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Sample records for primary ossification center

  1. Prognostic Value of the Radiologic Appearance of the Navicular Ossification Center in Congenital Talipes Equinovarus.

    PubMed

    Atanda, Abiola A; Oni, Julius K; Ramsden, David M; Yoon, Richard S; Ahmad, Alaa A; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-01-01

    Congenital talipes equinovarus (CTEV), more commonly known as clubfoot, is a deformity of the foot that is not well understood. The tarsal navicular is at the center of the disease process and exhibits abnormal development and delayed ossification. However, its role in the pathologic process is not clear. The aim of the present study was to better understand the role of the tarsal navicular in CTEV by correlating the presence of the navicular ossification center and relapse of clubfoot deformity after surgical treatment. The medical records and radiographs of 34 patients (41 feet) with surgically treated CTEV were reviewed for the presence of the navicular ossification center and the lateral talocalcaneal angles. Of the 41 feet, 17 (41.46%) did not have the tarsal navicular ossification center present before surgery, and 24 (58.54%) did have the ossification center present. The talocalcaneal angles were similar between those with and without the navicular ossification center present. No significant difference was found in the incidence of relapse between the nonossified navicular group (17.6%) and the ossified navicular group (16.7%; p = .63). The presence of the navicular ossification center before surgery does not appear to have prognostic value for the relapse of CTEV after surgical intervention. PMID:26049641

  2. Avulsion fracture of the pelvis: separation of the secondary ossification center in the superior margin of the acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Nanka, O; Havránek, P; Pesl, T; Dutka, J

    2003-09-01

    A 13-year-old female sustained a rare avulsion fracture of the secondary ossification center in the superior margin of the acetabulum as the result of contraction of the reflected head of the rectus femoris muscle. Diagnosis was made from plain films and CT scans with 3D image reconstruction. The patient was treated non-operatively by bed rest with semiflexion of the hip and knee, and appropriate analgesia. PMID:12903071

  3. Glucocerebrosidase deficiency in zebrafish affects primary bone ossification through increased oxidative stress and reduced Wnt/?-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Zancan, Ilaria; Bellesso, Stefania; Costa, Roberto; Salvalaio, Marika; Stroppiano, Marina; Hammond, Chrissy; Argenton, Francesco; Filocamo, Mirella; Moro, Enrico

    2015-03-01

    Loss of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) function is responsible for several organ defects, including skeletal abnormalities in type 1 Gaucher disease (GD). Enhanced bone resorption by infiltrating macrophages has been proposed to lead to major bone defects. However, while more recent evidences support the hypothesis that osteoblastic bone formation is impaired, a clear pathogenetic mechanism has not been depicted yet. Here, by combining different molecular approaches, we show that Gba1 loss of function in zebrafish is associated with defective canonical Wnt signaling, impaired osteoblast differentiation and reduced bone mineralization. We also provide evidence that increased reactive oxygen species production precedes the Wnt signaling impairment, which can be reversed upon human GBA1 overexpression. Type 1 GD patient fibroblasts similarly exhibit reduced Wnt signaling activity, as a consequence of increased ?-catenin degradation. Our results support a novel model in which a primary defect in canonical Wnt signaling antecedes bone defects in type 1 GD. PMID:25326392

  4. Heterotopic Ossification in Neurorehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joseph A; Waryasz, Gregory R; Klyce, Walter; Daniels, Alan H

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) involves deposition of bone in extraskeletal tissue in the setting of a neurological disorder, and its pathophysiology is incompletely understood. NHO can lead to significant disability and functional impairment. NHO initially manifests as pain and joint stiffness. Early diagnosis requires appropriate suspicion and imaging studies to detect the uncalcified collagen matrix that forms in the early stages of NHO. If diagnosis is made in the early phase of NHO, progression may be halted with bisphosphonates, indomethacin or radiation therapy. If NHO progresses to its final stages without intervention, it may restrict joints and render them dysfunctional. Surgical treatment of NHO may restore function, but complications may occur, and prophylaxis and aggressive rehabilitation are essential. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2015-12.asp, free with no login]. PMID:26623453

  5. Delayed hypertrophic differentiation of epiphyseal chondrocytes contributes to failed secondary ossification in mucopolysaccharidosis VII dogs.

    PubMed

    Peck, Sun H; O'Donnell, Philip J M; Kang, Jennifer L; Malhotra, Neil R; Dodge, George R; Pacifici, Maurizio; Shore, Eileen M; Haskins, Mark E; Smith, Lachlan J

    2015-11-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VII is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by deficient ?-glucuronidase activity, which leads to the accumulation of incompletely degraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). MPS VII patients present with severe skeletal abnormalities, which are particularly prevalent in the spine. Incomplete cartilage-to-bone conversion in MPS VII vertebrae during postnatal development is associated with progressive spinal deformity and spinal cord compression. The objectives of this study were to determine the earliest postnatal developmental stage at which vertebral bone disease manifests in MPS VII and to identify the underlying cellular basis of impaired cartilage-to-bone conversion, using the naturally-occurring canine model. Control and MPS VII dogs were euthanized at 9 and 14days-of-age, and vertebral secondary ossification centers analyzed using micro-computed tomography, histology, qPCR, and protein immunoblotting. Imaging studies and mRNA analysis of bone formation markers established that secondary ossification commences between 9 and 14days in control animals, but not in MPS VII animals. mRNA analysis of differentiation markers revealed that MPS VII epiphyseal chondrocytes are unable to successfully transition from proliferation to hypertrophy during this critical developmental window. Immunoblotting demonstrated abnormal persistence of Sox9 protein in MPS VII cells between 9 and 14days-of-age, and biochemical assays revealed abnormally high intra and extracellular GAG content in MPS VII epiphyseal cartilage at as early as 9days-of-age. In contrast, assessment of vertebral growth plates and primary ossification centers revealed no significant abnormalities at either age. The results of this study establish that failed vertebral bone formation in MPS VII can be traced to the failure of epiphyseal chondrocytes to undergo hypertrophic differentiation at the appropriate developmental stage, and suggest that aberrant processing of Sox9 protein may contribute to this cellular dysfunction. These results also highlight the importance of early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention to prevent the progression of debilitating skeletal disease in MPS patients. PMID:26422116

  6. [Ossification of the collagen implant].

    PubMed

    Walter, M; Müller, J M; Keller, H W; Brenner, U

    1985-12-01

    Native collagen type I was studied morphologically and fluorescent-histologically after implantation in bony defects. As criteria for revitalisation we used depth and density of immigration, type of immigrated cells, revascularisation, formation of new cartilage and bone. Furthermore the deposition of fluorochromes was studied. The maximum of cellular immigration was reached after 8 weeks and remained at this level for the period of observation. The implants were impregnated only with fibroblasts and fibrocytes, developing into chondroblasts, chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteocytes. Only in one case basophilic round-cells could be seen. The centres of the implants were after 6 weeks rarely, after 8 weeks fully revascularized. Formation of new cartilage and bone could be seen after 6 weeks, increasing in number and extension during the observation-period. Osteoneogenesis was performed both by desmal and enchondral ossification, enchondral ossification much more in evidence. The deposition of fluorochromes could be seen in each implant. After 8 weeks fluorochromes could only be seen at the bone-implant interface, after 12 and 16 weeks even the centres were well impregnated. In a single case reossification in a control-rib could be seen as well morphologically as fluorescent-histologically. PMID:2868614

  7. Primary production cycle in an upwelling center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIsaac, J. J.; Dugdale, R. C.; Barber, R. T.; Blasco, D.; Packard, T. T.

    1985-05-01

    The cycle of nitrogen and carbon productivity of phytoplankton in an upwelling center at 15°S on the coast of Peru was studied during the JOINT-II expedition of the Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis program. The productivity cycle was characterized by repeated stations at various locations in the upwelling plume, a time series of stations in mid plume, and stations located along drogue tracks. Four zones of physiological condition were distinguished along the axis of the upwelling plume. In Zone I phytoplankton upwelled with nutrient-rich water were initially 'shifted-down'; in Zone II they underwent light induced 'shift-up' to increased nutrient uptake, photosynthesis, and synthesis of macromolecules. In Zone III ambient nutrient concentrations were rapidly reduced, there was a rapid accumulation of phytoplankton biomass in the water column, and rate processes proceeded at maximal rates. In Zone IV ambient nutrient concentrations were significantly decreased, phytoplankton biomass remained high, and limitation of phytoplankton processes was beginning to be observed. Phytoplankton responded to the altered environment by undergoing 'shift-down' to lower rates of nutrient uptake, photosynthesis, and macromolecule synthesis. The time and space domain where this entire sequence occurs was relatively small; the cycle from initial upwelling to 'shift-down' was completed in 8 to 10 days within 30 to 60 km off the coast.

  8. Primary Care Practice Development: A Relationship-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William L.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Nutting, Paul A.; Stange, Kurt C.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Numerous primary care practice development efforts, many related to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), are emerging across the United States with few guides available to inform them. This article presents a relationship-centered practice development approach to understand practice and to aid in fostering practice development to advance key attributes of primary care that include access to first-contact care, comprehensive care, coordination of care, and a personal relationship over time. METHODS Informed by complexity theory and relational theories of organizational learning, we built on discoveries from the American Academy of Family Physicians’ National Demonstration Project (NDP) and 15 years of research to understand and improve primary care practice. RESULTS Primary care practices can fruitfully be understood as complex adaptive systems consisting of a core (a practice’s key resources, organizational structure, and functional processes), adaptive reserve (practice features that enhance resilience, such as relationships), and attentiveness to the local environment. The effectiveness of these attributes represents the practice’s internal capability. With adequate motivation, healthy, thriving practices advance along a pathway of slow, continuous developmental change with occasional rapid periods of transformation as they evolve better fits with their environment. Practice development is enhanced through systematically using strategies that involve setting direction and boundaries, implementing sensing systems, focusing on creative tensions, and fostering learning conversations. CONCLUSIONS Successful practice development begins with changes that strengthen practices’ core, build adaptive reserve, and expand attentiveness to the local environment. Development progresses toward transformation through enhancing primary care attributes. PMID:20530396

  9. Heterotopic ossification: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Dafydd S; Clasper, J C

    2015-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the formation of mature lamellar bone in extraskeletal soft tissues. It was first described 1000 years ago in the healing of fractures, and in relation to military wounds, texts from the American Civil War and World War I refer to HO specifically. It continues to cause problems to injured service personnel; the consequences of wound and soft tissue complications in traumatic amputations pose particular problems to rehabilitation and prosthetic use. While HO is seen in rare genetic conditions, it is most prevalent after joint replacement surgery and trauma. In the civilian setting HO has been commonly described in patients after traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and burns. Militarily, as a consequence of recent operations, and the characteristic injury of blast-related amputations, a renewed interest in HO has emerged due to an increased incidence seen in casualties. The heterogeneous nature of a blast related amputation makes it difficult for a single aetiological event to be identified, although it is now accepted that blast, amputation through the zone of injury, increased injury severity and associated brain injuries are significant risk factors in HO formation. The exact cellular event leading to HO has yet to be identified, and as a consequence its prevention is restricted to the use of anti-inflammatory medication and radiation, which is often contraindicated in the acute complex military casualty. A systematic review in PubMed and the Cochrane Database identified research articles related to HO to illustrate the military problem of HO and its management, current research concepts and experimental theories regarding HO. This also served as a gap analysis providing the researchers detail of any knowledge deficit in this field, in particular to the military aspects of HO; 637 out of 7891 articles initially identified that referenced HO were relevant to this review. PMID:25015927

  10. Ossification of the discoid meniscus: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Semra; Çavu?o?lu, Mehtap; Kocadal, Onur

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal ossification, or bone formation within the substance of the meniscus, is a rare entity. Magnetic resonance imaging allows the unequivocal diagnosis of a meniscal ossification. We aimed to present a case of discoid meniscal ossification, which is quite rare, with the emphasis on imaging findings. PMID:25983511

  11. A model for patient-centered Army primary care.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Paul C; Holcomb, Barbara

    2012-12-01

    This pilot evaluated a novel method of primary care delivery in a military family practice setting. A registered nurse, registered nurse case manager, and primary care provider formed the patient management team. Approximately 2,500 empanelled patients participated in a pilot program that applied a patient-centered approach to primary care. The pilot tracked outcome measures, which included (1) panel size, (2) access to care, (3) care utilization, (4) continuity of care, (5) nurse and provider productivity, (6) Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set measures, and (7) satisfaction measures. When compared to the standard family practice clinic, the patients in the pilot were able to access the family practice clinic more frequently (p < 0.05), were less seen in the urgent care (p < 0.05), and had a lower no-show rate (p < 0.001) for scheduled appointments. The providers were able to see their own empanelled patients significantly more frequently (p < 0.05) and virtually all Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set markers improved with colon cancer screening, low-density lipoprotein annual exams, low-density lipoprotein control, and breast cancer screening/mammogram being significantly improved over the comparison group (p < 0.05). These results suggest a change in staffing and a focus on patient-centered care can significantly improve outpatient care access and population health maintenance. PMID:23397696

  12. Effect of alendronate on endochondral ossification in mandibular condyles of growing rats

    PubMed Central

    Bradaschia-Correa, V.; Barrence, F.A.C.; Ferreira, L.B.; Massa, L.F.; Arana-Chavez, V.E.

    2012-01-01

    The replacement of the calcified cartilage by bone tissue during the endochondral ossification of the mandibular condyle is dependent of the resorbing activity of osteoclats. After partial resorption, calcified cartilage septa are covered by a primary bone matrix secreted by osteoblasts. Osteoadherin (OSAD) is a small proteoglycan present in bone matrix but absent in cartilage during the endochondral ossification. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of alendronate, a drug known to inhibit bone resorption by osteoclasts, on the endochondral ossification of the mandibular condyle of young rats, by evaluating the distribution of osteoclasts and the presence of OSAD in the bone matrix deposited. Wistar newborn rats (n=45) received daily injections of alendronate (n=27) or sterile saline solution as control (n=18) from the day of birth until the ages of 4, 14 and 30 days. At the days mentioned, the mandibular condyles were collected and processed for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Specimens were also submitted to tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) histochemistry and ultrastructural immunodetection of OSAD. Alendronate treatment did not impede the recruitment and fusion of osteoclasts at the ossification zone during condyle growth, but they presented inactivated phenotype. The trabeculae at the ossification area consisted of cartilage matrix covered by a layer of primary bone matrix that was immunopositive to OSAD at all time points studied. Apparently, alendronate impeded the removal of calcified cartilage and maturation of bone trabeculae in the mandibular ramus, while in controls they occurred normally. These findings highlight for giving attention to the potential side-effects of bisphosphonates administered to young patients once it may represent a risk of disturbing maxillofacial development. PMID:22688305

  13. Uncommon Cause of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Tentorial Ossification over Trigeminal Notch

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Sun Woo; Han, Kyung Ream; Kim, Seung Ho; Jeong, Won Ho; Kim, Eun Jin; Choi, Jin Wook; Kim, Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ossification of the tentorium cerebelli over the trigeminal notch is rare, but it may cause compression of the trigeminal nerve, leading to trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We were unable to find any previously reported cases with radiological evaluation, although we did find one case with surgically proven ossification of the tentorium cerebelli. Here, we present a case of TN caused by tentorial ossification over the trigeminal notch depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). PMID:26380124

  14. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of heterotopic ossification

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Diana M.; Ramirez, Melissa R.; Reginato, Anthony M.; Medici, Damian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a debilitating condition in which cartilage and bone forms in soft tissues such as muscle, tendon, and ligament causing immobility. This process is induced by inflammation associated with traumatic injury. In an extremely rare genetic disorder called fibrodysplasia ossificans progessiva (FOP), a combination of inflammation associated with minor soft tissue injuries and a hereditary genetic mutation causes massive HO that progressively worsens throughout the patients’ lifetime leading to the formation of an ectopic skeleton. An activating mutation in the BMP type I receptor ALK2 has been shown to contribute to the heterotopic lesions in FOP patients, yet recent studies have shown that other events are required to stimulate HO including activation of sensory neurons, mast cell degranulation, lymphocyte infiltration, skeletal myocyte cell death, and endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). In this review, we discuss the recent evidence and mechanistic data that describe the cellular and molecular mechanisms that give rise to heterotopic bone. PMID:24796520

  15. Heterotopic ossification in chronic fibrosing otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Elizabeth F; Bhutta, Mahmood F; Lavy, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Acquired external auditory canal atresia is a rare complication of chronic inflammatory otitis, and is generally fibrous or soft tissue in nature. Here, we present the first reported case of heterotopic ossification within chronic fibrosing otitis externa in a 25-year-old male patient with a childhood history of granular myringitis and failed tympanoplasty. A calcified mass was demonstrated adjacent to the tympanic membrane on CT imaging, and surgical exploration revealed a cohesive bar of bone traversing the medial external auditory canal. Drill canaloplasty and split-thickness skin graft coverage of the lateral tympanic membrane resulted in an improvement in the pure tone average from 79 to 55 dB. As the treatment for chronic fibrosing otitis externa involves the surgical widening of the external auditory canal, we alert surgeons to the possibility of cohesive bone formation as a potential cause of navigational confusion and inadvertent over- or under-drilling of the canal stenosis. PMID:26429555

  16. Heterotopic ossification in chronic fibrosing otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, Elizabeth F.; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Lavy, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Acquired external auditory canal atresia is a rare complication of chronic inflammatory otitis, and is generally fibrous or soft tissue in nature. Here, we present the first reported case of heterotopic ossification within chronic fibrosing otitis externa in a 25-year-old male patient with a childhood history of granular myringitis and failed tympanoplasty. A calcified mass was demonstrated adjacent to the tympanic membrane on CT imaging, and surgical exploration revealed a cohesive bar of bone traversing the medial external auditory canal. Drill canaloplasty and split-thickness skin graft coverage of the lateral tympanic membrane resulted in an improvement in the pure tone average from 79 to 55 dB. As the treatment for chronic fibrosing otitis externa involves the surgical widening of the external auditory canal, we alert surgeons to the possibility of cohesive bone formation as a potential cause of navigational confusion and inadvertent over- or under-drilling of the canal stenosis. PMID:26429555

  17. Prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification – an updated review

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Evan O; Kang, Qian K

    2009-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is defined as the process by which trabecular bone forms outside of the skeletal structure, occupying space in soft tissue where it does not normally exist. The current popular prophylactic treatment modalities include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and radiation therapy, although the literature remains inconclusive as to which is superior. Additionally, both treatments can lead to adverse effects to the patient. Recently there have been several studies attempting to identify new aspects of the etiology of heterotopic bone formation and introduce new prophylactic modalities with increased efficacy and fewer side effects. For this review, we selectively retrieved articles from Medline published from 1958–2008 on the prophylaxis of HO with the aim of assisting readers in quickly grasping the current status of research and clinical aspects of HO prophylaxis. PMID:19379483

  18. A Treasure Chest of Primary Learning Center Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Margaret; Kessler, John

    Defining a learning center as a classroom area containing several learning stations where students may work independently with materials which teach, reinforce, or enrich their skills, this guide presents a number of ideas for use in the visual motivation display area of such a center. Suggestions for displays for the various teaching stations are…

  19. Triceps tendon avulsion: a case report and discussion about the olecranon ossification nucleus.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kiyohito; Homma, Yasuhiro; Morita, Mamoru; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Obayashi, Osamu

    2013-11-01

    Rupture of the triceps tendon is a rare condition. We report a case of triceps tendon rupture with avulsion fracture of the olecranon with discussion about pathogenesis from the viewpoint of healing of the olecranon ossification nucleus. An 18-year-old man presented with avulsion fracture of the olecranon and triceps tendon rupture. Operative treatment was conducted with good results. Rupture of the triceps tendon is a rare injury comprising approximately 2% of all tendon injuries, and avulsion at insertion into the olecranon is the most common site of rupture. This injury is most likely to happen in young people as sports-related trauma. Among young people who have insufficient healing of the olecranon ossification nucleus, avulsion fracture of the olecranon may occur due to strong contraction force of the triceps tendon. Our clinical evidence may suggest that avulsion fracture of the olecranon is related in olecranon ossification center healing. Most triceps tendon ruptures are accompanied by avulsion fracture of the olecranon, and it is important to suspect this injury when radiographs show a small fleck of bone avulsed from the olecranon. PMID:23412252

  20. Primary Trait Analysis to Assess a Learner-Centered, Upper-Level Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsardary, Salar; Pontiggia, Laura; Hamid, Mohammed; Blumberg, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a primary trait analysis of a learner-centered, discrete mathematics course based on student-to-student instruction. The authors developed a scoring rubric for the primary traits: conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, application of understanding, and mathematical communication skills. Eleven students took an exam…

  1. Heterotopic ossification in cervical total disk replacement: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Ganbat, Danaa; Kim, Kyungsoo; Jin, Yong Jun; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2014-02-01

    Heterotopic ossification is one of the possible complications following cervical total disk replacement. Although there are numerous hypotheses regarding the etiology of heterotopic ossification, the main causes of heterotopic ossification remain unknown. In this study, we hypothesize that heterotopic ossification formation is related to external loading in the cervical vertebrae after total disk replacement. A two-dimensional finite element model of a cervical vertebra treated by total disk replacement in the sagittal plane was developed. The bone adaptation process of heterotopic ossification was simulated based on strain energy density under both compressive and shear forces. Different types of heterotopic ossification formation were analyzed according to the directions of forces. Two distinct types of heterotopic ossification following cervical total disk replacement were predicted, which was consistent with previous clinical studies. Type 1 heterotopic ossification was observed in the posterior upper part of the vertebra under compressive forces, while type 2 heterotopic ossification was detected mostly in the anterior upper part under shear forces. In addition, heterotopic ossification formation enhanced the strain energy distribution, which is known to be related to bone remodeling. This article presents the effects of different mechanical loading conditions on the occurrence of heterotopic ossification following cervical total disk replacement, and the results may be useful for the design of artificial disks that minimize heterotopic ossification. PMID:24477889

  2. Surgical treatment of ossification of the ligamentum flavum associated with dural ossification in the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong; Xue, Yuan; Zhang, Chao; Dai, Qin; Zhou, Huifang

    2013-02-01

    Between January 2006 and December 2009, dural ossification (DO) was found intraoperatively in 26 of 98 patients with thoracic spinal stenosis due to ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF). MRI showed single-level (n = 2), two-level (n = 8) and multilevel (n = 16) areas of low signal intensity in the ligamentum flavum of the thoracic spine. Of the 68 ossified segments in the study population, 11 (16.2%) were located in the upper thoracic spine (T1-T4), nine (13.2%) were located in the midthoracic spine (T5-T8), and 48 (70.6%) were located in the lower thoracic spine (T9-L1). All patients underwent en bloc resection of the areas affected by OLF and DO. All patients underwent posterior decompression; we did not use instrumented fusion to restore the stability of the involved segments after decompression for any patient. The dural defect was not repaired. The neurological status had improved at follow up (22-66 months; mean, 46.7 months) from a preoperative mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score of 5.46 ± 1.73 points to 8.92 ± 1.38 points at the last follow up (t = 13.87, p < 0.05). The mean values for preoperative and postoperative kyphosis of the involved vertebrae were 6.6 ± 1.5° and 8.2 ± 1.4°, respectively; the mean increase in kyphosis was only 1.7 ± 1.4°. Thus, the surgical techniques discussed in this paper for treatment of OLF associated with DO in the thoracic spine, are effective. PMID:23266313

  3. FGFR3 mutation causes abnormal membranous ossification in achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Di Rocco, Federico; Biosse Duplan, Martin; Heuzé, Yann; Kaci, Nabil; Komla-Ebri, Davide; Munnich, Arnold; Mugniery, Emilie; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2014-06-01

    FGFR3 gain-of-function mutations lead to both chondrodysplasias and craniosynostoses. Achondroplasia (ACH), the most frequent dwarfism, is due to an FGFR3-activating mutation which results in impaired endochondral ossification. The effects of the mutation on membranous ossification are unknown. Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice mimicking ACH and craniofacial analysis of patients with ACH and FGFR3-related craniosynostoses provide an opportunity to address this issue. Studying the calvaria and skull base, we observed abnormal cartilage and premature fusion of the synchondroses leading to modifications of foramen magnum shape and size in Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice, ACH and FGFR3-related craniosynostoses patients. Partial premature fusion of the coronal sutures and non-ossified gaps in frontal bones were also present in Fgfr3(Y367C/+) mice and ACH patients. Our data provide strong support that not only endochondral ossification but also membranous ossification is severely affected in ACH. Demonstration of the impact of FGFR3 mutations on craniofacial development should initiate novel pharmacological and surgical therapeutic approaches. PMID:24419316

  4. Patterns of ossification in southern versus northern placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Bennett, Nigel C; Viljoen, Hermien; Howard, Lauren; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Tzika, Athanasia C; Goswami, Anjali; Asher, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    Consensus on placental mammal phylogeny is fairly recent compared to that for vertebrates as a whole. A stable phylogenetic hypothesis enables investigation into the possibility that placental clades differ from one another in terms of their development. Here, we focus on the sequence of skeletal ossification as a possible source of developmental distinctiveness in "northern" (Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires) versus "southern" (Afrotheria and Xenarthra) placental clades. We contribute data on cranial and postcranial ossification events during growth in Afrotheria, including elephants, hyraxes, golden moles, tenrecs, sengis, and aardvarks. We use three different techniques to quantify sequence heterochrony: continuous method, sequence-ANOVA (analysis of variance) and event-paring/Parsimov. We show that afrotherians significantly differ from other placentals by an early ossification of the orbitosphenoid and caudal vertebrae. Our analysis also suggests that both southern placental groups show a greater degree of developmental variability; however, they rarely seem to vary in the same direction, especially regarding the shifts that differ statistically. The latter observation is inconsistent with the Atlantogenata hypothesis in which afrotherians are considered as the sister clade of xenarthrans. Interestingly, ancestral nodes for Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires show very similar trends and our results suggest that developmental homogeneity in some ossification sequences may be restricted to northern placental mammals (Boreoeutheria). PMID:23815655

  5. Skeletal ossification and sequence heterochrony in xenarthran evolution.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali; Knight, Frank; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Asher, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Previous analyses of how mammals vary in their ossification sequences have focused on monotremes, marsupials, and boreoeutherian placentals. Here, we focus on the sequence of cranial and postcranial ossification events during growth in the xenarthran skull and skeleton, including armadillos, anteaters, and sloths. We use two different methods to quantify sequence heterochrony: sequence analysis of variance (ANOVA) and event-paring/Parsimov. Our results indicate that Parsimov is conservative and does not detect clear heterochronic shifts between xenarthran and boreoeutherian placentals. Sequence-ANOVA performs better, but both methods exhibit sensitivity to the artifactual accumulation of ties. By controlling for ties and taking into account results that the methods have in common, our analysis suggests that xenarthrans significantly differ from other placentals by a late ossification of the sternum and an early ossification of the phalanges and pubis. We interpret these differences as showing that heterochrony plays a role in the skeletal development of xenarthrans, a change from previous studies that have emphasized the developmental homogeneity of the skeleton across placental mammals. PMID:23016907

  6. Monotreme ossification sequences and the riddle of mammalian skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Vera

    2011-05-01

    The developmental differences between marsupials, placentals, and monotremes are thought to be reflected in differing patterns of postcranial development and diversity. However, developmental polarities remain obscured by the rarity of monotreme data. Here, I present the first postcranial ossification sequences of the monotreme echidna and platypus, and compare these with published data from other mammals and amniotes. Strikingly, monotreme stylopodia (humerus, femur) ossify after the more distal zeugopodia (radius/ulna, tibia/fibula), resembling only the European mole among all amniotes assessed. European moles also share extreme humeral adaptations to rotation digging and/or swimming with monotremes, suggesting a causal relationship between adaptation and ossification heterochrony. Late femoral ossification with respect to tibia/fibula in monotremes and moles points toward developmental integration of the serially homologous fore- and hindlimb bones. Monotreme cervical ribs and coracoids ossify later than in most amniotes but are similarly timed as homologous ossifications in therians, where they are lost as independent bones. This loss may have been facilitated by a developmental delay of coracoids and cervical ribs at the base of mammals. The monotreme sequence, although highly derived, resembles placentals more than marsupials. Thus, marsupial postcranial development, and potentially related diversity constraints, may not represent the ancestral mammalian condition. PMID:21521190

  7. Spinal dural ossification causing neurological signs in a cat.

    PubMed

    Antila, Johanna M; Jeserevics, Janis; Rakauskas, Mindaugas; Anttila, Marjukka; Cizinauskas, Sigitas

    2013-01-01

    A six-year-old Ragdoll cat underwent examination due to a six-month history of slowly progressive gait abnormalities. The cat presented with an ambulatory tetraparesis with a neurological examination indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. Radiographs of the spine showed a radiopaque irregular line ventrally in the vertebral canal dorsal to vertebral bodies C3-C5. In this area, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary/extradural lesion compressing the spinal cord. The spinal cord was surgically decompressed. The cause of the spinal cord compression was dural ossification, a diagnosis confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgically dissected sample of dura mater. The cat gradually improved after the procedure and was ambulating better than prior to the surgery. The cat's locomotion later worsened again due to ossified plaques in the dura causing spinal cord compression on the same cervical area as before. Oral prednisolone treatment provided temporary remission. Ten months after surgery, the cat was euthanized due to severe worsening of gait abnormalities, non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Necropsy confirmed spinal cord compression and secondary degenerative changes in the spinal cord on cervical and lumbar areas caused by dural ossification. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal dural ossification in a cat. The reported cat showed neurological signs associated with these dural changes. Dural ossification should be considered in the differential diagnosis of compressive spinal cord disorders in cats. PMID:23777582

  8. Spinal dural ossification causing neurological signs in a cat

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A six-year-old Ragdoll cat underwent examination due to a six-month history of slowly progressive gait abnormalities. The cat presented with an ambulatory tetraparesis with a neurological examination indicating a C1-T2 myelopathy. Radiographs of the spine showed a radiopaque irregular line ventrally in the vertebral canal dorsal to vertebral bodies C3-C5. In this area, magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural extramedullary/extradural lesion compressing the spinal cord. The spinal cord was surgically decompressed. The cause of the spinal cord compression was dural ossification, a diagnosis confirmed by histopathological examination of the surgically dissected sample of dura mater. The cat gradually improved after the procedure and was ambulating better than prior to the surgery. The cat’s locomotion later worsened again due to ossified plaques in the dura causing spinal cord compression on the same cervical area as before. Oral prednisolone treatment provided temporary remission. Ten months after surgery, the cat was euthanized due to severe worsening of gait abnormalities, non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Necropsy confirmed spinal cord compression and secondary degenerative changes in the spinal cord on cervical and lumbar areas caused by dural ossification. To our knowledge, this is the first report of spinal dural ossification in a cat. The reported cat showed neurological signs associated with these dural changes. Dural ossification should be considered in the differential diagnosis of compressive spinal cord disorders in cats. PMID:23777582

  9. Three strategies used by academic health centers to expand primary care capacity.

    PubMed

    Retchin, S M

    2000-01-01

    The growth of managed care in the late 1980s and early 1990s severely disadvantaged academic health centers (AHCs). The reliance on primary care gatekeeping and selective contracting by managed care plans were two contributing factors. Because most AHCs had only a modest primary care capacity, they were understandably concerned about their strategic positions. Thus, many felt it was essential to expand their primary care capacities to ensure downstream referrals, to improve contract negotiations with third parties, and to permit assumption of risk for defined populations. Among the different approaches used, three principal strategies emerged for the expansion of the primary care capacity of AHCs: (1) the "assembly strategy," in which many AHCs recruited new generalist faculty into existing clinical departments; (2) the "acquisition strategy," in which AHCs purchased established primary care practices in the community; and (3) the "affiliation strategy," in which some AHCs affiliated with primary care physicians in the community and formed networks of academic and community physicians. For each of these approaches, the author reviews the relative merits and disadvantages, and analyzes why some AHCs' original assumptions about the imperative for increasing primary care capacity may have been spurious. He concludes that recent marketplace and regulatory changes may make it less necessary for AHCs to secure substantial primary care bases in the future. PMID:10667871

  10. Primary events in photoacid dissociation Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center, \\Lambda

    E-print Network

    Agmon, Noam

    Primary events in photoacid dissociation Noam Agmon Department of Physical Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center, \\Lambda The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904, Israel Postulated hydrogen:5 upon excitation. Consequently, it is able to transfer its proton to a range of pure \\Lambda The Fritz

  11. The National Area Health Education Center Program and Primary Care Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    As part of its mission to increase the availability of primary care providers in rural and other underserved areas of the country, the national Area Health Education Center Program has developed new rural-focused initiatives, including expanded student experiences in underserved areas, rural-track residencies, and telehealth links to rural…

  12. Academic medicine: a key partner in strengthening the primary care infrastructure via teaching health centers.

    PubMed

    Rieselbach, Richard E; Crouse, Byron J; Neuhausen, Katherine; Nasca, Thomas J; Frohna, John G

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, a worsening shortage of primary care physicians, along with structural deficiencies in their training, threaten the primary care system that is essential to ensuring access to high-quality, cost-effective health care. Community health centers (CHCs) are an underused resource that could facilitate rapid expansion of the primary care workforce and simultaneously prepare trainees for 21st-century practice. The Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program, currently funded by the Affordable Care Act, uses CHCs as training sites for primary-care-focused graduate medical education (GME).The authors propose that the goals of the THCGME program could be amplified by fostering partnerships between CHCs and teaching hospitals (academic medical centers [AMCs]). AMCs would encourage their primary care residency programs to expand by establishing teaching health center (THC) tracks. Modifications to the current THCGME model, facilitated by formal CHC and academic medicine partnerships (CHAMPs), would address the primary care physician shortage, produce physicians prepared for 21st-century practice, expose trainees to interprofessional education in a multidisciplinary environment, and facilitate the rapid expansion of CHC capacity.To succeed, CHAMP THCs require a comprehensive consortium agreement designed to ensure equity between the community and academic partners; conforming with this agreement will provide the high-quality GME necessary to ensure residency accreditation. CHAMP THCs also require a federal mechanism to ensure stable, long-term funding. CHAMP THCs would develop in select CHCs that desire a partnership with AMCs and have capacity for providing a community-based setting for both GME and health services research. PMID:24128617

  13. Emergence of the Primary Pediatric Stroke Center: impact of the Thrombolysis in Pediatric Stroke (TIPS) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Timothy J; Rivkin, Michael J; Scholz, Kelley; deVeber, Gabrielle; Kirton, Adam; Gill, Joan Cox; Chan, Anthony K; Hovinga, Collin A; Ichord, Rebecca N; Grotta, James; Jordan, Lori C; Benedict, Susan; Friedman, Neil R; Dowling, Michael M; Elbers, Jorina; Torres, Marcela; Sultan, Sally; Cummings, Dana D; Grabowski, Eric; McMillan, Hugh J; Beslow, Lauren A; Amlie-Lefond, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE In adult stroke, the advent of thrombolytic therapy led to the development of Primary Stroke Centers able to diagnose and treat patients with acute stroke rapidly. We describe the development of Primary Pediatric Stroke Centers through preparation of participating centers in the Thrombolysis in Pediatric Stroke (TIPS) Trial. METHODS We collected data from the 17 enrolling TIPS centers regarding the process of becoming an acute pediatric stroke center with capability to diagnose, evaluate and treat pediatric stroke rapidly, including use of thrombolytic therapy. RESULTS Prior to 2004 <25% of TIPS sites had continuous twenty-four hour availability of acute stroke teams, MRI capability, or stroke order sets, despite significant pediatric stroke expertise. Following TIPS preparation, >80% of sites now have these systems in place, and all sites reported increased readiness to treat a child with acute stroke. Use of a 1–10 Likert scale on which 10 represented complete readiness, median center readiness increased from 6.2 prior to site preparation to 8.7 at the time of site activation (P=<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Prior to preparing for TIPS, centers interested in pediatric stroke had not developed systematic strategies to diagnose and treat acute pediatric stroke. TIPS trial preparation has resulted in establishment of pediatric acute stroke centers with clinical and system preparedness for evaluation and care of children with acute stroke, including use of a standardized protocol for evaluation and treatment of acute arterial stroke in children that includes use of intravenous tPA. PMID:24916908

  14. Skeletal development in the African elephant and ossification timing in placental mammals.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Stansfield, Fiona J; Allen, W R Twink; Asher, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    We provide here unique data on elephant skeletal ontogeny. We focus on the sequence of cranial and post-cranial ossification events during growth in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana). Previous analyses on ossification sequences in mammals have focused on monotremes, marsupials, boreoeutherian and xenarthran placentals. Here, we add data on ossification sequences in an afrotherian. We use two different methods to quantify sequence heterochrony: the sequence method and event-paring/Parsimov. Compared with other placentals, elephants show late ossifications of the basicranium, manual and pedal phalanges, and early ossifications of the ischium and metacarpals. Moreover, ossification in elephants starts very early and progresses rapidly. Specifically, the elephant exhibits the same percentage of bones showing an ossification centre at the end of the first third of its gestation period as the mouse and hamster have close to birth. Elephants show a number of features of their ossification patterns that differ from those of other placental mammals. The pattern of the initiation of the ossification evident in the African elephant underscores a possible correlation between the timing of ossification onset and gestation time throughout mammals. PMID:22298853

  15. Differences in the use of spirometry between rural and urban primary care centers in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Martín, Eduardo; Soriano, Joan B; Rubio, Myriam Calle; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate the ability and practice of spirometry, training of technicians, and spirometry features in primary care centers in Spain, evaluating those located in a rural environment against those in urban areas. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 by a telephone survey in 970 primary health care centers in Spain. The centers were divided into rural or urban depending on the catchment population. The survey contacted technicians in charge of spirometry and consisted of 36 questions related to the test that included the following topics: center resources, training doctors and technicians, using the spirometer, bronchodilator test, and the availability of spirometry and maintenance. Results Although the sample size was achieved in both settings, rural centers (RCs) gave a lower response rate than urban centers (UCs). The number of centers without spirometry in rural areas doubled those in the urban areas. Most centers had between one and two spirometers. However, the number of spirometry tests per week was significantly lower in RCs than in UCs (4 [4.1%] vs 6.9 [5.7%], P<0.01). The availability of a specific schedule for conducting spirometries was higher in RCs than in UCs (209 [73.0%] vs 207 [64.2%], P=0.003). RCs were more satisfied with the spirometries (7.8 vs 7.6, P=0.019) and received more training course for interpreting spirometry (41.0% vs 33.2%, P=0.004). The performance of the bronchodilator test showed a homogeneous measure in different ways. The spirometer type and the reference values were unknown to the majority of respondents. Conclusion This study shows the differences between primary care RCs and UCs in Spain in terms of performing spirometry. The findings in the present study can be used to improve the performance of spirometry in these areas. PMID:26316737

  16. Intracochlear Bleeding Enhances Cochlear Fibrosis and Ossification: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Kyeung A.; Lyu, Ah-Ra; Park, Heesung; Choi, Jin Woong; Hur, Gang Min; Park, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intracochlear bleeding during cochleostomy on cochlear inflammatory response and residual hearing in a guinea pig animal model. Auditory brainstem response threshold shifts were greater in blood injected ears (p<0.05). Interleukin-1?, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor-? and nitric oxide synthase 2, cytokines that are related to early stage inflammation, were significantly increased in blood injected ears compared to normal and cochleostomy only ears at 1 day after surgery; with the increased IL-1? being sustained until 3 days after the surgery (p<0.05). Hair cells were more severely damaged in blood injected ears than in cochleostomy only ears. Histopathologic examination revealed more extensive fibrosis and ossification in blood injected ears than cochleostomy only ears. These results show that intracochlear bleeding enhanced cochlear inflammation resulting in increased fibrosis and ossification in an experimental animal model. PMID:26308864

  17. The role of endothelial-mesenchymal transition in heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Medici, Damian; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2012-08-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a process by which bone forms in soft tissues, in response to injury, inflammation, or genetic disease. This usually occurs by initial cartilage formation, followed by endochondral ossification. A rare disease called fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) allows this mechanism to be induced by a combination of genetic mutation and acute inflammatory responses. FOP patients experience progressive HO throughout their lifetime and form an ectopic skeleton. Recent studies on FOP have suggested that heterotopic cartilage and bone is of endothelial origin. Vascular endothelial cells differentiate into skeletal cells through a mesenchymal stem cell intermediate that is generated by endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). Local inflammatory signals and/or other changes in the tissue microenvironment mediate the differentiation of endothelial-derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes and osteoblasts to induce HO. We discuss the current evidence for the endothelial contribution to heterotopic bone formation. PMID:22806925

  18. The role of endothelial-mesenchymal transition in heterotopic ossification

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Damian; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a process by which bone forms in soft tissues, in response to injury, inflammation or genetic disease. This usually occurs by initial cartilage formation, followed by endochondral ossification. A rare disease called Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP) allows this mechanism to be induced by a combination of genetic mutation and acute inflammatory responses. FOP patients experience progressive HO throughout their lifetime and form an ectopic skeleton. Recent studies on FOP have suggested that heterotopic cartilage and bone is of endothelial origin. Vascular endothelial cells differentiate into skeletal cells through a mesenchymal stem cell intermediate that is generated by endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). Local inflammatory signals and/or other changes in the tissue microenvironment mediate the differentiation of endothelial-derived mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes and osteoblasts to induce HO. Here we discuss the current evidence for the endothelial contribution to heterotopic bone formation. PMID:22806925

  19. Discrepancy in Diagnosis of Primary Myelofibrosis between Referral and Tertiary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Cecilia Arana; Jeyakumar, Ghayathri; Medina, Pedro; Cortes, Jorge; Pierce, Sherry; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Kantarjian, Hagop; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is myeloproliferative neoplasm whose diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical and pathology criteria. We evaluated 560 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with PMF upon a referral to our center and evaluated the frequency of and reasons for diagnostic discordance. Discordance in the diagnosis was found in 70 (12.5%) patients. Discordant cases had a significantly lower grade of bone marrow fibrosis (grade 0–1), more likely to be JAK2V617F-mutation negative, and have no peripheral blood blasts, possibly explaining the difficulty in making a proper diagnosis and underscoring the need for a complete evaluation at a tertiary center. PMID:24284333

  20. A Patient-Centered Understanding of the Referral System in Ethiopian Primary Health Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Abrahim, Orit; Linnander, Erika; Mohammed, Halima; Fetene, Netsanet; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary healthcare systems in sub-Saharan Africa have undergone substantial development in an effort to expand access to appropriate facilities through a well-functioning referral system. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current patterns of seeking prior care before arriving at a health center or a hospital as a key aspect of the referral system of the primary health care unit (PHCU) in three regions in Ethiopia. We examined what percentage of patients had either sought prior care or had been referred to the present facility and identified demographic and clinical factors associated with having sought prior care or having been referred. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study using face-to-face interviews in the local language with 796 people (99% response rate) seeking outpatient care in three primary health care units serving approximately 100,000 people each and reflecting regional and ethnic diversity; 53% (N = 418) of the sample was seeking care at hospital outpatient departments, and 47% of the sample was seeking care at health centers (N = 378). We used unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression to identify factors associated with having been referred or sought prior care. Our findings indicated that only 10% of all patients interviewed had been referred to their current place of care. Among those in the hospital population, 14% had been referred; among those in the health center population, only 6% had been referred. Of those who had been referred to the hospital, most (74%) had been referred by a health center. Among those who were referred to the health center, the plurality portion (32%) came from a nearby hospital (most commonly for continued HIV treatment or early childhood vaccinations); only 18% had come from a health post. Among patients who had not been formally referred, an additional 25% in the hospital sample and 10% in the health center sample had accessed some prior source of care for their present health concern. In the adjusted analysis, living a longer distance from the source of care and needing more specialized care were correlated with having sought prior care in the hospital sample. We found no factors significantly associated with having sought prior care in the health center sample. Conclusions The referral system among health facilities in Ethiopia is used by a minority of patients, suggesting that intended connections between health posts, health centers, and hospitals may need strengthening to increase the efficiency of primary care nationally. PMID:26436759

  1. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a clinico-radiological study of 74 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Nose, T; Egashira, T; Enomoto, T; Maki, Y

    1987-01-01

    A clinico-radiological analysis of 74 cases of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament is reported. Eighteen cases (24%) were asymptomatic or only had neck or shoulder pain; 16 cases (22%) showed signs of radiculopathy, and the remaining 40 cases (54%) had myelopathy. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament developed most frequently at C5, and was rare in thoracic and lumbar regions. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament led to stenosis of the spinal canal; more marked stenosis caused clinical myelopathy. The data showed that 30% of stenosis caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament was critical for the production of myelopathy. Images PMID:3104541

  2. Integration of substance use disorder services with primary care: health center surveys and qualitative interviews

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Each year, nearly 20 million Americans with alcohol or illicit drug dependence do not receive treatment. The Affordable Care Act and parity laws are expected to result in increased access to treatment through integration of substance use disorder (SUD) services with primary care. However, relatively little research exists on the integration of SUD services into primary care settings. Our goal was to assess SUD service integration in California primary care settings and to identify the practice and policy facilitators and barriers encountered by providers who have attempted to integrate these services. Methods Primary survey and qualitative interview data were collected from the population of federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) in five California counties known to be engaged in SUD integration efforts was surveyed. From among the organizations that responded to the survey (78% response rate), four were purposively sampled based on their level of integration. Interviews were conducted with management, staff, and patients (n?=?18) from these organizations to collect further qualitative information on the barriers and facilitators of integration. Results Compared to mental health services, there was a trend for SUD services to be less integrated with primary care, and SUD services were rated significantly less effective. The perceived difference in effectiveness appeared to be due to provider training. Policy suggestions included expanding the SUD workforce that can bill Medicaid, allowing same-day billing of two services, facilitating easier reimbursement for medications, developing the workforce, and increasing community SUD specialty care capacity. Conclusions Efforts to integrate SUD services with primary care face significant barriers, many of which arise at the policy level and are addressable. PMID:24679108

  3. Incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 complications among Saudi adult patients at primary health care center

    PubMed Central

    Alsenany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed type 2 diabetes and its role in complications among adult Saudi patients. [Subjects] Patients attending four primary health care centers in Jeddah were enrolled. [Methods] A cross-sectional design study among Saudi patients attending Ministry of Health primary health care centers in Jeddah was selected for use by the Primary Health Care administration. Patients were interviewed with structured questionnaires to determine the presence of diabetes and risk factors using questions about the history of any disease. [Results] Diabetes mellitus was present in 234 subjects during the data collection period (March–June 2014). Mean patient age was 58 years; diabetes prevalence was 42% in males and 58% in females. The mean age for diabetes onset in males and females was 34 and 39 years, respectively. There was a higher incidence of obesity (75%) associated with a sedentary lifestyle (body mass index ?25) in females (N= 96; 40%) compared with males (N= 87; 36%). In this study, >44% of individuals aged 55 or older had severe to uncontrolled diabetes with long-term complications. The age-adjusted incidence of hypertension and coronary heart disease was 38% and 24%, respectively, showing a clear incidence of diabetes associated with cardiovascular disease in Saudi Arabia. [Conclusion] This study found that a multifactorial approach to managing diabetes complication risks is needed. PMID:26180307

  4. Occupational stress among paramedical staff working in primary health care centers in Abha, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoneim, Ismail

    2003-01-01

    Occupational stress among paramedical staff in Primary Health care centers was not extensively studied as in medical or hospital nursing staff. The aim of the present study was to reveal the work characteristics in the PHC centers in Abha city, Saudi Arabia, with its stressful hazardous conditions as perceived by the working paramedical staff. The study revealed that this staff is facing heavy workload with low decision and control latitude. This is the most hazardous condition generating stress among working populations. As most of them are foreigners the language barrier compounds the problem. It was noticed however that most of them enjoy good social support from both colleagues and home members that might play a modifying role alleviating stress. This group of workers needs special care and continuous evaluation of mental stress induced by their working conditions. PMID:17219902

  5. Food insecure families: description of access and barriers to food from one pediatric primary care center.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, Tori L; Beck, Andrew F; Kahn, Robert S; Klein, Melissa D

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence that food insecurity negatively impacts child health, health care providers play little role in addressing the issue. To inform potential primary care interventions, we sought to assess a range of challenges faced by food insecure (FI) families coming to an urban, pediatric primary care setting. A cross-sectional study was performed at a hospital-based, urban, academic pediatric primary care clinic that serves as a medical home for approximately 15,000 patients with 35,000 annual visits. Subjects included a convenience sample of caregivers of children presenting for either well child or ill care over a 4 months period in 2012. A self-administered survey assessed household food security status, shopping habits, transportation access, budgeting priorities, and perceptions about nutrition access in one's community. Bivariate analyses between food security status and these characteristics were performed using Chi square statistics or Fisher's exact test. The survey was completed by 199 caregivers. Approximately 33% of families were FI; 93% received food-related governmental assistance. FI families were more likely to obtain food from a corner/convenience store, utilize food banks, require transportation other than a household car, and prioritize paying bills before purchasing food. FI families perceived less access to healthy, affordable foods within their community. Thus, FI families may face unique barriers to accessing food. Knowledge of these barriers could allow clinicians to tailor in-clinic screening and create family-centered interventions. PMID:23852328

  6. Luxury Primary Care, Academic Medical Centers, and the Erosion of Science and Professional Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed. PMID:14748866

  7. Luxury primary care, academic medical centers, and the erosion of science and professional ethics.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed. PMID:14748866

  8. Designing Excellence and Quality Model for Training Centers of Primary Health Care: A Delphi Method Study

    PubMed Central

    TABRIZI, Jafar-Sadegh; FARAHBAKHSH, Mostafa; SHAHGOLI, Javad; RAHBAR, Mohammad Reza; NAGHAVI-BEHZAD, Mohammad; AHADI, Hamid-Reza; AZAMI-AGHDASH, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Excellence and quality models are comprehensive methods for improving the quality of healthcare. The aim of this study was to design excellence and quality model for training centers of primary health care using Delphi method. Methods: In this study, Delphi method was used. First, comprehensive information were collected using literature review. In extracted references, 39 models were identified from 34 countries and related sub-criteria and standards were extracted from 34 models (from primary 39 models). Then primary pattern including 8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards was developed as a Delphi questionnaire and evaluated in four stages by 9 specialists of health care system in Tabriz and 50 specialists from all around the country. Results: Designed primary model (8 criteria, 55 sub-criteria, and 236 standards) were concluded with 8 criteria, 45 sub-criteria, and 192 standards after 4 stages of evaluations by specialists. Major criteria of the model are leadership, strategic and operational planning, resource management, information analysis, human resources management, process management, costumer results, and functional results, where the top score was assigned as 1000 by specialists. Functional results had the maximum score of 195 whereas planning had the minimum score of 60. Furthermore the most and the least sub-criteria was for leadership with 10 sub-criteria and strategic planning with 3 sub-criteria, respectively. Conclusion: The model that introduced in this research has been designed following 34 reference models of the world. This model could provide a proper frame for managers of health system in improving quality. PMID:26576350

  9. Diagnosis and surgery of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament associated with dural ossification in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Guo, Yongfei; Chen, Deyu; Lu, Xuhua; Wang, Xinwei; Tian, Haijun; Yuan, Wen

    2009-10-01

    Direct removal of the ossified mass via anterior approach carries good decompression to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) in the cervical spine. Ossification occasionally involves not only the posterior longitudinal ligament but also the underlying dura mater, which increased the opportunity of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage or neurological damage. The surgeon was required to recognize the dural ossification (DO) and need more cautious manipulation. Hida et al. first described the computed tomography (CT) findings that indicated the association with DO, and suggest the double-layer sign appeared more specific for DO. This study reviewed 138 patients who received anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) for OPLL, and 40 patients were found in the association with DO during anterior procedure. Radiological studies revealed that the patients with severe OPLL (higher occupying rate and larger extent) have increasing opportunity of association with DO. The double-layer sign, as a specific indicator for association with DO was sensitive in the patients with mild OPLL, but less frequent in those with severe OPLL with DO. Two surgical techniques were used for the patients with DO in anterior decompression procedure. When the double-layer sign was observed on CT scans, the OPLL could be separated from DO through a thin layer consisting a nonossified degenerated PLL to avoid CSF leakage. Otherwise, the entire ossified mass including OPLL and DO was removed completely. In this technique, the arachnoid membrane needed to be persevered with the aid of microscope to avoid a large area of membrane defect, resulting in uncontrolled CSF leakage. There was no significant difference in clinical results between the patients with DO and those without DO. Therefore, ACCF is meritorious for the patient with OPLL associated with DO, although more difficult manipulation and higher risk of CSF leakage. PMID:19452175

  10. Identifying the Cellular Mechanisms Leading to Heterotopic Ossification.

    PubMed

    Davies, O G; Grover, L M; Eisenstein, N; Lewis, M P; Liu, Y

    2015-11-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a debilitating condition defined by the de novo development of bone within non-osseous soft tissues, and can be either hereditary or acquired. The hereditary condition, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is rare but life threatening. Acquired HO is more common and results from a severe trauma that produces an environment conducive for the formation of ectopic endochondral bone. Despite continued efforts to identify the cellular and molecular events that lead to HO, the mechanisms of pathogenesis remain elusive. It has been proposed that the formation of ectopic bone requires an osteochondrogenic cell type, the presence of inductive agent(s) and a permissive local environment. To date several lineage-tracing studies have identified potential contributory populations. However, difficulties identifying cells in vivo based on the limitations of phenotypic markers, along with the absence of established in vitro HO models have made the results difficult to interpret. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate current literature within the field in an attempt identify the cellular mechanisms required for ectopic bone formation. The major aim is to collate all current data on cell populations that have been shown to possess an osteochondrogenic potential and identify environmental conditions that may contribute to a permissive local environment. This review outlines the pathology of endochondral ossification, which is important for the development of potential HO therapies and to further our understanding of the mechanisms governing bone formation. PMID:26163233

  11. Experimental model of heterotopic ossification in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, T.G.G.; de Paula, J.B.; Moser, A.D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues adjacent to large joints, resulting in joint mobility deficit. In order to determine which treatment techniques are more appropriate for such condition, experimental models of induced heterotopic bone formation have been proposed using heterologous demineralized bone matrix implants and bone morphogenetic protein and other tissues. The objective of the present experimental study was to identify a reliable protocol to induce HO in Wistar rats, based on autologous bone marrow (BM) implantation, comparing 3 different BM volumes and based on literature evidence of this HO induction model in larger laboratory animals. Twelve male Wistar albino rats weighing 350/390?g were used. The animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction in order to quantify serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP). HO was induced by BM implantation in both quadriceps muscles of these animals, experimental group (EG). Thirty-five days after the induction, another blood sample was collected for ALP determination. The results showed a weight gain in the EG and no significant difference in ALP levels when comparing the periods before and after induction. Qualitative histological analysis confirmed the occurrence of heterotopic ossification in all 12 EG rats. In conclusion, the HO induction model was effective when 0.35?mL autologous BM was applied to the quadriceps of Wistar rats. PMID:22473322

  12. Toward a strategy of patient-centered access to primary care.

    PubMed

    Berry, Leonard L; Beckham, Dan; Dettman, Amy; Mead, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Patient-centered access (PCA) to primary care services is rapidly becoming an imperative for efficiently delivering high-quality health care to patients. To enhance their PCA-related efforts, some medical practices and health systems have begun to use various tactics, including team-based care, satellite clinics, same-day and group appointments, greater use of physician assistants and nurse practitioners, and remote access to health services. However, few organizations are addressing the PCA imperative comprehensively by integrating these various tactics to develop an overall PCA management strategy. Successful integration means taking into account the changing competitive and reimbursement landscape in primary care, conducting an evidence-based assessment of the barriers and benefits of PCA implementation, and attending to the particular needs of the institution engaged in this important effort. This article provides a blueprint for creating a multifaceted but coordinated PCA strategy-one aimed squarely at making patient access a centerpiece of how health care is delivered. The case of a Wisconsin-based health system is used as an illustrative example of how other institutions might begin to conceive their fledgling PCA strategies without proposing it as a one-size-fits-all model. PMID:25199953

  13. Viral Agents of Diarrhea in Young Children in Two Primary Health Centers in Edo State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Imade, Paul Erhunmwunse; Eghafona, Nosakhare Odeh

    2015-01-01

    Enteric viruses have been shown to be responsible for diarrhea among children during their early childhood. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of rotavirus, adenovirus, and norovirus infection in young children with diarrhea in two primary health centers in Edo State, Nigeria. A total of 223 stool specimens were collected from children aged 0–36 months with clinical signs of diarrhea and 59 apparently healthy age-matched children as control. These specimens were investigated for three viral agents using immunochromatographic technique (ICT). The overall results showed that at least one viral agent was detected in 95/223 (42.6%) of the children with diarrhea while the control had none. The prevalence of rotavirus was 28.3%, adenovirus 19.3%, and norovirus 3.6%. There was a significant association between age group and infection (P < 0.0001). Seasonal pattern of enteric viruses was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The overall coinfection rate was 7.6% and rotavirus-adenovirus coinfection had the highest with 5.4%. Rotavirus was the most prevalent viral agent. Coinfections are not uncommon among the population studied. The most commonly associated clinical symptom of viral diarrhea in this study was vomiting. Viral diagnostic tests are advocated for primary health care facilities in this locality. PMID:26064123

  14. A practice-centered intervention to increase screening for domestic violence in primary care practices

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Denise E; Ellis, Shellie D; Weeks, Erin; Palla, Shana L; Lichstein, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background Interventions to change practice patterns among health care professionals have had mixed success. We tested the effectiveness of a practice centered intervention to increase screening for domestic violence in primary care practices. Methods A multifaceted intervention was conducted among primary care practice in North Carolina. All practices designated two individuals to serve as domestic violence resources persons, underwent initial training on screening for domestic violence, and participated in 3 lunch and learn sessions. Within this framework, practices selected the screening instrument, patient educational material, and content best suited for their environment. Effectiveness was evaluated using a pre/post cross-sectional telephone survey of a random selection of female patients from each practice. Results Seventeen practices were recruited and fifteen completed the study. Baseline screening for domestic violence was 16% with a range of 2% to 49%. An absolute increase in screening of 10% was achieved (range of increase 0 to 22%). After controlling for clustering by practice and other patient characteristics, female patients were 79% more likely to have been screened after the intervention (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.43–2.23). Conclusion An intervention that allowed practices to tailor certain aspects to fit their needs increased screening for domestic violence. Further studies testing this technique using other outcomes are needed. PMID:17064413

  15. Evaluating efficiency of training: an application in primary health centers using multiple comparison techniques.

    PubMed

    Tascio?ullari, Bahar; Kiyak, Mithat; Cicek, Isik

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to measure the efficiency of training in the general principles of vaccine applications, the cold chain, and the adverse effects after vaccination for 51 employees (31 midwives and 20 nurses) working at primary health centers in Tuzla Health Group Region via test and retest method. The data collected through measurement of test scores before and after training is analyzed via multiple comparison techniques such as general test scores, the scores of each training, the scores of previously trained subjects, and difference scores. Achievement scores after training were significantly high. Previous training did not reveal significant effects on the results. Having been trained before did not cause permanent influence. PMID:21678141

  16. Quality of Antenatal Care in Primary Health Care Centers of Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Mansur, Ahmed M. S. A.; Rezaul, Karim M.; Mahmudul, Hoque. M.; S, Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find out the quality of ANC in the Upazila Health Complexes (PHC centres) of Bangladesh. Materials and methods: This cross sectional study was done in purposively selected three upazilas among the clients receiving antenatal care (ANC). Data were collected with questionnaire cum checklist in the context of two aspects of quality issues, namely assessment of physical arrangements for ANC (input) and services rendered by the providers (process). Results: The mean age of respondents was 24.6±4.5 years. Majority of the respondents were with primary level education (60.3%). About half (52.8%) of the families had monthly income ranging from 3000-5000 taka (38-64 US$). Nearly half (48.9%) had no child, little more than one third (42.3%) were primigravida and 528 (57.7%) were multigravida. Out of 528 multigravid respondents 360 (68.2%) took ANC in their previous pregnancy whereas 168 (31.8%) did not take ANC Pregnancy outcome was found to be associated with receiving ANC (?2=73.599; p=0.000). Respondents receiving ANC had more good pregnancy outcome. The mean waiting time for receiving ANC was 0.77±.49 hours. Out of the 13 centers, only 3 (23.1%) have sufficient instruments to render ANC services. Findings showed that where the modes of ANC service delivery in the ANC centers are fairly satisfactory. Though some of the points of standard operation procedures (SOPs) on ANC are not covered by some ANC centers, those were not considered necessary. But, regarding the physical facilities available for rendering ANC services, it is seen that facilities are not quite satisfactory. Number of doctors and nurses are not very satisfactory. One of the centers under this study has no doctor, where ANC services are given by nurses. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the ANC services at the primary health care level is not adequate in Bangladesh. To ensure further improvement of the quality of ANC services, instruments used in logistics and supplies should be enhanced. PMID:25530770

  17. Patients’ Satisfaction with Primary Health Care Centers’ Services, Majmaah, Kingdom of Saudi of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Elsadig Yousif; Sami, Waqas; Alotaibi, Abdullah; Alfarag, Abdulrahman; Almutairi, Ahmed; Alanzi, Fahad

    2015-01-01

    Background PHC Patient’ satisfaction represents a key marker for the quality of health care delivery and this internationally accepted factor needs to be studied repeatedly for smooth functioning of the health care systems. The objectives of the current study were to determine the level of patients’ satisfaction with the primary health care services provided in Majmaah city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; to identify the reasons behind satisfaction or dissatisfaction and to determine the effect of the social factors on the level of satisfaction. Methodology The study was a cross-sectional facility- based. The sample comprised 370 patients selected by stratified and systematic sampling at the health centers’ level and the patients’ level respectively. The data were collected by a pre-tested questionnaire and analyzed by SPSS software. Results Patients’ level of satisfaction was 82%. The reasons behind satisfaction were cleanliness of the facilities and technical competencies of the staff (33.1% and 24.2%). The study showed that the most stated reason behind dissatisfaction was the unsuitable buildings (29%). Significant association was found between the level of patients’ satisfaction about PHC centers services and the respondents’ level of education. Conclusion The level of satisfaction with the services provided by PHC centers in Majmaah is high. The gender, marital status and income have no effect on the level of satisfaction with the services provided by PHC centers. However, the lower educated are more satisfied than the higher educated. Cleanliness, competence of the staff along with respect and good handling are the drivers behind the high level of satisfaction. PMID:26309435

  18. Acquired heterotopic ossification in hips and knees following encephalitis: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a rare and potentially detrimental complication of soft-tissue trauma, amputations, central nervous system injury (traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord lesions, tumors, encephalitis), vasculopathies, arthroplasties and burn injury, characterized by lamellar bone growth in non-osseous tissues such as the muscle and the joint capsule. Heterotopic ossification associated with encephalitis is rare and the occurrence of excessive, symptomatic heterotopic ossification around bilateral hips and bilateral knees is rarely described in the literature. Case presentation We present a 47-year-old man with heterotopic ossification in the bilateral hips and bilateral knees that prevented him from walking after being attacked by encephalitis as the case study. He developed severe pain and significantly impaired range of motion of bilateral hips and bilateral knees. Research so far revealed that the management of heterotopic ossification is controversial. After requiring revision surgery resection of heterotopic ossification, reconstruction of the medial collateral ligament and adjunctive pharmacotherapy of 200 mg Celecoxib for 8 weeks after operation, he regained mobility of his joints. On review of X-ray, there was no recurrence of HO and no loosening of rivets which were used in the reconstruction of medial collateral ligament. Conclusion Heterotopic ossification in the bilateral hip joints and bilateral knee joints associated with encephalitis have never been reported previously. Daily functions of heterotopic ossification patients can be hampered by pain, inflammation, reduced mobility, the loss of normal posture and other complications. Further studies of presumptive root causes, the early diagnosis, preventability and optimal therapeutic measures for heterotopic ossification following encephalitis are required. Different patient should be managed with different appropriated protocol based on the risk of individual patient and the institutional experience. PMID:25280472

  19. Severe soft tissue ossification in a southern right whale Eubalaena australis.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Luciano F; Pozzi, Luciana M; McAloose, Denise; Kaplan, Frederick S; Shore, Eileen M; Kompanje, Erwin J O; Sidor, Inga F; Musmeci, Luciana; Uhart, Marcela M

    2012-12-27

    The carcass of a stranded southern right whale Eubalaena australis, discovered on the coast of Golfo Nuevo in Península Valdés, Argentina, exhibited extensive orthotopic and heterotopic ossification, osteochondroma-like lesions, and early degenerative joint disease. Extensive soft tissue ossification led to ankylosis of the axial skeleton in a pattern that, in many respects, appeared more similar to a disabling human genetic disorder, fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), than to more common skeletal system diseases in cetaceans and other species. This is the first reported case of a FOP-like condition in a marine mammal and raises important questions about conserved mechanisms of orthotopic and heterotopic ossification in this clade. PMID:23269389

  20. Heterotopic ossification of the elbows in a major petrol burn

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Shahriar Raj

    2012-01-01

    A case of a young man who developed heterotopic ossification (HO) in his elbows following an accident where he sustained petrol burns to over 60% of his body. His injuries necessitated intubation, escharotomies and a protracted intensive care unit stay that was complicated by septicaemia. Several weeks after the injury, he was diagnosed with HO in his right elbow, followed by the left elbow a week later. He was commenced on an non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, a long-term course of a bisphosphonate and regular physiotherapy. He is now waiting for the HO bone to mature before having definitive excision of his lesions in 12-18 months time. PMID:22927269

  1. Heterotopic ossification of the elbows in a major petrol burn.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Shahriar Raj

    2012-01-01

    A case of a young man who developed heterotopic ossification (HO) in his elbows following an accident where he sustained petrol burns to over 60% of his body. His injuries necessitated intubation, escharotomies and a protracted intensive care unit stay that was complicated by septicaemia. Several weeks after the injury, he was diagnosed with HO in his right elbow, followed by the left elbow a week later. He was commenced on an non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, a long-term course of a bisphosphonate and regular physiotherapy. He is now waiting for the HO bone to mature before having definitive excision of his lesions in 12-18 months time. PMID:22927269

  2. Difficulties faced by family physicians in primary health care centers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mumenah, Sahar H.; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the difficulties faced by family physicians, and compare how satisfied those working with the Ministry of Health (MOH) are with their counterparts who work at some selected non-MOH hospitals. Methods: An analytical, cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center (KFSH and RC), and 40 MOH primary health care centers across Jeddah. A structured multi-item questionnaire was used to collect demographic data and information on the difficulties family physicians face. The physicians’ level of satisfaction and how it was affected by the difficulties was assessed. Results: Women constituted 71.9% of the sample. Problems with transportation formed one of the main difficulties encountered by physicians. Compared to non-MOH physician, a significantly higher proportion of MOH physicians reported unavailability of radiology technicians (P = 0.011) and radiologists (P < 0.001), absence of the internet and computer access (P < 0.001), unavailability of laboratory services (P = 0.004), reagents (P = 0.001), X-ray equipment (P = 0.027), ultrasound equipment (P < 0.001), an electronic medical records system (P < 0.001), insufficient laboratory tests (P = 0.0001), and poor building maintenance (P < 0.001). Family physicians with the MOH were less satisfied with their jobs compared with non-MOH physicians (P = 0.032). Conclusion: MOH family physicians encountered difficulties relating to staff, services, and infrastructure, which consequently affected their level of satisfaction. PMID:26392794

  3. Lifestyle and Dietary Behaviors among Saudi Preschool Children Attending Primary Health Care Centers, Eastern Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Magdy A; Al-Saif, Ghadeer; Albahrani, Suha; Sabra, Amr A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study life styles and dietary behaviors among Saudi preschool children (1-5 years) attending primary health care centers (PHCCs) in Dammam and Qatif areas, eastern province, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. Data were collected using structured, interviewer-filled questionnaire. Children and their mothers were encountered during their well-baby clinic visits. A total number of 300 preschool children and their mothers were interviewed during study period. Results. Unsatisfactory areas include smoking fathers (32%), smoking in front of children (11.3%), overweight and obesity among mothers (60.3%), noncompliance using seat belts for both parents (56.3%) and children (68%), children watching television (T.V) more than 2 hours (50%), adherence to exclusive breast feeding (only 20.7%), and late solid food introduction (65.3%). Frequent intake of unhealthy food items was 26%, 25%, and 24% for pizza, burger, and soft drinks. Unfortunately frequent intake of the following unhealthy food items was high: biscuits, deserts/chocolates, and chips which was 78%, 67%, and 72%, respectively. Conclusion. This study provides benchmark about the current situation. It provides health care workers and decision makers with important information that may help to improve health services. PMID:25114804

  4. Lifestyle and Dietary Behaviors among Saudi Preschool Children Attending Primary Health Care Centers, Eastern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Darwish, Magdy A.; Al-Saif, Ghadeer; Albahrani, Suha; Sabra, Amr A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study life styles and dietary behaviors among Saudi preschool children (1–5 years) attending primary health care centers (PHCCs) in Dammam and Qatif areas, eastern province, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. Data were collected using structured, interviewer-filled questionnaire. Children and their mothers were encountered during their well-baby clinic visits. A total number of 300 preschool children and their mothers were interviewed during study period. Results. Unsatisfactory areas include smoking fathers (32%), smoking in front of children (11.3%), overweight and obesity among mothers (60.3%), noncompliance using seat belts for both parents (56.3%) and children (68%), children watching television (T.V) more than 2 hours (50%), adherence to exclusive breast feeding (only 20.7%), and late solid food introduction (65.3%). Frequent intake of unhealthy food items was 26%, 25%, and 24% for pizza, burger, and soft drinks. Unfortunately frequent intake of the following unhealthy food items was high: biscuits, deserts/chocolates, and chips which was 78%, 67%, and 72%, respectively. Conclusion. This study provides benchmark about the current situation. It provides health care workers and decision makers with important information that may help to improve health services. PMID:25114804

  5. Fulminant heterotopic ossification after combat-related amputation: a report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Dolomisiewicz, Edward A; Miller, Matthew E; Potter, Benjamin K

    2014-03-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the process of abnormal formation of lamellar bone in nonosseous tissues. In this case presentation, we describe patients with aggressive HO, which becomes symptomatic shortly after injury for which we have suggested the term "fulminant heterotopic ossification." These atypical presentations of fulminant HO highlight the necessity for continued research directed at improved understanding of HO and may suggest a role for early partial surgical excision as a definitive management strategy. PMID:24374089

  6. Characterization of Heterotopic Ossification Using Radiographic Imaging: Evidence for a Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Brownley, R. Cameron; Agarwal, Shailesh; Loder, Shawn; Eboda, Oluwatobi; Li, John; Peterson, Joshua; Hwang, Charles; Breuler, Christopher; Kaartinen, Vesa; Zhou, Bin; Mishina, Yuji; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the growth of extra-skeletal bone which occurs following trauma, burns, and in patients with genetic bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor mutations. The clinical and laboratory evaluation of HO is dependent on radiographic imaging to identify and characterize these lesions. Here we show that despite its inadequacies, plain film radiography and single modality microCT continue to serve as a primary method of HO imaging in nearly 30% of published in vivo literature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that detailed microCT analysis is superior to plain film and single modality microCT radiography specifically in the evaluation of HO formed through three representative models due to its ability to 1) define structural relationships between growing extra-skeletal bone and normal, anatomic bone, 2) provide accurate quantification and growth rate based on volume of the space-occupying lesion, thereby facilitating assessments of therapeutic intervention, 3) identify HO at earlier times allowing for evaluation of early intervention, and 4) characterization of metrics of bone physiology including porosity, tissue mineral density, and cortical and trabecular volume. Examination of our trauma model using microCT demonstrated two separate areas of HO based on anatomic location and relationship with surrounding, normal bone structures. Additionally, microCT allows HO growth rate to be evaluated to characterize HO progression. Taken together, these data demonstrate the need for a paradigm shift in the evaluation of HO towards microCT as a standard tool for imaging. PMID:26544555

  7. Different ossification patterns of intermuscular bones in fish with different swimming modes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenjie; Lv, Yaoping; Gong, Xiaoling; Wu, Jiaming; Bao, Baolong

    2015-01-01

    Intermuscular bones are found in the myosepta in teleosts. However, there is very little information on the development and ossification of these intermuscular bones. In this study, we performed an in-depth investigation of the ossification process during development in zebrafish (Danio rerio) and Japanese eel (Anguilla japonica). In Japanese eel, a typical anguilliform swimmer, the intermuscular bones ossified predominantly from the anterior to the posterior. By contrast, in the zebrafish, a sub-carangiform or carangiform swimmer, the intermuscular bones ossified predominantly from the posterior to the anterior regions of the fish. Furthermore, tail amputation affected the ossification of the intermuscular bones. The length of the intermuscular bones in the posterior area became significantly shorter in tail-amputated zebrafish and Japanese eels, and both had less active and lower swimming speeds; this indicates that swimming might induce the ossification of the intermuscular bones. Moreover, when a greater length of tail was amputated in the zebrafish, the intermuscular bones became even shorter. Tail amputation affected the length and ossification of intermuscular bones in the anterior part of the fish, close to the head, differently between the two fish: they became significantly shorter in the zebrafish, but did not in the Japanese eel. This might be because tail amputation did not significantly affect the undulations in the anterior of the Japanese eel, especially near the head. This study shows that the ossification of intermuscular bones might be induced through mechanical force loadings that are produced by swimming. PMID:26603470

  8. Primary Care and Public Health Activities in Select US Health Centers: Documenting Successes, Barriers, and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Leiyu; Chowdhury, Joya; Sripipatana, Alek; Zhu, Jinsheng; Sharma, Ravi; Hayashi, A. Seiji; Daly, Charles A.; Tomoyasu, Naomi; Nair, Suma; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We examined primary care and public health activities among federally funded health centers, to better understand their successes, the barriers encountered, and the lessons learned. Methods. We used qualitative and quantitative methods to collect data from 9 health centers, stratified by administrative division, urban–rural location, and race/ethnicity of patients served. Descriptive data on patient and institutional characteristics came from the Uniform Data System, which collects data from all health centers annually. We administered questionnaires and conducted phone interviews with key informants. Results. Health centers performed well on primary care coordination and community orientation scales and reported conducting many essential public health activities. We identified specific needs for integrating primary care and public health: (1) more funding for collaborations and for addressing the social determinants of health, (2) strong leadership to champion collaborations, (3) trust building among partners, with shared missions and clear expectations of responsibilities, and (4) alignment and standardization of data collection, analysis, and exchange. Conclusions. Lessons learned from health centers should inform strategies to better integrate public health with primary care. PMID:22690975

  9. Burn Injury Enhances Bone Formation in Heterotopic Ossification Model

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jonathan R.; De La Rosa, Sara; Sun, Hongli; Eboda, Oluwatobi; Cilwa, Katherine E.; Donneys, Alexis; Morris, Michael; Buchman, Steven R.; Cederna, Paul S.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Wang, Stewart C.; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the pro-osteogenic effect of burn injury on heterotopic bone formation using a novel burn ossicle in vivo model. Background Heterotopic ossification (HO), or the abnormal formation of bone in soft tissue, is a troubling sequela of burn and trauma injuries. The exact mechanism by which burn injury influences bone formation is unknown. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model to study the effect of burn injury on heterotopic bone formation. We hypothesized that burn injury would enhance early vascularization and subsequent bone formation of subcutaneously implanted mesenchymal stem cells. Methods Mouse adipose-derived stem cells were harvested from C57/BL6 mice, transfected with a BMP-2 adenovirus, seeded on collagen scaffolds (ossicles), and implanted subcutaneously in the flank region of 8 adult mice. Burn and sham groups were created with exposure of 30% surface area on the dorsum to 60°C water or 30°C water for 18 seconds, respectively (n = 4/group). Heterotopic bone volume was analyzed in vivo by micro-computed tomography for 3 months. Histological analysis of vasculogenesis was performed with platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule staining. Osteogenic histological analysis was performed by Safranin O, Picrosirius red, and aniline blue staining. Qualitative analysis of heterotopic bone composition was completed with ex vivo Raman spectroscopy. Results Subcutaneously implanted ossicles formed heterotopic bone. Ossicles from mice with burn injuries developed significantly more bone than sham control mice, analyzed by micro-computed tomography at 1, 2, and 3 months (P < 0.05), and had enhanced early and late endochondral ossification as demonstrated by Safranin O, Picrosirius red, and aniline blue staining. In addition, burn injury enhanced vascularization of the ossicles (P < 0.05). All ossicles demonstrated chemical composition characteristic of bone as demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy. Conclusions Burn injury increases the predilection to osteogenic differentiation of ectopically implanted ossicles. Early differences in vascularity correlated with later bone development. Understanding the role of burn injury on heterotopic bone formation is an important first step toward the development of treatment strategies aimed to prevent unwanted and detrimental heterotopic bone formation. PMID:23673767

  10. Object-centered shifts of receptive field positions in monkey primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Amy. M.; Murray, Scott. O.; Horwitz, Gregory. D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Stimuli that project the same retinal visual angle can appear to occupy very different proportions of the visual field if they are perceived to be at different distances (Fig. 1A) [1–8]. Previous research shows that perceived angular size alters the spatial distribution of activity in early retinotopic visual cortex [7, 9–11]. For example, a sphere superimposed on the far end of a corridor scene appears to occupy a larger visual angle and activates a larger region of primary visual cortex (V1) compared with the same sphere superimposed on the near end of the corridor [7]. These previous results, however, were obtained from human subjects using psychophysics and fMRI, a fact that fundamentally limits our understanding of the underlying neuronal mechanisms. Here we present an animal model that allows for a finer examination of size perception at the level of single neurons. We first show that macaque monkeys perceive a size-distance illusion similarly to humans. Then, using extracellular recordings, we test the specific hypothesis [12] that neurons in V1 shift the position of their receptive fields (RFs) in response to complex, monocular depth cues. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that when ring-shaped stimuli appeared at the back of the corridor, RFs of V1 neurons shifted towards the center of the rings. When the same stimuli appeared at the front of the corridor, RFs shifted outward. Thus, our results show for the first time that V1 RFs can shift, potentially serving as the neural basis for the perception of angular size. PMID:25017208

  11. Assessment of medical waste management at a primary health-care center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, A.M.M.; Guenther, W.M.R.

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of medical waste management at health-care center before/after intervention. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Qualitative and quantitative results of medical waste management plan are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adjustments to comply with regulation were adopted and reduction of waste was observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method applied could be useful for similar establishments. - Abstract: According to the Brazilian law, implementation of a Medical Waste Management Plan (MWMP) in health-care units is mandatory, but as far as we know evaluation of such implementation has not taken place yet. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the improvements deriving from the implementation of a MWMP in a Primary Health-care Center (PHC) located in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The method proposed for evaluation compares the first situation prevailing at this PHC with the situation 1 year after implementation of the MWMP, thus allowing verification of the evolution of the PHC performance. For prior and post-diagnosis, the method was based on: (1) application of a tool (check list) which considered all legal requirements in force; (2) quantification of solid waste subdivided into three categories: infectious waste and sharp devices, recyclable materials and non-recyclable waste; and (3) identification of non-conformity practices. Lack of knowledge on the pertinent legislation by health workers has contributed to non-conformity instances. The legal requirements in force in Brazil today gave origin to a tool (check list) which was utilized in the management of medical waste at the health-care unit studied. This tool resulted into an adequate and simple instrument, required a low investment, allowed collecting data to feed indicators and also conquered the participation of the unit whole staff. Several non-conformities identified in the first diagnosis could be corrected by the instrument utilized. Total waste generation increased 9.8%, but it was possible to reduce the volume of non-recyclable materials (11%) and increase the volume of recyclable materials (4%). It was also possible to segregate organic waste (7%), which was forwarded for production of compost. The rate of infectious waste generation in critical areas decreased from 0.021 to 0.018 kg/procedure. Many improvements have been observed, and now the PHC complies with most of legal requirements, offers periodic training and better biosafety conditions to workers, has reduced the volume of waste sent to sanitary landfills, and has introduced indicators for monitoring its own performance. This evaluation method might subsidize the creation and evaluation of medical waste management plans in similar heath institutions.

  12. Evaluation of the cellular origins of heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Kan, Lixin; Kessler, John A

    2014-05-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO), acquired or hereditary, is featured by the formation of bone outside of the normal skeleton. Typical acquired HO is a common, debilitating condition associated with traumatic events. Cardiovascular calcification, an atypical form of acquired HO, is prevalent and associated with high rates of cardiovascular mortality. Hereditary HO syndromes, such as fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva and progressive osseous heteroplasia, are rare, progressive, life-threatening disorders. The cellular origins of HO remain elusive. Some bona fide contributing cell populations have been found through genetic lineage tracing and other experiments in vivo, and various other candidate populations have been proposed. Nevertheless, because of the difficulties in establishing cellular phenotypes in vivo and other confounding factors, the true identities of these populations are still uncertain. This review critically evaluates the accumulating data in the field. The major focus is on the candidate populations that may give rise to osteochondrogenic lineage cells directly, not the populations that may contribute to HO indirectly. This issue is important not solely because of the clinical implications, but also because it highlights the basic biological processes that govern bone formation. PMID:24810815

  13. Prospective heterotopic ossification progenitors in adult human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Downey, Jennifer; Lauzier, Dominique; Kloen, Peter; Klarskov, Klaus; Richter, Martin; Hamdy, Reggie; Faucheux, Nathalie; Scimè, Anthony; Balg, Frédéric; Grenier, Guillaume

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle has strong regenerative capabilities. However, failed regeneration can lead to complications where aberrant tissue forms as is the case with heterotopic ossification (HO), in which chondrocytes, osteoblasts and white and brown adipocytes can arise following severe trauma. In humans, the various HO cell types likely originate from multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in skeletal muscle, which have not been identified in humans until now. In the present study, adherent cells from freshly digested skeletal muscle tissue were expanded in defined culture medium and were FACS-enriched for the CD73(+)CD105(+)CD90(-) population, which displayed robust multilineage potential. Clonal differentiation assays confirmed that all three lineages originated from a single multipotent progenitor. In addition to differentiating into typical HO lineages, human muscle resident MSCs (hmrMSCs) also differentiated into brown adipocytes expressing uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). Characterizing this novel multipotent hmrMSC population with a brown adipocyte differentiation capacity has enhanced our understanding of the contribution of non-myogenic progenitor cells to regeneration and aberrant tissue formation in human skeletal muscle. PMID:25445454

  14. Treatment of heterotopic ossification through remote ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jonathan R.; De La Rosa, Sara; Eboda, Oluwatobi; Cilwa, Katherine E.; Agarwal, Shailesh; Buchman, Steven R.; Cederna, Paul S.; Xi, Chuanwu; Morris, Michael D.; Herndon, David N.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Wang, Stewart C.; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the pathologic development of ectopic bone in soft tissues because of a local or systemic inflammatory insult, such as burn injury or trauma. In HO, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are inappropriately activated to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Through the correlation of in vitro assays and in vivo studies (dorsal scald burn with Achilles tenotomy), we have shown that burn injury enhances the osteogenic potential of MSCs and causes ectopic endochondral heterotopic bone formation and functional contractures through bone morphogenetic protein–mediated canonical SMAD signaling. We further demonstrated a prevention strategy for HO through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis at the burn site using apyrase. Burn site apyrase treatment decreased ATP, increased adenosine 3?,5?-monophosphate, and decreased phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 in MSCs in vitro. This ATP hydrolysis also decreased HO formation and mitigated functional impairment in vivo. Similarly, selective inhibition of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation with LDN-193189 decreased HO formation and increased range of motion at the injury site in our burn model in vivo. Our results suggest that burn injury–exacerbated HO formation can be treated through therapeutics that target burn site ATP hydrolysis and modulation of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation. PMID:25253675

  15. Direct Mouse Trauma/Burn Model of Heterotopic Ossification.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jonathan R; Agarwal, Shailesh; Brownley, R Cameron; Loder, Shawn J; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Cederna, Paul S; Mishina, Yuji; Wang, Stewart C; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the formation of bone outside of the skeleton which forms following major trauma, burn injuries, and orthopaedic surgical procedures. The majority of animal models used to study HO rely on the application of exogenous substances, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), exogenous cell constructs, or genetic mutations in BMP signaling. While these models are useful they do not accurately reproduce the inflammatory states that cause the majority of cases of HO. Here we describe a burn/tenotomy model in mice that reliably produces focused HO. This protocol involves creating a 30% total body surface area partial thickness contact burn on the dorsal skin as well as division of the Achilles tendon at its midpoint. Relying solely on traumatic injury to induce HO at a predictable location allows for time-course study of endochondral heterotopic bone formation from intrinsic physiologic processes and environment only. This method could prove instrumental in understanding the inflammatory and osteogenic pathways involved in trauma-induced HO. Furthermore, because HO develops in a predictable location and time-course in this model, it allows for research to improve early imaging strategies and treatment modalities to prevent HO formation. PMID:26274052

  16. Treatment of heterotopic ossification through remote ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jonathan R; De La Rosa, Sara; Eboda, Oluwatobi; Cilwa, Katherine E; Agarwal, Shailesh; Buchman, Steven R; Cederna, Paul S; Xi, Chuanwu; Morris, Michael D; Herndon, David N; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G; Krebsbach, Paul H; Wang, Stewart C; Levi, Benjamin

    2014-09-24

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the pathologic development of ectopic bone in soft tissues because of a local or systemic inflammatory insult, such as burn injury or trauma. In HO, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are inappropriately activated to undergo osteogenic differentiation. Through the correlation of in vitro assays and in vivo studies (dorsal scald burn with Achilles tenotomy), we have shown that burn injury enhances the osteogenic potential of MSCs and causes ectopic endochondral heterotopic bone formation and functional contractures through bone morphogenetic protein-mediated canonical SMAD signaling. We further demonstrated a prevention strategy for HO through adenosine triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis at the burn site using apyrase. Burn site apyrase treatment decreased ATP, increased adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, and decreased phosphorylation of SMAD1/5/8 in MSCs in vitro. This ATP hydrolysis also decreased HO formation and mitigated functional impairment in vivo. Similarly, selective inhibition of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation with LDN-193189 decreased HO formation and increased range of motion at the injury site in our burn model in vivo. Our results suggest that burn injury-exacerbated HO formation can be treated through therapeutics that target burn site ATP hydrolysis and modulation of SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation. PMID:25253675

  17. Evolution and functional significance of derived sternal ossification patterns in ornithothoracine birds.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, J K; Zheng, X-T; Sullivan, C; Chuong, C-M; Wang, X-L; Li, A; Wang, Y; Zhang, X-M; Zhou, Z-H

    2015-08-01

    The midline pattern of sternal ossification characteristic of the Cretaceous enantiornithine birds is unique among the Ornithodira, the group containing birds, nonavian dinosaurs and pterosaurs. This has been suggested to indicate that Enantiornithes is not the sister group of Ornithuromorpha, the clade that includes living birds and their close relatives, which would imply rampant convergence in many nonsternal features between enantiornithines and ornithuromorphs. However, detailed comparisons reveal greater similarity between neornithine (i.e. crown group bird) and enantiornithine modes of sternal ossification than previously recognized. Furthermore, a new subadult enantiornithine specimen demonstrates that sternal ossification followed a more typically ornithodiran pattern in basal members of the clade. This new specimen, referable to the Pengornithidae, indicates that the unique ossification pattern observed in other juvenile enantiornithines is derived within Enantiornithes. A similar but clearly distinct pattern appears to have evolved in parallel in the ornithuromorph lineage. The atypical mode of sternal ossification in some derived enantiornithines should be regarded as an autapomorphic condition rather than an indication that enantiornithines are not close relatives of ornithuromorphs. Based on what is known about molecular mechanisms for morphogenesis and the possible selective advantages, the parallel shifts to midline ossification that took place in derived enantiornithines and living neognathous birds appear to have been related to the development of a large ventral keel, which is only present in ornithuromorphs and enantiornithines. Midline ossification can serve to medially reinforce the sternum at a relatively early ontogenetic stage, which would have been especially beneficial during the protracted development of the superprecocial Cretaceous enantiornithines. PMID:26079847

  18. A Comparative Evaluation of Public Health Centers with Private Health Training Centers on Primary Healthcare Parameters in India: a Study by Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Sanjeev; Raghav, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Jai Vir; Davey, Anuradha; Singh, Nirankar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The evaluation of primary healthcare services provided by health training centers of a private medical college has not been studied in comparison with government health facilities in Indian context. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is one such technique of operations research, which can be used on health facilities for identifying efficient operating practices and strategies for relatively efficient or inefficient health centers by calculating their efficiency scores. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out by DEA technique by using basic radial models (constant ratio to scale (CRS)) in linear programming via DEAOS free online Software among four decision making units (DMUs; by comparing efficiency of two private health centers of a private medical college of India with two public health centers) in district Muzaffarnagar of state Uttar Pradesh. The input and output records of all these health facilities (two from private and two from Government); for 6 months duration from 1st Jan 2014 to 1st July 2014 was taken for deciding their efficiency scores. Results: The efficiency scores of primary healthcare services in presence of doctors (100 vs 30%) and presence of health staff (100 vs 92%) were significantly better from government health facilities as compared to private health facilities (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: The evaluation of primary healthcare services delivery by DEA technique reveals that the government health facilities group were more efficient in delivery of primary healthcare services as compared to private training health facilities group, which can be further clarified in by more in-depth studies in future. PMID:26435598

  19. Clinically applicable antianginal agents suppress osteoblastic transformation of myogenic cells and heterotopic ossifications in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ryuichiro; Matsushita, Masaki; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Masuda, Akio; Ito, Mikako; Katagiri, Takenobu; Kawai, Tatsushi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2013-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive heterotopic ossification. FOP is caused by a gain-of-function mutation in ACVR1 encoding the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor, ACVR1/ALK2. The mutant receptor causes upregulation of a transcriptional factor, Id1. No therapy is available to prevent the progressive heterotopic ossification in FOP. In an effort to search for clinically applicable drugs for FOP, we screened 1,040 FDA-approved drugs for suppression of the Id1 promoter activated by the mutant ACVR1/ALK2 in C2C12 cells. We found that that two antianginal agents, fendiline hydrochloride and perhexiline maleate, suppressed the Id1 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. The drugs also suppressed the expression of native Id1 mRNA and alkaline phosphatase in a dose-dependent manner. Perhexiline but not fendiline downregulated phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8 driven by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. We implanted crude BMPs in muscles of ddY mice and fed them fendiline or perhexiline for 30 days. Mice taking perhexiline showed a 38.0 % reduction in the volume of heterotopic ossification compared to controls, whereas mice taking fendiline showed a slight reduction of heterotopic ossification. Fendiline, perhexiline, and their possible derivatives are potentially applicable to clinical practice to prevent devastating heterotopic ossification in FOP. PMID:23011467

  20. Chondrocyte-specific ablation of Osterix leads to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jung-Hoon; Park, Seung-Yoon; Crombrugghe, Benoit de; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional ablation of Osterix (Osx) in chondrocytes leads to skeletal defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osx has an autonomous function in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification. -- Abstract: Osterix (Osx) is an essential transcription factor required for osteoblast differentiation during both intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Endochondral ossification, a process in which bone formation initiates from a cartilage intermediate, is crucial for skeletal development and growth. Osx is expressed in differentiating chondrocytes as well as osteoblasts during mouse development, but its role in chondrocytes has not been well studied. Here, the in vivo function of Osx in chondrocytes was examined in a chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout model using Col2a1-Cre. Chondrocyte-specific Osx deficiency resulted in a weak and bent skeleton which was evident in newborn by radiographic analysis and skeletal preparation. To further understand the skeletal deformity of the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout, histological analysis was performed on developing long bones during embryogenesis. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were expanded, the formation of bone trabeculae and marrow cavities was remarkably delayed, and subsequent skeletal growth was reduced. The expression of several chondrocyte differentiation markers was reduced, indicating the impairment of chondrocyte differentiation and endochondral ossification in the chondrocyte-specific Osx conditional knockout. Taken together, Osx regulates chondrocyte differentiation and bone growth in growth plate chondrocytes, suggesting an autonomous function of Osx in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification.

  1. The Impact of Body Mass Index on Heterotopic Ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Waleed Fouad; Packianathan, Satya; Shourbaji, Rania A.; Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew; Khan, Majid A.; Baird, Michael C.; Russell, George; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the impact of different body mass index (BMI) as a surrogate marker for heterotopic ossification (HO) in patients who underwent surgical repair (SR) for displaced acetabular fractures (DAF) followed by radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective study of 395 patients. All patients underwent SR for DAF followed by RT {+-} indomethacin. All patients received postoperative RT, 7 Gy, within 72 h. The patients were separated into four groups based on their BMI: <18.5, 18.5-24.9, 25-29.9, and >30. The end point of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of RT {+-} indomethacin in preventing HO in patients with different BMI. Results: Analysis of BMI showed an increasing incidence of HO with increasing BMI: <18.5, (0%) 0/6 patients; 18.5-24.9 (6%), 6 of 105 patients developed HO; 25-29.9 (19%), 22 of 117; >30 (31%), 51 of 167. Chi-square and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the correlation between odds of HO and BMI is significant, p < 0.0001. As the BMI increased, the risk of HO and Brooker Classes 3, 4 HO increased. The risk of developing HO is 1.0 Multiplication-Sign (10%) more likely among those with higher BMI compared with those with lower BMI. For a one-unit increase in BMI the log odds of HO increases by 1.0, 95% CI (1.06-1.14). Chi-square test shows no significant difference among all other factors and HO (e.g., indomethacin, race, gender). Conclusions: Despite similar surgical treatment and prophylactic measures (RT {+-} indomethacin), the risk of HO appears to significantly increase in patients with higher BMI after DAF. Higher single-fraction doses or multiple fractions and/or combination therapy with nonsteroidal inflammatory drugs may be of greater benefit to these patients.

  2. Sensory Nerve Induced Inflammation Contributes to Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Elizabeth; Rodenberg, Eric; Sonnet, Corinne; Hipp, John; Gannon, Francis H.; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Olmsted-Davis, Elizabeth A.; Davis, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO), or bone formation in soft tissues, is often the result of traumatic injury. Much evidence has linked the release of BMPs (bone morphogenetic proteins) upon injury to this process. HO was once thought to be a rare occurrence, but recent statistics from the military suggest that as many as 60% of traumatic injuries, resulting from bomb blasts, have associated HO. In this study, we attempt to define the role of peripheral nerves in this process. Since BMP2 has been shown previously to induce release of the neuroinflammatory molecules, substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), from peripheral, sensory neurons, we examined this process in vivo. SP and CGRP are rapidly expressed upon delivery of BMP2 and remain elevated throughout bone formation. In animals lacking functional sensory neurons (TRPV1?/?), BMP2-mediated increases in SP and CGRP were suppressed as compared to the normal animals, and HO was dramatically inhibited in these deficient mice, suggesting that neuroinflammation plays a functional role. Mast cells, known to be recruited by SP and CGRP, were elevated after BMP2 induction. These mast cells were localized to the nerve structures and underwent degranulation. When degranulation was inhibited using cromolyn, HO was again reduced significantly. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed nerves expressing the stem cell markers nanog and Klf4, as well as the osteoblast marker osterix, after BMP2 induction, in mice treated with cromolyn. The data collectively suggest that BMP2 can act directly on sensory neurons to induce neurogenic inflammation, resulting in nerve remodeling and the migration/release of osteogenic and other stem cells from the nerve. Further, blocking this process significantly reduces HO, suggesting that the stem cell population contributes to bone formation. PMID:21678472

  3. Figure Facts: Encouraging Undergraduates to Take a Data-Centered Approach to Reading Primary Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Round, Jennifer E.; Campbell, A. Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    The ability to interpret experimental data is essential to understanding and participating in the process of scientific discovery. Reading primary research articles can be a frustrating experience for undergraduate biology students because they have very little experience interpreting data. To enhance their data interpretation skills, students…

  4. Postoperative Single-Fraction Radiation for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification of the Elbow

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Clifford G.; Polster, Joshua M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Lyons, Janice A.; Evans, Peter J.; Lawton, Jeffrey N.; Graham, Thomas J.; Suh, John H.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) about the elbow has been described after surgery, trauma, and burns. Even limited deposits can lead to significant functional deficits. Little data exist regarding outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) after elbow surgery. We report here the Cleveland Clinic experience with single-fraction radiation following surgery to the elbow. The primary endpoint was the rate of new HO after RT. Secondary endpoints were range of motion, functional compromise, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to July 2006, 36 patients underwent elbow surgery followed by single-fraction RT. Range of motion data were collected before and during surgery and at last follow-up. Radiographs were reviewed for persistent or new HO. Patient and treatment factors were analyzed for correlation with development of HO or functional compromise. Results: Median follow-up was 8.7 months, median age was 42 years, and 75% of patients were male. Twenty-six (72%) patients had HO prior to surgery. All patients had significant limitations in flexion/extension or pronation/supination at baseline. Thirty-one (86%) patients had prior elbow trauma, and 26 (72%) patients had prior surgery. RT was administered a median of 1 day postoperatively (range, 1-4 days). Thirty-four patients received 700 cGy, and 2 patients received 600 cGy. Three (8%) patients developed new HO after RT. All patients had improvement in range of motion from baseline. No patient or treatment factors were significantly associated with the development of HO or functional compromise. Conclusions: Single-fraction RT after surgery to the elbow is associated with favorable functional and radiographic outcomes.

  5. Lincoln County Primary Care Center Is a Model for Good Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casto, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a rural West Virginia health-care center as a successful model program for integration between the clinic and community. Describes center facilities, funding sources, community cooperation, and cooperative residency program with regional medical school. Discusses implications for other medical-education programs. Describes differences…

  6. Centralized care management support for "high utilizers" in primary care practices at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brent C; Paik, Jamie L; Haley, Laura L; Grammatico, Gina M

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence of effectiveness is limited, care management based outside primary care practices or hospitals is receiving increased attention. The University of Michigan (UM) Complex Care Management Program (CCMP) provides care management for uninsured and underinsured, high-utilizing patients in multiple primary care practices. To inform development of optimal care management models, we describe the CCMP model and characteristics and health care utilization patterns of its patients. Of a consecutive series of 49 patients enrolled at CCMP in 2011, the mean (SD) age was 48 (+/- 14); 23 (47%) were women; and 29 (59%) were White. Twenty-eight (57%) had two or more chronic medical conditions, 39 (80%) had one or more psychiatric condition, 28 (57%) had a substance abuse disorder, and 11 (22%) were homeless. Through phone, e-mail, and face-to-face contact with patients and primary care providers (PCPs), care managers coordinated health and social services and facilitated access to medical and mental health care. Patients had a mean (SD) number of hospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits in 6 months prior to enrollment of2.2 (2.5) and 4.2 (4.3), respectively, with a nonstatistically significant decrease in hospitalizations, hospital days, and emergency room visits in 6 months following enrollment in CCMP. Centralized care management support for primary care practices engages high-utilizing patients with complex medical and behavioral conditions in care management that would be difficult to provide through individual practices and may decrease health care utilization by these patients. PMID:24761538

  7. Ossification in the caudal attachments of the ligamentum flavum: an anatomic and computed tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.M.; Gabrielson, T.O.; Latack, J.T.

    1982-12-01

    A review of anatomic specimens and routine computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest and abdomen demonstrated that ossification in the caudal attachments of the ligamentum flavum is a common anatomic finding, but a much less common CT finding. Its characteristic location should help prevent confusion with other entities. The present study was prompted by a case of thoracic spine trauma, reported here, in which areas of bone density in the spinal canal simulated fracture fragments. The true nature of these bony projections, namely ossification in the ligamentum flavum, was established by computer reconstruction of axial CT images.

  8. Peroxisomes in Different Skeletal Cell Types during Intramembranous and Endochondral Ossification and Their Regulation during Osteoblast Differentiation by Distinct Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Guofeng; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2015-01-01

    Ossification defects leading to craniofacial dysmorphism or rhizomelia are typical phenotypes in patients and corresponding knockout mouse models with distinct peroxisomal disorders. Despite these obvious skeletal pathologies, to date no careful analysis exists on the distribution and function of peroxisomes in skeletal tissues and their alterations during ossification. Therefore, we analyzed the peroxisomal compartment in different cell types of mouse cartilage and bone as well as in primary cultures of calvarial osteoblasts. The peroxisome number and metabolism strongly increased in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification from the reserve to the hypertrophic zone, whereas in bone, metabolically active osteoblasts contained a higher numerical abundance of this organelle than osteocytes. The high abundance of peroxisomes in these skeletal cell types is reflected by high levels of Pex11? gene expression. During culture, calvarial pre-osteoblasts differentiated into secretory osteoblasts accompanied by peroxisome proliferation and increased levels of peroxisomal genes and proteins. Since many peroxisomal genes contain a PPAR-responsive element, we analyzed the gene expression of PPAR?/ß/? in calvarial osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cells, revealing higher levels for PPARß than for PPAR? and PPAR?. Treatment with different PPAR agonists and antagonists not only changed the peroxisomal compartment and associated gene expression, but also induced complex alterations of the gene expression patterns of the other PPAR family members. Studies in M3CT3-E1 cells showed that the PPARß agonist GW0742 activated the PPRE-mediated luciferase expression and up-regulated peroxisomal gene transcription (Pex11, Pex13, Pex14, Acox1 and Cat), whereas the PPARß antagonist GSK0660 led to repression of the PPRE and a decrease of the corresponding mRNA levels. In the same way, treatment of calvarial osteoblasts with GW0742 increased in peroxisome number and related gene expression and accelerated osteoblast differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest that PPARß regulates the numerical abundance and metabolic function of peroxisomes via Pex11ß in parallel to osteoblast differentiation. PMID:26630504

  9. Single-center experience with primary orthotopic liver transplantation with FK 506 immunosuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Todo, S; Fung, J J; Starzl, T E; Tzakis, A; Doyle, H; Abu-Elmagd, K; Jain, A; Selby, R; Bronsther, O; Marsh, W

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The efficacy for primary orthotopic liver transplantation of a new immunosuppressive agent, FK 506 (tacrolimus, Prograf, Fujisawa USA, Deerfield, IL), was determined. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: After 3 years of preclinical research, a clinical trial of FK 506 for orthotopic liver transplantation was begun in February 1989, first as a rescue therapy for patients with intractable rejection with conventional immunosuppression, then as a primary drug. METHODS: Between August 1989 and December 1993, 1391 recipients (1188 adult and 203 pediatric) of primary liver allografts were treated with FK 506 from the outset. Results from these patients were analyzed and compared with those of 1212 historical control patients (971 adult and 241 pediatric) given cyclosporine-based immunosuppression. RESULTS: Actuarial survival at 4 years was 86.2% with FK 506 versus 65.5% with cyclosporine in the pediatric patients (p < 0.0000) and 71.4% versus 65.5% in the adults (p < 0.0005). The need for retransplantation was reduced significantly for FK 506 patients. Four-year graft survival was 77.0% with FK 506 versus 48.4% with cyclosporine in the pediatric patients (p < 0.0000), and 61.9% with FK 506 versus 51.4% with cyclosporine in the adult recipients (p < 0.0000). Regression analysis revealed that reduction in mortality or graft loss from uncontrollable rejection, sepsis, technical failure, and recurrent original liver disease were responsible for the improved results with FK 506 therapy. CONCLUSIONS: FK 506 is a potent and superior immunosuppressive agent for orthotopic liver transplantation. PMID:7522431

  10. Primary Stenting of Subclavian and Innominate Artery Occlusive Disease: A Single Center's Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Brountzos, E. N. Petersen, B.; Binkert, C.; Panagiotou, I.; Kaufman, J. A.

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To review immediate and midterm results of primary stenting for innominate and subclavian artery occlusive lesions. Methods: Retrospective data were collected from 48 consecutive symptomatic patients (27 men and 21 women, median age 64 years) having 49 subclavian and innominate artery lesions treated with stenting. Of the patients 52% had concomitant ischemic heart disease, and 30% had carotid and/or vertebral artery disease. Indication for treatment was vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) in 16.6% of the patients; upper limb ischemia (ULI) in 31.3%; VBI and ULI in 12.5%; transient ischemic attack in 16.7%; angina in 12.5% before or after left internal mammary artery-to-coronary artery bypass grafting; and leg claudication in 10.4% before or after axillofemoral bypass grafting. Balloon-expandable stents were used in 44 lesions and self-expandable stents in 5 lesions. In total, 53 stents were placed in 48 patients. Results: Technical success was 96%, and clinical success 94%. We encountered four complications (two puncture site hematomas, one distal hand embolization and one transient cerebral ischemia). Two patients died within 30 days from other causes, and seven patients were lost to follow-up. Mean follow-up time was 16.7 months (range 0.3 to 68.2). Five patients had recurrent lesions treated by surgical (n = 2) or endovascular (n = 3) means. Cumulative primary patency rate was 91.7% and 77% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Cumulative secondary patency rate was 96.5% and 91.7% at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Conclusion: Stenting of subclavian and innominate artery lesions resulted in immediate resolution of patients' symptoms with durable midterm effect and few complications in a larger patient group with serious comorbid conditions.

  11. Timing of Ossification in Duck, Quail, and Zebra Finch: Intraspecific Variation, Heterochronies, and Life History Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mitgutsch, Christian; Wimmer, Corinne; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.; Hahnloser, Richard; Schneider, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Skeletogenic heterochronies have gained much attention in comparative developmental biology. The temporal appearance of mineralized individual bones in a species – the species ossification sequence – is an excellent marker in this kind of study. Several publications describe interspecific variation, but only very few detail intraspecific variation. In this study, we describe and analyze the temporal order of ossification of skeletal elements in the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, the Japanese quail, Coturnix coturnix japonica, and the White Pekin duck, a domestic race of the mallard Anas platyrhynchos, and explore patterns of intraspecific variation in these events. The overall sequences were found to be conserved. In the duck, variability is present in the relative timing of ossification in the occipital, the basisphenoid and the otic regions of the skull and the phalanges in the postcranium. This variation appears generally in close temporal proximity. Comparison with previously published data shows differences in ossification sequence in the skull, the feet, and the pelvis in the duck, and especially the pelvis in the quail. This clearly documents variability among different breeds. PMID:21728797

  12. Flight tests of a hybrid-centered integrated 3D perspective-view primary flight display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Feyereisen, Thea; Wilson, Blake; Wyatt, Sandy; Engels, Jary

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes flight tests of a Honeywell Synthetic Vision System (SVS) prototype operating in a hybrid-centered mode on a Primus Epic TM large format display. This novel hybrid mode effectively resolves some cognitive and perceptual human factors issues associated with traditional heading-up or track-up display modes. By integrating synthetic 3D perspective view with advanced Head-Up Display (HUD) symbology in this mode, the test results demonstrate that the hybrid display mode provides clear indications of current track and crab conditions, and is effective in overcoming flight guidance symbology collision and resultant ambiguity. The hybrid-centering SVS display concept is shown to be effective in all phases of flight and is particularly valuable during landing operations with a strong cross-wind. The recorded flight test data from Honeywell's prototype SVS concept at Reno, Nevada on board Honeywell Citation V aircraft will be discussed.

  13. Screening, diagnosis, treatment, and management of hepatitis C: a novel, comprehensive, online resource center for primary care providers and specialists.

    PubMed

    Lebovics, Edward; Czobor, Klara

    2014-11-01

    Current initiatives focusing on hepatitis C (HCV) screening and diagnosis, together with the advent of oral interferon (IFN)-free treatment regimens have prompted Elsevier Multimedia Publishing and the American Journal of Medicine (AJM) to develop a novel, comprehensive, online Resource Center dedicated to providing both primary care providers and specialists with the latest information on the screening, diagnosis, treatment, and management of HCV. To date, only 25% of infected patients have been diagnosed and only 5% cured. With the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Prevention Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation of one-time screening for all individuals born between 1945 and 1965, and the availability of safe and effective therapy, it is anticipated that primary care providers and community practices will become increasingly responsible for the screening, diagnosis, and management of infected patients, as well as providing access to care by specialists when needed. The AJM Hepatitis C Resource Center site will have two major channels; one channel tailored to specifically address the needs of internal medicine physicians and other primary care providers, and one channel tailored to address the needs of specialists including hepatologists, gastroenterologists, and infectious disease specialists. Systematic surveys of these clinician audiences are being conducted by Elsevier to assess educational gaps, and ensure that the content of each channel of the Resource Center satisfies the needs of the intended audiences. In a recent Elsevier survey of primary care physicians (PCPs) who had screened and/or participated in the care of patients with HCV within 6 months of participating in the survey, 60% of PCPs stated that they were not very confident or only somewhat confident about screening patients for chronic HCV infection. A recent Elsevier survey of specialists revealed low levels of satisfaction with the treatment options available in 2013, with "no therapy" being selected for up to 38% of patients. This survey also showed that experience with newly-approved options for HCV including IFN-free regimens is currently limited, but the likelihood that a variety of patient types will be treated with these options is high. This provides an impetus for educational opportunities focusing on optimizing treatments for the different HCV genotypes and for patients with comorbidities. Further results of the PCP and specialist surveys will be published on the Resource Center. Each channel of the Resource Center will be comprised of a variety of specific communication elements, which are open to sponsorship, and include roundtable panel discussions, case studies, and direct links to relevant original research, review articles, and guidelines. All Resource Center components are peer-reviewed for publication on the Resource Center by the AJM Editorial Office and the Resource Center Guest Editor, Edward Lebovics, MD. The AJM Hepatitis C Resource Center will be accessible from the AJM online home page (http://www.amjmed.com) and will be launched immediately prior to the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Liver Meeting to be held from November 7 to 11, 2014 in Boston, Massachusetts. PMID:25308624

  14. Solid Waste Processing Center Primary Opening Cells Systems, Equipment and Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Sharon A.; Baker, Carl P.; Mullen, O Dennis; Valdez, Patrick LJ

    2006-04-17

    This document addresses the remote systems and design integration aspects of the development of the Solid Waste Processing Center (SWPC), a facility to remotely open, sort, size reduce, and repackage mixed low-level waste (MLLW) and transuranic (TRU)/TRU mixed waste that is either contact-handled (CH) waste in large containers or remote-handled (RH) waste in various-sized packages.

  15. Endochondral ossification for enhancing bone regeneration: converging native extracellular matrix biomaterials and developmental engineering in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dennis, S Connor; Berkland, Cory J; Bonewald, Lynda F; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-06-01

    Autologous bone grafting (ABG) remains entrenched as the gold standard of treatment in bone regenerative surgery. Consequently, many marginally successful bone tissue engineering strategies have focused on mimicking portions of ABG's "ideal" osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic composition resembling the late reparative stage extracellular matrix (ECM) in bone fracture repair, also known as the "hard" or "bony" callus. An alternative, less common approach that has emerged in the last decade harnesses endochondral (EC) ossification through developmental engineering principles, which acknowledges that the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in developmental skeletogenesis, specifically EC ossification, are closely paralleled during native bone healing. EC ossification naturally occurs during the majority of bone fractures and, thus, can potentially be utilized to enhance bone regeneration for nearly any orthopedic indication, especially in avascular critical-sized defects where hypoxic conditions favor initial chondrogenesis instead of direct intramembranous ossification. The body's native EC ossification response, however, is not capable of regenerating critical-sized defects without intervention. We propose that an underexplored potential exists to regenerate bone through the native EC ossification response by utilizing strategies which mimic the initial inflammatory or fibrocartilaginous ECM (i.e., "pro-" or "soft" callus) observed in the early reparative stage of bone fracture repair. To date, the majority of strategies utilizing this approach rely on clinically burdensome in vitro cell expansion protocols. This review will focus on the confluence of two evolving areas, (1) native ECM biomaterials and (2) developmental engineering, which will attempt to overcome the technical, business, and regulatory challenges that persist in the area of bone regeneration. Significant attention will be given to native "raw" materials and ECM-based designs that provide necessary osteo- and chondro-conductive and inductive features for enhancing EC ossification. In addition, critical perspectives on existing stem cell-based therapeutic strategies will be discussed with a focus on their use as an extension of the acellular ECM-based designs for specific clinical indications. Within this framework, a novel realm of unexplored design strategies for bone tissue engineering will be introduced into the collective consciousness of the regenerative medicine field. PMID:25336144

  16. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: pathogenesis, management, and current surgical approaches. A review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Zachary A; Buchanan, Colin C; Raphael, Dan; Khoo, Larry T

    2011-03-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is an important cause of cervical myelopathy that results from bony ossification of the cervical or thoracic posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL). It has been estimated that nearly 25% of patients with cervical myelopathy will have features of OPLL. Patients commonly present in their mid-40s or 50s with clinical evidence of myelopathy. On MR and CT imaging, this can be seen as areas of ossification that commonly coalesce behind the cervical vertebral bodies, leading to direct ventral compression of the cord. While MR imaging will commonly demonstrate associated changes in the soft tissue, CT scanning will better define areas of ossification. This can also provide the clinician with evidence of possible dural ossification. The surgical management of OPLL remains a challenge to spine surgeons. Surgical alternatives include anterior, posterior, or circumferential decompression and/or stabilization. Anterior cervical stabilization options include cervical corpectomy or multilevel anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, while posterior stabilization approaches include instrumented or noninstrumented fusion or laminoplasty. Each of these approaches has distinct advantages and disadvantages. While anterior approaches may provide more direct decompression and best improve myelopathy scores, there is soft-tissue morbidity associated with the anterior approach. Posterior approaches, including laminectomy and fusion and laminoplasty, may be well tolerated in older patients. However, there often is associated axial neck pain and less improvement in myelopathy scores. In this review, the authors discuss the epidemiology, imaging findings, and clinical presentation of OPLL. The authors additionally discuss the merits of the different surgical techniques in the management of this challenging disease. PMID:21361748

  17. Bone Marrow Blood Vessel Ossification and “Microvascular Dead Space” in Rat and Human Long Bone

    PubMed Central

    Prisby, Rhonda D.

    2014-01-01

    Severe calcification of the bone microvascular network was observed in rats, whereby the bone marrow blood vessels appeared ossified. This study sought to characterize the magnitude of ossification in relation to patent blood vessels and adipocyte content in femoral diaphyses. Additionally, this study confirmed the presence of ossified vessels in patients with arteriosclerotic vascular disease and peripheral vascular disease and cellulitis. Young (4–6 mon; n=8) and old (22–24 mon; n=8) male Fischer-344 rats were perfused with barium sulfate to visualize patent bone marrow blood vessels. Femoral shafts were processed for bone histomorphometry to quantify ossified (Goldner’s Trichrome) and calcified (Alizarin Red) vessels. Adipocyte content was also determined. Additional femora (n=5/age group) were scanned via µCT to quantify microvascular ossification. Bone marrow blood vessels from rats and the human patients were also isolated and examined via microscopy. Ossified vessels (rats and humans) had osteocyte lacunae on the vessel surfaces and “normal” vessels were transitioning into bone. The volume of ossified vessels was 4800% higher (p <0.05) in old vs. young rats. Calcified and ossified vessel volumes per tissue volume and calcified vessel volume per patent vessel volume were augmented (p <0.05) 262%, 375% and 263%, respectively, in old vs. young rats. Ossified and patent vessel number was higher (171%) and lower (40%), respectively, in old vs. young rats. Finally, adipocyte volume per patent vessel volume was higher (86%) with age. This study is the first to report ossification of bone marrow blood vessels in rats and humans. Ossification presumably results in “microvascular dead space” in regards to loss of patency and vasomotor function as opposed to necrosis. The progression of bone microvascular ossification may provide the common link associated with age-related changes in bone and bone marrow. The clinical implications may be evident in the difficulties treating bone disease in the elderly. PMID:24680721

  18. Regulation of the Primary Quinone Binding Conformation by the H Subunit in Reaction Centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Taguchi, Alexander T; Beal, Nathan J; O'Malley, Patrick J; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A

    2015-11-19

    Unlike photosystem II (PSII) in higher plants, bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (bRCs) from Proteobacteria have an additional peripheral membrane subunit "H". The H subunit is necessary for photosynthetic growth, but can be removed chemically in vitro. The remaining LM dimer retains its activity to perform light-induced charge separation. Here we investigate the influence of the H subunit on interactions between the primary semiquinone and the protein matrix, using a combination of site-specific isotope labeling, pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The data reveal substantially weaker binding interactions between the primary semiquinone and the LM dimer than observed for the intact bRC; the amount of electron spin transferred to the nitrogen hydrogen bond donors is significantly reduced, the methoxy groups are more free to rotate, and the spectra indicate a heterogeneous mixture of bound semiquinone states. These results are consistent with a loosening of the primary quinone binding pocket in the absence of the H subunit. PMID:26517602

  19. Family Centered Approach in Primary Health Care: Experience from an Urban Area of Mangalore, India

    PubMed Central

    Majra, J. P.; Akshaya, K. M.; Qadiri, Ghulam Jeelani

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. “Health for All” still eludes public health experts despite many approaches to prevent disease and promote health among urban poor. Several key illness factors lie beyond the conventional healthcare boundaries. Objective. To examine the effectiveness of family centered approach (FCA) in addressing health and related issues in an urban area of Mangalore, India. Method. A longitudinal study was conducted in Bengre, an outreach centre of Mangalore from June 2011 to November 2013. Family folders were created with pertinent details. Demand generation and health education activities were conducted through two female community health link workers. An FCA package was implemented by medical and nursing interns, under supervision, to address the priority issues. Effect was assessed by comparing their practices and service utilization before and after the study. Results. About 809 families participated in this study. Social, cultural, and religious factors were responsible for viciousness of malaria and maternal and child health issues. FCA improved their perceptions and practices towards health and related issues. Significant (P < 0.05) and sustained hike in service utilization was evident. Conclusion. FCA exposes key illness factors beyond the conventional care, eases need based healthcare implementation, and provides feasible and enduring solutions. Community involvement makes it more practicable. PMID:25695098

  20. Screening Genetic Resources of Capsicum Peppers in Their Primary Center of Diversity in Bolivia and Peru.

    PubMed

    van Zonneveld, Maarten; Ramirez, Marleni; Williams, David E; Petz, Michael; Meckelmann, Sven; Avila, Teresa; Bejarano, Carlos; Ríos, Llermé; Peña, Karla; Jäger, Matthias; Libreros, Dimary; Amaya, Karen; Scheldeman, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    For most crops, like Capsicum, their diversity remains under-researched for traits of interest for food, nutrition and other purposes. A small investment in screening this diversity for a wide range of traits is likely to reveal many traditional varieties with distinguished values. One objective of this study was to demonstrate, with Capsicum as model crop, the application of indicators of phenotypic and geographic diversity as effective criteria for selecting promising genebank accessions for multiple uses from crop centers of diversity. A second objective was to evaluate the expression of biochemical and agromorphological properties of the selected Capsicum accessions in different conditions. Four steps were involved: 1) Develop the necessary diversity by expanding genebank collections in Bolivia and Peru; 2) Establish representative subsets of ~100 accessions for biochemical screening of Capsicum fruits; 3) Select promising accessions for different uses after screening; and 4) Examine how these promising accessions express biochemical and agromorphological properties when grown in different environmental conditions. The Peruvian Capsicum collection now contains 712 accessions encompassing all five domesticated species (C. annuum, C. chinense, C. frutescens, C. baccatum, and C. pubescens). The collection in Bolivia now contains 487 accessions, representing all five domesticates plus four wild taxa (C. baccatum var. baccatum, C. caballeroi, C. cardenasii, and C. eximium). Following the biochemical screening, 44 Bolivian and 39 Peruvian accessions were selected as promising, representing wide variation in levels of antioxidant capacity, capsaicinoids, fat, flavonoids, polyphenols, quercetins, tocopherols, and color. In Peru, 23 promising accessions performed well in different environments, while each of the promising Bolivian accessions only performed well in a certain environment. Differences in Capsicum diversity and local contexts led to distinct outcomes in each country. In Peru, mild landraces with high values in health-related attributes were of interest to entrepreneurs. In Bolivia, wild Capsicum have high commercial demand. PMID:26402618

  1. Screening Genetic Resources of Capsicum Peppers in Their Primary Center of Diversity in Bolivia and Peru

    PubMed Central

    van Zonneveld, Maarten; Ramirez, Marleni; Williams, David E.; Petz, Michael; Meckelmann, Sven; Avila, Teresa; Bejarano, Carlos; Peña, Karla; Jäger, Matthias; Libreros, Dimary; Amaya, Karen; Scheldeman, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    For most crops, like Capsicum, their diversity remains under-researched for traits of interest for food, nutrition and other purposes. A small investment in screening this diversity for a wide range of traits is likely to reveal many traditional varieties with distinguished values. One objective of this study was to demonstrate, with Capsicum as model crop, the application of indicators of phenotypic and geographic diversity as effective criteria for selecting promising genebank accessions for multiple uses from crop centers of diversity. A second objective was to evaluate the expression of biochemical and agromorphological properties of the selected Capsicum accessions in different conditions. Four steps were involved: 1) Develop the necessary diversity by expanding genebank collections in Bolivia and Peru; 2) Establish representative subsets of ~100 accessions for biochemical screening of Capsicum fruits; 3) Select promising accessions for different uses after screening; and 4) Examine how these promising accessions express biochemical and agromorphological properties when grown in different environmental conditions. The Peruvian Capsicum collection now contains 712 accessions encompassing all five domesticated species (C. annuum, C. chinense, C. frutescens, C. baccatum, and C. pubescens). The collection in Bolivia now contains 487 accessions, representing all five domesticates plus four wild taxa (C. baccatum var. baccatum, C. caballeroi, C. cardenasii, and C. eximium). Following the biochemical screening, 44 Bolivian and 39 Peruvian accessions were selected as promising, representing wide variation in levels of antioxidant capacity, capsaicinoids, fat, flavonoids, polyphenols, quercetins, tocopherols, and color. In Peru, 23 promising accessions performed well in different environments, while each of the promising Bolivian accessions only performed well in a certain environment. Differences in Capsicum diversity and local contexts led to distinct outcomes in each country. In Peru, mild landraces with high values in health-related attributes were of interest to entrepreneurs. In Bolivia, wild Capsicum have high commercial demand. PMID:26402618

  2. The Origin of Variation in Primary Care Process and Outcome Indicators: Patients, Professionals, Centers, and Health Districts.

    PubMed

    Orueta, Juan F; García-Alvarez, Arturo; Grandes, Gonzalo; Nuño-Solinís, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Healthcare providers are often evaluated by studying variability in their indicators. However, the usefulness of this analysis may be limited if we do not distinguish the variability attributable to health professionals and organizations from that associated with their patients.Our objectives are to describe the main process and outcome indicators of primary healthcare services, analyzing the contribution to variability in these indicators from different levels: individual, health professional, health center, and health district.This is a cross-sectional study that includes all.All the individuals covered by the public Basque Health Service (children [age 0-13], n?=?247,493; adults [?14 years old], n?=?1,959,682) over a 12-month period.We calculated the number of visits to primary care doctors, number of referrals, prescription costs, and potentially avoidable hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). Using multilevel analysis, we determined the percentage of variance attributable to each level.After adjusting for the characteristics of patients (demographic, socioeconomic, and morbidity), doctors (panel size), health center (size, staff satisfaction, demographic structure of the community), and health district, the variance in the indicators was mainly attributable to differences between patients, independently of the attending health professional, the center, or the healthcare organization, both in children (94.21% for visits to the doctor; 96.66% for referrals; 98.57% for prescription costs; 90.02% for potentially avoidable hospitalizations for ACSCs) and in adults (88.10%; 96.26%; 97.92%; and 93.77%, respectively).The limited contribution of health professionals and organizations to variability in indicators should be taken into account when performing evaluations and planning quality improvement strategies. PMID:26252315

  3. Cancer risk estimates from radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theoharris; Damilakis, John; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication following total hip arthroplasty. This study was conducted to calculate the radiation dose to organs-at-risk and estimate the probability of cancer induction from radiotherapy for HO prophylaxis.Methods: Hip irradiation for HO with a 6 MV photon beam was simulated with the aid of a Monte Carlo model. A realistic humanoid phantom representing an average adult patient was implemented in Monte Carlo environment for dosimetric calculations. The average out-of-field radiation dose to stomach, liver, lung, prostate, bladder, thyroid, breast, uterus, and ovary was calculated. The organ-equivalent-dose to colon, that was partly included within the treatment field, was also determined. Organ dose calculations were carried out using three different field sizes. The dependence of organ doses upon the block insertion into primary beam for shielding colon and prosthesis was investigated. The lifetime attributable risk for cancer development was estimated using organ, age, and gender-specific risk coefficients.Results: For a typical target dose of 7 Gy, organ doses varied from 1.0 to 741.1 mGy by the field dimensions and organ location relative to the field edge. Blocked field irradiations resulted in a dose range of 1.4–146.3 mGy. The most probable detriment from open field treatment of male patients was colon cancer with a high risk of 564.3 × 10{sup ?5} to 837.4 × 10{sup ?5} depending upon the organ dose magnitude and the patient's age. The corresponding colon cancer risk for female patients was (372.2–541.0) × 10{sup ?5}. The probability of bladder cancer development was more than 113.7 × 10{sup ?5} and 110.3 × 10{sup ?5} for males and females, respectively. The cancer risk range to other individual organs was reduced to (0.003–68.5) × 10{sup ?5}.Conclusions: The risk for cancer induction from radiation therapy for HO prophylaxis after total hip arthroplasty varies considerably by the treatment parameters, organ site in respect to treatment volume and patient's gender and age. The presented risk estimates may be useful in the follow-up studies of irradiated patients.

  4. Cervical Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in X-Linked Hypophosphatemic Rickets Revealing Homogeneously Increased Vertebral Bone Density

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Masaki; Kuraishi, Keita; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    There is no report that describes in detail the radiological and intraoperative findings of rickets with symptomatic cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Here, we describe a case of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets with cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament presenting unique radiological and intraoperative findings. The patient presented progressive tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed severe cervical spinal cord compression caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Computed tomography scans revealed homogeneously increased vertebral bone density. An expansive laminoplasty was performed. At surgery, homogeneously hard lamina bone was burdened in drilling and opening of the laminae. The patient's neurological symptoms were improved postoperatively. Bony fusion of the hinges occurred postoperatively. Therefore, expansive laminoplasty could be performed for symptomatic cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament with X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. However, unusual bone characters should be taken into consideration for careful operation during surgery. PMID:25705343

  5. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  6. Primary and aggregate color centers in proton irradiated LiF crystals and thin films for luminescent solid state detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, M.; Ambrosini, F.; Ampollini, A.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2015-04-01

    Proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by the injector of a linear accelerator for proton therapy, were used to irradiate at room temperature lithium fluoride crystals and polycrystalline thin films grown by thermal evaporation. The irradiation fluence range was 1011-1015 protons/cm2. The proton irradiation induced the stable formation of primary and aggregate color centers. Their formation was investigated by optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The F2 and F3+ photoluminescence intensities, carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films, show linear behaviours up to different maximum values of the irradiation fluence, after which a quenching is observed, depending on the nature of the samples (crystals and films). The Principal Component Analysis, applied to the absorption spectra of colored crystals, allowed to clearly identify the formation of more complex aggregate defects in samples irradiated at highest fluences.

  7. Reoperations for Persistent or Recurrent Primary Hyperparathyroidism: Results of a Retrospective Cohort Study at a Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Nawrot, Ireneusz; Chudzi?ski, Witold; Ci??ka, Tomasz; Barczy?ski, Marcin; Szmidt, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Background Parathyroid reoperations are challenging and achieving a cure requires multidisciplinary treatment team cooperation. The aims of this study were to summarize our experience in revision surgery for persistent (pHPT) or recurrent primary hyperparathyroidism (rHPT) and to explore factors underlying failure to cure at initial surgery. Material/Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent reoperations for pHPT or rHPT at a tertiary referral center. The database of parathyroid surgery was searched for eligible patients (treated in the years 2000–2012). The primary outcome was the cure rate. All the patients were followed-up for at least 12 months postoperatively. Factors underlying failure to cure at initial surgery were reviewed based on hospital records. Results The study group comprised 88 patients (69 women, 19 men) operated on for persistent (n=57) or recurrent disease (n=31), who underwent 98 reoperations, including 26 (2.4%) patients first operated on at our institution, and 72 (81.8%) patients operated on elsewhere, but referred for revision surgery. A long-term cure was achieved in 83/88 patients (94.3%). The mean post-reoperation follow-up was 91.7 (12–176) months. Missed hyperfunctioning parathyroid gland was found on reoperation in eutopic position in 49 (55.5%) patients, and in ectopic position in 39 (44.3%) patients, including 20 (22.7%) cases of cervical ectopy and 19 (21.6%) cases of mediastinal ectopy. Conclusions Multidisciplinary treatment team cooperation at a tertiary referral center, consisting of an accurate preoperative localization, expertise in parathyroid re-explorations, and correct use of intraoperative adjuncts, contribute to the high success rate of parathyroid reoperations. PMID:25201515

  8. Selected Aspects of Mental Health of Elderly Patients with Chronic Back Pain Treated in Primary Care Centers.

    PubMed

    Cabak, Anna; D?browska-Zimakowska, Anna; Tomaszewski, Pawe?; ?yp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Tomaszewski, Wies?aw; Fija?kowska, Barbara; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improvement of the effectiveness and efficiency of chronic back pain therapy is a continuing challenge on an international scale. The aim of the present study was to tentatively assess mental health of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care centers. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study enrolled 100 persons over 50 years of age. The back pain group consisted of 53 patients with chronic back pain and the control group consisted of 47 pain-free persons. The assessment of mental health used a Polish version of the international Goldberger's General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). ANOVA (1- and 2-factor) analysis of variance, Tukey's test, and Pearson's simple correlation were used to analyze the significance of differences, with the significance level set at ?=0.05. RESULTS All patients with chronic back pain, regardless of their age and gender, displayed poorer mental well-being compared to the control group: their overall score was higher by over 7 points than in persons without back pain (F1.96=14.8; p<0.001). Men with back pain were significantly more susceptible to depression than women (F2.96=5.5; p<0.05), compared to the control group. The duration of back pain also showed a significant (p<0.05) direct correlation with the overall mental health score from the questionnaire. Mental health was considerably poorer among patients occasionally (p<0.001) and regularly (p<0.05) consuming analgesics than among persons who did not do so. CONCLUSIONS The study revealed that mental health was markedly poorer in patients with chronic back pain than in healthy controls. A preliminary assessment of aspects of mental health should be given more attention in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care center outpatient clinics. PMID:26522877

  9. Selected Aspects of Mental Health of Elderly Patients with Chronic Back Pain Treated in Primary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Cabak, Anna; D?browska-Zimakowska, Anna; Tomaszewski, Pawe?; ?yp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Tomaszewski, Wies?aw; Fija?kowska, Barbara; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Background Improvement of the effectiveness and efficiency of chronic back pain therapy is a continuing challenge on an international scale. The aim of the present study was to tentatively assess mental health of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care centers. Material/Methods The study enrolled 100 persons over 50 years of age. The back pain group consisted of 53 patients with chronic back pain and the control group consisted of 47 pain-free persons. The assessment of mental health used a Polish version of the international Goldberger’s General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). ANOVA (1- and 2-factor) analysis of variance, Tukey’s test, and Pearson’s simple correlation were used to analyze the significance of differences, with the significance level set at ?=0.05. Results All patients with chronic back pain, regardless of their age and gender, displayed poorer mental well-being compared to the control group: their overall score was higher by over 7 points than in persons without back pain (F1.96=14.8; p<0.001). Men with back pain were significantly more susceptible to depression than women (F2.96=5.5; p<0.05), compared to the control group. The duration of back pain also showed a significant (p<0.05) direct correlation with the overall mental health score from the questionnaire. Mental health was considerably poorer among patients occasionally (p<0.001) and regularly (p<0.05) consuming analgesics than among persons who did not do so. Conclusions The study revealed that mental health was markedly poorer in patients with chronic back pain than in healthy controls. A preliminary assessment of aspects of mental health should be given more attention in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care center outpatient clinics. PMID:26522877

  10. The delivery and evaluation of RNAi therapeutics for heterotopic ossification pathologies.

    PubMed

    Shrivats, Arun R; Hollinger, Jeffrey O

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool being used to develop therapies for pathologies caused by gene overexpression. Heterotopic ossification pathologies such as trauma-induced heterotopic ossification and fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva may be treatable with an RNAi approach. However, there is a lack of consensus in literature regarding the delivery conditions and evaluation of RNAi therapeutics in these disease models. Here, we describe in vitro protocols for the delivery of polymer-based RNAi therapeutics as well as a streamlined strategy for the assessment of osteoblast lineage progression due to dysregulated bone morphogenetic protein signaling. This strategy focuses on the quantification of early-stage osteoblast transcription factors RUNX2 and OSX, followed by the measurement of alkaline phosphatase activity and late-stage matrix deposition. PMID:24155228

  11. Intra-Articular Giant Heterotopic Ossification following Total Knee Arthroplasty for Charcot Arthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Shintaro; Aoki, Yasuchika; Sonobe, Masato; Shibata, Yoshifumi; Sasaki, Yu; Nakagawa, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Although the Charcot arthropathy may be associated with serious complications, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the preferred choice of treatment by patients. This case report presents an 80-year-old man with intra-articular giant heterotopic ossification following loosening of femoral and tibial implants and femoral condylar fracture. He had undergone TKA because of Charcot neuropathy seven years ago and had been doing well since. Immediately after a left knee sprain, he became unable to walk. Because he had developed a skin ulcer on his left calf where methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was detected, we postponed revision surgery until the ulcer was completely healed. While waiting, intra-articular bony fragments grew larger and formed giant heterotopic ossified masses. Eventually, the patient underwent revision surgery, and two major ossified masses were carefully and successfully extirpated. It should be noted that intra-articular heterotopic giant ossification is a significant complication after TKA for neuropathic arthropathy. PMID:24151574

  12. Endochondral ossification in a case of progressive osseous heteroplasia in a young female child.

    PubMed

    Schrander, Dirk E; Welting, Tim J; Caron, Marjolein M J; Schrander, Jaap J P; van Rhijn, Lodewijk W; Körver-Keularts, Inge; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T R M

    2014-09-01

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) (OMIM 166350) is a rare autosomal dominant condition, characterized by heterotopic ossification of the skin, subcutaneous fat, and deep connective tissue. This condition is distinct from Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy or McCune Albright syndrome (OMIM 103580) and fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (OMIM 135100). We present an unusual presentation of POH in a 7-year-old female child. The clinical features included a painful swelling on the left foot, with mechanical complaints. There was no congenital hallux valgus. Family anamnesis was positive in the father. There were subcutaneous ossifications of his left upper arm, right-sided thorax, and lateral side of the right ankle. The father did not allow any radiographs or further examinations. Radiographic examination of the patient revealed ossified subcutaneous plaques on the left foot, lumbar spine, and left scapulae. Additional blood samples were analyzed, revealing no pseudohypoparathyroidism. Sequence analysis of the gene associated with POH, the GNAS1 gene, revealed the heterozygote mutation c.565_568del, previously found in Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Histopathological examination of the subcutaneous ossification showed presence of chondrocyte clusters, a feature usually found in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva. The combination of the clinical features, the absence of pseudohypoparathyroidism, histology revealing chondrocyte clusters, and the specific GNAS mutation in this patient makes this a truly unusual presentation of POH. The findings in the described case might denote subdivisions of POH. The condition is associated with progressive superficial to deep ossification, progressive restriction of range of motion, and recurrence if excised. We hope to inform pediatricians and orthopedic surgeons to create more awareness of this disorder so that unnecessary treatments can be avoided and proper counseling offered. PMID:24626099

  13. Ectopic ossification associated with osteoid osteoma in the acetabulum. A case report.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, K; Yoshikawa, H; Masuhara, K; Sugano, N; Ono, K

    1994-02-01

    Ectopic bone formation was associated with osteoid osteoma in the anterior rim of the acetabulum. A factor, which has been speculated to be secreted from the nidus and is responsible for increased osteoblastic activity, also seemed to have the capacity to stimulate young mesenchymal cells to differentiate into an osteogenic pathway. A case of a 35-year-old woman with osteoid osteoma, which caused ectopic ossification adjacent to the nidus, is presented. PMID:8119020

  14. Alk2 regulates early chondrogenic fate in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva heterotopic endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Culbert, Andria L; Chakkalakal, Salin A; Theosmy, Edwin G; Brennan, Tracy A; Kaplan, Frederick S; Shore, Eileen M

    2014-05-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is a critical regulator of cartilage differentiation and endochondral ossification. Gain-of-function mutations in ALK2, a type I BMP receptor, cause the debilitating disorder fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) and result in progressive heterotopic (extraskeletal) endochondral ossification within soft connective tissues. Here, we used murine mesenchymal progenitor cells to investigate the contribution of Alk2 during chondrogenic differentiation and heterotopic endochondral ossification (HEO). Alk2(R206H/+) (gain-of-function), Alk2(CKO) (loss-of-function), and wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts were evaluated for chondrogenic potential. Chondrogenic differentiation was accelerated in Alk2(R206H/+) cells, due in part to enhanced sensitivity to BMP ligand. In vivo, Alk2(R206H/+) cells initiated robust HEO and recruited wild-type cell contribution. Despite expression of other type I BMP receptors (Alk3 and Alk6), chondrogenesis of Alk2(CKO) cells was severely impaired by absence of Alk2 during early differentiation. Alk2 is therefore a direct regulator of cartilage formation and mediates chondrogenic commitment of progenitor cells. These data establish that at least one effect of ALK2 gain-of-function mutations in FOP patients is enhanced chondrogenic differentiation which supports formation of heterotopic endochondral bone. This establishes ALK2 as a plausible therapeutic target during early chondrogenic stages of lesion formation for preventing heterotopic bone formation in FOP and other conditions. PMID:24449086

  15. Alk2 Regulates Early Chondrogenic Fate in Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva Heterotopic Endochondral Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Culbert, Andria L.; Chakkalakal, Salin A.; Theosmy, Edwin G.; Brennan, Tracy A.; Kaplan, Frederick S.; Shore, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is a critical regulator of cartilage differentiation and endochondral ossification. Gain-of-function mutations in ALK2, a type I BMP receptor, cause the debilitating disorder fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) and result in progressive heterotopic (extraskeletal) endochondral ossification within soft connective tissues. Here, we used murine mesenchymal progenitor cells to investigate the contribution of Alk2 during chondrogenic differentiation and heterotopic endochondral ossification (HEO). Alk2R206H/+ (gain-of-function), Alk2CKO (loss-of-function), and wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts were evaluated for chondrogenic potential. Chondrogenic differentiation was accelerated in Alk2R206H/+ cells, due in part to enhanced sensitivity to BMP ligand. In vivo, Alk2R206H/+ cells initiated robust HEO and recruited wild-type cell contribution. Despite expression of other type I BMP receptors (Alk3 and Alk6), chondrogenesis of Alk2CKO cells was severely impaired by absence of Alk2 during early differentiation. Alk2 is therefore a direct regulator of cartilage formation and mediates chondrogenic commitment of progenitor cells. These data establish that at least one effect of ALK2 gain-of-function mutations in FOP patients is enhanced chondrogenic differentiation which supports formation of heterotopic endochondral bone. This establishes ALK2 as a plausible therapeutic target during early chondrogenic stages of lesion formation for preventing heterotopic bone formation in FOP and other conditions. PMID:24449086

  16. Fibrinolysis is essential for fracture repair and prevention of heterotopic ossification

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, Masato; Mignemi, Nicholas A.; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Duvall, Craig L.; Schwartz, Herbert S.; Okawa, Atsushi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Bhattacharjee, Gourab; Zhao, Chenguang; Bible, Jesse E.; Obremskey, William T.; Flick, Matthew J.; Degen, Jay L.; Barnett, Joey V.; Cates, Justin M.M.; Schoenecker, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Bone formation during fracture repair inevitably initiates within or around extravascular deposits of a fibrin-rich matrix. In addition to a central role in hemostasis, fibrin is thought to enhance bone repair by supporting inflammatory and mesenchymal progenitor egress into the zone of injury. However, given that a failure of efficient fibrin clearance can impede normal wound repair, the precise contribution of fibrin to bone fracture repair, whether supportive or detrimental, is unknown. Here, we employed mice with genetically and pharmacologically imposed deficits in the fibrin precursor fibrinogen and fibrin-degrading plasminogen to explore the hypothesis that fibrin is vital to the initiation of fracture repair, but impaired fibrin clearance results in derangements in bone fracture repair. In contrast to our hypothesis, fibrin was entirely dispensable for long-bone fracture repair, as healing fractures in fibrinogen-deficient mice were indistinguishable from those in control animals. However, failure to clear fibrin from the fracture site in plasminogen-deficient mice severely impaired fracture vascularization, precluded bone union, and resulted in robust heterotopic ossification. Pharmacological fibrinogen depletion in plasminogen-deficient animals restored a normal pattern of fracture repair and substantially limited heterotopic ossification. Fibrin is therefore not essential for fracture repair, but inefficient fibrinolysis decreases endochondral angiogenesis and ossification, thereby inhibiting fracture repair. PMID:26214526

  17. Osteogenic capillaries orchestrate growth plate-independent ossification of the malleus.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koichi; Kuroda, Yukiko; Nango, Nobuhito; Shimoda, Kouji; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Ema, Masatsugu; Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi

    2015-11-15

    Endochondral ossification is a developmental process by which cartilage is replaced by bone. Terminally differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes are calcified, vascularized, and removed by chondroclasts before bone matrix is laid down by osteoblasts. In mammals, the malleus is one of three auditory ossicles that transmit vibrations of the tympanic membrane to the inner ear. The malleus is formed from a cartilaginous precursor without growth plate involvement, but little is known about how bones of this type undergo endochondral ossification. Here, we demonstrate that in the processus brevis of the malleus, clusters of osteoblasts surrounding the capillary loop produce bone matrix, causing the volume of the capillary lumen to decrease rapidly in post-weaning mice. Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy revealed a concentric, cylindrical arrangement of osteocyte lacunae along capillaries, indicative of pericapillary bone formation. Moreover, we report that overexpression of Fosl1, which encodes a component of the AP-1 transcription factor complex, in osteoblasts significantly blocked malleal capillary narrowing. These data suggest that osteoblast/endothelial cell interactions control growth plate-free endochondral ossification through 'osteogenic capillaries' in a Fosl1-regulated manner. PMID:26428006

  18. A study on teenage pregnant mothers attending primary health centers of Kempegowda Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore.

    PubMed

    Parasuramalu, B G; Shakila, N; Masthi, Ramesh N R

    2010-01-01

    Data were collected from 78 teenage pregnant mothers (15-19 years) out of 1446 pregnant mothers who attended the primary health centers situated in the field practice area of the rural health center, Kengeri of Kempegowda Institute of Medical Sciences, Bangalore, between May and July 2009 to study the factors associated with teenage pregnancies and awareness regarding family planning. This was a descriptive study. Out of 78 teenage pregnant mothers, 57 (73%) were Hindus and 45 (57.7%) belonged to joint families. 76 (97.4%) teenage pregnant mothers were housewives, i.e. 55 (70.5%) of the spouses of the teenage pregnant mothers were laborers, in majority, i.e. 40 (51.3%) teenage pregnant mothers' age at marriage and the age at first pregnancy were 18 years. The mean age at marriage increased significantly with an increase of the educational status of the teenage pregnant mothers (F value = 7.08%, P< 0.002). The mean age at first pregnancy was also increased with an increase of the education status of both the teenage pregnant mothers and their spouse. The most common reason for early marriage and early pregnancy was traditional practices and family pressure among 50 (64%) and 45 (57.7%) teenage pregnant mothers, respectively. 49 (63%) teenage pregnant mothers were not aware of any family planning methods. PMID:21372369

  19. A review of injection and antibiotic use at primary health care (public and private) centers in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ofori-Asenso, Richard; Agyeman, Akosua Adom

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a review to study antibiotic and injections use at primary care centers (PHCs) within the World Health Organization African region. This was part of a larger study on prescribing indicators at PHCs within the region. We analyzed antibiotic and injection use reported in studies published between 1993 and June 2013, which were identified through searches conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of science, Africa-Wide NiPAD, Africa Journals Online, Google Scholar, and International Network for Rational Use of Drugs bibliography databases. Sub-group analysis was carried out for private and public centers. Data were retrieved from 18 studies in 6 countries involving 21,283 patient encounters across 338 PHCs. The percentage of patient encounters with antibiotics prescribed was 51.5% (IQR 41.1-63.3%). The percentage of patient encounters which resulted in the prescription of an injection was 36.8% (IQR 20.7-57.6%). Injection use rate at private facilities was 38% (IQR 19.1-42.7) while that of the public was 32.3% (IQR 20.6-57.6). Rate of antibiotic prescribing at public centers was 49.7% (IQR 51.1-75.7) and that of private facilities 57.6 (IQR 39.0-69.5). The percentage use of injections and antibiotics is high in Africa. The excessive use of antibiotics and injections are particularly more problematic in private than public facilities. Further research is needed to understand fully the underlying factors for the observed patterns and ways of improving medicines use. PMID:26229350

  20. A review of injection and antibiotic use at primary health care (public and private) centers in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ofori-Asenso, Richard; Agyeman, Akosua Adom

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a review to study antibiotic and injections use at primary care centers (PHCs) within the World Health Organization African region. This was part of a larger study on prescribing indicators at PHCs within the region. We analyzed antibiotic and injection use reported in studies published between 1993 and June 2013, which were identified through searches conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of science, Africa-Wide NiPAD, Africa Journals Online, Google Scholar, and International Network for Rational Use of Drugs bibliography databases. Sub-group analysis was carried out for private and public centers. Data were retrieved from 18 studies in 6 countries involving 21,283 patient encounters across 338 PHCs. The percentage of patient encounters with antibiotics prescribed was 51.5% (IQR 41.1–63.3%). The percentage of patient encounters which resulted in the prescription of an injection was 36.8% (IQR 20.7–57.6%). Injection use rate at private facilities was 38% (IQR 19.1–42.7) while that of the public was 32.3% (IQR 20.6–57.6). Rate of antibiotic prescribing at public centers was 49.7% (IQR 51.1–75.7) and that of private facilities 57.6 (IQR 39.0–69.5). The percentage use of injections and antibiotics is high in Africa. The excessive use of antibiotics and injections are particularly more problematic in private than public facilities. Further research is needed to understand fully the underlying factors for the observed patterns and ways of improving medicines use. PMID:26229350

  1. As good as physicians: patient perceptions of physicians and non-physician clinicians in rural primary health centers in India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Krishna D; Stierman, Elizabeth; Bhatnagar, Aarushi; Gupta, Garima; Gaffar, Abdul

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Attracting physicians to rural areas has been a long-standing challenge in India. Government efforts to address the shortage of rural physicians include posting non-physician clinicians (NPCs) at primary health centers (PHCs) in select areas. Performance assessments of NPCs have typically focused on the technical quality of their care with little attention to the perspectives of patients. This study investigates patient views of physicians (Medical Officers) and NPCs in terms of patient satisfaction, perceived quality, and provider trust. NPCs include: Indian system of medicine physicians (AYUSH Medical Officers) and clinicians with 3 years of training, such as Rural Medical Assistants (RMAs). At PHCs without clinicians, paramedics provide clinical care, although they are not trained for this. Methods: PHCs in the state of Chhattisgarh were stratified by provider type: Medical Officer, AYUSH Medical Officer, RMA, or paramedic. PHCs were randomly sampled in each group. A total of 1,082 exiting patients were sampled from138 PHCs. Factor analysis was used to identify perceived quality domains. Multiple regression analysis was used to test for group differences. Results: Patients of Medical Officers and NPCs reported similar levels of satisfaction, trust, and perceived quality, with scores of 84% for Medical Officers, 80% for AYUSH Medical Officers, and 85% for RMAs. While there were no significant differences in these outcomes between these groups, scores for paramedical staff were significantly lower, at 73%. Conclusions: Physicians and NPCs performed similarly in terms of patient satisfaction, trust, and perceived quality. From a patient's perspective, this supports the use and scale up of NPCs in primary care settings in India. Leaving clinician posts vacant undermines public trust and quality perceptions of government health services. PMID:25276553

  2. The applicability of the new WHO-EORTC classification of primary cutaneous lymphomas to a single referral center.

    PubMed

    Khamaysi, Ziad; Ben-Arieh, Yehudith; Izhak, Ofer Ben; Epelbaum, Ronnie; Dann, Eldad J; Bergman, Reuven

    2008-02-01

    Recent years have witnessed differences between the World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification systems of primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs). Recently, a joint WHO-EORTC classification system for PCLs has been reached. This study was performed to assess the applicability of this new classification to a single referral center. All new PCL cases, excluding mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome, who were referred from 1999 to 2005 were included. The histological, immunohistochemical stainings and molecular studies were reviewed, and additional stains were performed as needed. The cases were then reclassified according to the WHO-EORTC classifications. The clinical files were also studied, and the patients were followed up clinically. There were 43 new non-mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome PCLs, including 29 B-cell lymphomas of which 14 were follicle center lymphoma, 10 marginal zone lymphoma, 4 diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma, leg type, and 1 diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma, other. The 14 T-cell lymphomas included 5 cases of lymphomatoid papulosis, 2 CD30+ anaplastic large-cell lymphomas, 1 NK/T-cell lymphoma, and 6 peripheral T-cell lymphomas, unspecified. Of the 6 "unspecified" T-cell lymphomas, 3 were CD4+ small/medium-sized pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma, which is considered currently a provisional entity under the unspecified T-cell category. The remaining 3 cases could not be classified beyond the unspecified T-cell category, of which 2 cases had an aggressive course. The new WHO-EORTC classification is applicable to most non-mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome PCL cases, especially the B-cell lymphomas. However, there is still a substantial subset of T-cell PCLs which cannot be classified beyond the unspecified peripheral T-cell category, some of which may have an aggressive course. PMID:18212543

  3. Putative Hydrogen Bond to Tyrosine M208 in Photosynthetic Reaction Centers from Rhodobacter capsulatus Significantly Slows Primary Charge Separation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Slow, ?50 ps, P* ? P+HA– electron transfer is observed in Rhodobacter capsulatus reaction centers (RCs) bearing the native Tyr residue at M208 and the single amino acid change of isoleucine at M204 to glutamic acid. The P* decay kinetics are unusually homogeneous (single exponential) at room temperature. Comparative solid-state NMR of [4?-13C]Tyr labeled wild-type and M204E RCs show that the chemical shift of Tyr M208 is significantly altered in the M204E mutant and in a manner consistent with formation of a hydrogen bond to the Tyr M208 hydroxyl group. Models based on RC crystal structure coordinates indicate that if such a hydrogen bond is formed between the Glu at M204 and the M208 Tyr hydroxyl group, the ?OH would be oriented in a fashion expected (based on the calculations by Alden et al., J. Phys. Chem.1996, 100, 16761–16770) to destabilize P+BA– in free energy. Alteration of the environment of Tyr M208 and BA by Glu M204 via this putative hydrogen bond has a powerful influence on primary charge separation. PMID:24902471

  4. Primary care provider practices and beliefs related to cervical cancer screening with the HPV test in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Roland, K.B.; Benard, V.B.; Greek, A.; Hawkins, N.A.; Manninen, D.; Saraiya, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cervical cancer screening using the human papillomavirus (HPV) test and Pap test together (co-testing) is an option for average-risk women ?30 years of age. With normal co-test results, screening intervals can be extended. The study objective is to assess primary care provider practices, beliefs, facilitators and barriers to using the co-test and extending screening intervals among low-income women. Method Data were collected from 98 providers in 15 Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) clinics in Illinois between August 2009 and March 2010 using a cross-sectional survey. Results 39% of providers reported using the co-test, and 25% would recommend a three-year screening interval for women with normal co-test results. Providers perceived greater encouragement for co-testing than for extending screening intervals with a normal co-test result. Barriers to extending screening intervals included concerns about patients not returning annually for other screening tests (77%), patient concerns about missing cancer (62%), and liability (52%). Conclusion Among FQHC providers in Illinois, few administered the co-test for screening and recommended appropriate intervals, possibly due to concerns over loss to follow-up and liability. Education regarding harms of too-frequent screening and false positives may be necessary to balance barriers to extending screening intervals. PMID:23628517

  5. The Clinical Significance of Ossification of Ligamentum Nuchae in Simple Lateral Radiograph : A Correlation with Cervical Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Gyu; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ossification of the ligamentum nuchae (OLN) is usually asymptomatic and incidentally observed in cervical lateral radiographs. Previous literatures reported the correlation between OLN and cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the clinical significance of OLN with relation to cervical ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). Methods We retrospectively compared the prevalence of OPLL in 105 patients with OLN and without OLN and compared the prevalence of OLN in 105 patients with OPLL and without OPLL. We also analyzed the relationship between the morphology of OLN and involved OPLL level. The OPLL level was classified as short (1-3) or long (4-6), and the morphologic subtype of OLN was categorized as round, rod, or segmented. Results The prevalence of OPLL was significantly higher in the patients with OLN (64.7%) than without OLN (16.1%) (p=0.0001). And the prevalence of OLN was also higher in the patients with OPLL (54.2%) than without OPLL (29.5%) (p=0.0002). In patients with round type OLN, 5 of 26 (19.2%) showed long level OPLL, while in patients with larger type (rod and segmented) OLN, 22 of 42 (52.3%) showed long level OPLL (p=0.01). Conclusion There was significant relationship between OLN and OPLL prevalence. This correlation indicates that there might be common systemic causes as well as mechanical causes in the formation of OPLL and OLN. The incidentally detected OLN in cervical lateral radiograph, especially larger type, might be helpful to predict the possibility of cervical OPLL. PMID:26713144

  6. Krüppel-like factor 4 regulates membranous and endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Michikami, Ikumi; Fukushi, Toshiya; Tanaka, Mariko; Egusa, Hiroshi; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Ooshima, Takashi; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Abe, Makoto

    2012-02-15

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4/GKLF/EZF) is a zinc finger type of transcription factor highly expressed in the skin, intestine, testis, lung and bone. The role played by Klf4 has been studied extensively in normal epithelial development and maintenance; however, its role in bone cells is unknown. Previous reports showed that Klf4 is expressed in the developing flat bones but its expression diminishes postnatally. We now show that in the developing long bones, Klf4 is expressed in the perichondrium, trabecular osteoblasts and prehypertrophic chondrocytes. In contrast, osteoblasts lining at the surface of the bone collar showed extremely low levels of Klf4 expression. To investigate the possible roles played by Klf4 during skeletal development, we generated transgenic mice expressing Klf4 under mouse type I collagen regulatory sequence. Transgenic mice exhibited severe skeletal deformities and died soon after birth. Transgenic mice showed delayed formation of the calvarial bones; and over-expressing Klf4 in primary mouse calvarial osteoblasts in culture resulted in strong repression of mineralization indicating that this regulation of Klf4 is through an osteoblast-autonomous effect. Surprisingly, long bones of the transgenic mice exhibited delayed marrow cavity formation. Even at E18.5, the presumptive marrow space was occupied by cartilage anlage and invasion of the vascular endothelial cells and osteoclasts were seldom observed. Instead of entering the cartilage anlage, osteoclasts accumulated at the periosteum in the transgenic mice. Significantly, osteocalcin, which is known to chemotact osteoclasts, was up-regulated at the perichindrium as early as E14.5 in the mutants. In vitro studies showed that this induction of osteocalcin by Klf4 was regulated at its transcriptional level. Our results demonstrate that Klf4 regulates normal skeletal development through coordinating the differentiation and migration of osteoblasts, chondrocytes, vascular endothelial cells and osteoclasts. PMID:22206865

  7. Osteogenic lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells from patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yoshifumi; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Asari, Toru; Chin, Shunfu; Ono, Atsushi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Mizukami, Hiroki; Murakami, Manabu; Yagihashi, Soroku; Motomura, Shigeru; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-17

    Ectopic bone formation is thought to be responsible for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from spinal ligaments and shown to play a key role in the process of ectopic ossification. The purpose of this study was to explore the capacity of these MSCs to undergo lineage commitment and to assess the gene expression changes between these committed and uncommitted MSCs between OPLL and non-OPLL patients. Spinal ligament-derived cells were obtained from OPLL patients or patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (non-ossified) for comparison (n=8 in each group). MSCs from the two patient cohorts were evaluated for changes in colony forming ability; osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential; and changes in gene expression following induction with lineage-specific conditions. We show that the osteogenic differentiation potential was significantly higher in MSCs from OPLL patients than in those from non-OPLL patients. In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and several osteogenic-related genes expressions (bone morphogenetic protein 2, runt-related transcription factor 2 and alkaline phosphatase) were significantly higher in the OPLL group than in the non-OPLL group. However, single cell cloning efficiency, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation, and the expression of adipogenic and chondrogenic-related genes were equivalent between MSCs harvested from OPLL and non-OPLL patient samples. These findings suggest an increase in the osteogenic differentiation potential of MSCs from OPLL patients and that this propensity toward the osteogenic lineage may be a causal factor in the ossification in these ligaments. PMID:24361881

  8. Surgical strategies for ossified ligamentum flavum associated with dural ossification in thoracic spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingcheng; Zhang, Chao; Ning, Guangzhi; Li, Yulin; Li, Yan; Wang, Pei; Feng, Shiqing

    2014-12-01

    We describe two surgical strategies for treating thoracic spinal stenosis (TSS) with ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) and dural ossification (DO), and discuss their postoperative efficacy. From January 2004 to June 2008, 147 patients underwent TSS surgery. Thirty three of those with intraoperative evidence of OLF and DO were included in the present study. Based on the different intraoperative treatment of the dura, these 33 patients were divided into two groups: Group A, 17 patients who had their dura slit and the ossification excised, and Group B, 16 patients treated by floating the ossified dura by thinning it with a drill. All patients underwent outpatient follow-up. Pre- and postoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores and recovery rates were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 42 months. The incidence of DO with OLF in TSS was 22%. At 1 year follow-up, the mean JOA score improved from 5.12 ± 1.17 to 6.94 ± 0.90 in Group A and from 5.25 ± 1.34 to 7.13 ± 1.41 in Group B. Additionally, the mean JOA score improved from 5.18 ± 1.24 to 7.03 ± 1.16 in TSS patients with DO and from 5.52 ± 1.21 to 7.21 ± 1.18 in TSS patients without DO. The increased cross-sectional area of the pre- and postoperative dural sac at the level of stenosis suggested that decompression was complete. Both decompression methods are feasible for curing TSS with OLF and DO. Moreover, slitting the dura for ossified dura and ligamentum flavum removal to relax the spinal cord is a safe and reliable method. Even though it increased the surgical difficulties and risks, DO did not affect postoperative neurological recovery. PMID:25012488

  9. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses' knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team-based problem solving. PMID:26681711

  10. Opportunistic Screening for Hypertension and Selected Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Adults Attending a Primary Health Center in Puducherry, India

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Anindo; Chinnakali, Palanivel; Vinayagamoorthy, V; Daya, Praveena A; Shidam, Umakant G.; Roy, Gautam

    2014-01-01

    Background: India is currently suffering from an epidemic of noncommunicable diseases; it is thus imperative to screen for cardiovascular risk factors in people visiting Primary Health Centers (PHCs). The objective of the study was to measure the amount of undiagnosed hypertension and selected cardiovascular risk factors present among the adult population through opportunistic screening at the PHC. Methods: A facility-based opportunistic screening program was carried out in a PHC in rural Puducherry. Patients and accompanying persons aged 30 years and above, who attended the daily outpatient department (OPD) were included. The OPD provides outpatient services and medical procedures or tests without requirement of an overnight stay, and functions for 4 h a day. Known hypertensive patients and pregnant women were excluded. Information on age, gender, diabetes status, and personal history of tobacco and alcohol use were collected using an interview schedule. Height, weight and waist circumference were measured, along with blood pressure and blood sugar using standard protocols. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) ?140 and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ?90 mm Hg was taken as hypertension. SBP of 120-139 mm Hg and/or DBP of 80-89 mm Hg were taken as prehypertension. Results: A total of 324 participants were screened; 56.8% were females. The mean standard deviation (SD) age of the participants was 47.7 (SD 12.6) years. Hypertension and prehypertension were present in 17.9% and 37.7% of the participants respectively. 17.3% participants had diabetes. 22.2% and 21.3% of all participants were current users of tobacco and alcohol respectively. Generalized obesity was present in 31.8% of the participants; 19.1% were overweight. 45.1% participants had central obesity. Conclusions: A relatively large proportion of adults were found to have prehypertension and obesity, thus showing the need for early intervention. PMID:25709799

  11. Low Rates of Heterotopic Ossification After Resurfacing Hip Arthroplasty With Use of Prophylactic Radiotherapy in Select Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kruser, Tim J.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Cannon, Donald M.; Platta, Christopher S.; Heiner, John P.; Illgen, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have noted higher rates of heterotopic ossification (HO) with surface replacement arthroplasty (SRA) than with traditional total hip arthroplasty in the absence of postoperative HO prophylaxis. This study reports rates and grades of HO in 44 SRA patients with at least 1 year of follow-up. Heterotopic ossification prophylaxis was used in 32 (73%) of 44 cases. Heterotopic ossification prophylaxis consisted of radiotherapy (22/32), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (8/32), or both (2/32). One case of clinically significant HO was documented in the no-prophylaxis group. This strategy of selective HO prophylaxis in patients felt by orthopedic surgeons to be at high risk of HO resulted in low rates of clinically relevant HO after SRA (1/44, 2.3%). Further study is needed to establish optimal selection criteria for HO prophylaxis after SRA. PMID:22245125

  12. Efficacy and safety of rituximab treatment in early primary Sjögren's syndrome: a prospective, multi-center, follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is an autoimmune disorder affecting exocrine glands; however, a subgroup of pSS patients experience systemic extra-glandular involvement leading to a worsening of disease prognosis. Current therapeutic options are mainly empiric and often translated by other autoimmune diseases. In the last few years growing evidence suggests that B-cell depletion by rituximab (RTX) is effective also in pSS. Patients with early active disease appear to be those who could benefit the most from RTX. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of RTX in comparison to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in early active pSS patients. Methods Forty-one patients with early pSS and active disease (EULAR Sjogren’s syndrome disease activity index, ESSDAI???6) were enrolled in the study. Patients were treated with either RTX or DMARDs in two different Rheumatology centers and followed up for 120 weeks. Clinical assessment was performed by ESSDAI every 12 weeks up to week 120 and by self-reported global disease activity pain, sicca symptoms and fatigue on visual analogic scales, unstimulated saliva flow and Schirmer’s I test at week 12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120. Laboratory assessment was performed every 12 weeks to week 120. Two labial minor salivary gland (MSG) biopsies were obtained from all patients at the time of inclusion in the study and at week 120. Results Our study demonstrated that RTX treatment results in a faster and more pronounced decrease of ESSDAI and other clinical parameters compared to DMARDs treatment. No adverse events were reported in the two groups. We also observed that RTX is able to reduce glandular infiltrate, interfere with B/T compartmentalization and consequently with the formation of ectopic lymphoid structures and germinal center-like structures in pSS-MSGs. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study performed in a large cohort of early active pSS patients for a period of 120 weeks. We showed that RTX is a safe and effective agent to be employed in pSS patients with systemic, extra-glandular involvement. Furthermore, our data on pSS-MSGs provide additional biological basis to employ RTX in this disease. PMID:24286296

  13. Evaluation and Comparison of Changes in Microhardness of Primary and Permanent Enamel on Exposure to Acidic Center-filled Chewing Gum: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Muppa, Radhika; Srinivas, NCH; Kumar, Duddu Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: The study is to evaluate changes in microhardness of enamel after exposure to acidic center filled chewing gum on primary and permanent teeth. Methods: Thirty primary and 30 permanent molar extracted teeth were painted with acid resistant varnish except a small window over buccal surface. Teeth were divided into four groups according to type of teeth and type of chewing gum (Center fresh and Bubbaloo) (D1, P1, D2 and P2); each tooth was exposed to whole chewing gum mashed with 5 ml of artificial saliva for five minutes at room temperature twice a day for 5 days. After the exposure, teeth were stored in deionized water and submitted for microhardness tests. Results: Paired t-test and independent sample t-test were used for statistical analysis. A significant reduction in microhardness was found between exposed and unexposed areas in all groups. There was no statistically significant difference in reduction of microhardness to chewing gums, and between primary and permanent enamel. Conclusion: There is a definite reduction in microhardness in all groups exposed to chewing gums. Both the chewing gums are equally erosive; both permanent and primary teeth were affected. How to cite this article: Mudumba VL, Muppa R, Srinivas NCH, Kumar DM. Evaluation and Comparison of Changes in Microhardness of Primary and Permanent Enamel on Exposure to Acidic Center-filled Chewing Gum: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):24-29. PMID:25206233

  14. Complex Evolutionary and Genetic Patterns Characterize the Loss of Scleral Ossification in the Blind Cavefish Astyanax mexicanus

    PubMed Central

    O’Quin, Kelly E.; Doshi, Pooja; Lyon, Anastasia; Hoenemeyer, Emma; Yoshizawa, Masato; Jeffery, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The sclera is the tough outer covering of the eye that provides structural support and helps maintain intraocular pressure. In some fishes, reptiles, and birds, the sclera is reinforced with an additional ring of hyaline cartilage or bone that forms from scleral ossicles. Currently, the evolutionary and genetic basis of scleral ossification is poorly understood, especially in teleost fishes. We assessed scleral ossification among several groups of the Mexican tetra (Astyanax mexicanus), which exhibit both an eyed and eyeless morph. Although eyed Astyanax surface fish have bony sclera similar to other teleosts, the ossicles of blind Astyanax cavefish generally do not form. We first sampled cavefish from multiple independent populations and used ancestral character state reconstructions to determine how many times scleral ossification has been lost. We then confirmed these results by assessing complementation of scleral ossification among the F1 hybrid progeny of two cavefish populations. Finally, we quantified the number of scleral ossicles present among the F2 hybrid progeny of a cross between surface fish and cavefish, and used this information to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for this trait. Our results indicate that the loss of scleral ossification is common–but not ubiquitous–among Astyanax cavefish, and that this trait has been convergently lost at least three times. The presence of wild-type, ossified sclera among the F1 hybrid progeny of a cross between different cavefish populations confirms the convergent evolution of this trait. However, a strongly skewed distribution of scleral ossicles found among surface fish x cavefish F2 hybrids suggests that scleral ossification is a threshold trait with a complex genetic basis. Quantitative genetic mapping identified a single QTL for scleral ossification on Astyanax linkage group 1. We estimate that the threshold for this trait is likely determined by at least three genetic factors which may control the severity and onset of lens degeneration in cavefishes. We conclude that complex evolutionary and genetic patterns underlie the loss of scleral ossification in Astyanax cavefish. PMID:26649887

  15. GET THE CARE YOU NEED...AND SAVE TIME AND MONEY. Go to urgent care centers, retail clinics or your primary care

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Robert F.

    full-service, walk-in health care clinic that is accessible 12 hours a day, Monday through FridayGET THE CARE YOU NEED...AND SAVE TIME AND MONEY. Go to urgent care centers, retail clinics or your primary care physician instead of the emergency room (ER) for minor accidents like burns, cuts, sprains

  16. Promoting Achievement in Child Centered Education: Evaluation of a Non-Graded, Multi-age, Continuous Progress Primary School (K-3).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Robert O.; And Others

    An evaluation was conducted of a comprehensive plan to restructure a primary school in Candler County, Georgia, into a non-graded, multi-age, continuous progress learning center. The project entailed restructuring the classroom, implementing a shared decision-making structure, developing a learning curriculum, and using portfolio assessment to…

  17. Rates of primary electron transfer reactions in the photosystem I reaction center reconstituted with different quinones as the secondary acceptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazaki, Shigeichi; Kandori, Hideki; Yoshihara, Keitaro ); Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru ); Ikegamu, Isamu )

    1994-10-27

    Rates of sequential electron transfer reactions from the primary electron donor chlorophyll dimer (P700) to the electron acceptor chlorophyll a-686 (A[sub 0]) and to the secondary acceptor quinone (Q[sub [phi

  18. The use of spect/ct in the evaluation of heterotopic ossification in para/tetraplegics

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Maurício Coelho; Passarelli, Marcus Ceregati; Dario, Virgílio; Lebani, Bruno Rodrigues; Monteiro, Paulo Henrique Silva; Ramos, Celso Darío

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the stage of maturation and the metabolism of neurogenic heterotopic ossification by using SPECT/CT. Methods: A total of 12 medical records of patients with spinal cord injury, all of them classified according to the ASIA protocol (disability scale from the American Spinal Injury Association) in complete lesion (A) and partial lesions (B, C and D) and registered at the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotor System, were submitted to SPECT/CT evaluation. Results: Sixteen hips with heterotopic ossification observed in X-ray were studied and only two (12.5%) had high osteoblastic activity. Five hips showed medium activity, three (18.75%) low activity and six (37.5%) did not present any activity detected by SPECT/CT. Conclusion: SPECT/CT helps to determinate which patients have a greater risk of relapse after surgical resection, proving to be a useful imaging study in preoperative evaluation that can be used to determinate the postoperative prognosis of these patients. Level of Evidence III, Investigating a Diagnostic Test. PMID:24644413

  19. Ossification of the Posterior Petroclinoid Dural Fold: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance.

    PubMed

    Kimball, David; Kimball, Heather; Matusz, Petru; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, A Aaron

    2015-08-01

    Objectives?The roof of the porus trigeminus, composed of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold, is an important landmark to the skull base surgeon. Ossification of the posterior petroclinoid dural fold is an anatomical variation rarely mentioned in the literature. Such ossification results in the trigeminal nerve traversing a bony foramen as it enters Meckel cave. The authors performed this study to better elucidate this anatomical variation. Design?Fifteen adult cadaveric head halves were subjected to dissection of the middle cranial fossa. Microdissection techniques were used to examine the posterior petroclinoid dural folds. Skull base osteology was also studied in 71 dry human skulls with attention paid to the attachment point of the posterior petroclinoid dural folds at the trigeminal protuberances. Setting?Cadaver laboratory Main Outcome Measures?Measurements were made using a microcaliper. Digital images were made of the dissections. Results?Completely ossified posterior petroclinoid folds were present in 20% of the specimens. Of the 142 dry skull sides examined, 9% had large trigeminal protuberances. Conclusions?Based on this study, the posterior petroclinoid dural fold may completely ossify in adults that may lead to narrowing of the porus trigeminus and potential compression of the trigeminal nerve at the entrance to Meckel cave. PMID:26225315

  20. Primary Cutting Balloon Angioplasty for Treatment of Venous Stenoses in Native Hemodialysis Fistulas: Long-Term Results from Three Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, Rajesh McBride, Kieran; Chakraverty, Sam; Vikram, Raghunandan; Severn, Alison

    2007-11-15

    Aim. To evaluate the technical success and patency rates following primary cutting balloon angioplasty for venous stenoses in native dialysis fistulas. Methods. Forty-one patients (26 men, 15 women; age range 26-82 years, average age 59 years) underwent 50 (repeat procedures in 9 patients) primary cutting balloon (PCB) angioplasty procedures in three institutions by three primary operators. The indication was primary stenosis in 21 patients, recurrent lesions in 15, and immature fistulas in 5. A PCB was used alone in 17 cases, but was followed by a larger standard balloon in 33 cases. Follow-up included ultrasound, flow analysis and urea reduction ratio, and ranged from 2 to 30 months (mean 14 months). Results. The technical success rate was 98%. All procedures were relatively painless. Two PCBs burst and 4 leaked, but without causing any morbidity. Nineteen fistulas were still working at last follow-up. Primary patency rates at 6, 12, and 24 months using Kaplan-Meier analysis were 88%, 73%, and 34%, respectively, and the primary assisted patencies were 90%, 75%, and 50%, respectively. Conclusion. PCB angioplasty has high technical success and low complication rates. The long-term patency rates are favorable for PCB angioplasty and compare favorably with other series.

  1. Health reform's impact on federally qualified community health centers: the unintended consequence of increased Medicaid enrollment on the primary care medical home.

    PubMed

    Kulesher, Robert R

    2013-01-01

    The impact of recently passed health reform legislation may cause substantial changes in community health center (CHC) operations. The new legislation provides federal funding for center expansion, increased Medicaid enrollment, enhanced Medicare payments, training to increase primary care providers, and incentives to develop CHCs as accountable care organizations. Health reform could place CHCs in a vulnerable financial situation. Newly insured patients may seek care at private providers, whereas CHCs are left caring only for the uninsured. Thus, CHCs are unable to benefit from enhanced insurance payments needed to offset care given to the uninsured. Conversely, if CHCs participate in developing comprehensive care networks for low-income populations by strengthening referral networks, developing primary medical care homes and accountable care organizations, and investing in infrastructure, then health center medical care will be a desired option for the newly insured, and a robust safety-net system may result. PMID:23629032

  2. How Strong Is the Primary Care Safety Net? Assessing the Ability of Federally Qualified Health Centers to Serve as Patient-Centered Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jamie; Riley, Pamela; Abrams, Melinda; Nocon, Robert

    2015-09-01

    By expanding access to affordable insurance coverage for millions of Americans, the Affordable Care Act will likely increase demand for the services provided by federally qualified health centers (FQHCs), which provide an important source of care in low-income communities. A pair of Commonwealth Fund surveys asked health center leaders about their ability to function as medical homes. Survey findings show that between 2009 and 2013, the percentage of centers exhibiting medium or high levels of medical home capability almost doubled, from 32 percent to 62 percent. The greatest improvement was reported in patient tracking and care management. Despite this increased capability, health centers reported diminished ability to coordinate care with providers outside of the practice, particularly specialists. Ongoing federal funding and technical support for medical home transformation will be needed to ensure that FQHCs can fulfill their mission of providing high-quality, comprehensive care to low-income and minority populations. PMID:26372972

  3. Diagnostic and Mutational Spectrum of Progressive Osseous Heteroplasia (POH) and Other Forms of GNAS-based Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    Adegbite, N. S.; Xu, M.; Kaplan, F. S.; Shore, E. M.; Pignolo, R. J.

    2008-01-01

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) is a rare, disabling disease of heterotopic ossification (HO) that progresses from skin and subcutaneous tissues into deep skeletal muscle. POH occurs in the absence of multiple developmental features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) or hormone resistance, clinical manifestations that are also associated with GNAS inactivation. However, occasional patients with AHO and pseudohypoparathyroidism 1a/c (PHP1a/c; AHO features plus hormone resistance) have also been described who have progressive HO. This study was undertaken to define the diagnostic and mutational spectrum of POH and progressive disorders of HO, and to distinguish them from related disorders in which HO remains confined to the skin and subcutaneous tissues. We reviewed the charts of 111 individuals who had cutaneous and subcutaneous ossification. All patients were assessed for eight characteristics: age of onset of HO, presence and location of HO, depth of HO, type of HO, progression of HO, features of AHO, PTH resistance, and GNAS mutation analysis. We found, based on clinical criteria that POH and progressive HO syndromes are at the severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of GNAS-inactivating conditions associated with extra-skeletal ossification. While most individuals with superficial or progressive ossification had mutations in GNAS, there were no specific genotype-phenotype correlations that distinguished the more progressive forms of HO (e.g., POH) from the non-progressive forms (osteoma cutis, AHO, and PHP1a/c). PMID:18553568

  4. Ossification sequence of the common tern (Sterna hirundo) and its implications for the interrelationships of the Lari (Aves, Charadriiformes).

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Erin E; Harrison, Luke B

    2008-09-01

    The hypotheses of relationships within Lari (gulls) are highly unstable, and depend on whether morphological or molecular data are examined. Developmental sequence data are thought to contain phylogenetic information, but have never been applied to the problem of avian systematics. In this article, we describe the ossification sequence of the Common Tern (Sterna hirundo), and compare the pattern observed to published descriptions of other Charadriiformes, specifically the Great Skua (Stercorariidae) and various species of gulls (Laridae). We use changes in ossification sequence to elucidate the relationship between these three taxa, using both qualitative and systematic approaches. The first analysis of the ossification sequence data does not support a close relationship between Stercorariidae and Laridae, as has been proposed in some morphological analyses; however it was unable to differentiate between a Laridae-Sternidae sister-group relationship or a Sternidae-Stercorariidae sister-group relationship. The second analysis was unable to differentiate between any topology, including a polytomy, for these taxa. These results highlight the potential for use of ossification sequence data in an evolutionary context but caution that analyses are highly dependent on sequence resolution and the taxonomic level of the data set. PMID:18570230

  5. Effects of a Psychological Intervention in a Primary Health Care Center for Caregivers of Dependent Relatives: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Sanchez, Emiliano; Patino-Alonso, Maria C.; Mora-Simon, Sara; Gomez-Marcos, Manuel A.; Perez-Penaranda, Anibal; Losada-Baltar, Andres; Garcia-Ortiz, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess, in the context of Primary Health Care (PHC), the effect of a psychological intervention in mental health among caregivers (CGs) of dependent relatives. Design and Methods: Randomized multicenter, controlled clinical trial. The 125 CGs included in the trial were receiving health care in PHC. Inclusion criteria: Identifying…

  6. Heterotopic ossification in victims of the London 7/7 bombings.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D S; Clasper, J C; Patel, H D L

    2015-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the formation of bone at extraskeletal sites. Over 60% of amputees injured by improvised explosive devices in the recent conflict in Afghanistan have developed HO, resulting in functional impairment. It is hypothesised that a key aetiological factor is the blast wave; however, other environmental and medical risk factors, which the casualties have been exposed to, have also been postulated. The suicide terrorist bombings in London in 2005 resulted in many blast-related casualties, many of whom were managed by the Royal London Hospital. This cohort of severely injured patients whose injuries also included trauma-related amputations shared some, but not all, of the risk factors identified in the military population. We reviewed these patients, in particular to assess the presence or absence of military-established risk factors for the formation of HO in these casualties. PMID:25645697

  7. TARGETING RUNX2 EXPRESSION IN HYPERTROPHIC CHONDROCYTES IMPAIRS ENDOCHONDRAL OSSIFICATION DURING EARLY SKELETAL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ming; Lu, Yaojuan; Abbassi, Sam; Li, Feifei; Li, Xin; Song, Yu; Geoffroy, Valérie; Im, Hee-Jeong; Zheng, Qiping

    2012-01-01

    Runx2 is a known master transcription factor for osteoblast differentiation, as well as an essential regulator for chondrocyte maturation. Recently, more and more data has shown that Runx2 regulates hypertrophic chondrocyte-specific type X collagen gene (Col10a1) expression in different species. However, how Runx2 regulation of Col10a1 expression impacts chondrocyte maturation, an essential step of endochondral bone formation, remains unknown. We have recently generated transgenic mice in which flag-tagged Runx2 was driven by a cell-specific Col10a1 control element. Significantly increased level of Runx2 and Col10a1 mRNA transcripts were detected in transgenic mouse limbs at both E17.5 (embryonic day 17.5) and P1 (postnatal day1) stages, suggesting an in vivo correlation of Runx2 and Col10a1 expression. Surprisingly, skeletal staining suggested delayed ossification in both the axial and the appendicular skeleton of transgenic mice from E14.5 until P6. Histological analysis showed elongated hypertrophic zones in transgenic mice, with less von Kossa and TUNEL staining in long bone sections at both E17.5 and P1 stages, suggesting defective mineralization due to delayed chondrocyte maturation or apoptosis. Indeed, we detected increased level of anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-2, Opn, and Sox9 in transgenic mice by real-time RT-PCR. Moreover, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis also suggested increased Sox9 expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes of transgenic mice. Together, our data suggest that targeting Runx2 in hypertrophic chondrocytes upregulates expression of Col10a1 and other marker genes (such as Sox9 etc.). This will change the local matrix environment, delay chondrocyte maturation, reduce apoptosis and matrix mineralization, and eventually, lead to impaired endochondral ossification. PMID:22223437

  8. Risk of symptomatic heterotopic ossification following plate osteosynthesis in multiple trauma patients: an analysis in a level-1 trauma centre

    PubMed Central

    Zeckey, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank; Mommsen, Philipp; Schumann, Julia; Frink, Michael; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Krettek, Christian; Probst, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background Symptomatic heterotopic ossification (HO) in multiple trauma patients may lead to follow up surgery, furthermore the long-term outcome can be restricted. Knowledge of the effect of surgical treatment on formation of symptomatic heterotopic ossification in polytrauma is sparse. Therefore, we test the effects of surgical treatment (plate osteosynthesis or intramedullary nailing) on the formation of heterotopic ossification in the multiple trauma patient. Methods We retrospectively analysed prospectively documented data of blunt multiple trauma patients with long bone fractures which were treated at our level-1 trauma centre between 1997 and 2005. Patients were distributed to 2 groups: Patients treated by intramedullary nails (group IMN) or plate osteosynthesis (group PLATE) were compared. The expression and extension of symptomatic heterotopic ossifications on 3-6 months follow-up x-rays in antero-posterior (ap) and lateral views were classified radiologically and the maximum expansion was measured in millimeter (mm). Additionally, ventilation time, prophylactic medication like indomethacine and incidence and correlation of head injuries were analysed. Results 101 patients were included in our study, 79 men and 22 women. The fractures were treated by intramedullary nails (group IMN n = 50) or plate osteosynthesis (group PLATE n = 51). Significantly higher radiologic ossification classes were detected in group PLATE (2.9 ± 1.3) as compared to IMN (2.2 ± 1.1; p = 0.013). HO size in mm ap and lateral showed a tendency towards larger HOs in the PLATE group. Additionally PLATE group showed a higher rate of articular fractures (63% vs. 28% in IMN) while IMN demonstrated a higher rate of diaphyseal fractures (72% vs. 37% in PLATE; p = 0.003). Ventilation time, indomethacine and incidence of head injuries showed no significant difference between groups. Conclusion Fracture care with plate osteosynthesis in polytrauma patients is associated with larger formations of symptomatic heterotopic ossifications (HO) while intramedullary nailing was associated with a higher rate of remote HO. For future fracture care of multiply injured patients these facts may be considered by the responsible surgeon. PMID:19825174

  9. Proton ENDOR study of the primary donor P740 +, a special pair of chlorophyll d in photosystem I reaction center of Acaryochloris marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, Hiroyuki; Kawamori, Asako; Aoyama, Daisuke; Tomo, Tatsuya; Iwaki, Masayo; Itoh, Shigeru

    2005-08-01

    Oxidized primary electron donor P740, a special pair of chlorophyll (Chl) d in photosystem (PS) I reaction center of a newly identified cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina was studied by EPR and proton ENDOR spectroscopy. EPR and ENDOR spectra of P740 + were compared with those of P700 + in PS I reaction center of spinach. The g-factors of the purified Chl a+ and Chl d+ in CH 2Cl 2/THF, P700 + and P740 + in PS I reaction centers were determined to be 2.0025, 2.0032, 2.0027 and 2.0028, respectively. Hyperfine coupling constants of 1.9, 2.8 and 3.8 MHz that were detected in the ENDOR spectrum of P700 + were absent in the ENDOR spectrum of P740 +. These features of P740 + were mainly ascribed to the difference between the chemical structures of Chl a and Chl d.

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) combined with concurrent but not adjuvant chemotherapy in primary nasopharyngeal cancer – a retrospective single center analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report our experience in 49 consecutive patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma who were treated by Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) combined with simultaneous but not adjuvant chemotherapy (CHT). Methods The medical records of 49 patients with histologically proven primary nasopharygeal carcinoma treated with IMRT and concurrent platin-based CHT (predominantly cisplatin weekly) were retrospectively reviewed. The majority of patients showed advanced clinical stages (stage III/IV:72%) with undifferentiated histology (82%). IMRT was performed in step-and-shoot technique using an integrated boost concept in 84%. In this concept, the boost volume covered the primary tumor and involved nodes with doses of 66–70.4 Gy (single dose 2.2 Gy). Uninvolved regional nodal areas were covered with doses of 54–59.4 Gy (median single dose 1.8 Gy). At least one parotid gland was spared. None of the patients received adjuvant CHT. Results The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 48 months. Radiation therapy was completed without interruption in all patients and 76% of the patients received at least 80% of the scheduled CHT. Four local recurrences have been observed, transferring into 1-, 3-, and 5-year Local Control (LC) rates of 98%, 90% and 90%. One patient developed an isolated regional nodal recurrence, resulting in 1-, 3-, and 5-year Regional Control (RC) rates of 98%. All locoregional failures were located inside the radiation fields. Distant metastases were found in six patients, transferring into 1-, 3, and 5-year Distant Control (DC) rates of 92%, 86% and 86%. Progression free survival (PFS) rates after 1, 3 and 5 years were 86%, 70% and 69% and 1-, 3- and 5-year Overall Survival (OS) rates were 96%, 82% and 79%. Acute toxicity???grade III mainly consisted of dysphagia (32%), leukopenia (24%), stomatitis (16%), infection (8%) and nausea (8%). Severe late toxicity (grade III) was documented in 18% of the patients, mainly as xerostomia (10%). Conclusion Concurrent chemoradiation without the addition of adjuvant chemotherapy cycles using IMRT with an integrated boost concept yielded good disease control and overall survival in patients suffering from primary nasopharyngeal cancer with acceptable acute side effects and limited rates of late toxicity. PMID:23347410

  11. Primary Electron Transfer Kinetics in Membrane-Bound Rhodobacter sphaeroides Reaction Centers: A Global and Target Analysis

    E-print Network

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    : A Global and Target Analysis I. H. M. van Stokkum,*, L. M. P. Beekman, M. R. Jones,§ M. E. van Brederode, and R. van Grondelle Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Vrije UniVersiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands kinetics were measured on quinone-reduced membrane-bound wild type Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction centers

  12. A partnership model for implementing electronic health records in resource-limited primary care settings: experiences from two nurse-managed health centers

    PubMed Central

    Dennehy, Patricia; White, Mary P; Hamilton, Andrew; Pohl, Joanne M; Tanner, Clare; Onifade, Tiffiani J

    2011-01-01

    Objective To present a partnership-based and community-oriented approach designed to ease provider anxiety and facilitate the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) in resource-limited primary care settings. Materials and Methods The approach, referred to as partnership model, was developed and iteratively refined through the research team's previous work on implementing health information technology (HIT) in over 30 safety net practices. This paper uses two case studies to illustrate how the model was applied to help two nurse-managed health centers (NMHC), a particularly vulnerable primary care setting, implement EHR and get prepared to meet the meaningful use criteria. Results The strong focus of the model on continuous quality improvement led to eventual implementation success at both sites, despite difficulties encountered during the initial stages of the project. Discussion There has been a lack of research, particularly in resource-limited primary care settings, on strategies for abating provider anxiety and preparing them to manage complex changes associated with EHR uptake. The partnership model described in this paper may provide useful insights into the work shepherded by HIT regional extension centers dedicated to supporting resource-limited communities disproportionally affected by EHR adoption barriers. Conclusion NMHC, similar to other primary care settings, are often poorly resourced, understaffed, and lack the necessary expertise to deploy EHR and integrate its use into their day-to-day practice. This study demonstrates that implementation of EHR, a prerequisite to meaningful use, can be successfully achieved in this setting, and partnership efforts extending far beyond the initial software deployment stage may be the key. PMID:21828225

  13. Primary Care DirectConnect: How the Marriage of Call Center Technology and the EMR Brought Dramatic Results—A Service Quality Improvement Study

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Brent; Smith, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Of the key Health Plan patient satisfaction measures used in Kaiser Permanente Colorado, ease of contacting the physician's office with a medical question was consistently rated as the lowest quarterly patient satisfaction measure. Furthermore, medical office staff had become dissatisfied with their inability to contact patients who had previously left messages. In addition to the shear volume of messages, the return calls were often unanswered, leading to subsequent attempts to reach patients, creating additional work for medical office staff. DirectConnect—the project name for a system and set of processes focused on improving patient satisfaction with the ability to contact Primary Care delivery teams by telephone—focuses on isolating medical advice calls from the other types of calls handled by the centralized Call Center. The system identifies the patient using his/her unique electronic medical record number, then automatically routes medical advice calls directly to the appropriate Primary Care Physician (PCP) or staff. The clinician may then evaluate and respond to the patient's need quickly, thus managing more of their panel's requests in real time. How is DirectConnect different from simply having the patient contact their PCP's office directly? The primary difference is “one-number” convenience that allows all patients to dial one number to access their PCP's team. In addition, calls are routed to various staff as available to reduce long telephone queues and wait times. The DirectConnect system has resulted in statistically significant improvement in key service quality measures. Patient satisfaction improved from a pre-implementation nine quarter mean of 55.9% to a post-implementation 12 quarter mean of 70.2%. Fourteen percent to 17% of all Primary Care calls are now handled by the patient's home medical office team, creating a 54% improvement in the centralized Call Center's speed of answering calls in the first quarter post implementation—making no additions to medical office staffing levels. The efficiencies gained by directly connecting medical advice-seeking patients with their Primary Care team resulted in an estimated savings of 198 and 247 cumulative hours per week in unnecessary telephone work for Call Center and medical office staff regionwide. PMID:20740112

  14. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva-related activated activin-like kinase signaling enhances osteoclast formation during heterotopic ossification in muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Yano, Masato; Kawao, Naoyuki; Okumoto, Katsumi; Tamura, Yukinori; Okada, Kiyotaka; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-06-13

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is characterized by extensive ossification within muscle tissues, and its molecular pathogenesis is responsible for the constitutively activating mutation (R206H) of the bone morphogenetic protein type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2). In this study, we investigated the effects of implanting ALK2 (R206H)-transfected myoblastic C2C12 cells into nude mice on osteoclast formation during heterotopic ossification in muscle and subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells with BMP-2 in nude mice induced robust heterotopic ossification with an increase in the formation of osteoclasts in muscle tissues but not in subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells in muscle induced heterotopic ossification more effectively than that of empty vector-transfected cells. A co-culture of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells as well as the conditioned medium from ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells enhanced osteoclast formation in Raw264.7 cells more effectively than those with empty vector-transfected cells. The transfection of ALK2 (R206H) into C2C12 cells elevated the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-?, whereas the inhibition of TGF-? signaling suppressed the enhanced formation of osteoclasts in the co-culture with ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells and their conditioned medium. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the causal mutation transfection of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in myoblasts enhanced the formation of osteoclasts from its precursor through TGF-? in muscle tissues. PMID:24798338

  15. Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva-related Activated Activin-like Kinase Signaling Enhances Osteoclast Formation during Heterotopic Ossification in Muscle Tissues*

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Masato; Kawao, Naoyuki; Okumoto, Katsumi; Tamura, Yukinori; Okada, Kiyotaka; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva is characterized by extensive ossification within muscle tissues, and its molecular pathogenesis is responsible for the constitutively activating mutation (R206H) of the bone morphogenetic protein type 1 receptor, activin-like kinase 2 (ALK2). In this study, we investigated the effects of implanting ALK2 (R206H)-transfected myoblastic C2C12 cells into nude mice on osteoclast formation during heterotopic ossification in muscle and subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells with BMP-2 in nude mice induced robust heterotopic ossification with an increase in the formation of osteoclasts in muscle tissues but not in subcutaneous tissues. The implantation of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells in muscle induced heterotopic ossification more effectively than that of empty vector-transfected cells. A co-culture of ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells as well as the conditioned medium from ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells enhanced osteoclast formation in Raw264.7 cells more effectively than those with empty vector-transfected cells. The transfection of ALK2 (R206H) into C2C12 cells elevated the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-?, whereas the inhibition of TGF-? signaling suppressed the enhanced formation of osteoclasts in the co-culture with ALK2 (R206H)-transfected C2C12 cells and their conditioned medium. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the causal mutation transfection of fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva in myoblasts enhanced the formation of osteoclasts from its precursor through TGF-? in muscle tissues. PMID:24798338

  16. The development of a rat model to investigate the formation of blast-related post-traumatic heterotopic ossification.

    PubMed

    Polfer, E M; Hope, D N; Elster, E A; Qureshi, A T; Davis, T A; Golden, D; Potter, B K; Forsberg, J A

    2015-04-01

    Currently, there is no animal model in which to evaluate the underlying physiological processes leading to the heterotopic ossification (HO) which forms in most combat-related and blast wounds. We sought to reproduce the ossification that forms under these circumstances in a rat by emulating patterns of injury seen in patients with severe injuries resulting from blasts. We investigated whether exposure to blast overpressure increased the prevalence of HO after transfemoral amputation performed within the zone of injury. We exposed rats to a blast overpressure alone (BOP-CTL), crush injury and femoral fracture followed by amputation through the zone of injury (AMP-CTL) or a combination of these (BOP-AMP). The presence of HO was evaluated using radiographs, micro-CT and histology. HO developed in none of nine BOP-CTL, six of nine AMP-CTL, and in all 20 BOP-AMP rats. Exposure to blast overpressure increased the prevalence of HO. This model may thus be used to elucidate cellular and molecular pathways of HO, the effect of varying intensities of blast overpressure, and to evaluate new means of prophylaxis and treatment of heterotopic ossification. PMID:25820900

  17. Who may benefit from preoperative breast MRI? A single-center analysis of 1102 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Debald, Manuel; Abramian, Alina; Nemes, Lisa; Döbler, Michael; Kaiser, Christina; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Leutner, Claudia; Höller, Tobias; Braun, Michael; Kuhl, Christiane; Kuhn, Walther; Schild, Hans H

    2015-10-01

    Several authors question the potential benefit of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) against the background of possible overdiagnosis, false-positive findings, and unnecessary resections in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer. In order to reveal a better selection of patients who should undergo preoperative MRI after histological confirmed breast cancer, the present analysis was implemented. We aimed to evaluate the influence of preoperative breast MRI in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer to find subgroups of patients that are most likely to benefit from preoperative MRI by the detection of occult malignant foci. A total of 1102 consecutive patients who underwent treatment for primary breast cancer between 2002 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent triple assessment by breast ultrasound, mammography, and bilateral breast MRI. MRI findings not seen on conventional imaging that suggested additional malignant disease was found in 344 cases (31.2 %). Histological confirmed malignant foci were found in 223 patients (20.2 %) within the index breast and in 28 patients (2.5 %) in the contralateral breast. The rate of false-negative biopsies was 31 (2.8 %) and 62 (5.6 %), respectively. Premenopausal women (p = 0.024), lobular invasive breast cancer (p = 0.02) as well as patients with high breast density [American College of Radiology (ACR) 3 + 4; p = 0.01] were significantly associated with additional malignant foci in the index breast. Multivariate analysis confirmed lobular histology (p = 0.041) as well as the co-factors "premenopausal stage" and "high breast density (ACR 3+4)" (p = 0.044) to be independently significant. Previous studies revealed that breast MRI is a reliable tool for predicting tumor extension as well as for the detection of additional ipsilateral and contralateral tumor foci in histological confirmed breast cancer. In the present study, we demonstrate that especially premenopausal patients with high breast density as well as patients with lobular histology seem to profit from preoperative MRI. PMID:26323190

  18. RISQy business (Relationships, Incentives, Supports, and Quality): evolution of the British Columbia Model of Primary Care (patient-centered medical home).

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Dan; Hollander, Marcus J

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, the British Columbia Ministry of Health and the British Columbia Medical Association (now Doctors of BC) came together to form the British Columbia General Practice Services Committee to bring about transformative change in primary care in British Columbia, Canada. This committee's approach to primary care was to respond to an operational problem--the decline of family practice in British Columbia--with an operational solution--assist general practitioners to provide better care by introducing new incentive fees into the fee-for-service payment schedule, and by providing additional training to general practitioners. This may be referred to as a "soft power" approach, which can be summarized in the abbreviation RISQ: focus on Relationships; provide Incentives for general practitioners to spend more time with their patients and provide guidelines-based care; Support general practitioners by developing learning modules to improve their practices; and, through the incentive payments and learning modules, provide better Quality care to patients and improved satisfaction to physicians. There are many similarities between the British Columbian approach to primary care and the US patient-centered medical home. PMID:24867550

  19. Race/Ethnicity, Primary Language, and Income Are Not Demographic Drivers of Mortality in Breast Cancer Patients at a Diverse Safety Net Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Divya A.; Chudasama, Rani; Agarwal, Ankit; Rand, Alexandar; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Ngo, Taylor; Hirsch, Ariel E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine the impact of patient demographics on mortality in breast cancer patients receiving care at a safety net academic medical center. Patients and Methods. 1128 patients were diagnosed with breast cancer at our institution between August 2004 and October 2011. Patient demographics were determined as follows: race/ethnicity, primary language, insurance type, age at diagnosis, marital status, income (determined by zip code), and AJCC tumor stage. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors related to mortality at the end of follow-up in March 2012. Results. There was no significant difference in mortality by race/ethnicity, primary language, insurance type, or income in the multivariate adjusted model. An increased mortality was observed in patients who were single (OR = 2.36, CI = 1.28–4.37, p = 0.006), age > 70 years (OR = 3.88, CI = 1.13–11.48, p = 0.014), and AJCC stage IV (OR = 171.81, CI = 59.99–492.06, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. In this retrospective study, breast cancer patients who were single, presented at a later stage, or were older had increased incidence of mortality. Unlike other large-scale studies, non-White race, non-English primary language, low income, or Medicaid insurance did not result in worse outcomes. PMID:26605089

  20. Psychosocial Risk Factors, Interventions, and Comorbidity in Patients with Non-Specific Low Back Pain in Primary Care: Need for Comprehensive and Patient-Centered Care

    PubMed Central

    Ramond-Roquin, Aline; Bouton, Céline; Bègue, Cyril; Petit, Audrey; Roquelaure, Yves; Huez, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Non-specific low back pain (LBP) affects many people and has major socio-economic consequences. Traditional therapeutic strategies, mainly focused on biomechanical factors, have had moderate and short-term impact. Certain psychosocial factors have been linked to poor prognosis of LBP and they are increasingly considered as promising targets for management of LBP. Primary health care providers (HCPs) are involved in most of the management of people with LBP and they are skilled in providing comprehensive care, including consideration of psychosocial dimensions. This review aims to discuss three pieces of recent research focusing on psychosocial issues in LBP patients in primary care. In the first systematic review, the patients’ or HCPs’ overall judgment about the likely evolution of LBP was the factor most strongly linked to poor outcome, with predictive validity similar to that of multidimensional scales. This result may be explained by the implicit aggregation of many prognostic factors underlying this judgment and suggests the relevance of considering the patients from biopsychosocial and longitudinal points of view. The second review showed that most of the interventions targeting psychosocial factors in LBP in primary care have to date focused on the cognitive-behavioral factors, resulting in little impact. It is unlikely that any intervention focusing on a single factor would ever fit the needs of most patients; interventions targeting determinants from several fields (mainly psychosocial, biomechanical, and occupational) may be more relevant. Should multiple stakeholders be involved in such interventions, enhanced interprofessional collaboration would be critical to ensure the delivery of coordinated care. Finally, in the third study, the prevalence of psychosocial comorbidity in chronic LBP patients was not found to be significantly higher than in other patients consulting in primary care. Rather than specifically screening for psychosocial conditions, this suggests taking into account any potential comorbidity in patients with chronic LBP, as in other patients. All these results support the adoption of a more comprehensive and patient-centered approach when dealing with patients with LBP in primary care. As this condition is illustrative of many situations encountered in primary care, the strategies proposed here may benefit most patients consulting in this setting. PMID:26501062

  1. Management of pelvic heterotopic ossification post-myocutaneous flap reconstruction of a sacral pressure ulcer

    PubMed Central

    McInnes, Colin W; Reynolds, Richard AK; Arneja, Jugpal S

    2011-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a process whereby lamellar bone forms in the soft tissues surrounding a joint. The most common type of HO is traumatic myositis ossificans, which develops following traumatic injuries, burns or arthroplasty. A variety of other forms of HO also exist, such as those associated with central nervous system injury and systemic forms that can manifest at other joints simultaneously. Clinically, patients can present with decreased range of motion, pressure ulcers, nerve compression, swelling, pain or asymptomatically. Symptomatic patients are most commonly treated with surgical debridement of the affected heterotopic deposits. Spinal dysraphism (SD) is a term describing a wide range of congenital malformations of the neural tube, ranging from spina bifida occulta to the more severe form, myelomeningocele. The cause of SD is multifactorial and has been associated with chromosomal disorders, teratogenic exposure and folate deficiency. Many patients with SD experience neuropathy below the affected neurological level, making them particularly susceptible to pressure ulcers. If these ulcers are severe and do not respond to conservative therapy, they often require surgical debridement and flap reconstruction – a clinical scenario that rarely results in HO. The present article describes a case involving a patient with pelvic HO following myocutaneous flap reconstruction of a pressure ulcer. The patient was successfully treated with oral bisphosphonate and aggressive physiotherapy. PMID:22654535

  2. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takehito Kondo, Eri; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inamoto, Masataka; Kiyosu, Chiyo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2008-11-07

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification.

  3. Skeletal ossification impairment in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after exposure to lead acetate.

    PubMed

    Hassanain, Mohey A; Abbas, Wafaa T; Ibrahim, Taghreed B

    2012-08-01

    Heavy metal pollution represents a serious problem facing many of the aquatic organisms. Lead is one of the most toxic elements found in many industrial effluents which are metabolized inside bodies and can cause skeletal deformities by impairing developmental processes and bone formation. This study was undertaken to determine the LC50 of Pb-acetate and detect the effect of 1/10 LC50 exposure on fingerlings of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Modern and accurate diagnostic methods were used; Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of gills, plain X-ray and Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) of the spinal column to explain the elemental analysis. The results indicated that the 96 h LC50 of lead acetate was 146.8 mg L(-1). SEM showed a distinct degeneration in gill filaments and pavement cells with increasing of mucus secretion after lead exposure. X-ray revealed slight dorsal spinal curvature. EDX analysis of the spinal column of treated fish showed decrease in calcium and phosphorus weight percents, on the other hand Pb appeared in treated fish but not in control ones. Finally this study can spot a light on the dangerous effects of lead toxicity in developing of fish and impairment of their skeletal ossification which may lead to skeletal deformities. PMID:24171258

  4. Tissue Engineering Whole Bones Through Endochondral Ossification: Regenerating the Distal Phalanx.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Eamon J; Mesallati, Tariq; Kelly, Lara; Vinardell, Tatiana; Buckley, Conor T; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies are urgently required to facilitate regeneration of entire bones lost due to trauma or disease. In this study, we present a novel framework for the regeneration of whole bones by tissue engineering anatomically shaped hypertrophic cartilaginous grafts in vitro that subsequently drive endochondral bone formation in vivo. To realize this, we first fabricated molds from digitized images to generate mesenchymal stem cell-laden alginate hydrogels in the shape of different bones (the temporomandibular joint [TMJ] condyle and the distal phalanx). These constructs could be stimulated in vitro to generate anatomically shaped hypertrophic cartilaginous tissues that had begun to calcify around their periphery. Constructs were then formed into the shape of the distal phalanx to create the hypertrophic precursor of the osseous component of an engineered long bone. A layer of cartilage engineered through self-assembly of chondrocytes served as the articular surface of these constructs. Following chondrogenic priming and subcutaneous implantation, the hypertrophic phase of the engineered phalanx underwent endochondral ossification, leading to the generation of a vascularized bone integrated with a covering layer of stable articular cartilage. Furthermore, spatial bone deposition within the construct could be modulated by altering the architecture of the osseous component before implantation. These findings open up new horizons to whole limb regeneration by recapitulating key aspects of normal bone development. PMID:26309799

  5. Uremia Induces Dental Pulp Ossification but Reciprocally Inhibits Adjacent Alveolar Bone Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Yu; Chang, Zee-Fen; Chau, Yat-Pang; Chen, Ann; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng; Yang, An-Hang

    2015-11-01

    Uremic patients are predisposed to atrophy of the alveolar bone and narrowing of the dental pulp chamber. Such pulp chamber changes have only been diagnosed radiologically; however, this has not been supported by any pathological evidence. We used a uremic rat model with secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by 5/6 nephrectomy surgery and high-phosphate diet to examine the dental pulp and adjacent alveolar bone pathology. In addition, we collected pulp tissues for real-time PCR. We found an opposite histopathological presentation of the ossified dental pulp and the osteomalacic adjacent alveolar bone. Furthermore, pulp cells with positive staining for Thy-1, a surrogate stem cell marker, were significantly reduced in the pulp of uremic rats compared to the controls, indicating a paucity of stem cells. This was further evidenced by the reduced pulp expression of dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1), a Wnt/?-catenin signaling inhibitor produced by mesenchymal stem cells. In contrast, expressions of receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B ligand (RANKL) and RANK in uremic pulp were up-regulated, probably to counteract the ossifying process of uremic pulp. In conclusion, uremic pulp ossifications were associated with a paucity of stem cells and dysregulated Dkk-1 and RANKL signaling systems, further shifting the imbalance toward osteogenesis. Strategies to counteract such an imbalance may offer a potential therapeutic target to improve dental health in uremic patients, which warrants further interventional studies. PMID:26126938

  6. Association of vitamin D deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and heterotopic ossification in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Oleson, Christina V; Seidel, Benjamin J; Zhan, Tingting

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to explore the relationship between low vitamin D, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and heterotopic ossification (HO) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Ninety-six subjects with acute or chronic motor complete SCI participated. Levels of serum vitamin D25(OH), calcium, and intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) were collected, and information regarding nutritional patterns and fracture history was obtained from subjects. Evidence of current or previous HO was ascertained through chart review. Of the 96 subjects, 12 were found to have developed HO, 11 with serum vitamin D25(OH) between 5 and 17 ng/mL. Nine subjects exhibited secondary hyperparathyroidism in the range of 72 to 169 pg/mL. Only one subject demonstrated HO in the absence of low vitamin D. However, many subjects with low vitamin D (5-31 ng/mL) did not have hyperparathyroidism or HO. Statistical testing demonstrated a correlation between hyperparathyroidism and HO (p < 0.001) as well as hyperparathyroidism and vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL). Direct correlation between HO and low vitamin D was not observed, but hyperparathyroidism may increase this risk. We believe that those patients who demonstrate low vitamin D and elevated PTH should be screened for HO in addition to beginning vitamin supplementation. Initiating early treatment of low vitamin D to restore therapeutic levels may prevent development of HO. PMID:24458959

  7. Tissue Engineering Whole Bones Through Endochondral Ossification: Regenerating the Distal Phalanx

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Eamon J.; Mesallati, Tariq; Kelly, Lara; Vinardell, Tatiana; Buckley, Conor T.; Kelly, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Novel strategies are urgently required to facilitate regeneration of entire bones lost due to trauma or disease. In this study, we present a novel framework for the regeneration of whole bones by tissue engineering anatomically shaped hypertrophic cartilaginous grafts in vitro that subsequently drive endochondral bone formation in vivo. To realize this, we first fabricated molds from digitized images to generate mesenchymal stem cell-laden alginate hydrogels in the shape of different bones (the temporomandibular joint [TMJ] condyle and the distal phalanx). These constructs could be stimulated in vitro to generate anatomically shaped hypertrophic cartilaginous tissues that had begun to calcify around their periphery. Constructs were then formed into the shape of the distal phalanx to create the hypertrophic precursor of the osseous component of an engineered long bone. A layer of cartilage engineered through self-assembly of chondrocytes served as the articular surface of these constructs. Following chondrogenic priming and subcutaneous implantation, the hypertrophic phase of the engineered phalanx underwent endochondral ossification, leading to the generation of a vascularized bone integrated with a covering layer of stable articular cartilage. Furthermore, spatial bone deposition within the construct could be modulated by altering the architecture of the osseous component before implantation. These findings open up new horizons to whole limb regeneration by recapitulating key aspects of normal bone development. PMID:26309799

  8. Surgery for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Yang, Hui-Lin; Wang, Gen-Lin; Gu, Yong; Pan, Wen-Ming; Dong, Ren-Bin; Qiu, Zhi-Jie; Wu, Ji-Bin; Mei, Xin

    2009-10-01

    Between January 1996 and December 2003, our department treated 16 patients (10 men and 6 women; average age 57.5 years) by performing a laminectomy for thoracic myelopathy caused by ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF). We followed up all patients for 36 to 86 months (mean follow-up time, 57.3 months). The mean (+/-standard deviation) Japanese Orthopaedic Association score increased from 5.0+/-1.4 points before the operation to 7.7+/-1.9 points at the last follow-up (p<0.01). The average values for pre-operative and post-operative kyphosis of the involved vertebrae were 5.8 degrees +/-4.1 degrees and 8.8 degrees +/-6.0 degrees , respectively; the mean increase in kyphosis was only 3.0 degrees +/-2.4 degrees . An intraoperative dural tear was the main complication and none of the patients developed severe neurological complications. We conclude that laminectomy was both effective and safe in the treatment of thoracic OLF, but it must be performed with great care because of frequent dural adhesions to the OLF. The increase in kyphosis after the laminectomy was minimal when most of the facet joints were left intact and when the patient followed a back extensor exercise program post-operatively. PMID:19564112

  9. Spontaneous Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Associated with Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dachuan; Wang, Haifeng; Shen, Wun-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Intradural herniation of a cervical disc is rare; less than 35 cases have been reported to date. A 52-year-old man with preexisting ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament developed severe neck pain with Lt hemiparesis while asleep. Neurological exam was consistent with Brown-Séquard syndrome. Magnetic resonance images showed a C5-6 herniated disc that was adjacent to the ossified ligament and indenting the cord. The mass was surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity margin, and caudally the ventral dura line appears divided into two, consistent with the “Y-sign” described by Sasaji et al. Cord edema were noted. Because of preexisting canal stenosis and spinal cord at risk, a laminoplasty was performed, followed by an anterior C6 corpectomy. Spot-weld type adhesions of the posterior longitudinal ligament to the dura was noted, along with a longitudinal tear in the dura. An intradural extra-arachnoid fragment of herniated disc was removed. Clinical exam at 6 months after surgery revealed normal muscle strength but persistent mild paresthesias. It is difficult to make a definite diagnosis of intradural herniation preoperatively; however, the clinical findings and radiographic signs mentioned above are suggestive and should alert the surgeon to look for an intradural fragment. PMID:25295205

  10. Clinicopathological Characteristics and Survival Outcomes of Primary Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma in the Stomach: Retrospective Analysis of Single Center Database

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaowen; Cai, Hong; Sheng, Weiqi; Yu, Lin; Long, Ziwen; Shi, Yingqiang; Wang, Yanong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the clinicopathological features and prognosis of signet ring cell carcinoma of the stomach (SRC). Methods A total of 1464 gastric cancer patients who underwent curative gastrectomy from 2000 to 2008 at a single center were evaluated. Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRC) was defined as the presence of at least 50% signet ring cells in the pathologic specimen. The clinicopathological parameters and prognosis of SRC were analyzed by comparing with non-signet ring cell carcinoma (NSRC). Results Of 1464 patients, 138 patients (9.4%) were classified as SRC. There were significant differences in gender, age, tumor location, TNM stage, p21 expression, and p53 expression between SRC and NSRC. The 5-year survival rates of SRC and NSRC were 36.2% and 49.5%, respectively. The prognosis of SRC was poorer than that of NSRC (P <0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that SRC histology was an independent factor for poor prognosis (P <0.001). Conclusion Patients with SRC tend to present with a more advanced stage and poorer prognosis than patients with other types of gastric carcinoma. PMID:26642199

  11. Potential prescription patterns and errors in elderly adult patients attending public primary health care centers in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Corona-Rojo, José Antonio; Altagracia-Martínez, Marina; Kravzov-Jinich, Jaime; Vázquez-Cervantes, Laura; Pérez-Montoya, Edilberto; Rubio-Poo, Consuelo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Six out of every 10 elderly persons live in developing countries. Objective To analyze and assess the drug prescription patterns and errors in elderly outpatients attending public health care centers in Mexico City, Mexico. Materials and methods A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted in 2007. Fourteen hundred prescriptions were analyzed. Prescriptions of ambulatory adults aged >70 years who were residents of Mexico City for at least two years were included. Prescription errors were divided into two groups: (1) administrative and legal, and (2) pharmacotherapeutic. In group 2, we analyzed drug dose strength, administration route, frequency of drug administration, treatment length, potential drug–drug interactions, and contraindications. Variables were classified as correct or incorrect based on clinical literature. Variables for each drug were dichotomized as correct (0) or incorrect (1). A Prescription Index (PI) was calculated by considering each drug on the prescription. SPSS statistical software was used to process the collected data (95% confidence interval; p <0.05). Results The drug prescription pattern in elderly outpatients shows that 12 drugs account for 70.72% (2880) of prescribed drugs. The most prescribed drugs presented potential pharmacotherapeutic errors (as defined in the present study). Acetylsalicylic acid–captopril was the most common potential interaction (not clinically assessed). Potential prescription error was high (53% of total prescriptions). Most of the prescription errors were due to omissions of dosage, administration route, and length of treatment and may potentially cause harm to the elderly outpatients. Conclusions A high number of potential prescription errors were found, mainly due to omissions. The drug prescription pattern of the study population is mainly constituted by 12 drugs. The results indicate that prescription quality depends on the number of prescribed drugs per prescription (p < 0.000). PMID:19750234

  12. Elastic Vibrations in the Photosynthetic Bacterial Reaction Center Coupled to the Primary Charge Separation: Implications from Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Stochastic Langevin Approach.

    PubMed

    Milanovsky, Georgy E; Shuvalov, Vladimir A; Semenov, Alexey Yu; Cherepanov, Dmitry A

    2015-10-29

    Primary electron transfer reactions in the bacterial reaction center are difficult for theoretical explication: the reaction kinetics, almost unalterable over a wide range of temperature and free energy changes, revealed oscillatory features observed initially by Shuvalov and coauthors (1997, 2002). Here the reaction mechanism was studied by molecular dynamics and analyzed within a phenomenological Langevin approach. The spectral function of polarization around the bacteriochlorophyll special pair PLPM and the dielectric response upon the formation of PL(+)PM(-) dipole within the special pair were calculated. The system response was approximated by Langevin oscillators; the respective frequencies, friction, and energy coupling coefficients were determined. The protein dynamics around PL and PM were distinctly asymmetric. The polarization around PL included slow modes with the frequency 30-80 cm(-1) and the total amplitude of 130 mV. Two main low-frequency modes of protein response around PM had frequencies of 95 and 155 cm(-1) and the total amplitude of 30 mV. In addition, a slowly damping mode with the frequency of 118 cm(-1) and the damping time >1.1 ps was coupled to the formation of PL(+)PM(-) dipole. It was attributed to elastic vibrations of ?-helices in the vicinity of PLPM. The proposed trapping of P excitation energy in the form of the elastic vibrations can rationalize the observed properties of the primary electron transfer reactions, namely, the unusual temperature and ?G dependences, the oscillating phenomena in kinetics, and the asymmetry of the charge separation reactions. PMID:26148224

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Depressive Symptoms and Resiliency among African American Women in a Community-Based Primary Health Care Center

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Kisha B.; Bradford, L. Dianne; Hall, Stephanie P.; Belton, Allyson S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional pilot study was to determine the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms and resiliency among 290 African American women (AAW) in a community-based primary health care center. Descriptive statistics, Pearson product-moment correlation, and logistic regression analyses were conducted. Findings indicate that depressive symptoms are experienced by 49% of the participants, while 10% indicated a history of suicidal ideation. Participants had moderately high resiliency scores that had a statistically significant inverse relationship with depressive symptoms. This suggests that resiliency is potentially a protective factor for depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were positively correlated with participants’ diagnosis of at least one chronic disease. The strongest predictors of depressive symptoms were previous diagnoses of a mental health condition and unemployment. This study identifies risk and potential protective factors for depression among a clinic sample of AAW. PMID:24241263

  14. Evaluation of input and process components of quality of child health services provided at 24 × 7 primary health centers of a district in Central Gujarat

    PubMed Central

    Chavda, Paragkumar; Misra, Shobha

    2015-01-01

    Context: With the critical Indian challenge on child survival and health, time is ripe to initiate focus on quality of services apart from measuring coverage, to bring about improvements. Aims: To assess the quality of child health services provided at 24 × 7 Primary Health Centers of Vadodara District in Gujarat in terms of Input and Process Indicators. Settings and Design: The study was carried out in 12 randomly chosen 24 × 7 Primary Health Centers (PHCs) of Vadodara district using a modified quality assessment checklist of the Program on District Quality Assurance for Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) services with use of scores from May 2010 to June 2011. Subjects and Methods: Inputs assessment was done by facility survey. Process assessment for the four child health service components used actual observation of service, review of records and interview of service providers and clients. Results: The mean obtained score for facilities in Input section was 65%. Highest score was obtained for Drugs and Consumables (86%) followed by Equipments and Supplies (74%). The score obtained for Infrastructure facility was 65%, Personnel and training was 56% and Essential protocols and guidelines scored 43%. The mean obtained score in the process section was 55%. Highest scores were obtained for immunization at 76%. This was followed by newborn care (52%), growth monitoring (52%). management of sick child (41%). Conclusion: Quality improvement efforts should focus not only on resource-intensive structural improvements, but also on cost-effective measures at improving service delivery process, especially adherence to service guidelines by providers. PMID:26288773

  15. Use of calcitonin in recalcitrant phantom limb pain complicated by heterotopic ossification

    PubMed Central

    Viana, Ricardo; Payne, Michael WC

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a common complication after amputation, affecting up to 80% of the amputee population. However, only 5% to 10% of amputees have severe PLP impacting daily function. The present report details the management of severe, treatment-resistant PLP in a 72-year-old man with a traumatic left transradial amputation and a comorbid complication of heterotopic ossification (HO). OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of PLP with HO and the possible role of calcitonin in the treatment of both conditions. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature regarding the management of PLP. RESULTS: Seventeen articles that directly addressed PLP were identified; 11 were randomized controlled trials. All involved small samples and follow-up ranged from 6 h to one year, with the majority limited to six weeks. DISCUSSION: In the present case, medication management was limited by side effects, lack of response and the patient’s desire to avoid long-term medication. Investigations revealed HO, which was suspected to envelop the median nerve in the proximal forearm. After several unsuccessful medication trials, the literature was reviewed in search of common variables between HO formation and persistent PLP. Ultimately, the biochemical effects associated with nerve injury were identified to be a possible factor in both HO and PLP development. Calcitonin’s proposed mechanisms of action may help to manage HO and PLP at multiple stages of disease development and maintenance. In the present case, a four-week trial of intranasal calcitonin was successful, with pain control lasting at least 18 months. CONCLUSION: The present case report provided a review of the current literature in PLP pharmacological management and the current understanding of the etiology of PLP and HO, as well as how the two may coexist. It also provided an opportunity to discuss the proposed mechanisms of action of calcitonin in the management of PLP and HO. PMID:26291126

  16. Influence of transcutaneous electrical stimulation on heterotopic ossification: an experimental study in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Zotz, T.G.G.; de Paula, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a metaplastic biological process in which there is newly formed bone in soft tissues, resulting in joint mobility deficit and pain. Different treatment modalities have been tried to prevent HO development, but there is no consensus on a therapeutic approach. Since electrical stimulation is a widely used resource in physiotherapy practice to stimulate joint mobility, with analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, its usefulness for HO treatment was investigated. We aimed to identify the influence of electrical stimulation on induced HO in Wistar rats. Thirty-six male rats (350-390 g) were used, and all animals were anesthetized for blood sampling before HO induction, to quantify the serum alkaline phosphatase. HO induction was performed by bone marrow implantation in both quadriceps of the animals, which were then divided into 3 groups: control (CG), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) group (TG), and functional electrical stimulation (FES) group (FG) with 12 rats each. All animals were anesthetized and electrically stimulated twice per week, for 35 days from induction day. After this period, another blood sample was collected and quadriceps muscles were bilaterally removed for histological and calcium analysis and the rats were killed. Calcium levels in muscles showed significantly lower results when comparing TG and FG (P<0.001) and between TG and CG (P<0.001). Qualitative histological analyses confirmed 100% HO in FG and CG, while in TG the HO was detected in 54.5% of the animals. The effects of the muscle contractions caused by FES increased HO, while anti-inflammatory effects of TENS reduced HO. PMID:26292223

  17. Progress on clinical characteristics and identification of location of thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fa-bo; Sun, Chui-guo; Chen, Zhong-qiang

    2015-05-01

    Thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (TOLF) is the most common cause for thoracic spinal stenosis. TOLF is usually complicated by thoracic disc herniation, ossi?cation of the posterior longitudinal ligament and degenerative spinal diseases such as cervical spondylosis and lumbar spinal stenosis, and the ossi?cation also usually has a discontinuous or continuous multi-segment distribution. The resultant superposition of several symptoms makes the clinical manifestations complex. Currently, the diagnosis of TOLF depends mainly on the patient's symptoms, physical examination and thoracic CT and MRI examinations. Identification of the location of TOLF depends more on the doctor's subjective judgement. Diagnostic problems are related to the specific region and level of surgical decompression: if the extent of decompression is insufficient, the treatment is inadequate, resulting in residual symptoms. Obversely, unnecessary trauma and a various complications will occur if the decompression is too extensive. Hence, the clinical features and process of diagnosis, especially the means of identifying the location, still require further improvement. It is necessary to establish a simple and accurate means of identifying the segment of TOLF that is responsible for the neurologic deficit: a number of spinal surgeons have been working hard on this. This article will provided an overview of the clinical features of TOLF and the related problems of clinical identification of the location of the segment causing the neurological deficit. The relationship between the imaging manifestations and clinical characteristics still need to be explored with the aim of establishing a simple and precise method for determining precisely whether TOLF is related to spinal cord injury or not, thus reducing surgical trauma and achieving an optimal prognosis. PMID:26033987

  18. Risk of Radiation-Induced Malignancy With Heterotopic Ossification Prophylaxis: A Case–Control Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sheybani, Arshin; TenNapel, Mindi J.; Lack, William D.; Clerkin, Patrick; Hyer, Daniel E.; Sun, Wenqing; Jacobson, Geraldine M.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of radiation-induced malignancy after prophylactic treatment for heterotopic ossification (HO). Methods and Materials: A matched case–control study was conducted within a population-based cohort of 3489 patients treated either for acetabular fractures with acetabular open reduction internal fixation or who underwent total hip arthroplasty from 1990 to 2009. Record-linkage techniques identified patients who were diagnosed with a malignancy from our state health registry. Patients with a prior history of malignancy were excluded from the cohort. For each documented case of cancer, 2 controls were selected by stratified random sampling from the cohort that did not develop a malignancy. Matching factors were sex, age at time of hip treatment, and duration of follow-up. Results: A total of 243 patients were diagnosed with a malignancy after hip treatment. Five patients were excluded owing to inadequate follow-up time in the corresponding control cohort. A cohort of 238 cases (control, 476 patients) was included. Mean follow-up was 10 years, 12 years in the control group. In the cancer cohort, 4% of patients had radiation therapy (RT), compared with 7% in the control group. Of the 9 patients diagnosed with cancer after RT, none occurred within the field. The mean latency period was 5.9 years in the patients who received RT and 6.6 years in the patients who did not. Median (range) age at time of cancer diagnosis in patients who received RT was 62 (43-75) years, compared with 70 (32-92) years in the non-RT patients. An ad hoc analysis was subsequently performed in all 2749 patients who were not matched and found neither an increased incidence of malignancy nor a difference in distribution of type of malignancy. Conclusion: We were unable to demonstrate an increased risk of malignancy in patients who were treated with RT for HO prophylaxis compared with those who were not.

  19. Cost of Radiotherapy Versus NSAID Administration for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Jonathan B. Chen, Sea S.; Shah, Anand P.; Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO), or abnormal bone formation, is a common sequela of total hip arthroplasty. This abnormal bone can impair joint function and must be surgically removed to restore mobility. HO can be prevented by postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or radiotherapy (RT). NSAIDs are associated with multiple toxicities, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Although RT has been shown to be more efficacious than NSAIDs at preventing HO, its cost-effectiveness has been questioned. Methods and Materials: We performed an analysis of the cost of postoperative RT to the hip compared with NSAID administration, taking into account the costs of surgery for HO formation, treatment-induced morbidity, and productivity loss from missed work. The costs of RT, surgical revision, and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated using the 2007 Medicare Fee Schedule and inpatient diagnosis-related group codes. The cost of lost wages was estimated using the 2006 median salary data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Results: The cost of administering RT was estimated at $899 vs. $20 for NSAID use. After accounting for the additional costs associated with revision total hip arthroplasty and gastrointestinal bleeding, the corresponding estimated costs were $1,208 vs. $930. Conclusion: If the costs associated with treatment failure and treatment-induced morbidity are considered, the cost of NSAIDs approaches that of RT. Other NSAID morbidities and quality-of-life differences that are difficult to quantify add to the cost of NSAIDs. These considerations have led us to recommend RT as the preferred modality for use in prophylaxis against HO after total hip arthroplasty, even when the cost is considered.

  20. Effects of aging on osteogenic response and heterotopic ossification following burn injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jonathan R; Eboda, Oluwatobi N; Brownley, R Cameron; Cilwa, Katherine E; Pratt, Lauren E; De La Rosa, Sara; Agarwal, Shailesh; Buchman, Steven R; Cederna, Paul S; Morris, Michael D; Wang, Stewart C; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-01-15

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a common and debilitating complication of burns, traumatic brain injuries, and musculoskeletal trauma and surgery. Although the exact mechanism of ectopic bone formation is unknown, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) capable of osteogenic differentiation are known to play an essential role. Interestingly, the prevalence of HO in the elderly population is low despite the high overall occurrence of musculoskeletal injury and orthopedic procedures. We hypothesized that a lower osteogenicity of MSCs would be associated with blunted HO formation in old compared with young mice. In vitro osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived MSCs from old (18-20 months) and young (6-8 weeks) C57/BL6 mice was assessed, with or without preceding burn injury. In vivo studies were then performed using an Achilles tenotomy with concurrent burn injury HO model. HO formation was quantified using ?CT scans, Raman spectroscopy, and histology. MSCs from young mice had more in vitro bone formation, upregulation of bone formation pathways, and higher activation of Smad and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B) signaling following burn injury. This effect was absent or blunted in cells from old mice. In young mice, burn injury significantly increased HO formation, NF-?B activation, and osteoclast activity at the tenotomy site. This blunted, reactive osteogenic response in old mice follows trends seen clinically and may be related to differences in the ability to mount acute inflammatory responses. This unique characterization of HO and MSC osteogenic differentiation following inflammatory insult establishes differences between age populations and suggests potential pathways that could be targeted in the future with therapeutics. PMID:25122460

  1. Novel surgical technique for ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament in the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Kato, Satoshi; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Several surgical procedures have been developed to treat thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). However, favorable surgical results are not always achieved, and consistent protocols and procedures for surgical treatment of thoracic OPLL have not been established. This technical note describes a novel technique to achieve anterior decompression via a single posterior approach. Three patients with a beak-type thoracic OPLL underwent surgery in which the authors' technique was used. Complete removal of the ossified PLL was achieved in all cases. With the patient in the prone position, the authors performed total resection of the posterior elements at the anterior decompression levels. This maneuver included not only laminectomies but also removal of the transverse processes and pedicles, which allowed space to be created bilaterally at the sides of the dural sac for the subsequent anterior decompression. The thoracic nerves at the levels of anterior decompression were ligated bilaterally and lifted up to manipulate the ossified ligament and the dural sac. An anterior decompression was then performed posteriorly. The PLL was floated without any difficulty. After exfoliation of the adhesions between the ossified ligament and the ventral aspect of the dural sac, the ossified PLL was removed. In every step of the anterior decompression, the space created in the bilateral sides of the dural sac allowed the surgeons to see the OPLL and anterolateral aspect of the dural sac directly and easily. After removal of the ossified PLL, posterior instrumented fusion was performed. This surgical procedure allows the surgeon to perform, safely and effectively, anterior decompression via a posterior approach for thoracic OPLL. PMID:23039177

  2. The impact of accreditation of primary healthcare centers: successes, challenges and policy implications as perceived by healthcare providers and directors in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2009, the Lebanese Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) launched the Primary Healthcare (PHC) accreditation program to improve quality across the continuum of care. The MOPH, with the support of Accreditation Canada, conducted the accreditation survey in 25 PHC centers in 2012. This paper aims to gain a better understanding of the impact of accreditation on quality of care as perceived by PHC staff members and directors; how accreditation affected staff and patient satisfaction; key enablers, challenges and strategies to improve implementation of accreditation in PHC. Methods The study was conducted in 25 PHC centers using a cross-sectional mixed methods approach; all staff members were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire whereas semi-structured interviews were conducted with directors. Results The scales measuring Management and Leadership had the highest mean score followed by Accreditation Impact, Human Resource Utilization, and Customer Satisfaction. Regression analysis showed that Strategic Quality Planning, Customer Satisfaction and Staff Involvement were associated with a perception of higher Quality Results. Directors emphasized the benefits of accreditation with regards to documentation, reinforcement of quality standards, strengthened relationships between PHC centers and multiple stakeholders and improved staff and patient satisfaction. Challenges encountered included limited financial resources, poor infrastructure, and staff shortages. Conclusions To better respond to population health needs, accreditation is an important first step towards improving the quality of PHC delivery arrangement system. While there is a need to expand the implementation of accreditation to cover all PHC centers in Lebanon, considerations should be given to strengthening their financial arrangements as well. PMID:24568632

  3. The Psychometric Properties of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale in Chinese Primary Care Patients: Factor Structure, Construct Validity, Reliability, Sensitivity and Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) is a commonly used instrument to measure depressive symptomatology. Despite this, the evidence for its psychometric properties remains poorly established in Chinese populations. The aim of this study was to validate the use of the CES-D in Chinese primary care patients by examining factor structure, construct validity, reliability, sensitivity and responsiveness. Methods and Results The psychometric properties were assessed amongst a sample of 3686 Chinese adult primary care patients in Hong Kong. Three competing factor structure models were examined using confirmatory factor analysis. The original CES-D four-structure model had adequate fit, however the data was better fit into a bi-factor model. For the internal construct validity, corrected item-total correlations were 0.4 for most items. The convergent validity was assessed by examining the correlations between the CES-D, the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) and the Short Form-12 Health Survey (version 2) Mental Component Summary (SF-12 v2 MCS). The CES-D had a strong correlation with the PHQ-9 (coefficient: 0.78) and SF-12 v2 MCS (coefficient: -0.75). Internal consistency was assessed by McDonald’s omega hierarchical (?H). The ?H value for the general depression factor was 0.855. The ?H values for “somatic”, “depressed affect”, “positive affect” and “interpersonal problems” were 0.434, 0.038, 0.738 and 0.730, respectively. For the two-week test-retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.91. The CES-D was sensitive in detecting differences between known groups, with the AUC >0.7. Internal responsiveness of the CES-D to detect positive and negative changes was satisfactory (with p value <0.01 and all effect size statistics >0.2). The CES-D was externally responsive, with the AUC>0.7. Conclusions The CES-D appears to be a valid, reliable, sensitive and responsive instrument for screening and monitoring depressive symptoms in adult Chinese primary care patients. In its original four-factor and bi-factor structure, the CES-D is supported for cross-cultural comparisons of depression in multi-center studies. PMID:26252739

  4. Comparative ENDOR study at 34 GHz of the triplet state of the primary donor in bacterial reaction centers of Rb. sphaeroides and Bl. viridis.

    PubMed

    Marchanka, Aliaksandr; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Plato, Martin; van Gastel, Maurice

    2014-05-01

    The primary electron donor (P) in the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Blastochloris viridis consists of a dimer of bacteriochlorophyll a and b cofactors, respectively. Its photoexcited triplet state in frozen solution has been investigated by time resolved ENDOR spectroscopy at 34 GHz. The observed ENDOR spectra for (3)P865 and (3)P960 are essentially the same, indicating very similar spin density distributions. Exceptions are the ethylidene groups unique to the bacteriochlorophyll b dimer in (3)P960. Strikingly, the observed hyperfine coupling constants of the ethylidene groups are larger than in the monomer, which speaks for an asymmetrically delocalized wave function over both monomer halves in the dimer. The latter observation corroborates previous findings of the spin density in the radical cation states P 865 (•+) (Lendzian et al. in Biochim Biophys Acta 1183:139-160, 1993) and P 960 (•+) (Lendzian et al. in Chem Phys Lett 148:377-385, 1988). As compared to the bacteriochlorophyll monomer, the hyperfine coupling constants of the methyl groups 2(1) and 12(1) are reduced by at least a factor of two, and quantitative analysis of these couplings gives rise to a ratio of approximately 3:1 for the spin density on the halves PL:PM. Our findings are discussed in light of the large difference in photosynthetic activity of the two branches of cofactors present in the bacterial reaction center proteins. PMID:23184403

  5. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) Use in Primary Health Care Centers in A’Seeb, Muscat: A Clinical Audit

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shidhani, Asma; Al-Rawahi, Naama; Al-Rawahi, Abdulhakeem

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to assess the trend of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use in primary health care institutions located in A’Seeb, a province in the capital city of Oman, Muscat. Additionally, we evaluated the relationship between a physician’s years of experience and the number of prescription issued, as well as the presence of risk factors and side effects in the patients who received these prescriptions. Method A clinical audit was conducted in four primary health care centers in the Muscat region over a one-week period in April 2014. The target population included patients aged 18 years or over who attended one of the four health centers and were prescribed NSAIDs. Overall, 272 patients were recruited by systematic random sampling. The data were collected by two methods: direct face-to-face interviews and evaluations of the patient’s electronic medical file. The prescribing doctors were blind to the audit. The collected information included patients demographics, past and current medical history of related comorbidities, NSAID type, dose, duration and indications for use, concomitant warfarin or/and aspirin prescriptions, and co-prescription of gastroprotective agents. Results In total, 15% of patients received an NSAID prescription: females were issued more prescriptions than males. The percentage of patients who received an NSAID prescription across the health centers ranged from 9% to 24%. The main reason for prescribing NSAIDs was musculoskeletal problems. The most frequently prescribed NSAID was ibuprofen. Sixteen percent of patients who received an NSAID prescription had a risk factor related to its use. The mean and median duration of the NSAID prescriptions of all types were 5.6 and 5.0 days, respectively. Physicians with a greater number of years experience prescribed more NSAIDs. Conclusion Our study showed that the number of prescriptions of NSAIDs among various institutes varied, which could reflect the level of awareness concerning NSAID risks among the prescribing doctors. NSAIDs were prescribed for patients with comorbidities and patients with previously documented side effects without considering protective agents. Therefore, we suggest that the use of these medications is controlled, especially in high-risk populations. PMID:26421118

  6. [Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament Found in a Case of Sudden Head-tilt Difficulty following Induction of General Anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nishihara, Isao; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-05-01

    We report a case of sudden head-tilt difficulty after induction of general anesthesia which was postoperatively diagnosed as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. A 42-year-old man weighing 115 kg was scheduled for emergent laparoscopic appendectomy for acute appendicitis. Prior to induction of anesthesia, the patient could tilt his head, but was unable to do so afterwards. Following mask ventilation with jaw-thrust maneuver, we successfully performed tracheal intubation using the Pentax-AWS Airwayscope. After surgery, he was diagnosed with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament by an orthopedist. PMID:26422964

  7. Impact of the prehospital activation strategy in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous revascularization: a single center community hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Sofia A; Xu, Ke; Nwanyanwu, Francis; Chan, Richard; Correa, Luis; Nass, Nouri; Jaraki, Abdul-Rahman; Jurkovich, David; Kennedy, Richard; Andrzejewski, Lee; Vignola, Paul A; Cubeddu, Roberto J

    2012-12-01

    The strategy of prehospital activation by the emergency medical system (EMS) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been poorly adopted among the US hospitals that currently offer 24/7 primary percutaneous coronary intervention. In this study, we report a single center experience after the implementation of this strategy. From 2008 to 2011, we identified a total 188 STEMI patients (age 65 ± 15 years) presenting via EMS for primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Of these, 112 (59.6%) underwent prehospital activation (EMS group), whereas the remaining 76 (40.4%) underwent emergency department activation [emergency department (ED) group]. Baseline demographic characteristics were similar between both groups. The overall median door-to-balloon (DTB) time was 49 ± 14 minutes. Patients undergoing prehospital activation had on average significantly lower overall DTB times (EMS 44 ± 11 minutes vs. ED 57 ± 15 minutes; P < 0.001). Concordantly, DTB times <60 minutes were much more commonly achieved with this strategy (EMS 95.5% vs. ED 64.5%; P < 0.001). Fallouts beyond the recommended 90-minute DTB time were seen among ED patients only. No difference in in-hospital death (EMS 5.4% vs. ED 6.6%; P = 0.75) or cumulative 30-day mortality (EMS 6.3% vs. ED 7.9%; P = 0.68) was observed between both groups. However, on average, EMS patients had higher postinfarct left ventricular ejection fraction (EMS 48 ± 9.5% vs. ED 39 ± 14.6%; P = 0.004). Differences in DTB time and left ventricular ejection fraction remained significant after adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics. In conclusion, the prehospital activation strategy is largely effective and should be systematically adopted in the treatment scheme of STEMI patients to lower mechanical reperfusion times and reduce the potential for untoward clinical outcomes. PMID:23149360

  8. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs as Prophylaxis for Heterotopic Ossification after Total Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Shun-Li; Yang, Bo; Ning, Guang-Zhi; Chen, Ling-Xiao; Li, Yu-Lin; Gao, Shi-Jie; Chen, Xing-Yu; Sun, Jing-Cheng; Feng, Shi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a frequent complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been used as routine prophylaxis for HO after THA. However, the efficacy of NSAIDs on HO, particularly selective NSAIDs versus nonselective NSAIDs, is uncertain. We searched PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and clinicaltrials.gov to identify randomized controlled trials with respect to HO after THA. Two reviewers extracted the data and estimated the risk of bias. For the ordered data, we followed the Bayesian framework to calculate the odds ratio (OR) with a 95% credible interval (CrI). For the dichotomous data, the OR and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using Stata version 12.0. The subgroup analyses and the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach were used. A total of 1856 articles were identified, and 21 studies (5995 patients) were included. In the NSAIDs versus placebo analysis, NSAIDs could decrease the incidence of HO, according to the Brooker scale (OR?=?2.786, 95% CrI 1.879–3.993) and Delee scale (OR?=?9.987, 95% CrI 5.592–16.17). In the selective NSAIDs versus nonselective NSAIDs analysis, there was no significant difference (OR?=?0.7989, 95% CrI 0.5506–1.125) in the prevention of HO. NSAIDs could increase discontinuation caused by gastrointestinal side effects (DGSE) (OR?=?1.28, 95% CI 1.00–1.63, P?=?0.046) more than a placebo. Selective NSAIDs could decrease DGSE (OR?=?0.48, 95% CI 0.24–0.97, P?=?0.042) compared with the nonselective NSAIDs. There was no significant difference with respect to discontinuation caused by nongastrointestinal side effects (DNGSE) in NSAIDs versus a placebo (OR?=?1.16, 95% CI 0.88–1.53, P?=?0.297) and in selective NSAIDs versus nonselective NSAIDs (OR?=?0.83, 95% CI 0.50–1.37, P?=?0.462). NSAIDs might reduce the incidence of HO and increase DGSE in the short-term. PMID:25950691

  9. Early Detection of Burn Induced Heterotopic Ossification using Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jonathan R.; Okagbare, Paul I.; De La Rosa, Sara; Cilwa, Katherine E.; Perosky, Joseph E.; Eboda, Oluwatobi N.; Donneys, Alexis; Su, Grace L.; Buchman, Steven R.; Cederna, Paul S.; Wang, Stewart C.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Morris, Michael D; Levi, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Heterotopic ossification (HO), or the abnormal formation of bone in soft tissue, occurs in over 60% of major burn injuries and blast traumas. A significant need exists to improve the current diagnostic modalities for HO which are inadequate to diagnose and intervene on HO at early time-points. Raman spectroscopy has been used in previous studies to report on changes in bone composition during bone development but has not yet been applied to burn induced HO. In this study, we validate transcutaneous, in-vivo Raman spectroscopy as a methodology for early diagnosis of HO in mice following a burn injury. Methods An Achilles tenotomy model was used to study HO formation. Following tenotomy, mice were divided into burn and sham groups with exposure of 30% surface area on the dorsum to 60° water or 30° water for 18 seconds respectively. In-vivo, transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy was performed at early time points (5 days, 2 and 3 weeks) and a late time point (3 months) on both the tenotomized and non-injured leg. These same samples were then dissected down to the bone and ex-vivo Raman measurements were performed on the excised tissue. Bone formation was verified with Micro CT and histology at corresponding time-points. Results Our Raman probe allowed non-invasive, transcutaneous evaluation of heterotopic bone formation. Raman data showed significantly increased bone mineral signaling in the tenotomy compared to control leg at 5 days post injury, with the difference increasing over time whereas Micro CT did not demonstrate heterotopic bone until three weeks. Ex-vivo Raman measurements showed significant differences in the amount of HO in the burn compared to sham groups and also showed differences in the spectra of new, ectopic bone compared to pre-existing cortical bone. Conclusions Burn injury increases the likelihood of developing HO when combined with traumatic injury. In our in-vivo mouse model, Raman spectroscopy allowed for detection of HO formation as early as 5 days post injury. Changes in bone mineral and matrix composition of the new bone were also evidenced in the Raman spectra which could facilitate early identification of HO and allow more timely therapy decisions for HO patients. PMID:23314070

  10. Endochondral ossification pathway genes and postmenopausal osteoporosis: Association and specific allele related serum bone sialoprotein levels in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunzhi; Liu, Haiyan; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Tianxiao; Zhang, Bo; Li, Lu; Chen, Gang; Fu, Dongke; Wang, KunZheng

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and disrupted bone architecture, predisposing the patient to increased fracture risk. Evidence from early genetic epidemiological studies has indicated a major role for genetics in the development of osteoporosis and the variation in BMD. In this study, we focused on two key genes in the endochondral ossification pathway, IBSP and PTHLH. Over 9,000 postmenopausal Han Chinese women were recruited, and 54 SNPs were genotyped. Two significant SNPs within IBSP, rs1054627 and rs17013181, were associated with BMD and postmenopausal osteoporosis by the two-stage strategy, and rs17013181 was also significantly associated with serum IBSP levels. Moreover, one haplotype (rs12425376-rs10843047-rs42294) covering the 5' end of PTHLH was associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our results provide evidence for the association of these two key endochondral ossification pathway genes with BMD and osteoporosis in postmenopausal Han Chinese women. Combined with previous findings, we provide evidence that a particular SNP in IBSP has an allele-specific effect on mRNA levels, which would, in turn, reflect serum IBSP levels. PMID:26568273

  11. Endochondral ossification pathway genes and postmenopausal osteoporosis: Association and specific allele related serum bone sialoprotein levels in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunzhi; Liu, Haiyan; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Tianxiao; Zhang, Bo; Li, Lu; Chen, Gang; Fu, Dongke; Wang, KunZheng

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and disrupted bone architecture, predisposing the patient to increased fracture risk. Evidence from early genetic epidemiological studies has indicated a major role for genetics in the development of osteoporosis and the variation in BMD. In this study, we focused on two key genes in the endochondral ossification pathway, IBSP and PTHLH. Over 9,000 postmenopausal Han Chinese women were recruited, and 54 SNPs were genotyped. Two significant SNPs within IBSP, rs1054627 and rs17013181, were associated with BMD and postmenopausal osteoporosis by the two-stage strategy, and rs17013181 was also significantly associated with serum IBSP levels. Moreover, one haplotype (rs12425376-rs10843047-rs42294) covering the 5’ end of PTHLH was associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our results provide evidence for the association of these two key endochondral ossification pathway genes with BMD and osteoporosis in postmenopausal Han Chinese women. Combined with previous findings, we provide evidence that a particular SNP in IBSP has an allele-specific effect on mRNA levels, which would, in turn, reflect serum IBSP levels. PMID:26568273

  12. The relationship of calcaneal apophyseal ossification and Sanders hand scores to the timing of peak height velocity in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, A D; Sanders, J O; Liu, R W; Cooperman, D R

    2015-12-01

    The accurate assessment of skeletal maturity is essential in the management of orthopaedic conditions in the growing child. In order to identify the time of peak height velocity (PHV) in adolescents, two systems for assessing skeletal maturity have been described recently; the calcaneal apophyseal ossification method and the Sanders hand scores. The purpose of this study was to compare these methods in assessing skeletal maturity relative to PHV. We studied the radiographs of a historical group of 94 healthy children (49 females and 45 males), who had been followed longitudinally between the ages of three and 18 years with serial radiographs and physical examination. Radiographs of the foot and hand were undertaken in these children at least annually between the ages of ten and 15 years. We reviewed 738 radiographs of the foot and 694 radiographs of the hand. PHV was calculated from measurements of height taken at the time of the radiographs. Prior to PHV we observed four of six stages of calcaneal apophyseal ossification and two of eight Sanders stages. Calcaneal stage 3 and Sanders stage 2 was seen to occur about 0.9 years before PHV, while calcaneal stage 4 and Sanders stage 3 occurred approximately 0.5 years after PHV. The stages of the calcaneal and Sanders systems can be used in combination, offering better assessment of skeletal maturity with respect to PHV than either system alone. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1710-17. PMID:26637689

  13. Increased Utilization of Primary Health Care Centers for Birthing Care in Tamil Nadu, India: A Visible Impact of Policies, Initiatives, and Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Pandian, Jayanthi; Suresh, Saradha; Desikachari, B. R.; Padmanaban, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tamil Nadu has been showing an increasing trend in institutional deliveries since early 1990's and has now achieved near 100%. Among the institutional deliveries, a change was observed since 2006, wherein primary health centers (PHCs) showed a four-fold increase in deliveries, while other public and private health facilities showed a decline, despite equal access to all categories of health facilities. What led to this increased utilization of PHCs for birthing care? Material and Methods: Policies, documents, and published reports of the Government of Tamil Nadu (GoTN) were reviewed and interviews were conducted with the various stakeholders involved in providing birthing care in the PHCs. This study analyzes the impact of the policies and supply side initiatives and innovations which led to increase utilization of the PHCs for birthing care. Results: Scaling up of 24 × 7 services in all PHCs, upgrading PHCs with good infrastructure, human resources, and women friendly services have helped to boost the image of the PHCs. Pro-women policies like maternity benefit schemes, birth companionship, providing food, and compulsory stay for 48 h following delivery have attracted women towards PHC. Innovative strategies like maternity picnics and use of expected date of delivery (EDD) chart for follow-up have made women choose PHCs, while periodic reviews and support to staff has improved service delivery. Conclusion: Women centered policies, efficient managerial systems, quality care, and innovative marketing of services have together contributed to increased utilization of PHCs for birthing. Other states could explore the possibility of replicating this model to make optimal use the PHC facilities.

  14. Effectiveness of an intervention in groups of family caregivers of dependent patients for their application in primary health centers. Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although Primary Health Care (PHC) Teams are used to deal with prevention and treatment of sanitary problems in adults with chronic diseases, they usually have a lack of experience in development of psychotherapeutic interventions. However, these interventions are the ones that achieve better results to reduce symptomatology and improve emotional state of caregivers. The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention of psychotherapy in improving the mental health and Quality of life of caregivers. This intervention is based on theoretical approaches to care adjusted to cognitive theory, in order to be applied in primary health care centres. Methods/Design This is multicentre clinical trials study, randomized in two parallel groups, carry out in two PHC, Study population: 150 caregivers will be included by consecutive sampling and they will be randomized the half to experimental group and the other half to control group. They provide mostly all the assistance to care-dependent familiars receiving attention in PHC Centers. Measurements: Each caregiver will be evaluated on a personal interview. The caregivers' assessment protocol: 1) Assessment of different socio-demographic related to care, and caregiver's personal situation. 2)Care-dependent individuals will also be assessed by Barthel Index and Pfeiffer Questionnaire (SPMSQ). 3)Change in caregivers will be the principal measure: family function (Family APGAR Questionnaire), burden short questionnaire (Short Zarit Burden Interview), quality of life (Ruiz & Baca: 1993 Questionnaire), the Duke-UNK Functional Social Support Questionnaire, the General Health Questionnaire-12, and changes in Dysfunctional Thoughts about caring. 4) Intervention implementation measures will also be assessed. Intervention: A psychotherapeutic intervention will be 8 sessions of 90 minutes in groups. This intervention has been initially developed for family caregivers of patients with dementia. Discussion Psychotherapeutic interventions have been proved to obtain better results to reduce symptomatology and improve emotional state of caregivers. Moreover, this intervention has been proved to be effective in a different setting other than PHC, and was developed by professionals of Mental Health. If we found that this intervention is effective in PHC and with our professionals, it would be an important instrument to offer to caregivers of care-dependent patients. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01177696 PMID:20849630

  15. Primary Cutaneous Follicle Center Lymphomas Expressing BCL2 Protein Frequently Harbor BCL2 Gene Break and May Present 1p36 Deletion: A Study of 20 Cases.

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Vanessa; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Baia, Maryse; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Helene; Copie-Bergman, Christiane; Ortonne, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The classification of cutaneous follicular lymphoma (CFL) into primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) or secondary cutaneous follicular lymphoma (SCFL) is challenging. SCFL is suspected when tumor cells express BCL2 protein, reflecting a BCL2 translocation. However, BCL2 expression is difficult to assess in CFLs because of numerous BCL2 reactive T cells. To investigate these issues and to further characterize PCFCL, we studied a series of 25 CFLs without any extracutaneous disease at diagnosis, selected on the basis of BCL2 protein expression using 2 BCL2 antibodies (clones 124 and E17) and BOB1/BCL2 double immunostaining. All cases were studied using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization with BCL2, BCL6, IGH, IGK, IGL breakapart, IGH-BCL2 fusion, and 1p36/1q25 dual-color probes. Nineteen CFLs were BCL2 positive, and 6 were negative. After a medium follow-up of 24 (6 to 96) months, 5 cases were reclassified as SCFL and were excluded from a part of our analyses. Among BCL2 PCFCLs, 60% (9/15) demonstrated a BCL2 break. BCL2-break-positive cases had a tendency to occur in the head and neck and showed the classical phenotype of nodal follicular lymphoma (CD10, BCL6, BCL2, STMN) compared with BCL2-break-negative PCFCLs. Del 1p36 was observed in 1 PCFCL. No significant clinical differences were observed between BCL2 or BCL2 PCFCL. In conclusion, we show that a subset of PCFCLs harbor similar genetic alterations, as observed in nodal follicular lymphomas, including BCL2 breaks and 1p36 deletion. As BCL2 protein expression is usually associated with the presence of a BCL2 translocation, fluorescence in situ hybridization should be performed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26658664

  16. What you need to know about ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament to optimize cervical spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    What are the risks, benefits, alternatives, and pitfalls for operating on cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL)? To successfully diagnose OPLL, it is important to obtain Magnetic Resonance Images (MR). These studies, particularly the T2 weighted images, provide the best soft-tissue documentation of cord/root compression and intrinsic cord abnormalities (e.g. edema vs. myelomalacia) on sagittal, axial, and coronal views. Obtaining Computed Tomographic (CT) scans is also critical as they best demonstrate early OPLL, or hypertrophied posterior longitudinal ligament (HPLL: hypo-isodense with punctate ossification) or classic (frankly ossified) OPLL (hyperdense). Furthermore, CT scans reveal the “single layer” and “double layer” signs indicative of OPLL penetrating the dura. Documenting the full extent of OPLL with both MR and CT dictates whether anterior, posterior, or circumferential surgery is warranted. An adequate cervical lordosis allows for posterior cervical approaches (e.g. lamionplasty, laminectomy/fusion), which may facilitate addressing multiple levels while avoiding the risks of anterior procedures. However, without lordosis and with significant kyphosis, anterior surgery may be indicated. Rarely, this requires single/multilevel anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF), as this approach typically fails to address retrovertebral OPLL; single or multilevel corpectomies are usually warranted. In short, successful OPLL surgery relies on careful patient selection (e.g. assess comorbidities), accurate MR/CT documentation of OPLL, and limiting the pros, cons, and complications of these complex procedures by choosing the optimal surgical approach. Performing OPLL surgery requires stringent anesthetic (awake intubation/positioning) and also the following intraoperative monitoring protocols: Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and electromyography (EMG). PMID:24843819

  17. Primary Syphilis

    MedlinePLUS

    newsletter | contact Share | Primary Syphilis Information for adults A A A This image displays a painless ulcer with a red base, typical of primary syphilis. Overview Primary syphilis is a disease caused by ...

  18. Chiropractic Care of a Patient With Neurogenic Heterotopic Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, William E.; Morgan, Clare P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of chiropractic care for a patient with neurogenic heterotopic ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine and soft tissues of the right hip after a traumatic brain injury and right femur fracture. Clinical Features A 25-year-old military officer was referred to a hospital-based chiropractic clinic with complaints of pain and stiffness of the neck and back along with reduced respiratory excursions that began several months after a motor vehicle accident in which he had a traumatic brain injury. The patient had a fractured right femur from the accident, which had since been treated surgically, but had complications of heterotopic ossification in the soft tissues of the hip. His overall pain level was 3 of 10 on a verbal pain scale during use of oxycodone HCL/acetaminophen. Chest excursion was initially measured at .5 cm. Intervention and Outcome With the intent to restore respiratory chest motion and to reduce the patient's back and neck pain, the patient was placed on a program of chiropractic and myofascial manipulation, exercise therapy, and respiratory therapy. After a year of care, the patient rated overall pain at 3 of 10 verbal pain scale level but was no longer taking medications for pain and an increase in respiratory chest excursions measured at 3.5 cm. Conclusion This case demonstrated that chiropractic treatment provided benefit to a patient with heterotopic ossification concurrent with musculoskeletal pain. PMID:25435839

  19. Syphilis - primary

    MedlinePLUS

    Primary syphilis; Secondary syphilis; Late syphilis; Tertiary syphilis ... Syphilis has three stages: Primary syphilis Secondary syphilis Tertiary syphilis (the late phase of the illness) Secondary ...

  20. Thanksgiving in Primary Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branum, Nell Carter

    1996-01-01

    Examines how the holiday of Thanksgiving is treated in primary books and offers comparisons of 28 popular titles in print. Innovative classroom and media center projects are described, including discussions, drawings, bulletin boards, problem-solving activities, and cooking. (LRW)

  1. Defective Endochondral Ossification-Derived Matrix and Bone Cells Alter the Lymphopoietic Niche in Collagen X Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Elizabeth; Roberts, Douglas; Lin, Angela; Guldberg, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Despite the appreciated interdependence of skeletal and hematopoietic development, the cell and matrix components of the hematopoietic niche remain to be fully defined. Utilizing mice with disrupted function of collagen X (ColX), a major hypertrophic cartilage matrix protein associated with endochondral ossification, our data identified a cytokine defect in trabecular bone cells at the chondro-osseous hematopoietic niche as a cause for aberrant B lymphopoiesis in these mice. Specifically, analysis of ColX transgenic and null mouse chondro-osseous regions via micro-computed tomography revealed an altered trabecular bone environment. Additionally, cocultures with hematopoietic and chondro-osseous cell types highlighted impaired hematopoietic support by ColX transgenic and null mouse derived trabecular bone cells. Further, cytokine arrays with conditioned media from the trabecular osteoblast cocultures suggested an aberrant hematopoietic cytokine milieu within the chondro-osseous niche of the ColX deficient mice. Accordingly, B lymphopoiesis was rescued in the ColX mouse derived trabecular osteoblast cocultures with interlukin-7, stem cell factor, and stromal derived factor-1 supplementation. Moreover, B cell development was restored in vivo after injections of interlukin-7. These data support our hypothesis that endrochondrally-derived trabecular bone cells and matrix constituents provide cytokine-rich niches for hematopoiesis. Furthermore, this study contributes to the emerging concept that niche defects may underlie certain immuno-osseous and hematopoietic disorders. PMID:23656481

  2. Ossification of the sesamoid bone at the base of the first finger in Czech boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Prokopec, M; Pfeiferová, K; Josífko, M

    1997-12-01

    Ossification of the sesamoid bone of the first finger was studied in left hand-and-wrist X-rays of 296 Czech boys and 272 girls 9 to 15 years old using data collected between 1962 and 1966. The logit and the YES or NO methods were used in treating the data. A sesamoid bone, clearly visible to the naked eye, was considered as positive and when it was not yet visible, as negative. The sesamoid bone was developed in 50 per cent of boys at the age of 13.6 years and in 50 per cent of girls at the age of 11.2 years. This stage preceded the age at onset of menarche in Czech girls by 1.9 years. Boys showed a greater variability (SD = 1.4) than girls (SD = 0.8). Both sexes with clearly visible (ossified) sesamoid bones in their first fingers showed to be, on the average, taller and heavier in comparison with the Czech standard and with those boys and girls of corresponding ages without the sesamoid bone. In contrast to the still continuing secular trend in stature in Czech youths, the age of menarche remained in the last cca 30 years unchanged. In view of the close link between bone age and onset of menarche which remained unchanged for the past 30 years, we may consider our finding as still applicable to present-day adolescents. PMID:9457411

  3. Hatching, growth, ion accumulation, and skeletal ossification of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) alevins in acidic soft waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steingraeber, M.T.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    Brook trout eyed eggs and subsequent alevins were exposed to pH 5.0, 6.5, and 7.0 in soft reconstituted water and to pH 8.2 in hard well water for up to 72 d. Hatching was delayed and hatching success reduced (p K+ > Cl- during yolk absorption and early exogenous feeding. Whole-body monovalent ion concentrations were reduced for short periods during yolk absorption in alevins exposed to pH 6.5 and throughout most of the experiment for those exposed to pH 5.0. Whole-body Mg2+ concentrations were not affected by treatment pH and remained near their median hatch level throughout the exposure. The whole-body concentration of Ca2+ was reduced in fish exposed to pH 5.0, particularly near the end of the experiment. Calcium accumulation in fish was influenced by the interaction of pH and time at pH 5.0 but not at the other pH levels. Alevins exposed to pH 5.0 experienced delayed ossification of skeletal structures associated with feeding, respiration, and locomotion that usually persisted for up to 10 d. The detection of skeletal abnormalities early in life might aid in identifying fish populations at risk in acidified waters.

  4. Probabilistic age classification with Bayesian networks: A study on the ossification status of the medial clavicular epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Emanuele; Pinchi, Vilma; Taroni, Franco

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, the rise of criminal, civil and asylum cases involving young people lacking valid identification documents has generated an increase in the demand of age estimation. The chronological age or the probability that an individual is older or younger than a given age threshold are generally estimated by means of some statistical methods based on observations performed on specific physical attributes. Among these statistical methods, those developed in the Bayesian framework allow users to provide coherent and transparent assignments which fulfill forensic and medico-legal purposes. The application of the Bayesian approach is facilitated by using probabilistic graphical tools, such as Bayesian networks. The aim of this work is to test the performances of the Bayesian network for age estimation recently presented in scientific literature in classifying individuals as older or younger than 18 years of age. For these exploratory analyses, a sample related to the ossification status of the medial clavicular epiphysis available in scientific literature was used. Results obtained in the classification are promising: in the criminal context, the Bayesian network achieved, on the average, a rate of correct classifications of approximatively 97%, whilst in the civil context, the rate is, on the average, close to the 88%. These results encourage the continuation of the development and the testing of the method in order to support its practical application in casework. PMID:26699731

  5. Biglycan (Bgn) and fibromodulin (Fmod) in ectopic ossification of tendon induced by exercise and in rotarod performance

    PubMed Central

    Kilts, T.; Ameye, L.; Syed-Picard, F.; Ono, M.; Berendsen, A. D.; Oldberg, A.; Heegaard, A-M.; Bi, Y.; Young, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the ectopic ossification (EO) found in tendons of biglycan (Bgn), fibromodulin (Fmod) single and double Bgn/Fmod deficient (DKO) mice with aging. At 3 months, Fmod KO, Bgn KO and DKO displayed torn cruciate ligaments and EO in their quadriceps tendon, menisci and cruciate and patellar ligaments. The phenotype was the least severe in the Fmod KO, intermediate in the Bgn KO and the most severe in the DKO. This condition progressed with age in all 3 mouse strains and resulted in the development of large supernumerary sesmoid bones. To determine the role of exercise on the extent of EO, we subjected normal and DKO mice to treadmill exercise for 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The EO in moderately exercised DKO was decreased compared to unexercised DKO mice. Finally, DKO and Bgn KO mice tested using a rotarod showed they had a reduced ability to maintain their grip on a rotating cylinder compared to WT controls. In summary, we show: 1) a detailed description of EO formed by Bgn, Fmod or combined depletion, 2) the role of exercise in modulating EO, and 3) that Bgn and Fmod are critical in controlling motor function. PMID:19422643

  6. Shielding of the Hip Prosthesis During Radiation Therapy for Heterotopic Ossification is Associated with Increased Failure of Prophylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Gaccione, Peter; Gobezie, Reuben; Mamon, Harvey J. . E-mail: hmamon@partners.org

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently administered to prevent heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an increased risk of HO after RT prophylaxis with shielding of the THA components. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective analysis of THA patients undergoing RT prophylaxis of HO at Brigham and Women's Hospital between June 1994 and February 2004. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess the relationships of all variables to failure of RT prophylaxis. Results: A total of 137 patients were identified and 84 were eligible for analysis (61%). The median RT dose was 750 cGy in one fraction, and the median follow-up was 24 months. Eight of 40 unshielded patients (20%) developed any progression of HO compared with 21 of 44 shielded patients (48%) (p = 0.009). Brooker Grade III-IV HO developed in 5% of unshielded and 18% of shielded patients (p 0.08). Multivariate analysis revealed shielding (p = 0.02) and THA for prosthesis infection (p = 0.03) to be significant predictors of RT failure, with a trend toward an increasing risk of HO progression with age (p = 0.07). There was no significant difference in the prosthesis failure rates between shielded and unshielded patients. Conclusions: A significantly increased risk of failure of RT prophylaxis for HO was noted in those receiving shielding of the hip prosthesis. Shielding did not appear to reduce the risk of prosthesis failure.

  7. Home Improvement in HIV Primary Care: Investigating the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model for People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Erin Gael; Crowley, Megan; Howard, Kim Ammann; Pavel, M Paoloma

    2015-10-01

    This article details the processes and findings of a 3-year demonstration project implementing population health management and the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model in 3 community health centers in Alameda County, California. The article provides a first look at the PCMH Continuum, a tool for aiding staff in conceptualizing and implementing complex organizational change. Findings of the project evaluation also are shared, comprising a road map for other organizations looking to implement population health management, panel management, and PCMH. The article reflects on lessons learned and best practices from the demonstration project. (Population Health Management 2015;18:323-329). PMID:25867483

  8. Increasing Participation by African Americans in NCI-Designated Cancer Center Colorectal Trials by Involving Primary Care Physicians | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    An academic cancer center developed a partnership with a national organization of African-American physicians with the goal of engaging community physicians and encouraging them to refer patients to clinical trials. Although the program focused on colorectal cancer and related trials, the insights gained may be useful for engaging referring physicians for other types of trials as well.

  9. Adventures in Cooking: A Collection of Recipes for Use in Nursery Schools, Day Care Centers, Head Start Programs, Kindergartens, and Primary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.

    This is a collection of recipes which children involved in early childhood education centers can prepare for their own consumption. The recipes were contributed by teachers in such schools based on their own successful experiences in using cooking as a learning experience for children to incorporate and integrate a number of intellectual tasks,…

  10. Primary Aldosteronism

    MedlinePLUS

    ... MD, MSc What is primary aldosteronism? Primary aldosteronism (PA) is a type of hyperaldosteronism. This condition occurs ... stroke may be even greater in people with PA than in other people with high blood pressure. ...

  11. Single-Center Experience of Unrelated and Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation with TCR?? and CD19 Depletion in Children with Primary Immunodeficiency Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Balashov, Dmitry; Shcherbina, Anna; Maschan, Michael; Trakhtman, Pavel; Skvortsova, Yulia; Shelikhova, Larisa; Laberko, Alexandra; Livshits, Anna; Novichkova, Galina; Maschan, Alexei

    2015-11-01

    The transplantation of stem cells from a matched unrelated donor (MUD) or a haploidentical mismatched related donor (MMRD) is a widely used variant of curative treatment for patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID). Currently, different strategies are used to reduce the risk of post-transplant complications and enhance immune reconstitution. We report the preliminary results of MUD and MMRD transplantation with TCR??/CD19 depletion in patients with PID (trial registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02327351). Thirty-seven PID patients (median age, 2.6 years; range, .2 to 17) were transplanted from MUDs (n = 27) or haploidentical MMRDs (n = 10) after TCR??(+)/CD19(+) graft depletion. The median numbers of CD34(+) and TCR??(+) cells in the graft were 11.7 × 10(6)/kg and 10.6 × 10(3)/kg, respectively. Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was observed in 8 patients (22%), without a statistically significant difference between MUDs and MMRDs; 7 of these patients had grade II acute GVHD and responded to first-line therapy, whereas 1 patient had grade IV acute GVHD with transformation to extensive chronic GVHD. Primary and secondary graft failure (nonengraftment or rejection) was observed in 10 patients (27%), 9 of whom were treated with 1 alkylating agent in the conditioning regimen. All these patients were successfully retransplanted with different rescue protocols. Preliminary data on immune reconstitution were very encouraging. Most patients had significant numbers of T lymphocytes detected on the first assessment (day +30) and more than 500 T cells/?L, on day +120. Based on our preliminary data, no significant difference was seen between MMRD and MUD hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). With a median follow-up period of 15 months, the cumulative probabilities of overall patient survival and transplant-related mortality were 96.7% and 3.3%, respectively. Based on the results, the ability to control the main post-transplant complications and the immune reconstitution rates are the main factors leading to successful outcome in patients with PID after TCR??(+)-depleted HSCT. PMID:26187864

  12. Conceptual models for Mental Distress among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals: A contribution to clinical practice and research in primary-health-care centers in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mental distress is common in primary care and overrepresented among Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, but access to effective treatment is limited, particularly in developing countries. Explanatory models (EM) are contextualised explanations of illnesses and treatments framed within a given society and are important in understanding an individual's perspective on the illness. Although individual variations are important in determining help-seeking and treatment behaviour patterns, the ability to cope with an illness and quality of life, the role of explanatory models in shaping treatment preferences is undervalued. The aim was to identify explanatory models employed by HIV-infected and uninfected individuals and to compare them with those employed by local health care providers. Furthermore, we aimed to build a theoretical model linking the perception of mental distress to treatment preferences and coping mechanisms. Methods Qualitative investigation nested in a cross-sectional validation study of 28 (male and female) attendees at four primary care clinics in Lusaka, Zambia, between December 2008 and May 2009. Consecutive clinic attendees were sampled on random days and conceptual models of mental distress were examined, using semi-structured interviews, in order to develop a taxonomic model in which each category was associated with a unique pattern of symptoms, treatment preferences and coping strategies. Results Mental distress was expressed primarily as somatic complaints including headaches, perturbed sleep and autonomic symptoms. Economic difficulties and interpersonal relationship problems were the most common causal models among uninfected individuals. Newly diagnosed HIV patients presented with a high degree of hopelessness and did not value seeking help for their symptoms. Patients not receiving anti-retroviral drugs (ARV) questioned their effectiveness and were equivocal about seeking help. Individuals receiving ARV were best adjusted to their status, expressed hope and valued counseling and support groups. Health care providers reported that 40% of mental distress cases were due to HIV infection. Conclusions Patient models concerning mental distress are critical to treatment-seeking decisions and coping mechanisms. Mental health interventions should be further researched and prioritized for HIV-infected individuals. PMID:21219644

  13. Surgical Results and Prognostic Factors of Anterior Cervical Corpectomy and Fusion for Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Haisong; Wang, Xinwei; Chen, Deyu

    2014-01-01

    Background Mechanism of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) has not been elucidated clearly. Surgical decompression is usually necessary for the patients with neurological symptoms. Anterior decompression and resection of OPLL seems to be a radical surgical option, because the spinal cord is compressed from the anterior direction. Methods Among 229 patients who underwent ACF for OPLL between January 2001 and December 2007 in our hospital, a total of 133 patients responded to the invitation and made return visits, with a follow-up rate of 58.1%. For these patients, clinical data were collected from medical and operative records. Neurological status were evaluated by using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scoring system. Radiological evaluations including C2-7 lordotic angle, sagittal vertical axis (SVA), occupying rate of OPLL, double-layer sign and high-intensity zone were obtained from all the patients. Complications and causes of revision surgery were also investigated. Correlations between the long-term surgical outcome and various prognostic factors were statistically analyzed. Findings Eighty-four males and forty-nine females completed the follow-up, with a mean age at operation of 56.8 years. The overall average JOA score significantly increased, with a mean recovery rate of 64.1%±14.2%. The mean C2-7 lordotic angle and SVA were also significantly improved, and fusion rate was satisfactory. The incidence of complications was consistent to the previous reports and most of them were controllable by suitable treatments. Multiple regression analysis showed that number of corpectmies and preoperative JOA score were important predictors of surgical outcome. Conclusions ACF is a reliable and effective method for treating OPLL patients in terms of neurological recovery, maintenance of radiological parameters, fusion rate and complications. Number of corpectomies and preoperative JOA score are important predictors for the clinical outcome when this procedure is used. PMID:25000183

  14. A Prolonged Time Interval Between Trauma and Prophylactic Radiation Therapy Significantly Increases the Risk of Heterotopic Ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Mourad, Waleed F.; Packianathan, Satyaseelan; Shourbaji, Rania A.; Zhang Zhen; Graves, Mathew; Khan, Majid A.; Baird, Michael C.; Russell, George; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To ascertain whether the time from injury to prophylactic radiation therapy (RT) influences the rate of heterotopic ossification (HO) after operative treatment of displaced acetabular fractures. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution, retrospective analysis of patients referred for RT for the prevention of HO. Between January 2000 and January 2009, 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures were treated surgically followed by RT for HO prevention. We analyzed the effect of time from injury on prevention of HO by RT. In all patients, 700 cGy was prescribed in a single fraction and delivered within 72 hours postsurgery. The patients were stratified into five groups according to time interval (in days) from the date of their accident to the date of RT: Groups A {<=}3, B {<=}7, C {<=}14, D {<=}21, and E >21days. Results: Of the 585 patients with displaced acetabular fractures treated with RT, (18%) 106 patients developed HO within the irradiated field. The risk of HO after RT increased from 10% for RT delivered {<=}3 days to 92% for treatment delivered >21 days after the initial injury. Wilcoxon test showed a significant correlation between the risk of HO and the length of time from injury to RT (p < 0.0001). Chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis showed no significant association between all other factors and the risk of HO (race, gender, cause and type of fracture, surgical approach, or the use of indomethacin). Conclusions: Our data suggest that there is higher incidence and risk of HO if prophylactic RT is significantly delayed after a displaced acetabular fracture. Thus, RT should be administered as early as clinically possible after the trauma. Patients undergoing RT >3 weeks from their displaced acetabular fracture should be informed of the higher risk (>90%) of developing HO despite prophylaxis.

  15. Altered hematopoiesis in glypican-3-deficient mice results in decreased osteoclast differentiation and a delay in endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Viviano, Beth L; Silverstein, Laura; Pflederer, Camila; Paine-Saunders, Stephenie; Mills, Kathy; Saunders, Scott

    2005-06-01

    Loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the heparan sulfate proteoglycan Glypican-3 (GPC3) causes an X-linked disorder in humans known as Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS). This disorder includes both pre- and postnatal overgrowth, a predisposition to certain childhood cancers, and a complex assortment of congenital defects including skeletal abnormalities. In this study, we have identified a previously unrecognized delay in endochondral ossification associated with the loss of Gpc3 function. Gpc3 knockout animals show a marked reduction in calcified trabecular bone, and an abnormal persistence of hypertrophic chondrocytes at embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5). These hypertrophic chondrocytes down-regulate Type X collagen mRNA expression and undergo apoptosis, suggesting a normal progression of hypertrophic chondrocyte cell fate. However, replacement of these cells by mineralized bone is delayed in association with a marked delay in the appearance of osteoclasts in the bone in vivo. This delay in vivo correlates with a significant reduction in the capacity to form osteoclasts from bone marrow macrophage precursors in vitro in response to M-CSF and RANKL, and with a reduction in the numbers of bone-marrow-derived cells expressing the markers CD11b and Gr-1. Together, these results indicate selective impairment in the development of the common hematopoietic lineage from which monocyte/macrophages and PMNs are derived. This is the first report of a requirement for heparan sulfate, and specifically Gpc3, in the lineage-specific differentiation of these cell types in vivo. PMID:15936336

  16. Clinical and Imaging Predictors of Surgical Outcome in Multilevel Cervical Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament: An Analysis of 184 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peng; Yuan, Wen; Wu, Huiqiao; Yang, Lili; Tian, Ye; Liang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical and imaging predictors of surgical outcomes in patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). Materials and Methods From May 2010 to April 2012, a total of 200 consecutive patients with cervical OPLL were recruited for this study. Of them, 184 patients (130 men and 54 women) who could be tracked for more than 24 months after surgery were finally included for analysis. Their demographic, clinical and radiological data were collected preoperatively. The recovery ratio in terms of JOA score was used to assess the outcome of the patients preoperatively and at 2 years postoperatively. A JOA recovery rate less than 50% was considered a poor outcome. Results Compared with good outcome group, an older mean age at operation, a longer mean duration of symptoms, a lower mean pre-operativer JOA score, and a higher proportion of diabetics were observed in poor outcome group. Patients in poor outcome group were more likely to present kyphotic cervical alignment, smaller mean transverse area of the spinal cord, and intramedullary signal abnormalities. The result of multivariate stepwise logistic regression showed that a longer duration of symptoms and the presence of T1 hypo-intensity intramedullary changes on MRI were significant risk factors of lower JOA recovery ratios. Conclusion A longer duration of symptom, T1 hypointensity on MRI and a history of minor trauma were highly predictive of a poor outcome for patients undergoing surgical treatment of OPLL. Age at operation, the history of diabetes, the preoperative JOA score, the transverse area of the spinal cord and T2 hyper-intensity on MRI were also associated with the prognosis of OPLL. PMID:26327216

  17. Does Intramedullary Signal Intensity on MRI Affect the Surgical Outcomes of Patients with Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Tae Hong; Shin, Hyung Shik; Hwang, Yong Soon; Park, Sang Keun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Patients with cervical ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) are susceptible to cord injury, which often develops into myelopathic symptoms. However, little is known regarding the prognostic factors that are involved in minor trauma. We evaluated the relationship between minor trauma and neurological outcome of OPLL and investigated the prognostic factors with a focus on compressive factors and intramedullary signal intensity (SI). Methods A total of 74 patients with cervical myelopathy caused by OPLL at more than three-levels were treated with posterior decompression surgeries. We surveyed the space available for spinal cord (SAC), the severity of SI change on T2-weighted image, and diabetes mellitus (DM). The neurological outcome using Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scale was assessed at admission and at 12-month follow-up. Results Among the variables tested, preoperative JOA score, severity of intramedullary SI, SAC, and DM were significantly related to neurological outcome. The mean preoperative JOA were 11.3±1.9 for the 41 patients who did not have histories of trauma and 8.0±3.1 for the 33 patients who had suffered minor traumas (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences in the recovery ratios between those two groups. Conclusions Initial neurological status and high intramedullary SI in the preoperative phase were related to poorer postoperative outcomes. Moreover, the patients with no histories of DM and larger SACs exhibited better improvement than did the patients with DM and smaller SACs. Although the initial JOA scores were worse for the minor trauma patients than did those who had no trauma prior to surgery, minor trauma exerted no direct effects on the surgical outcomes. PMID:25328649

  18. The 12 item W.H.O.D.A.S. as primary self report outcome measure in a correctional community treatment center for dually diagnosed patients.

    PubMed

    Bastiaens, Leo; Galus, James; Goodlin, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The World Health Organization Disability Assessment Scale (WHODAS) is suggested as a measure of impairment in DSM-5. The measurement of impaired functioning is crucial in the rehabilitation of dually diagnosed, addiction and mental health, patients. This study is the first to look at the use of the 12 item self report WHODAS as the primary outcome in a community correctional treatment facility for dually diagnosed patients.100 (55 male; 73 white, 25 black, 2 hispanic) former inmates, age 36.1 ± 11.1, with psychiatric and addiction diagnoses were treated in an integrated program. The 12 item WHODAS was completed by the patients during the initial evaluation and repeated an average of 11.1 ± 2.7 weeks later. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI) was completed at the same time by the psychiatrist, independently of the WHODAS. At initial assessment, the CGI showed moderate severity and the WHODAS showed severe disability. CGI and WHODAS were significantly correlated (R 0.48, p < 0.0001). After three months of treatment, both measures improved: CGI with 46% and WHODAS with 49%. The CGI showed mild severity and the WHODAS moderate disability. The change in CGI was correlated with the change in WHODAS (R 0.57, p < 0.0001). The WHODAS appears sensitive to clinical improvement related to shortterm treatment of a highly co-morbid dual diagnosis population. PMID:25262006

  19. Bone morphogenetic protein receptors and activin receptors are highly expressed in ossified ligament tissues of patients with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed Central

    Yonemori, K.; Imamura, T.; Ishidou, Y.; Okano, T.; Matsunaga, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kato, M.; Sampath, T. K.; Miyazono, K.; ten Dijke, P.; Sakou, T.

    1997-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is a pathological ossification in the spinal ligament, with formation of ectopic bone mainly through endochondral ossification. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and activins are multifunctional proteins that belong to the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily and that have been implicated in the formation of new bone and cartilage. BMPs and activins signal via type I and type II receptors for BMPs (BMPRs) and activins (ActRs), respectively. OP-1/BMP-7 binds to BMPR-II and ActR-II and forms complexes with BMPR-IA and -IB and ActR-I. We studied the expression of BMPR-IA, -IB, and -II, ActR-I, ActR-II, and OP-1/BMP-7 by immunohistochemistry in ossified ligament tissues of patients with OPLL and control ligament tissues from patients with cervical disc herniation. The expression of BMPRs and ActRs was elevated in OPLL compared with controls. Expressions of BMPR-IA, -IB, and -II were observed not only in chondrocytes at the fibrocartilage tissue around the calcified zone but also in fibroblast-like spindle cells at the nonossified ligament. ActR-I and -II were found co-localized in the hypertrophic chondrocytes near the calcified zone and in the ossified tissue. OP-1/BMP-7 was expressed in chondrocytes near the calcified zone. In the control cases, the BMPRs and ActRs were only weakly expressed in the fibrocartilage tissue at the site of ligament attachments to bone and OP-1/BMP-7 was not detected. Enhanced expression of BMPRs at the nonossified ligament in OPLL patients suggests that these cells have a greater potential to differentiate into osteogenic cells than ligament cells from non-OPLL patients. The high expression of BMPRs and ActRs in the ectopic ossified ligament suggests that BMPs and activin may be tightly involved in the pathological ossification process of OPLL. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9094990

  20. Spinal cord herniation after multilevel anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun-Hong; Jung, Byung-Joo; Jang, Jee-Soo; Kim, Seok-Kang; Jung, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2009-03-01

    The authors report the case of a 52-year-old man who had undergone resection of an ossified posterior longitudinal ligament via the anterior approach. The patient experienced postoperative neurological deterioration that may have been caused by a massive cord herniation associated with a dural defect at the corpectomy site. Spinal cord herniation may develop as a complication of anterior cervical decompression. Surgeons should be alert to this condition when planning to treat cervical ossification of the ossified posterior longitudinal ligament via the anterior approach. PMID:19320584

  1. Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma in a Tertiary Referral Center: Clinical Characteristics, CT, and 18F-FDG PET Findings, With Pathologic Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gun Ha; Kim, Mi Young; Koo, Hyun Jung; Song, Joon Seon; Choi, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to describe the patient characteristics, computed tomography (CT) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) findings, and clinical outcomes of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS), together with their pathologic correlations. The medical records of 14 patients with pathologically proven PPSS in a tertiary hospital from January 1997 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The CT findings were evaluated. The maximum standardized uptake value (maxSUV) of the tumors was obtained, and clinical outcomes with respect to tumor recurrence and mortality were assessed by Kaplan–Meier analysis. The median tumor size was 10.2?cm and the most common anatomic location was the lung followed by the pleura/chest wall and mediastinum. Most of the tumors appeared as single lesions and had circumscribed margins. All the cases showed heterogeneous enhancement with necrotic or cystic portions, and intratumoral vessels were frequently seen. Half of the tumors had intratumoral calcifications, and tumor rupture, pleural/chest wall extension, and pleural effusion occurred frequently. However, lymph node enlargement was rare. The median maxSUV of the tumors was 4.35. Patient outcomes with respect to tumor recurrence (n?=?8, 57.1%) and death (n?=?3, 21.4%) were poor despite their young age, and the mean follow-up period was 28.5 months. In conclusion, PPSS usually occurs in young adults, generally in the lung, presents as a large, circumscribed mass, and tumor rupture or extension of the pleura/chest wall may occur. The tumors often contain calcifications and vessels; they may exhibit triple attenuation on enhanced CT images, and clinical outcomes are poor. PMID:26313782

  2. Three-dimensional distribution of NO sources in a primary mechanosensory integration center in the locust and its implications for volume signaling.

    PubMed

    Münch, Daniel; Ott, Swidbert R; Pflüger, Hans-Joachim

    2010-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an evolutionarily conserved mediator of neural plasticity. Because NO is highly diffusible, signals from multiple sources might combine in space and time to affect the same target. Whether such cooperative effects occur will depend on the effective signaling range and on the distances of NO sources to one another and to their targets. These anatomical parameters have been quantified in only few systems. We analyzed the 3D architecture of NO synthase (NOS) expression in a sensory neuropil, the ventral association center (VAC) of the locust. High-resolution confocal microscopy revealed NOS immunoreactive fiber boutons in submicrometer proximity to both the axon terminals of sensory neurons and their postsynaptic target, interneuron A4I1. Pharmacological manipulation of NO signaling affected the response of A4I1 to individual wind-puff stimuli and the response decrement during repetitive stimulation. Mapping NOS immunoreactivity in defined volumes around dendrites of A4I1 revealed NOS-positive fiber boutons within 5 mum of nearly every surface point. The mean distances between neighboring NOS-boutons and between any point within the VAC and its nearest NOS-bouton were likewise about 5 mum. For an NO signal to convey the identity of its source, the effective signaling range would therefore have to be less than 5 mum, and shorter still when multiple boutons release NO simultaneously. The architecture is therefore well suited to support the cooperative generation of volume signals by interaction between the signals from multiple active boutons. PMID:20533352

  3. The ASH1-RELATED3 SET-Domain Protein Controls Cell Division Competence of the Meristem and the Quiescent Center of the Arabidopsis Primary Root1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kumpf, Robert; Thorstensen, Tage; Rahman, Mohummad Aminur; Heyman, Jefri; Nenseth, H. Zeynep; Lammens, Tim; Herrmann, Ullrich; Swarup, Ranjan; Veiseth, Silje Veie; Emberland, Gitika; Bennett, Malcolm J.; De Veylder, Lieven; Aalen, Reidunn B.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cell niche of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) primary root apical meristem is composed of the quiescent (or organizing) center surrounded by stem (initial) cells for the different tissues. Initial cells generate a population of transit-amplifying cells that undergo a limited number of cell divisions before elongating and differentiating. It is unclear whether these divisions occur stochastically or in an orderly manner. Using the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2?-deoxyuridine to monitor DNA replication of cells of Arabidopsis root meristems, we identified a pattern of two, four, and eight neighboring cells with synchronized replication along the cortical, epidermal, and endodermal cell files, suggested to be daughters, granddaughters, and great-granddaughters of the direct progeny of each stem cell. Markers of mitosis and cytokinesis were not present in the region closest to the transition zone where the cells start to elongate, suggesting that great-granddaughter cells switch synchronously from the mitotic cell cycle to endoreduplication. Mutations in the stem cell niche-expressed ASH1-RELATED3 (ASHR3) gene, encoding a SET-domain protein conferring histone H3 lysine-36 methylation, disrupted this pattern of coordinated DNA replication and cell division and increased the cell division rate in the quiescent center. E2Fa/E2Fb transcription factors controlling the G1-to-S-phase transition regulate ASHR3 expression and bind to the ASHR3 promoter, substantiating a role for ASHR3 in cell division control. The reduced length of the root apical meristem and primary root of the mutant ashr3-1 indicate that synchronization of replication and cell divisions is required for normal root growth and development. PMID:25034019

  4. [Primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Maruani, G; Cornière, N; Nicolet, L; Baron, S; Courbebaisse, M; Renaud, S; Houillier, P

    2013-10-01

    For the past 40 years, primary hyperparathyroidism has been recognized as a common endocrine disease which is, most often, "non-symptomatic", without the occurrence of nephrolithiasis or osteitis fibrosa cystica. Our knowledge in the pathophysiology has increased largely and diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism is usually easy. The only radical treatment is surgery and the surgical indications have been codified by several consensus conferences. For patients who do not undergo surgery, prolonged medical monitoring is needed. PMID:23195909

  5. Prevalence, Distribution, and Significance of Incidental Thoracic Ossification of the Ligamentum Flavum in Korean Patients with Back or Leg Pain : MR-Based Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Bong Ju; Kuh, Sung Uk; Kim, Sungjun; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (OLF) is a relatively rare disease. Because of ambiguous clinical symptom, it is difficult for early diagnosis of OLF and subsequent treatment can be delayed or missed. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to comprehensively assess the prevalence and distribution of thoracic OLF by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and coexisting spinal disease in Korean patients with back pain or leg pain. Methods The sample included 2134 Korean patients who underwent MRI evaluation for back pain. The prevalence and distribution of thoracic OLF were assessed using lumbar MRI with whole spine sagittal images. Additionally, we examined the presence of coexisting lumbar and cervical diseases. The presence of thoracic OLF as well as clinical parameters such as age, sex, and surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Results The prevalence of thoracic OLF in total patients was 16.9% (360/2134). The prevalence tended to increase with aging and was higher in women than in men. The lower thoracic segment of T10-11 was the most frequently affected segment. Of the 360 patients with OLF, 31.9% had coexisting herniated thoracic discs at the same level. Approximately 74% of the patients with OLF had coexisting lumbar and cervical disease. Nine (2.5%) of 360 OLF patients underwent surgery for thoracic lesion. Conclusion The prevalenceof thoracic OLF was relatively higher than those of previous reports. And coexisting lumbar and cervical disease were very frequent. Therefore, we should check coexisting spinal diseases and the exact diagnostic localization of ossification besides lumbar disease. PMID:26361526

  6. Ossified Posterior Longitudinal Ligament With Massive Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Dysphagia in a Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinichi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Maruo, Keishi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Tsuji, Shotaro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Descriptive case report. To report a case of a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) patient with both massive ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) leading to severe dysphagia as well as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) causing mild cervical myelopathy, warranting not only an anterior approach but also a posterior one. Although DISH can cause massive OALL in the cervical spine, severe dysphagia resulting from DISH is a rare occurrence. OALLs are frequently associated with OPLL. Treatment for a DISH patient with OPLL in setting of OALL-caused dysphagia is largely unknown. A 70-year-old man presented with severe dysphagia with mild cervical myelopathy. Neurological examination showed mild spastic paralysis and hyper reflex in his lower extremities. Plane radiographs and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a discontinuous massive OALL at C4-5 and continuous type OPLL at C2-6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pronounced spinal cord compression due to OPLL at C4-5. Esophagram demonstrated extrinsic compression secondary to OALL at C4-5. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. Severe dysphagia markedly improved without any complications. We considered that this patient not only required osteophytectomy and fusion by the anterior approach but also required decompression and spinal fusion by the posterior approach to prevent both deterioration of cervical myelopathy and recurrence of OALL after surgery. PMID:26266365

  7. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in osteoporosis (weak bones that break easily), kidney stones (small clumps of calcium), and a decline in kidney function. DiD YOu knOW? Women are more likely than men to develop primary hyperparathyroidism, and the risk increases with age. FAcT SHeeT Parathyroid Glands thyroid Gland Back View ...

  8. Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    MedlinePLUS

    ... D.C.: American Society of Bone and Mineral Research; 2009: 361–367. Eastell R, Arnold A, Brandi ML, et al. Diagnosis of asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism: proceedings of the Third International Workshop. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2009;94(2): ...

  9. Center Goals Center Mission

    E-print Network

    Yener, Aylin

    before they obtain "members only" reports, data, software, etc. Membership dues are the primary funding budgets, and presenting results in a professional manner. Member Benefits Current Members AIRBUS INNOGREEN

  10. 76 FR 61103 - Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Medicare Program; Comprehensive Primary Care... announces a solicitation for health care payer organizations to participate in the Comprehensive Primary Care initiative (CPC), a multipayer model designed to improve primary care. DATES: Letter of...

  11. Role of endochondral ossification of articular cartilage and functional adaptation of the subchondral plate in the development of fatigue microcracking of joints.

    PubMed

    Muir, P; McCarthy, J; Radtke, C L; Markel, M D; Santschi, E M; Scollay, M C; Kalscheur, V L

    2006-03-01

    The mechanisms that regulate functional adaptation of the articular ends of long bones are poorly understood. However, endochondral ossification of articular cartilage and modeling/remodeling of the subchondral plate and epiphyseal trabeculae are important components of the adaptive response. We performed a histologic study of the distal end of the third metacarpal/metatarsal bone of Thoroughbreds after bones were bulk-stained in basic fuchsin and calcified sections were prepared. The Thoroughbred racehorse is a model of an extreme athlete which experiences particularly high cyclic strains in distal limb bones. The following variables were quantified: microcrack boundary density in calcified cartilage (N.Cr/B.Bd); blood vessel boundary density in calcified cartilage (N.Ve/B.Bd); calcified cartilage width (Cl.Cg.Wi); duplication of the tidemark; and bone volume fraction of the subchondral plate (B.Ar/T.Ar). Measurements were made in five joint regions (lateral condyle and condylar groove; sagittal ridge; medial condylar and condylar groove). N.Cr/B.Bd was site-specific and was increased in the condylar groove region; this is the joint region from which parasagittal articular fatigue (condylar) fractures are typically propagated. Formation of resorption spaces in the subchondral plate was co-localized with microcracking. N.Ve/B.Bd was also site-specific. In the sagittal ridge region, N.Ve/B.Bd was increased, Cl.Cg.Wi was decreased, and B.Ar/T.Ar was decreased, when compared with the other joint regions. Multiple tidemarks were seen in all joint regions. Cumulative athletic activity was associated with a significant decrease in B.Ar/T.Ar in the condylar groove regions. N.Cr/B.Bd was positively correlated with B.Ar/T.Ar (P < 0.05, r(s) = 0.29) and N.Ve/B.Bd was negatively correlated with B.Ar/T.Ar (P < 0.005, r2 = 0.14) and Cl.Cg.Wi (P < 0.05, r2 = 0.07). We conclude that endochondral ossification of articular cartilage and modeling/remodeling of the subchondral plate promote initiation and propagation of site-specific fatigue microcracking of the joint surface, respectively, in this model. Microcracking of articular calcified cartilage likely represents mechanical failure of the joint surface. Propagation of microcracks into the subchondral plate is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of articular condylar fatigue (stress) fracture. Functional adaptation of the joint likely protects hyaline cartilage from injury in the short-term but may promote joint degeneration and osteoarthritis with ongoing athleticism. PMID:16275175

  12. The UConn Co-op is the primary shopping center for students and serves as the official bookstore for the University. In addition to textbooks and course materials, the Co-op offers general books, computers, software, school supplies, engineering & art sup

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    The UConn Co-op is the primary shopping center for students and serves as the official bookstore, the Co-op is a convenient place for students to shop. For store hours visit www.bookstore.uconn.edu. ATM Shops 1254 Storrs Rd Storrs-Mansfield, CT 0.8 miles (860) 487-0092 Drug Stores Storrs Drug 1232 Storrs

  13. The effect of co-culturing costal chondrocytes and dental pulp stem cells combined with exogenous FGF9 protein on chondrogenesis and ossification in engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiewen; Wang, Jia; Lu, Jingting; Zou, Duohong; Sun, Hao; Dong, Yuefu; Yu, Hongbo; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Tong; Zhang, Xiuli; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2012-11-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), which arise from cranial neural crest cells, are multipotent, making them a candidate for use in tissue engineering that may be especially useful for craniofacial tissues. Costal chondrocytes (CCs) can be easily obtained and demonstrate higher initial cell yields and expansion than articular chondrocytes. CCs have been found to retain chondrogenic capacity that can effectively repair articular defects. In this study, human CCs were co-cultured with human DPSCs, and the results showed that the CCs were able to supply a chondro-inductive niche that promoted the DPSCs to undergo chondrogenic differentiation and to enhance the formation of cartilage. Although CCs alone could not prevent the mineralization of chondro-differentiated DPSCs, CCs combined with exogenous FGF9 were able to simultaneously promote the chondrogenesis of DPSCs and partially inhibit their mineralization. Furthermore, FGF9 may activate this inhibition by binding to FGFR3 and enhancing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in DPSCs. Our results strongly suggest that the co-culture of CCs and DPSCs combined with exogenous FGF9 can simultaneously enhance chondrogenesis and partially inhibit ossification in engineered cartilage. PMID:22841919

  14. Diminished Chondrogenesis and Enhanced Osteoclastogenesis in Leptin-Deficient Diabetic Mice (ob/ob) Impair Pathologic, Trauma-Induced Heterotopic Ossification.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shailesh; Loder, Shawn; Li, John; Brownley, Cameron; Peterson, Jonathan R; Oluwatobi, Eboda; Drake, James; Cholok, David; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Sung, Hsiao Hsin; Goulet, James; Li, Shuli; Levi, Benjamin

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic trauma patients exhibit delayed postsurgical wound, bony healing, and dysregulated bone development. However, the impact of diabetes on the pathologic development of ectopic bone or heterotopic ossification (HO) following trauma is unknown. In this study, we use leptin-deficient mice as a model for type 2 diabetes to understand how post-traumatic HO development may be affected by this disease process. Male leptin-deficient (ob/ob) or wild-type (C57BL/6 background) mice aged 6-8 weeks underwent 30% total body surface area burn injury with left hind limb Achilles tenotomy. Micro-CT (?CT) imaging showed significantly lower HO volumes in diabetic mice compared with wild-type controls (0.70 vs. 7.02?mm(3), P?

  15. Expansion of murine periosteal progenitor cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 reveals an intrinsic endochondral ossification program mediated by bone morphogenetic protein 2.

    PubMed

    van Gastel, Nick; Stegen, Steve; Stockmans, Ingrid; Moermans, Karen; Schrooten, Jan; Graf, Daniel; Luyten, Frank P; Carmeliet, Geert

    2014-09-01

    The preservation of the bone-forming potential of skeletal progenitor cells during their ex vivo expansion remains one of the major challenges for cell-based bone regeneration strategies. We report that expansion of murine periosteal cells in the presence of FGF2, a signal present during the early stages of fracture healing, is necessary and sufficient to maintain their ability to organize in vivo into a cartilage template which gives rise to mature bone. Implantation of FGF2-primed cells in a large bone defect in mice resulted in complete healing, demonstrating the feasibility of using this approach for bone tissue engineering purposes. Mechanistically, the enhanced endochondral ossification potential of FGF2-expanded periosteal cells is predominantly driven by an increased production of BMP2 and is additionally linked to an improved preservation of skeletal progenitor cells in the cultures. This characteristic is unique for periosteal cells, as FGF2-primed bone marrow stromal cells formed significantly less bone and progressed exclusively through the intramembranous pathway, revealing essential differences between both cell pools. Taken together, our findings provide insight in the molecular regulation of fracture repair by identifying a unique interaction between periosteal cells and FGF2. These insights may promote the development of cell-based therapeutic strategies for bone regeneration which are independent of the in vivo use of growth factors, thus limiting undesired side effects. PMID:24989687

  16. Developing a quantitative measurement system for assessing heterotopic ossification and monitoring the bioelectric metrics from electrically induced osseointegration in the residual limb of service members.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Brad M; Stinstra, Jeroen G; MacLeod, Rob S; Pasquina, Paul F; Bloebaum, Roy D

    2010-09-01

    Poor prosthetic fit is often the result of heterotopic ossification (HO), a frequent problem following blast injuries for returning service members. Osseointegration technology offers an advantage for individuals with significant HO and poor socket tolerance by using direct skeletal attachment of a prosthesis to the distal residual limb, but remains limited due to prolonged post-operative rehabilitation regimens. Therefore, electrical stimulation has been proposed as a catalyst for expediting skeletal attachment and the bioelectric effects of HO were evaluated using finite element analysis in 11 servicemen with transfemoral amputations. Retrospective computed tomography (CT) scans provided accurate reconstructions, and volume conductor models demonstrated the variability in residual limb anatomy and necessity for patient-specific modeling to characterize electrical field variance if patients were to undergo a theoretical osseointegration of a prosthesis. In this investigation, the volume of HO was statistically significant when selecting the optimal potential difference for enhanced skeletal fixation, since higher HO volumes required increased voltages at the periprosthetic bone (p = 0.024, r = 0.670). Results from Spearman's rho correlations also indicated that the age of the subject and volume of HO were statistically significant and inversely proportional, in which younger service members had a higher frequency of HO (p = 0.041, r = -0.622). This study demonstrates that the volume of HO and age may affect the voltage threshold necessary to improve current osseointegration procedures. PMID:20458630

  17. The Effects of Targeted Deliveries of Lovastatin and Tocotrienol on Ossification-Related Gene Expressions in Fracture Healing in an Osteoporosis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nurul ‘Izzah; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima Nirwana; Shuid, Ahmad Nazrun

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporotic drugs are used to prevent fragility fractures, but their role in fracture healing still remains unknown. Thus, alternative agents with suitable mode of delivery are needed to promote fracture healing. This study was performed to investigate the effects of direct deliveries of lovastatin and tocotrienol to fracture sites on ossification-related gene expression in fracture healing in a postmenopausal osteoporosis model. Forty-eight Sprague Dawley female rats were divided into six groups. Group I comprised the sham-operated rats, while Groups II–VI were ovariectomized rats. After 8 weeks, the right tibiae of all rats were fractured and stabilized. Group I and Group II were given two single injections of lovastatin and tocotrienol carriers. Group III was given an estrogen preparation at 64.5 µg/kg daily via oral gavages. Group IV was injected with lovastatin particles (750 µg/kg), while Group V was injected with tocotrienol particles (60 mg/kg). Group VI received two single injections of 750 µg/kg lovastatin particles and 60 mg/kg tocotrienol particles. After 4 weeks, the gene expressions were measured. Group VI showed significantly higher gene expressions of osteocalcin, BMP-2, VEGF-?, and RUNX-2 compared to Group II. In conclusion, combined treatment of lovastatin and tocotrienol upregulated the expression of genes related to fracture healing. PMID:26501302

  18. Primary Sleep Disorders.

    PubMed

    Khoury, John; Doghramji, Karl

    2015-12-01

    Primary sleep disorders include those not attributable to another medical or psychiatric condition: insomnia disorder, hypersomnolence disorder, narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome, central sleep apnea syndrome, and the parasomnias. They are commonly encountered and are comorbid with many psychiatric disorders. It is important to recognize these disorders and be comfortable treating them or to know when to refer to a sleep disorders center and sleep specialist. Treatment of a comorbid sleep disorder can improve the overall quality of life, symptoms in mood disorders, and symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness, and decrease cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26600103

  19. Primary Teachers' Conceptions of Giftedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Tonya R.; Brighton, Catherine M.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the first phase of a recent National Research Center on Giftedness and Talented (NRC/GT) project, which used survey research to target a disproportionate nationally stratified random sample of primary grade teachers about their beliefs and practices related to talent development in young children and their responses to case…

  20. Primary Lateral Sclerosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Primary Lateral Sclerosis Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Primary Lateral Sclerosis? Primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) is a rare ...

  1. Thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of ligamentum flavum: a retrospective analysis of predictors of surgical outcome and factors affecting preoperative neurological status.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Amish V; Chhabra, Harvinder Singh; Mascarenhas, Amrithlal A; Mittal, Vivek K; Sangondimath, Gururaj M

    2011-02-01

    Despite good posterior decompression of thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of ligamentum flavum (OLF), recovery varies widely from 25 to 100%. Neurological status on presentation also varies widely in different patients. We, therefore retrospectively studied relation of various clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters with preoperative neurological status and postoperative recovery in 25 patients who underwent decompressive laminectomy for thoracic myelopathy due to OLF. Patients were assessed using leg-trunk-bladder scores of JOA scale and recovery rate (RR) was calculated as RR = postoperative score - preoperative score/11 - preoperative score × 100. With Pearson's correlation, postoperative recovery rate (RR) significantly correlated with preoperative duration of symptoms, JOA score, sensory JOA score, canal grade, dural canal-body ratio (DCBR), intramedullary signal size (ISS), and intramedullary signal type (IST) on MRI. On MRI, two types of signal changes were identified: normal in T1/hyperintense in T2 representing cord edema and hypointense in T1/hyperintense in T2 representing cystic changes indicating lesser and higher grades, respectively. Presence or absence of signal changes did not correlate with postoperative recovery; but whenever present, ISS greater than 15 mm significantly compromised recovery. Multiple regression analysis (MRA) identified preoperative duration of symptoms and preoperative ISS as significant predictors of postoperative outcome. Based on MRA, we formulated a multiple regression equation to predict RR as Predicted RR = 83.4 + (0.1 × age in years) - (0.7 × preoperative duration of symptoms in months) + (1.5 × preoperative JOA score) + (0.2 × preoperative canal grade in percentage) - (2.5 × ISS in mm) - (1.5 × IST in grade). Though age, preoperative anal sensations, spasticity, canal grade, DCBR, ISS, and IST significantly correlated with preoperative neurological status, MRA identified ISS as most important factor determining preoperative neurological status. Preoperative duration of symptoms and developmentally narrow canal had no influence on preoperative neurological status. Patients with developmentally narrow canal showed significant correlation with younger age at onset of myelopathy. To conclude, only independent factor determining preoperative neurological status is ISS. Predictors of postoperative recovery are preoperative duration of symptoms and ISS. Postoperative recovery can be predicted by formulated equation. PMID:20473624

  2. SUMMER 2013 CENTER EXPANDS

    E-print Network

    Bushman, Frederic

    a fellowship in move- ment disorders. She is currently completing a fellowship in Sleep Medicine. P arkinson rigorously studied in PD patients with RLS. Other primary motor sleep disorders often seen in PD includeSUMMER 2013 PENN SLEEP CENTER EXPANDS INPATIENT CONSULT SERVICE 10th ANNUAL CSCN RESEARCH RETREAT

  3. A Rural Primary Care Pediatric Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairys, Steven; Newell, Priscilla

    1985-01-01

    The primary care pediatric residency program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has developed a training program in rural primary care. Residents experience the many facets of rural practice and are introduced to community-oriented approaches to child health care. (Author/MLW)

  4. 9. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF PRIMARY REDUCING GEARS; NOTE BRAKE WHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF PRIMARY REDUCING GEARS; NOTE BRAKE WHEEL AND PADS AT RIGHT CENTER BEHIND PRIMARY GEAR; MITER GEAR AT CENTER IS PART OF MECHANISM FOR MANUAL OPERATION OF BRIDGE; FLANGE FOR COUPLING THE NORTH AND SOUTH REDUCTION GEAR TRAINS IS AT CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH BEHIND SOUTH PRIMARY REDUCTION GEAR - East Washington Avenue Bridge, Spanning Pequonnock River at East Washington Avenue, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  5. Postoperative nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and the prevention of heterotopic ossification after cervical arthroplasty: analysis using CT and a minimum 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Ko, Chin-Chu; Fay, Li-Yu; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Heterotopic ossification (HO) after cervical arthroplasty is not uncommon and may cause immobility of the disc. To prevent HO formation, study protocols of clinical trials for cervical arthroplasty undertaken by the US FDA included perioperative use of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, there are few data supporting the use of NSAIDs to prevent HO after cervical arthroplasty. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of NSAIDs in HO formation and clinical outcomes. METHODS Consecutive patients who underwent 1- or 2-level cervical arthroplasty with a minimum follow-up of 24 months were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were grouped into 1 of 2 groups, an NSAID group (those patients who had used NSAIDs postoperatively) and a non-NSAID group (those patients who had not used NSAIDs postoperatively). The formation of HO was detected and classified using CT in every patient. The incidence of HO formation, disc mobility, and clinical outcomes, including visual analog scale (VAS) scores of neck and arm pain, neck disability index (NDI) scores, and complications were compared between the two groups. Furthermore, a subgroup analysis of the patients in the NSAID group, comparing the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 to nonselective COX-2 NSAID users, was also conducted for each of the above-mentioned parameters. RESULTS A total of 75 patients (mean age [± SD] 46.71 ± 9.94 years) with 107 operated levels were analyzed. The mean follow-up duration was 38.71 ± 9.55 months. There were no significant differences in age, sex, and levels of arthroplasty between the NSAID and non-NSAID groups. There was a nonsignificantly lower rate of HO formation in the NSAID group than the non-NSAID group (47.2% vs. 68.2%, respectively; p = 0.129). During follow-up, most of the arthroplasty levels remained mobile, with similar rates of immobile discs in the NSAID and non-NSAID groups (13.2% and 22.7%, respectively; p = 0.318). Furthermore, there was a nonsignificantly lower rate of HO formation in the selective COX-2 group than the nonselective COX-2 group (30.8% vs 52.5%, respectively; p = 0.213). The clinical outcomes, including VAS neck, VAS arm, and NDI scores at 24 months postoperatively, were all similar in the NSAID and non-NSAID groups, as well as the selective and nonselective COX-2 groups (all p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS In this study there was a trend toward less HO formation and fewer immobile discs in patients who used postoperative NSAIDs after cervical arthroplasty than those who did not, but this trend did not reach statistical significance. Patients who used selective COX-2 NSAIDs had nonsignificantly less HO than those who used nonselective COX-2 NSAIDs. The clinical outcomes were not affected by the use of NSAIDs or the kinds of NSAIDs used (selective vs nonselective COX-2). However, the study was limited by the number of patients included, and the efficacy of NSAIDs in the prevention of HO after cervical arthroplasty may need further investigation to confirm these results. PMID:25723121

  6. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    MedlinePLUS

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the bile ducts of the liver. This blocks the flow ... ducts in the liver is not known. However, primary biliary cirrhosis is an autoimmune disorder. That means your body's ...

  7. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  8. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  9. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  10. Qualitative Strategy for Inbound Call Center Outsourcing

    E-print Network

    Sankaranaraynan, Meenakshi

    2010-05-14

    center services. Telephone call centers are an integral part of today‘s business world, serving as a primary channel for customer contact for organizations in many industries. Globalization, the advancements in the telecommunication and technology...

  11. Assessing physical activity in daily life, exercise, and sedentary behavior among Japanese moving to westernized environment: a cross-sectional study of Japanese migrants at an urban primary care center in Pittsburgh

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Noncommunicable chronic diseases (NCDs) are global public health issues. Physical activity, exercise and sedentary behavior are important lifestyle factors to determine risk of NCDs. Immigrant studies have shown higher risk of developing NCDs among immigrants. Less physical activity among Japanese immigrants to westernized environment was also documented. However, little is known about detailed physical activity, exercise and sedentary behavior among Japanese residing in westernized environment. This cross-sectional study was conducted to analyze physical activity in daily life, exercise, and sedentary behavior among Japanese in westernized environment and then to compare the results to native Japanese in Japan. Methods Japanese adults in Pittsburgh who were registered at an urban primary care clinic were surveyed in terms of physical activity in daily life, exercise, and sedentary behavior. The results were compared to age- and gender-matched Japanese averages from the national data (Japanese National Health and Nutrition Survey, J-NHANS). Results Of 97 identified for inclusion, all responded. Japanese in Pittsburgh did not engage physical activity in daily life as compared to J-NHANS results (p?

  12. Primary Hyperparathyroidism: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie-Feder, Jessica; Sirrs, Sandra; Anderson, Donald; Sharif, Jibran; Khan, Aneal

    2011-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common condition that affects 0.3% of the general population. Primary and tertiary care specialists can encounter patients with primary hyperparathyroidism, and prompt recognition and treatment can greatly reduce morbidity and mortality from this disease. In this paper we will review the basic physiology of calcium homeostasis and then consider genetic associations as well as common etiologies and presentations of primary hyperparathyroidism. We will consider emerging trends in detection and measurement of parathyroid hormone as well as available imaging modalities for the parathyroid glands. Surgical indications and approach will be reviewed as well as medical management of primary hyperparathyroidism with bisphosphonates and calcimimetics. PMID:21747852

  13. Precision Joining Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a Precision Joining Center (PJC) is proposed. The PJC will be a cooperatively operated center with participation from U.S. private industry, the Colorado School of Mines, and various government agencies, including the Department of Energy's Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). The PJC's primary mission will be as a training center for advanced joining technologies. This will accomplish the following objectives: (1) it will provide an effective mechanism to transfer joining technology from the NWC to private industry; (2) it will provide a center for testing new joining processes for the NWC and private industry; and (3) it will provide highly trained personnel to support advance joining processes for the NWC and private industry.

  14. Primary Containment for Biohazards

    E-print Network

    Primary Containment for Biohazards: Selection, Installation and Use of Biological Safety Cabinets 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 E. Cabinet Leak Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 F. Electrical Leakage and Ground

  15. [Primary health care contributes to global health].

    PubMed

    Aabenhus, Mette Morre; Schriver, Michael; Kallestrup, Per

    2012-05-28

    Global health interventions often focus on specific diseases, thus forming vertical programmes. Studies show that vertical programmes perform poorly, which underlines the need for a horizontal basis: universal community-based primary health care, which improves health equity and outcomes. The diagonal approach supports an integrated patient-centered health-care system. The ''15% by 2015''-initiative suggests that vertical programmes invest 15% of their budgets in strengthening integrated primary health care. Strategies depend on local context. PMID:22668645

  16. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  17. Interprofessional Competencies in Integrative Primary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kligler, Benjamin; Brooks, Audrey J; Maizes, Victoria; Goldblatt, Elizabeth; Klatt, Maryanna; Koithan, Mary S; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Lee, Jeannie K; Lopez, Ana Marie; McClafferty, Hilary; Rhode, Robert; Sandvold, Irene; Saper, Robert; Taren, Douglas; Wells, Eden; Lebensohn, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    In October 2014, the National Center for Integrative Primary Healthcare (NCIPH) was launched as a collaboration between the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine and the Academic Consortium for Integrative Health and Medicine and supported by a grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration. A primary goal of the NCIPH is to develop a core set of integrative healthcare (IH) competencies and educational programs that will span the interprofessional primary care training and practice spectra and ultimately become a required part of primary care education. This article reports on the first phase of the NCIPH effort, which focused on the development of a shared set of competencies in IH for primary care disciplines. The process of development, refinement, and adoption of 10 "meta-competencies" through a collaborative process involving a diverse interprofessional team is described. Team members represent nursing, the primary care medicine professions, pharmacy, public health, acupuncture, naturopathy, chiropractic, nutrition, and behavioral medicine. Examples of the discipline-specific sub-competencies being developed within each of the participating professions are provided, along with initial results of an assessment of potential barriers and facilitators of adoption within each discipline. The competencies presented here will form the basis of a 45-hour online curriculum produced by the NCIPH for use in primary care training programs that will be piloted in a wide range of programs in early 2016 and then revised for wider use over the following year. PMID:26421232

  18. Study of Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Parmar; Lala, M.; Chadha, M.; Shah, N. F.; Chauhan, P. H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The clinical spectrum of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) has undergone a striking change with asymptomatic form predominant in developed countries, whereas symptomatic form predominant in developing countries. In this study, we have analyzed clinical presentation, investigations, management, operative findings in patients with PHPT at our center. Materials and Method: A retrospective, review of medical records of all patients with PHPT between 2000 and July 2012 at our institute was undertaken. A total of 96 patients were included in this study. Results: The mean age of patients was 50.8 years. Of the 96 patients, 63 were females (65.6%) and 33 were males (34.4%). Among them, 17.7% were asymptomatic and 82.3% were symptomatic. Bone pain was the most common complaint (52%) followed by renal stones (27%). Nearly 10.4% were part of familial PHPT, whereas others were sporadic adenomas. All patients had hypercalcemia (range 10.5–19.4 mg/dl) with elevated parathyroid (PTH) levels (range 32–3820 pg/ml). 25(OH) VitD levels were available in 86 patients (89.6%). There was no correlation between VitaminD levels and symptomatology. Sestamibi scan was true positive in 95.6%, false negative 2.2%, and inconclusive in 2.2%. Ultrasonography (USG) results were true positive in 84.2%, false positive in 6.3%, and false negative in 9.5%. Intraoperative PTH levels were measured in 83.3% patients. Postoperative complications were reported in 20.8% patients. Conclusions: Clinical spectrum of PHPT varies but bones and stones are still the predominant manifestations even in affluent society. Asymptomatic form also exists and can be detected by routine measurement of serum calcium. There was no correlation seen between the 25 VitD levels and clinical symptoms. PMID:23565449

  19. Gross Primary Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's new Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) allows scientists to gauge our planet's metabolism on an almost daily basis. GPP, gross primary production, is the technical term for plant photosynthesis. This composite image over the continental United States, acquired during the period March 26-April 10, 2000, shows regions where plants were more or less productive-i.e., where they 'inhaled' carbon dioxide and then used the carbon from photosynthesis to build new plant structures. This false-color image provides a map of how much carbon was absorbed out of the atmosphere and fixed within land vegetation. Areas colored blue show where plants used as much as 60 grams of carbon per square meter. Areas colored green and yellow indicate a range of anywhere from 40 to 20 grams of carbon absorbed per square meter. Red pixels show an absorption of less than 10 grams of carbon per square meter and white pixels (often areas covered by snow or masked as urban) show little or no absorption. This is one of a number of new measurements that MODIS provides to help scientists understand how the Earth's landscapes are changing over time. Scientists' goal is use of these GPP measurements to refine computer models to simulate how the land biosphere influences the natural cycles of water, carbon, and energy throughout the Earth system. The GPP will be an integral part of global carbon cycle source and sink analysis, an important aspect of Kyoto Protocol assessments. This image is the first of its kind from the MODIS instrument, which launched in December 1999 aboard the Terra spacecraft. MODIS began acquiring scientific data on February 24, 2000, when it first opened its aperture door. The MODIS instrument and Terra spacecraft are both managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. Image courtesy Steven Running, MODIS Land Group Member, University of Montana

  20. Education research Primary Science

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Education research Primary Science Survey Report December 2011 #12;Primary Science Survey Report, Wellcome Trust 1 Background In May 2009 Key Stage 2 science SATs (Standard Assessment Tests) were abolished fiasco might occur, where the results were delayed and their quality questioned. The loss of science SATs

  1. Primary tuberculosis of thyroid.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Ashish; Suneha, Swati; Shaha, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) of the thyroid gland, either in its primary or secondary form, is an extremely rare occurrence. It is infrequent even in countries with high incidence and prevalence of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. We report here a case of primary tuberculosis of thyroid presenting to us with sudden onset thyroid swelling since 20 days. PMID:26545476

  2. Using Primary Source Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Explores the use of primary sources when teaching about U.S. slavery. Includes primary sources from the Gilder Lehrman Documents Collection (New York Historical Society) to teach about the role of slaves in the Revolutionary War, such as a proclamation from Lord Dunmore offering freedom to slaves who joined his army. (CMK)

  3. Primary Science Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Liz Lawrence has recently finished her term as Chair of Primary Science Committee (PSC). She is one of the 41 hub leaders who have led and mentored 192 schools across England and British Forces' schools in Germany, to achieve the first ever nationally recognised awards to celebrate excellence in primary science. In this article, the author writes…

  4. The Impact of Primary Care: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Leiyu

    2012-01-01

    Primary care serves as the cornerstone in a strong healthcare system. However, it has long been overlooked in the United States (USA), and an imbalance between specialty and primary care exists. The objective of this focused review paper is to identify research evidence on the value of primary care both in the USA and internationally, focusing on the importance of effective primary care services in delivering quality healthcare, improving health outcomes, and reducing disparities. Literature searches were performed in PubMed as well as “snowballing” based on the bibliographies of the retrieved articles. The areas reviewed included primary care definitions, primary care measurement, primary care practice, primary care and health, primary care and quality, primary care and cost, primary care and equity, primary care and health centers, and primary care and healthcare reform. In both developed and developing countries, primary care has been demonstrated to be associated with enhanced access to healthcare services, better health outcomes, and a decrease in hospitalization and use of emergency department visits. Primary care can also help counteract the negative impact of poor economic conditions on health. PMID:24278694

  5. Hastings Center

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Care Organizations Sally Bean and Maxwell J. Smith More from the Hastings Center Report: Fever More ... human research studies. Public Comments on Proposed Regulatory Reforms That Would Impact Biospecimen Research: The Good, the ...

  6. Translational Research Overview Health Policy and Primary Care Research Center

    E-print Network

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    and organizational change theory, health information technology (HIT), medicine, methods of clinical research is an integral tool of health policy research: it provides information that is particularly relevant assessing diffusion of innovation in clinical practice, problems in successful integration of research

  7. Other primary headaches

    PubMed Central

    Bahra, Anish

    2012-01-01

    The ‘Other Primary Headaches’ include eight recognised benign headache disorders. Primary stabbing headache is a generally benign disorder which often co-exists with other primary headache disorders such as migraine and cluster headache. Primary cough headache is headache precipitated by valsalva; secondary cough has been reported particularly in association with posterior fossa pathology. Primary exertional headache can occur with sudden or gradual onset during, or immediately after, exercise. Similarly headache associated with sexual activity can occur with gradual evolution or sudden onset. Secondary headache is more likely with both exertional and sexual headache of sudden onset. Sudden onset headache, with maximum intensity reached within a minute, is termed thunderclap headache. A benign form of thunderclap headache exists. However, isolated primary and secondary thunderclap headache cannot be clinically differentiated. Therefore all headache of thunderclap onset should be investigated. The primary forms of the aforementioned paroxysmal headaches appear to be Indomethacin sensitive disorders. Hypnic headache is a rare disorder which is termed ‘alarm clock headache’, exclusively waking patients from sleep. The disorder can be Indomethacin responsive, but can also respond to Lithium and caffeine. New daily persistent headache is a rare and often intractable headache which starts one day and persists daily thereafter for at least 3 months. The clinical syndrome more often has migrainous features or is otherwise has a chronic tension-type headache phenotype. Management is that of the clinical syndrome. Hemicrania continua straddles the disorders of migraine and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and is not dealt with in this review. PMID:23024566

  8. Primary cardiac synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Gul, Saira; Tufail, Zafar; Khan, Kamran; Sharma, Praman; Waheed, Abdul

    2015-07-01

    Approximately 10% of soft tissue sarcomas are synovial sarcomas, and 90% of these occur in the extremities. Among the primary tumors in the heart, 25% are malignant. Primary synovial sarcoma of the heart is an extremely rare entity. A myriad of investigations such as histopathology, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and molecular genetic techniques are required for confirmation of the diagnosis. The tumor is nearly always lethal, but surgical resection with chemotherapy may prolong the life of the patient. We describe the case of a young patient with a primary synovial sarcoma arising from the right ventricle. PMID:24585318

  9. Novel Therapy for Primary Canaliculitis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianjiang; Liu, Zuguo; Mashaghi, Alireza; Sun, Xinghuai; Lu, Yi; Li, Yimin; Wu, Dan; Yang, Yujing; Wei, Anji; Zhao, Yujin; Lu, Chun; Hong, Jiaxu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In patients with primary canaliculitis, conservative medical therapy is associated with a high recurrence rate. Surgical treatments carry a great resolution rate but sometimes can result in the lacrimal pump dysfunction and canalicular scarring. The aim of this study is to introduce a minimally invasive approach, intracanalicular ophthalmic corticosteroid/antibiotic combination ointment infiltration (IOI, intracanalicular ointment infiltration), and to report our preliminary results for treating primary canaliculitis. In this retrospective, interventional case series, 68 consecutive patients with newly developed primary canaliculitis at a major tertiary eye center between January 2012 and January 2015. Thirty-six patients received conservative medical treatment alone (group 1; 36 eyes). Twenty-two patients and 10 medically uncontrolled patients from group 1 underwent IOI therapy (group 2; 32 eyes). Ten patients and 26 recurrent patients from group 1 and group 2 underwent surgery (group 3; 36 eyes). Patients were followed-up for at least 8 weeks. Clinical characteristics and outcomes were analyzed and compared. In this study, patients’ age, sex, onset location, and durations of disease among 3 groups showed no significant difference. The resolution rate in group 2 was 72.7% (16/22) for new patients and 68.8% (22/32) for gross patients, respectively, both of which are higher than that of group 1 (22.2%, 10/36) but lower than that of group 3 (100%, 36/36). Of group 3, 2 patients received 2 surgical interventions and resolved finally. Microbiological workup was available in 51 patients. The most common isolates were staphylococcus species (27.9%) and streptococcus species (20%). Canalicular laceration developed in 1 patient during the IOI procedure and 1 patient undergoing surgery. Only 2 had postoperative lacrimal pump dysfunction and 1 had canalicular scarring in group 3. The IOI may be an effective and minimally invasive technique for treating primary canaliculitis and obviate the need for further intensive surgery. PMID:26426646

  10. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... budget justification & Director’s testimony Advisory Groups Councils, committees, task forces & boards that help guide activities Staff Directory ... and Gynecologists. (2011). Primary ovarian insufficiency in the adolescent : Committee opinion no. 502. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 118 , ...

  11. Primary infertility (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  12. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  13. Hyperaldosteronism - primary and secondary

    MedlinePLUS

    ... caused by a noncancerous (benign) tumor of the adrenal gland. The condition is most common in people 30 to 50 years old. ... Primary and secondary hyperaldosteronism have common symptoms, ... Headache Muscle weakness Numbness Paralysis that comes and goes

  14. Primary Coating Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaganiaris, Alcibiade; Karmazsin, E.

    1986-04-01

    The thermomechanical properties of various primary coatings was studied under static and dynamic conditions. Especially two different epoxy-acrylate resins have been investigated with respect to their aging parameters under hostile environments.

  15. Inside the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Brian

    1980-01-01

    Presents some of the findings of the ORACLE research program (Observational Research and Classroom Learning Evaluation), a detailed observational study of teacher-student interaction, teaching styles, and management methods within a sample of primary classrooms. (Editor/SJL)

  16. Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Directors Committees/Working Groups By-Laws Committee Cervical Cancer Working Group Clinical Trials Working Group Communications Committee ... Connected About Gynecologic Cancers Types of Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention Primary Prevention with Cervical Cancer ...

  17. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case study findings, and participation in data center industry meetings and workshops. Industry partners enthusiastically provided valuable insight into current practice, and helped to identify areas where additional public interest research could lead to significant efficiency improvement. This helped to define and prioritize the research agenda. The interaction involved industry representatives with expertise in all aspects of data center facilities, including specialized facility infrastructure systems and computing equipment. In addition to the input obtained through industry workshops, LBNL's participation in a three-day, comprehensive design ''charrette'' hosted by the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) yielded a number of innovative ideas for future research.

  18. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  19. Primary care research ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R; Murphy, E; Crosland, A

    1995-01-01

    Research activity in primary care is increasing rapidly, and raises a range of specific ethical issues. Many of these relate to the involvement of individuals in the community who are not seeking medical care and to the impact of research participation on relationships between general practitioners and their patients. The ethical issues pertinent to a range of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies in primary care are identified and considered. PMID:8554844

  20. Teaching primary care obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith B.; Jordan, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the experiences and recommendations for recruitment of family physicians who practise and teach primary care obstetrics. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews. Setting Six primary care obstetrics groups in Edmonton, Alta, that were involved in teaching family medicine residents in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Alberta. Participants Twelve family physicians who practised obstetrics in groups. All participants were women, which was reasonably representative of primary care obstetrics providers in Edmonton. Methods Each participant underwent an in-depth interview. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The investigators independently reviewed the transcripts and then analyzed the transcripts together in an iterative and interpretive manner. Main findings Themes identified in this study include lack of confidence in teaching, challenges of having learners, benefits of having learners, and recommendations for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. While participants described insecurity and challenges related to teaching, they also identified positive aspects, and offered suggestions for recruiting learners to primary care obstetrics. Conclusion Despite describing poor confidence as teachers and having challenges with learners, the participants identified positive experiences that sustained their interest in teaching. Supporting these teachers and recruiting more such role models is important to encourage family medicine learners to enter careers such as primary care obstetrics. PMID:24627402

  1. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Ali, Ahmad H; Lindor, Keith D

    2015-10-17

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterised by destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and potential cirrhosis through resulting complications. The serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis is the antimitochondrial antibody, a highly disease-specific antibody identified in about 95% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients usually have fatigue and pruritus, both of which occur independently of disease severity. The typical course of primary biliary cirrhosis has changed substantially with the introduöction of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Several randomised placebo-controlled studies have shown that UDCA improves transplant-free survival in primary biliary cirrhosis. However, about 40% of patients do not have a biochemical response to UDCA and would benefit from new therapies. Liver transplantation is a life-saving surgery with excellent outcomes for those with decompensated cirrhosis. Meanwhile, research on nuclear receptor hormones has led to the development of exciting new potential treatments. This Seminar will review the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis, discuss management of the disease and its sequelae, and introduce research on new therapeutic options. PMID:26364546

  2. Centers | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The Methodist Hospital Research Institute The Methodist Hospital Research Institute Physical Sciences-Oncology Center evaluates the process of mass transport in cancer to generate novel methods to improve diagnosis and treatment of cancer. This center focuses on hepatic, breast, colorectal, and pancreatic primary cancers as well on liver metastasis of the last three conditions. The investigators show that transport differentials are very important in the ability to efficiently treat malignancies.

  3. Organisation of Prevention in Primary Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

    This report examines the possiblities of increasing the amount of preventive work being carried out by primary care workers in European communities. Before making practical recommendations about promoting prevention, an analysis is presented of the main present day problems. These center on the environment (not only physical but also social and…

  4. A compound heterozygote SLC26A2 mutation resulting in robin sequence, mild limbs shortness, accelerated carpal ossification, and multiple epiphysial dysplasia in two Brazilian sisters. A new intermediate phenotype between diastrophic dysplasia and recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Zechi-Ceide, Roseli Maria; Moura, Priscila Padilha; Raskin, Salmo; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Guion-Almeida, Maria Leine

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in solute carrier family 26 (sulfate transporter), member 2 (SLC26A2) gene result in a spectrum of autosomal recessive chondrodysplasias that range from the mildest recessive form of multiple epiphysial dysplasia (rMED) through the most common diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) to lethal atelosteogenesis type II and achondrogenesis IB. The clinical variability has been ascribed to quantitative effect of mutations of the sulfate transporter activity. Here we describe two Brazilian sisters, born to healthy and non consanguineous parents, with Robin sequence, mild shortening of upper and lower limbs, brachymetacarpalia/tarsalia, additional and accelerated carpal ossification, marked genu valgum, and multiple epiphysial dysplasia. This phenotype was intermediate between DTD and rMED, and both girls have a compound heterozygous mutations for the SLC26A2, a Finnish founder mutation (c.-26 + 2T>C), and R279W. This combination of mutations has been observed in individuals with different phenotypes, including DTD, DTD variant, and rMED. The distinct phenotype of our cases reinforces the hypothesis that other factors may be influencing the phenotype as previously suggested. PMID:23840040

  5. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePLUS

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. Patients who have a weakened immune system are at high risk of primary lymphoma of the ...

  6. [Primary hepatic carcinoid].

    PubMed

    Plásek, J; Vybíralová, M; Dvorácková, J; Petrusková, A; Sagan, J; Golián, M; Hrabovský, V; Petejová, N; Martínek, A

    2011-06-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoid (PHC) is considered to be particularly sporadic diagnosis; in current world literature about 60 cases have been reported. Most of the patients present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, icterus, flush, weight loss or respiratory disease; even though the course of the disease might stay asymptomatic for a long time. An illuminating case of at presentation oligosymptomatic 72-year-old patient, which was after extensive examination based on OctreoScan and histological verification diagnosed to have generalized PHC, is reported. Paliative therapy with somatostatine analogues followed. At autopsy 8 months later the clinical diagnosis of PHC was confirmed. PHC is difficult to diagnose both due to radiological similarity to other hepatic lesions and demanding exclusion of other primary foci. The diagnosis of PHC is based on negative imaging techniques result in other possible localizations. Minimal symptomatology in stage of generalization, atypical primary localization and rapid progression is of interest in current case. PMID:21751545

  7. 75 FR 21001 - Health Center Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ...will be transferring Health Center Program (section 330 of the Public Health Service Act) New Access...Improvement Program (CIP) funds originally awarded to Community Medical Services to...of critical primary health care services to...

  8. Primary hypertrophic colonopathy.

    PubMed

    Janaki, M; Chandrasekhar, K P; Rao, G M; Reddy, S V

    2000-01-01

    We report a 45-year-old man and a 60-year-old woman who presented with features of intermittent intestinal obstruction. Barium enema revealed narrowing at the pelvic-rectal junction in the man, and from the pelvic colon to the anal verge in the woman. Histology of the resected sections showed marked hypertrophy of the muscularis propria in both cases, with normal mucosa, submucosa and myenteric plexus. Both patients are asymptomatic at 4 years' and 2 years' follow up. This entity of primary hypertrophic colonopathy may be a variant of primary visceral myopathy. PMID:10918725

  9. Primary Prevention of Hypertension

    E-print Network

    Shen, Jun

    B L O O D I N S T I T U T E National High Blood Pressure Education Program #12;#12;National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute National High Blood Pressure Education Program Health Advisory from the National High Blood Pressure Education Program #12;#12;PRIMARY PREVENTION

  10. Writing for Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Tara, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, two short pieces are presented to show educators just what a good article and a good review could have in them. This article has been written for the purpose of illustrating a good example, but is also representative of the type of content the editors encourage in "Primary Science": practical and active, with images. They also…

  11. Primary Art Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton Unified School District 373, KS.

    GRADES OR AGES: Primary Grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Art. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide begins with a list of topics for art expression. The main body of the guide contains 15 color-coded sections on the following subjects: 1) mobiles and folded paper; 2) collage and photo montage; 3) square paper and mosaics; 4) wax paper and…

  12. Primary Premier for Belfast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author talks about the Association for Science Education (ASE) Primary Science Committee's (PSC) March 2009 meeting which was held in Belfast as guests of ASE Northern Ireland. To mark the auspicious occasion of a body that usually meets four times a year in the Hatfield HQ crossing the Irish Sea to be hosted by its Celtic cousins, a Lord…

  13. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Cancer.gov

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  14. Philosophy in Primary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John

    2012-01-01

    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education" Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on "Philosophy for Children in Transition", so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just mentioned. The result…

  15. Composite Crew Module: Primary Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to design, build, and test a full-scale crew module primary structure, using carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based composite materials. The overall goal of the Composite Crew Module project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project's baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. This report discusses the project management aspects of the project including team organization, decision making, independent technical reviews, and cost and schedule management approach.

  16. The Selling of Primary Care 2015.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Walter N; Elnicki, D Michael; Hauer, Karen E

    2015-09-01

    The role of undergraduate medical education in creating, perpetuating, and potentially solving the physician shortage in adult primary care has been debated for years, but often the discussions revolve around overly simplistic notions of supply and demand. The supply is curtailed, it is said, because the work is hard and the pay is low relative to other career options. Missing is a recognition that medical schools make choices in developing primary care learning environments that profoundly affect student perceptions of this career. Emerging developments in healthcare, including the transformation of academic health centers into integrated health systems that enter into risk-based contracts, may provide an opportunity to re-direct discussions about primary care. More schools may begin to recognize that they can control the quality of primary care teaching environments, and that doing so will help them achieve excellence in education and compete in the new marketplace. The selling of primary care to medical schools may be the first step in primary care selling itself to medical students. PMID:26173527

  17. Composites technology for transport primary structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Victor; Hawley, Arthur; Klotzsche, Max; Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    The ACT contract activity being performed by the McDonnell Douglas Corporation is divided into two separate activities: one effort by Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach, California with a focus on Transport Primary Wing and Fuselage Structure, and the other effort by McDonnell Aircraft in St. Louis, Missouri with a focus on Advanced Combat Aircraft Center Wing-Fuselage Structure. This presentation is on the Douglas Aircraft Transport Structure portion of the ACT program called ICAPS - Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structure.

  18. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management...

  19. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management...

  20. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.168 Primary care case management services. (a)...

  1. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management...

  2. 42 CFR 440.168 - Primary care case management services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care case management services. 440.168 Section 440.168 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... care case management services. (a) Primary care case management services means case management...

  3. 42 CFR 411.175 - Basis for Medicare primary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Basis for Medicare primary payments. 411.175 Section...175 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM...

  4. 77 FR 74381 - Medicaid Program; Payments for Services Furnished by Certain Primary Care Physicians and Charges...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ...Certain Primary Care Physicians and Charges for Vaccine Administration Under the Vaccines for Children Program; Correction AGENCY: Centers...Certain Primary Care Physicians and Charges for Vaccine Administration under the Vaccines for...

  5. Mutations in fam20b and xylt1 Reveal That Cartilage Matrix Controls Timing of Endochondral Ossification by Inhibiting Chondrocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Eames, B. Frank; Yan, Yi-Lin; Swartz, Mary E.; Levic, Daniel S.; Knapik, Ela W.; Postlethwait, John H.; Kimmel, Charles B.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiating cells interact with their extracellular environment over time. Chondrocytes embed themselves in a proteoglycan (PG)-rich matrix, then undergo a developmental transition, termed “maturation,” when they express ihh to induce bone in the overlying tissue, the perichondrium. Here, we ask whether PGs regulate interactions between chondrocytes and perichondrium, using zebrafish mutants to reveal that cartilage PGs inhibit chondrocyte maturation, which ultimately dictates the timing of perichondral bone development. In a mutagenesis screen, we isolated a class of mutants with decreased cartilage matrix and increased perichondral bone. Positional cloning identified lesions in two genes, fam20b and xylosyltransferase1 (xylt1), both of which encode PG synthesis enzymes. Mutants failed to produce wild-type levels of chondroitin sulfate PGs, which are normally abundant in cartilage matrix, and initiated perichondral bone formation earlier than their wild-type siblings. Primary chondrocyte defects might induce the bone phenotype secondarily, because mutant chondrocytes precociously initiated maturation, showing increased and early expression of such markers as runx2b, collagen type 10a1, and ihh co-orthologs, and ihha mutation suppressed early perichondral bone in PG mutants. Ultrastructural analyses demonstrated aberrant matrix organization and also early cellular features of chondrocyte hypertrophy in mutants. Refining previous in vitro reports, which demonstrated that fam20b and xylt1 were involved in PG synthesis, our in vivo analyses reveal that these genes function in cartilage matrix production and ultimately regulate the timing of skeletal development. PMID:21901110

  6. [Primary lymphedema of limbs].

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Loïc; Tauveron, Valérie

    2010-12-01

    Limb lymphedema is frequent and not well-known. Clinical classification distinguishes primary lymphedemas due to developmental disorders of the lymphatic system (hereditary or not, sometimes associated with other malformations) and secondary lymphedemas. Primary lymphedema is a lymphedema without a cause to explain lymphatic impairment. It is due to an abnormal lymphangiogenesis in utero. It is often associated with mutation in a gene involved in lymphangiogenesis (FOX C2, VEGFR 3, SOX18, PROX 1…). To assess clinical diagnosis, non-invasive techniques are able to study structure and function of the lymphatic system (mainly isotopic lymphography). Treatment is the complex decongestive therapy which associates manual lymphatic drainage and bandage. Predisposing or precipitating factors have to be treated (particularly streptococcal infections). Surgical treatment has precise and rare indication. PMID:21035299

  7. Spirometry in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Allan L; Graham, Brian L; McFadden, Robin G; McParland, Colm; Moosa, Dilshad; Provencher, Steeve; Road, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) clinical guidelines for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) specify that spirometry should be used to diagnose these diseases. Given the burden of asthma and COPD, most people with these diseases will be diagnosed in the primary care setting. The present CTS position statement was developed to provide guidance on key factors affecting the quality of spirometry testing in the primary care setting. The present statement may also be used to inform and guide the accreditation process for spirometry in each province. Although many of the principles discussed are equally applicable to pulmonary function laboratories and interpretation of tests by respirologists, they are held to a higher standard and are outside the scope of the present statement. PMID:23457669

  8. [Primary retroperitoneal seminoma].

    PubMed

    Dvorák, J; Kubín, S; Hlavatý, T

    2001-07-01

    The case-history presents a case of a rare retroperitoneal tumour--primary retroperitoneal classical seminoma. This type of tumour accounts for half the extragonadal germinal tumours. From the clinical aspect this group is important as in addition to surgery it can be successfully treated by chemotherapy and radiation. The clinical findings in the authors' patient led to the diagnosis of a retroperitoneal tumour and after repeated examinations the authors concluded on the presence of some form of malignant mesenchymal tumour. A more aggressive surgical procedure implies radical removal of the tumour, and treatment was, based on the final histological diagnosis, supplemented by chemotherapy. Despite the favourable diagnosis of seminomas, we have to foresee in case of a primary tumour in the retroperitoneum a poorer prognosis (sometimes by as much as 50%) and despite all conclusions attention should be devoted to a possible late development a testicular tumour. PMID:11505692

  9. Primary perisplenic hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Muhammad Ashraf; Mahmood, Asad; Murtaza, Badar; Malik, Imran Bashir; Khan, Abdullah; Asghar, Zunera; Arif, Adeel

    2009-06-01

    Splenic parasitic cysts due to flat worm Echinococci resulting in hydatid disease are a rare presentation as primary site even in the endemic regions. Primary splenic parasitic cysts have an incidence of 0.5-4%. A 21-year-old male with pet dogs at home, presented with 3 months history of gradually increasing discomfort in the left hypochondrium and tender splenomegaly. He had marked eosinophilia with normal liver function tests and positive serum IgM Echinococcus antibodies. Ultrasonography showed a cyst in the hilar region of spleen having septations with internal echos. An upper midline laparotomy was performed and a perisplenic cyst was removed along with spleen from the sub-diaphragmatic location. Histopathological examination confirmed acellular fibrous wall of hydatid cyst with germinal layer and scolices in the centre. Postoperatively, patient was continued on oral Albendazole for one month. PMID:19486579

  10. Primary Pulmonary Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Liang, Qi-Lian; Jiang, Liang; Liu, Qiu-Long; Ou, Wen-Ting; Li, Da-Heng; Zhang, Hui-Jie; Yuan, Gao-Le

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary pulmonary paraganglioma is a rare disease. We report a case of a 37-year old female patient with space-occupying lesions in the right lower pulmonary lobe during a routine examination without any symptoms. The patient underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) resection of the right middle lobe and dissection of hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes under general anesthesia. She recovered without recrudescence. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult. Accurate diagnosis requires pathological examination, and immunohistochemical test is particularly important. Complete resection is the first treatment option for solitary primary pulmonary paraganglioma; however, VATS is a better technique. Given the high local control rates and few complications of radiotherapy, it is considered as a standard treatment. PMID:26252294

  11. Hypocalcaemic Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, W. M.; Caird, F. I.

    1970-01-01

    A patient with many symptoms and signs of primary hyperparathyroidism had hypocalcaemia when first seen. Bone section histology showed osteomalacia and osteitis fibrosa, and the hyperparathyroidism at this stage was considered to be secondary to osteomalacia with postgastrectomy steatorrhoea. On treatment with vitamin D (with disappearance of her bone pains and weakness) she developed hypercalcaemia. She regained her health after removal of a 6-g. parathyroid adenoma. Normal histology was shown in another parathyroid gland. We believe that the initial hypocalcaemia was due to vitamin-D deficiency, which produced ineffective hyperparathyroidism until it was corrected. A review of the few reports of patients with autonomous hyperparathyroidism with steatorrhoea and osteomalacia does not support the argument that these patients had “tertiary” disease. It suggests that most of them, like our patient, had primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:5412947

  12. Primary immunodeficiencies: 2009 update

    PubMed Central

    Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Fischer, Alain; Geha, Raif. S.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Chapel, Helen; Conley, Mary Ellen; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Etzioni, Amos; Hammartröm, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Ochs, Hans D.; Puck, Jennifer; Roifman, Chaim; Seger, Reinhard; Wedgwood, Josiah

    2009-01-01

    More than 50 years after Ogdeon Bruton’s discovery of congenital agammaglobulinemia, human primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) continue to unravel novel molecular and cellular mechanisms that govern development and function of the human immune system. This report provides the updated classification of PIDs, that has been compiled by the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) Expert Committee of Primary Immunodeficiencies after its biannual meeting, in Dublin (Ireland) in June 2009. Since the appearance of the last classification in 2007, novel forms of PID have been discovered, and additional pathophysiology mechanisms that account for PID in humans have been unraveled. Careful analysis and prompt recognition of these disorders is essential to prompt effective forms of treatment and thus to improve survival and quality of life in patients affected with PIDs. PMID:20004777

  13. Acute primary herpetic gingivostomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ravi Prakash Sasankoti; Verma, Sankalp; Singh, Udita; Agarwal, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a double-stranded virus belonging to human herpes virus family. Although it exists in eight various forms, HSV-1 causes most of the oral infections. Since dentists are more likely to be consulted in the case of oral infections, familiarity with these lesions becomes mandatory. It is more commonly reported in children and rarely in adults. This article presents an acute episode of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis in a 32-year-old male patient. PMID:23839615

  14. [Primary gastric lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Guerrera, C; Marzola, R; Fabi, P; Salomoni, C; Zandi, G; Pozza, E; Rubbini, M; Ortolani, M

    1990-10-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma (P.G.L.), though rare, is nevertheless the most frequent non-epithelial neoplasm of the stomach. The Authors report their experience based on 18 cases of lymphoma observed from 1975 throughout 1989. Diagnostic and therapeutic problems related to the disease are stressed, uncertain in the results the former, still discussed the latter. The crucial role of surgery, either diagnostic or therapeutic, even in advanced stages, is underlined. PMID:2288849

  15. (RA) Josef's Cost Centers (RA) Jena's Cost Centers BK Anesthesiology LN Biomedical Engineering

    E-print Network

    Portman, Douglas

    Development & Disease AC Center for Oral Biology LN Center for Primary Care AB Center for Pediatric Biomedical Physics & Astronomy N/A SMH AC Psychiatry LN Surgery (Cardiothoracic) DB Radiation Oncology LN Surgery (General) CW School of Medicine and Dentistry - Dean's office LN Surgery (Vascular) AC School of Nursing

  16. Primary care for refugees.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Barbara

    2011-02-15

    Over the past decade, at least 600,000 refugees from more than 60 different countries have been resettled in the United States. The personal history of a refugee is often marked by physical and emotional trauma. Although refugees come from many different countries and cultures, their shared pattern of experiences allows for some generalizations to be made about their health care needs and challenges. Before being accepted for resettlement in the United States, all refugees must pass an overseas medical screening examination, the purpose of which is to identify conditions that could result in ineligibility for admission to the United States. Primary care physicians have the opportunity to care for members of this unique population once they resettle. Refugees present to primary care physicians with a variety of health problems, including musculoskeletal and pain issues, mental and social health problems, infectious diseases, and longstanding undiagnosed chronic illnesses. Important infectious diseases to consider in the symptomatic patient include tuberculosis, parasites, and malaria. Health maintenance and immunizations should also be addressed. Language barriers, cross-cultural medicine issues, and low levels of health literacy provide additional challenges to caring for this population. The purpose of this article is to provide primary care physicians with a guide to some of the common issues that arise when caring for refugee patients. PMID:21322519

  17. The Primary School Students of 1950s' Yozgat: Our Memories about Our Primary School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to lay bare the educational memories of primary school students in 1950s' Yozgat city which is in the center of Turkey. Memories that belong to education are also reflections of the individuals' past educational practices. Why they take part in lives of individuals as memories may let us see the importance of…

  18. Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    of the precipitation norm? How will water quality and quantity be affected under different cycles of extreme weather and for acceptable water quality during rapid cycle of climate extremes has been a primary focus this year and Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011 Iowa Water Center Annual Technical Report FY 2011

  19. Models for Primary Eye Care Services in India

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Vasundhra; Vashist, Praveen; Malhotra, Sumit; Gupta, Sanjeev K.

    2015-01-01

    Blindness and visual impairment continues to be a major public health problem in India. Availability and easy access to primary eye care services is essential for elimination of avoidable blindness. ‘Vision 2020: The Right to Sight - India’ envisaged the need for establishing primary eye care units named vision centers for every 50,000 population in the country by the year 2020. The government of India has given priority to develop vision centers at the level of community health centers and primary health centers under the ‘National Program for Control of Blindness’. NGOs and the private sector have also initiated some models for primary eye care services. In the current situation, an integrated health care system with primary eye care promoted by government of India is apparently the best answer. This model is both cost effective and practical for the prevention and control of blindness among the underprivileged population. Other models functioning with the newer technology of tele-ophthalmology or mobile clinics also add to the positive outcome in providing primary eye care services. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of various models presently functioning in the country with the idea of providing useful inputs for eye care providers and enabling them to identify and adopt an appropriate model for primary eye care services. PMID:25861167

  20. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, Maryland

    Cancer.gov

    More than 40% of the medical center's patients come from outside the primary service area, defined as a 12-mile radius of the hospital. 78% of the Cancer Institute's patients are adults over 55, and 12% are African American.

  1. Primary Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Barohn, Richard J; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Floeter, Mary Kay; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Primary lateral sclerosis is characterized by insidious onset of progressive upper motor neuron dysfunction in the absence of clinical signs of lower motor neuron involvement. Patients experience stiffness; decreased balance and coordination; mild weakness; and, if the bulbar region is affected, difficulty speaking and swallowing, and emotional lability. The diagnosis is made based on clinical history, typical examination findings, and diagnostic testing negative for other causes of upper motor neuron dysfunction. Electromyogram is normal, or only shows mild neurogenic findings in a few muscles, not meeting El Escorial criteria. Treatment is largely supportive. PMID:26515619

  2. Primary fibrosarcoma of brain.

    PubMed

    Vatsal, D K; Sharma, S; Renjen, P N; Kaul, S; Jha, A N

    2000-12-01

    This is a case presentation of a young patient with an intracranial space-occupying lesion following multiple episodes of generalised tonic clonic seizures for the last 20 years. Such a long latency period between the onset of fits and the discovery of an intracranial lesion is highly unusual in malignant brain tumours. This lesion was excised completely and proved to be a primary lesion of the brain - fibrosarcoma. These rare tumours of mesenchymal origin in the central nervous system are very rare. PMID:11146612

  3. Primary length standard adjustment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šev?ík, Robert; Guttenová, Jana

    2007-04-01

    This paper deals with problems and techniques connected with primary length standard adjusting, which includes disassembling of the device and by use of the secondary laser with collimated beam and diffraction laws successively reassembling of the laser. In the reassembling process the device was enhanced with substituting the thermal grease cooling of cold finger by copper socket cooler. This improved external cooling system enables more effective cooling of molecular iodine in the cell, which allows better pressure stability of iodine vapor and easier readjustment of the system.

  4. Primary mediastinal trophoblastic teratomas.

    PubMed Central

    Walden, P A; Woods, R L; Fox, B; Bagshawe, K D

    1977-01-01

    Three cases of primary mediastinal trophoblastic teratoma are described. One patient died from respiratory failure during the initial chemotherapy, Another patient with advanced disease is now apparently free from disease after multiple-drug chemotherapy. The third patient is alive and well four years after a combination of surgery, radiotherapy, and multiple-drug chemotherapy. In the diagnosis and assessment of response to treatment in these tumours emphasis is placed on the measurement of the tumour cell markers, chorionic gonadotrophin and alpha-fetoprotein, by radioimmunoassay. The efficacy of multiple-drug regimens is discussed together with a review of the literature. Images PMID:74864

  5. Primary thyroid lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Widder, Sandy; Pasieka, Janice L

    2004-08-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma is a rare disease that continues to produce diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. There was great difficulty in distinguishing thyroid lymphoma from anaplastic thyroid carcinoma but, because of new immunocytochemical staining techniques and increased cytopathologic knowledge, our ability to diagnose thyroid lymphoma has improved drastically over the past decade. Surgery that was once the mainstay of treatment for this disease, now plays a minimal role. Current treatment regimens for primary thyroid lymphoma consist of chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) and external beam radiation. The overall and distant relapse rates have been shown to be significantly lower in those patients receiving combined modality therapy compared to chemotherapy or radiation alone. Although the role of surgery has changed over time, it continues to play an important role, especially in confirming diagnoses through open biopsies, potentially providing local control in the more indolent subtypes, and may play a role in the palliation of symptoms for large obstructive lymphomas. The evolving classification of extranodal lymphomas has brought about a better understanding of the biologic behavior of these tumors. Most thyroid lymphomas are B-cell origin, with six different histologic subtypes, but there appears to be two distinct clinical and prognostic groupings of these rare tumors. The more indolent lymphomas are the subgroup of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas comprising approximately 6% to 27% of thyroid lymphomas. This subgroup, when localized to the thyroid (stage IE), responds well to total thyroidectomy or radiation with a complete response rate of more than 90%, leading some authors to recommend surgery as primary therapy in the treatment of localized MALT lymphomas. Therefore, surgery as a primary treatment for thyroid lymphomas would only be recommended under ideal conditions, such as MALT subtype stage IE only, and completely resectable with minimal morbidity. Unfortunately, this scenario is rarely the case. The more common subtype, comprising up to 70% of cases, is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This subtype appears to have the most aggressive clinical course with almost 60% of these tumors diagnosed with disseminated disease. Up to 40% of all diffuse large cell lymphomas appear to have undergone transformation from a MALT lymphoma, but they behave in a similar fashion to diffuse large cell lymphomas. Treatment for these tumors should include chemotherapy and radiation. The overall 5-year survival for this aggressive group is less then 50%. Surgery is rarely beneficial in diffuse large cell lymphoma and the mixed large cell subtypes because the disease is generally disseminated and surgical excision of all disease is not possible or associated with increased morbidity. However, there may be a role for palliative surgical debulking to alleviate obstructive symptoms while the patient is undergoing standard chemotherapy and radiation. PMID:15233907

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Primary hyperoxaluria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... genetic cause. In primary hyperoxaluria type 1, kidney stones typically begin to appear anytime from childhood to early adulthood, and ESRD can develop at any age. Primary hyperoxaluria type 2 is similar to type ...

  7. Center for Beam Physics, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Center for Beam Physics is a multi-disciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation and focusing of energy. Dedicated to exploring the frontiers of the physics of (and with) particle and photon beams, its primary mission is to promote the science and technology of the production, manipulation, storage and control systems of charged particles and photons. The Center serves this mission via conceptual studies, theoretical and experimental research, design and development, institutional project involvement, external collaborations, association with industry and technology transfer. This roster provides a glimpse at the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up this team and a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1993.

  8. Improving primary science great science

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Improving primary science Developing great science subject leadershipGreat ideas for primary science leaders from schools that value science. #12;2 | Primary science Where science has a good profile, investigative science with access to high-quality expertise, children are likely to enjoy learning the subject

  9. Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide - 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1999-01-01

    The 1990 U.S. Bureau of Mines publication, Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide, has been updated and is now available. The 1998 USGS edition of Primary Aluminum Plants Worldwide is published in two parts. Part I—Detail contains information on individual primary smelter capacity, location, ownership, sources of energy, and other miscellaneous information. Part II—Summary summarizes the capacity data by country

  10. Primary Teacher Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Chin Phoi; Yee, Chin Peng

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia the training of primary school teachers is solely carried out by teacher training institutes which offer the Bachelor of Teaching with Honors (Primary education) program and was first launched in 2007. This program prepares primary school teachers specializing in various subjects or major and is carried out in 27 teacher training…

  11. Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Science Operation Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, G. S.; Kronberg, F. A.; Meriwether, H. D.; Wong, L. S.; Grassi, C. L.

    1993-01-01

    The EUVE Science Operations Center (ESOC) is a satellite payload operations center for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer project, located on the Berkeley campus of the University of California. The ESOC has the primary responsibility for commanding the EUVE telescopes and monitoring their telemetry. The ESOC is one of a very few university-based satellite operations facilities operating with NASA. This article describes the history, operation, and advantages of the ESOC as an on-campus operations center.

  12. Assessing & Developing Primary Care for Children: Reforms in Health Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grason, Holly Allen, Ed.; Guyer, Bernard, Ed.

    This publication is a compilation of papers presented at an April 1994 workshop sponsored by the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and the Bureau-funded Johns Hopkins Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center (CAHPC). The papers are as follows: (1) "Defining the Issues and Planning for Change: Health Care Systems, Primary

  13. 8. VIEW SOUTH OF PRIMARY REDUCING GEARS; HORIZONTAL ARM AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW SOUTH OF PRIMARY REDUCING GEARS; HORIZONTAL ARM AT CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH IS A PART OF LEVER MECHANISM THAT LOCKS MECHANICAL BRAKE; 75 LB. COUNTERWEIGHT IS AT EXTREME LEFT CENTER - East Washington Avenue Bridge, Spanning Pequonnock River at East Washington Avenue, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  14. Primary Care Practice Transformation Is Hard Work

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Nutting, Paul A.; Miller, William L.; McDaniel, Reuben R.; Stange, Kurt C.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Stewart, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Serious shortcomings remain in clinical care in the United States despite widespread use of improvement strategies for enhancing clinical performance based on knowledge transfer approaches. Recent calls to transform primary care practice to a patient-centered medical home present even greater challenges and require more effective approaches. Methods Our research team conducted a series of National Institutes of Health funded descriptive and intervention projects to understand organizational change in primary care practice settings, emphasizing a complexity science perspective. The result was a developmental research effort that enabled the identification of critical lessons relevant to enabling practice change. Results A summary of findings from a 15-year program of research highlights the limitations of viewing primary care practices in the mechanistic terms that underlie current or traditional approaches to quality improvement. A theoretical perspective that views primary care practices as dynamic complex adaptive systems with “agents” who have the capacity to learn, and the freedom to act in unpredictable ways provides a better framework for grounding quality improvement strategies. This framework strongly emphasizes that quality improvement interventions should not only use a complexity systems perspective, but also there is a need for continual reflection, careful tailoring of interventions, and ongoing attention to the quality of interactions among agents in the practice. Conclusions It is unlikely that current strategies for quality improvement will be successful in transforming current primary care practice to a patient-centered medical home without a stronger guiding theoretical foundation. Our work suggests that a theoretical framework guided by complexity science can help in the development of quality improvement strategies that will more effectively facilitate practice change. PMID:20856145

  15. National Centers for Career and Technical Education Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Dissemination Center for Career and Technical Education, Columbus, OH.

    The National Research Center for Career and Technical Education and the National Dissemination Center for Career and Technical Education were established at the University of Minnesota and The Ohio State University, respectively, in 1999. The centers operate as a consortium with primary and associate partners. Through the centers, the partners…

  16. Nucleofection of primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, Annette; Collin, Ludovic; Lalli, Giovanna

    2006-01-01

    Efficient gene transfer is an important tool for the study of neuronal function and biology. This has proved difficult and inefficient with traditional transfection strategies, which can also be fairly toxic, whereas viral-mediated gene transfer, although highly efficient, is often time-consuming. The recently developed Amaxa Nucleofector technology, based on electroporation with preset parameters in a cell-type-specific solution, enables direct delivery of DNA, small interfering (si)RNA oligonucleotides and siRNA vectors into the cell nucleus. This strategy results in reproducible, rapid, and efficient transfection of a broad range of cells, including primary neurons. Nucleofected neurons survive for up to 3 weeks and remain functional. We are currently using this transfection method to examine the contribution of Rho GTPase signaling pathways in the establishment of neuronal polarity, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth. Here, we describe three protocols to efficiently nucleofect rat cerebellar granule, cortical, and hippocampal neurons. PMID:16472671

  17. Primary scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Stamatios, Gregoriou; Ioannides, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Scarring alopecia or cicatricial alopecia results from follicular damage that is sufficient to cause the destruction and replacement of pilosebaceous structures by scar tissue. Primary scarring alopecias represent a group of disorders that primarily affect the hair follicles, as opposed to secondary scarring alopecias, which affect the dermis and secondarily cause follicular destruction. Inflammation may predominantly involve lymphocytes or neutrophils. Cicatricial alopecias that mainly involve lymphocytic inflammation include discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia, central centrifugal alopecia, and pseudopelade (Brocq). Cicatricial alopecias that are due to predominantly neutrophilic inflammation include folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Folliculitis keloidalis is a cicatricial alopecia with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. PMID:26370646

  18. Accountability and Primary Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  19. Primary thrombocytosis in children

    PubMed Central

    Kucine, Nicole; Chastain, Katherine M.; Mahler, Michelle B.; Bussel, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms are uncommon disorders in children, for which we have limited understanding of the pathogenesis and optimal management. JAK2 and MPL mutations, while common drivers of myeloproliferative neoplasms in adult patients, are not clearly linked to pediatric disease. Management and clinical outcomes in adults have been well delineated with defined recommendations for risk stratification and treatment. This is not the case for pediatric patients, for whom there is neither a standard approach to workup nor any consensus regarding management. This review will discuss thrombocytosis in children, including causes of thrombocytosis in children, the limited knowledge we have regarding pediatric primary thrombocytosis, and our thoughts on potential risk stratification and management, and future questions to be answered by laboratory research and collaborative clinical study. PMID:24688110

  20. Multiple primary prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lanesky, J; Opipari, M I; McKenzie, M

    1979-06-01

    Although increasing reports are noted of apparent endometrial carcinoma of prostatic origin, the controversy is present of the actual existence of such an entity. The association of papillary prostatic cancer (endometrial or ductal) with the typical microacinar variety has also been previously presented. This report is an account of 2 cases of multiple prostatic primary tumors. The first case is the twelfth reported case of endometrial (utricular) carcinoma not only simultaneously associated with microacinar type carcinoma, but also with a previous transitional carcinoma of the urinary bladder. The second case is a papillary carcinoma and associated microacinar type with the papillary component responding dramatically to chemotherapy. Significant aspects of interest in this case include the site of papillary metastasis to the lungs, elevated estrogen levels with normalization after treatment, and finally response to chemotherapy. PMID:452201

  1. Primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, B S; Snyder, L S

    2001-12-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is an infection caused by the soil-inhabiting fungus Coccidioides immitis. The fungus is endemic in the desert Southwest, which is a major area for tourism and growth. Travel through this region results in many new coccidioidal pulmonary infections annually, including pneumonia, cavities, and nodules. Patients with coccidioidomycosis are therefore likely to present with pulmonary manifestations of infection when they return home to nonendemic parts of the country. This makes coccidioidomycosis a fungal infection of nationwide importance, and it is crucial that physicians everywhere have a heightened awareness of this disease to avert delays in diagnosis and treatment. This article describes primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis and its complications for clinicians practicing both in endemic and nonendemic areas. PMID:11740823

  2. Accountability and primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Mukhi, Shaheena; Barnsley, Jan; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the accountability structures within primary healthcare (PHC) in Ontario; in particular, who is accountable for what and to whom, and the policy tools being used. Ontario has implemented a series of incremental reforms, using expenditure policy instruments, enforced through contractual agreements to provide a defined set of publicly financed services that are privately delivered, most often by family physicians. The findings indicate that reporting, funding, evaluation and governance accountability requirements vary across service provider models. Accountability to the funder and patients is most common. Agreements, incentives and compensation tools have been used but may be insufficient to ensure parties are being held responsible for their activities related to stated goals. Clear definitions of various governance structures, a cohesive approach to monitoring critical performance indicators and associated improvement strategies are important elements in operationalizing accountability and determining whether goals are being met. PMID:25305392

  3. [Primary spontaneous pneumomediastinum].

    PubMed

    Togashi, K; Hosaka, Y

    2007-12-01

    We report 5 cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum. They were 4 men and 1 female with a mean age of 17 (14-25). Four patients developed sport-related pneumomediastinum and 1 patient had a karaoke-related condition. Primary spontaneous pneumomediasinum is a rare condition. In addition, there is no previous report describing karaoke-related spontaneous pneumomediastinum. Each of the patients experienced chest pain and/or neck pain before consulting our hospital. Chest roentgenogram and chest computed tomography showed pneumomediastinum without esophageal or tracheal injury. Four patients did not require hospitalization, but 1 patient was necessary to hospitalize for 7 days because of severe chest and neck pain. None of these 5 patients has had any recurrence for more than 1 year. Differentiating this entity from other diseases involving anterior chest pain is important. PMID:18078083

  4. The Primary Headteacher's Handbook: The Essential Guide for Primary Heads. Primary Essentials Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Roger

    Although the setting is British, the primary head's problems are similar to those faced by U.S. elementary principals. This is a guidebook for managing primary schools. It shows the day-to-day running of a primary school and the organizational structures in which staff and pupils can be inspired. Chapter 1 considers the creation of a positive…

  5. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzemeier, L., Boysel, M.B., and Smith, D.R.

    2005-01-14

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics���������������������������������������������������������������¢�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  6. Neptune in Primary Colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    These two NASA Hubble Space Telescope images provide views of weather on opposite hemispheres of Neptune. Taken Aug. 13, 1996, with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, these composite images blend information from different wavelengths to bring out features of Neptune's blustery weather. The predominant blue color of the planet is a result of the absorption of red and infrared light by Neptune's methane atmosphere. Clouds elevated above most of the methane absorption appear white, while the very highest clouds tend to be yellow-red as seen in the bright feature at the top of the right-hand image. Neptune's powerful equatorial jet -- where winds blow at nearly 900 mph -- is centered on the dark blue belt just south of Neptune's equator. Farther south, the green belt indicates a region where the atmosphere absorbs blue light.

    The images are part of a series of images made by Hubble during nine orbits spanning one 16.11-hour rotation of Neptune. The team making the observation was directed by Lawrence Sromovsky of the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Space Science and Engineering Center.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.

    This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  7. The Montana Model: Integrated Primary Care and Behavioral Health in a Family Practice Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Claire; Moore, Douglas; Burford, Duncan; Fahrenwald, Roxanne; Woodward, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    To address the local health care needs of both patients and primary care providers in Montana, an integrated primary care and behavioral health family practice clinic was developed. In this paper we describe our experience with integrating mental health and substance abuse services into a primary care setting (a community health center) while…

  8. Autoimmune primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Silva, C A; Yamakami, L Y S; Aikawa, N E; Araujo, D B; Carvalho, J F; Bonfá, E

    2014-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is defined as sustained amenorrhea, increased follicle-stimulating hormone and low estrogen levels, whereas diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) is characterized as regular menses and alterations of ovarian reserve tests. POI of autoimmune origin may be associated with adrenal autoimmunity, non-adrenal autoimmunity or isolated. This autoimmune disease is characterized by serum ovarian, adrenocortical or steroidogenic cell autoantibodies. POI of adrenal autoimmune origin is the most frequent type observed in 60-80% of patients. Clinically, amenorrhea is the hallmark of POI, however before menstruation stops completely, irregular cycles occur. Infertility, hot flushes, vaginal atrophy, and dyspareunia are also common. Autoimmune oophoritis is characterized by mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate in the theca cells of growing follicles, with early stage follicles without lymphocytic infiltration. This infiltrate includes plasma, B and T-cells. A novel classification criterion for autoimmune POI/DOR is proposed subdividing in three distinct categories (possible, probable and confirmed) according to autoantibodies, autoimmune disease and ovarian histology. Unfortunately, up to date guidelines for the treatment of autoimmune oophoritis are not available. Strategies to POI treatment include hormone replacement and infertility therapy. Assisted conception with donated oocytes has been proven to achieve pregnancy by intra cytoplasmic sperm injection in POI women. PMID:24418305

  9. Primary CNS lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Elizabeth H; Fox, Christopher P; Cwynarski, Kate

    2014-09-01

    Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the central nervous system is an aggressive malignancy that exhibits unique biological features and characteristic clinical behaviour, with overall long-term survival rates of around 20-40%. Clinical outcome has improved following the advent of chemoradiation protocols incorporating high-dose methotrexate in the mid-1980s, but disease relapse and adverse neurocognitive sequelae remain major clinical challenges. To address this, investigators have focused on improving drug therapy with novel cytotoxic combinations, monoclonal antibody therapy, and intensive chemotherapy consolidation approaches, in an attempt to improve disease control whilst reducing the requirement for whole-brain radiotherapy. Outcomes for patients that are older, immunocompromised, or have relapsed/refractory disease remain unsatisfactory and there is a paucity of clinical trial data to guide treatment of these groups. This review highlights recent advances in pathobiology, imaging, and clinical management of PCNSL and looks ahead to research priorities for this rare and challenging lymphoid malignancy. PMID:24969265

  10. Primary cerebellopontine angle angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Guode, Zhai; Qi, Pang; Hua, Guo; Shangchen, Xu; Hanbin, Wang

    2008-08-01

    Primary intracranial angiosarcomas are rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. All cases reported were located in the supratentorial areas. To our knowledge, no cerebellopontine (CP) angle angiosarcoma has been reported. We report a 16-year-old girl who had mild headache, right-sided tinnitus and amblyacousia of 1-year's duration. She later developed abruptly severe headache and vomiting, accompanied by left hemiparesis, numbness, ataxia and bucking, and computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging were performed. There was a lesion in the right CP angle with haemorrhage and edema. The preoperative diagnosis was neurogenic tumor with haemorrhage. The patient underwent an emergency suboccipital craniectomy, and the lesion was excised completely. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry revealed an angiosarcoma. Postoperative radiotherapy was given. At the time of hospital discharge, she was in better clinical and neurological condition than her preoperative state. She has been followed up for 6 months and is is still in excellent condition without any sign of recurrence. This case report highlights that clinicians should be aware of the characteristics of angiosarcoma, and also stresses the need to include angiosarcoma in the differential diagnosis of rare lesions located in the CP angle. PMID:18314334

  11. Primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Mesulam, Marsel

    2014-01-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a clinical syndrome diagnosed when three core criteria are met. First, there should be a language impairment (i.e., aphasia) that interferes with the usage or comprehension of words. Second, the neurological work-up should determine that the disease is neurodegenerative, and therefore progressive. Third, the aphasia should arise in relative isolation, without equivalent deficits of comportment or episodic memory. The language impairment can be fluent or non-fluent and may or may not interfere with word comprehension. Memory for recent events is preserved although memory scores obtained in verbally mediated tests may be abnormal. Minor changes in personality and behavior may be present but are not the leading factors that bring the patient to medical attention or that limit daily living activities. This distinctive clinical pattern is most conspicuous in the initial stages of the disease, and reflects a relatively selective atrophy of the language network, usually located in the left hemisphere. There are different clinical variants of PPA, each with a characteristic pattern of atrophy. The underlying neuropathological diseases are heterogeneous and can include Alzheimer’s disease as well as frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The clinician’s task is to recognize PPA and differentiate it from other neurodegenerative phenotypes, use biomarkers to surmise the nature of the underlying neuropathology, and institute the most fitting multimodal interventions. PMID:24707349

  12. Primary congenital glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Fang; Papadopoulos, Maria; Khaw, Peng T

    2015-01-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is the most common nonsyndromic glaucoma in infancy, which can lead to blindness, or a lifetime of vision when diagnosed and treated properly. PCG is more common in populations with a higher prevalence of consanguinity and is associated with CYP1B1 gene mutations which show variable expressivity and phenotypes. The immature angle appearance of PCG likely results from arrested development of tissues of neural crest origin in the third trimester, with the severity of abnormality varying according to the stage at which arrested development occurred. Classic symptoms at presentation include tearing, photophobia, blepharospasm, eye rubbing, and irritability. Examination may reveal elevated intraocular pressure, corneal edema, increased corneal diameter, Haab striae, or enlarged axial length. Angle surgery remains the first line treatment for PCG with a recent advance being circumferential trabeculotomy with the potential to incise the whole angle during one operation as oppose to an incremental approach and the associated multiple anesthetics. Once angle surgery fails, either trabeculectomy or glaucoma drainage device surgery may be appropriate. PMID:26518078

  13. Primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Andrew; Harciarek, Micha?

    2014-06-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a progressive loss of specific language functions with relative sparing of other cognitive domains at least for the first few years of the illness. Based on the constellation of symptoms, PPA has been recently classified into a nonfluent, semantic, or logopenic variant. Nonfluent variant PPA is characterized by dysfluent and effortful speech, often combined with agrammatism. Also, some patients have initially predominant apraxia of speech. The neuroimaging findings in nfvPPA are in most cases progressive atrophy within the left inferior, opercular, and insular regions. Pathology is a tauopathy (FTLD-T), most often Pick's disease or CBD. Semantic variant PPA, on the other hand is characterized by fluent, but circumlocutory speech, then severe anomia and word-finding difficulties, all being associated with a progressive loss of lexical-semantic knowledge. As the disease progresses, the semantic impairment typically becomes multimodal. The clinical picture of svPPA is often associated with atrophy of the anterior regions of the temporal lobes, usually more prominent on the left side. The majority of these patients have TDP-43 pathology. The third, most recently described form of PPA is the logopenic variant characterized by decreased spontaneous speech output with frequent word-finding pauses, phonologic parahpasias, and repetition deficits. It resembles aphasia in Alzheimer's disease. Imaging abnormalities in lvPPA have been predominantly found in the left temporo-parietal junction area, and the pathological changes have been often those of AD. PMID:24716649

  14. Do nurses feel stressed? A perspective from primary health care.

    PubMed

    Galdikien, Nijol?; Asikainen, Paula; Bal?i?nas, Sigitas; Suominen, Tarja

    2014-09-01

    This study describes nurses' experiences of stress in primary healthcare settings, and examines correlations between stress and personal factors. There were 187 nurses from 18 public primary care centers participating, drawn from one county of Lithuania. The Expanded Nursing Stress Scale was used to evaluate the study data. The study indicates that in primary healthcare centers, nurses working with adult patients experienced less stress than those working with younger patients. The most frequently reported stressors were those related to death and dying, and conflicts with physicians and patients and their families. In particular, older nurses more frequently experienced stress related to death and dying. The intensity of nurses' stress in conflict situations with physicians was related to age, however, the depth of work experience in the healthcare setting was more influential. Findings indicate that more detailed research is needed regarding stress experiences in primary health care, and especially the related impact of the social contexts involved in the setting. PMID:25389543

  15. Nurturing Second Graders' Literacy and Language Development through Child-Centered versus Curriculum-Centered Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Gwendolyn C.

    A practicum was designed and implemented to foster 24 second graders' literacy and language development via child-centered as opposed to curriculum-centered experiences. The primary goal was to improve students' quality and quantity of writing by allowing extra time, much exposure to more and various non-basal literature, hands-on activities, and…

  16. Primary biliary cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagi, Teru; Heathcote, E Jenny

    2008-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology characterized by injury of the intrahepatic bile ducts that may eventually lead to liver failure. Affected individuals are usually in their fifth to seventh decades of life at time of diagnosis, and 90% are women. Annual incidence is estimated between 0.7 and 49 cases per million-population and prevalence between 6.7 and 940 cases per million-population (depending on age and sex). The majority of patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis, however, some patients present with symptoms of fatigue and/or pruritus. Patients may even present with ascites, hepatic encephalopathy and/or esophageal variceal hemorrhage. PBC is associated with other autoimmune diseases such as Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, Raynaud's phenomenon and CREST syndrome and is regarded as an organ specific autoimmune disease. Genetic susceptibility as a predisposing factor for PBC has been suggested. Environmental factors may have potential causative role (infection, chemicals, smoking). Diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical features, abnormal liver biochemical pattern in a cholestatic picture persisting for more than six months and presence of detectable antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) in serum. All AMA negative patients with cholestatic liver disease should be carefully evaluated with cholangiography and liver biopsy. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the only currently known medication that can slow the disease progression. Patients, particularly those who start UDCA treatment at early-stage disease and who respond in terms of improvement of the liver biochemistry, have a good prognosis. Liver transplantation is usually an option for patients with liver failure and the outcome is 70% survival at 7 years. Recently, animal models have been discovered that may provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of this disease and facilitate appreciation for novel treatment in PBC. PMID:18215315

  17. Primary haemangiopericytoma of lung

    PubMed Central

    Meade, J. B.; Whitwell, F.; Bickford, B. J.; Waddington, J. K. B.

    1974-01-01

    Meade, J. B., Whitwell, F., Bickford, B. J., and Waddington, J. K. B. (1974).Thorax,29, 1-15. Primary haemangiopericytoma of lung. Haemangiopericytoma is a rare neoplasm which may occur at any age and arise in almost any part of the body. At least 247 examples have been reported in the world literature, but only 24 appear to have arisen primarily in the lung. A summary of the features of these cases, collected from the literature, is presented, and four additional cases are described. The tumour may be innocent [ill] malignant, but there are no characteristic clinical or radiological features to distinguish it from other neoplasms of the lung. Because of uncertainty as to diagnosis and prognosis, surgical excision appears to be the treatment of choice. In the whole series of 28 cases, rather more than half (16) were female, and they tended to be older than the male patients. The mortality from recurrence was higher in males than in females (50% compared with 32%). The prognosis in general seems to be best with small, asymptomatic tumours, especially in female patients. A brief account is given of the nature and function of the pericyte. It was originally thought to be a cell of muscular type, but recent research suggests that it is a multipotent cell capable of development into other cell types and having phagocytic properties. It lies in the basement membrane of capillary blood vessels and may have some connection with antibody formation, but its exact function has not yet been elucidated. Images PMID:4825550

  18. Swimming Pools for Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jo

    This seven-chapter report on swimming in primary schools deals with the policies of local British education authorities and institutes for the physically handicapped toward promoting swimming. Interspersed throughout are comments from teachers and children. "Swimming and Education" comments on the benefits of primary school swimming programs.…

  19. Learning outside the Primary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedgwick, Fred

    2012-01-01

    In "Learning Outside the Primary Classroom," the educationalist and writer Fred Sedgwick explores in a practical way the many opportunities for intense learning that children and teachers can find outside the confines of the usual learning environment, the classroom. This original work is based on tried and tested methods from UK primary schools.…

  20. [American Primary Experimental Program (APEX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermont Univ., Burlington. Coll. of Education.

    The American Primary Experience Program (APEX) is a four semester junior-senior year specialization in primary education at the University of Vermont's College of Education and Social Services. In the first semester of their program experience, students spend concentrated time as participant observers in two of three cooperating elementary…

  1. Primary Components of Binomial Ideals 

    E-print Network

    Eser, Zekiye

    2014-07-11

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.3 Lattice Ideals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Primary Decomposition of Binomial Ideals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1.5 Primary Decomposition of Lattice Ideals in Positive Characteristic . . 18 2... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 2.3 Codimension Two Lattice Basis Ideals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 2.4 Graphs Associated to Matrices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 2.5 Codimension Two Lattice Basis Ideals in Three Variables . . . . . . . 54 3. CELLULAR...

  2. Primary Decomposition: Algorithms and Comparisons

    E-print Network

    Greuel, Gert-Martin

    Primary Decomposition: Algorithms and Comparisons Wolfram Decker 1 Gert­Martin Greuel 2 and Gerhard Kaiserslautern 1 Introduction Primary decomposition of an ideal in a polynomial ring over a field belongs to the decomposition of an affine variety into irreducible components and is, therefore, also an important geometric

  3. NCI Community Cancer Centers Program - Pilot Site Profile - Sanford USD Medical Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota

    Cancer.gov

    The Sanford USD Medical Center is the largest tertiary hospital in South Dakota with nearly 500 beds. It serves as the primary teaching institution for the Sanford School of Medicine of the University of South Dakota. The Medical Center serves as a regional institution, with half of its patients coming from outside the immediate Sioux Falls community. The Sanford Cancer Center is the region's largest, treating more than 1,278 new patients in 2005.

  4. The GLAST Science Support Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Donald J.; Science Support Center, GLAST

    2007-12-01

    The GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) serves as the mission's primary interface to the scientific community. The GSSC supports the planning and scheduling of science observations and maintains a publicly accessible archive of all GLAST data products. The GSSC also maintains and distributes data analysis software and documentation as well as providing technical and scientific support. In addition, the GSSC is administering the guest investigator program for NASA Headquarters and provide proposal preparation tools and documentation. We present an overview of our role in each of these activities.

  5. The GLAST Science Support Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Donald J.; Science Support Center, GLAST

    2008-03-01

    The GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) serves as the mission's primary interface to the scientific community. The GSSC supports the planning and scheduling of science observations and maintains a publicly accessible archive of all GLAST data products. The GSSC also maintains and distributes data analysis software and documentation as well as providing technical and scientific support. In addition, the GSSC is administering the guest investigator program for NASA Headquarters and provide proposal preparation tools and documentation. We present an overview of our role in each of these activities.

  6. The GLAST Science Support Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Thomas E.; Science Support Center, GLAST

    2006-12-01

    The GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC) serves as the mission’s primary interface to the scientific community. The GSSC supports the planning and scheduling of science observations and maintains a publicly accessible archive of all GLAST data products. The GSSC also maintains and distributes data analysis software and documentation as well as providing technical and scientific support. In addition, the GSSC will administer the guest investigator program for NASA HQ and provide proposal preparation tools and documentation. We present an overview of our role in each of these activities.

  7. Air Risk Information Support Center

    SciTech Connect

    Shoaf, C.R.; Guth, D.J.

    1990-12-31

    The Air Risk Information Support Center (Air RISC) was initiated in early 1988 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Health and Environmental Assessment (OHEA) and the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS) as a technology transfer effort that would focus on providing information to state and local environmental agencies and to EPA Regional Offices in the areas of health, risk, and exposure assessment for toxic air pollutants. Technical information is fostered and disseminated by Air RISCs three primary activities: (1) a {open_quotes}hotline{close_quotes}, (2) quick turn-around technical assistance projects, and (3) general technical guidance projects. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  8. Center of Mass Academic Resource Center

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    in a system, this integral can also be written as the following sum: · In other words, the center of mass · The velocity and acceleration of the center of mass of a sytem is found the same way as the center of mass that the water exerts no friction. #12;Example Problem 3 (Solution) This problem is very simple to solve because

  9. Technology Transfer Center | Competitive Service Center

    Cancer.gov

    The Technology Transfer Center (TTC) is a designated Competitive Service Center (CSC) for technology transfer to other NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs). The CSC at TTC offers a range of services and works with each client IC to determine the IC's unique technology transfer needs.

  10. National Cancer Institute | Technology Transfer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The first-of-its-kind, the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge, an international university student-based startup competition, was launched by the National Cancer Institute's Technology Transfer Center in partnership with the non-profit organizations Avon Foundation and the Center for Advancing Innovation. The primary goals of this challenge were to accelerate the process of bringing emerging technologies from the NCI Intramural Research Program to market and stimulate the creation of start-up businesses around NCI’s discoveries.

  11. Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention, Newton, MA.

    This brochure describes the mission, approach, and services of the Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention. The Center is the nation's primary resource center for assisting higher education institutions in the development, implementation, and evaluation of alcohol and drug violence prevention policies and programs that…

  12. Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 Pennsylvania Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report FY 2013 1 #12;Introduction The Pennsylvania Water of the Pennsylvania State University, the primary land-grant University within Pennsylvania. The Center resides

  13. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives. PMID:24139498

  14. University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston

    Cancer.gov

    The primary project is to focus upon translation of imaging agents and devices developed at The Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) and translated in Phase I studies at The Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Administration Medical Center (MEDVAMC) as well as at Ben Taub General Hospital (BTGH).

  15. Seattle Opportunities Industrialization Center. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opportunities Industrialization Center, Inc., Seattle, WA.

    The goals of the Opportunities Industrialization Center organization in Seattle include providing hope for impoverished and hard-core unemployed in the form of job preparation by providing adult education, pre-vocational training, skills training, counseling, job development, placement and followup. Another primary goal of OIC is providing and…

  16. Computational Center for Studies of Plasma Microturbulence

    SciTech Connect

    William Dorland

    2006-10-11

    The Maryland Computational Center for Studies of Microturbulence (CCSM) was one component of a larger, multi-institutional Plasma Microturbulence Project, funded through what eventually became DOE's Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing Program. The primary focus of research in CCSM was to develop, deploy, maintain, and utilize kinetic simulation techniques, especially the gyrokinetic code called GS2.

  17. Primary ion sources for EBIS

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, R.

    2001-03-21

    This paper gives an introduction into the topic of primary ion sources that can be used to feed ions of normally solid elements into EBIS devices. Starting with a set of typical requirements for primary ion sources, some major types of ion generators are discussed first, with emphasis on their working principles rather than trying to give a fully representative listing of used and proposed generators. Beam-transport issues between primary ion source and EBIS are then examined, and generic characteristics of suitable beam-formation and transport systems are explained.

  18. Primary-Progressive MS (PPMS)

    MedlinePLUS

    Primary-progressive MS (PPMS) - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area Donate Make a donation ...

  19. Lung Multiple Primary Rules Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    Lung Multiple Primary Rules – Matrix C340-C349 (Excludes lymphoma and leukemia M9590 – 9989 and Kaposi sarcoma M9140) * Prepare one abstract. Use the histology coding rules to assign the appropriate histology code. ** Prepare two or more abstracts.

  20. Problems of Primary Education Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubova, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Primary education in Russia has failed to adapt to the needs of post-Soviet society, and is still based on rote learning and memorization instead of learning through discovery and learning to use and apply what is learned.

  1. Dilemma of the Primary Colors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Artists use red, yellow, and blue as primary colors, whereas physicists use red, green, and blue. Explains the reason using the spectra of mixtures of red, green, blue, and yellow tempera obtained with a Carey spectrophotometer. (GA)

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Primary myelofibrosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... megakaryocytes stimulate another type of cell to release collagen. Collagen is a protein that normally provides structural support ... bone marrow. However, in primary myelofibrosis, the excess collagen forms scar tissue in the bone marrow. Although ...

  3. Primary hyperparathyroidism in a child

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, A.; Babu, K.; Siddini, V.; Ballal, H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is rare in children. We report a 12-year-old girl who presented with recurrent renal calculi, muscular weakness and inability to walk; was diagnosed to have parathyroid adenoma and underwent parathyroidectomy. PMID:26060368

  4. Primary medical care in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J T

    1990-01-01

    The extremely complex and rapidly but unevenly developing system of primary care in Spain is described. The health centre movement in Spain merits close attention, and could be a useful model for our own service. PMID:2117951

  5. PATTERNS OF PRIMARY MOULT IN

    E-print Network

    de Villiers, Marienne

    Underhill and Walter Zucchini developed a statistical model to analyse timing and duration of primary moult the Underhill-Zucchini method throughout. In some species, this method was applied to individual feathers

  6. Patient Experience in Health Center Medical Homes.

    PubMed

    Cook, Nicole; Hollar, Lucas; Isaac, Emmanuel; Paul, Ludmilla; Amofah, Anthony; Shi, Leiyu

    2015-12-01

    The Human Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care Health Center program was developed to provide comprehensive, community-based quality primary care services, with an emphasis on meeting the needs of medically underserved populations. Health Centers have been leaders in adopting innovative approaches to improve quality care delivery, including the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Engaging patients through patient experience assessment is an important component of PCMH evaluation and a vital activity that can help drive patient-centered quality improvement initiatives. A total of 488 patients from five Health Center PCMHs in south Florida were surveyed in order to improve understanding of patient experience in Health Center PCMHs and to identify quality improvement opportunities. Overall patients reported very positive experience with patient-centeredness including being treated with courtesy and respect (85 % responded "always") and communication with their provider in a way that was easy to understand (87.7 % responded "always"). Opportunities for improvement included patient goal setting, referrals for patients with health conditions to workshops or educational programs, contact with the Health Center via phone and appointment availability. After adjusting for patient characteristics, results suggest that some patient experience components may be modified by educational attainment, years of care and race/ethnicity of patients. Findings are useful for informing quality improvement initiatives that, in conjunction with other patient engagement strategies, support Health Centers' ongoing transformation as PCMHs. PMID:26026275

  7. The National Lending Library: Information Resource Center Extraordinaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Theodore P.

    1973-01-01

    This article provides a brief glimpse of the National Lending Library at Boston Spa in Yorkshire which is the primary bibliographic resource center for science and technology in Great Britain. (Author)

  8. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-print Network

    Sands ANL Mike Miller Collaborating Scientists & Institutions Consortium for Agricultural Soils Harrison USDA ­ Center for Forested Wetlands Research Carl Trettin USDA ­ Land Management and Water Primary Production NMR Nuclear Magnetic Resonance OM Organic Matter ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pg

  9. Effects of the institutionalization of primary health care.

    PubMed

    Melville, B F

    1989-07-01

    This paper address the institutionalization of the primary health care program in Cornwall County Jamaica, supervised by the Ministry of Health. Under this program, 59 new health centers were constructed and 28 existing ones remodelled. The primary health centers were decentralized and an administrative unit of a hierarchy of health centers was established and classified as type 1 through type 4. Type 1 health center was the smallest and the simplest health unit, and both type 2 and 3 health unit functioned as referral units for patients from type 1 health center. The type 4 health center had an additional administrative block for senior staff of the parish. The implications of this health system to Cornwall county in 1976 were 1) a decline in community health aides per health center, 2) additional child welfare, prenatal family planning, and medical clinics were held, 3) the number of rural families utilizing health care increased, 4) community health workers made significantly fewer home visits as a result of additional clinic units and in turn child health care declined significantly, 5) health workers carried out more curative activities and fewer preventive duties, 6) an increase in data collection through defaults in the system lead to non-utilization of the data for policy planning purposes, 7) shortage of staff to support the increased patient load and duties at health centers. Consequently, the health system could not cope with this well intentioned policy change which emphasized shifting from community outreach to health center-based activities. PMID:2773049

  10. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  11. Rare Skeletal Complications in the Setting of Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Sabanis, Nikos; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Paschou, Eleni; Kalaitzoglou, Asterios; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Ioannidou, Pinelopi; Vasileiou, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma represents an extremely rare neoplasm with diverse clinical manifestations which vary from asymptomatic patients to severe complications of hypercalcemia or parathyrotoxicosis while skeletal involvement is rather common. Herein we aimed at presenting a unique case of a young patient with rare aggressive skeletal complications of parathyroid cancer that initially were misdiagnosed. Ossification of the cervical ligamentum flavum and skull tumor illustrates erosive bonny lesions of hyperparathyroidism that in association with previous medical history of recurrent nephrolithiasis and biochemical findings guide the diagnosis. We suggest that increased awareness and holistic approach are needed in order to recognize and further investigate signs and symptoms of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26664767

  12. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health Information Center (NHIC) ... Clearinghouses Toll-Free Numbers for Health Information National Health Observances National Health Observances (NHOs) are special days, ...

  13. Poison Control Centers

    MedlinePLUS

    Local Poison Centers Search Centers Name States Any state Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of ... 222-1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A ...

  14. Fireworks Information Center

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home / Safety Education / Safety Education Centers En Español Fireworks Information Center This is an information center on ... Video Put Safety First This Fourth of July Fireworks Information What are consumer fireworks and where are ...

  15. Overcoming obstacles to implementing a primary care research framework

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Seater, Margaret; Palmarozzi, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Background Primary care research has recently garnered greater attention at the national level. Yet, primary care (i.e., family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, and obstetrics and gynecology) departments within academic institutions struggle to develop and sustain strong research frameworks. Methods This paper discusses a successful model that was developed in the department of family medicine at the University of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine. Results Overall, the framework revolves around three core values: training future primary care researchers, providing resources to emerging and junior faculty members, and creating a partnership with the community and clinicians to conduct primary care clinical research. Conclusion Significant effort is required to establish a successful research framework in family medicine. The framework presented herein serves as an example for other departments to use and adapt in developing their research division. PMID:17371580

  16. 42 CFR 438.804 - Primary care provider payment increases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Primary care provider payment increases. 438.804 Section 438.804 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Conditions for Federal...

  17. Deep-sea primary production at the Galapagos hydrothermal vents

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, D.M.; Wirsen, C.O.; Jannasch, H.W.

    1980-03-21

    Dense animal populations surrounding recently discovered hydrothermal vents at the Galapagos Rift sea-floor spreading center, 2550 meters deep, are probably sustained by microbial primary production. Energy in the form of geothermically reduced sulfur compounds emitted from the vents is liberated during oxidation and used for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic matter by chemosynthetic bacteria.

  18. Primary EFL Teachers' Technology Use in China: Patterns and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Guofang; Ni, Xiaopeng

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on survey data, this paper examines the patterns and perceptions of technology use by primary EFL teachers in China. Findings suggest that although Chinese EFL teachers hold positive attitudes toward the value of technology for teaching and learning, they use technology mainly for teacher-centered purposes, such as teaching preparation and…

  19. Rainbows: a primary health care initiative for primary schools.

    PubMed

    Munns, Ailsa; Forde, Karen A; Krouzecky, Miriam; Shields, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Within the current Australian health system is the understanding of a need to change from the predominate biomedical model to incorporate a comprehensive primary health care centred approach, embracing the social contexts of health and wellbeing. Recent research investigated the benefits of the primary health care philosophy and strategies in relation to the Rainbows programme which addresses grief and loss in primary school aged students in Western Australia. A multidisciplinary collaboration between the Western Australian Departments of Health and Education enabled community school health nurse coordinators to train teacher facilitators in the implementation of Rainbows, enabling support for students and their parents. The results of this qualitative study indicate that all participants regard Rainbows as effective, with many perceived benefits to students and their families. PMID:26281402

  20. Center for Networked Center for Networked Computing

    E-print Network

    Wu, Jie

    - spatiotemporal properties - can be learned over time Adaptive battery charge schedule - task failure ratio vs on an empirical battery model obtained from experiments. Our solution - achieves a 68.26% lower task failure ratioCenter for Networked Computing Center for Networked Computing Adaptive Battery Charge Scheduling

  1. Women's Centers: The Frameworks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Jodi

    1988-01-01

    Presents a typology of women's centers and provides an overview of state, regional, and national networks of women's centers, including the evolution of the Women's Center/Services Caucus of the National Women's Studies Association and the more recently organized National Association of Women's Centers. (NB)

  2. [Primary leptomeningeal sarcomatosis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Weglewski, Arkadiusz; Jury?czyk, Jacek; Papierz, Wielis?aw

    2003-01-01

    Primary intracranial sarcomas are very rare and aggressive tumors. A case of a 40-year-old woman with primary leptomeningeal sarcomatosis is presented. Initially her clinical symptoms resembled those of a pseudo tumor cerebri. Neuroimaging did not allow establishing a diagnosis of leptomeninges neoplastic infiltration. The patient died 8 months since the onset of symptoms. A neuropathological examination revealed diffuse thickening of leptomeninges. Microscopically a widespread sarcomatous infiltration of the subarachnoid space was shown, as well as a neoplastic infiltration of the choroid plexus and of some perivascular spaces in the cerebral cortex. On the grounds of a review of the literature diagnostic problems, differential diagnosis and clinical course of primary leptomeningeal sarcomatosis are discussed. PMID:12910846

  3. Primary angioplasty: preprocedural pharmacological therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, N.; de Boer, M-J.; Zijlstra, F.; Suryapranata, H.; Dambrink, J-H.E.; Hoorntje, J.C.A.; van 't Hof, A.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    Primary coronary angioplasty has been shown to be an effective reperfusion therapy for patients with acute myocardial infarction, not only for those who present to PTCA centres but also for patients who present to hospitals without angioplasty facilities. With the increasing use of primary angioplasty more patients will be transferred to a (tertiary) PTCA centre. An increase in treatment delay is associated with a worse clinical outcome. The importance of an open infarct-related vessel at acute angiography is becoming clear. Pharmacological pretreatment of patients during transportation to a PTCA centre with the aim to open the infarct-related vessel in advance might be beneficial. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor blockers seem to be the agents of choice for facilitated PTCA. The safety and (cost) effectiveness of this pretreatment of patients transported to undergo primary angioplasty remain to be evaluated. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696594

  4. Primary Bilingual logo 02 Primary Unilingual Logo 02

    E-print Network

    materials, stationery and official documents. The crest logo may be used in solid black for black and white or newsletters. pms 268 blaCk primary unilingual Crest logo The English, unilingual version of the crest logo may be used for promotional materials destined primarily for the U.S. market, or with approval

  5. Microbial production of primary metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demain, Arnold L.

    1980-12-01

    Microbial production of primary metabolites contributes significantly to the quality of life. Through fermentation, microorganisms growing on inexpensive carbon sources can produce valuable products such as amino acids, nucleotides, organic acids, and vitamins which can be added to food to enhance its flavor or increase its nutritive value. The contribution of microorganisms will go well beyond the food industry with the renewed interest in solvent fermentations. Microorganisms have the potential to provide many petroleum-derived products as well as the ethanol necessary for liquid fuel. The role of primary metabolites and the microbes which produce them will certainly increase in importance.

  6. Primary ovarian insufficiency: an update

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Leticia; Liu, James H

    2014-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency is a condition that represents impaired ovarian function on a continuum with intermittent ovulation. This condition commonly leads to premature menopause, defined as cessation of ovulation prior to the age of 40 years. Because there are potential immediate and long-term consequences of hypoestrogenism, a timely diagnosis is invaluable. This comprehensive review will discuss identifiable causes for primary ovarian insufficiency, including genetic disorders and metabolic abnormalities, as well as review current strategies for diagnosis, evaluation, and management of women with this condition. PMID:24591848

  7. Anxiety disorders in primary care.

    PubMed

    Combs, Heidi; Markman, Jesse

    2014-09-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric condition presenting to primary care practitioners. Yet they can be easily overlooked or misdiagnosed. Patients that struggle with anxiety disorders are more likely to seek treatment from primary care providers than mental health specialists. Given the costs in terms of debilitation and associated financial burden, and increased risk of suicide, the identification and successful treatment of anxiety is imperative. By means of clinical acumen and the use of screening tools, the provider can develop expertise in recognition and effective treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:25134870

  8. Immunotherapy for primary immunodeficiency diseases.

    PubMed

    Wood, Philip

    2012-05-01

    The 2 most commonly encountered primary immunodeficiency syndromes in adult practice are antibody deficiency disorders and hereditary angioedema.Immunologic therapy for these disorders has significantly improved patient management. Therapy with immunoglobulin leads to improvement in overall quality of life. With increasing survival rates and decreasing levels of life-threatening infections in patients with primary antibody deficiencies, disease complications are more commonly encountered. Treatment of these complications with monoclonal antibody therapy seems promising and is likely to increase in the future. More recently,several additional agents have become available, including novel drugs targeted at different elements of the disease process. PMID:22703850

  9. Genetics of Canine Primary Glaucomas.

    PubMed

    Komáromy, András M; Petersen-Jones, Simon M

    2015-11-01

    Primary glaucomas are a leading cause of incurable vision loss in dogs. Based on their specific breed predilection, a genetic cause is suspected to be responsible, and affected dogs should be excluded from breeding. Despite the high prevalence of primary glaucomas in dogs, their genetics have been studied in only a small number of breeds. The identification of canine glaucoma disease genes, and the development of genetic tests, will help to avoid the breeding of affected dogs in the future and will allow for earlier diagnosis and potentially more effective therapy. PMID:26277300

  10. Shoulder arthropathy in primary hyperparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, A.J.; Doppman, J.L.

    1982-12-01

    An erosive arthropathy of the hands and wrists has been recognized in patients with primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Recently, intra-articular erosions of the humeral head were described in six patients who had been on chronic long-term hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We would like to present the finding of shoulder erosions in four patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and one patient with renal osteodystrophy and suggest that the humeral erosion can occur in both an intra-articular and peri-articular location.

  11. Primary Hepatocytes in Sandwich Culture.

    PubMed

    Keemink, Janneke; Oorts, Marlies; Annaert, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocytes in sandwich configuration constitute of primary hepatocytes cultured between two layers of extracellular matrix. Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes maintain expression of liver-specific proteins and gradually form intact bile canaliculi with functional biliary excretion of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. Both freshly isolated and cryopreserved hepatocytes can be used to establish sandwich cultures. Therefore, this preclinical model has become an invaluable in vitro tool to evaluate hepatobiliary drug transport, metabolism, hepatotoxicity, and drug interactions. In this chapter, commonly used procedures to cultivate primary hepatocytes from human and rat in sandwich configuration are described. PMID:26272142

  12. Stop 1 Welcome Center, Siegel Center, Student Health Center,

    E-print Network

    Hammack, Richard

    host basketball and volleyball games, concerts, guest speakers and large social gatherings. Some of our shop, woodshops and a computer and video-editing room for our students. Across Shafer Street to your and is home to our VCU Medical Center. VCU also offers students the opportunity to earn degrees in fashion

  13. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) Report

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Linda M.; Cowan, Morton J.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Kohn, Donald B.; Puck, Jennifer M.; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C.; Bleesing, Jack J. H.; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M.; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J.; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Filipovich, Alexandra H.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Gaspar, Hubert Bobby; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M.; Logan, Brent R.; Long-Boyle, Janel R.; Malech, Harry L.; McGhee, Sean A.; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D.; O'Reilly, Richard J.; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J.; Routes, John M.; Shearer, William T.; Small, Trudy N.; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R.; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases (PID). Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome and Chronic Granulomatous Disease through retrospective, prospective and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to: encourage training of junior investigators; establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues; work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness; and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for PID. To date, the PIDTC has funded two pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans; and B cell reconstitution in SCID patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first two PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives. PMID:24139498

  14. Choosing a primary care provider

    MedlinePLUS

    Family doctor - how to choose one; Primary care provider - how to choose one; Doctor - how to choose a family doctor ... A PCP is your main health care provider in non-emergency ... and teach healthy lifestyle choices Identify and treat common ...

  15. ASE and Primary School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlen, Wynne

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of the Association for Science Education (ASE) in supporting and developing policy and practice in primary school science. It first sets the events after the formation of ASE in 1963 in the context of what went before. It then takes a mainly chronological view of some, but by no means all, of ASE's activities…

  16. Lead-free primary explosives

    DOEpatents

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  17. Primary Teachers Opinion about Homework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matei, Stefania; Ciasca, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Homework assignments trigger various perceptions and attitudes in students, parents or teachers: some overestimate them, others reject them, some do it with pleasure and to others they cause tears. Literature indicates both benefits and disadvantages of homework. In Romania, at primary level, homework is a systematic practice. The explanation is…

  18. Primary Science Education in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pook, Gayle

    2013-01-01

    Consider the extent to which primary science teaching has evolved since it became a core subject in England with the introduction of the National Curriculum in 1988, and the pace at which theory-driven classroom practice has advanced. It is no wonder that, given the recent economic restructuring and boom in technological development in China,…

  19. Presentation 7: Multiple Primary Rules

    Cancer.gov

    MP Rules - Note 2 The registrar must recognize that during the diagnostic workup the physician may start with a non-specific diagnosis (NOS) and as testing is completed, a more specific histology is identified. These diagnoses are not multiple primaries; they represent steps in the diagnostic work-up. See rules M7-M12.

  20. Department of Primary Care Respiratory

    E-print Network

    Delgado, Mauricio

    Department of Primary Care Respiratory Therapy - South - about it's all ChoiCes... exclusively to the Program office at Rutgers SHRP, Respiratory Therapy Program, 40 East Laurel Road, Suite 2105, Stratford Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). The Respiratory Therapy Program

  1. Phytotherapy in primary health care

    PubMed Central

    Antonio, Gisele Damian; Tesser, Charles Dalcanale; Moretti-Pires, Rodrigo Otavio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize the integration of phytotherapy in primary health care in Brazil. METHODS Journal articles and theses and dissertations were searched for in the following databases: SciELO, Lilacs, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Theses Portal Capes, between January 1988 and March 2013. We analyzed 53 original studies on actions, programs, acceptance and use of phytotherapy and medicinal plants in the Brazilian Unified Health System. Bibliometric data, characteristics of the actions/programs, places and subjects involved and type and focus of the selected studies were analyzed. RESULTS Between 2003 and 2013, there was an increase in publications in different areas of knowledge, compared with the 1990-2002 period. The objectives and actions of programs involving the integration of phytotherapy into primary health care varied: including other treatment options, reduce costs, reviving traditional knowledge, preserving biodiversity, promoting social development and stimulating inter-sectorial actions. CONCLUSIONS Over the past 25 years, there was a small increase in scientific production on actions/programs developed in primary care. Including phytotherapy in primary care services encourages interaction between health care users and professionals. It also contributes to the socialization of scientific research and the development of a critical vision about the use of phytotherapy and plant medicine, not only on the part of professionals but also of the population. PMID:25119949

  2. ICT, Learning and Primary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, John

    2004-01-01

    ICT has the capability to transform the way pupils understand and learn mathematics. When used with sensitivity and careful planning, it can act as a catalyst, contributing to a stimulating classroom climate which can bring mathematics alive. This paper takes a fresh and critical look at the use of ICT in mathematics teaching in Primary schools,…

  3. Primary Journal Literature of Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Marianne; Thayer, Candace W.

    Four hundred and ninety one primary journals covered by "Physics Abstracts" in 1965 have been studied and their basic characteristics analyzed in terms of sponsorship, distribution by country, language, frequency, and coverage by secondary services other than "Physics Abstracts," and the number of libraries holding each journal. (Author)

  4. Primary Sources Enliven Civil War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2011-01-01

    Today, a growing number of teachers are moving beyond the textbook in teaching about the war, and U.S. history more broadly. Teachers are digging directly into primary sources and harnessing technology, all in an attempt to help students better understand the past and bring it to life. Doing so may be especially important with the Civil War,…

  5. Civil Engineering in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Martin; Strong, Alan

    2010-01-01

    For many children of primary school age, an engineer is the man who comes to service the central heating system or who fixes the family car when it breaks down. Most have never met a "real" professional engineer, and have no idea of what is involved in the exciting world of engineering. Most assume that engineers are men. To try to remove these…

  6. Primary care. On the mend?

    PubMed

    Nolan, Alexis

    2005-03-10

    Alternative provider medical services contracts are encouraging primary care trusts to innovate in the way they invite tenders--but private companies have had mixed success in winning business. However, now the situation seems to be changing, with about half of all out-of-hours contracts run under APMS rules and a small number of prison and general practice 'wins'. PMID:15787229

  7. Conditional Logic and Primary Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Robert H.

    Conditional logic, as interpreted in this paper, means deductive logic characterized by "if-then" statements. This study sought to investigate the knowledge of conditional logic possessed by primary children and to test their readiness to learn such concepts. Ninety students were designated the experimental group and participated in a 15-week…

  8. The Plant Information Center (PIC): A Web-Based Learning Center for Botanical Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, J.; Daniel, E.; Massey, J.; White, P.

    The Plant Information Center (PIC) is a project funded under the Institute of Museum and Library Studies that aims to provide global access to both primary and secondary botanical resources via the World Wide Web. Central to the project is the development and employment of a series of applications that facilitate resource discovery, interactive…

  9. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  10. Primary prevention of adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schinke, S P; Blythe, B J; Gilchrist, L D; Burt, G A

    1981-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is associated with many health, emotional and socioeconomic problems including higher rates of anemia, labor complications, mortality, legal and social struggles and hhigher divorce rates. Professional social workers need strategies to help teenagers avoid early, unwanted pregnancy. This paper offers promising experential and research backing for a primary prevention group work strategy for all adolescents. Social and health programs overlook educational, cognitive anc interpersonal factors biasing youths' ability to comprehend and regulate contraception. Primary prevention to assist adolescents in thinking analytically about their sexual behavior must stress problem solving and decision-making as well as facts about human reproduction and birth control. To implement decisions, youths also need interpersonal communication skills. Small groups are ideal for delivering cognitive-behavioral primary prevention. This approach is based on the premise that youths become pregnant not because of a lack of relevant information, but because they lack cognitive and behavioral skills necessary to use information. Group work involving role-playing helps develop communication skills. Results from 2 field studies describe short-term and longitudinal benefits of the prevention strategy. Professionals can reach significant numbers of youth in this way. By treating sexual issues and the risk of pregnancy as normal in adolescence, social workers can introduce information and pertinent skills to all teenagers. No one is singled out as deviant and the group format enables young people to discuss taboo topics, discovering what the norms are and gradually learning how to deal with peers, family members, techers and others. Adolescents in primary prevention groups gained knowledge, cognitive skills and communication acumen. Improved attitudes toward family planning, increased regular contraception and less unsafe sex resulted from this cognitive-behavioral approach. Primary prevention should begin early to be most effective. Other personal and social issures such as a alcohol and drug abuse, delinquency, marital and family conflicts, parenting difficulties and money management may be dealt with effectively using a cognitive-behavioral approach. PMID:12266532

  11. A computational analysis of bone formation in the cranial vault in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanyoung; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Kraft, Reuben H

    2015-01-01

    Bones of the cranial vault are formed by the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts on a surface that surrounds the brain, eventually forming mineralized bone. Signaling pathways causative for cell differentiation include the actions of extracellular proteins driven by information from genes. We assume that the interaction of cells and extracellular molecules, which are associated with cell differentiation, can be modeled using Turing's reaction-diffusion model, a mathematical model for pattern formation controlled by two interacting molecules (activator and inhibitor). In this study, we hypothesize that regions of high concentration of an activator develop into primary centers of ossification, the earliest sites of cranial vault bone. In addition to the Turing model, we use another diffusion equation to model a morphogen (potentially the same as the morphogen associated with formation of ossification centers) associated with bone growth. These mathematical models were solved using the finite volume method. The computational domain and model parameters are determined using a large collection of experimental data showing skull bone formation in mouse at different embryonic days in mice carrying disease causing mutations and their unaffected littermates. The results show that the relative locations of the five ossification centers that form in our model occur at the same position as those identified in experimental data. As bone grows from these ossification centers, sutures form between the bones. PMID:25853124

  12. A Computational Analysis of Bone Formation in the Cranial Vault in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanyoung; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Kraft, Reuben H.

    2015-01-01

    Bones of the cranial vault are formed by the differentiation of mesenchymal cells into osteoblasts on a surface that surrounds the brain, eventually forming mineralized bone. Signaling pathways causative for cell differentiation include the actions of extracellular proteins driven by information from genes. We assume that the interaction of cells and extracellular molecules, which are associated with cell differentiation, can be modeled using Turing’s reaction–diffusion model, a mathematical model for pattern formation controlled by two interacting molecules (activator and inhibitor). In this study, we hypothesize that regions of high concentration of an activator develop into primary centers of ossification, the earliest sites of cranial vault bone. In addition to the Turing model, we use another diffusion equation to model a morphogen (potentially the same as the morphogen associated with formation of ossification centers) associated with bone growth. These mathematical models were solved using the finite volume method. The computational domain and model parameters are determined using a large collection of experimental data showing skull bone formation in mouse at different embryonic days in mice carrying disease causing mutations and their unaffected littermates. The results show that the relative locations of the five ossification centers that form in our model occur at the same position as those identified in experimental data. As bone grows from these ossification centers, sutures form between the bones. PMID:25853124

  13. The Fermi Science Support Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernaleo, John C.; Science Support Center, Fermi

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) serves as the primary interface between the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission and the scientific community. The FSSC supports the planning and scheduling of science observations and maintains an archive of all publicly accessible Fermi data products (currently this is primarily data from the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), but will ultimately include all Fermi data products). The FSSC also maintains and distributes data analysis software and associated documentation as well as providing technical and scientific support. In addition, the FSSC is administering the guest investigator program for NASA Headquarters and provides proposal preparation tools and documentation. We present an overview of the FSSC's role in each of these activities.

  14. Teaching primary health care: a comprehensive approach.

    PubMed

    Smith, R A; Mehra, S; Devereaux, M O; Rich, J

    1988-01-01

    The MEDEX Primary Health Care Series, an integrated training system for everyone in primary care (PHC), was published in 1983. It is now used in over 70 countries and has demonstrated its value in the developing world. The Series lays considerable emphasis on the crucial link between the performance of health workers and the management support with which they are provided. It was the result of 10 years of development and field testing. The Series is so widely employed because its development involved health centers and health workers associated in PHC programs in Guyana, Lesotho, Micronesia, Pakistan, and Thailand. It also addresses everyday problems and provides pragmatic solutions which PHC programs can apply. Attention is given to the development of skills in health workers, using a competency-based methodology, in contrast to the concentration on knowledge acquition found in more conventional training programs. Training activities are detailed for as little as 15 minutes at a time in courses lasting 6-15 months. Dialogic methods are used for the more peripheral workers who may not be literate. Management is given systematic, practical treatment. The Series advocates disease prevention and health promotion and helps to train health workers to diagnose an treat the most common clinical problems. It can be used to strengthen existing programs or to start new ones. It has a consistent formant, facilitating local adaption. Any part of the Series can be copied or reproduced for noncommercial purposes without persmission from the publisher. The Series is based on the realistic and pragmatic organization of health care delivery systems found in most countries and places great importance on the use of health center presonnel to orientate and link resources at the center to needs at the periphery. Nurses, the health center person at the middle level of the PHC, often fulfills the role of trainer and supervisor of the community health worker. The diagnostic, curative and community health skills in the Series are consistent with the expanding role of nursing in PHC. The Series is published in English but also available in a mini-edition in Spanish with increasing interest in a French translation. Various sections have been translated into 21 other languages. A newsletter and a network of series users (MEDINET) has been established. PMID:3252832

  15. Active Optics Performance Study of the Primary Mirror of the Gemini Telescopes Project

    E-print Network

    Active Optics Performance Study of the Primary Mirror of the Gemini Telescopes Project Myung K. Cho Optical Sciences Center in the University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 and Gemini Telescopes Project P. O. Box 26732 Tucson, AZ 85726­6732 Gemini Preprint #9 #12; Active optics performance study of the primary

  16. Uncommon Caring: Primary Males and Implicit Judgments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, James R.

    The caring and nurturing of children, which characterize primary education culture, have tended to shape a public perception of primary teaching as "women's work." Several social factors influence men's underrepresentation in the profession of primary education, such as parents not wanting their children exposed to "soft" males. Male primary

  17. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  18. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 895-2520 Accredited Since June 2011 36 Morning Star Women's Health & Birth Center - St. Louis Park Accredited ... 586-1203 Accredited Since June 2006 07 Morning Star Women's Health & Birth Center - Duluth Accredited 1730 E. ...

  19. Transplant Center Directory

    MedlinePLUS

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Suite 9000 Durham, NC 27705 (919) 668-1027 Wake Forest Baptist Health NMDP Transplant Center Medical Center ...

  20. Center Pivot Irrigation 

    E-print Network

    New, Leon; Fipps, Guy

    2000-07-10

    The center pivot is the system of choice for agricultural irrigation because of its low labor and maintenance requirements, convenience, flexibility, performance and easy operation. This publication includes complete details on choosing a center...

  1. Albert Einstein Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The clinical research activities of AECC are conducted primarily at the Montefiore Medical Center which houses the Montefiore-Einstein Center for Cancer Care and encompasses participation from all the clinical oncologic academic disciplines.

  2. Alzheimer's Disease Research Centers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... decarli@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu Fax: 916-703-5290 Satellite Center: UC Davis East Bay Bruce Reed, PhD, ... mednet.ucla.edu Director's Fax: 310-794-3148 Satellite Center: Memory Disorders Clinical and Research Program Olive ...

  3. Rural Assistance Center

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Rural Health Resource Center Access to Health Information Technology Training Programs at the Community College Level Source: WWAMI Rural Health Research Center Online Library ... Need help finding information? RHIhub can provide free assistance customized to your ...

  4. Center of Attention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, J. Steven; Wood-Steed, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how college and university student centers are becoming the institution's marketing tools. Explores how the Millennium Center at the University of Missouri in St. Louis exemplifies this new trend. (GR)

  5. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  6. 42 CFR 411.206 - Basis for Medicare primary payments and limits on secondary payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Basis for Medicare primary payments and limits on secondary...206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM EXCLUSIONS FROM...

  7. 42 CFR 417.528 - Payment when Medicare is not primary payer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Payment when Medicare is not primary payer. 417... Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH...

  8. Masonic Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The Masonic Cancer Center was founded in 1991 as the University of Minnesota Cancer Center and received its NCI designation in 1998. It was renamed the Masonic Cancer Center (MCC) in 2008. MCC is part of the University of Minnesota’s Academic Health Center, which also includes the Medical School, School of Dentistry, School of Nursing, College of Pharmacy, School of Public Health and College of Veterinary Medicine.

  9. Abramson Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    In 1973, the University of Pennsylvania established a cancer center to serve as the focus and stimulus for all cancer-related activities at the University. In 1974, it was designated as a comprehensive cancer center by NCI and in 2002, it was renamed the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania. The mission of the Center is the eradication of cancer as a cause of human disease and suffering.

  10. SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY AEROSOL HEALTH EFFECTS RESEARCH CENTER (SAHERC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    All studies in the SAHERC were being undertaken within the primary theme of ?ambient particulate matter and resulting health effects in the San Joaquin Valley?. Below is a chart outlining the relationship between the center?s five projects. All five research projects were...

  11. Alternate Learning Center. Abstracts of Inservice Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Education, Providence. Div. of Development and Operations.

    This booklet is a collection of abstracts describing the 18 programs offered at the Alternate Learning Center of the Rhode Island Teacher Center which has as its Primary function school based inservice training for local teachers and administrators. Each project is described in detail, including course goals, specific objectives, training…

  12. Family-Centered Intervention and Satisfaction with AAC Device Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starble, Amy; Hutchins, Tiffany; Favro, Mary Alice; Prelock, Patricia; Bitner, Brooke

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a family-centered collaborative approach for developing and implementing augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device training for one family. Family-centered training emphasized collaboration with the primary investigator and focused on needs assessment, the identification of priority…

  13. Yale Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    Established in 1974, the Yale Cancer Center (YCC) also received its NCI designation the same year. The Center combines the resources of the Yale-New Haven Hospital and the Yale School of Medicine. The Center is committed to combating cancer with the most effective modern tools. Its mission encompasses research, cancer prevention and control, patient care, education, and community outreach.

  14. Circle Centers, Circumcenters

    E-print Network

    Baldwin, John T.

    Circle Centers, the Common Core, and authentic problems John T. Baldwin, Andreas Mueller Overview Circumcenters Transformations and Concurrencies Incenters Circle Centers, the Common Core, and authentic problems John T. Baldwin, Andreas Mueller April 12, 2013 #12;Circle Centers, the Common Core, and authentic

  15. Child Care Center APPLICATION

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Child Care Center APPLICATION Child's name:_______________________Date of birth/Expected due date payroll deduction Community #12;Child Care Center Application Process To apply for enrollment at the LSU Child Care Center, this application form must be completed, signed and received with the $45

  16. Center for Instructional Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Washington, DC.

    The Center for Instructional Computing (CIC) at Eastern Michigan University is described in this report. The center serves as a model for making the infusion of innovative uses of microcomputers within instruction a faculty-centered effort. CIC provides a physical facility with IBM and Apple microcomputers dedicated to faculty use, both as a…

  17. Mental Health Screening Center

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Events Events by Other Organziations Advocacy Center Balanced Mind Parent Network Wellness Tracker Facing Us Clubhouse Find a Pro Survey Center WeSearchTogether Resource Center En Español OUR MISSION: DBSA provides hope, help, support, and education to improve the lives of people who have ...

  18. Connections Career Center

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Retention Efficacy Engagement Connections Resources About Us Clemson Career Center Ranked #11 The Center has once again been ranked among the top career services offices in the Princeton Review's College for Career and Professional Development 316 Hendrix Student Center Clemson University Box 344007 Clemson, SC

  19. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  20. UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    Established in 1971, the University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center (UAB), received its NCI designation in the same year. The Center has grown to include a membership of more than 330 physicians and researchers and remains the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in Alabama.

  1. Medicine and Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;400 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2014­15 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers Vice President for Medical Affairs and the Raja N. Khuri Dean of the Faculty of Medicine Ziyad Ghazzal

  2. Medicine and Medical Center

    E-print Network

    Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) #12;418 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Graduate Catalogue 2015­16 Faculty of Medicine and Medical Center (FM/AUBMC) Officers. Sayegh Executive Vice President for Medicine and Global Strategy and the Raja N. Khuri Dean

  3. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  4. Equality of Fitness Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swoyer, Jesse O.

    2008-01-01

    The author, who has been a personal trainer for the past ten years, recently realized that all fitness centers are not equal. In February, he was able to participate in the grand opening of the Center for Independent Living of Central PA (CILCP), a fitness center that is designed to accommodate persons with disabilities living in the Central…

  5. Center Vortices and Ghosts

    E-print Network

    H. Reinhardt

    2006-10-12

    Assuming that center vortices are the confining gauge field configurations, we argue that in gauges that are sensitive to the confining center vortex degrees of freedom, and where the latter lie on the Gribov horizon, the corresponding ghost form factor is infrared divergent. Furthermore, this infrared divergence disappears when center vortices are removed from the Yang-Mills ensemble. On the other hand, for gauge conditions which are insensitive to center vortex degrees of freedom, the ghost form factor is infrared finite and does not change (qualitatively) when center vortices are removed. Evidence for our observation is provided from lattice calculations.

  6. Arizona Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The University of Arizona Cancer Center (UACC) was founded in 1976 as a division of the University of Arizona’s College of Medicine and is now a free-standing center of excellence at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center. It became an NCI-designated cancer center in 1978 and received Comprehensive Cancer Center status in 1990. UACC developed a scientific program in cancer prevention and control in the 1980s, with special emphasis on colon, breast, prostate, and skin cancer.

  7. 20 UTHealthScienceCenter20 UTHealthScienceCenter Celebrating its first anniversary in June, Clinica

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yan

    Esperanza has made that hope for medical care a reality and is providing a gateway into the American health primary care health center for the medically underserved. CCHS generously offered Clinica Esperanza and faculty members from the Uni- versity of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Medicine (COM

  8. Hyperparathyroidism: primary or secondary disease?

    PubMed

    Cordellat, Isabel Martínez

    2012-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is characterized by the autonomous production of parathyroid hormone (PTH), in which there is hypercalcemia or normal-high serum calcium levels in the presence of elevated or inappropriately normal serum PTH concentrations. Exceptionally in symptomatic patients, a diagnostic can be established on the basis of clinical data. PHPT must always be evaluated in patients with clinical histories of nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, osseous pain, subperiosteal resorption, and pathologic fractures, as well as in those with osteoporosis-osteopenia, a personal history of neck irradiation, or a family history of multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome (types 1 or 2). Diagnosis of PHPT is biochemical. Asymptomatic hypercalcemia without guiding signs or symptoms is the most frequent manifestation of the disease. For differential diagnosis, PTH must be measured, as well as phosphate, chloride, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25 dyhidroxyvitamin D and calcium-to-creatinine clearance. The diagnosis and differential diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism will be discussed here. PMID:22089066

  9. Shower center of gravity and interaction characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheyn, Lev

    2015-08-01

    The shower center of gravity is used for studying the interconnection between shower longitudinal profile and hadronic interaction characteristics. The equations for the shower originated by high energy proton in the atmosphere are written and, within certain simplifications, solved for the case of logarithmically decreasing interaction length of hadrons in the air. The obtained expression explicitely splits into center of gravity of the purely electromagnetic cascade at the primary proton energy and modification of that by hadronic cascading and provides transparent view of the way in which hadronic interaction characteristics determine the longitudinal shower development.

  10. Melanoma Multiple Primary Rules Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    Cutaneous Melanoma Multiple Primary Rules – Matrix C440 – C449 (Excludes melanoma of any other site) * P r e p ar e o n e abs tr a c t. U s e t h e hi s t o lo g y c o di ng r u le s t o as s i gn th e ap pr o p r iat e h is to lo

  11. Viking orbiter system primary mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goudy, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of Viking Orbiter (VO) system and subsystem performances during the primary mission (the time period from VO-1 launch on August 20, 1975, through November 15, 1976) is presented. Brief descriptions, key design requirements, pertinent historical information, unique applications or situations, and predicted versus actual performances are included for all VO-1 and VO-2 subsystems, both individually and as an integrated system.

  12. Kidney Multiple Primary Rules Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    Kidney Multiple Primary Rules – Matrix C649 (Excludes lymphoma and leukemia M9590 – 9989 and Kaposi sarcoma M9140) * P r e p ar e o n e abs tr a c t. U s e t h e hi s t o lo g y c o di ng r u le s t o as s i gn th e ap pr o p r iat

  13. Colon Multiple Primary Rules Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    Colon Multiple Primary Rules – Matrix C180-C189 (Excludes lymphoma and leukemia M9590 – 9989 and Kaposi sarcoma M9140) * P r e p ar e o n e abs tr a c t. U s e t h e hi s t o lo g y c o di ng r u le s t o as s i gn th e ap pr o p

  14. Primary productivity in the sea

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in primary productivity is discussed in the book based on 27 symposia texts and 19 poster abstracts. Most papers deal with particular cellular processes in pelagic phytoplankton and their relationship to whole plant photosynthesis and growth. In addition, presentations on the productivity of the seaweed, Laminaria, zooxanthellae and whole corals are included. Other articles discuss predictive modeling, new developments in remote sensing, nutrient regeneration within the sea, grazing effects, and carbon cycling. (JMT)

  15. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  16. Medicare reform and primary care concerns for future physicians.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Charles H; Spinelli, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    The widening income gap between specialists and primary care physicians (PCPs) has spurred many physician associations to reform the current Resource-Based Relative Value Scale fee schedule and sustainable growth rate expenditure target system. Hoping to better represent primary care, the American Association of Family Physicians formed a task force in 2011 to suggest supplements to the Relative Value Update Committee's procedural code recommendations to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. In addition, the predicted shortage of PCPs has caused many medical schools to increase class sizes; the scarcity of PCPs has also spurred the founding of new medical schools. Such measures, however, have not been met with more residency program sites or graduate medical education funding. The present article highlights major Medicare reform strategies and explores several issues affecting the field of primary care, including reimbursement, representation, and residency training. PMID:24084804

  17. Contributors to primary care guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Allan, G. Michael; Kraut, Roni; Crawshay, Aven; Korownyk, Christina; Vandermeer, Ben; Kolber, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the professions of those who contribute to guidelines, guideline variables associated with differing contributor participation, and whether conflict of interest statements are provided in primary care guidelines. Design Retrospective analysis of the primary care guidelines from the Canadian Medical Association website. Two independent data extractors reviewed the guidelines and extracted relevant data. Setting Canada. Main outcome measures Sponsors of guidelines, jurisdiction (national or provincial) of guidelines, the professions of those who contribute to guidelines, and the reported conflict of interest statements within guidelines. Results Of the 296 guidelines in the family medicine section of the CMA Infobase, 65 were duplicates and 35 had limited relevance to family medicine. Twenty did not provide contributor information, leaving 176 guidelines for analysis. In total, there were 2495 contributors (authors and committee members): 1343 (53.8%) non–family physician specialists, 423 (17.0%) family physicians, 141 (5.7%) nurses, 75 (3.0%) pharmacists, 269 (10.8%) other clinicians, 203 (8.1%) nonclinician scientists, and 41 (1.6%) unknown professions. The proportion of contributors from the various professions differed significantly between provincial and national guidelines, as well as between industry-funded and non–industry-funded guidelines (both P < .001). For provincial guidelines, 30.8% of contributors were family physicians and 37.3% were other specialists compared with 13.9% and 57.4%, respectively, for national guidelines. Of industry-funded guidelines, 7.8% of contributors were family physicians and 68.6% were other specialists compared with 19.4% and 49.9%, respectively, for non–industry-funded guidelines. Conflicts of interest were not reported in 68.9% of guidelines. When reported, conflict of interest statements were present for 48.6% of non–family physician specialists, 30.0% of pharmacists, 27.7% of family physicians, and 10.0% or less of the remaining groups; differences were statistically significant (P < .001). Conclusion Non–family physician specialists outnumber all other health care providers combined and are more than 3 times more likely to contribute to primary care guidelines than family physicians are. Conflict of interest statements were provided in the minority of guidelines, and for guidelines in which conflict of interest statements were included, non–family physician specialists were most likely to report them. Guidelines targeted to primary care should have much more primary care and family medicine representation and include fewer contributors who have conflicts of interest. PMID:25609522

  18. Operating and Managing a Backup Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Angela L.; Pirani, Joseph L.; Bornas, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Due to the criticality of continuous mission operations, some control centers must plan for alternate locations in the event an emergency shuts down the primary control center. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas is the Mission Control Center (MCC) for the International Space Station (ISS). Due to Houston s proximity to the Gulf of Mexico, JSC is prone to threats from hurricanes which could cause flooding, wind damage, and electrical outages to the buildings supporting the MCC. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the capability to be the Backup Control Center for the ISS if the situation is needed. While the MSFC Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) does house the BCC, the prime customer and operator of the ISS is still the JSC flight operations team. To satisfy the customer and maintain continuous mission operations, the BCC has critical infrastructure that hosts ISS ground systems and flight operations equipment that mirrors the prime mission control facility. However, a complete duplicate of Mission Control Center in another remote location is very expensive to recreate. The HOSC has infrastructure and services that MCC utilized for its backup control center to reduce the costs of a somewhat redundant service. While labor talents are equivalent, experiences are not. Certain operations are maintained in a redundant mode, while others are simply maintained as single string with adequate sparing levels of equipment. Personnel at the BCC facility must be trained and certified to an adequate level on primary MCC systems. Negotiations with the customer were done to match requirements with existing capabilities, and to prioritize resources for appropriate level of service. Because some of these systems are shared, an activation of the backup control center will cause a suspension of scheduled HOSC activities that may share resources needed by the BCC. For example, the MCC is monitoring a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico. As the threat to MCC increases, HOSC must begin a phased activation of the BCC, while working resource conflicts with normal HOSC activities. In a long duration outage to the MCC, this could cause serious impacts to the BCC host facility s primary mission support activities. This management of a BCC is worked based on customer expectations and negotiations done before emergencies occur. I.

  19. Photosynthetic reaction centers in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Schiffer, M. )

    1990-07-30

    The photochemistry of photosynthesis begins in complexes called reaction centers. These have become model systems to study the fundamental process by which plants and bacteria convert and store solar energy as chemical free energy. In green plants, photosynthesis occurs in two systems, each of which contains a different reaction center, working in series. In one, known as photosystem 1, oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP[sup +]) is reduced to NADPH for use in a series of dark reactions called the Calvin cycle, named for Nobel Laureate Melvin Calvin, by which carbon dioxide is converted into useful fuels such as carbohydrates and sugars. In the other half of the photosynthetic machinery of green plants, called photosystem 2, water is oxidized to produce molecular oxygen. A different form of photosynthesis occurs in photosynthetic bacteria, which typically live at the bottom of ponds and feed on organic debris. Two main types of photosynthetic bacteria exist: purple and green. Neither type liberates oxygen from water. Instead, the bacteria feed on organic media or inorganic materials, such as sulfides, which are easier to reduce or oxidize than carbon dioxide or water. Perhaps in consequence, their photosynthetic machinery is simpler than that of green, oxygen-evolving plants and their primary photochemistry is better understood.

  20. School Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining student health, safety, and welfare is a primary goal for any K-12 school system. If a child becomes sick, is injured, or seems in any other way incapacitated at school, it is the understood responsibility that the school will provide care and, if necessary, contact the parents and direct the child to outside treatment. Beyond that…

  1. Science and Literacy Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Meeteren, Beth Dykstra; Escalada, Lawrence T.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, science has taken a backseat to reading and mathematics in many primary classrooms. Imaginative teachers have coped with this loss of science time by creatively integrating science topics into reading instructional materials (Douglas, Klentschy, and Worth 2006). In this article, the author describes an effective physical science…

  2. EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    The Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, located in Sioux Falls, SD, is a data management, systems development, and research field center of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Mapping Division. The Center was established in the early 1970's to receive, process, and distribute data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Landsat satellites. The Center holds the world's largest collection of space and aircraft acquired imagery of the Earth. These holdings include over 2 million images acquired from satellites and over 8 million aerial photographs. The Center is also a major focal point for information concerning the holdings of foreign Landsat ground reception stations and data acquired by other countries' Earth observing satellites. The central U.S. location provides the Center with a unique capability to receive real-time electronic signals from Earth orbiting satellites, used for developing data sets of most of the North American continent.

  3. Cancer Therapy & Research Center

    Cancer.gov

    The mission of CTRC is to conquer cancer through research, prevention and treatment. The CTRC is located in the center of a growing complex of clinical and science facilities at the UT Health Science Center. Working in disease-specific, multidisciplinary clinics, the more than 50 physician-members of the Center work with the staff to build a regimen of treatment for each patient in a convenient, one-stop approach.

  4. Hollings Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The Hollings Cancer Center (HCC) was founded in 1993 and became an NCI-designated cancer center in 2009. Located at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), the HCC has a robust, interdisciplinary base that now includes 122 cancer scientists from five MUSC colleges and 20 academic departments. The mission of the Center is to reduce the cancer burden in South Carolina through the highest quality patient care, research, professional education, and cancer control programs with a focus on reaching underserved populations.

  5. Genome Data Analysis Centers

    Cancer.gov

    The use of novel technologies, the need to integrate different data types and the immense quantity of data generated by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network has led to an expansion of the TCGA Research Network to include new centers devoted to data analysis. The Genome Data Analysis Centers (GDACs) work hand-in-hand with the Genome Characterization Centers (GCCs) to develop state-of-the-art tools that assist researchers with processing and integrating data analyses across the entire genome.

  6. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  7. Current Concepts in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Sclair, Seth N; Little, Ester; Levy, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are chronic, cholestatic diseases of the liver with common clinical manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of PBC slows progression and decreases the need for transplant. However, one-third of patients will progress regardless of treatment. Bilirubin <1.0 and alkaline phosphatase <2.0 x the upper limit of normal at 1 year after treatment appear to predict 10-year survival. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the recommended treatment for PBC, and recent studies with obeticholic acid showed promising results for UDCA non-responders. Unlike PBC, no therapy has been shown to alter the natural history of PSC. The recommended initial diagnostic test for PSC is magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, typically showing bile duct wall thickening, focal bile duct dilatation, and saccular dilatation of the intra- and/or extrahepatic bile ducts. Immunoglobulin 4-associated cholangitis must be excluded when considering the diagnosis of PSC, to allow for proper treatment, and monitoring of disease progression. In addition to the lack of therapy, PSC is a pre-malignant condition and close surveillance is indicated. PMID:26312413

  8. Case Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    The Case Comprehensive Cancer Center (Case CCC) at Case Western Reserve University was both founded and became an NCI-designated cancer center in 1987. It was recognized as an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center 11 years later. In 2004, the institutional and membership base from the founding partnership between Case Western Reserve and Ireland Cancer Center of University Hospitals (UH) expanded to include the Cleveland Clinic. Cancer research and care at these three institutions are now unified under the leadership of the Case CCC.

  9. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  10. ENERGY CENTER OF WISCONSIN

    E-print Network

    ENERGY CENTER OF WISCONSIN Report Summary 210-1 Life-Cycle Energy Costs and Greenhouse Gas ........................................................................................... 14 3.1.3 Reservoir Carbon Emissions

  11. Comprehensive Cancer Center Nutrition

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Comprehensive Cancer Center Nutrition Bldg.Pedestrian Link from Ardmore Tower to Comprehensive Nutrition Education Wing Hanes Bldg. Gray Bldg. Library Creative Communications University Dental Associates

  12. Role of primary surgery in advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Münstedt, Karsten; Franke, Folker E

    2004-01-01

    Background Major issues in surgery for advanced ovarian cancer remain unresolved. Existing treatment guidelines are supported by a few published reports and fewer prospective randomized clinical trials. Methods We reviewed published reports on primary surgical treatment, surgical expertise, inadequate primary surgery/quality assurance, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, interval debulking, and surgical prognostic factors in advanced ovarian cancer to help resolve outstanding issues. Results The aim of primary surgery is a well-planned and complete intervention with optimal staging and surgery. Surgical debulking is worthwhile as there are further effective treatments available to control unresectable residual disease. Patients of gynecologic oncology specialist surgeons have better survival rates. This may reflect a working 'culture' rather than better technical skills. One major problem though, is that despite pleas to restrict surgery to experienced surgeons, specialist centers are often left to cope with the results of inadequate primary surgical resections. Patients with primary chemotherapy or those who have had suboptimal debulking may benefit from interval debulking. A proposal for a better classification of residual tumor is given. Conclusions Optimal surgical interventions have definite role to play in advanced ovarian cancers. Improvements in surgical treatment in the general population will probably improve patients' survival when coupled with improvements in current chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:15461788

  13. Multiobjective location planning for primary medical services in rural Iowa

    SciTech Connect

    Hillsman, E.L.

    1980-01-01

    Developing location plans for primary medical services is a multiobjective location problem. In rural regions, plans must consider both the ability of a location to retain needed health care professionals and the accessibility of service center locations to the rural population. Using township level population data and a model of physician attrition, these objectives were incorporated into a location-allocation model and applied to rural Iowa.

  14. SOUTH ELEVATION OF GOLD HILL MILL, LOOKING NORTH. THE PRIMARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTH ELEVATION OF GOLD HILL MILL, LOOKING NORTH. THE PRIMARY ORE BIN IS A CENTER, WITH A JAW CRUSHER JUST TO THE RIGHT. A CONVEYOR (MISSING) WAS USED TO CARRY CRUSHED ORE UP AND INTO THE SECONDARY ORE BIN. THE STONE RAMP TO THE LEFT OF THE ORE BIN WAS USED TO DRIVE TRUCKS UP TO DUMPING LEVEL. - Gold Hill Mill, Warm Spring Canyon Road, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. Myopathy in primary systemic amyloidosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gertz, M A; Kyle, R A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To define the natural history of primary systemic amyloidosis when muscle involvement is prominent at presentation. METHODS--A retrospective review was carried out of all patients seen at the tertiary referral practice of the Mayo Clinic between 1 January 1960 and 31 December 1994. All patients with primary systemic amyloidosis and proof of amyloid deposits by muscle biopsy were included for analysis. No patients were lost to follow up. RESULTS--Twelve patients were identified with amyloidosis in muscle. Muscle involvement was the most prominent symptom in patients who had widespread visceral involvement, which included the heart, peripheral nerve, and tongue. Of the 12, three had skeletal muscle pseudohypertrophy. All patients had a demonstrable dysproteinaemia by the finding of free light chain in the serum or urine, a discrete monoclonal peak on serum or urine protein electrophoresis, or a monoclonal population of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Measurement of creatine kinase was not a useful test. Of eight patients treated with chemotherapy based on alkylating agents, three responded. The median survival for the entire group was 12 months. CONCLUSIONS--The finding of a monoclonal protein in a patient with muscle weakness is an important clue to the diagnosis of primary systemic amyloidosis. Most patients have visceral involvement outside the musculoskeletal system. A subset of patients seems to respond to systemic chemotherapy. The overall survival, however, remains poor, with most patients dying of cardiac failure. Immunoelectrophoresis of serum and urine should be a routine diagnostic test during the evaluation of myopathy of unknown cause. Images PMID:8648333

  16. Primary lithium cell life studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capulli, John; Donley, Sam; Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, David

    1990-01-01

    One solution for providing a truly independent power source is to package, within the critical subsystem element, a primary battery that can remain dormant for time periods as long as the mission life, which can be 10-15 years, maximum. When primary power from the spacecraft solar array/battery system is interrupted, the backup battery system, which is connected through a diode to the power input line, would automatically support the load to avoid a power interruption to the critical load for a time period long enough to ensure that ground control could access the satellite and correct the anomaly by sending appropriate commands to the spacecraft. Critical subsystems identified for the application are telemetry and command circuits, volatile computer memory, attitude control circuits, and some critical payloads. Due to volume packaging and weight restrictions that exist on most spacecraft, coupled with the long storage periods required, lithium cell technology was selected for the backup power source. Because of the high energy density (200-400 Wh/kg), long shelf life, and load capability, soluble cathode primary lithium technology was chosen. The most important lithium cell properties that require detail characterization for this application are capacity loss, shelf life, and the voltage delay mechanism. These are functions of storage time and temperature. During storage, a passive film builds up on the lithium electrode. The film protects the lithium electrode from progressive capacity decay but requires time to break down when a load is applied. This phenomenon results in a depressed voltage during the period of film breakdown which can last from fractions of a second to minutes.

  17. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia*

    PubMed Central

    Olm, Mary Anne Kowal; Caldini, Elia Garcia; Mauad, Thais

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disorder of ciliary structure or function. It results in mucus accumulation and bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract which leads to chronic upper and lower airway infections, organ laterality defects, and fertility problems. We review the respiratory signs and symptoms of PCD, as well as the screening tests for and diagnostic investigation of the disease, together with details related to ciliary function, ciliary ultrastructure, and genetic studies. In addition, we describe the difficulties in diagnosing PCD by means of transmission electron microscopy, as well as describing patient follow-up procedures. PMID:26176524

  18. JWST Primary Mirror Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Mirror Technology was identified as a (if not the) critical capability necessary to achieve the Level 1 science goals. A never before demonstrated space telescope capability was required: 6 to 8 meter class pri mary mirror, diffraction limited at 2 micrometers and operates at temperatures below 50K. Launch vehicle constraints placed significant architectural constraints: deployed/segmented primary mirror (4.5 meter fairing diameter) 20 kg/m2 areal density (PM 1000 kg mass) Such mirror technology had never been demonstrated - and did not exist

  19. Improving Patient's Primary Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Leguelinel-Blache, Géraldine; Dubois, Florent; Bouvet, Sophie; Roux-Marson, Clarisse; Arnaud, Fabrice; Castelli, Christel; Ray, Valérie; Kinowski, Jean-Marie; Sotto, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quality of transitions of care is one of the first concerns in patient safety. Redesigning the discharge process to incorporate clinical pharmacy activities could reduce the incidence of postdischarge adverse events by improving medication adherence. The present study investigated the value of pharmacist counseling sessions on primary medication adherence after hospital discharge. This study was conducted in a 1844-bed hospital in France. It was divided in an observational period and an interventional period of 3 months each. In both periods, ward-based clinical pharmacists performed medication reconciliation and inpatient follow-up. In interventional period, initial counseling and discharge counseling sessions were added to pharmaceutical care. The primary medication adherence was assessed by calling community pharmacists 7 days after patient discharge. We compared the measure of adherence between the patients from the observational period (n?=?201) and the interventional period (n?=?193). The rate of patients who were adherent increased from 51.0% to 66.7% between both periods (P?primary medication adherence. We identified predictive factors of primary nonadherence in order to target the most eligible patients for discharge counseling sessions. Moreover, implementation of discharge counseling could be facilitated by using Health Information Technology to adapt human resources and select patients at risk of nonadherence. PMID:26469927

  20. Primary Sjögren Syndrome in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun; Li, Ya; Wang, Li; Li, Xiao-Feng; Huang, Ci-Bo; Wang, Guo-Chun; Zhang, Xue-Wu; Zhang, Zhuo-Li; Zhang, Xiao; Xiao, Wei-Guo; Dai, Lie; Wang, Yong-Fu; Hu, Shao-Xian; Li, Hong-Bin; Gong, Lu; Liu, Bin; Sun, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Miao-Jia; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Yong-Zhe; Du, De-Shun; Zhang, Shun-Hua; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The epidemiological characteristics of Sjögren syndrome (SS) are significantly varied in different countries. We conducted the present study to survey the epidemiological characteristics of primary SS in China. We recruited 483 primary SS patients from 16 Chinese medical centers nationwide from January 2009 to November 2011 and assessed salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, organ involvement, and autoimmunity in these patients. The cohort included 456 women and 27 men (ratio, 17:1; mean age at onset, 42?±?11 years; median age at diagnosis, 49 years; range, 41–56 years). Male patients showed a lower frequency of xerophthalmia (37.0% vs 60.7%) and a higher frequency of arthritis (40.7% vs 16.4%). Young-onset patients showed a higher frequency of low C3 levels (57.7% vs 36.3%) and pancytopenia (22.2% vs 8.8%). Patients with systemic involvement had a higher frequency of immunoglobulin A (IgA) (39.4% vs 22.5%) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) (12.4% vs 37.9%). Patients with pulmonary involvement had a higher parotid enlargement (21.4% vs 10.2%), purpura (12.1% vs 5.7%) and higher anti-La/SS-B (61.7% vs 41.8%), immunoglobulin G (IgG) (80.7% vs 64.6%) and IgA (48.9% vs 30.6%) levels. Patients with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies had more frequent exocrine gland symptoms and some extraglandular symptoms and immunological alterations. Compared with previous studies performed in other countries, SS patients in China showed particular clinical manifestation, systemic involvement, and immunological alterations. PMID:25906094