non-osteogenic neoplasms were similar across strains and mutant stocks; osteogenic neoplasms exhibited greater diversity. This comparison and summarization of mouse bone neoplasms provides valuable information for the selection of strains to create, compare, and validate models of bone neoplasms. PMID:21343597

  18. Ex vivo 3D osteocyte network construction with primary murine bone cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiaoling; Gu, Yexin; Zhang, Wenting; Dziopa, Leah; Zilberberg, Jenny; Lee, Woo

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes reside as three-dimensionally (3D) networked cells in the lacunocanalicular structure of bones and regulate bone and mineral homeostasis. Despite of their important regulatory roles, in vitro studies of osteocytes have been challenging because: (1) current cell lines do not sufficiently represent the phenotypic features of mature osteocytes and (2) primary cells rapidly differentiate to osteoblasts upon isolation. In this study, we used a 3D perfusion culture approach to: (1) construct the 3D cellular network of primary murine osteocytes by biomimetic assembly with microbeads and (2) reproduce ex vivo the phenotype of primary murine osteocytes, for the first time to our best knowledge. In order to enable 3D construction with a sufficient number of viable cells, we used a proliferated osteoblastic population of healthy cells outgrown from digested bone chips. The diameter of microbeads was controlled to: (1) distribute and entrap cells within the interstitial spaces between the microbeads and (2) maintain average cell-to-cell distance to be about 19 µm. The entrapped cells formed a 3D cellular network by extending and connecting their processes through openings between the microbeads. Also, with increasing culture time, the entrapped cells exhibited the characteristic gene expressions (SOST and FGF23) and nonproliferative behavior of mature osteocytes. In contrast, 2D-cultured cells continued their osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation. This 3D biomimetic approach is expected to provide a new means of: (1) studying flow-induced shear stress on the mechanotransduction function of primary osteocytes, (2) studying physiological functions of 3D-networked osteocytes with in vitro convenience, and (3) developing clinically relevant human bone disease models. PMID:26421212

  19. Huge primary soft tissue sarcoma of the breast on bone scan.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yeh-You; Wu, Yu-Chin; Kao, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Te-Chun

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman had a primary breast sarcoma with rapid enlargement in 3 months. The mass became so huge that it was more than 20 cm in diameter and occupied the entire right breast on presentation. Extraosseous uptake was present in this mass and demonstrated a unique picture, mimicking the posture of a racing driver who holds a helmet under the armpit, on the bone scan. PMID:24152643

  20. Characteristics and response of mouse bone marrow derived novel low adherent mesenchymal stem cells acquired by quantification of extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ri-Cheng; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Lee, Joo-Hee; Park, Ji-Man

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of present study was to identify characteristic and response of mouse bone marrow (BM) derived low-adherent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) obtained by quantification of extracellular matrix (ECM). MATERIALS AND METHODS Non-adherent cells acquired by ECM coated dishes were termed low-adherent BMMSCs and these cells were analyzed by in vitro and in vivo methods, including colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-f), bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), multi-potential differentiation, flow cytometry and transplantation into nude mouse to measure the bone formation ability of these low-adherent BMMSCs. Titanium (Ti) discs with machined and anodized surfaces were prepared. Adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs were cultured on the Ti discs for testing their proliferation. RESULTS The amount of CFU-f cells was significantly higher when non-adherent cells were cultured on ECM coated dishes, which was made by 7 days culturing of adherent BMMSCs. Low-adherent BMMSCs had proliferation and differentiation potential as adherent BMMSCs in vitro. The mean amount bone formation of adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs was also investigated in vivo. There was higher cell proliferation appearance in adherent and low-adherent BMMSCs seeded on anodized Ti discs than machined Ti discs by time. CONCLUSION Low-adherent BMMSCs acquired by ECM from non-adherent cell populations maintained potential characteristic similar to those of the adherent BMMSCs and therefore could be used effectively as adherent BMMSCs in clinic. PMID:25352957

  1. Developmental changes in primary cilia in the mouse tooth germ and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Hisamoto, Meri; Goto, Marie; Muto, Mami; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory apparatus, functions as both a chemical and mechanical sensor to receive environmental stimuli. The present study focused on the primary cilia in the epithelialmesenchymal interaction during tooth development. We examined the localization and direction of projection of primary cilia in the tooth germ and oral cavity of mice by immunohistochemical observation. Adenylyl cyclase 3 (ACIII)-immunolabeled cilia were visible in the inner/outer enamel epithelium of molars at the fetal stage and then conspicuously developed in the odontoblast layer postnatally. The primary cilia in ameloblasts and odontoblasts-shown by the double staining of acetylated tubulin and γ-tubulin-were regularly arranged from postnatal Day12, projecting apart from each other. The periodontal ligament possessed ACIII-positive cilia, which gathered on both sides of the dentin/cement and alveolar bone in postnatal days. In the oral cavity, numerous long primary cilia immunoreactive for ACIII were condensed at subepithelial stromal cells in the oral processes in fetuses, while postnatally a small number of short cilia were dispersed throughout the stroma of the oral cavity. These findings suggest that the primary cilia showing stage- and regionspecific morphology are involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during tooth development via mechano- and/or chemoreception for growth factors. PMID:27356608

  2. Avascular necrosis of bone associated with primary antiphospholipid syndrome: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zonana-Nacach, Abraham; Jiménez-Balderas, Francisco Javier

    2004-08-01

    We describe, the case of a 34-year-old mestizo Mexican woman with previous history of fetal loss, deep vein thrombosis that developed avascular necrosis (AVN) of the right knee with strong positive levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) IgG and IgM. AVN of bone in association with aCL has been seen principally in systemic lupus erythematosus patients. However, few cases have been reported of AVN as a clinical manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome. A review of the association of aCL and AVN in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, primary antiphospholipid syndrome, and idiopathic osteonecrosis is presented. PMID:17043512

  3. Primary amines protect against retinal degeneration in mouse models of retinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Akiko; Golczak, Marcin; Chen, Yu; Okano, Kiichiro; Kohno, Hideo; Shiose, Satomi; Ishikawa, Kaede; Harte, William; Palczewska, Grazyna; Maeda, Tadao; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate vision is initiated by photoisomerization of the visual pigment chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and is maintained by continuous regeneration of this retinoid through a series of reactions termed the retinoid cycle. However, toxic side reaction products, especially those involving reactive aldehyde groups of the photoisomered product, all-trans-retinal, can cause severe retinal pathology. Here we lowered peak concentrations of free all-trans-retinal with primary amine-containing FDA-approved drugs that did not inhibit chromophore regeneration in mouse models of retinal degeneration. Schiff base adducts between all-trans-retinal and these amines were identified by mass spectrometry. Adducts were observed in mouse eyes only when an experimental drug protected the retina from degeneration in both short-term and long-term treatment experiments. This study demonstrates a molecular basis of all-trans-retinal-induced retinal pathology and identifies an assemblage of FDA-approved compounds with protective effects against this pathology in a mouse model that displays features of Stargardt’s and age-related retinal degeneration. PMID:22198730

  4. Peptidomic Analyses of Mouse Astrocytic Cell Lines and Rat Primary Cultured Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ping; Knolhoff, Ann M.; Rosenberg, Harry J.; Millet, Larry J.; Gillette, Martha U.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes play an active role in the modulation of synaptic transmission by releasing cell-cell signaling molecules in response to various stimuli that evoke a Ca2+ increase. We expand on recent studies of astrocyte intracellular and secreted proteins by examining the astrocyte peptidome in mouse astrocytic cell lines and rat primary cultured astrocytes, as well as those peptides secreted from mouse astrocytic cell lines in response to Ca2+-dependent stimulations. We identified 57 peptides derived from 24 proteins with LC–MS/MS and CE–MS/MS in the astrocytes. Among the secreted peptides, four peptides derived from elongation factor 1, macrophage migration inhibitory factor, peroxiredoxin-5, and galectin-1, were putatively identified by mass-matching to peptides confirmed to be found in astrocytes. Other peptides in the secretion study were mass-matched to those found in prior peptidomics analyses on mouse brain tissue. Complex peptide profiles were observed after stimulation, suggesting that astrocytes are actively involved in peptide secretion. Twenty-six peptides were observed in multiple stimulation experiments but not in controls and thus appear to be released in a Ca2+-dependent manner. These results can be used in future investigations to better understand stimulus-dependent mechanisms of astrocyte peptide secretion. PMID:22742998

  5. Homeobox genes d11–d13 and a13 control mouse autopod cortical bone and joint formation

    PubMed Central

    Villavicencio-Lorini, Pablo; Kuss, Pia; Friedrich, Julia; Haupt, Julia; Farooq, Muhammed; Türkmen, Seval; Duboule, Denis; Hecht, Jochen; Mundlos, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that govern bone and joint formation are complex, involving an integrated network of signaling pathways and gene regulators. We investigated the role of Hox genes, which are known to specify individual segments of the skeleton, in the formation of autopod limb bones (i.e., the hands and feet) using the mouse mutant synpolydactyly homolog (spdh), which encodes a polyalanine expansion in Hoxd13. We found that no cortical bone was formed in the autopod in spdh/spdh mice; instead, these bones underwent trabecular ossification after birth. Spdh/spdh metacarpals acquired an ovoid shape and developed ectopic joints, indicating a loss of long bone characteristics and thus a transformation of metacarpals into carpal bones. The perichondrium of spdh/spdh mice showed abnormal morphology and decreased expression of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), which was identified as a direct Hoxd13 transcriptional target. Hoxd11–/–Hoxd12–/–Hoxd13–/– triple-knockout mice and Hoxd13–/–Hoxa13+/– mice exhibited similar but less severe defects, suggesting that these Hox genes have similar and complementary functions and that the spdh allele acts as a dominant negative. This effect was shown to be due to sequestration of other polyalanine-containing transcription factors by the mutant Hoxd13 in the cytoplasm, leading to their degradation. These data indicate that Hox genes not only regulate patterning but also directly influence bone formation and the ossification pattern of bones, in part via Runx2. PMID:20458143

  6. Microarchitecture, but Not Bone Mechanical Properties, Is Rescued with Growth Hormone Treatment in a Mouse Model of Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Erika; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Morck, Douglas W.; Boyd, Steven K.

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) deficiency is related to an increased fracture risk although it is not clear if this is due to compromised bone quality or a small bone size. We investigated the relationship between bone macrostructure, microarchitecture and mechanical properties in a GH-deficient (GHD) mouse model undergoing GH treatment commencing at an early (prepubertal) or late (postpubertal) time point. Microcomputed tomography images of the femur and L4 vertebra were obtained to quantify macrostructure and vertebral trabecular microarchitecture, and mechanical properties were determined using finite element analyses. In the GHD animals, bone macrostructure was 25 to 43% smaller as compared to the GH-sufficient (GHS) controls (P < 0.001). GHD animals had 20% and 19% reductions in bone volume ratio (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), respectively. Whole bone mechanical properties of the GHD mice were lower at the femur and vertebra (67% and 45% resp.) than the GHS controls (P < 0.001). Both early and late GH treatment partially recovered the bone macrostructure (15 to 32 % smaller than GHS controls) and the whole bone mechanical properties (24 to 43% larger than GHD animals) although there remained a sustained 27–52% net deficit compared to normal mice (P < 0.05). Importantly, early treatment with GH led to a recovery of BV/TV and Tb.Th with a concomitant improvement of trabecular mechanical properties. Therefore, the results suggest that GH treatment should start early, and that measurements of microarchitecture should be considered in the management of GHD. PMID:22505889

  7. Live-Cell Imaging of Phagosome Motility in Primary Mouse RPE Cells.

    PubMed

    Hazim, Roni; Jiang, Mei; Esteve-Rudd, Julian; Diemer, Tanja; Lopes, Vanda S; Williams, David S

    2016-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a post-mitotic epithelial monolayer situated between the light-sensitive photoreceptors and the choriocapillaris. Given its vital functions for healthy vision, the RPE is a primary target for insults that result in blinding diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). One such function is the phagocytosis and digestion of shed photoreceptor outer segments. In the present study, we examined the process of trafficking of outer segment disk membranes in live cultures of primary mouse RPE, using high speed spinning disk confocal microscopy. This approach has enabled us to track phagosomes, and determine parameters of their motility, which are important for their efficient degradation. PMID:26427485

  8. Metal block augmentation for bone defects of the medial tibia during primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stable and well-aligned placement of tibial components during primary total knee arthroplasty is challenging in patients with bone defects. Although rectangular block-shaped augmentations are widely used to reduce the shearing force between the tibial tray and bone compared with wedge-shaped augmentations, the clinical result remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome of primary total knee arthroplasty with metal block augmentation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the 3- to 6-year follow-up results of 33 knees that underwent total knee arthroplasty with metal block augmentation (metal-augmented group) for bone defects of the medial tibia and 132 varus knees without bone defects as the control group. All surgeries were performed using posterior-stabilized cemented prostheses in both groups. Cemented stems were routinely augmented when the metal block was used. Results There were no differences in implant survival rates (100% in metal-augmented and 99.2% in control) or knee function scores (82 points in metal-augmented and 84 points in control) between the two groups at the final follow-up examination (P = 0.60 and P = 0.09, respectively). No subsidence or loosening of the tibial tray was observed. Of 33 metal-augmented total knee arthroplasties, a nonprogressive radiolucent line beneath the metal was detected in 10 knees (30.3%), and rounding of the medial edge of the tibia was observed in 17 knees (51.5%). Conclusions The clinical results of total knee arthroplasty with metal augmentation were not inferior to those in patients without bone defects. However, radiolucent lines were observed in 30.3%. PMID:24139483

  9. Analysis of differences in bone removal during femoral box osteotomy for primary total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    GRACEFFA, ANGELO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; BASNETT, KAITLYN; MARCUCCI, MASSIMILIANO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to compare the quantity of intercondylar bone removed during femoral box osteotomy for implantation of three contemporary posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty designs: Sigma PS (DePuy), Vanguard (Biomet) and Persona (Zimmer). Methods we compared the maximum volumetric bone resection required for the housing of the PS mechanism of these three designs. Bone removal by each PS box cutting jig was three-dimensionally measured. The differences between the three designs were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used for pairwise comparisons. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results for small-size implants, the average box osteotomy volume of Persona was significantly smaller than the Vanguard and Sigma PS volumes (p=0.003). The mean difference between Vanguard and Sigma PS (p=0.01) was also significant. For medium size implants, the mean difference between Persona and Sigma PS (p=0.008) and the mean difference between Vanguard and Sigma PS (p=0.01) were statistically significant. For large size implants, the mean difference between Vanguard and Sigma PS (p=0.01) and the mean difference between Sigma PS and Persona (p=0.008) were statistically significant. Conclusions irrespective of implant size, the Persona cutting jig always resected significantly less bone than did Vanguard and Sigma PS. Clinical Relevance although this study does not establish any clinical relevance of removing more or less bone at primary TKA, its results suggest that if a PS design is indicated, it is preferable to select a model which resects less distal femoral bone. PMID:25606547

  10. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gefei; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia; Dai, Jianping; Li, Kangsheng

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  11. Chemokine-Targeted Mouse Models of Human Primary and Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Sun, Jian; Huang, Zhiliang; Hou, Harry; Arcilla, Myra; Rakhilin, Nikolai; Joe, Daniel J.; Choi, Jiahn; Gadamsetty, Poornima; Milsom, Jeff; Nandakumar, Govind; Longman, Randy; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Edwards, Robert; Chen, Jonlin; Chen, Kai Yuan; Bu, Pengcheng; Wang, Lihua; Xu, Yitian; Munroe, Robert; Abratte, Christian; Miller, Andrew D.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Shuler, Michael; Nishimura, Nozomi; Edelmann, Winfried; Shen, Xiling; Lipkin, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Current orthotopic xenograft models of human colorectal cancer (CRC) require surgery and do not robustly form metastases in the liver, the most common site clinically. CCR9 traffics lymphocytes to intestine and colorectum. We engineered use of the chemokine receptor CCR9 in CRC cell lines and patient-derived cells to create primary gastrointestinal (GI) tumors in immunodeficient mice by tail-vein injection rather than surgery. The tumors metastasize inducibly and robustly to the liver. Metastases have higher DKK4 and NOTCH signaling levels and are more chemoresistant than paired sub-cutaneous xenografts. Using this approach, we generated 17 chemokine-targeted mouse models (CTMMs) that recapitulate the majority of common human somatic CRC mutations. We also show that primary tumors can be modeled in immunocompetent mice by microinjecting CCR9-expressing cancer cell lines into early-stage mouse blastocysts, which induces central immune tolerance. We expect that CTMMs will facilitate investigation of the biology of CRC metastasis and drug screening. PMID:26006007

  12. Establishment of primary cultures for mouse ameloblasts as a model of their lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Suzawa, Tetsuo . E-mail: suzawa@dent.showa-u.ac.jp; Itoh, Nao; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Katagiri, Takenobu; Morimura, Naoko; Kobayashi, Yasuna; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2006-07-07

    To understand how the properties of ameloblasts are spatiotemporally regulated during amelogenesis, two primary cultures of ameloblasts in different stages of differentiation were established from mouse enamel epithelium. Mouse primary ameloblasts (MPAs) prepared from immature enamel epithelium (MPA-I) could proliferate, whereas those from mature enamel epithelium (MPA-M) could not. MPA-M but not MPA-I caused apoptosis during culture. The mRNA expression of amelogenin, a marker of immature ameloblasts, was down-regulated, and that of enamel matrix serine proteiase-1, a marker of mature ameloblasts, was induced in MPA-I during culture. Using green fluorescence protein as a reporter, a visualized reporter system was established to analyze the promoter activity of the amelogenin gene. The region between -1102 bp and -261 bp was required for the reporter expression in MPA-I. These results suggest that MPAs are valuable in vitro models for investigation of ameloblast biology, and that the visualized system is useful for promoter analysis in MPAs.

  13. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  14. Endogenous retrovirus induces leukemia in a xenograft mouse model for primary myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Triviai, Ioanna; Ziegler, Marion; Bergholz, Ulla; Oler, Andrew J.; Stübig, Thomas; Prassolov, Vladimir; Fehse, Boris; Kozak, Christine A.; Kröger, Nicolaus; Stocking, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The compound immunodeficiencies in nonobese diabetic (NOD) inbred mice homozygous for the Prkdcscid and Il2rgnull alleles (NSG mice) permit engraftment of a wide-range of primary human cells, enabling sophisticated modeling of human disease. In studies designed to define neoplastic stem cells of primary myelofibrosis (PMF), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by profound disruption of the hematopoietic microenvironment, we observed a high frequency of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in NSG mice. AML was of mouse origin, confined to PMF-xenografted mice, and contained multiple clonal integrations of ecotropic murine leukemia virus (E-MuLV). Significantly, MuLV replication was not only observed in diseased mice, but also in nontreated NSG controls. Furthermore, in addition to the single ecotropic endogenous retrovirus (eERV) located on chromosome 11 (Emv30) in the NOD genome, multiple de novo germ-line eERV integrations were observed in mice from each of four independent NSG mouse colonies. Analysis confirmed that E-MuLV originated from the Emv30 provirus and that recombination events were not necessary for virus replication or AML induction. Pathogenicity is thus likely attributable to PMF-mediated paracrine stimulation of mouse myeloid cells, which serve as targets for retroviral infection and transformation, as evidenced by integration into the Evi1 locus, a hotspot for retroviral-induced myeloid leukemia. This study thus corroborates a role of paracrine stimulation in PMF disease progression, underlines the importance of target cell type and numbers in MuLV-induced disease, and mandates awareness of replicating MuLV in NOD immunodeficient mice, which can significantly influence experimental results and their interpretation. PMID:24912157

  15. Complement Component C1q Programs a Pro-Efferocytic Phenotype while Limiting TNFα Production in Primary Mouse and Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hulsebus, Holly J.; O’Conner, Sean D.; Smith, Emily M.; Jie, Chunfa; Bohlson, Suzanne S.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency in complement component C1q is associated with an inability to clear apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) and aberrant inflammation in lupus, and identification of the pathways involved in these processes should reveal important regulatory mechanisms in lupus and other autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In this study, C1q-dependent regulation of TNFα/IL-6 expression and efferocytosis was investigated using primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and human monocyte-derived macrophages. C1q downregulated LPS-dependent TNFα production in mouse and human macrophages. While prolonged stimulation with C1q (18 h) was required to elicit a dampening of TNFα production from mouse macrophages, the human macrophages responded to C1q with immediate downregulation of TNFα. IL-6 production was unchanged in mouse and upregulated by human macrophages following prolonged stimulation with C1q. Our previous studies indicated that C1q programmed enhanced efferocytosis in mouse macrophages by enhancing expression of Mer tyrosine kinase and its ligand Gas6, a receptor–ligand pair that also inhibits proinflammatory signaling. Here, we demonstrated that C1q-dependent programming of human macrophage efferocytosis required protein synthesis; however, neither Mer nor the related receptor Axl was upregulated in human cells. In addition, while the C1q-collagen-like tails are sufficient for promoting C1q-dependent phagocytosis of antibody-coated targets, the C1q-tails failed to program enhanced efferocytosis or dampen TNFα production. These data further elucidate the mechanisms by which C1q regulates proinflammatory signaling and efferocytosis in macrophages, functions that are likely to influence the progression of autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. PMID:27379094

  16. The role of bone marrow-derived cells in bone fracture repair in a green fluorescent protein chimeric mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro . E-mail: s3061@nms.ac.jp; Ogawa, Rei; Migita, Makoto; Hanawa, Hideki; Ito, Hiromoto; Orimo, Hideo

    2005-05-27

    We investigated the role of bone marrow cells in bone fracture repair using green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric model mice. First, the chimeric model mice were created: bone marrow cells from GFP-transgenic C57BL/6 mice were injected into the tail veins of recipient wild-type C57BL/6 mice that had been irradiated with a lethal dose of 10 Gy from a cesium source. Next, bone fracture models were created from these mice: closed transverse fractures of the left femur were produced using a specially designed device. One, three, and five weeks later, fracture lesions were extirpated for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. In the specimens collected 3 and 5 weeks after operation, we confirmed calluses showing intramembranous ossification peripheral to the fracture site. The calluses consisted of GFP- and osteocalcin-positive cells at the same site, although the femur consisted of only osteocalcin-positive cells. We suggest that bone marrow cells migrated outside of the bone marrow and differentiated into osteoblasts to make up the calluses.

  17. Bone Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... most common types of primary bone cancer are: • Multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is the most common primary bone cancer. It ... Any bone can be affected by this cancer. Multiple myeloma affects approximately six people per 100,000 each ...

  18. [Intraoperative extracorporeal irradiation and replantation in local treatment of primary malignant bone tumors].

    PubMed

    Sabo, D; Bernd, L; Buchner, M; Treiber, M; Wannenmacher, M; Ewerbeck, V; Parsch, D

    2003-11-01

    In 13 patients with primary malignant bone tumors (10 Ewing's sarcoma, 1 parosteal osteosarcoma, 1 adamantinoma recurrence, and 1 MFH) local therapy was performed as intraoperative extracorporeal irradiation and replantation (IEIR) of the involved bone segment (5 tibia, 2 femur, and 6 pelvis). Of the 13 patients (69%), 9 are alive at the time of the follow-up (5 CDF, 4 AWM(treated)) and 4 patients died of disease (DOD). Up to now during the follow-up of 32 months (6-57), no local recurrence was observed in the replanted bone segments. The complication rate was very high (18 complications in 11 of the 13 patients, including 6 cases with complication V degrees according to Ruggieri with loss of the reconstruction). The typical complication is severe local infection necessitating removal of the replant. In cases of mechanical failure, the replanted segment could mostly be preserved by surgical revision and autologous bone grafting. If serious complications can be managed or avoided, functional results can be achieved. IEIR must be seen as an extraordinary reconstruction procedure in cases where established procedures such as endoprosthesis, biological reconstructions, or rotationplasties cannot be used or are refused by the patient. PMID:14615850

  19. In vivo visualizing the dynamics of bone marrow stem cells in mouse retina and choroidal-retinal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heuy-Ching H.; Zwick, Harry; Edsall, Peter R.; Cheramie, Rachel D.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce

    2007-02-01

    It has recently been shown that bone marrow cells can differentiate into various lineage cells including neural cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore it is an attractive therapeutic intervention to apply autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells that may offer neuroprotection to laser-induced retinal injuries. The purpose of this study is to develop a method with which to visualize bone marrow stem cells dynamics in mouse retinal circulation. We have used a physiological method, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), to track the highly enriched stem/progenitor cells circulating in the retina. Stem cells were enriched by immunomagnetic depletion of cells committed to the T- and B lymphocytic, myeloid and erythorid lineages. CellTracker TM Green-labeled stem cells were injected into the tail veins of mice with laser-induced focal retinal injuries. Bone marrow stem cells labeled with CellTracker TM Green were visible in the retinal circulation for as long as 1 hour and 30 minutes. These studies suggest that stem cell-enriched bone marrow cells may have the ability to mobilize into laser-induced retinal injuries and possibly further proliferate, differentiate and functionally integrate into the retina.

  20. Constructing a multi-scan synchrotron X-ray microscope to study the function of osteocyte canaliculi in mouse bone

    SciTech Connect

    Nango, Nobuhito; Kubota, Shogo; Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi; Takada, Yasunari; Matsuo, Koichi

    2012-07-31

    Formulating a multi-scan method applied to an X-ray microscope CT with synchrotron radiation, we attempted to analyze the 3D functional structure of osteocyte canaliculi inside the cortical bone of a mouse tibia. We employed a two-method combination to scan the same position of the specimen. To extract the internal bone canalicular structure, we first combined a Talbot interferometer with an X-ray microscope, and applied a differential phase imaging method to measure the absolute value of bone mineral around the canaliculi. Next, we used the X-ray microscope without the Talbot interferometer under a defocus condition, moving the specimen toward the zone plate by 6 mm. This defocus contrast method visualizes the canaliculi by emphasizing the edges of the bone. We performed CT scans by the two configurations and precisely aligned resultant 3D images so that the same position in the specimen is compared. We could extract the osteocyte canaliculi and evaluate the mineral density of their surroundings. The degree of mineralization varied for each osteocyte lacuna and canaliculus. The multi-scan microscopic X-ray CT is a powerful tool for analyzing bone mineralization.

  1. Enumeration of the colony-forming units–fibroblast from mouse and human bone marrow in normal and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Bianco, Paolo; Robey, Pamela G.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell populations, containing a subset of multipotential skeletal stem cells, are increasingly contemplated for use in tissue engineering and stem cell therapy, whereas their involvement in the pathogenetic mechanisms of skeletal disorders is far less recognized. We compared the concentrations of stromal clonogenic cells, colony forming units–fibroblast (CFU-Fs), in norm and pathology. Initially, culture conditions were optimized by demonstrating that fetal bovine serum heat inactivation could significantly repress colony formation. Using non-heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum, the concentration of CFU-Fs (colony-forming efficiency, CFE) ranged from 3.5 ± 1.0 to 11.5 ± 4.0 per 1 × 105 nucleated cells in five inbred mouse strains. In four transgenic lines with profound bone involvement, CFE was either significantly reduced or increased compared to wild-type littermates. In normal human donors, CFE decreased slightly with age and averaged 52.2 ± 4.1 for children and 32.3 ± 3.0 for adults. CFE was significantly altered in patients with several skeletal, metabolic, and hematological disorders: reduced in congenital generalized lipodystrophy, achondroplasia (SADDAN), pseudoachondroplasia, and Paget disease of bone and elevated in alcaptonuria and sickle cell anemia. Our findings indicate that under appropriate culture conditions, CFE values may provide useful insights into bone/bone marrow pathophysiology. PMID:19383412

  2. Turnover of bone marrow-derived cells in the irradiated mouse cornea

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, Holly R; Humphries, Timothy; Clare, Adam; Dixon, Ariane E; Howes, Kristen; Moran, Caitlin B; Scott, Danielle; Zakrzewski, Marianna; Pearlman, Eric; McMenamin, Paul G

    2008-01-01

    In light of an increasing awareness of the presence of bone marrow (BM)-derived macrophages in the normal cornea and their uncertain role in corneal diseases, it is important that the turnover rate of these resident immune cells be established. The baseline density and distribution of macrophages in the corneal stroma was investigated in Cx3cr1gfp transgenic mice in which all monocyte-derived cells express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). To quantify turnover, BM-derived cells from transgenic eGFP mice were transplanted into whole-body irradiated wild-type recipients. Additionally, wild-type BM-derived cells were injected into irradiated Cx3cr1+/gfp recipients, creating reverse chimeras. At 2, 4 and 8 weeks post-reconstitution, the number of eGFP+ cells in each corneal whole mount was calculated using epifluorescence microscopy, immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. The total density of myeloid-derived cells in the normal Cx3cr1+/gfp cornea was 366 cells/mm2. In BM chimeras 2 weeks post-reconstitution, 24% of the myeloid-derived cells had been replenished and were predominantly located in the anterior stroma. By 8 weeks post-reconstitution 75% of the myeloid-derived cells had been replaced and these cells were distributed uniformly throughout the stroma. All donor eGFP+ cells expressed low to moderate levels of CD45 and CD11b, with approximately 25% coexpressing major histocompatibility complex class II, a phenotype characteristic of previous descriptions of corneal stromal macrophages. In conclusion, 75% of the myeloid-derived cells in the mouse corneal stroma are replenished after 8 weeks. These data provide a strong basis for functional investigations of the role of resident stromal macrophages versus non-haematopoietic cells using BM chimeric mice in models of corneal inflammation. PMID:18540963

  3. Bone Marrow-Derived Nonreactive Astrocytes in the Mouse Brain After Permanent Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Zsuzsanna E.; Leker, Ronen R.; Shahar, Tal; Bratincsak, Andras; Szalayova, Ildiko; Key, Sharon; Palkovits, Miklós; Cassiani-Ingoni, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effect of permanent unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion (PMCAO) on the generation of bone marrow (BM)-derived astrocytes in female mice previously transplanted with enchanced green fluorescent protein-expressing BM from male donors. In addition to an untreated PMCAO group, one group of mice also received intracerebral infusion of transforming growth factor-alpha, resulting in a decrease in the size of the infarct. Two months after PMCAO, we found a specific type of astrocyte of BM origin in the side of the injury, near the lesion. These astrocytes did not express glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) by conventional fluorescence immunostaining; however, GFAP was easily detectable by tyramide signal amplification. These cells also expressed S100β, confirming their astrocytic character. Unlike the endogenous reactive astrocytes, these BM-derived astrocytes did not proliferate during the first week of ischemia and did not contribute to the glial scar formation. Transforming growth factor-alpha infusion increased the number of BM-derived astrocytes, without affecting their distribution. Interestingly, exclusively by tyramide signal amplification staining, we found that endogenous astrocytes displaying an identical morphology were also present in control mouse and human brains. Our data demonstrate that a subpopulation of nonreactive astrocytes expressing low levels of GFAP can originate from transplanted BM in the ischemic brain. We believe that these cells represent a subpopulation of astrocytes earlier considered to be GFAP negative. The high number of astrocytes with identical morphology and chemical character in control brains suggest that these type of astrocytes may have important functional role in the central nervous system that calls for further studies. PMID:20604679

  4. Euphorbia supina inhibits inflammatory mediators in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chae, Hee-Sung; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Kim, Young-Mi; Lee, Hyeong-Kyu; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Chin, Young-Won

    2015-12-01

    Euphorbia supina has been traditionally used for the treatment of furuncle and bloody diarrhea relevant to the inflammatory process. It has been proven to have a variety of pharmacological efficacies including antiarthritic, detoxification, hemostatic, and diuretic activities. RAW 264.7 macrophages and bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) were used to determine the anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects of E. supina (ES). NO production was assayed by measuring the nitrite content of the supernatants of cultured RAW 264.7 cells. β-hexosaminidase, a marker of mast cell degranulation, was quantitated by spectrophotometric analysis. ELISA was used for the analysis of interleukin-6 expression, and Western blotting was used to analyze 5-LOX, iNOS, and MAPK activation. The relevant gene expression upon ES treatment was measured by RT-PCR. ES inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in RAW 264.7 cells, and IL-6 and LTC4 production in PMA- and A23187-induced BMMCs along with the downregulation of 5-LOX gene expression. Furthermore, in the present study, a decrease in p-ERK, p-JNK, and p-P38 expression, as well as the suppression of degranulation, were observed by treatment with ES. Further in vivo study revealed that ES treatment also remarkably inhibited xylene-induced mouse ear edema and MPO levels in mice ears. This study demonstrates that ES has a potential regulatory effect on the expression of inflammatory mediators through the inhibition of both the phosphorylation of MAPK signaling and the activation of degranulation. PMID:26386544

  5. Bone marrow stromal cells as an inducer for cardiomyocyte differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yue, Fengming; Johkura, Kohei; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Nagai, Mika; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2010-09-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) secrete soluble factors and display varied cell-biological functions. To confirm the ability and efficiency of BMSCs to induce embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into cardiomyocytes, mouse embryoid bodies (EBs) were co-cultured with rat BMSCs. After about 10 days, areas of rhythmically contracting cells in more solid aggregates became evident with bundle-like structures formed along borders between EB outgrowth and BMSC layer. ESC-derived cardiomyocytes exhibited sarcomeric striations when stained with troponin I (Trop I), organized in separated bundles. Besides, the staining for connexin 43 was detected in cell-cell junctions, which demonstrated that ESC-derived cardiomyocytes were coupled by gap junction in culture. The related genes of cardiomyocytes were found in these beating and no-beating EBs co-cultured with BMSCs. In addition, an improved efficiency of cardiomyocyte differentiation from ESC-BMSC co-culture was found in the serum-free medium: 5-fold up-regulation in the number of beating area compared with the serum medium. Effective cardiac differentiation was also recognized in transfer filter assay and in condition medium obtained from BMSC culture. A clear increase in the expression of cardiac genes and TropI protein confirmed further cardiac differentiation by BMP4 and Retinoic Acid (RA) treatment. These results demonstrate that BMSCs can induce cardiomyocyte differentiation from ESCs through soluble factors and enhance it with BMP4 or RA treatment. Serum-free ESC-BMSC co-culture represents a defined in vitro model for identifying the cardiomyocyte-inducing activity from BMSCs and, in addition, a straightforward experimental system for assessing clinical applications. PMID:20801009

  6. Does bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) affect female fertility in the mouse?

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Koji; Su, You-Qiang; Eppig, John J

    2010-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) is a transforming growth factor beta superfamily member produced by mammalian oocytes as well as other cell types. Despite well-characterized effects of recombinant BMP6 on granulosa cells in vitro, the function of BMP6 in vivo has been ill-defined. Therefore, the effects of genetic deletion of the Bmp6 gene on female mouse fertility were assessed. The mean litter size of Bmp6(-/-) females was reduced by 22% (P < 0.05) compared to Bmp6(+/+) controls. Not only did Bmp6(-/-) females naturally ovulate 24% fewer eggs, but competence of in vitro-matured oocytes to complete preimplantation development after fertilization in vitro was decreased by 50%. No apparent effect of Bmp6 deletion on either the morphology or the dynamics of follicular development was apparent. Nevertheless, levels of luteinizing hormone (LH)/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced transcripts, which encode proteins required for cumulus expansion (HAS2, PTGS2, PTX3, and TNFAIP6), and of epidermal growth factor-like peptides (AREG, BTC, and EREG) were lower in Bmp6(-/-) mice than in controls after administration of a reduced dose of hCG (1 IU) in vivo. LH receptor (Lhcgr) transcript levels were not significantly lower in Bmp6(-/-) granulosa cells, suggesting that BMP6 is required for processes downstream of LH receptors. To assess whether another oocyte-derived BMP, BMP15, could have BMP6-redundant functions in vivo, the fertility of Bmp15/Bmp6 double mutants was assessed. Fertility was not significantly reduced in double-homozygous mutants compared with that in double-heterozygous controls. Therefore, BMP6 promotes normal fertility in female mice, at least in part, by enabling appropriate responses to LH and normal oocyte quality. Thus, Bmp6 probably is part of the complex genetic network that determines female fertility. PMID:20702851

  7. Alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevented bone loss in ovariectomy induced osteoporosis mouse model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoporosis is a major healthcare burden affecting mostly postmenopausal women characterized by compromised bone strength and increased risk of fragility fracture. Although pathogenesis of this disease is complex, elevated proinflammatory cytokine production is clearly involved in bone loss at meno...

  8. The Effects of RANKL Inhibition on Fracture Healing and Bone Strength in a Mouse Model of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Delos, D.; Yang, X.; Ricciardi, B.F.; Myers, E.R.; Bostrom, M.P.G.; Pleshko Camacho, N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Currently, the standard treatment for osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is bisphosphonate therapy. Recent studies, however, have shown delayed healing of osteotomies in a subset of OI patients treated with such agents. The current study sought to determine the effects of another therapy, RANKL inhibition, on bone healing and bone strength in the growing oim/oim mouse, a model of moderate-to-severe OI. Mice (73 oim/oim and 69 wildtype (WT)) were injected twice weekly with either soluble murine RANK (RANK-Fc) (1.5mg/kg) or saline beginning at 6 weeks of age. At 8 weeks of age, the animals underwent transverse mid-diaphyseal osteotomies of the right femur. Therapy was continued until sacrifice at 2, 3, 4 or 6 weeks post-fracture. At 6 weeks post-fracture, greater callus area (6.59±3.78mm2 vs 2.67±2.05mm2, p=0.003) and increased radiographic intensity (mineral density) (0.48 ± 0.14 vs. 0.30 ± 0.80, p=0.005) were found in the RANK-Fc vs saline oim/oim group, indicating a delay in callus remodeling. Despite this delay, mechanical tests at 6 weeks post-fracture revealed no significant differences in whole bone properties of stiffness and failure moment. Further, RANKL inhibition resulted in a greater failure moment and greater work to failure for the non-fractured contralateral WT bones compared to the non-fractured saline WT bones. Together, these results demonstrate that RANKL-inhibition does not adversely affect the mechanical properties of healing bone in the oim/oim mice, and is associated with increased strength in intact bone in the WT mice. PMID:17729310

  9. Receptor-Activator of Nuclear KappaB Ligand Expression as a New Therapeutic Target in Primary Bone Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Tetsuro; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Ogose, Akira; Ariizumi, Takashi; Sasaki, Taro; Hatano, Hiroshi; Hotta, Tetsuo; Endo, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    The receptor-activator of nuclear kappaB ligand (RANKL) signaling pathway plays an important role in the regulation of bone growth and mediates the formation and activation of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are involved in significant bone resorption and destruction. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody against RANKL that specifically inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. It has been approved for use for multiple myeloma and bone metastases, as well as for giant cell tumor of bone. However, there is no previous report quantitatively, comparing RANKL expression in histologically varied bone tumors. Therefore, we analyzed the mRNA level of various bone tumors and investigated the possibility of these tumors as a new therapeutic target for denosumab. We examined RANKL mRNA expression in 135 clinical specimens of primary and metastatic bone tumors using real-time PCR. The relative quantification of mRNA expression levels was performed via normalization with RPMI8226, a human multiple myeloma cell line that is recognized to express RANKL. Of 135 cases, 64 were also evaluated for RANKL expression by using immunohistochemistry. Among all of the tumors investigated, RANKL expression and the RANKL/osteoprotegerin ratio were highest in giant cell tumor of bone. High RANKL mRNA expression was observed in cases of aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia, osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and enchondroma, as compared to cases of multiple myeloma and bone lesions from metastatic carcinoma. RANKL-positive stromal cells were detected in six cases: five cases of GCTB and one case of fibrous dysplasia. The current study findings indicate that some primary bone tumors present new therapeutic targets for denosumab, particularly those tumors expressing RANKL and those involving bone resorption by osteoclasts. PMID:27163152

  10. Primary Ewing's sarcoma of the squamous part of temporal bone in a young girl treated with adjuvant volumetric arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Moujhuri; Bhattacharya, Jibak; Goswami, Suchanda; Goswami, Chanchal

    2015-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES)/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors usually arise in the long bones of children and young adults. Primary ES of the cranium is unusual. Treatment involves multi-modality therapy incorporating surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy; outcomes are similar to those arising from long bones. We report a case of Primary ES of the squamous part of temporal bone with intracranial extension in a 9-year-old girl who was treated with surgery, chemotherapy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy by volumetric arc therapy. Post 1-year of treatment the girl is performing well in her classes. PMID:26881573

  11. Radiotherapy Combined With Androgen Deprivation for Bone Oligometastases After Primary Curative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Xin; Lin, Li-Mei; He, Jun-Yan; Hong, Liang; Li, Jin-Luan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the effects and toxicity of radiotherapy (RT) combined with androgen deprivation (AD) for bone oligometastases after primary curative RT for prostate cancer (PCa). We retrospectively analyzed 30 consecutively treated PCa patients with bone oligometastases from April 2005 to July 2014. All patients underwent RT combined with AD for oligometastatic bones after curative RT for PCa. Measured outcomes included overall survival (OS) rate, local control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), pain relief, and toxicities. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS17.0. The median follow-up was 32.5 months (range, 0.6–50.3). The 3-year PFS and OS rates were 22.8% (95% CI, 13.4–37.5%) and 69% (95% CI, 51.7–81.1%), respectively. The number of bone oligometastases and RT schedule were found to be significantly associated with OS on univariate analysis (P < 0.05, respectively). The 3-year OS for patients with 1 and >1 metastases was 78.8% versus 42.2%, respectively (P = 0.037). The long-course RT was associated with better 3-year OS compared with short-course (76.4% vs 44.1%, P = 0.03). A total of 15 (83.3%, 15/18) patients achieved pain relief. No grade 3 toxicity was observed. Long-course RT combined with ADT was effective and well-tolerated in PCa patients with bone oligometastases after curative RT for PCa. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to corroborate the findings. PMID:26871838

  12. Bone fracture toughness and strength correlate with collagen cross-link maturity in a dose-controlled lathyrism mouse model

    PubMed Central

    McNerny, Erin M. B.; Gong, Bo; Morris, Michael D.; Kohn, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen cross-linking is altered in many diseases of bone, and enzymatic collagen cross-links are important to bone quality as evidenced by losses of strength following lysyl oxidase inhibition (lathyrism). We hypothesized that cross-links also contribute directly to bone fracture toughness. A mouse model of lathyrism using subcutaneous injection of up to 500mg/kg β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) was developed and characterized (60 animals across 4 dosage groups). Three weeks of 150 or 350 mg/kg BAPN treatment in young growing mice significantly reduced cortical bone fracture toughness, strength, and pyridinoline cross-link content. Ratios reflecting relative cross-link maturity were positive regressors of fracture toughness (HP/[DHLNL+HLNL] r2=0.208, p<0.05; [HP+LP]/[DHNL+HLNL] r2=0.196, p<0.1), whereas quantities of mature pyridinoline cross-links were significant positive regressors of tissue strength (lysyl pyridinoline r2=0.159, p=0.014; hydroxylysyl pyridinoline r2=0.112, p<0.05). Immature and pyrrole cross-links, which were not significantly reduced by BAPN, did not correlate with mechanical properties. The effect of BAPN treatment on mechanical properties was dose specific, with the greatest impact found at the intermediate (350mg/kg) dose. Calcein labeling was used to define locations of new bone formation, allowing for the identification of regions of normally cross-linked (preexisting) and BAPN treated (newly formed, cross-link-deficient) bone. Raman spectroscopy revealed spatial differences due to relative tissue age and effects of cross-link inhibition. Newly deposited tissues had lower mineral/matrix, carbonate/phosphate and Amide I cross-link (matrix maturity) ratios compared to preexisting tissues. BAPN treatment did not affect mineral measures, but significantly increased the cross-link (matrix maturity) ratio compared to newly formed control tissue. Our study reveals that spatially localized effects of short term BAPN cross-link inhibition can alter

  13. Radiogallium Complex-Conjugated Bifunctional Peptides for Detecting Primary Cancer and Bone Metastases Simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuma; Yu, Jing; Ishizaki, Atsushi; Yokokawa, Masaru; Kitamura, Masanori; Kitamura, Yoji; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Odani, Akira

    2015-08-19

    (68)Ga (T(1/2) = 68 min, a generator-produced nuclide) is an interesting radionuclide for clinical positron emission tomography (PET). Recently, it was reported that radiogallium-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated (Asp)n peptide [Ga-DOTA-(Asp)n] has great potential for bone metastases imaging. In the current study, a compound containing an aspartic acid peptide linker (D11) as a carrier to bone metastases, an RGD peptide [c(RGDfK) peptide] as a carrier to the primary cancer, and Ga-DOTA as a stable radiometal complex for imaging in one molecule, Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK), was designed, prepared, and evaluated to detect both the primary cancer and bone metastases simultaneously using (67)Ga, which is easy to handle. After DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) was synthesized using Fmoc-based solid-phase methodology, (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) was prepared by complexing DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) with (67)Ga. Hydroxyapatite binding assays, integrin binding assays, biodistribution experiments, and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging using tumor-bearing mice were performed using (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK). (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) was prepared with a radiochemical purity of >97%. In vitro, (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) had a high affinity for hydroxyapatite and αvβ3 integrin. In vivo, (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) exhibited high uptake in bone and tumor. The accumulation of (67)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) in tumor decreased when it was co-injected with c(RGDfK) peptide. (68)Ga-DOTA-D11-c(RGDfK) has great potential as a PET tracer for the diagnosis of both the primary cancer and bone metastases simultaneously. PMID:26087328

  14. Localization of sarcomeric proteins during myofibril assembly in cultured mouse primary skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    White, Jennifer; Barro, Marietta V; Makarenkova, Helen P; Sanger, Joseph W; Sanger, Jean M

    2014-09-01

    It is important to understand how muscle forms normally in order to understand muscle diseases that result in abnormal muscle formation. Although the structure of myofibrils is well understood, the process through which the myofibril components form organized contractile units is not clear. Based on the staining of muscle proteins in avian embryonic cardiomyocytes, we previously proposed that myofibrils formation occurred in steps that began with premyofibrils followed by nascent myofibrils and ending with mature myofibrils. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the premyofibril model of myofibrillogenesis developed from studies developed from studies in avian cardiomyocytes was supported by our current studies of myofibril assembly in mouse skeletal muscle. Emphasis was on establishing how the key sarcomeric proteins, F-actin, nonmuscle myosin II, muscle myosin II, and α-actinin were organized in the three stages of myofibril assembly. The results also test previous reports that nonmuscle myosins II A and B are components of the Z-bands of mature myofibrils, data that are inconsistent with the premyofibril model. We have also determined that in mouse muscle cells, telethonin is a late assembling protein that is present only in the Z-bands of mature myofibrils. This result of using specific telethonin antibodies supports the approach of using YFP-tagged proteins to determine where and when these YFP-sarcomeric fusion proteins are localized. The data presented in this study on cultures of primary mouse skeletal myocytes are consistent with the premyofibril model of myofibrillogenesis previously proposed for both avian cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. PMID:25125171

  15. Positive selection in bone morphogenetic protein 15 targets a natural mutation associated with primary ovarian insufficiency in human.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Rossetti, Raffaella; Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  16. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  17. The inward rectifier potassium channel Kir2.1 is expressed in mouse neutrophils from bone marrow and liver

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Daniela S.; Yellen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are phagocytic cells that play a critical role in innate immunity by destroying bacterial pathogens. Channels belonging to the inward rectifier potassium channel subfamily 2 (Kir2 channels) have been described in other phagocytes (monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils) and in hematopoietic precursors of phagocytes. Their physiological function in these cells remains unclear, but some evidence suggests a role in growth factor-dependent proliferation and development. Expression of functional Kir2 channels has not been definitively demonstrated in mammalian neutrophils. Here, we show by RT-PCR that neutrophils from mouse bone marrow and liver express mRNA for the Kir2 subunit Kir2.1 but not for other subunits (Kir2.2, Kir2.3, and Kir2.4). In electrophysiological experiments, resting (unstimulated) neutrophils from mouse bone marrow and liver exhibit a constitutively active, external K+-dependent, strong inwardly rectifying current that constitutes the dominant current. The reversal potential is dependent on the external K+ concentration in a Nernstian fashion, as expected for a K+-selective current. The current is not altered by changes in external or internal pH, and it is blocked by Ba2+, Cs+, and the Kir2-selective inhibitor ML133. The single-channel conductance is in agreement with previously reported values for Kir2.1 channels. These properties are characteristic of homomeric Kir2.1 channels. Current density in short-term cultures of bone marrow neutrophils is decreased in the absence of growth factors that are important for neutrophil proliferation [granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF)]. These results demonstrate that mouse neutrophils express functional Kir2.1 channels and suggest that these channels may be important for neutrophil function, possibly in a growth factor-dependent manner. PMID:25472961

  18. Cytotoxic effects of propiconazole and its metabolites in mouse and human hepatoma cells and primary mouse hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Propiconazole is a triazole-containing fungicide that is used agriculturally on grasses, fruits, grains, seeds, hardwoods, and conifers. Propiconazole is a mouse liver hepatotoxicant and a hepatocarcinogen and has adverse reproductive and developmental toxicities in exp...

  19. Histamine H3 receptor in primary mouse microglia inhibits chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomomitsu; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Matsuzawa, Takuro; Naganuma, Fumito; Nakamura, Tadaho; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb S; Harada, Ryuichi; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a physiological amine which initiates a multitude of physiological responses by binding to four known G-protein coupled histamine receptor subtypes as follows: histamine H1 receptor (H1 R), H2 R, H3 R, and H4 R. Brain histamine elicits neuronal excitation and regulates a variety of physiological processes such as learning and memory, sleep-awake cycle and appetite regulation. Microglia, the resident macrophages in the brain, express histamine receptors; however, the effects of histamine on critical microglial functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion have not been examined in primary cells. We demonstrated that mouse primary microglia express H2 R, H3 R, histidine decarboxylase, a histamine synthase, and histamine N-methyltransferase, a histamine metabolizing enzyme. Both forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation and ATP-induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients were reduced by the H3 R agonist imetit but not the H2 R agonist amthamine. H3 R activation on two ubiquitous second messenger signalling pathways suggests that H3 R can regulate various microglial functions. In fact, histamine and imetit dose-dependently inhibited microglial chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production. Furthermore, we confirmed that microglia produced histamine in the presence of LPS, suggesting that H3 R activation regulate microglial function by autocrine and/or paracrine signalling. In conclusion, we demonstrate the involvement of histamine in primary microglial functions, providing the novel insight into physiological roles of brain histamine. PMID:25754956

  20. Isolation and Assessment of Single Long-Term Reconstituting Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Adult Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Kent, David G; Dykstra, Brad J; Eaves, Connie J

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells with long-term repopulating activity can now be routinely obtained at purities of 40% to 50% from suspensions of adult mouse bone marrow. Here we describe robust protocols for both their isolation as CD45(+) EPCR(+) CD150(+) CD48(-) (ESLAM) cells using multiparameter cell sorting and for tracking their clonal growth and differentiation activity in irradiated mice transplanted with single ESLAM cells. The simplicity of these procedures makes them attractive for characterizing the molecular and biological properties of individual hematopoietic stem cells with unprecedented power and precision. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532815

  1. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency Induced by Fanconi Anemia E Mutation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chun; Begum, Khurshida; Overbeek, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    In most cases of primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), the cause of the depletion of ovarian follicles is unknown. Fanconi anemia (FA) proteins are known to play important roles in follicular development. Using random insertional mutagenesis with a lentiviral transgene, we identified a family with reduced fertility in the homozygous transgenic mice. We identified the integration site and found that the lentivirus had integrated into intron 8 of the Fanconi E gene (Fance). By RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, we found that Fance transcript levels were significantly reduced. The Fance homozygous mutant mice were assayed for changes in ovarian development, follicle numbers and estrous cycle. Ovarian dysplasias and a severe lack of follicles were seen in the mutant mice. In addition, the estrous cycle was disrupted in adult females. Our results suggest that POI has been induced by the Fance mutation in this new mouse model. PMID:26939056

  2. Chitosan-poly(butylene succinate) scaffolds and human bone marrow stromal cells induce bone repair in a mouse calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Costa-Pinto, A R; Correlo, V M; Sol, P C; Bhattacharya, M; Srouji, S; Livne, E; Reis, R L; Neves, N M

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering sustains the need of a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold to promote the regeneration of tissues in volume. Usually, scaffolds are seeded with an adequate cell population, allowing their growth and maturation upon implantation in vivo. Previous studies obtained by our group evidenced significant growth patterns and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) when seeded and cultured on melt-based porous chitosan fibre mesh scaffolds (cell constructs). Therefore, it is crucial to test the in vivo performance of these in vitro 3D cell constructs. In this study, chitosan-based scaffolds were seeded and cultured in vitro with hBMSCs for 3 weeks under osteogenic stimulation conditions and analysed for cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Implantation of 2 weeks precultured cell constructs in osteogenic culture conditions was performed into critical cranial size defects in nude mice. The objective of this study was to verify the scaffold integration and new bone formation. At 8 weeks of implantation, scaffolds were harvested and prepared for micro-computed tomography (µCT) analysis. Retrieved implants showed good integration with the surrounding tissue and significant bone formation, more evident for the scaffolds cultured and implanted with human cells. The results of this work demonstrated that chitosan-based scaffolds, besides supporting in vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs, induced bone formation in vivo. Thus, their osteogenic potential in orthotopic location in immunodeficient mice was validated, evidencing good prospects for their use in bone tissue-engineering therapies. PMID:21312336

  3. Lysyl oxidase modulates the osteoblast differentiation of primary mouse calvaria cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma-Bhandari, Anjali; Park, Sun-Hyang; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Jaemin; Kim, Youngho

    2015-12-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is an extracellular amine oxidase that mediates the formation of collagen fibers. Thus far, five LOX family genes [LOX, lysyl oxidase-like (LOXL)1, LOXL2, LOXL3 and LOXL4] have been identified in humans, each encoding the characteristic C-terminal domains that are required for amine oxidase activity. During osteoblastogenesis, collagen fibers function as a three-dimensional scaffold for organizing mineral deposition. In this study, to assess the functional roles of the LOX family members in osteoblastogenesis, we investigated the temporal expression of these genes as a function of phenotypic development during the osteoblast differentiation of primary cultured mouse calvaria cells. Of the LOX family members, only LOX was prominently expressed during osteoblast differentiation. LOX expression was highest on day 9 of differentiation, as shown by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. The expression pattern of collagen, type I, alpha 2 (COL1A2), which encodes the α2-chain of mouse collagen type I, was similar to that of LOX. The total amine oxidase activity of the differentiating calvaria cells exhibited a temporal pattern that paralleled LOX expression, reaching the highest level on day 9 of differentiation. We also noted that the inhibition of the amine oxidase activity of LOX significantly suppressed both mineral nodule formation and the expression of osteoblast marker genes during the differentiation of primary calvaria cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that the LOX-mediated organization of collagen fibers in the extracellular matrix is an important regulator of osteoblastogenesis. PMID:26497171

  4. Scaffold-mediated BMP-2 minicircle DNA delivery accelerated bone repair in a mouse critical-size calvarial defect model.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Michael; Chung, Michael T; Zielins, Elizabeth R; Paik, Kevin J; McArdle, Adrian; Morrison, Shane D; Ransom, Ryan C; Barbhaiya, Namrata; Atashroo, David; Jacobson, Gunilla; Zare, Richard N; Longaker, Michael T; Wan, Derrick C; Yang, Fan

    2016-08-01

    Scaffold-mediated gene delivery holds great promise for tissue regeneration. However, previous attempts to induce bone regeneration using scaffold-mediated non-viral gene delivery rarely resulted in satisfactory healing. We report a novel platform with sustained release of minicircle DNA (MC) from PLGA scaffolds to accelerate bone repair. MC was encapsulated inside PLGA scaffolds using supercritical CO2 , which showed prolonged release of MC. Skull-derived osteoblasts transfected with BMP-2 MC in vitro result in higher osteocalcin gene expression and mineralized bone formation. When implanted in a critical-size mouse calvarial defect, scaffolds containing luciferase MC lead to robust in situ protein production up to at least 60 days. Scaffold-mediated BMP-2 MC delivery leads to substantially accelerated bone repair as early as two weeks, which continues to progress over 12 weeks. This platform represents an efficient, long-term nonviral gene delivery system, and may be applicable for enhancing repair of a broad range of tissues types. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2099-2107, 2016. PMID:27059085

  5. Using digital image correlation to determine bone surface strains during loading and after adaptation of the mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Sztefek, Pavel; Vanleene, Maximilien; Olsson, Robin; Collinson, Rebecca; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Shefelbine, Sandra

    2010-03-01

    Previous models of cortical bone adaptation, in which loading is imposed on the bone, have estimated the strains in the tissue using strain gauges, analytical beam theory, or finite element analysis. We used digital image correlation (DIC), tracing a speckle pattern on the surface of the bone during loading, to determine surface strains in a murine tibia during compressive loading through the knee joint. We examined whether these surface strains in the mouse tibia are modified following two weeks of load-induced adaptation by comparison with contralateral controls. Results indicated non-uniform strain patterns with isolated areas of high strain (0.5%), particularly on the medial side. Strain measurements were reproducible (standard deviation of the error 0.03%), similar between specimens, and in agreement with strain gauge measurements (between 0.1 and 0.2% strain). After structural adaptation, strains were more uniform across the tibial surface, particularly on the medial side where peak strains were reduced from 0.5% to 0.3%. Because DIC determines local strains over the entire surface, it will provide a better understanding of how strain stimulus influences the bone response during adaptation. PMID:20005517

  6. Effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-02-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. /sup 51/Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras.

  7. Administration of soluble activin receptor 2B increases bone and muscle mass in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    DiGirolamo, Douglas J.; Singhal, Vandana; Chang, Xiaoli; Lee, Se-Jin; Germain-Lee, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of heritable connective tissue disorders generally defined by recurrent fractures, low bone mass, short stature and skeletal fragility. Beyond the skeletal complications of OI, many patients also report intolerance to physical activity, fatigue and muscle weakness. Indeed, recent studies have demonstrated that skeletal muscle is also negatively affected by OI, both directly and indirectly. Given the well-established interdependence of bone and skeletal muscle in both physiology and pathophysiology and the observations of skeletal muscle pathology in patients with OI, we investigated the therapeutic potential of simultaneous anabolic targeting of both bone and skeletal muscle using a soluble activin receptor 2B (ACVR2B) in a mouse model of type III OI (oim). Treatment of 12-week-old oim mice with ACVR2B for 4 weeks resulted in significant increases in both bone and muscle that were similar to those observed in healthy, wild-type littermates. This proof of concept study provides encouraging evidence for a holistic approach to treating the deleterious consequences of OI in the musculoskeletal system. PMID:26161291

  8. Compensating for poor primary implant stability in different bone densities by varying implant geometry: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Möhlhenrich, S C; Heussen, N; Elvers, D; Steiner, T; Hölzle, F; Modabber, A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of implant diameter and length on primary stability in artificial bone blocks. In total, 240 implants of various diameters (Ø 3.3, 4.1, and 4.8mm) and lengths (8 and 12 mm) were inserted in four artificial bone blocks of different densities (D1-D4). The primary stability for each bone block density was measured and compared with the primary stability of a narrow and short implant (Ø 3.3mm, length 8mm) in the next higher density block. Analysis was done by three-way ANOVA, and mean differences were determined with the 95% confidence interval. Levels of primary stability achieved by choosing the next higher diameter or length were not comparable to those of the next level of block density. However, equivalent values could be achieved by selecting the largest diameter for short and long implants in the lowest block density D4, as well as for long implants in bone type D2. The diameter of an implant has greater influence on primary stability than length. In particular, in the case of poor bone quality, a variation of implant geometry can lead to significant improvement in primary stability. PMID:26362488

  9. Deregulation of arginase induces bone complications in high-fat/high-sucrose diet diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, Anil; Sangani, Rajnikumar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Toque, Haroldo A; Cain, Michael; Wong, Abby; Howie, Nicole; Shinde, Rahul; Elsalanty, Mohammed; Yao, Lin; Chutkan, Norman; Hunter, Monty; Caldwell, Ruth B; Isales, Carlos; Caldwell, R William; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-02-15

    A balanced diet is crucial for healthy development and prevention of musculoskeletal related diseases. Diets high in fat content are known to cause obesity, diabetes and a number of other disease states. Our group and others have previously reported that activity of the urea cycle enzyme arginase is involved in diabetes-induced dysregulation of vascular function due to decreases in nitric oxide formation. We hypothesized that diabetes may also elevate arginase activity in bone and bone marrow, which could lead to bone-related complications. To test this we determined the effects of diabetes on expression and activity of arginase, in bone and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). We demonstrated that arginase 1 is abundantly present in the bone and BMSCs. We also demonstrated that arginase activity and expression in bone and bone marrow is up-regulated in models of diabetes induced by HFHS diet and streptozotocin (STZ). HFHS diet down-regulated expression of healthy bone metabolism markers (BMP2, COL-1, ALP, and RUNX2) and reduced bone mineral density, bone volume and trabecular thickness. However, treatment with an arginase inhibitor (ABH) prevented these bone-related complications of diabetes. In-vitro study of BMSCs showed that high glucose treatment increased arginase activity and decreased nitric oxide production. These effects were reversed by treatment with an arginase inhibitor (ABH). Our study provides evidence that deregulation of l-arginine metabolism plays a vital role in HFHS diet-induced diabetic complications and that these complications can be prevented by treatment with arginase inhibitors. The modulation of l-arginine metabolism in disease could offer a novel therapeutic approach for osteoporosis and other musculoskeletal related diseases. PMID:26704078

  10. Enhanced Wnt signaling improves bone mass and strength, but not brittleness, in the Col1a1(+/mov13) mouse model of type I Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Christina M; Schwartz, Marissa A; Roberts, Heather J; Lim, Kyung-Eun; Spevak, Lyudmila; Boskey, Adele L; Zurakowski, David; Robling, Alexander G; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-09-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) comprises a group of genetic skeletal fragility disorders. The mildest form of OI, Osteogenesis Imperfecta type I, is frequently caused by haploinsufficiency mutations in COL1A1, the gene encoding the α1(I) chain of type 1 collagen. Children with OI type I have a 95-fold higher fracture rate compared to unaffected children. Therapies for OI type I in the pediatric population are limited to anti-catabolic agents. In adults with osteoporosis, anabolic therapies that enhance Wnt signaling in bone improve bone mass, and ongoing clinical trials are determining if these therapies also reduce fracture risk. We performed a proof-of-principle experiment in mice to determine whether enhancing Wnt signaling in bone could benefit children with OI type I. We crossed a mouse model of OI type I (Col1a1(+/Mov13)) with a high bone mass (HBM) mouse (Lrp5(+/p.A214V)) that has increased bone strength from enhanced Wnt signaling. Offspring that inherited the OI and HBM alleles had higher bone mass and strength than mice that inherited the OI allele alone. However, OI+HBM and OI mice still had bones with lower ductility compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that enhancing Wnt signaling does not make OI bone normal, but does improve bone properties that could reduce fracture risk. Therefore, agents that enhance Wnt signaling are likely to benefit children and adults with OI type 1. PMID:27297606

  11. Mineralized human primary osteoblast matrices as a model system to analyse interactions of prostate cancer cells with the bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Johannes C; Quent, Verena M C; Burke, Leslie J; Stansfield, Scott H; Clements, Judith A; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2010-11-01

    Prostate cancer metastasis is reliant on the reciprocal interactions between cancer cells and the bone niche/micro-environment. The production of suitable matrices to study metastasis, carcinogenesis and in particular prostate cancer/bone micro-environment interaction has been limited to specific protein matrices or matrix secreted by immortalised cell lines that may have undergone transformation processes altering signaling pathways and modifying gene or receptor expression. We hypothesize that matrices produced by primary human osteoblasts are a suitable means to develop an in vitro model system for bone metastasis research mimicking in vivo conditions. We have used a decellularized matrix secreted from primary human osteoblasts as a model for prostate cancer function in the bone micro-environment. We show that this collagen I rich matrix is of fibrillar appearance, highly mineralized, and contains proteins, such as osteocalcin, osteonectin and osteopontin, and growth factors characteristic of bone extracellular matrix (ECM). LNCaP and PC3 cells grown on this matrix, adhere strongly, proliferate, and express markers consistent with a loss of epithelial phenotype. Moreover, growth of these cells on the matrix is accompanied by the induction of genes associated with attachment, migration, increased invasive potential, Ca(2+) signaling and osteolysis. In summary, we show that growth of prostate cancer cells on matrices produced by primary human osteoblasts mimics key features of prostate cancer bone metastases and thus is a suitable model system to study the tumor/bone micro-environment interaction in this disease. PMID:20688384

  12. Benefit of Consolidative Radiation Therapy for Primary Bone Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Randa; Allen, Pamela K.; Rodriguez, Alma; Shihadeh, Ferial; Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Arzu, Isadora; Reed, Valerie K.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Westin, Jason R.; Fayad, Luis E.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Outcomes for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) differ according to the site of presentation. With effective chemotherapy, the need for consolidative radiation therapy (RT) is controversial. We investigated the influence of primary bone presentation and receipt of consolidative RT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with DLBCL. Methods and Materials: We identified 102 patients with primary bone DLBCL treated consecutively from 1988 through 2013 and extracted clinical, pathologic, and treatment characteristics from the medical records. Survival outcomes were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, with factors affecting survival determined by log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done with a Cox regression model. Results: The median age was 55 years (range, 16-87 years). The most common site of presentation was in the long bones. Sixty-five patients (63%) received R-CHOP–based chemotherapy, and 74 (72%) received rituximab. RT was given to 67 patients (66%), 47 with stage I to II and 20 with stage III to IV disease. The median RT dose was 44 Gy (range, 24.5-50 Gy). At a median follow-up time of 82 months, the 5-year PFS and OS rates were 80% and 82%, respectively. Receipt of RT was associated with improved 5-year PFS (88% RT vs 63% no RT, P=.0069) and OS (91% vs 68%, P=.0064). On multivariate analysis, the addition of RT significantly improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.14, P=.014) with a trend toward an OS benefit (HR=0.30, P=.053). No significant difference in PFS or OS was found between patients treated with 30 to 35 Gy versus ≥36 Gy (P=.71 PFS and P=.31 OS). Conclusion: Patients with primary bone lymphoma treated with standard chemotherapy followed by RT can have excellent outcomes. The use of consolidative RT was associated with significant benefits in both PFS and OS.

  13. Primary cilia expression in bone marrow in response to mechanical stimulation in explant bioreactor culture.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, T R; Schiavi, J; Alyssa Varsanik, M; Voisin, M; Birmingham, E; Haugh, M G; McNamara, L M; Niebur, G L

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow contains a multitude of mechanically sensitive cells that may participate in mechanotransduction. Primary cilia are sensory organelles expressed on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblasts, osteocytes, and other cell types that sense fluid flow in monolayer culture. In marrow, cilia could similarly facilitate the sensation of relative motion between adjacent cells or interstitial fluid. The goal of this study was to determine the response of cilia to mechanical stimulation of the marrow. Bioreactors were used to supply trabecular bone explants with low magnitude mechanical stimulation (LMMS) of 0.3 ×g at 30 Hz for 1 h/d, 5 d/week, inducing shear stresses in the marrow. Four groups were studied: unstimulated (UNSTIM), stimulated (LMMS), and with and without chloral hydrate (UNSTIM+CH and LMMS+CH, respectively), which was used to disrupt cilia. After 19 days of culture, immunohistochemistry for acetylated α-tubulin revealed that more cells expressed cilia in culture compared to in vivo controls. Stimulation decreased the number of cells expressing cilia in untreated explants, but not in CH-treated explants. MSCs represented a greater fraction of marrow cells in the untreated explants than CH-treated explants. MSCs harvested from the stimulated groups were more proliferative than in the unstimulated explants, but this effect was absent from CH treated explants. In contrast to the marrow, neither LMMS nor CH treatment affected bone formation as measured by mineralising surface. Computational models indicated that LMMS does not induce bone strain, and the reported effects were thus attributed to shear stress in the marrow. From a clinical perspective, genetic or pharmaceutical alterations of cilia expression may affect marrow health and function. PMID:27434268

  14. Clinical characterization and outcome of primary bone lymphoma: a retrospective study of 61 Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, XuanYe; Zhu, Jun; Song, YuQin; Ping, LingYan; Zheng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Primary bone lymphoma(PBL) is a rare disease. To assess the clinical characteristics, outcome, and prognostic factors of this entity in Chinese population, we retrospectively analyzed 61 PBL patients initially treated in our institution between 1997 and 2014. The median age was 45 years. The most common histological subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (55.7%), followed by T-cell lymphoma (18.0%). All patients underwent systemic chemotherapy as initial treatment while 24 patients (39.3%) were additionally treated with radiotherapy. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and the 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates of 57 cases with completed follow-up were 52.3% and 40.1%, respectively. In further analysis of the primary bone DLBCL (PB-DLBCL) subgroup, the 5-year OS and PFS rates were 53.0% and 47.0%, and a multivariable analysis revealed that baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score and response to initial treatment (complete remission versus no complete remission) were independent prognostic factors for both OS and PFS. The proportion of T-cell lymphoma is higher in China than in western populations. High baseline ECOG scores (≥2) and unachieved CR in initial therapy were factors for poor PB-DLBCL prognosis. The role of radiotherapy and rituximab in PLB therapy remains to be confirmed in further investigation. PMID:27357354

  15. TUMOR CONTAMINATION IN THE BIOPSY PATH OF PRIMARY MALIGNANT BONE TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marcelo Parente; Lima, Pablo Moura de Andrade; de Mello, Roberto José Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study factors possibly associated with tumor contamination in the biopsy path of primary malignant bone tumors. Method: Thirty-five patients who underwent surgical treatment with diagnoses of osteosarcoma, Ewing's tumor and chondrosarcoma were studied retrospectively. The sample was analyzed to characterize the biopsy technique used, histological type of the tumor, neoadjuvant chemotherapy used, local recurrences and tumor contamination in the biopsy path. Results: Among the 35 patients studied, four cases of contamination occurred (11.43%): one from osteosarcoma, two from Ewing's tumor and one from chondrosarcoma. There was no association between the type of tumor and presence of tumor contamination in the biopsy path (p = 0.65). There was also no association between the presence of tumor contamination and the biopsy technique (p = 0.06). On the other hand, there were associations between the presence of tumor contamination and local recurrence (p = 0.01) and between tumor contamination and absence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Tumor contamination in the biopsy path of primary malignant bone tumors was associated with local recurrence. On the other hand, the histological type of the tumor and the type of biopsy did not have an influence on tumor contamination. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy had a protective effect against this complication. Despite these findings, tumor contamination is a complication that should always be taken into consideration, and removal of the biopsy path is recommended in tumor resection surgery. PMID:27047877

  16. Array CGH analysis identifies two distinct subgroups of primary angiosarcoma of bone.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; de Jong, Danielle; Bertoni, Franco; Sciot, Raf; Antonescu, Cristina R; Szuhai, Karoly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-02-01

    Molecular genetic studies on vascular tumors are rare. Recently, possible involvement of MYC and KDR has been documented in a subset of angiosarcomas of soft tissue. We performed a cytogenetic analysis of primary angiosarcomas of bone (n = 13) and soft tissue (n = 5) using high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). Regions of interest were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Antibodies for candidate genes (SKI, MYC, KDR, and MAPK9) were selected and immunohistochemistry was performed. Six angiosarcomas of bone and four angiosarcomas of soft tissue showed chromosomal losses, gains, and high level amplifications. Cluster analysis identified two groups: a group with a complex genetic profile and a group with only few genetic aberrations. Five regions of interest were selected, which were located at chromosome bands 1p36.23, 2q32-34, 5q35, 8q24, and 17q21.32-24.2. Interphase FISH confirmed the high-level amplifications. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high expression of MYC (16/60), MAPK9 (63/69), and SKI (52/62). There were no differences between the two groups with regards to location, immunohistochemical expression nor survival. In summary, we identified two subgroups of angiosarcoma: those with few or no gross aberrations and those which show numerous genetic aberrations consisting of chromosomal losses, gains and high level amplifications or complex aberrations. The most common finding was amplification of 2q and 17q in both angiosarcoma of bone and soft tissue, suggesting overlap in tumorigenesis irrespective of their location. We show MYC amplification in primary angiosarcoma indicating this is not entirely specific for radiation-induced angiosarcoma. PMID:25231439

  17. Cerium oxide nanoparticles stimulate proliferation of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Popov, Anton L; Popova, Nelly R; Selezneva, Irina I; Akkizov, Azamat Y; Ivanov, Vladimir K

    2016-11-01

    The increasing application of cell therapy technologies in the treatment of various diseases requires the development of new effective methods for culturing primary cells. The major limitation for the efficient use of autologous cell material is the low rate of cell proliferation. Successful cell therapy requires sufficient amounts of cell material over a short period of time with the preservation of their differentiation and proliferative potential. In this regard, the development of novel, highly efficient stimulators of proliferative activity in stem cells is a truly urgent task. In this paper we have demonstrated that citrate-stabilized cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) enhance the proliferative activity of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts in vitro. Cerium oxide nanoparticles stimulate cell proliferation in a wide range of concentrations (10(-3)М-10(-9)M) through reduction of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the lag phase of cell growth and by modulating the expression level of the major antioxidant enzymes. We found the optimal concentration of nanoceria, which provides the greatest acceleration of cell proliferation in vitro, while maintaining the levels of intracellular ROS and mRNA of antioxidant enzymes in the physiological range. Our results confirm that nanocrystalline ceria can be considered as a basis for effective and inexpensive supplements in cell culturing. PMID:27524035

  18. Protective effect of resveratrol against caspase 3 activation in primary mouse fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ulakcsai, Zsófia; Bagaméry, Fruzsina; Vincze, István; Szökő, Éva; Tábi, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    Aim To study the effect of resveratrol on survival and caspase 3 activation in non-transformed cells after serum deprivation. Methods Apoptosis was induced by serum deprivation in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Caspase 3 activation and lactate dehydrogenase release were assayed as cell viability measure by using their fluorogenic substrates. The involvement of PI3K, ERK, JNK, p38, and SIRT1 signaling pathways was also examined. Results Serum deprivation of primary fibroblasts induced significant activation of caspase 3 within 3 hours and reduced cell viability after 24 hours. Resveratrol dose-dependently prevented caspase activation and improved cell viability with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 66.3 ± 13.81 µM. It also reduced the already up-regulated caspase 3 activity when it was added to the cell culture medium after 3 hour serum deprivation, suggesting its rescue effect. Among the major signaling pathways, p38 kinase was critical for the protective effect of resveratrol which was abolished completely in the presence of p38 inhibitor. Conclusion Resveratrol showed protective effect against cell death in a rather high dose. Involvement of p38 kinase in this effect suggests the role of mild stress in its cytoprotective action. Furthermore due to its rescue effect, resveratrol may be used not only for prevention, but also treatment of age-related degenerative diseases, but in the higher dose than consumed in conventional diet. PMID:25891866

  19. Acute toxicity and cytotoxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus sphaericus strains on fish and mouse bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Grisolia, Cesar Koppe; Oliveira-Filho, Eduardo Cyrino; Ramos, Felipe Rosa; Lopes, Madaí Cruz; Muniz, Daphne Heloisa Freitas; Monnerat, Rose Gomes

    2009-01-01

    The insecticidal properties of delta-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) serotypes kurstaki and israelensis and crystal proteins of Bacillus sphaericus (Bs) serotype H5 have been used in insect control for decades. The availability of microbial toxins in biopesticides as well as in plants with incorporated protection has been increasing the concerns about biosafety. Acute toxicity to Danio rerio and cytotoxicity on mouse bone marrow cells and peripheral erythrocytes of Oreochromis niloticus were tested with Bt israelensis, Bt kurstaki and Bs H5 strains. The concentration and dose tested were 10(6) and 10(8) spores/ml, respectively. Neither lethality nor effects on mouse bone marrow were promoted by any strain. In necrosis-apoptosis study on peripheral erythrocytes of O. niloticus an increased frequency of necrotic cells caused by exposure to strains of B. thuringiensis was found. Exposure to B. sphaericus did not show cytotoxic effects in either tested system. None of the strains studied induced apoptosis in contrast with the chemical controls. PMID:18670879

  20. Characterization of xenogeneic mouse-to-rat bone marrow chimeras. I. Examination of hematologic and immunologic function

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, A.C.; Luckert, P.H.; Tazume, S.; Niedbalski, J.L.; Pollard, M.

    1987-07-01

    Eighteen xenogeneic chimeric rats (survival: greater than 100 days) were established by transplanting bone marrow cells from femurs of 10 gnotobiotic CFW mice into each germfree Sprague-Dawley or Wistar rat. The erythrocytes circulating in the rats were of mouse origin as determined by hemagglutination. Hemoglobin electrophoresis, radial immunodiffusion for IgG, and assay of granulocytic neutrophils for leukocyte alkaline phosphatase verified that true chimerism was achieved. The extent of hematological and immunological reconstitution varied. In general, hematocrit levels were low to normal, white blood cell counts and differentials were within normal limits, and serum protein levels were normal. Levels of circulating IgG of each species were comparable to those of germfree rat and mouse controls. Natural killer (NK) activity was depressed, a phenomenon that may be attributable to the radiation treatment of recipients, or to failure to transfer NK cells or precursors. Mitogenic stimulation reactions were varied, but most chimeric rats demonstrated moderately depressed responses. Reactions as a whole suggested that gnotobiotic rats with xenogeneic bone marrow are incompletely reconstituted, both hematologically and immunologically. No acute graft-versus-host reaction was seen.

  1. In vivo radiometric analysis of glucose uptake and distribution in mouse bone.

    PubMed

    Zoch, Meredith L; Abou, Diane S; Clemens, Thomas L; Thorek, Daniel L J; Riddle, Ryan C

    2016-01-01

    Bone formation and remodeling occurs throughout life and requires the sustained activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, particularly during periods of rapid bone growth. Despite increasing evidence linking bone cell activity to global energy homeostasis, little is known about the relative energy requirements or substrate utilization of bone cells. In these studies, we measured the uptake and distribution of glucose in the skeleton in vivo using positron-emitting (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]-FDG) and non-invasive, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography. Assessment of [(18)F]-FDG uptake demonstrated that relative to other tissues bone accumulated a significant fraction of the total dose of the glucose analog. Skeletal accumulation was greatest in young mice undergoing the rapid bone formation that characterizes early development. PET/CT imaging revealed that [(18)F]-FDG uptake was greatest in the epiphyseal and metaphyseal regions of long bones, which accords with the increased osteoblast numbers and activity at this skeletal site. Insulin administration significantly increased skeletal accumulation of [(18)F]-FDG, while uptake was reduced in mice lacking the insulin receptor specifically in osteoblasts or fed a high-fat diet. Our results indicated that the skeleton is a site of significant glucose uptake and that its consumption by bone cells is subject to regulation by insulin and disturbances in whole-body metabolism. PMID:27088042

  2. In vivo radiometric analysis of glucose uptake and distribution in mouse bone

    PubMed Central

    Zoch, Meredith L; Abou, Diane S; Clemens, Thomas L; Thorek, Daniel L J; Riddle, Ryan C

    2016-01-01

    Bone formation and remodeling occurs throughout life and requires the sustained activity of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, particularly during periods of rapid bone growth. Despite increasing evidence linking bone cell activity to global energy homeostasis, little is known about the relative energy requirements or substrate utilization of bone cells. In these studies, we measured the uptake and distribution of glucose in the skeleton in vivo using positron-emitting 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]-FDG) and non-invasive, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging and ex vivo autoradiography. Assessment of [18F]-FDG uptake demonstrated that relative to other tissues bone accumulated a significant fraction of the total dose of the glucose analog. Skeletal accumulation was greatest in young mice undergoing the rapid bone formation that characterizes early development. PET/CT imaging revealed that [18F]-FDG uptake was greatest in the epiphyseal and metaphyseal regions of long bones, which accords with the increased osteoblast numbers and activity at this skeletal site. Insulin administration significantly increased skeletal accumulation of [18F]-FDG, while uptake was reduced in mice lacking the insulin receptor specifically in osteoblasts or fed a high-fat diet. Our results indicated that the skeleton is a site of significant glucose uptake and that its consumption by bone cells is subject to regulation by insulin and disturbances in whole-body metabolism. PMID:27088042

  3. Loss of SH3BP2 function suppresses bone destruction in TNF-driven and collagen-induced arthritis mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Tomoyuki; Gallant, Richard; Ishida, Shu; Kittaka, Mizuho; Yoshitaka, Teruhito; Fox, David A.; Morita, Yoshitaka; Nishida, Keiichiro; Rottapel, Robert; Ueki, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective SH3BP2 is a signaling adapter protein which regulates immune and skeletal systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of SH3BP2 in arthritis in human TNF-α transgenic (hTNFtg) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) models. Methods First, SH3BP2-deficient (Sh3bp2–/–) and wild-type (Sh3bp2+/+) mice were crossed with hTNFtg mice. Inflammation and bone loss were examined by clinical inspection and histological and micro-CT analyses. Osteoclastogenesis was evaluated with primary bone marrow-derived M-CSF-dependent macrophages (BMMs). Second, CIA was induced in Sh3bp2–/– and Sh3bp2+/+ mice, and the incidence and severity of arthritis were evaluated. Anti-mouse type II collagen (CII) antibody levels were measured by ELISA. Lymph node cell responses to CII were also determined. Results SH3BP2-deficiency did not alter the severity of joint swelling but suppressed bone erosion in the hTNFtg model. Bone loss of talus and tibia was prevented in Sh3bp2–/–/hTNFtg mice compared to Sh3bp2+/+/hTNFtg mice. RANKL- and TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis was suppressed in Sh3bp2–/– BMM cultures. NFATc1 nuclear localization in response to TNF-α was decreased in Sh3bp2–/– BMMs compared to Sh3bp2+/+ BMMs. In the CIA model, SH3BP2-deficiency suppressed the incidence of arthritis, which was associated with decreased anti-CII antibody production, while the antigen-specific T-cell responses in lymph nodes were not significantly different between Sh3bp2+/+ and Sh3bp2–/– mice. Conclusion SH3BP2-deficiency prevents bone loss via impaired osteoclastogenesis in the hTNFtg model and suppresses the induction of arthritis via decreased autoantibody production in the CIA model. Therefore, SH3BP2 could be a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25470448

  4. The biphasic effect of triiodothyronine compared to bone resorbing effect of PTH on bone modelling of mouse long bone in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Soskolne, W.A.; Schwartz, Z.; Goldstein, M.; Ornoy, A. )

    1990-01-01

    To examine the effects of T3 on fetal long bone modelling the radii and ulnae of 16 day old fetal mice were grown in vitro for two days. Their growth, mineralization, and resorption were assessed by measuring diaphyseal length, calcium and phosphorus content, hydroxyproline content, and the release of incorporated {sup 45}Ca. The effects of T3 were compared to the effects of 1-34 PTH, a known resorbing agent, on the same system. Devitalized bones were used as a control. The results showed that T3 had a biphasic effect. At high concentrations (10(-5) M-10(-6) M) T3 inhibited the growth of the bones as indicated by their diaphyseal length and hydroxyproline content. Calcium and phosphorus content were significantly decreased while {sup 45}Ca release was increased. Similar effects were also found after the addition of 1-34 PTH to the media. However, T3, at lower concentrations (10(-7) M-10(-9) M), stimulated the growth and calcification of the bones as indicated by an increase in diaphyseal length and the hydroxyproline, calcium, and phosphorus content. {sup 45}Ca release was significantly decreased at these concentrations. Neither T3 nor 1-34 PTH affected devitalized bones in the same system. The results suggest that at physiological concentrations, T3 has a direct, anabolic effect on bone, which may explain its major role in the growth process of various species. At high doses, however, T3 stimulates bone resorption in a way similar to PTH.

  5. Spontaneous activations follow a common developmental course across primary sensory areas in mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Frye, Charles G; MacLean, Jason N

    2016-08-01

    Spontaneous propagation of spiking within the local neocortical circuits of mature primary sensory areas is highly nonrandom, engaging specific sets of interconnected and functionally related neurons. These spontaneous activations promise insight into neocortical structure and function, but their properties in the first 2 wk of perinatal development are incompletely characterized. Previously, we have found that there is a minimal numerical sample, on the order of 400 cells, necessary to fully capture mature neocortical circuit dynamics. Therefore we maximized our numerical sample by using two-photon calcium imaging to observe spontaneous activity in populations of up to 1,062 neurons spanning multiple columns and layers in 52 acute coronal slices of mouse neocortex at each day from postnatal day (PND) 3 to PND 15. Slices contained either primary auditory cortex (A1) or somatosensory barrel field (S1BF), which allowed us to compare sensory modalities with markedly different developmental timelines. Between PND 3 and PND 8, populations in both areas exhibited activations of anatomically compact subgroups on the order of dozens of cells. Between PND 9 and PND 13, the spatiotemporal structure of the activity diversified to include spatially distributed activations encompassing hundreds of cells. Sparse activations covering the entire field of view dominated in slices taken on or after PND 14. These and other findings demonstrate that the developmental progression of spontaneous activations from active local modules in the first postnatal week to sparse, intermingled groups of neurons at the beginning of the third postnatal week generalizes across primary sensory areas, consistent with an intrinsic developmental trajectory independent of sensory input. PMID:27146981

  6. Intrinsic differences in BRITE adipogenesis of primary adipocytes from two different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongguo; Bolze, Florian; Fromme, Tobias; Klingenspor, Martin

    2014-09-01

    BRITE (brown-in-white) cells are brown adipocyte-like cells found in white adipose tissue (WAT) of rodents and/or humans. The recruitment of BRITE adipocytes, referred to as the browning of WAT, is hallmarked by the expression of UCP1 and exerts beneficial metabolic effects. Here we address whether beyond systemic cues depot- and strain-specific variation in BRITE recruitment is determined by a cellular program intrinsic to progenitors. Therefore we compared the browning capacity of serum and investigated brown and BRITE adipogenesis in primary cultures of stromal-vascular cells isolated from interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT), inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) and epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) in two inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J (B6, a strain with low browning propensity) and 129/S6SvEv (129, a strain with high browning propensity). Paradoxically, serum collected from B6 mice was more potent in the promotion of browning than serum collected from 129 mice. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that depot- and strain-specific differences observed in vivo are pheno-copied in primary cultures in vitro, as judged by UCP1 expression and by functional analysis. Notably, primary adipocytes from 129 mice had a higher capacity for isoproterenol-induced uncoupled respiration than B6. We conclude that cues intrinsic to the progenitor cells contribute to differential BRITE adipogenesis. Further analyses demonstrate that these cues are independent of autocrine/paracrine mechanisms, BRITE progenitor abundance and genetic variation in the gene regulatory region of Ucp1 but rather depend on trans-acting factors. These results provide new insights on the molecular basis of strain and depot-specific differences in BRITE adipogenesis. PMID:24953778

  7. The flow field along the entire length of mouse aorta and primary branches.

    PubMed

    Huo, Yunlong; Guo, Xiaomei; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2008-05-01

    There is a spatial disposition to atherosclerosis along the aorta corresponding to regions of flow disturbances. The objective of the present study is to investigate the detailed distribution of hemodynamic parameters (wall shear stress (WSS), spatial gradient of wall shear stress (WSSG), and oscillatory shear index (OSI)) in the entire length of C57BL/6 mouse aorta with all primary branches (from ascending aorta to common iliac bifurcation). The detailed geometrical parameters (e.g., diameter and length of the vessels) were obtained from casts of entire aorta and primary branches of mice. The flow velocity was measured at the inlet of ascending aorta using Doppler flowprobe in mice. The outlet pressure boundary condition was estimated based on scaling law. The continuity and Navier-Stokes equations were solved using three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). The model prediction was tested by comparing the computed flow rate with the flow rate measured just before the common iliac bifurcation, and good agreement was found. It was also found that complex flow patterns occur at bifurcations between main trunk and branches. The major branches of terminal aorta, with the highest proportion of atherosclerosis, have the lowest WSS, and the relatively atherosclerotic-prone aortic arch has much more complex WSS distribution and higher OSI value than other sites. The low WSS coincides with the high OSI, which approximately obeys a power law relationship. Furthermore, the scaling law between flow and diameter holds in the entire aorta and primary branches of mice under pulsatile blood flow conditions. This model will eventually serve to elucidate the causal relation between hemodynamic patterns and atherogenesis in KO mice. PMID:18299987

  8. Duration sensitivity of neurons in the primary auditory cortex of albino mouse.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Qi, Qiaozhen; Huang, Caifei; Chomiak, Taylor; Luo, Feng

    2016-02-01

    Many neurons in the central auditory system of a number of species have been found to be sensitive to the duration of sound stimuli. While previous studies have shown that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory input is important for duration sensitivity in the inferior colliculus (IC), it is still unknown whether (GABA)-ergic inhibitory input plays an important role in generating duration sensitivity in the cortex. Using free-field sound stimulation and in vivo extracellular recording, we investigated duration sensitivity in primary auditory cortical (AI) neurons of the Nembutal anesthetized albino mouse (Mus musculus, Km) and examined the effect of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline on AI neuron duration sensitivity. A total of 63 duration tuning curves were measured in AI neurons. Of these, 44% (28/63) exhibited duration sensitive responses, while 43% (27/63) lacked duration sensitivity. The remaining 13% (8/63) exhibited long-pass properties likely reflecting both duration sensitive and insensitive features. We found that duration sensitive neurons had shorter first spike latency (FSL) and longer firing duration (FD) when stimulated with best duration (p < 0.05), while duration insensitive neurons had invariable FSL and FD at different sound durations (p>0.05). Furthermore, 60% (6/10) of duration sensitive neurons and 75% (3/4) long-pass neurons lost duration sensitivity following bicuculline application. Taken together, our results show that cortical neurons in the albino mouse are sensitive to sound duration, and that GABAergic inhibition may play an important role in the formation of de novo duration sensitivity in AI. The possible mechanism and behavioral significance of duration sensitivity in AI neurons is discussed. PMID:26529681

  9. Reduced bone mass accrual in mouse model of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongrun; Wergedal, Jon E; Rundle, Charles H; Mohan, Subburaman

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can affect bone by influencing the production/actions of pituitary hormones and neuropeptides that play significant regulatory roles in bone metabolism. Previously, we demonstrated that experimental TBI exerted a negative effect on the skeleton. Since mild TBI (mTBI) accounts for the majority of TBI cases, this study was undertaken to evaluate TBI effects using a milder impact model in female mice. Repetitive mTBI caused microhemorrhaging, astrocytosis, and increased anti-inflammatory protective actions in the brain of the impacted versus control mice 2 wk after the first impact. Serum levels of growth regulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were reduced by 28.9%. Bone mass was reduced significantly in total body as well as individual skeletons. Tibial total cortical density was reduced by 7.0%, which led to weaker bones, as shown by a 31.3% decrease in femoral size adjusted peak torque. A 27.5% decrease in tibial trabecular bone volume per total volume was accompanied by a 34.3% (p = 0.07) decrease in bone formation rate (BFR) per total area. Based on our data, we conclude that repetitive mTBI exerted significant negative effects on accrual of both cortical and trabecular bone mass in mice caused by a reduced BFR. PMID:25785491

  10. Prostaglandin E2 stimulates the production of interleukin-6 by neonatal mouse parietal bones.

    PubMed

    Holt, I; Davie, M W; Braidman, I P; Marshall, M J

    1994-04-01

    The pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) is thought to be involved in bone homeostasis. A number of bone resorbing agents have been shown to induce the release of IL-6 from bone. We wished to determine whether prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which is a mediator of bone resorption, can elicit the production of IL-6. IL-6 was measured by the proliferative response of B9 hybridoma cells and could be completely neutralised by an anti-IL-6 antibody. Parietal bones from neonatal mice were maintained in culture in the presence of indomethacin (10(-6) M) with or without PGE2. The time course and dose-response to PGE2 of IL-6 production were determined. After 6 h in culture, 10(-8) M PGE2 produced significantly more IL-6 than the controls (P < 0.005). PGE2 (10(-6) M) stimulated the production of a mean of 12.8 ng/ml IL-6 over 6 h. Preincubating bones with indomethacin for 20 h prior to a 6 h culture with indomethacin led to a lowering of the production of IL-6 (mean 1.8 ng/ml) compared to bones cultured without the preincubation period (5.8 ng/ml). When the indomethacin preincubation period was used, a significant increase in IL-6 production was found with 10(-9) M PGE2 (P < 0.005), and 10(-6) M PGE2 caused the production of 39.9 ng/ml IL-6 over 6 h. Stripping endocranial and ectocranial membranes from bones demonstrated the membranes to be the major site of IL-6 production. However, intact bones were required for maximal stimulated IL-6 production. PMID:8061551