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Sample records for primary proton beamline

  1. Simulations of proton beam characteristics for ELIMED Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psikal, Jan; Limpouch, Jiri; Klimo, Ondrej; Vyskocil, Jiri; Margarone, Daniele; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    ELIMED Beamline should demonstrate the capability of laser-based particle accelerators for medical applications, mainly for proton radiotherapy of tumours which requires a sufficient number of accelerated protons with energy about 60 MeV at least. In this contribution, we study the acceleration of protons by laser pulse with parameters accessible for ELIMED Beamline (intensity ∼ 1022 W/cm2, pulse length ∼ 30 fs). In our two-dimensional particle-incell simulations, we observed higher energies of protons for linear than for circular polarization. Oblique incidence of the laser pulse on target does not seem to be favourable for proton acceleration at such high intensities as the accelerated protons are deflected from target normal axis and their energy and numbers are slightly decreased. The expected numbers of accelerated protons in the energy interval 60 MeV ± 5% are calculated between 109 and 1010 per laser shot with estimated proton beam divergence about 20° (FWHM).

  2. Muon calculations for the polarized proton beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1986-11-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of the muon intensities due to the new polarized proton beam using the program CASIM are reported. Results are reported in terms of tissue absorbed dose per incident proton. (LEW)

  3. A telescope proton recoil spectrometer for fast neutron beam-lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Nocente, M.; Ansell, S.; Frost, C. D.; Gorini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Fast neutron measurements were performed on the VESUVIO beam-line at the ISIS spallation source using a new telescope proton recoil spectrometer. Neutrons interact on a plastic target. Proton production is mainly due to elastic scattering on hydrogen nuclei and secondly due to interaction with carbon nuclei. Recoil protons are measured by a proton spectrometer, which uses in coincidence a 2.54 cm thick YAP scintillator and a 500μm thick silicon detector, measuring the full proton recoil energy and the partial deposited energy in transmission, respectively. Recoil proton spectroscopy measurements (up to Ep = 60MeV) have been interpreted by using Monte Carlo simulations of the beam-line. This instrument is of particular interest for the characterization of the ChipIr beam-line at ISIS, which was designed to feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for the irradiation of micro-electronics.

  4. Leakage and scatter radiation from a double scattering based proton beamline.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Benton, E R; Ghebremedhin, A; Coutrakon, G

    2008-01-01

    Proton beams offer several advantages over conventional radiation techniques for treating cancer and other diseases. These advantages might be negated if the leakage and scatter radiation from the beamline and patient are too large. Although the leakage and scatter radiation for the double scattering proton beamlines at the Loma Linda University Proton Treatment Facility were measured during the acceptance testing that occurred in the early 1990s, recent discussions in the radiotherapy community have prompted a reinvestigation of this contribution to the dose equivalent a patient receives. The dose and dose equivalent delivered to a large phantom patient outside a primary proton field were determined using five methods: simulations using Monte Carlo calculations, measurements with silver halide film, measurements with ionization chambers, measurements with rem meters, and measurements with CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. The Monte Carlo dose distribution was calculated in a coronal plane through the simulated patient that coincided with the central axis of the beam. Measurements with the ionization chambers, rem meters, and plastic nuclear track detectors were made at multiple locations within the same coronal plane. Measurements with the film were done in a plane perpendicular to the central axis of the beam and coincident with the surface of the phantom patient. In general, agreement between the five methods was good, but there were some differences. Measurements and simulations also tended to be in agreement with the original acceptance testing measurements and results from similar facilities published in the literature. Simulations illustrated that most of the neutrons entering the patient are produced in the final patient-specific aperture and precollimator just upstream of the aperture, not in the scattering system. These new results confirm that the dose equivalents received by patients outside the primary proton field from primary particles that leak

  5. Leakage and scatter radiation from a double scattering based proton beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Benton, E. R.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Coutrakon, G.

    2008-01-15

    Proton beams offer several advantages over conventional radiation techniques for treating cancer and other diseases. These advantages might be negated if the leakage and scatter radiation from the beamline and patient are too large. Although the leakage and scatter radiation for the double scattering proton beamlines at the Loma Linda University Proton Treatment Facility were measured during the acceptance testing that occurred in the early 1990s, recent discussions in the radiotherapy community have prompted a reinvestigation of this contribution to the dose equivalent a patient receives. The dose and dose equivalent delivered to a large phantom patient outside a primary proton field were determined using five methods: simulations using Monte Carlo calculations, measurements with silver halide film, measurements with ionization chambers, measurements with rem meters, and measurements with CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. The Monte Carlo dose distribution was calculated in a coronal plane through the simulated patient that coincided with the central axis of the beam. Measurements with the ionization chambers, rem meters, and plastic nuclear track detectors were made at multiple locations within the same coronal plane. Measurements with the film were done in a plane perpendicular to the central axis of the beam and coincident with the surface of the phantom patient. In general, agreement between the five methods was good, but there were some differences. Measurements and simulations also tended to be in agreement with the original acceptance testing measurements and results from similar facilities published in the literature. Simulations illustrated that most of the neutrons entering the patient are produced in the final patient-specific aperture and precollimator just upstream of the aperture, not in the scattering system. These new results confirm that the dose equivalents received by patients outside the primary proton field from primary particles that leak

  6. MARS simulations of the NuMI primary beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Sergei I Striganov

    2004-05-18

    MARS is a Monte Carlo code for simulation of three-dimensional hadronic and electromagnetic cascades, muon and low-energy neutron transport in shielding and in accelerator and detector components in the energy range from a fraction of an eV up to 100 TeV. This report uses MARS to both transport the 120 GeV primary proton beam from the NuMI extraction Lambertsons through the NuMI Pre-target Hall and calculate the radiological effect of beam losses at various locations and for a variety of conditions. These results are used to: anticipate where beam losses will be significant; determine the level of activation of components; and calculate ground water activation and confirm adequacy of shielding. The results are presented in tables and figures along with drawings of the magnets as they were modeled in MARS. Details of the model elements are found in Appendix A. Further details of beam loss case studies are included in Appendix B.

  7. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  8. Design of the LBNF Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, V.; Andrews, R.; Hylen, J.; Kobilarcik, T.; Krafczyk, G.; Marchinonni, A.; Moore, C. D.; Schlabach, P.; Tariq, S.

    2015-08-30

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) will utilize a beamline located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a wide band neutrino beam toward underground detectors placed at the SURF Facility in South Dakota, about 1,300 km away. The main elements of the facility are a primary proton beamline and a neutrino beamline. The primary proton beam (60-120 GeV) will be extracted from the MI-10 section of Fermilab’s Main Injector. Neutrinos are produced after the protons hit a solid target and produce mesons which are subsequently focused by magnetic horns into a 204 m long decay pipe where they decay into muons and neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account the physics goals, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial proton beam power is expected to be 1.2 MW; however, the facility is designed to be upgradeable to 2.4 MW. We discuss here the design status and the associated challenges as well as plans for improvements before baselining the facility.

  9. Design of the LBNE Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; Andrews, Richard; Hylen, James; Kobilarcik, Thomas; Marchionni, Alberto; Moore, Craig D.; Schlabach, Phil; Tariq, Salman

    2015-02-05

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a wide band beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, about 1,300 km away. The main elements of the facility are a primary proton beamline and a neutrino beamline. The primary proton beam (60-120 GeV) will be extracted from the MI-10 section of Fermilab’s Main Injector. Neutrinos are produced after the protons hit a solid target and produce mesons which are sign selected and subsequently focused by a set of magnetic horns into a 204 m long decay pipe where they decay mostly into muons and neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account the physics goals, spacial and radiological constraints, and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~1.2 MW; however, the facility is designed to be upgradeable for 2.3 MW operation. We discuss here the status of the design and the associated challenges.

  10. Dosimetric properties of a proton beamline dedicated to the treatment of ocular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Slopsema, R. L. Mamalui, M.; Yeung, D.; Malyapa, R.; Li, Z.; Zhao, T.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: A commercial proton eyeline has been developed to treat ocular disease. Radiotherapy of intraocular lesions (e.g., uveal melanoma, age-related macular degeneration) requires sharp dose gradients to avoid critical structures like the macula and optic disc. A high dose rate is needed to limit patient gazing times during delivery of large fractional dose. Dose delivery needs to be accurate and predictable, not in the least because current treatment planning algorithms have limited dose modeling capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to determine the dosimetric properties of a new proton eyeline. These properties are compared to those of existing systems and evaluated in the context of the specific clinical requirements of ocular treatments. Methods: The eyeline is part of a high-energy, cyclotron-based proton therapy system. The energy at the entrance of the eyeline is 105 MeV. A range modulator (RM) wheel generates the spread-out Bragg peak, while a variable range shifter system adjusts the range and spreads the beam laterally. The range can be adjusted from 0.5 up to 3.4 g/cm{sup 2}; the modulation width can be varied in steps of 0.3 g/cm{sup 2} or less. Maximum field diameter is 2.5 cm. All fields can be delivered with a dose rate of 30 Gy/min or more. The eyeline is calibrated according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol using a cylindrical ionization chamber. Depth dose distributions and dose/MU are measured with a parallel-plate ionization chamber; lateral profiles with radiochromic film. The dose/MU is modeled as a function of range, modulation width, and instantaneous MU rate with fit parameters determined per option (RM wheel). Results: The distal fall-off of the spread-out Bragg peak is 0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, larger than for most existing systems. The lateral penumbra varies between 0.9 and 1.4 mm, except for fully modulated fields that have a larger penumbra at skin. The source-to-axis distance is found to be 169 cm. The dose/MU shows a strong dependence

  11. Nuclide production by primary cosmic-ray protons

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in the solar system and in interstellar space were calculated for the primary protons in the galactic and solar cosmic rays. At 1 AU, the long-term average fluxes of solar protons usually produce many more atoms of a cosmogenic nuclide than the primary protons in the galactic cosmic rays (GCR), the exceptions being nuclides made only by high-energy reactions (like /sup 10/Be). Because the particle fluxes inside meteorites and other large objects in space include many secondary neutrons, the production rates are much higher and ratios inside large objects are often very different from those by just the primary GCR protons in small objects. The production rates of cosmogenic nuclides are calculated to vary by about factors of 2.5 during at typical 11-year solar cycle, in agreement with measurements of short-lived radionuclides in recently fallen meteorites. The production of cosmogenic nuclides by the GCR particles outside the heliosphere is higher than that by the modulated GCR primaries normally in the solar system. However, there is considerable uncertainty in the fluxes of interstellar protons and, therefore, in the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in interstellar space. Production rates and ratios for cosmogenic nuclides would be able to identify particles that were small in space or that were exposed to an unmodulated spectrum of GCR particles. 25 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Neutrinos from the primary proton-proton fusion process in the Sun.

    PubMed

    2014-08-28

    In the core of the Sun, energy is released through sequences of nuclear reactions that convert hydrogen into helium. The primary reaction is thought to be the fusion of two protons with the emission of a low-energy neutrino. These so-called pp neutrinos constitute nearly the entirety of the solar neutrino flux, vastly outnumbering those emitted in the reactions that follow. Although solar neutrinos from secondary processes have been observed, proving the nuclear origin of the Sun's energy and contributing to the discovery of neutrino oscillations, those from proton-proton fusion have hitherto eluded direct detection. Here we report spectral observations of pp neutrinos, demonstrating that about 99 per cent of the power of the Sun, 3.84 × 10(33) ergs per second, is generated by the proton-proton fusion process. PMID:25164748

  13. Study of the production yields of 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O positron emitters from plasma-laser proton sources at ELI-Beamlines for labeling of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Margarone, Daniele; Pagano, Benedetta; Baldari, Sergio; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of microfluidics labeling approaches. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources such that expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility. 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O production yields were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account the broad proton spectra expected. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of 18F-, 11C- and 13N-labeled radiopharmaceuticals exploiting fast and efficient microfluidic labeling systems.

  14. Transport from the Recycler Ring to the Antiproton Source Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    In the post-NOvA era, the protons are directly transported from the Booster ring to the Recycler ring rather than the Main Injector. For Mu2e and g-2 project, the Debuncher ring will be modified into a Delivery ring to deliver the protons to both Mu2e and g-2 experiments. Therefore, it requires the transport of protons from the Recycler Ring to the Delivery ring. A new transfer line from the Recycler ring to the P1 beamline will be constructed to transport proton beam from the Recycler Ring to existing Antiproton Source beamlines. This new beamline provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. This paper presents the Conceptual Design of this new beamline.

  15. Preliminary shielding assessment for the 100 MeV proton linac (KOMAC).

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Ouk; Cho, Y S; Chang, J

    2005-01-01

    The Proton Engineering Frontier Project is building the Korea Multipurpose Accelerator Complex facilities from 2002 to 2012, which consists of a high-current 100 MeV proton linear accelerator and various beam-lines. This paper provides a preliminary estimate of the shielding required for the 20 mA proton linac and the beam-dump. For an accurate information on secondary neutron production from the guiding magnet and primary heat sink of the beam dump, proton-induced 63Cu and 65Cu cross section data were evaluated and applied to shielding calculations. The required thickness of the concrete was assessed by a simple line-of-sight model for the lateral shielding of the beam-line and the full shielding of the beam dump. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed using the MCNPX code to obtain the source term and attenuation coefficients for the three-dimensional lateral shielding model of the beam-line. PMID:16381787

  16. Design and Simulation of the nuSTORM Pion Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Bross, A.

    2015-08-15

    The nuSTORM (neutrinos from STORed Muons) proposal presents a detailed design for a neutrino facility based on a muon storage ring, with muon decay in the production straight section of the ring providing well defined neutrino beams. The facility includes a primary high-energy proton beam line, a target station with pion production and collection, and a pion beamline for pion transportation and injection into a muon decay ring. The nuSTORM design uses “stochastic injection”, in which pions are directed by a chicane, referred to as the Orbit Combination Section (OCS), into the production straight section of the storage ring. Pions that decay within that straight section provide muons within the circulating acceptance of the ring. Furthermore, the design enables injection without kickers or a separate pion decay transport line. The beam line that the pions traverse before being extracted from the decay ring is referred to as the pion beamline. Our paper describes the design and simulation of the pion beamline, and includes full beam dynamics simulations of the system.

  17. Design and Simulation of the nuSTORM Pion Beamline

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Bross, A.

    2015-08-15

    The nuSTORM (neutrinos from STORed Muons) proposal presents a detailed design for a neutrino facility based on a muon storage ring, with muon decay in the production straight section of the ring providing well defined neutrino beams. The facility includes a primary high-energy proton beam line, a target station with pion production and collection, and a pion beamline for pion transportation and injection into a muon decay ring. The nuSTORM design uses “stochastic injection”, in which pions are directed by a chicane, referred to as the Orbit Combination Section (OCS), into the production straight section of the storage ring. Pionsmore » that decay within that straight section provide muons within the circulating acceptance of the ring. Furthermore, the design enables injection without kickers or a separate pion decay transport line. The beam line that the pions traverse before being extracted from the decay ring is referred to as the pion beamline. Our paper describes the design and simulation of the pion beamline, and includes full beam dynamics simulations of the system.« less

  18. Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the nasolacrimal duct treated with proton beam therapy.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kota; Arai, Chiaki; Suda, Toshihito; Nagaoka, Masato; Shimura, Eiji; Yanagisawa, Sawako; Edamatsu, Hideo

    2015-12-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the lacrimal passage, particularly of the nasolacrimal duct, are rare. We describe a 72-year-old woman who presented with lacrimation 5 years previously. She had pain and bloody and purulent lacrimation, and a mass was identified in the inferior meatus. Accordingly, she was diagnosed with primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the nasolacrimal duct. She was treated with proton beam therapy and showed a favorable response. Owing to the long-term risks of recurrence and distant metastasis, adenoid cystic carcinoma requires sufficient follow-up. PMID:25998851

  19. Radiation field characterization and shielding studies for the ELI Beamlines facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, A.; Amato, E.; Margarone, D.; Cowan, T.; Korn, G.

    2013-05-01

    The ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure) Beamlines facility in the Czech Republic, which is planned to complete the installation in 2015, is one of the four pillars of the ELI European project. Several laser beamlines with ultrahigh intensities and ultrashort pulses are foreseen, offering versatile radiation sources in an unprecedented energy range: laser-driven particle beams are expected to range between 1 and 50 GeV for electrons and from 100 MeV up to 3 GeV for protons. The number of particles delivered per laser shot is estimated to be 109-1010 for the electron beams and 1010-1012 for the proton beams. The high energy and current values of the produced particles, together with the potentiality to operate at 10 Hz laser repetition rate, require an accurate study of the primary and secondary radiation fields to optimize appropriate shielding solutions: this is a key issue to minimize prompt and residual doses in order to protect the personnel, reduce the radiation damage of electronic devices and avoid strong limitations in the operational time. A general shielding study for the 10 PW (0.016 Hz) and 2 PW (10 Hz) laser beamlines is presented here. Starting from analytical calculations, as well as from dedicated simulations, the main electron and proton fields produced in the laser-matter interaction have been described and used to characterize the "source terms" in full simulations with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. The secondary radiation fields have been then analyzed to assess a proper shielding. The results of this study and the proposed solutions for the beam dumps of the high energy beamlines, together with a cross-check analysis performed with the Monte Carlo code GEANT4, are presented.

  20. Proton/sodium pumping pyrophosphatases: the last of the primary ion pumps.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jia-Yin; Kellosalo, Juho; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Goldman, Adrian

    2014-08-01

    Membrane-bound pyrophosphatases (M-PPases) are homodimeric enzymes that couple the generation and utilization of membrane potentials to pyrophosphate (PPi) hydrolysis and synthesis. Since the discovery of the link between PPi use and proton transport in purple, non-sulphur bacteria in the 1960s, M-PPases have been found in all three domains of life and have been shown to have a crucial role in stress tolerance and in plant maturation. The discovery of sodium-pumping and sodium/proton-pumping M-PPases showed that the pumping specificity of these enzymes is not limited to protons, further suggesting that M-PPases are evolutionarily very ancient. The recent structures of two M-PPases, the Vigna radiata H(+)-pumping M-PPase and Thermotoga maritima Na(+)-pumping M-PPase, provide the basis for understanding the functional data. They show that M-PPases have a novel fold and pumping mechanism, different to the other primary pumps. This review discusses the current structural understanding of M-PPases and of ion selection among various M-PPases. PMID:24768824

  1. Terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin reveals correlated primary electron and proton transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Groma, G. I.; Hebling, J.; Kozma, I. Z.; Váró, G.; Hauer, J.; Kuhl, J.; Riedle, E.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of electrogenic events associated with the different steps of the light-induced proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin is well studied in a wide range of time scales by direct electric methods. However, the investigation of the fundamental primary charge translocation phenomena taking place in the functional energy conversion process of this protein, and in other biomolecular assemblies using light energy, has remained experimentally unfeasible because of the lack of proper detection technique operating in the 0.1- to 20-THz region. Here, we show that extending the concept of the familiar Hertzian dipole emission into the extreme spatial and temporal range of intramolecular polarization processes provides an alternative way to study ultrafast electrogenic events on naturally ordered biological systems. Applying a relatively simple experimental arrangement based on this idea, we were able to observe light-induced coherent terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin with femtosecond time resolution. The detected terahertz signal was analyzed by numerical simulation in the framework of different models for the elementary polarization processes. It was found that the principal component of the terahertz emission can be well described by excited-state intramolecular electron transfer within the retinal chromophore. An additional slower process is attributed to the earliest phase of the proton pump, probably occurring by the redistribution of a H bond near the retinal. The correlated electron and proton translocation supports the concept, assigning a functional role to the light-induced sudden polarization in retinal proteins. PMID:18456840

  2. Use of primary cell cultures to measure the late effects in the skins of rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.; Lett, J. T.

    Previous pilot investigations of the uses of primary cell cultures to study late damage in stem cells of the skin of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit and the rhesus monkey /1-3/, have been extended to individual monkeys exposed to 55 MeV protons. Protons of this energy have a larger range in tissue of (~2.6 cm) than the 32 MeV protons (~0.9 cm) to which the animals in our earlier studies had been exposed. Although the primary emphases in the current studies were improvement and simplification in the techniques and logistics of transportation of biopsies to a central analytical facility, comparison of the quantitative measurements obtained thus far for survival of stem cells in the skins from animals irradiated 21 years ago reveals that the effects of both proton energies are similar.

  3. Design, Installation, and Initial Commissioning of the MTA Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Craig; Anderson, John; Garcia, Fernanda; Gerardi, Michael; Johnstone, Carol; Kobilarcik, Thomas; Kucera, Michael; Kufer, Mathew; Newhart, Duane; Rakhno, Igor; Vogel, Gregory; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    A new experimental area designed to develop, test and verify muon ionization cooling apparatus using the 400-MeV Fermilab Linac proton beam has been fully installed and is presently being commissioned. Initially, this area was used for cryogenic tests of liquid-hydrogen absorbers for the MUCOOL R&D program and, now, for high-power beam tests of absorbers, high-gradient rf cavities in the presence of magnetic fields (including gas-filled cavities), and other prototype muon-cooling apparatus. The experimental scenarios being developed for muon facilities involve collection, capture, and cooling of large-emittance, high-intensity muon beams--{approx}10{sup 13} muons, so that conclusive tests of the apparatus require full Linac beam, which is 1.6 x 10{sup 13} p/pulse. To support the muon cooling facility, this new primary beamline extracts and transports beam directly from the Linac to the test facility. The design concept for the MuCool facility is taken from an earlier proposal [1], but modifications were necessary to accommodate high-intensity beam, cryogenics, and the increased scale of the cooling experiments. Further, the line incorporates a specialized section and utilizes a different mode of operation to provide precision measurements of Linac beam parameters. This paper reports on the technical details of the MuCool beamline for both modes.

  4. Hutch for CSX Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Ed Haas

    2012-12-12

    NSLS-II will produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than NSLS. To keep people safe from intense x-rays in the new facility, special enclosures, called hutches, will surround particular sections of beamlines.

  5. G4beamline

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-05-24

    G4beamline is a single-particle-tracking simulation code based on the Geant4 toolkit. It is specifically optimized for the realistic evaluation of beam lines. It is especially useful for evaluating future muon facilities.

  6. Hutch for CSX Beamlines

    ScienceCinema

    Ed Haas

    2013-07-17

    NSLS-II will produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than NSLS. To keep people safe from intense x-rays in the new facility, special enclosures, called hutches, will surround particular sections of beamlines.

  7. Monte Carlo study of radial energy deposition from primary and secondary particles for narrow and large proton beamlet source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeler, Christopher R.; Titt, Uwe

    2012-06-01

    In spot-scanning intensity-modulated proton therapy, numerous unmodulated proton beam spots are delivered over a target volume to produce a prescribed dose distribution. To accurately model field size-dependent output factors for beam spots, the energy deposition at positions radial to the central axis of the beam must be characterized. In this study, we determined the difference in the central axis dose for spot-scanned fields that results from secondary particle doses by investigating energy deposition radial to the proton beam central axis resulting from primary protons and secondary particles for mathematical point source and distributed source models. The largest difference in the central axis dose from secondary particles resulting from the use of a mathematical point source and a distributed source model was approximately 0.43%. Thus, we conclude that the central axis dose for a spot-scanned field is effectively independent of the source model used to calculate the secondary particle dose.

  8. The SLS optics beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, U.; Abela, R.; Betemps, R.; Blumer, H.; Frank, K.; Jaggi, A.; MacDowell A.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Schonherr, V.; Ulrich, J.; Walther, H.; Zelenika, S.; Zumbach, C.

    2006-05-20

    A multipurpose beamline for tests and developments in the field of x-ray optics and synchrotron radiation instrumentation in general is under construction at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) bending magnet X05DA. The beamline uses a newly developed UHV compatible, 100 mm thick, brazed CVD diamond vacuum window. The very compact cryogenically cooled channel cut Si(111) monochromator and bendable 1:1 toroidal focusing mirror at 7:75 m from the source point are installed inside the shielding tunnel. The beamline covers a photon energy range of about 6 to 17 keV.We expect 5x1011 photons=s within a 100 mu m spot and a resolving power of 1300. The monochromator and focusing mirror can be retracted independently for unfocused monochromatic and focused ''white'' light operation respectively.

  9. The SLS Optics Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, U.; Abela, R.; Betemps, R.; Blumer, H.; Jaggi, A.; Schoenherr, V.; Ulrich, J.; Walther, H.; Zumbach, C.; Frank, K.; MacDowell, A. A.; Padmore, H. A.; Zelenika, S.

    2007-01-19

    A multipurpose beamline for tests and developments in the field of x-ray optics and synchrotron radiation instrumentation in general is under construction at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) bending magnet X05DA. The beamline uses a newly developed UHV compatible, 100 {mu}m thick, brazed CVD diamond vacuum window. The very compact cryogenically cooled channel cut Si(111) monochromator and bendable 1:1 toroidal focusing mirror at 7.75m from the source point are installed inside the shielding tunnel. The beamline covers a photon energy range of about 6 to 17 keV. We expect 5 {center_dot} 1011 photons/s within a 100 {mu}m spot and a resolving power of 1300. The monochromator and focusing mirror can be retracted independently for unfocused monochromatic and focused ''white'' light operation respectively.

  10. Nomenclature of SLC Arc beamline components

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.; Weng, W.T.

    1986-04-10

    This note defines I and C formal names for beamline components in the Arc as specified in the TRANSPORT decks ARCN FINAL and ARCS FINAL of June 5, 1985. The formal name consists of three fields: the primary name, the zone and the unit number. The general principles and guidelines are explained in Reference 1. The rationale and the final resolutions of the naming conventions for the Arc are explained.

  11. Automatic beamline calibration procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, W.J.; Lee, M.J.; Zambre, Y.

    1992-03-01

    Recent experience with the SLC and SPEAR accelerators have led to a well-defined set of procedures for calibration of the beamline model using the orbit fitting program, RESOLVE. Difference orbit analysis is used to calibrate quadrupole strengths, BPM sensitivities, corrector strengths, focusing effects from insertion devices, and to determine the source of dispersion and coupling errors. Absolute orbit analysis is used to locate quadrupole misalignments, BPM offsets, or beam loss. For light source applications, the photon beam source coordinates can be found. The result is an accurate model of the accelerator which can be used for machine control. In this paper, automatable beamline calibration procedures are outlined and illustrated with recent examples. 5 refs.

  12. The Energetics of the Primary Proton Transfer in Bacteriorhodopsin Revisited: It is a Sequential Light Induced Charge Separation After All

    PubMed Central

    Braun-Sand, Sonja; Sharma, Pankaz K.; Chu, Zhen T.; Pisliakov, Andrei V.; Warshel, Arieh

    2008-01-01

    The light induced proton transport in bacteriorhodopsin has been considered as a model for other light-induced proton pumps. However, the exact nature of this process is still unclear. For example, it is not entirely clear what the driving force of the initial proton transfer is and, in particular, whether it reflects electrostatic forces or other effects. The present work simulates the primary proton transfer (PT) by a specialized combination of the EVB and the QCFF/PI methods. This combination allows us to obtain sufficient sampling and a quantitative free energy profile for the PT at different protein configurations. The calculated profiles provide new insight about energetics of the primary PT and its coupling to the protein conformational changes. The present finding confirms the tentative analysis of our early work [1] and determines that the overall PT process is driven by the energetics of the charge separation between the Schiff base and its counterion Asp85. Apparently, the light-induced relaxation of the steric energy of the chromophore leads to an increase in the ion-pair distance, and this drives the PT process. Our use of the linear response approximation allows us to estimate the change in the protein conformational energy and provides the first computational description of the coupling between the protein structural changes and the PT process. It is also found that the PT is not driven by twist-modulated changes of the Schiff base’s pKa, changes in the hydrogen bond directionality, or other non-electrostatic effects. Overall, based on a consistent use of structural information as the starting point for converging free-energy calculations, we conclude that the primary event should be described as a light-induced formation of an unstable ground state, whose relaxation leads to charge separation and to the destabilization of the ion-pair state. This provides the driving force for the subsequent PT steps. PMID:18387356

  13. Upgrades to the Fermilab NuMI beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Michael A.; Childress, Sam; Grossman, Nancy; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Marchionni, Alberto; McCluskey, Elaine; Moore, Craig Damon; Reilly, Robert; Tariq, Salman; Wehmann, Alan; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The NuMI beamline at Fermilab has been delivering high-intensity muon neutrino beams to the MINOS experiment since the spring of 2005. A total of 3.4 x 10{sup 20} protons has been delivered to the NuMI target and a maximum beam power of 320 kW has been achieved. An upgrade of the NuMI facility increasing the beam power capability to 700 kW is planned as part of the NOvA experiment. The plans for this upgrade are presented and the possibility of upgrading the NuMI beamline to handle 1.2 MW is considered.

  14. Performance measurements at the SLS SIM beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, U.; Nolting, F.; Fraile Rodriguez, A.; Krempasky, J.; Quitmann, C.; Schmidt, T.; Spielmann, S.; Zimoch, D.

    2010-06-23

    The Surface/Interface: Microscopy beamline of the Swiss Light Source started operation in 2001. In 2007 the beamline has been significantly upgraded with a second refocusing section and a blazed grating optimized for high photon flux. Two Apple II type undulators with a plane grating monochromator using the collimated light scheme deliver photons with an energy from 90eV to about 2keV with variable polarization for the photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) as the primary user station. We measured a focus of (45x60) {mu}m({nu}xh) and a photon flux > 10{sup 12} photon/s for all gratings. Polarization switching within a few seconds is realized with the small bandpass of the monochromator and a slight detuning of the undulator.

  15. A modular optics design for the LBNE beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, John A.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Protons extracted from the Main Injector (MI) in the MI-60 straight section are transported 84 m through quadrupole Q106 in the NuMI stub, at which point two 6-3-120 vertical switching magnets, followed by three EPB vertical dipoles, steer the beam into the main body of the LBNE beamline. From Q106 in NuMI the LBNE beamline transports these protons 722.0 m to the LBNE target, located 41.77 m (137.0 ft) below the MI beamline center (BLC) elevation, on a trajectory aimed towards DUSEL. Bending is provided (predominantly) by 34 long (6 m) MI-style IDA/IDB and 8 short (4 m) IDC/IDD dipoles [through 48.36{sup o} horizontally and -5.844{sup o} (net) vertically]. Optical properties are defined by 49 quadrupoles (grouped functionally into 44 focusing centers) of the proven MI beamline-style 3Q60/3Q120 series. All focusing centers are equipped with redesigned MI-style IDS orbit correctors and dual-plane beam position monitors (BPM's). Ample space is available in each arc cell to accommodate ion pumps and diagnostic instrumentation. Parameters of the main magnets are listed in a table.

  16. PLS photoemission electron microscopy beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tai-Hee; Kim, Ki-jeong; Hwang, C. C.; Rah, S.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, Bongsoo

    2001-07-01

    The performance of a recently commissioned beamline at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) is described. The beamline, which is located at 4B1 at PLS, is a Varied Line Spacing (VLS) Plane Grating Monochromator (PGM) beamline. VLS PGM has become very popular because of the simple scanning mechanism and the fixed exit slit. The beamline which takes 3 mrad horizontal beam fan from bending magnet, covers the energy range 200-1000 eV for Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) experiments. Simplicity of the optics and high flux with medium resolution were the design goals for these applications. The beamline consists of a horizontal focusing mirror, a vertical focusing mirror, VLS plane grating and exit slit. The source of PLS could be used as a virtual entrance slit because of its small size and stability. The flux and the resolution of the beamline at the experimental station have been measured using an ion chamber and a calibrated photodiode. Test images of PEEM from a standard sample were taken to illustrate the further performance of the beamline and PEEM station.

  17. Primary and secondary particle contributions to the depth dose distribution in a phantom shielded from solar flare and Van Allen protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, R. T.; Claiborne, H. C.; Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been made using the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC to estimate the absorbed dose and dose equivalent distributions in astronauts inside space vehicles bombarded by solar flare and Van Allen protons. A spherical shell shield of specific radius and thickness with a 30-cm-diam. tissue ball at the geometric center was used to simulate the spacecraft-astronaut configuration. The absorbed dose and the dose equivalent from primary protons, secondary protons, heavy nuclei, charged pions, muons, photons, and positrons and electrons are given as a function of depth in the tissue phantom. Results are given for solar flare protons with a characteristic rigidity of 100 MV and for Van Allen protons in a 240-nautical-mile circular orbit at 30 degree inclination angle incident on both 20-g/sq cm-thick aluminum and polyethylene spherical shell shields.

  18. Advanced light source vacuum policy and vacuum guidelines for beamlines and experiment endstations

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to: (1) Explain the ALS vacuum policy and specifications for beamlines and experiment endstations. (2) Provide guidelines related to ALS vacuum policy to assist in designing beamlines which are in accordance with ALS vacuum policy. This document supersedes LSBL-116. The Advanced Light Source is a third generation synchrotron radiation source whose beam lifetime depends on the quality of the vacuum in the storage ring and the connecting beamlines. The storage ring and most of the beamlines share a common vacuum and are operated under ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions. All endstations and beamline equipment must be operated so as to avoid contamination of beamline components, and must include proper safeguards to protect the storage ring vacuum from an accidental break in the beamline or endstation vacuum systems. The primary gas load during operation is due to thermal desorption and electron/photon induced desorption of contaminants from the interior of the vacuum vessel and its components. The desorption rates are considerably higher for hydrocarbon contamination, thus considerable emphasis is placed on eliminating these sources of contaminants. All vacuum components in a beamline and endstation must meet the ALS vacuum specifications. The vacuum design of both beamlines and endstations must be approved by the ALS Beamline Review Committee (BRC) before vacuum connections to the storage ring are made. The vacuum design is first checked during the Beamline Design Review (BDR) held before construction of the beamline equipment begins. Any deviation from the ALS vacuum specifications must be approved by the BRC prior to installation of the equipment on the ALS floor. Any modification that is incorporated into a vacuum assembly without the written approval of the BRC is done at the user`s risk and may lead to rejection of the whole assembly.

  19. First Infrared Predissociation Spectra of He-TAGGED Protonated Primary Alcohols at 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Alexander; Redlich, Britta; Oomens, J.; Asvany, Oskar; Brünken, Sandra; Jusko, Pavol; Thorwirth, Sven; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Cryogenic multipole ion traps have become popular devices in the development of sensitive action-spectroscopic techniques. The low ion temperature leads to enhanced spectral resolution, and less congested spectra. In the early 2000s, a 22-pole ion trap was coupled to the Free-Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX), yielding infrared Laser Induced Reaction (LIR) spectra of the molecular ions C_2H_2+ and CH_5+. This pioneering work showed the great opportunities combining cold mass-selected molecular ions with widely tunable broadband IR radiation. In the past year a cryogenic (T>3.9 K) 22-pole ion trap designed and built in Cologne (FELion) has been successfully coupled to FELIX, which in its current configuration provides continuously tunable infrared radiation from 3 μm to 150 μm, hence allowing to probe characteristic vibrational spectra in the so-called "fingerprint region" with a sufficient spectral energy density also allowing for multiple photon processes (IR-MPD). Here we present the first infrared predissociation spectra of He-tagged protonated methanol and ethanol (MeOH_2+/EtOH_2+) stored at 4 K. These vibrational spectra were recorded with both a commercial OPO and FELIX, covering a total spectral range from 3700 wn to 550 wn at a spectral resolution of a few wn. The H-O-H stretching and bending modes clearly distinguish the protonated alcohols from their neutral analoga. For EtOH_2+, also IR-MPD spectra of the bare ion could be recorded. The symmetric and antisymmetric H-O-H stretching bands at around 3 μm show no significant shift within the given spectral resolution in comparison to those recorded with He predissociation, indicating a rather small perturbation caused by the attached He. The vibrational bands were assigned using quantum-chemical calculations on different levels of theory. The computed frequencies correspond favorably to the experimental spectra. Subsequent high resolution measurements could lead to a better structural

  20. SRI CAT Section 1 bending magnet beamline description

    SciTech Connect

    Srajer, G.; Rodricks, B.; Assoufid, L.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-03-10

    This report discusses: APS bending magnet source; beamline layout; beamline optical components; beamline operation; time-resolved studies station; polarization studies station; and commissioning and operational schedule.

  1. Rigidity Spectra of Primary Protons and Different Classes of Galactic Cosmic Ray Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alania, Michael; Modzelewska, Renata; Siluszyk, Marek; Gil, Agnieszka; Wawrzynczak-Szaban, Anna; Iskra, Krzysztof

    We study changes of proton spectra of Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) in free space for various minimum and near minimum epochs of 21/22, 22/23/ and 23/24 solar activity using data of different space probes. There are distinctions for positive (A>0) and negative (A<0) polarity epochs demonstrating a soft proton spectra for A<0 polarity epochs. We ascribe it to the increase of parallel and drift diffusion coefficients for the A<0 minimum epochs. We calculate rigidity spectra of long period variations of the GCR intensity using neutron monitors (NMs) and muon telescopes (MTs) data. We find that rigidity spectra of the GCR intensity variations are gradually hardening before and after reaching the maximum of the GCR intensity for all considered 21/22, 22/23/ and 23/24 minimum epochs of solar activity. In these periods an increase of the exponent nu of the Power Spectral Density (PSD) of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) turbulence is observed confirming a validity of the quasi linear theory to describe a propagation of GCR to which NMs and MTs respond. We also study rigidity dependencies of the amplitudes of Forbush degreases and 27-day variations of the GCR intensity. We compare results of 2-D and 3-D modeling of GCR transport with the experimental data in free space (interplanetary space) and at earth orbit. We conclude that in formation of the rigidity spectrum of 11-year, 27-days and Forbush decreases measured by NMs and MTs at earth’s orbit a crucial role belongs to the character of the dependence of diffusion coefficient on the GCR particle’s rigidity, i.e. to the structure of the IMF turbulence.

  2. SPring-8 Structural Biology Beamlines / Automatic Beamline Operation at RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Go; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Okazaki, Nobuo; Sakai, Hisanobu; Kumasaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2007-01-19

    RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamlines (BL26B1 and BL26B2) at SPring-8 have been constructed for high throughput protein crystallography. The beamline operation is automated cooperating with the sample changer robot. The operation software provides a centralized control utilizing the client and server architecture. The sample management system with the networked database has been implemented to accept dry-shipped crystals from distant users.

  3. The Stepwise Protonation and Electron-Transfer Reduction of a Primary Copper-Dioxygen Adduct

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Ryan L.; Ginsbach, Jake W.; Cowley, Ryan E.; Qayyum, Munzarin F.; Himes, Richard A.; Siegler, Maxime A.; Moore, Cathy D.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Solomon, Edward I.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The protonation-reduction of a dioxygen adduct with [LCuI][B(C6F5)4], cupric superoxo complex [LCuII(O2•−)]+ (1), (L=TMG3tren(1,1,1-tris[2-[N2-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidino)]ethyl]amine)), has been investigated. Trifluoroacetic acid (HOAcF) reversibly associates with the superoxo ligand in ([LCuII(O2•−)]+) in a 1:1 adduct [LCuII(O2•−)(HOAcF)]+ (2), as characterized by UV-visible, resonance Raman (rR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies, along with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Chemical studies reveal that for the binding of HOAcF with 1 to give 2, Keq = 1.2×105 M−1 (−130 °C) and ΔH° = − 6.9(7) kcal/mol, ΔS° = − 26(4) cal/mol•K). Vibrational (rR) data reveal a significant increase (29 cm−1) in νO-O (= 1149 cm−1) compared to that known for [LCuII(O2•−)]+ (1). Along with results obtained from XAS and DFT calculations, hydrogen bonding of HOAcF to a superoxo O-atom in 2 is established. NMR spectroscopy of 2 at −120 °C in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran are also consistent with 1/HOAcF = 1:1 formulation 2 and that this complex possesses a triplet (S = 1) ground state electronic configuration, as previously determined for 1. The pre-equilibrium acid association to 1 is followed by outer-sphere electron-transfer reduction of 2 by decamethylferrocene (Me10Fc) or octamethylferrocene (Me8Fc), leading to the products H2O2, the corresponding ferrocenium salt and [LCuII(OAcF)]+. Second-order rate constants for electron transfer (ket) were determined to be 1365 M−1 s−1 (Me10Fc) and 225 M−1 s−1 (Me8Fc) at −80 °C. The (bio)chemical relevance of the proton-triggered reduction of the metal-bound dioxygen-derived fragment is discussed. PMID:24164682

  4. The Scanning Nanoprobe Beamline Nanoscopium at Synchrotron Soleil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Kewish, C. M.; Polack, F.; Moreno, T.

    2011-09-01

    The Nanoscopium beamline at Synchrotron Soleil will offer advanced scanning-based hard x-ray imaging techniques in the 5- to 20-keV energy range, for user communities working in the earth, environmental, and life sciences. Two dedicated end stations will exploit x-ray coherence to produce images in which contrast is based on a range of physical processes. In the first experiment hutch, coherent scatter imaging techniques will produce images in which contrast arises from spatial variations in the complex refractive index, and orientation in the nanostructure of samples. In the second experiment hutch, elemental mapping will be carried out at the trace (ppm) level by scanning x-ray fluorescence, speciation mapping by XANES, and phase gradient mapping by scanning differential phase contrast imaging. The beamline aims to reach sub-micrometric, down to 30 nm, spatial resolution. This ˜155-meter-long beamline will share the straight section with a future tomography beamline by using canted undulators having 6.5-mrad separation angle. The optical design of Nanoscopium aims to reduce the effect of instabilities on the probing nanobeam by utilizing an all-horizontal geometry for the reflections of the primary beamline mirrors, which focus onto a slit, creating an over-filled secondary source. Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors and Fresnel zone plates will be used as focusing devices in the experiment hutches. Nanoscopium is expected to commence user operation in 2013.

  5. High power photon beamline elements in the LBL/SSRL/EXXON Beamline VI

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.

    1992-09-01

    Beamline VI is a wiggler-based, multi-kilowatt, intense synchrotron radiation beamline installed SPEAR. The thermal design parameters for this beamline are presented and then design considerations and construction descriptions are given for many of the high-power photon beamline elements.

  6. Experimental feature in the primary-proton flux at energies above 10 TeV according to the results of searches for primary particles in nuclear emulsions exposed in the stratosphere (RUNJOB Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2008-02-15

    In the RUNJOB experiment, a long-term exposure of x-ray emulsion chambers in the stratosphere from 1995 to 1999 with the aim of studying the composition and spectra of primary cosmic particles in the energy range 10-1000 TeV per nucleon revealed about 50% proton tracks. The remaining events of the proton group did not feature any candidate for a track of a singly charged particle within the search region determined from measurements of the coordinates of background nuclei going close to the sought track. Methodological factors that could explain this experimental observation are considered. A possible physical reason associated with the presence of a neutral component in the flux of primary protons in the energy region above 10 TeV is also analyzed.

  7. VESPERS: A Beamline for Combined XRF and XRD Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Renfei; Gerson, Andrea; Ice, Gene; Reininger, Ruben; Yates, Brian; McIntyre, Stewart

    2007-01-01

    VESPERS (VEry Sensitive Elemental and Structural Probe Employing Radiation from a Synchrotron) is a bending magnet beamline that is just beginning construction at the Canadian Light Source. The beamline has several novel design elements that are intended to increase its operating flexibility and availability to users. First, there is a requirement to deliver a microscopic beam with a variable bandwidth, thus enabling the generation of Laue diffraction patterns and high yield X-ray fluorescence spectra from the same region preferably simultaneously. Thus, the bandpass of the VESPERS monochromator can be readily changed to focus radiation into the same 2-4 micron diameter area that is either polychromatic or having a bandwidth of 10%, 1.6% or 0.01%. This allows the user to change the diffraction pattern to suit the complexity of the crystal and the spectral signal to noise ratio to suit the detection sensitivity required. Second, the beamline is designed to have two branches capable of operating simultaneously and virtually independently using the same primary optics. These design features are accomplished using four separate beams originating at four pinholes at the entry to the Primary Optical Enclosure. The compound focus design uses spherical mirrors to focus both polychromatic and pre-monochromatic beams onto the intermediate slits. A pair of bendable K-B mirrors in the experimental hutch is used to demagnify the beam further down to micron size. The photon energy of this beamline is 6-30 keV.

  8. VESPERS: A Beamline for Combined XRF and XRD Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Renfei; Yates, Brian; Gerson, Andrea; Ice, Gene; Reininger, Ruben; McIntyre, Stewart

    2007-01-19

    VESPERS (VEry Sensitive Elemental and Structural Probe Employing Radiation from a Synchrotron) is a bending magnet beamline that is just beginning construction at the Canadian Light Source. The beamline has several novel design elements that are intended to increase its operating flexibility and availability to users. First, there is a requirement to deliver a microscopic beam with a variable bandwidth, thus enabling the generation of Laue diffraction patterns and high yield X-ray fluorescence spectra from the same region preferably simultaneously. Thus, the bandpass of the VESPERS monochromator can be readily changed to focus radiation into the same 2-4 micron diameter area that is either polychromatic or having a bandwidth of 10%, 1.6% or 0.01%. This allows the user to change the diffraction pattern to suit the complexity of the crystal and the spectral signal to noise ratio to suit the detection sensitivity required. Second, the beamline is designed to have two branches capable of operating simultaneously and virtually independently using the same primary optics. These design features are accomplished using four separate beams originating at four pinholes at the entry to the Primary Optical Enclosure. The compound focus design uses spherical mirrors to focus both polychromatic and pre-monochromatic beams onto the intermediate slits. A pair of bendable K-B mirrors in the experimental hutch is used to demagnify the beam further down to micron size. The photon energy of this beamline is 6-30 keV.

  9. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone. PMID:16187755

  10. Single proton counting at the RIKEN cell irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mäckel, V. Puttaraksa, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-08-15

    We present newly developed tapered capillaries with a scintillator window, which enable us to count single protons at the RIKEN cell irradiation setup. Their potential for performing single proton irradiation experiments at our beamline setup is demonstrated with CR39 samples, showing a single proton detection fidelity of 98%.

  11. ALS beamline design requirements: A guide for beamline designers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This manual is written as a guide for researchers in designing beamlines and endstations acceptable for use at the ALS. It contains guidelines and policies related to personnel safety and equipment and vacuum protection. All equipment and procedures must ultimately satisfy the safety requirements set aside in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000) which is available from the ALS User Office or on the World WideWeb from the LBNL Homepage (http:// www.lbl.gov).

  12. Beamline 10: A multipole wiggler beamline at SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Karpenko, V.; Kinney, J. H.; Kulkarni, S.; Neufeld, K.; Poppe, C.; Tirsell, K. G.; Wong, J.; Cerino, J.; Troxel, T.; Yang, J.; and others

    1989-07-01

    A beamline has been constructed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) whose radiation source is a multipole permanent magnet wiggler installed in a straight section of the SPEAR 3--3.5 GeV electron storage ring. The wiggler is a hybrid design that utilizes Nd--Fe alloy magnet material combined with Vanadium Permendur poles. It is approximately 2 m long and has 15 full wiggler periods. Its field is regulated by varying its gap height. It has a peak operating field, limited by the electron beam vacuum chamber vertical aperture, of 1.4 T. The beamline consists of vacuum, safety, and optical components capable of transporting photons to one hard x-ray (3--30 keV) end station, with provisions for implementing up to two additional branch lines. The existing hard x-ray branch can be focused by a Pt-coated toroidal mirror with a cutoff energy of approximately 22 keV. The experimental end station is serviced by a Hower--Brown type double crystal monochromator. The wiggler and beamline construction was completed in the fall of 1987 and was operated for a brief period for characterization and experimental use. We present design details and results of the initial characterization studies.

  13. Beamline 10: A multipole wiggler beamline at SSRL (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, V.; Kinney, J. H.; Kulkarni, S.; Neufeld, K.; Poppe, C.; Tirsell, K. G.; Wong, J.; Cerino, J.; Troxel, T.; Yang, J.; Hoyer, E.; Green, M.; Humphries, D.; Marks, S.; Plate, D.

    1989-07-01

    A beamline has been constructed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) whose radiation source is a multipole permanent magnet wiggler installed in a straight section of the SPEAR 3-3.5 GeV electron storage ring. The wiggler is a hybrid design that utilizes Nd-Fe alloy magnet material combined with Vanadium Permendur poles. It is approximately 2 m long and has 15 full wiggler periods. Its field is regulated by varying its gap height. It has a peak operating field, limited by the electron beam vacuum chamber vertical aperture, of 1.4 T. The beamline consists of vacuum, safety, and optical components capable of transporting photons to one hard x-ray (3-30 keV) end station, with provisions for implementing up to two additional branch lines. The existing hard x-ray branch can be focused by a Pt-coated toroidal mirror with a cutoff energy of approximately 22 keV. The experimental end station is serviced by a Hower-Brown type double crystal monochromator. The wiggler and beamline construction was completed in the fall of 1987 and was operated for a brief period for characterization and experimental use. We present design details and results of the initial characterization studies.

  14. The Generic Beamline Concept of the PETRA III Undulator Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, U.; Peters, H. B.; Roehlsberger, R.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.

    2007-01-19

    The conversion of the PETRA storage ring at DESY to a third generation synchrotron radiation light source poses a challenge to the design of the beam transport system. The total power in the white beam will be as high as 7.5kW in the case of the 5m long undulator at 100mA. The power density will be 476 W/mm2 at 20m from the source. Upgrades to a beam current of 200mA have to be accounted for in the design of the beamline components. For the beam transport between the undulator and the experimental hall, the design of a generic beamline is presented. It contains all elements which are needed to guide the beam to the experiment. This generic beamline consists of the estimated maximum of components for this purpose. Special experimental needs may reduce the number of proposed devices in the generic part and add special optical devices close to the experiment, e. g. strong focusing. The paper focuses on the girder concept for all major beam transport components and the collimating shutter system which has to deal with the high power density of the PETRA III undulators.

  15. SPring-8 beamline control system.

    PubMed

    Ohata, T; Konishi, H; Kimura, H; Furukawa, Y; Tamasaku, K; Nakatani, T; Tanabe, T; Matsumoto, N; Ishii, M; Ishikawa, T

    1998-05-01

    The SPring-8 beamline control system is now taking part in the control of the insertion device (ID), front end, beam transportation channel and all interlock systems of the beamline: it will supply a highly standardized environment of apparatus control for collaborative researchers. In particular, ID operation is very important in a third-generation synchrotron light source facility. It is also very important to consider the security system because the ID is part of the storage ring and is therefore governed by the synchrotron ring control system. The progress of computer networking systems and the technology of security control require the development of a highly flexible control system. An interlock system that is independent of the control system has increased the reliability. For the beamline control system the so-called standard model concept has been adopted. VME-bus (VME) is used as the front-end control system and a UNIX workstation as the operator console. CPU boards of the VME-bus are RISC processor-based board computers operated by a LynxOS-based HP-RT real-time operating system. The workstation and the VME are linked to each other by a network, and form the distributed system. The HP 9000/700 series with HP-UX and the HP 9000/743rt series with HP-RT are used. All the controllable apparatus may be operated from any workstation. PMID:15263588

  16. His-75 in Proteorhodopsin, a Novel Component in Light-driven Proton Translocation by Primary Pumps*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bergo, Vladislav B.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Kralj, Joel M.; Partha, Ranga; Spudich, Elena N.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.; Spudich, John L.

    2009-01-01

    Proteorhodopsins (PRs), photoactive retinylidene membrane proteins ubiquitous in marine eubacteria, exhibit light-driven proton transport activity similar to that of the well studied bacteriorhodopsin from halophilic archaea. However, unlike bacteriorhodopsin, PRs have a single highly conserved histidine located near the photoactive site of the protein. Time-resolved Fourier transform IR difference spectroscopy combined with visible absorption spectroscopy, isotope labeling, and electrical measurements of light-induced charge movements reveal participation of His-75 in the proton translocation mechanism of PR. Substitution of His-75 with Ala or Glu perturbed the structure of the photoactive site and resulted in significantly shifted visible absorption spectra. In contrast, His-75 substitution with a positively charged Arg did not shift the visible absorption spectrum of PR. The mutation to Arg also blocks the light-induced proton transfer from the Schiff base to its counterion Asp-97 during the photocycle and the acid-induced protonation of Asp-97 in the dark state of the protein. Isotope labeling of histidine revealed that His-75 undergoes deprotonation during the photocycle in the proton-pumping (high pH) form of PR, a reaction further supported by results from H75E. Finally, all His-75 mutations greatly affect charge movements within the PR and shift its pH dependence to acidic values. A model of the proteorhodopsin proton transport process is proposed as follows: (i) in the dark state His-75 is positively charged (protonated) over a wide pH range and interacts directly with the Schiff base counterion Asp-97; and (ii) photoisomerization-induced transfer of the Schiff base proton to the Asp-97 counterion disrupts its interaction with His-75 and triggers a histidine deprotonation. PMID:19015272

  17. Beamline 9.0.1 - a high-resolution undulator beamline for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Heimann, P.A.; Mossessian, D.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source is an undulator beamline with a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) which provides very high resolution and flux over the photon energy range 20-320eV. The beamline has been used primarily by the atomic and molecular science community to conduct spectroscopy experiments using electron, ion and fluorescence photon detection. A description of the beamline and its performance will be provided in this abstract.

  18. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the status of the conceptual design and the associated challenges.

  19. Status of the crystallography beamlines at SSRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianhua; Gao, Xingyu

    2015-02-01

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF), an advanced intermediate-energy third-generation light source in China, was completed with seven phase-I beamlines opening to users in May 2009. Among these beamlines, there are two dedicated crystallography beamlines, one for macromolecular crystallography and one for crystallography in materials science, condensed matter physics and other relevant fields. The macromolecular crystallography beamline BL17U1, based on an in-vacuum undulator, has achieved very high brightness at the sample position with its flux of 4.1 × 1012 photons/s at 12 keV and focused beam size of FWHM (H × V) 67 × 23 μm2 in a small beam divergence over an energy range of 5-18 keV. Nowadays, there are about 200 user groups at this beamline with more than 330 structures solved each year. In the past, lots of significant results have been obtained at this beamline, such as the structural determination of important membrane proteins and proteins of viruses. In addition, three new macromolecular crystallography beamlines of different features have just been constructed and will soon open to users. To meet the rapidly growing user demands and the important scientific challenges, a few more dedicated crystallography beamlines have been proposed in the Phase-II Beamlines Project.

  20. Performance Measurements at the SLS Spectroscopy Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, U.; Patthey, L.; Schmidt, T.

    2004-05-12

    The Surfaces and Interfaces Spectroscopy beamline (SIS) started user operation in spring 2002 as one of the first beamlines at SLS. It is optimized for high resolution photo electron spectroscopy. The beamline concept with two helical undulators plus a plane grating monochromator with grazing- and normal incidence optics is very flexible and offers a well balanced performance from 10 eV to 800 eV. We report on beamline features and performance measurements. The final characterization is still in progress since not all options have been commissioned so far.

  1. A Comparative Ab Initio Study of the Primary Hydration and Proton Dissociation of Various Imide and Sulfonic Acid Ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark II, Jeffrey K.; Paddison, Stephen J.; Eikerling, Michael; Dupuis, Michel; Zawodzinski, Jr., Thomas A.

    2012-03-29

    We compare the role of neighboring group substitutions on proton dissociation of hydrated acidic moieties suitable for proton exchange membranes through electronic structure calculations. Three pairs of ionomers containing similar electron withdrawing groups within the pair were chosen for the study: two fully fluorinated sulfonyl imides (CF3SO2NHSO2CF3 and CF3CF2SO2NHSO2CF3), two partially fluorinated sulfonyl imides (CH3SO2NHSO2CF3 and C6H5SO2NHSO2CF2CF3), and two aromatic sulfonic acid based material s (CH3C6H4SO3H and CH3 OC6 - H3OCH3C6H4SO3H). Fully optimized counterpoise (CP) corrected geometries were obtained for each ionomer fragment with the inclusion of water molecules at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of density functional theory. Spontaneous proton dissociation was observed upon addition of three water molecules in each system, and the transition to a solvent-separated ion pair occurred when four water molecules were introduced. No considerable quantitative or qualitative differences in proton dissociation, hydrogen bond networks formed, or water binding energies were found between systems containing similar electron withdrawing groups. Each of the sulfonyl imide ionomers exhibited qualitatively similar results regarding proton dissociation and separation. The fully fluorinated sulfonyl imides, however, showed a greater propensity to exist in dissociated and ion-pair separated states at low degrees of hydration than the partially fluorinated sulfonyl imides. This effect is due to the additional electron withdrawing groups providing charge stabilization as the dissociated proton migrates away from the imide anion.

  2. The energetics of the primary proton transfer in bacteriorhodopsin revisited: it is a sequential light-induced charge separation after all.

    PubMed

    Braun-Sand, Sonja; Sharma, Pankaz K; Chu, Zhen T; Pisliakov, Andrei V; Warshel, Arieh

    2008-05-01

    The light-induced proton transport in bacteriorhodopsin has been considered as a model for other light-induced proton pumps. However, the exact nature of this process is still unclear. For example, it is not entirely clear what the driving force of the initial proton transfer is and, in particular, whether it reflects electrostatic forces or other effects. The present work simulates the primary proton transfer (PT) by a specialized combination of the EVB and the QCFF/PI methods. This combination allows us to obtain sufficient sampling and a quantitative free energy profile for the PT at different protein configurations. The calculated profiles provide new insight about energetics of the primary PT and its coupling to the protein conformational changes. Our finding confirms the tentative analysis of an earlier work (A. Warshel, Conversion of light energy to electrostatic energy in the proton pump of Halobacterium halobium, Photochem. Photobiol. 30 (1979) 285-290) and determines that the overall PT process is driven by the energetics of the charge separation between the Schiff base and its counterion Asp85. Apparently, the light-induced relaxation of the steric energy of the chromophore leads to an increase in the ion-pair distance, and this drives the PT process. Our use of the linear response approximation allows us to estimate the change in the protein conformational energy and provides the first computational description of the coupling between the protein structural changes and the PT process. It is also found that the PT is not driven by twist-modulated changes of the Schiff base's pKa, changes in the hydrogen bond directionality, or other non-electrostatic effects. Overall, based on a consistent use of structural information as the starting point for converging free energy calculations, we conclude that the primary event should be described as a light-induced formation of an unstable ground state, whose relaxation leads to charge separation and to the

  3. Recent Major Improvements to the ALS Sector 5 MacromolecularCrystallography Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Simon A.; Glossinger, James; Smith-Baumann, Alexis; McKean, John P.; Trame, Christine; Dickert, Jeff; Rozales, Anthony; Dauz,Azer; Taylor, John; Zwart, Petrus; Duarte, Robert; Padmore, Howard; McDermott, Gerry; Adams, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Although the Advanced Light Source (ALS) was initially conceived primarily as a low energy (1.9GeV) 3rd generation source of VUV and soft x-ray radiation it was realized very early in the development of the facility that a multipole wiggler source coupled with high quality, (brightness preserving), optics would result in a beamline whose performance across the optimal energy range (5-15keV) for macromolecular crystallography (MX) would be comparable to, or even exceed, that of many existing crystallography beamlines at higher energy facilities. Hence, starting in 1996, a suite of three beamlines, branching off a single wiggler source, was constructed, which together formed the ALS Macromolecular Crystallography Facility. From the outset this facility was designed to cater equally to the needs of both academic and industrial users with a heavy emphasis placed on the development and introduction of high throughput crystallographic tools, techniques, and facilities--such as large area CCD detectors, robotic sample handling and automounting facilities, a service crystallography program, and a tightly integrated, centralized, and highly automated beamline control environment for users. This facility was immediately successful, with the primary Multiwavelength Anomalous Diffraction beamline (5.0.2) in particular rapidly becoming one of the foremost crystallographic facilities in the US--responsible for structures such as the 70S ribosome. This success in-turn triggered enormous growth of the ALS macromolecular crystallography community and spurred the development of five additional ALS MX beamlines all utilizing the newly developed superconducting bending magnets ('superbends') as sources. However in the years since the original Sector 5.0 beamlines were built the performance demands of macromolecular crystallography users have become ever more exacting; with growing emphasis placed on studying larger complexes, more difficult structures, weakly diffracting or smaller

  4. THERMODYNAMIC INTERACTION OF THE PRIMARY PROTON BEAM WITH A MERCURY JET TARGET AT A NEUTRINO FACTORY SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SIMOS,N.; LUDEWIG,H.; KIRK,H.; THIEBERGER,P.; MCDONALD,K.

    2001-06-18

    This paper addresses the thermodynamic interaction of an intense proton beam with the proposed mercury jet target at a neutrino factory or muon collider source, and the consequences of the generated pressure waves on the target integrity. Specifically, a 24 GeV proton beam with approximately 1.6e13 protons per pulse and a pulse length of 2 nanosec will interact with a 1 cm diameter mercury jet within a 20 Tesla magnetic field. In one option, a train of six such proton pulses is to be delivered on target within 2 microsec, in which case the state of the mercury jet following the interaction with each pulse is critical. Using the equation of state for mercury from the SESAME library, in combination with the energy deposition rates calculated the by the hadron interaction code MARS, the induced 3-D pressure field in the target is estimated. The consequent pressure wave propagation and attenuation in the mercury jet is calculated using an ANSYS code transient analysis, and the state of the mercury jet at the time of arrival of the subsequent pulse is assessed. The amplitude of the pressure wave reaching the nozzle that ejects the mercury jet into the magnetic field is estimated and the potential for mechanical damage is addressed.

  5. Teaching the Fundamentals of Biological Research with Primary Literature: Learning from the Discovery of the Gastric Proton Pump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    For the purpose of teaching collegians the fundamentals of biological research, literature explaining the discovery of the gastric proton pump was presented in a 50-min lecture. The presentation included detailed information pertaining to the discovery process. This study was chosen because it demonstrates the importance of having a broad range of…

  6. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    SciTech Connect

    Fedurin, M.; Jing, Y.; Stratakis, D.; Swinson, C.

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  7. Characterization of CH3SO3H-doped PMMA/PVP blend-based proton-conducting polymer electrolytes and its application in primary battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambika, C.; Hirankumar, G.

    2016-02-01

    Various compositions of solid blend polymer electrolytes based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) complexed with methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as proton donor were prepared by solution casting technique. The complex nature of polymer blend with MSA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Good thermal stability of PMMA/PVP blend polymer electrolyte was identified by thermogravimetric analysis. The surface morphology of the prepared electrolytes was studied through optical microscopy. Ion transport number was determined in the range of 0.93-0.97 for proton-conducting blend polymer electrolytes. The maximum conductivity value was calculated as 2.51 × 10-5 S/cm at 303 K for 14.04 mol% MSA-doped polymer electrolytes. Dielectric studies were also carried out. The electrochemical stability window of blend polymer electrolyte was found to be 1.82 V. Primary proton battery was fabricated with Zn + ZnSO4·7H2O/solid polymer electrolytes/MnO2. The discharge characteristics were studied at constant current drain of 5, 20 and 50 μA. The energy and power density were calculated as 0.27 W h kg-1 and 269.23 mW kg-1 for 20 μA of discharge, respectively.

  8. Assessment of radiation-induced second cancer risks in proton therapy and IMRT for organs inside the primary radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganetti, Harald; Athar, Basit S.; Moteabbed, Maryam; Adams, Judith A.; Schneider, Uwe; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-10-01

    There is clinical evidence that second malignancies in radiation therapy occur mainly within the beam path, i.e. in the medium or high-dose region. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk for developing a radiation-induced tumor within the treated volume and to compare this risk for proton therapy and intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Instead of using data for specific patients we have created a representative scenario. Fully contoured age- and gender-specific whole body phantoms (4 year and 14 year old) were uploaded into a treatment planning system and tumor volumes were contoured based on patients treated for optic glioma and vertebral body Ewing's sarcoma. Treatment plans for IMRT and proton therapy treatments were generated. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for developing a second malignancy were calculated using a risk model considering cell kill, mutation, repopulation, as well as inhomogeneous organ doses. For standard fractionation schemes, the LAR for developing a second malignancy from radiation therapy alone was found to be up to 2.7% for a 4 year old optic glioma patient treated with IMRT considering a soft-tissue carcinoma risk model only. Sarcoma risks were found to be below 1% in all cases. For a 14 year old, risks were found to be about a factor of 2 lower. For Ewing's sarcoma cases the risks based on a sarcoma model were typically higher than the carcinoma risks, i.e. LAR up to 1.3% for soft-tissue sarcoma. In all cases, the risk from proton therapy turned out to be lower by at least a factor of 2 and up to a factor of 10. This is mainly due to lower total energy deposited in the patient when using proton beams. However, the comparison of a three-field and four-field proton plan also shows that the distribution of the dose, i.e. the particular treatment plan, plays a role. When using different fractionation schemes, the estimated risks roughly scale with the total dose difference in%. In conclusion, proton therapy can

  9. Diagnostic X-Multi-Axis Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A C

    2000-04-05

    Tomographic reconstruction of explosive events require time resolved multipal lines of sight. Considered here is a four (or eight) line of sight beam layout for a nominal 20 MeV 2000 Ampere 2 microsecond electron beam for generation of x-rays 0.9 to 5 meters from a given point, the ''firing point''. The requirement of a millimeter spatial x-ray source requires that the electron beam be delivered to the converter targets with sub-millimeter precision independent of small variations in beam energy and initial conditions. The 2 usec electron beam pulse allows for four bursts in each line, separated in time by about 500 microseconds. Each burst is divided by a electro-magnetic kicker into four (or eight) pulses, one for each beamline. The arrival time of the four (or eight) beam pulses at the x-ray target can be adjusted by the kicker timing and the sequence that the beams of each burst are switched into the different beamlines. There exists a simple conceptual path from a four beamline to a eight beamline upgrade. The eight line beamline is built up from seven unique types of sub-systems or ''blocks''. The beamline consists of 22 of these functional blocks and contains a total of 455 individual magnets, figure 1. The 22 blocks are inter-connected by a total of 30 straight line inter-block sections (IBS). Beamlines 1-4 are built from 12 blocks with conceptual layout structure shown in figure 2. Beamlines 5-8 are built with an additional 10 blocks with conceptual layout structure shown in figure 3. This beamline can be thought of as looking like a lollipop consisting of a 42 meter long stick leading to a 60 by 70 meter rectangular candy blob consisting of the eight lines of sight. The accelerator providing the electron beam is at the end of the stick and the firing point is at the center of the blob. The design allows for a two stage implementation. Beamlines 1-3 can be installed to provide a tomographic azimuthal resolution of 45 degrees. An upgrade can later be made

  10. Simulation of the ATIC-2 Silicon Matrix for Protons and Helium GCR Primaries at 0.3, 10, and 25 TeV/Nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha R. M.; Guzik, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    The energy deposition distribution for protons and helium galactic cosmic ray primaries at 0.3, 10, and 25 TeV/nucleon in the ATIC-2 silicon matrix detector are simulated with GEANT4. The GEANT3 geometrical model of ATIC developed by the University of Maryland was combined with a GEANT4 application developed for the Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB) detector package. The new code included relatively minor modifications to completely describe the ATIC materials and a more detailed model of the Silicon Matrix detector. For this analysis all particles were started as a unidirectional beam at a single point near the center of the Silicon Matrix front surface. The point was selected such that each primary passed through at least two of the overlapping silicon pixels.

  11. Status of the crystallography beamlines at Elettra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausi, A.; Polentarutti, M.; Onesti, S.; Plaisier, J. R.; Busetto, E.; Bais, G.; Barba, L.; Cassetta, A.; Campi, G.; Lamba, D.; Pifferi, A.; Mande, S. C.; Sarma, D. D.; Sharma, S. M.; Paolucci, G.

    2015-03-01

    Elettra is one of the first 3rd-generation storage rings, recently upgraded to routinely operate in top-up mode at both 2.0 and 2.4 GeV. The facility hosts four dedicated beamlines for crystallography, two open to the users and two under construction, and expected to be ready for public use in 2015. In service since 1994, XRD1 is a general-purpose diffraction beamline. The light source for this wide (4-21 keV) energy range beamline is a permanent magnet wiggler. XRD1 covers experiments ranging from grazing incidence X-ray diffraction to macromolecular crystallography, from industrial applications of powder diffraction to X-ray phasing with long wavelengths. The bending magnet powder diffraction beamline MCX has been open to users since 2009, with a focus on microstructural investigations and studies under non-ambient conditions. A superconducting wiggler delivers a high photon flux to a new fully automated beamline dedicated to macromolecular crystallography and to a branch beamline hosting a high-pressure powder X-ray diffraction station (both currently under construction). Users of the latter experimental station will have access to a specialized sample preparation laboratory, shared with the SISSI infrared beamline. A high throughput crystallization platform equipped with an imaging system for the remote viewing, evaluation and scoring of the macromolecular crystallization experiments has also been established and is open to the user community.

  12. Mutations in the environment of the primary quinone facilitate proton delivery to the secondary quinone in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    SciTech Connect

    Valerio-Lepiniec, M.; Schiffer, M.; Hanson, D. K.; Sebban, P.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; CNRS

    1999-01-01

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus, we constructed a quadruple mutant that reversed a structural asymmetry that contributes to the functional asymmetry of the two quinone sites. In the photosynthetically incompetent quadruple mutant RQ, two acidic residues near QB, L212Glu and L213Asp, have been mutated to Ala; conversely, in the QA pocket, the symmetry-related residues M246Ala and M247Ala have been mutated to Glu and Asp. We have selected photocompetent phenotypic revertants (designated RQrev3 and RQrev4) that carry compensatory mutations in both the QA and QB pockets. Near QA, the M246Ala {yields} Glu mutation remains in both revertants, but M247Asp is replaced by Tyr in RQrev3 and by Ala in RQrev4. The engineered L212Ala and L213Ala substitutions remain in the QB site of both revertants but are accompanied by an additional electrostatic-type mutation. To probe the respective influences of the mutations occurring near the QA and QB sites on electron and proton transfer, we have constructed two additional types of strains. First, 'half' revertants were constructed that couple the QB site of the revertants with a wild-type QA site. Second, the QA sites of the two revertants were linked with the L212Glu-L213Asp {yields} Ala-Ala mutations of the QB site. We have studied the electron and proton-transfer kinetics on the first and second flashes in reaction centers from these strains by flash-induced absorption spectroscopy. Our data demonstrate that substantial improvements of the proton-transfer capabilities occur in the strains carrying the M246Ala {yields} Glu + M247Ala {yields} Tyr mutations near QA. Interestingly, this is not observed when only the M246Ala {yields} Glu mutation is present in the QA pocket. We suggest that the M247Ala {yields} Tyr mutation in the QA pocket, or possibly the coupled M246Ala {yields} Glu + M247Ala {yields} Tyr mutations, accelerates the uptake and delivery of protons to the QB anions. The M247Tyr substitution may enable additional pathways for

  13. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 07: Monte Carlo Simulation of Primary Dose and PET Isotope Production for the TRIUMF Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, C; Jirasek, A; Blackmore, E; Hoehr, C; Schaffer, P; Trinczek, M; Sossi, V

    2014-08-15

    Uveal melanoma is a rare and deadly tumour of the eye with primary metastases in the liver resulting in an 8% 2-year survival rate upon detection. Large growths, or those in close proximity to the optic nerve, pose a particular challenge to the commonly employed eye-sparing technique of eye-plaque brachytherapy. In these cases external beam charged particle therapy offers improved odds in avoiding catastrophic side effects such as neuropathy or blindness. Since 1995, the British Columbia Cancer Agency in partnership with the TRIUMF national laboratory have offered proton therapy in the treatment of difficult ocular tumors. Having seen 175 patients, yielding 80% globe preservation and 82% metastasis free survival as of 2010, this modality has proven to be highly effective. Despite this success, there have been few studies into the use of the world's largest cyclotron in patient care. Here we describe first efforts of modeling the TRIUMF dose delivery system using the FLUKA Monte Carlo package. Details on geometry, estimating beam parameters, measurement of primary dose and simulation of PET isotope production are discussed. Proton depth dose in both modulated and pristine beams is successfully simulated to sub-millimeter precision in range (within limits of measurement) and 2% agreement to measurement within in a treatment volume. With the goal of using PET signals for in vivo dosimetry (alignment), a first look at PET isotope depth distribution is presented — comparing favourably to a naive method of approximating simulated PET slice activity in a Lucite phantom.

  14. A Dedicated THz Beamline At BESSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holldack, K.; Ponwitz, D.

    2007-01-01

    A special beamline dedicated to the Far Infrared (THz) region was successfully commissioned at BESSY for the spectral range between 50 GHz and 4.5 THz. The beamline accepts synchrotron radiation from a bend magnet source close to the interaction region of a femtosecond laser with the electron bunch. Either edge radiation as well as the regular bend magnet fan can be accepted. The beamline was tailored for diagnostics and experiments employing coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) from regular and compressed bunches as well as from a laser-induced fs density modulation on the electron bunch. Besides a technical description of the beamlinethe the sources are compared using Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTIR).

  15. Real Beamline Optics from a Synthetic Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Bodenstein,Michael Tiefenback,Yves Roblin

    2010-05-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab can be described as a series of concatenated beamlines. Methods used to measure the Twiss parameters in closed orbit machines are not applicable in such open ended systems. We are using properly selected sets of real orbits in the accelerator, as one would for numerical analysis. The evolution of these trajectories along the beamline models the behavior of a synthetic beam which deterministically supplements beam profile-based Twiss parameter measurements and optimizes the efficiency of beamline tuning. Examples will be presented alongside a description of the process.

  16. ELIMED, MEDical and multidisciplinary applications at ELI-Beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Anzalone, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Carpinelli, M.; Cuttone, G.; Cutroneo, M.; De Martinis, C.; Giove, D.; Korn, G.; Maggiore, M.; Manti, L.; Margarone, D.; Musumarra, A.; Perozziello, F. M.; Petrovic, I.; Pisciotta, P.; Renis, M.; Ristic-Fira, A.; Romano, F.; Romano, F. P.; Schettino, G.; Scuderi, V.; Torrisi, L.; Tramontana, A.; Tudisco, S.

    2014-04-01

    ELI-Beamlines is one of the pillars of the pan-European project ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure). It will be an ultra high-intensity, high repetition-rate, femtosecond laser facility whose main goal is generation and applications of high-brightness X-ray sources and accelerated charged particles in different fields. Particular care will be devoted to the potential applicability of laser-driven ion beams for medical treatments of tumors. Indeed, such kind of beams show very interesting peculiarities and, moreover, laser-driven based accelerators can really represent a competitive alternative to conventional machines since they are expected to be more compact in size and less expensive. The ELIMED project was launched thanks to a collaboration established between FZU-ASCR (ELI-Beamlines) and INFN-LNS researchers. Several European institutes have already shown a great interest in the project aiming to explore the possibility to use laser-driven ion (mostly proton) beams for several applications with a particular regard for medical ones. To reach the project goal several tasks need to be fulfilled, starting from the optimization of laser-target interaction to dosimetric studies at the irradiation point at the end of a proper designed transport beam-line. Researchers from LNS have already developed and successfully tested a high-dispersive power Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, which is the first prototype of a more performing device to be used within the ELIMED project. Also a Magnetic Selection System able to produce a small pencil beam out of a wide energy distribution of ions produced in laser-target interaction has been realized and some preliminary work for its testing and characterization is in progress. In this contribution the status of the project will be reported together with a short description of the of the features of device recently developed.

  17. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Aisa, D.; Alpat, B.; Alvino, A.; Ambrosi, G.; Andeen, K.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bigongiari, G.; Bindi, V.; Bizzaglia, S.; Bizzarri, M.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Borsini, S.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Cascioli, V.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cerreta, D.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, H.; Cheng, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Gil, E. Cortina; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Di Masso, L.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Donnini, F.; Du, W. J.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Eline, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Eronen, T.; Fan, Y. Y.; Farnesini, L.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Fiasson, A.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Gillard, W.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guandalini, C.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Haas, D.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Kossakowski, R.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Levi, G.; Li, H. L.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Lolli, M.; Lomtadze, T.; Lu, M. J.; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Müller, M.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Obermeier, A.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Papi, A.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pedreschi, E.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Piluso, A.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Postaci, E.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Sbarra, C.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; von Dratzig, A. Schulz; Schwering, G.; Scolieri, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shan, Y. H.; Shi, J. Y.; Shi, X. Y.; Shi, Y. M.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spada, F.; Spinella, F.; Sun, W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, C. P.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vaurynovich, S.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, R. S.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z. X.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xie, M.; Xie, S.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xin, G. M.; Xu, N. S.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Ye, Q. H.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, M. T.; Zhang, X. B.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; Zurbach, C.; AMS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities.

  18. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Cortina Gil, E; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities. PMID:25978222

  19. Doublet III beamline: as-built

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, C.R.; Holland, M.M.; Parker, J.W.; Gunn, J.; Resnick, L.

    1980-03-01

    In order to fully exploit Doublet III capabilities and to study new plasma physics regimes, a Neutral Beam Injector System has been constructed. Initially, a two beamline system will supply 7 MW of heat to the plasma. The system is currently being expanded to inject approx. 20 MW of power (6 beamlines). Each beamline is equipped with two Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory type rectangular ion sources with 10 cm x 40 cm extraction grids. These sources will accelerate hydrogen ions to 80 keV, with extracted beam currents in excess of 80 A per source expected. The first completed source is currently being tested and conditioned on the High Voltage Test Stand at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper pictorially reviews the as-built Doublet III neutral beamline with emphasis on component relation and configuration relative to spatial and source imposed design constraints.

  20. Microspectroscopy At Beamline 73 MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect

    Engdahl, Anders

    2010-02-03

    Presentation of some projects at the infrared microspectroscopy experimental station at beamline 73 MAX-lab. Among the subjects are found identification of organic residues in fossil material and examination of the chemistry in an old oak wood wreck.

  1. Proton Beam Radiotherapy Versus Three-Dimensional Conformal Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy in Primary Peripheral, Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma: A Comparative Dosimetric Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, O. Kenneth; Kruse, Jon J.; Miller, Janelle M.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Brown, Paul D.; Miller, Robert C.; Foote, Robert L.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy (PT) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have the capacity to optimize the therapeutic ratio. We analyzed the dosimetric differences between PT and SBRT in treating primary peripheral early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were simulated, planned, and treated with SBRT according to accepted techniques. SBRT treatments were retrospectively planned using heterogeneity corrections. PT treatment plans were generated using single-, two-, and three-field passively scattered and actively scanned proton beams. Calculated dose characteristics were compared. Results: Comparable planning target volume (PTV) median minimum and maximum doses were observed between PT and SBRT plans. Higher median maximum doses 2 cm from the PTV were observed for PT, but higher median PTV doses were observed for SBRT. The total lung mean and V5 doses were significantly lower with actively scanned PT. The lung V13 and V20 were comparable. The dose to normal tissues was lower with PT except to skin and ribs. Although the maximum doses to skin and ribs were similar or higher with PT, the median doses to these structures were higher with SBRT. Passively scattered plans, compared with actively scanned plans, typically demonstrated higher doses to the PTV, lung, and organs at risk. Conclusions: Single-, two-, or three-field passively or actively scanned proton therapy delivered comparable PTV dose with generally less dose to normal tissues in these hypothetic treatments. Actively scanned beam plans typically had more favorable dose characteristics to the target, lung, and other soft tissues compared with the passively scanned plans. The clinical significance of these findings remains to be determined.

  2. The New Structural Materials Science Beamlines BL8A and 8B at Photon Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Koyama, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2010-06-23

    BL8A and 8B are new beamlines for structural materials science at Photon Factory. The primary characteristics of both beamlines are similar. The incident beam is monochromatized by the Si(111) double-flat crystal monochromator and focused at the sample position by a Rh-coated bent cylindrical quartz mirror. The Weissenberg-camera-type imaging-plate (IP) diffractometers were installed. The X-ray diffraction experiments for structural studies of strongly correlated materials, such as transition metals, molecular conductors, endohedral fullerenes, nano-materials, etc, are conducted at these stations.

  3. Investigating the Cherenkov light lateral distribution function for primary proton and iron nuclei in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rubaiee, A. A.; Hashim, U.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The lateral distribution function (LDF) of Cherenkov radiation in extensive air showers (EAS) was simulated by CORSIKA program for the conditions of Yakutsk Cherenkov array at the high energy range (1013-1016) eV for two primary particles (p and Fe) for different zenith angles. By depending on Breit-Wigner function for analyzing of Cherenkov light LDF, a parameterization of Cherenkov light LDF was reconstructed by depending on CORSIKA simulation as a function of primary energy. The comparison between the estimated Cherenkov light LDF with the LDF that measured on the Yakutsk EAS array gives the ability of particle identification that initiated the shower and determination of particle's energy around the knee region. The extrapolation of approximated Cherenkov light LDF for energies 20 and 30 PeV was obtained for primary particles (p and Fe).

  4. Modeling of X-ray beamlines and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    X-ray beamlines on synchrotron sources are similar in size and complexity to beamlines at state-of-the-art neutron sources. The design principles, tools, and optimization strategies for synchrotron beamlines are also similar to those of neutron beamlines. The authors describe existing design tools for modeling synchrotron radiation beamlines and describe how these tools have evolved over the last two decades. The development of increasingly powerful modeling tools has been driven by the escalating cost and sophistication of state-of-the-art beamlines and by a world-wide race to exploit advanced synchrotron radiation sources.

  5. Ring beamlines and instrumentation for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, W. Jorge; Trippe, Anthony P.

    1994-08-01

    Many recently constructed storage rings are catering to the needs of industrial applications in addition to providing the traditional services required for synchrotron radiation research. The Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) was established by Louisiana State University to pioneer development of microfabrication while supporting research in basic science. Maxwell Laboratories designed, built, and successfully commissioned the 1.2 GeV, 400 mA light source for CAMD. Maxwell Laboratories has completed one X-ray lithography beamline at CAMD, and two more are now being manufactured. The completed beamline system, designed for thin resists, delivers photons up to 2 keV. The two beamlines currently under construction deliver photons up to 6 keV for thick (> 50 μm) resists, which play a role in the fabrication of 3-D nanostructures. One of the thick-resist beamlines includes an aspheric mirror that collimates the synchrotron-radiation beam in the horizontal plane while focusing it in the vertical direction - creating a sharp, uniform line image at the workpiece. The other thick-resist beamline has conventional planar optics. Beam position monitors (BPMs) developed for the CAMD beamlines provide a precise vertical profile of the beam by measuring differential photocurrents generated in the BPM probes. Beam power measurements are accomplished with a fixed-aperture calorimeter. Since each calorimeter is precisely calibrated before shipment, its thermal response in the beam is an accurate means to determine beam power for setting lithography exposure times or for computing beamline energy balance.

  6. National synchrotron light source user's manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines: Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.; White-DePace, S.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains information on the following topics: A Word on the Writing of Beamline Descriptions; Beamline Equipment Utilization for General Users; the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Storage Ring and Beamlines; VUV Beamline Descriptions--An Explanation; VUV Beamline Descriptions; X-Ray Storage Ring and Beamlines; X-Ray Beamline Descriptions--An Explanation; and X-Ray Beamline Descriptions.

  7. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  8. New SRC APPLE II variable polarization beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severson, M.; Bissen, M.; Fisher, M. V.; Rogers, G.; Reininger, R.; Green, M.; Eisert, D.; Tredinnick, B.

    2011-09-01

    SRC has recently commissioned a new Varied Line-Spacing Plane Grating Monochromator (VLS-PGM) utilizing as its source a 1 m long APPLE II insertion device in short-straight-section 9 of the Aladdin storage ring. The insertion device reliably delivers horizontal, vertical, and right and left circularly polarized light to the beamline. Measurements from an in situ polarimeter can be used for undulator corrections to compensate for depolarizing effects of the beamline. The beamline has only three optical elements and covers the energy range from 11.1 to 270 eV using two varied line-spacing gratings. A plane mirror rotates to illuminate the gratings at the correct angle to cancel the defocus term at all photon energies. An exit slit and elliptical-toroid refocusing mirror complete the beamline. Using a 50 μm exit slit, the beamline provides moderate to high resolution, with measured flux in the mid 10 12 (photons/s/200 mA) range, and a spot size of 400 μm horizontal by 30 μm vertical.

  9. New SRC APPLE ll Variable Polarization Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    M Severson; M Bissen; M Fisher; G Rogers; R Reininger; M Green; D Eisert; B Tredinnick

    2011-12-31

    SRC has recently commissioned a new Varied Line-Spacing Plane Grating Monochromator (VLS-PGM) utilizing as its source a 1 m long APPLE II insertion device in short-straight-section 9 of the Aladdin storage ring. The insertion device reliably delivers horizontal, vertical, and right and left circularly polarized light to the beamline. Measurements from an in situ polarimeter can be used for undulator corrections to compensate for depolarizing effects of the beamline. The beamline has only three optical elements and covers the energy range from 11.1 to 270 eV using two varied line-spacing gratings. A plane mirror rotates to illuminate the gratings at the correct angle to cancel the defocus term at all photon energies. An exit slit and elliptical-toroid refocusing mirror complete the beamline. Using a 50 {mu}m exit slit, the beamline provides moderate to high resolution, with measured flux in the mid 10{sup 12} (photons/s/200 mA) range, and a spot size of 400 {mu}m horizontal by 30 {mu}m vertical.

  10. Status of the Dortmund TGM3-Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Westphal, C.; Dreiner, S.; Krause, M.

    2004-05-12

    The former TGM3 beamline at BESSYI was rebuilt at the DELTA storage ring, University of Dortmund, Germany. The beamline uses synchrotron radiation from a dipole bending magnet. The previous design of the beamline had to be adapted to an operation at DELTA. This included a motorized rotation of the first mirror, since that mirror is located within the radiation shield wall at DELTA. Also, further minor components had to be modified, adapted, or replaced. During the set-up at DELTA, previously known operation problems due to mechanical vibrations were eliminated by a complete new mounting of the optical components. The measured performance parameters at BESSYI are compared with calculated results for an operation at DELTA. The first commissioning experiments are currently carried out.

  11. IR beamline at the Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ph, Lerch; L, Quaroni; J, Wambach; J, Schneider; B, Armstrong D.; D, Rossetti; L, Mueller F.; P, Peier; V, Schlott; L, Carroll; P, Friedli; H, Sigg; S, Stutz; M, Tran

    2012-05-01

    The infrared beamline at the Swiss light source uses dipole radiation and is designed to transport light to four experimental stations, A, B, C, D. Branch A is dedicated to far IR work in vacuum; branch B is a micro-spectrometer; branch C is dedicated to high resolution spectroscopy in the gas phase; branch D is a pump and probe set-up. This contribution describes the optical layout and provides a brief survey of currently available experimental stations. The beamline is in regular user operation since 2009.

  12. The First Group of CANDLE Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Aghasyan, M.; Grigoryan, A.; Mikaelyan, R.

    2004-05-12

    The Center for the Advancement of Natural Discoveries using Light Emission (CANDLE) is a 3 GeV intermediate energy light source project in Armenia. The paper presents the study and design futures of the first group of beamlines that are planed to run among with the facility operation scheduled for year 2007. Presented beamlines will cover the experimental researches based on diffraction and powder diffraction, XAS, Soft X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy, Small angle X-ray scattering, X-ray Imaging techniques and LIGA.

  13. Jefferson Lab Hall A Beamline Instrumentation and Calibration for GMP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Thir Narayan

    2015-10-01

    The nucleon electromagnetic form factors characterize the distributions of electric charge and magnetization current inside the nucleon and thus reflect the internal structure determined by Quantum Chromodynamics. The GMp experiment is a first experiment run in Hall A at Jefferson Lab after the upgrade to double the beam energy with the goal to precisely measure electron-proton elastic cross section in the Q2 range of 7 to 17 GeV2 with an accuracy of better than 2%; several time better than existing data at the highest Q2. In order to achieve this accuracy, a determination of the accumulated beam charge of better than 0.5% is required. The new 12 GeV beamline was commissioned during the spring of 2015, with the main instrumentation consisting of beam charge and position monitors. In this talk, the procedures and the results of the calibrations of these beamline components will be presented.

  14. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Haselton, Halsey H.; Stirling, William L.; Whealton, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  15. Human factors design for the BMIT biomedical beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. Denise; Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Belev, George; Chapman, L. Dean

    2013-03-01

    Operation of a biomedical beamline poses a unique set of operational and instrumentation challenges for a synchrotron facility. From proper handling and care of live animals and animal tissues, to a user community drawn primarily from the medical and veterinary realms, the work of a biomedical beamline is unique when compared to other beamlines. At the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamlines at Canadian Light Source (CLS), operation of the beamlines is geared towards our user community of medical personnel, in addition to basic science researchers. Human factors considerations have been incorporated wherever possible on BMIT, including in the design of software and hardware, as well as ease-of-use features of beamline control stations and experiment hutches. Feedback from users continues to drive usability improvements to beamline operations.

  16. Apparatus to study crystal channeling and volume reflection phenomena at the SPS H8 beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Scandale, Walter; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Still, Dean A.; Carnera, Alberto; De Salvador, Davide; Della Mea, Gianantonio; Milan, Riccardo; Vomiero, Alberto; Baricordi, Stefano; Chiozzi, Stefano; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Damiani, Chiara; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Guidi, Vincenzo; Martinelli, Giuliano; Mazzolari, Andrea; Milan, Emiliano; Ambrosi, Giovanni; Azzarello, Philipp; Battiston, Roberto

    2008-02-15

    A high performance apparatus has been designed and built by the H8-RD22 collaboration for the study of channeling and volume reflection phenomena in the interaction of 400 GeV/c protons with bent silicon crystals, during the 2006 data taking in the external beamline H8 of the CERN SPS. High-quality silicon short crystals were bent by either anticlastic or quasimosaic effects. Alignment with the highly parallel (8 {mu}rad divergence) proton beam was guaranteed through a submicroradian goniometric system equipped with both rotational and translational stages. Particle tracking was possible by a series of silicon microstrip detectors with high-resolution and a parallel plate gas chamber, triggered by various scintillating detectors located along the beamline. Experimental observation of volume reflection with 400 GeV/c protons proved true with a deflection angle of (10.4{+-}0.5) {mu}rad with respect to the unperturbed beam, with a silicon crystal whose (111) planes were parallel to the beam.

  17. Antimicrobial agent triclosan is a proton ionophore uncoupler of mitochondria in living rat and human mast cells and in primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Lisa M; Shim, Juyoung; Hashmi, Hina N; Kennedy, Rachel H; Hess, Samuel T; Gosse, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial used widely in hospitals and personal care products, at ~10 mm. Human skin efficiently absorbs TCS. Mast cells are ubiquitous key players both in physiological processes and in disease, including asthma, cancer and autism. We previously showed that non-cytotoxic levels of TCS inhibit degranulation, the release of histamine and other mediators, from rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), and in this study, we replicate this finding in human mast cells (HMC-1.2). Our investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect led to the discovery that TCS disrupts adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in RBL-2H3 cells in glucose-free, galactose-containing media (95% confidence interval EC50 = 7.5-9.7 µm), without causing cytotoxicity. Using these same glucose-free conditions, 15 µm TCS dampens RBL-2H3 degranulation by 40%. The same ATP disruption was found with human HMC-1.2 cells (EC50 4.2-13.7 µm), NIH-3 T3 mouse fibroblasts (EC50 4.8-7.4 µm) and primary human keratinocytes (EC50 3.0-4.1 µm) all with no cytotoxicity. TCS increases oxygen consumption rate in RBL-2H3 cells. Known mitochondrial uncouplers (e.g., carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone) previously were found to inhibit mast cell function. TCS-methyl, which has a methyl group in place of the TCS ionizable proton, affects neither degranulation nor ATP production at non-cytotoxic doses. Thus, the effects of TCS on mast cell function are due to its proton ionophore structure. In addition, 5 µm TCS inhibits thapsigargin-stimulated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells: further evidence that TCS disrupts mast cell signaling. Our data indicate that TCS is a mitochondrial uncoupler, and TCS may affect numerous cell types and functions via this mechanism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26204821

  18. High heat flux mirror design for an undulator beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonnessen, Thomas W.; Fisher, Steven E.; Anthony, Frank M.; Lunt, David L.; Khounsary, Ali M.; Randall, Kevin J.; Gluskin, Efim S.; Yun, Wenbing

    1993-11-01

    A-high-heat-load, horizontally deflecting/focusing mirror is designed for installation on an APS undulator beamline. The main design objective has been to keep the total tangential RMS slope error, including the thermally induced component, to less than 2 (mu) rad with an absorbed beam power on the mirror of 2 kW and a peak flux of 3.2 W/mm2. Extensive examination of various design parameters and detailed thermal/structural analyses has resulted in a mirror design that meets the tight slope-error requirement. Design features include a silicon substrate, a tailored pin-post cooling scheme, a moderate coolant flow rate, primary and secondary cooling areas, a multi-strip coating on the reflecting surface, and inlet/outlet cooling manifolds through an attached Ni-Fe mounting structure.

  19. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R.; Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. |; Castro, J.R. ||

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  20. 1993 CAT workshop on beamline optical designs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    An Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) Workshop on Beamline Optical Designs was held at Argonne National Laboratory on July 26--27, 1993. The goal of this workshop was to bring together experts from various synchrotron sources to provide status reports on crystal, reflecting, and polarizing optics as a baseline for discussions of issues facing optical designers for CAT beamlines at the APS. Speakers from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the University of Chicago, the National Synchrotron Light Source, and the University of Manchester (England) described single- and double-crystal monochromators, mirrors, glass capillaries, and polarizing optics. Following these presentations, the 90 participants divided into three working groups: Crystal Optics Design, Reflecting Optics, and Optics for Polarization Studies. This volume contains copies of the presentation materials from all speakers, summaries of the three working groups, and a ``catalog`` of various monochromator designs.

  1. Synchrotron beamlines for x-ray lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippe, Anthony P.; Pearce, W. J.

    1994-02-01

    Louisiana State University established the J. Bennett Johnston, Sr., Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD). Designed and constructed by the Brobeck Division of Maxwell Laboratories, the CAMD synchrotron light source is the first electron storage ring to be built by a commercial company in the United States. The synchrotron x-ray radiation generated at CAMD is an extremely useful exposure source for both thin and thick film lithography. Passing through a beamline containing two plane mirrors, the synchrotron light is used to expose thin resists for lithography of patterns with feature sizes of 0.25 micron and smaller. Two thick-resist beamlines, one using a single aspheric (collimating) mirror and one using a plane mirror, provide the higher flux photons required for miniaturization in silicon to produce microscopic mechanical devices including gears, motors, filters, and valves.

  2. How good can our beamlines be?

    PubMed Central

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Dauter, Miroslawa; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    The accuracy of X-ray diffraction data depends on the properties of the crystalline sample and on the performance of the data-collection facility (synchrotron beamline elements, goniostat, detector etc.). However, it is difficult to evaluate the level of performance of the experimental setup from the quality of data sets collected in rotation mode, as various crystal properties such as mosaicity, non-uniformity and radiation damage affect the measured intensities. A multiple-image experiment, in which several analogous diffraction frames are recorded consecutively at the same crystal orientation, allows minimization of the influence of the sample properties. A series of 100 diffraction images of a thaumatin crystal were measured on the SBC beamline 19BM at the APS (Argonne National Laboratory). The obtained data were analyzed in the context of the performance of the data-collection facility. An objective way to estimate the uncertainties of individual reflections was achieved by analyzing the behavior of reflection intensities in the series of analogous diffraction images. The multiple-image experiment is found to be a simple and adequate method to decompose the random errors from the systematic errors in the data, which helps in judging the performance of a data-collection facility. In particular, displaying the intensity as a function of the frame number allows evaluation of the stability of the beam, the beamline elements and the detector with minimal influence of the crystal properties. Such an experiment permits evaluation of the highest possible data quality potentially achievable at the particular beamline. PMID:22993097

  3. An Updated AP2 Beamline TURTLE Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, M.; O'Day, S.

    1991-08-23

    This note describes a TURTLE model of the AP2 beamline. This model was created by D. Johnson and improved by J. Hangst. The authors of this note have made additional improvements which reflect recent element and magnet setting changes. The magnet characteristics measurements and survey data compiled to update the model will be presented. A printout of the actual TURTLE deck may be found in appendix A.

  4. Beryllium window for an APS diagnostics beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Yang, B.X.; Sharma, Y.S.

    1997-09-01

    A beryllium (Be) window for an Advanced Photon Source (APS) diagnostics beamline has been designed and built. The window, which has a double concave axisymmetrical profile with a thickness of 0.5 mm at the center, receives 160 W/mm{sup 2} (7 GeV/100 mA stored beam) from an undulator beam. The window design as well as thermal and thermomechanical analyses, including thermal buckling of the Be window, are presented.

  5. How good can our beamlines be?

    SciTech Connect

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Dauter, Miroslawa; Rosenbaum, Gerold Dauter, Zbigniew

    2012-10-01

    A repetitive measurement of the same diffraction image allows to judge the performance of a data collection facility. The accuracy of X-ray diffraction data depends on the properties of the crystalline sample and on the performance of the data-collection facility (synchrotron beamline elements, goniostat, detector etc.). However, it is difficult to evaluate the level of performance of the experimental setup from the quality of data sets collected in rotation mode, as various crystal properties such as mosaicity, non-uniformity and radiation damage affect the measured intensities. A multiple-image experiment, in which several analogous diffraction frames are recorded consecutively at the same crystal orientation, allows minimization of the influence of the sample properties. A series of 100 diffraction images of a thaumatin crystal were measured on the SBC beamline 19BM at the APS (Argonne National Laboratory). The obtained data were analyzed in the context of the performance of the data-collection facility. An objective way to estimate the uncertainties of individual reflections was achieved by analyzing the behavior of reflection intensities in the series of analogous diffraction images. The multiple-image experiment is found to be a simple and adequate method to decompose the random errors from the systematic errors in the data, which helps in judging the performance of a data-collection facility. In particular, displaying the intensity as a function of the frame number allows evaluation of the stability of the beam, the beamline elements and the detector with minimal influence of the crystal properties. Such an experiment permits evaluation of the highest possible data quality potentially achievable at the particular beamline.

  6. Shielding Calculations for NSLS-II Beamlines.

    SciTech Connect

    Job,P.K.; Casey, W.R.

    2008-04-13

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is in the process of designing a new Electron Synchrotron for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. This facility, called the 'National Synchrotron Light Source II' (NSLS-II), will provide x-ray radiation of ultra-high brightness and exceptional spatial and energy resolution. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. The project scope includes the design, construction, installation, and commissioning of the following accelerators: a 200 MeV linac, a booster accelerator operating from 200 MeV to 3.0 GeV, the storage ring which stores 500 mA current of electrons at an energy of 3.0 GeV and 56 beamlines for experiments. It is planned to operate the facility primarily in a top-off mode, thereby maintaining the maximum variation in stored beam current to < 1%. Because of the very demanding requirements for beam emittance and synchrotron radiation brilliance, the beam life-time is expected to be quite low, on the order of 2 hours. Each of the 56 beamlines will be unique in terms of the source properties and configuration. The shielding designs for five representative beamlines are discussed in this paper.

  7. Undulator based beamline studies on U5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, L.; Johnson, P.; Klaffky, R. W.; Smith, N. V.

    An undulator installed on beamline U5 at NSLS is expected to produce an intense flux of photons into a highly collimated beam. At normal operating energies (750 MeV) the FEL undulator is expected to have a fundamental harmonic at wavelength lambda = 300A for magnetic strength parameter K = 1. A simple beamline has been constructed to allow measurements of the absolute photon flux available from this device at wavelengths in the long wavelength tail of the fundamental. The central element of this beamline is a small monochromator based on the chromatic aberration properties of a LiF lens. This lens focuses different wavelengths at different points along the optical axis and monochromatization is achieved by moving the lens to focus different wavelengths onto a fixed 200 microns wide exit slit. Photoelectron spectroscopy was carried out with a CMA; photoelectrons being ejected from a freshly evaporated gold surface. Examination of a typical series of EDC's recorded on this system allows measurements of the bandwidth of the monochromator to be made. By measuring the total yield of electrons from the surface and comparing with previously published electron yield measurements from the same surface it is possible to obtain the total flux of photons from the undultor source.

  8. Beamline Performance Simulations for the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, P. R.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Huerto, R. R.; Koehler, P.; Desai, D.; Mahurin, R.; Yue, A.; Palmquist, G. R.; Snow, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are being performed to design and characterize the neutron optics components for the two fundamental neutron physics beamlines at the Spallation Neutron Source. Optimization of the cold beamline includes characterization of the guides and benders, the neutron transmission through the 0.89 nm monochromator, and the expected performance of the four time-of-flight choppers. The locations and opening angles of the choppers have been studied using a simple spreadsheet-based analysis that was developed for other SNS chopper instruments. The spreadsheet parameters are then optimized using Monte Carlo techniques to obtain the results presented in this paper. Optimization of the 0.89 nm beamline includes characterizing the double crystal monochromator and the downstream guides. The simulations continue to be refined as components are ordered and their exact size and performance specifications are determined.

  9. Status of the Design of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.; Chen, A.Z.; Childress, S.C.; Moore, C.D.; Papadimitriou, V.; Campbell, M.R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota, about 1300 km away. The neutrinos are produced as follows: First, protons extracted from the MI-10 section of the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target above grade and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into a 200 m long decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the modelling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW in order to enable the facility to run with an upgraded accelerator complex. We discuss here the status of the design and the associated challenges.

  10. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L.; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; LaMarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F.; Orville, Allen M.; Robinson, Howard H.; Roessler, Christian G.; Schneider, Dieter K.; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S.; Sweet, Robert M.; Berman, Lonny E.

    2014-01-01

    Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community. PMID:24763654

  11. Design of Beamline BL9 at Saga Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Tooru; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Kamada, Masao; Nishio, Mitsuhiro; Guo, Qixin; Masuda, Masataka; Motooka, Teruaki; Kondo, Yuzi; Hayashida, Kazuki; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Okajima, Toshihiro

    2007-01-19

    Saga Light Source (SAGA-LS), which has been constructed at Tosu city in Saga prefecture, is a compact synchrotron light source with storage electron energy of 1.4 GeV. A new beamline for the development of advanced materials and processing has been designed, and is now under construction at BL9 of SAGA-LS. This beamline is one of the three bending magnet beamlines (BL9, BL12, and BL15) constructed by Saga Prefectural Government. In this paper, we describe the design and the expected optical performance of the beamline BL9 at SAGA-LS.

  12. Medical research and multidisciplinary applications with laser-accelerated beams: the ELIMED netwotk at ELI-Beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, A.; Anzalone, A.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.; Licciardello, T.; Maggiore, M.; Manti, L.; Margarone, D.; Musumarra, A.; Perozziello, F.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Romano, F. P.; Stancampiano, C.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Torrisi, L.; Tudisco, S.

    2014-04-01

    Laser accelerated proton beams represent nowadays an attractive alternative to the conventional ones and they have been proposed in different research fields. In particular, the interest has been focused in the possibility of replacing conventional accelerating machines with laser-based accelerators in order to develop a new concept of hadrontherapy facilities, which could result more compact and less expensive. With this background the ELIMED (ELIMED: ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications) research project has been launched by LNS-INFN researchers (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, IT) and ASCR-FZU researchers (Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic-Fyzikální ústar, Prague, Cz), within the pan-European ELI-Beamlines facility framework. Its main purposes are the demonstration of future applications in hadrontherapy of optically accelerated protons and the realization of a laser-accelerated ion transport beamline for multidisciplinary applications. Several challenges, starting from laser-target interaction and beam transport development, up to dosimetric and radiobiological issues, need to be overcome in order to reach the final goals. The design and the realization of a preliminary beam handling and dosimetric system and of an advanced spectrometer for high energy (multi-MeV) laser-accelerated ion beams will be shortly presented in this work.

  13. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  14. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-09-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  15. Functional description of APS beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-02-01

    Traditional synchrotron sources were designed to produce bending magnet radiation and have proven to be an essential scientific tool. Currently, a new generation of synchrotron sources is being built that will be able to accommodate a large number of insertion device (ID) and high quality bending magnet (BM) sources. One example is the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. The research and development effort at the APS is designed to fully develop the potential of this new generation of synchrotron sources. Of the 40 straight sections in the APS storage ring, 34 will be available for IDs. The remaining six sections are reserved for the storage ring hardware and diagnostics. Although the ring incorporates 80 BMs, only 40 of them can be used to extract radiation. The accelerator hardware shadows five of these 40 bending magnets, so the maximum number of BM sources on the lattice is 35. Generally, a photon beamline consists of four functional sections. The first section is the ID or the BM, which provides the radiation source. The second section, which is immediately outside the storage ring but inside a concrete shielding tunnel, is the front end, which is designed to control, define, and/or confine the x-ray beam. In the case of the APS, the front ends are designed to confine the photon beam. The third section, just outside the concrete shielding tunnel and on the experimental floor, is the first optics enclosure, which contains optics to filter and monochromatize the photon beam. The fourth section of a beamline consists of beam transports, additional optics, and experiment stations to do the scientific investigations. This document describes only the front ends of the APS beamlines.

  16. The Dutch-Belgian beamline at the ESRF.

    PubMed

    Borsboom, M; Bras, W; Cerjak, I; Detollenaere, D; Glastra Van Loon, D; Goedtkindt, P; Konijnenburg, M; Lassing, P; Levine, Y K; Munneke, B; Oversluizen, M; Van Tol, R; Vlieg, E

    1998-05-01

    A brief description is given of the design principles and layout of the Dutch-Belgian beamline at the ESRF. This beamline optimizes the use of the available bending-magnet radiation fan by splitting the beam into two branches, each accommodating two experimental techniques. PMID:15263564

  17. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  18. G4beamline Particle Tracking in Matter Dominated Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    T.J. Roberts, K.B. Beard, S. Ahmed, D. Huang, D.M. Kaplan

    2011-03-01

    The G4beamline program is a useful and steadily improving tool to quickly and easily model beam lines and experimental equipment without user programming. It has both graphical and command-line user interfaces. Unlike most accelerator physics codes, it easily handles a wide range of materials and fields, being particularly well suited for the study of muon and neutrino facilities. As it is based on the Geant4 toolkit, G4beamline includes most of what is known about the interactions of particles with matter. We are continuing the development of G4beamline to facilitate its use by a larger set of beam line and accelerator developers. A major new feature is the calculation of space-charge effects. G4beamline is open source and freely available at http://g4beamline.muonsinc.com

  19. A Remote and Virtual Synchrotron Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, J. M.; Alp, E.; Sturhahn, W.

    2012-12-01

    National facilities offer one-of-a-kind opportunities to apply state-of-the-art experimental techniques to the pressing scientific problems of today. Yet, few students are able to experience research projects at national facilities due to limited accessibility caused in part by limited involvement in the local academic institution, constrained working areas at the experimental stations, and/or travel costs. We present a virtual and remote beam-line for Earth science studies using nuclear resonant and inelastic x-ray scattering methods at Sector 3 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Off-site students have the capability of controlling their measurements via secure internet connections and webcams. Students can access a 'view only mode' for ease of interaction and safety-control. More experienced users have exclusive control of the experiment and can remotely change variables within the experimental setup. Students may also access the virtual aspects these experiments by simulating certain conditions with our newly developed software. We evaluate such a tool by giving "before" and "after" assignments to students at different levels. These levels include high-school students from the Pasadena and greater Los Angeles area school districts, undergraduate students from Caltech's SURF/MURF program, and graduate students at Caltech. We specifically target underrepresented groups. Our results thus far show that the capabilities offered by our remote and virtual beamline show improved knowledge and understanding of applying experimental-based studies at the synchrotron to solve problems in the Earth sciences.

  20. The mammography project at the SYRMEP beamline.

    PubMed

    Dreossi, D; Abrami, A; Arfelli, F; Bregant, P; Casarin, K; Chenda, V; Cova, M A; Longo, R; Menk, R-H; Quai, E; Quaia, E; Rigon, L; Rokvic, T; Sanabor, D; Tonutti, M; Tromba, G; Vascotto, A; Zanconati, F; Castelli, E

    2008-12-01

    A clinical program for X-ray phase contrast (PhC) mammography with synchrotron radiation (SR) has been started in March 2006 at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra, the SR facility in Trieste, Italy. The original beamline layout has been modified substantially and a clinical facility has been realized. In order to fulfill all security requirements, dedicated systems have been designed and implemented, following redundancy criteria and "fail safe" philosophy. Planar radiographic images are obtained by scanning simultaneously the patient and the detector through the stationary and laminar SR beam. In this first phase of the project a commercial screen-film system has been used as image receptor. Upon approval by the respective authorities, the mammography program is about half way to conclusion. Up to now about 50 patients have been examined. The patients are volunteers recruited by the radiologist after conventional examinations at the hospital resulted in an uncertain diagnosis. As an example one case of PhC SR mammography is shown and compared to conventional digital mammography. Preliminary analysis shows the high diagnostic quality of the PhC SR images that were acquired with equal or less delivered dose compared to the conventional ones. PMID:18617344

  1. Diagnostics Beamline for the SRF Gun Project

    SciTech Connect

    T. Kamps; V. Durr; K. Goldammer; D. Kramer; P. Kuske; J. Kuszynski; D. Lipka; F. Marhauser; T. Quast; D. Richter; U. Lehnert; P. Michel; J. Teichert; P. Evtushenko; I. Will

    2005-08-22

    A superconducting radio-frequency photo electron injector (SRF gun) is currently under construction by a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZR and MBI. The project aims at the design and setup of a CW SRF gun including a diagnostics beamline for the ELBE FEL and to address R&D issues on low emittance injectors for future light sources such as the BESSY FEL. Of critical importance for the injector performance is the control of the electron beam parameters. For this reason a compact diagnostics beamline is under development serving a multitude of operation settings ranging from low-charge (77pC), low-emittance (1 mm mrad) mode to high-charge (2.5nC) operation of the gun. For these operation modes beam dynamics simulations are resulting in boundary conditions for the beam instrumentation. Proven and mature technology is projected wherever possible, for example for current and beam position monitoring. The layout of the beam profile and emittance measurement systems is described. For the bunch length, which varies between 5 ps and 50 ps, two schemes using electro-optical sampling and Cherenkov radiation are detailed. The beam energy and energy spread is measured with a 180-degree spectrometer.

  2. The Infrared Microspectroscopy Beamline at CAMD

    SciTech Connect

    Kizilkaya, O.; Singh, V.; Desta, Y.; Pease, M.; Roy, A.; Scott, J.; Goettert, J.; Morikawa, E.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.

    2007-01-19

    The first infrared microspectroscopy beamline at the Louisiana State University, Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (LSU-CAMD) has been constructed and dedicated to investigation of samples from various disciplines including chemistry, geology, biology, and material sciences. The beamline comprises a simple optical configuration. A planar and toroidal mirror pair collects 50 and 15 mrad synchrotron radiation in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, and focuses the beam through a diamond window located outside of the shielding wall. This focus acts as a new source point for the rest of the optical systems. The synchrotron beam spot size of 35 {mu}m and 12 {mu}m is measured in the x and y direction of the sample stage position of the microscope. This small beam spot has a superior brightness compared to conventional IR sources and allows spatially resolved measurements with very good signal/noise ratio. Compared to a conventional thermal source, synchrotron radiation provides 30 times better intensity and a two orders of magnitude greater signal/noise ratio when measuring with microscope aperture size of 15 x 15 {mu}m{sup 2}. The results of the studies on the fungus-plant interaction with its resultant effects on the healthy leaves, and bacterial growth process in the crystallization of gordaite, a mineral, are presented.

  3. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  4. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  5. A heat transfer study for beamline components in high-power wiggler and undulator beamlines. Part I. Beam stops

    SciTech Connect

    Bedzyk, M. J.; Keeffe, M. J.; Schildkamp, W.; Shen, Q.

    1989-07-01

    The heat transfer capabilities of beam stops in CHESS wiggler and undulator beamlines is described. The thermal analysis for the design of these crucial in-vacuum beamline components is based on the use of a finite element analysis computer calculation and experimental heat loading tests.

  6. The ACCM Beamlines For Bioscience Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. I.; Chang, S. H.; Liu, C. Y.; Juang, J. M.; Chang, C. H.; Tsang, K. L.

    2007-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand of X-ray beamlines for bioscience research, we have designed two high-performance, side-branch, asymmetric-cut curved crystal monochromator (ACCM) beamlines to fully utilize the sideway output of the superconducting wiggler SW6 at NSRRC. Each of these two beamlines (BL13A and BL13C) collects 1 mrad of the radiation fan in the horizontal direction, one centered at 3 mrad and the other at 4 mrad away from the central line of the wiggler output. The newly designed ACCMs are capable of energy scanning from 12 keV to 14 keV and offer good performances in terms of flux, resolution and stability. The ACCMs are designed and built in-house, combining efficient cooling and bending mechanisms in a compact unit that allows precise adjustments on a goniometer assembly. The bender is specially designed with symmetrically driven piezo-actuators that minimize center displacement during bending. Both direct and indirect cooling methods were tested; the former using Ga/In directly under the beam footprint and the latter using both sides of the crystal clamping area for cooling. Performance of the beamlines employing both cooling methods has been measured. The indirect cooling method provides 4.9 × 1010 photons/sec through a pair of 100 μm slits (H × V) with energy resolution of 5.3 × 10-3 (ΔE/E) at 12.7 keV. Higher energy resolution in the 10-4 range can be achieved by adjusting the horizontal source fan or the crystal radius at the expense of flux. The direct cooling method provides 1.4 × 1010 photons/sec through a pair of 100 μm slits (H × V) with energy resolution of 1.2 × 10-3 (ΔE/E) at 12.7 keV. The FWHM of the focused beam profile in the indirect cooling mode is 800 × 109 μm (H × V), and 800 × 283 μm (H × V) in the direct cooling mode with some horizontal tail, the latter being larger due to influence of the Ga/In layer on the crystal shape. Cooling efficiency is excellent in the direct cooling mode, in which the performance

  7. High-pressure beamline (PLANET) at the spallation neutron source, J-PARC (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagi, H.; Hattori, T.; Arima, H.; Utsumi, W. S.; Komatsu, K.; Nagai, T.; Yagi, T.

    2009-12-01

    Material and Life Science experimental Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) will be one of the most powerful spallation neutron facilities in the world. The pulsed neutron source with a liquid Hg target is designed to be running at 25 Hz with a power of 1 MW. We have started the construction of the powder diffractometer dedicated to high-pressure experiments (PLANET) on BL-11. PLANET aims to study structures of hydrogen-bearing materials including dense hydrous minerals of the Earth’s deep interior, magmas and light element liquids. The instrument will realize diffraction and radiography experiments for powder and liquid/glass samples at high pressures up to 20 GPa and 2000 K using a large sized multi-anvil hydraulic press that can apply forces of ˜1500 ton. The instrument views a decoupled liquid H2 moderator with a cross section of 100 × 100 mm2. The primary and secondary fight paths are 25 m and 1.5 m, respectively. The 11.5-m-long supermirror guide with elliptical shape starts at a distance of 11.5 m from the moderator. Design of elliptical geometry is optimized by means of incorporating several different grade mirrors and linear approximation with planar guide in order to save cost for production without degradation of the intensity performance. The guide has a rectangular cross-section and consists of four walls coated with supermirror material. Sample is placed at 2 m from the guide exit. The 90° detectors will be installed at 1.5 m from the sample position. For the powder diffraction measurements using a multi-anvil press, an incident neutron beam passes through the vertical anvil gaps and irradiates the sample in the pressure medium. Diffracted neutrons go through the other anvil gaps at 90° direction. Half inch 3He linear position sensitive detectors with 600 mm length will be arranged horizontally and form these detector banks, which cover the scattering angle of 79° ≤ 2θ ≤ 101° and -35° ≤ Φ ≤ +35°. The

  8. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos. PMID:27610839

  9. Phase-space analysis and experimental results for secondary focusing at X-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Rong; Meron, Mati; Kujala, Naresh; Barrea, Raul A.

    2011-11-17

    Micro-focusing optical devices at synchrotron beamlines usually have a limited acceptance, but more flux can be intercepted if such optics are used to focus secondary sources created by the primary optics. Flux throughput can be maximized by placing the secondary focusing optics close to or exactly at the secondary source position. However, standard methods of beamline optics analysis, such as the lens equation or matching the mirror surface to an ellipse, work poorly when the source-to-optics distance is very short. In this paper the general characteristics of the focusing of beams with Gaussian profiles by a 'thin lens' are analysed under the paraxial approximation in phase space, concluding that the focusing of a beam with a short source-to-optics distance is distinct from imaging the source; slope errors are successfully included in all the formulas so that they can be used to calculate beamline focusing with good accuracy. A method is also introduced to use the thin-lens result to analyse the micro-focusing produced by an elliptically bent trapezoid-shaped Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror. The results of this analysis are in good agreement with ray-tracing simulations and are confirmed by the experimental results of the secondary focusing at the 18-ID Bio-CAT beamline (at the APS). The result of secondary focusing carried out at 18-ID using a single-bounce capillary can also be explained using this phase-space analysis. A discussion of the secondary focusing results is presented at the end of this paper.

  10. Mirrors for synchrotron-radiation beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    The authors consider the role of mirrors in synchrotron-radiation beamlines and discuss the optical considerations involved in their design. They discuss toroidal, spherical, elliptical, and paraboloidal mirrors in detail with particular attention to their aberration properties. They give a treatment of the sine condition and describe its role in correcting the coma of axisymmetric systems. They show in detail how coma is inevitable in single-reflection, grazing-incidence systems but correctable in two-reflection systems such as those of the Wolter type. In an appendix, they give the theory of point aberrations of reflectors of a general shape and discuss the question of correct naming of aberrations. In particular, a strict definition of coma is required if attempts at correction are to be based on the sine condition.

  11. Fast fluorescence techniques for crystallography beamlines

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Sergey; Hilgart, Mark; Yoder, Derek W.; Makarov, Oleg; Becker, Michael; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Ogata, Craig M.; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin; Smith, Janet L.; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on several developments of X-ray fluorescence techniques for macromolecular crystallography recently implemented at the National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Cancer Institute beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. These include (i) three-band on-the-fly energy scanning around absorption edges with adaptive positioning of the fine-step band calculated from a coarse pass; (ii) on-the-fly X-ray fluorescence rastering over rectangular domains for locating small and invisible crystals with a shuttle-scanning option for increased speed; (iii) fluorescence rastering over user-specified multi-segmented polygons; and (iv) automatic signal optimization for reduced radiation damage of samples. PMID:21808424

  12. Advanced beamline automation for biological crystallography experiments.

    PubMed

    Cork, Carl; O'Neill, James; Taylor, John; Earnest, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    An automated crystal-mounting/alignment system has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and has been installed on three of the protein-crystallography experimental stations at the Advanced Light Source (ALS); it is currently being implemented at synchrotron crystallography beamlines at CHESS, NSLS and the APS. The benefits to using an automounter system include (i) optimization of the use of synchrotron beam time, (ii) facilitation of advanced data-collection techniques, (iii) collection of higher quality data, (iv) reduction of the risk to crystals and (v) exploration of systematic studies of experimental protocols. Developments on the next-generation automounter with improvements in robustness, automated alignment and sample tracking are under way, with an end-to-end data-flow process being developed to allow remote data collection and monitoring. PMID:16855300

  13. Commissioning of a microprobe-XRF beamline (BL-16) on Indus-2 synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, M. K.; Gupta, P.; Sinha, A. K.; Garg, C. K.; Singh, A. K.; Kane, S. R.; Garg, S. R.; Lodha, G. S.

    2012-06-05

    We report commissioning of the microprobe-XRF beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron source. The beamline has been recently made operational and is now open for the user's experiments. The beamline comprises of Si(111) double crystal monochromator and Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing optics. The beamline covers wide photon energy range of 4 - 20 keV using both collimated and micro-focused beam modes. The design details and the first commissioning results obtained using this beamline are presented.

  14. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users’ Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    PubMed Central

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  15. Proton-air and proton-proton cross sections from air shower data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsley, J.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the fluctuations in depth of maximum development of cosmic ray air showers, corrected for the effects of mixed primary composition and shower development fluctuations, yield values of the inelastic proton-air cross section for laboratory energies in the range 10 to the 8th power to 10 to the 10th power GeV. From these values of proton-air cross section, corresponding values of the proton-proton total cross section are derived by means of Glauber theory and geometrical scaling. The resulting values of proton-proton cross section are inconsistent with a well known 1n(2)s extrapolation of ISR data which is consistent with SPS data; they indicate a less rapid rate of increase in the interval 540 sq root of s 100000 GeV.

  16. Moly99 Production Facility: Report on Beamline Components, Requirements, Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip A.

    2015-12-23

    In FY14 we completed the design of the beam line for the linear accelerator production design concept. This design included a set of three bending magnets, quadrupole focusing magnets, and octopoles to flatten the beam on target. This design was generic and applicable to multiple different accelerators if necessary. In FY15 we built on that work to create specifications for the individual beam optic elements, including power supply requirements. This report captures the specification of beam line components with initial cost estimates for the NorthStar production facility.This report is organized as follows: The motivation of the beamline design is introduced briefly, along with renderings of the design. After that, a specific list is provided, which accounts for each beamline component, including part numbers and costs, to construct the beamline. After that, this report details the important sections of the beamline and individual components. A final summary and list of follow-on activities completes this report.

  17. New HMI hard X-ray Diffraction Beamlines at BESSY

    SciTech Connect

    Denks, I. A.; Genzel, C.; Dudzik, E.; Feyerherm, R.; Klaus, M.; Wagener, G.

    2007-01-19

    Since April 2005 the Hahn-Meitner-Institute is operating two new beamlines for energy dispersive diffraction experiments (EDDI) and for (resonant) magnetic scattering (MAGS) at BESSY. The source for both beamlines is a superconducting 7 T multipole wiggler which provides hard X-ray photons with energies between 4 and 150 keV. The EDDI beamline uses the white beam and is intended for residual stress measurements on small samples as well as heavy engineering parts. The MAGS beamline delivers a focussed monochromatic beam with photon fluxes in the 1012 (s 100 mA 0.1 % bandwidth)-1 range at energies from 4 to 30 keV. It is equipped for single crystal diffraction and resonant (magnetic) scattering experiments as well as for the study of thin films, micro-, and nanostructures in materials science.

  18. New HMI hard X-ray Diffraction Beamlines at BESSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denks, I. A.; Genzel, C.; Dudzik, E.; Feyerherm, R.; Klaus, M.; Wagener, G.

    2007-01-01

    Since April 2005 the Hahn-Meitner-Institute is operating two new beamlines for energy dispersive diffraction experiments (EDDI) and for (resonant) magnetic scattering (MAGS) at BESSY. The source for both beamlines is a superconducting 7 T multipole wiggler which provides hard X-ray photons with energies between 4 and 150 keV. The EDDI beamline uses the white beam and is intended for residual stress measurements on small samples as well as heavy engineering parts. The MAGS beamline delivers a focussed monochromatic beam with photon fluxes in the 1012 (s 100 mA 0.1 % bandwidth)-1 range at energies from 4 to 30 keV. It is equipped for single crystal diffraction and resonant (magnetic) scattering experiments as well as for the study of thin films, micro-, and nanostructures in materials science.

  19. A hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline for nanoscale microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winarski, Robert P.; Holt, Martin V.; Rose, Volker; Fuesz, Peter; Carbaugh, Dean; Benson, Christa; Shu, Deming; Kline, David; Stephenson, G. Brian; McNulty, Ian; Maser, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline (or Nanoprobe Beamline) is an X-ray microscopy facility incorporating diffraction, fluorescence and full-field imaging capabilities designed and operated by the Center for Nanoscale Materials and the Advanced Photon Source at Sector 26 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was constructed to probe the nanoscale structure of biological, environmental and material sciences samples. The beamline provides intense focused X-rays to the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (or Nanoprobe) which incorporates Fresnel zone plate optics and a precision laser sensing and control system. The beamline operates over X-ray energies from 3 to 30 keV, enabling studies of most elements in the periodic table, with a particular emphasis on imaging transition metals. PMID:23093770

  20. New Large Volume Press Beamlines at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, H. J.; Hormes, J.; Lauterjung, J.; Secco, R.; Hallin, E.

    2013-12-01

    The Canadian Light Source, the German Research Centre for Geosciences and the Western University recently agreed to establish two new large volume press beamlines at the Canadian Lightsource. As the first step a 250 tons DIA-LVP will be installed at the IDEAS beamline in 2014. The further development is associated with the construction of a superconducting wiggler beamline at the Brockhouse sector. A 1750 tons DIA LVP will be installed there about 2 years later. Up to the completion of this wiggler beamline the big press will be used for offline high pressure high temperature experiments under simulated Earth's mantle conditions. In addition to X-ray diffraction, all up-to-date high pressure techniques as ultrasonic interferometry, deformation analyses by X-radiography, X-ray densitometry, falling sphere viscosimetry, multi-staging etc. will be available at both beamlines. After the required commissioning the beamlines will be open to the worldwide user community from Geosciences, general material sciences, physics, chemistry, biology etc. based on the evaluation and ranking of the submitted user proposals by an international review panel.

  1. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  2. ALS beamlines for independent investigators: A summary of the capabilities and characteristics of beamlines at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    There are two mods of conducting research at the ALS: To work as a member of a participating research team (PRT). To work as a member of a participating research team (PRT); to work as an independent investigator; PRTs are responsible for building beamlines, end stations, and, in some cases, insertion devices. Thus, PRT members have privileged access to the ALS. Independent investigators will use beamline facilities made available by PRTs. The purpose of this handbook is to describe these facilities.

  3. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  4. Beamline Insertions Manager at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael C.

    2015-09-01

    The beam viewer system at Jefferson Lab provides operators and beam physicists with qualitative and quantitative information on the transverse electron beam properties. There are over 140 beam viewers installed on the 12 GeV CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes an upgrade consisting of replacing the EPICS-based system tasked with managing all viewers with a mixed system utilizing EPICS and high-level software. Most devices, particularly the beam viewers, cannot be safely inserted into the beam line during high-current beam operations. Software is partly responsible for protecting the machine from untimely insertions. The multiplicity of beam-blocking and beam-vulnerable devices motivates us to try a data-driven approach. The beamline insertions application components are centrally managed and configured through an object-oriented software framework created for this purpose. A rules-based engine tracks the configuration and status of every device, along with the beam status of the machine segment containing the device. The application uses this information to decide on which device actions are allowed at any given time.

  5. Diamond beamline I07: a beamline for surface and interface diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Nicklin, Chris; Arnold, Tom; Rawle, Jonathan; Warne, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Beamline I07 at Diamond Light Source is dedicated to the study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces for a wide range of sample types, from soft matter to ultrahigh vacuum. The beamline operates in the energy range 8–30 keV and has two endstations. The first houses a 2+3 diffractometer, which acts as a versatile platform for grazing-incidence techniques including surface X-ray diffraction, grazing-incidence small- (and wide-) angle X-ray scattering, X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. A method for deflecting the X-rays (a double-crystal deflector) has been designed and incorporated into this endstation, extending the surfaces that can be studied to include structures formed on liquid surfaces or at liquid–liquid interfaces. The second experimental hutch contains a similar diffractometer with a large environmental chamber mounted on it, dedicated to in situ ultrahigh-vacuum studies. It houses a range of complementary surface science equipment including a scanning tunnelling microscope, low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ensuring that correlations between the different techniques can be performed on the same sample, in the same chamber. This endstation allows accurate determination of well ordered structures, measurement of growth behaviour during molecular beam epitaxy and has also been used to measure coherent X-ray diffraction from nanoparticles during alloying. PMID:27577783

  6. Diamond beamline I07: a beamline for surface and interface diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nicklin, Chris; Arnold, Tom; Rawle, Jonathan; Warne, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Beamline I07 at Diamond Light Source is dedicated to the study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces for a wide range of sample types, from soft matter to ultrahigh vacuum. The beamline operates in the energy range 8-30 keV and has two endstations. The first houses a 2+3 diffractometer, which acts as a versatile platform for grazing-incidence techniques including surface X-ray diffraction, grazing-incidence small- (and wide-) angle X-ray scattering, X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. A method for deflecting the X-rays (a double-crystal deflector) has been designed and incorporated into this endstation, extending the surfaces that can be studied to include structures formed on liquid surfaces or at liquid-liquid interfaces. The second experimental hutch contains a similar diffractometer with a large environmental chamber mounted on it, dedicated to in situ ultrahigh-vacuum studies. It houses a range of complementary surface science equipment including a scanning tunnelling microscope, low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ensuring that correlations between the different techniques can be performed on the same sample, in the same chamber. This endstation allows accurate determination of well ordered structures, measurement of growth behaviour during molecular beam epitaxy and has also been used to measure coherent X-ray diffraction from nanoparticles during alloying. PMID:27577783

  7. A beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Padmore, H.A.; Earnest, T.; Kim, S.H.; Thompson, A.C.; Robinson, A.L.

    1994-08-01

    A beamline for macromolecular crystallography has been designed for the ALS. The source will be a 37-pole wiggler with a, 2-T on-axis peak field. The wiggler will illuminate three beamlines, each accepting 3 mrad of horizontal aperture. The central beamline will primarily be used for multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion measurements in the wavelength range from 4 to 0.9 {angstrom}. The beamline optics will comprise a double-crystal monochromator with a collimating pre-mirror and a double-focusing mirror after the monochromator. The two side stations will be used for fixed-wavelength experiments within the wavelength range from 1.5 to 0.95 {angstrom}. The optics will consist of a conventional vertically focusing cylindrical mirror followed by an asymmetrically cut curved-crystal monochromator. This paper presents details of the optimization of the wiggler source for crystallography, gives a description of the beamline configuration, and discusses the reasons for the choices made.

  8. An XAFS Beamline at the SAGA Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, Toshihiro; Hara, Kazuhiro; Tabata, Masaaki; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Chikaura, Yoshinori

    2007-02-02

    A new hard X-ray beamline, BL15, has been designed and constructed at the SAGA-Light Source. The beamline is optimized for industrial applications of the synchrotron light. X-rays with photon energies from 2.1 keV to 14.2 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator and a bent cylindrical mirror. Basic experimental equipments for XAFS measurement, high resolution diffractometry, various kinds of X-ray imaging and energy-dispersive diffractometry have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, we show that BL15 can perform XAFS measurements.

  9. Upgrade of Saga-university beamline in SAGA-LS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Imamura, M.; Yamamoto, I.; Azuma, J.; Ogawa, K.; Kamada, M.; Ohkuma, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-03-01

    Saga-university beamline has been upgraded by installing a new planar-typ e undulator for advanced researches on nano-surfaces and interfaces in the soft X-ray region. The magnetic field of the undulator along the electron beam trajectory was measured at the magnetic gap width between 30 and 150 mm. After the installation of the undulator in a 2.7-m straight section of the Saga-LS storage ring, the performance of the beamline with varied line spacing plane grating monochromator was examined by measurements of peak energy, photon flux, and energy resolution. The beamline is opened for the experimental use in the energy region between 32 and 800 eV using fundamental and the higher harmonics.

  10. Status and evolution of the ESRF beamline ID19

    SciTech Connect

    Weitkamp, Timm; Tafforeau, Paul; Boller, Elodie; Cloetens, Peter; Valade, Jean-Paul; Bernard, Pascal; Baruchel, Jose; Peyrin, Francoise; Helfen, Lukas

    2010-04-06

    The ESRF synchrotron beamline ID19, dedicated to full-field parallel-beam imaging techniques such as phase-contrast and absorption microtomography and X-ray topography, is one of the most versatile instruments of its kind. This paper presents key characteristics of ID19 in its present form, names examples for research and development performed on the beamline, and outlines the plans for an upgrade on the beamline in coming years, to adapt to the growing needs of the user community. The technical goals envisioned include an increase in available beam size and maximum photon energy, and a substantial increase in flux density for applications using beams of small and intermediate size.

  11. The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Geoffrey; Cianciolo, Vince; Koehler, Paul; Allen, Richard; Snow, William Michael; Huffman, Paul; Gould, Chris; Bowman, David; Cooper, Martin; Doyle, John

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), currently under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory with an anticipated start-up in early 2006, will provide the most intense pulsed beams of cold neutrons in the world. At a projected power of 1.4 MW, the time averaged fluxes and fluences of the SNS will approach those of high flux reactors. One of the flight paths on the cold, coupled moderator will be devoted to fundamental neutron physics. The fundamental neutron physics beamline is anticipated to include two beam-lines; a broad band cold beam, and a monochromatic beam of 0.89 nm neutrons for ultracold neutron (UCN) experiments. The fundamental neutron physics beamline will be operated as a user facility with experiment selection based on a peer reviewed proposal process. An initial program of five experiments in neutron decay, hadronic weak interaction and time reversal symmetry violation have been proposed. PMID:27308112

  12. Far-Infrared Beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; May, Tim E.

    2014-06-01

    The far-infrared beamline at the Canadian Light Source is a state of the art user facility, which offers significantly more far-infrared brightness than conventional globar sources. The infrared radiation is collected from a bending magnet through a 55 X 37 mrad2 port to a Bruker IFS 125 HR spectrometer, which is equipped with a nine compartment scanning arm, allowing it to achieve spectral resolution better than 0.001 cm-1. Currently the beamline can achieve signal to noise ratios up to 8 times that which can be achieved using a traditional thermal source. This talk will provide an overview of the the beamline, and the capabilities available to users, recent and planned improvements including the addition of a Glow Discharge cell and advances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation. Furthermore, the process of acquiring access to the facility will be covered.

  13. The Far-Infrared Beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant; May, Tim

    2009-06-01

    The far-infrared beamline at the Canadian Light Source. is a state of the art facility, which offers significantly more far-infrared brightness than conventional globar sources. While there is the potential to direct this advantage to many research areas, to date most of the effort has been directed toward high-resolution gas phase studies. The infrared radiation is collected from a bending magnet through a 55 X 37 mrad^{2} port to a Bruker IFS 125 HR spectrometer, which is equipped with a nine compartment scanning arm, allowing it to achieve spectral resolution better than 0.001 cm^{-1}. Currently the beamline can achieve signal to noise ratios up to 8 times that which can be achieved using a traditional thermal source. Data from the recently completed commissioning experiments will be presented along with a general overview of the beamline.

  14. Effect of baseline gastrointestinal risk and use of proton pump inhibitors on frequency of discontinuation of aspirin for secondary cardiovascular prevention in United kingdom primary care.

    PubMed

    Martín Merino, Elisa; Johansson, Saga; Nagy, Péter; García Rodríguez, Luis A

    2013-10-15

    For patients at high cardiovascular and high gastrointestinal (GI) risk, coprescription of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) with low-dose aspirin is recommended. We aimed to quantify the extent to which low-dose aspirin discontinuation in patients at high cardiovascular risk is affected by PPI use and baseline GI risk. Patients aged 50 to 84 years who had evidence of ischemic heart disease or cardiovascular disease and who were new users of low-dose aspirin in 2000 to 2007 were identified using The Health Improvement Network (n = 35,604). Aspirin discontinuation was defined as a period of at least 90 days after completion of the last prescribed course during which no repeat prescription was issued. The incidence of low-dose aspirin discontinuation was 26.8 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI] 26.2 to 27.4). The age-, gender-, and indication-adjusted risk of aspirin discontinuation was 15% less among continuous PPI users than among PPI nonusers (hazard ratio [HR] 0.85, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.92); after further adjusting for number of coprescribed medications, the HR was 0.95 (95% CI 0.87 to 1.03). Continuous PPI use was associated with a reduced risk of aspirin discontinuation among patients at high GI risk (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.74 to 0.93) but not among those at low GI risk (HR 1.08; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.21). In conclusion, among patients at high GI risk, concomitant users of aspirin and PPI showed a greater aspirin adherence than aspirin users not on PPI. Further studies need to confirm factors with the potential to increase adherence to long-term aspirin. PMID:23831164

  15. Distributed control of protein crystallography beamline 5.0 using CORBA

    SciTech Connect

    Timossi, Chris

    1999-09-24

    The Protein Crystallography Beamline at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source is a facility that is being used to solve the structure of proteins. The software that is being used to control this beamline uses Java for user interface applications which communicate via CORBA with workstations that control the beamline hardware. We describe the software architecture for the beamline and our experiences after two years of operation.

  16. Kinematic mounting systems for NSLS beamlines and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oversluizen, T.; Stoeber, W.; Johnson, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for kinematically mounting equipment are well established, but applications at synchrotron radiation facilities are subject to constraints not always encountered in more traditional laboratory settings. Independent position adjustment of beamline components can have significant benefits in terms of minimizing time spent aligning, and maximizing time spent acquiring data. In this paper, we use examples taken from beamlines at the NSLS to demonstrate approaches for optimization of the reproducibility, stability, excursion, and set-up time for various situations. From our experience, we extract general principles which we hope will be useful for workers at other synchrotron radiation facilities. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  17. APS beamline standard components handbook, Version 1. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, U.; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-02-01

    This Handbook in its current version (1.3) contains descriptions, specifications, and preliminary engineering design drawings for many of the standard components. The design status and schedules have been provided wherever possible. In the near future, the APS plans to update engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components and complete the Handbook. The completed version of this Handbook will become available to both the CATs and potential vendors. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction.

  18. The Materials Science beamline upgrade at the Swiss Light Source.

    PubMed

    Willmott, P R; Meister, D; Leake, S J; Lange, M; Bergamaschi, A; Böge, M; Calvi, M; Cancellieri, C; Casati, N; Cervellino, A; Chen, Q; David, C; Flechsig, U; Gozzo, F; Henrich, B; Jäggi-Spielmann, S; Jakob, B; Kalichava, I; Karvinen, P; Krempasky, J; Lüdeke, A; Lüscher, R; Maag, S; Quitmann, C; Reinle-Schmitt, M L; Schmidt, T; Schmitt, B; Streun, A; Vartiainen, I; Vitins, M; Wang, X; Wullschleger, R

    2013-09-01

    The Materials Science beamline at the Swiss Light Source has been operational since 2001. In late 2010, the original wiggler source was replaced with a novel insertion device, which allows unprecedented access to high photon energies from an undulator installed in a medium-energy storage ring. In order to best exploit the increased brilliance of this new source, the entire front-end and optics had to be redesigned. In this work, the upgrade of the beamline is described in detail. The tone is didactic, from which it is hoped the reader can adapt the concepts and ideas to his or her needs. PMID:23955029

  19. The Materials Science beamline upgrade at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, P. R.; Meister, D.; Leake, S. J.; Lange, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Böge, M.; Calvi, M.; Cancellieri, C.; Casati, N.; Cervellino, A.; Chen, Q.; David, C.; Flechsig, U.; Gozzo, F.; Henrich, B.; Jäggi-Spielmann, S.; Jakob, B.; Kalichava, I.; Karvinen, P.; Krempasky, J.; Lüdeke, A.; Lüscher, R.; Maag, S.; Quitmann, C.; Reinle-Schmitt, M. L.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, B.; Streun, A.; Vartiainen, I.; Vitins, M.; Wang, X.; Wullschleger, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Materials Science beamline at the Swiss Light Source has been operational since 2001. In late 2010, the original wiggler source was replaced with a novel insertion device, which allows unprecedented access to high photon energies from an undulator installed in a medium-energy storage ring. In order to best exploit the increased brilliance of this new source, the entire front-end and optics had to be redesigned. In this work, the upgrade of the beamline is described in detail. The tone is didactic, from which it is hoped the reader can adapt the concepts and ideas to his or her needs. PMID:23955029

  20. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  1. Front end for high-repetition rate thin disk-pumped OPCPA beamline at ELI-beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Jonathan T.; Novák, Jakub; Antipenkov, Roman; Batysta, František; Zervos, Charalampos; Naylon, Jack A.; Mazanec, TomáÅ.¡; Horáček, Martin; Bakule, Pavel; Rus, Bedřich

    2015-02-01

    The ELI-Beamlines facility, currently under construction in Prague, Czech Republic, will house multiple high power laser systems with varying pulse energies, pulse durations, and repetition rates. Here we present the status of a high repetition rate beamline currently under construction with target parameters of 20 fs pulse duration, 100 mJ pulse energy, and 1 kHz repetition rate. Specifically we present the Yb:YAG thin disk lasers which are intended to pump picosecond OPCPA, synchronization between pump and signal pulses in the OPCPA, and the first stages of OPCPA.

  2. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should be able to resume your normal activities. You will likely see your doctor every 3 to 4 months for a follow-up exam.

  3. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  4. Preliminary measurements on the new TOF system installed at the AMS beamline of INFN-LABEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, L.; Castelli, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Liccioli, L.; Mandò, P. A.; Martini, M.; Mazzinghi, A.; Ruberto, C.; Schiavulli, L.; Sibilia, E.; Taccetti, F.

    2015-10-01

    A high resolution time of flight (TOF) system has been developed at LABEC, the 3 MV Tandem accelerator laboratory in Florence, in order to improve the sensitivity of AMS measurements on carbon samples with ultra-low concentration and also to measure other isotopes, such as 129I. The system can be employed to detect and identify residual interfering particles originated from the break-up of molecular isobars. The set-up has been specifically designed for low energy heavy ions: it consists of two identical time pick-off stations, each made up of a thin conductive foil and a Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) multiplier. The beamline is also equipped with a silicon detector, installed downstream the stop TOF station. In this paper the design of the new system and the implemented readout electronics are presented. The tests performed on the single time pick-off station are reported: they show that the maximum contribution to the timing resolution given by both the intrinsic MCP resolution and the electronics is ⩽500 ps (FWHM). For these tests, single particle pulsed beams of 2-5 MeV protons and 10 MeV 12C3+ ions, to simulate typical AMS conditions, were used. The preliminary TOF and TOF-E (TOF-energy) measurements performed with carbon beams after the installation of the new system on the AMS beam line are also discussed. These measurements were performed using the foil-MCP as the start stage and a silicon detector as the stop stage. The spectra acquired with carbon ions suggest the presence of a small residual background from neighboring masses reaching the end of the beamline with the same energy as the rare isotope.

  5. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  6. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance with wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C

  7. Using the Fermilab proton source for a muon to electron conversion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Bogert, D.; DeJongh, F.; Geer, S.; McGinnis, D.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    The Fermilab proton source is capable of providing 8 GeV protons for both the future long-baseline neutrino program (NuMI), and for a new program of low energy muon experiments. In particular, if the 8 GeV protons are rebunched and then slowly extracted into an external beamline, the resulting proton beam would be suitable for a muon-to-electron conversion experiment designed to improve on the existing sensitivity by three orders of magnitude. We describe a scheme for the required beam manipulations. The scheme uses the Accumulator for momentum stacking, and the Debuncher for bunching and slow extraction. This would permit simultaneous operation of the muon program with the future NuMI program, delivering 10{sup 20} protons per year at 8 GeV for the muon program at the cost of a modest ({approx}10%) reduction in the protons available to the neutrino program.

  8. The Nanoscience Beamline (I06) at Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Dhesi, S. S.; Cavill, S. A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Mott, R. A.; Steadman, P.; Peach, A.; Shepherd, E. L.; Ren, X.; Wagner, U. H.; Reininger, R.

    2010-06-23

    The Nanoscience beamline (I06) is one of seven Diamond Phase-I beamlines which has been operational since January 2007 delivering polarised soft x-rays, for a PhotoEmission Electron Microscope (PEEM) and branchline, in the energy range 80-2100 eV. The beamline is based on a collimated plane grating monochromator with sagittal focusing elements, utilising two APPLE II helical undulator sources, and has been designed for high flux density at the PEEM sample position. A {approx}5 {mu}m ({sigma}) diameter beam is focussed onto the sample in the PEEM allowing a range of experiments using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) as contrast mechanisms. The beamline is also equipped with a branchline housing a 6T superconducting magnet for XMCD and XMLD experiments. The magnet is designed to move on and off the branchline which allows a diverse range of experiments.

  9. The Nanoscience Beamline (I06) at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhesi, S. S.; Cavill, S. A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Mott, R. A.; Steadman, P.; Peach, A.; Shepherd, E. L.; Ren, X.; Wagner, U. H.; Reininger, R.

    2010-06-01

    The Nanoscience beamline (I06) is one of seven Diamond Phase-I beamlines which has been operational since January 2007 delivering polarised soft x-rays, for a PhotoEmission Electron Microscope (PEEM) and branchline, in the energy range 80-2100 eV. The beamline is based on a collimated plane grating monochromator with sagittal focusing elements, utilising two APPLE II helical undulator sources, and has been designed for high flux density at the PEEM sample position. A ˜5 μm (σ) diameter beam is focussed onto the sample in the PEEM allowing a range of experiments using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) as contrast mechanisms. The beamline is also equipped with a branchline housing a 6T superconducting magnet for XMCD and XMLD experiments. The magnet is designed to move on and off the branchline which allows a diverse range of experiments.

  10. Description and calibration beamline SEM/Ion Chamber Current Digitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Schoo, D.

    1994-05-01

    This report discusses the following on beamline SEM/ion chamber current digitizers: Module description; testing and calibration; common setup procedures; summary of fault indications and associated causes; summary of input and output connections; SEM conversion constant table; ion chamber conversion constant table; hexadecimal to decimal conversion table; and schematic diagram.

  11. The High Energy Materials Science Beamline (HEMS) at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, Norbert; King, Andrew; Beckmann, Felix; Ruhnau, Hans-Ulrich; Kirchhof, René; Kiehn, Rüdiger; Müller, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    The HEMS Beamline at the German high-brilliance synchrotron radiation storage ring PETRA III is fully tunable between 30 and 250 keV and optimized for sub-micrometer focusing. Approximately 70 % of the beamtime will be dedicated to Materials Research. Fundamental research will encompass metallurgy, physics and chemistry with first experiments planned for the investigation of the relationship between macroscopic and micro-structural properties of polycrystalline materials, grain-grain-interactions, and the development of smart materials or processes. For this purpose a 3D-microsctructure-mapper has been designed. Applied research for manufacturing process optimization will benefit from high flux in combination with ultra-fast detector systems allowing complex and highly dynamic in-situ studies of micro-structural transformations, e.g. during welding processes. The beamline infrastructure allows accommodation of large and heavy user provided equipment. Experiments targeting the industrial user community will be based on well established techniques with standardized evaluation, allowing full service measurements, e.g. for tomography and texture determination. The beamline consists of a five meter in-vacuum undulator, a general optics hutch, an in-house test facility and three independent experimental hutches working alternately, plus additional set-up and storage space for long-term experiments. HEMS is under commissioning as one of the first beamlines running at PETRA III.

  12. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-01

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  13. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-23

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  14. Pulsed Magnetic Fields for an XAS Energy Dispersive Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Linden, Peter van der; Mathon, Olivier; Neisius, Thomas

    2007-01-19

    Pulsed magnetic fields constitute an attractive alternative to superconducting magnets for many x-ray techniques. The ESRF ID24 energy dispersive beamline was used for pulsed magnetic field room temperature XMCD measurements on GdCo3. The signal has been measured up to a magnetic field of 5.5 Tesla without signs of deterioration.

  15. A synchrotron beamline for delivering high purity vacuum ultraviolet photons

    SciTech Connect

    Cavasso Filho, R. L.; Homen, M. G. P.; Fonseca, P. T.; Naves de Brito, A.

    2007-11-15

    We report on the current status and performance of the toroidal grating monochromator beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron). This beamline provides photons in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions from 12 to 330 eV with three interchangeable gratings. We report on the improvement, which allows the possibility of choosing the light polarization degree from linear to almost circular. Here, we also describe the development of a new apparatus, namely, the mirror-inserted harmonic attenuator and calibrating-device with a long length (MIRHACLLE). All beamlines based on diffraction gratings suffer from the problem of high harmonics contaminations to some extent. The MIRHACLLE provides a way to efficiently suppress high harmonics from 25% to 1 ppm in a grazing incidence bending magnet beamline. Its principle of operation relays on the absorption of the high energy photons in a gas phase region. It allows negligible high harmonics contamination for photon energies ranging from 12 eV to the gas first ionization threshold, 21.6 eV, in the case of neon. We also demonstrate the possibility to use this device for energy calibration and resolution evaluation together with any experiment needing its filtering capabilities. The device is also very cost effective compared to other filters presented previously in the literature.

  16. Neutral beamline with improved ion-energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

    1981-04-13

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  17. Aberration analysis calculations for synchrotron radiation beamline design

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Howells, M.; Padmore, H.A.

    1997-09-01

    The application of ray deviation calculations based on aberration coefficients for a single optical surface for the design of beamline optical systems is reviewed. A systematic development is presented which allows insight into which aberration may be causing the rays to deviate from perfect focus. A new development allowing analytical calculation of line shape is presented.

  18. Beam Instrumentation of the PXIE LEBT Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    D'Arcy, R.; Hanna, B.; Prost, L.; Scarpine, v.; Shemyakin, A.

    2015-06-01

    The PXIE accelerator [1] is the front-end test stand of the proposed Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) [2] initiative: a CW-compatible pulsed H- superconducting RF linac upgrade to Fermilab’s injection system. The PXIE Ion Source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section are designed to create and transfer a 1-10 mA $H^{-}$ beam, in either pulsed (0.001–16 ms) or DC mode, from the ion source through to the injection point of the RFQ. This paper discusses the range of diagnostic tools – Allison-type Emittance Scanner, Faraday Cup, Toroid, DCCT, electrically isolated diaphragms – involved in the commissioning of the beam line and preparation of the beam for injection into the RFQ.

  19. The INE-Beamline for actinide science at ANKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, J.; Butorin, S.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Löble, M.; Metz, V.; Seibert, A.; Steppert, M.; Vitova, T.; Walther, C.; Geckeis, H.

    2012-04-01

    Since its inauguration in 2005, the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA (KIT North Campus) provides dedicated instrumentation for x-ray spectroscopic characterization of actinide samples and other radioactive materials. R&D work at the beamline focuses on various aspects of nuclear waste disposal within INE's mission to provide the scientific basis for assessing long-term safety of a final nuclear waste repository. The INE-Beamline is accessible for the actinide and radiochemistry community through the ANKA proposal system and the European Union Integrated Infrastructure Initiative ACTINET-I3. Experiments with activities up to 1 × 10+6 times the European exemption limit are feasible within a safe but flexible containment concept. Measurements with monochromatic radiation are performed at photon energies varying between ˜2.1 keV (P K-edge) and ˜25 keV (Pd K-edge), including the lanthanide L-edges and the actinide M- and L3-edges up to Cf. The close proximity of the INE-Beamline to INE controlled area labs offers infrastructure unique in Europe for the spectroscopic and microscopic characterization of actinide samples. The modular beamline design enables sufficient flexibility to adapt sample environments and detection systems to many scientific questions. The well-established bulk techniques x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy in transmission and fluorescence mode have been augmented by advanced methods using a microfocused beam, including (confocal) XAFS/x-ray fluorescence detection and a combination of (micro-)XAFS and (micro-)x-ray diffraction. Additional instrumentation for high energy-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy has been successfully developed and tested.

  20. The INE-Beamline for actinide science at ANKA

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, J.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Loeble, M.; Metz, V.; Steppert, M.; Vitova, T.; Geckeis, H.; Butorin, S.; Seibert, A.; Walther, C.

    2012-04-15

    Since its inauguration in 2005, the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA (KIT North Campus) provides dedicated instrumentation for x-ray spectroscopic characterization of actinide samples and other radioactive materials. R and D work at the beamline focuses on various aspects of nuclear waste disposal within INE's mission to provide the scientific basis for assessing long-term safety of a final nuclear waste repository. The INE-Beamline is accessible for the actinide and radiochemistry community through the ANKA proposal system and the European Union Integrated Infrastructure Initiative ACTINET-I3. Experiments with activities up to 1 x 10{sup +6} times the European exemption limit are feasible within a safe but flexible containment concept. Measurements with monochromatic radiation are performed at photon energies varying between {approx}2.1 keV (P K-edge) and {approx}25 keV (Pd K-edge), including the lanthanide L-edges and the actinide M- and L3-edges up to Cf. The close proximity of the INE-Beamline to INE controlled area labs offers infrastructure unique in Europe for the spectroscopic and microscopic characterization of actinide samples. The modular beamline design enables sufficient flexibility to adapt sample environments and detection systems to many scientific questions. The well-established bulk techniques x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy in transmission and fluorescence mode have been augmented by advanced methods using a microfocused beam, including (confocal) XAFS/x-ray fluorescence detection and a combination of (micro-)XAFS and (micro-)x-ray diffraction. Additional instrumentation for high energy-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy has been successfully developed and tested.

  1. Instrumentation and Experimental Developments for the Beamlines at the Synchrotron SOLEIL

    SciTech Connect

    Prigent, P.; Bac, S.; Blanchandin, S.; Cauchon, G.; David, G.; Fernandez Varela, P.; Kubsky, S.; Picca, F.

    2010-06-23

    This paper presents an overview of the instrumentation and experiments developed for the beamlines at Synchrotron SOLEIL in France. Currently fourteen beamlines are opened to users out of the twenty six scheduled. About half of the beamlines cover the soft x-rays region using spectroscopy and imagery techniques. The second half covers the hard x-rays field studying diffraction of matter. Some sample environments carried out for beamlines, for biology, chemistry and surface sciences are described. For the soft x-rays beamlines, carbon contamination of optics is a crucial issue. Different experiments are currently under study in order to reduce or even avoid this effect. Other studies relate to the improvement of metrological methods for beamline optics, to the reduction of vibrational effects for the microbeams and development of computer control for diffractometers. The various types of instruments and experiments will be presented both with an overview of the status of the beamlines in operation and under construction.

  2. Diamond monochromators for APS undulator-A beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Blasdell, R.C.; Assoufid, L.A.; Mills, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    There has been considerable interest in the use of diamonds in high heat load monochromators (HHLMs) in the last several years. The superb thermal and mechanical properties of single crystal diamonds serve to minimize distortions caused by a given thermal load, while the low x-ray absorption cross-section reduces both the total power deposited in the crystal as well as the peak (volumetric) power density. The primary obstacle for the widespread use of diamonds at present is a lack of ready availability of perfect single crystals of the desired size and orientation. Although it is possible to obtain near-perfect natural diamonds of the size and orientation required for use on an undulator beamline, the selection process is generally one of trial and error. Near perfect synthetic diamonds can currently be obtained in the minimum necessary size (typically 4-5 mm on a side). A collaborative agreement has been made between the staff of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), and the Super Photon Ring-8 GeV (SPring-8) to explore the use of diamonds as high heat load monochromators and is on-going. One of the avenues of research is to push for improved perfection and size of synthetic diamonds. Sumitomo Electric Corporation of Japan has agreed to work with staff from SPring-8 to grow [100] oriented perfect single crystal diamonds of 10 x 10 x 1 mm{sup 3} size by 1996/1997 (from which one could also cut pieces with the large face parallel to the (111) planes). They have taken the first step in producing an essentially perfect 4 x 4 x 1 mm{sup 3} type II diamond with less than 5 {mu}rad (1 arc second) strain (measured over the entire surface). The authors believe progress in the production of synthetic diamonds, as well as improvement in ties with suppliers of natural diamonds, should make available a relatively large number of high quality diamonds of moderate size within the next several years.

  3. Beamline 9.3.2 - a high-resolution, bend-magnet beamline with circular polarization capability

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.2 is a high resolution, SGM beamline on an ALS bending magnet with access to photon energies from 30-1500 eV. Features include circular polarization capability, a rotating chamber platform that allows switching between experiments without breaking vacuum, an active feedback system that keeps the beam centered on the entrance slit of the monochromator, and a bendable refocusing mirror. The beamline optics consist of horizontally and vertically focussing mirrors, a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) with movable entrance and exit slits, and a bendable refocussing mirror. In addition, a movable aperature has been installed just upstream of the vertically focussing mirror which can select the x-rays above or below the plane of the synchrotron storage ring, allowing the user to select circularly or linearly polarized light. Circularly polarized x-rays are used to study the magnetic properties of materials. Beamline 9.3.2 can supply left and right circularly polarized x-rays by a computer controlled aperture which may be placed above or below the plane of the synchrotron storage ring. The degree of linear and circular polarization has been measured and calibrated.

  4. Radiological considerations for POE-1 photon shutters, collimators and beam stops of the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Juhachi; Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Smith, Sheldon; Chapman, Dean

    2008-01-01

    A study of radiation levels due to primary and secondary gas bremsstrahlung is carried out for the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). The BMIT beamline, being built at present, is a major research and diagnostic tool for X-ray imaging and X-ray radiation therapy for animals and humans. For the BMIT beamline to be as flexible as possible, a movable tungsten collimator is designed. This can move vertically and assumes two positions; up and down. The BMIT beamline is, thus, able to perform two modes of operation: one white beam, the other monochromatic. Gas bremsstrahlung produced in the vacuum chamber propagates with synchrotron radiation and may enter the imaging or therapy hutch. In this study, the dose behind the collimator is investigated in each mode by assessing the energy deposition in a water phantom that surrounds the entire copper shutter-tungsten collimator unit. When estimating the dose, particular attention is given to the opening area of the collimator, since this passage leads to the imaging or therapy hutch. Also examined are the doses when a tungsten safety shutter is closed.

  5. Application of Monte Carlo to Proton Beam Radiation Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebers, J. V.

    As with photon and electron radiotherapy, the future of dose calculation for hadron beams will be based upon Monte Carlo algorithms. Benchmark calculations of the LAHET Monte Carlo code with respect to measured in-phantom dose distributions show that the proton physics modules in LAHET accurately reproduce measured results. Since MCNP-X incorporates the proton and high energy neutron physics modules from LAHET, similar agreement with MCNP-X is expected. In addition to beam-line simulations, MCNP-X has the ability to input the lattice geometry required for simulating patient treatments based on CT data sets. The ability of MCNP-X to perform patient dose calculation simulations for proton radiotherapy was demonstrated by simulating a two-beam prostate treatment plan. While MCNP-X is fully capable to perform patient-planning calculations, currently, it is too time consuming to be used for routine patient planning.

  6. The ID23-2 structural biology microfocus beamline at the ESRF

    PubMed Central

    Flot, David; Mairs, Trevor; Giraud, Thierry; Guijarro, Matias; Lesourd, Marc; Rey, Vicente; van Brussel, Denis; Morawe, Christian; Borel, Christine; Hignette, Olivier; Chavanne, Joel; Nurizzo, Didier; McSweeney, Sean; Mitchell, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The first phase of the ESRF beamline ID23 to be constructed was ID23-1, a tunable MAD-capable beamline which opened to users in early 2004. The second phase of the beamline to be constructed is ID23-2, a monochromatic microfocus beamline dedicated to macromolecular crystallography experiments. Beamline ID23-2 makes use of well characterized optical elements: a single-bounce silicon (111) monochromator and two mirrors in Kirkpatrick–Baez geometry to focus the X-ray beam. A major design goal of the ID23-2 beamline is to provide a reliable, easy-to-use and routine microfocus beam. ID23-2 started operation in November 2005, as the first beamline dedicated to microfocus macromolecular crystallography. The beamline has taken the standard automated ESRF macromolecular crystallography environment (both hardware and software), allowing users of ID23-2 to be rapidly familiar with the microfocus environment. This paper describes the beamline design, the special considerations taken into account given the microfocus beam, and summarizes the results of the first years of the beamline operation. PMID:20029119

  7. Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Channelrhodopsins

    PubMed Central

    Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Govorunova, Elena G.; Wang, Jihong; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Channelrhodopsins serve as photoreceptors that control the motility behavior of green flagellate algae and act as light-gated ion channels when heterologously expressed in animal cells. Here, we report direct measurements of proton transfer from the retinylidene Schiff base in several channelrhodopsin variants expressed in HEK293 cells. A fast outward-directed current precedes the passive channel current that has the opposite direction at physiological holding potentials. This rapid charge movement occurs on the timescale of the M intermediate formation in microbial rhodopsins, including that for channelrhodopsin from Chlamydomonas augustae and its mutants, reported in this study. Mutant analysis showed that the glutamate residue corresponding to Asp85 in bacteriorhodopsin acts as the primary acceptor of the Schiff-base proton in low-efficiency channelrhodopsins. Another photoactive-site residue corresponding to Asp212 in bacteriorhodopsin serves as an alternative proton acceptor and plays a more important role in channel opening than the primary acceptor. In more efficient channelrhodopsins from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Mesostigma viride, and Platymonas (Tetraselmis) subcordiformis, the fast current was apparently absent. The inverse correlation of the outward proton transfer and channel activity is consistent with channel function evolving in channelrhodopsins at the expense of their capacity for active proton transport. PMID:23442959

  8. Proton scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  9. Electron cloud simulations of a proton storage ring using cold proton bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Holmes, J.; Lee, S. Y.; Macek, R.

    2008-02-01

    Using the ORBIT code we study the sensitivity of electron cloud properties with respect to different proton beam profiles, the secondary electron yield (SEY) parameter, and the proton loss rate. Our model uses a cold proton bunch to generate primary electrons and electromagnetic field for electron cloud dynamics. We study the dependence of the prompt and swept electron signals vs the bunch charge and the recovery of electron clouds after sweeping on the beam loss rate and the SEY. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data measured at the proton storage ring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our simulations indicate that the fractional proton loss rate in the field-free straight section may be an exponential function of proton beam charge and may also be lower than the averaged fractional proton loss rate over the whole ring.

  10. P05 imaging beamline at PETRA III: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greving, Imke; Wilde, Fabian; Ogurreck, Malte; Herzen, Julia; Hammel, Jörg U.; Hipp, Alexander; Friedrich, Frank; Lottermoser, Lars; Dose, Thomas; Burmester, Hilmar; Müller, Martin; Beckmann, Felix

    2014-09-01

    The imaging beamline (IBL/P05) operated by Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG) at the DESY PETRA III storage ring consists of two experimental stations: A micro tomography and a nano tomography end station. Here an overview of the experimental setups and the data acquisition will be given. In addition some first results out of the wide range of applications using the micro tomography station at P05 will be shown. Furthermore, we present first results of the nano tomography end station. These were obtained with an x-ray microscopy setup, which currently operates at energies of 17.4 and 30 keV using polymer compound refractive lenses (CRLs) and rolled prism lenses. Taken together these results clearly show the high potential of the newly built imaging beamline IBL.

  11. MONO: A program to calculate synchrotron beamline monochromator throughputs

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.

    1989-01-01

    A set of Fortran programs have been developed to calculate the expected throughput of x-ray monochromators with a filtered synchrotron source and is applicable to bending magnet and wiggler beamlines. These programs calculate the normalized throughput and filtered synchrotron spectrum passed by multiple element, flat un- focussed monochromator crystals of the Bragg or Laue type as a function of incident beam divergence, energy and polarization. The reflected and transmitted beam of each crystal is calculated using the dynamical theory of diffraction. Multiple crystal arrangements in the dispersive and non-dispersive mode are allowed as well as crystal asymmetry and energy or angle offsets. Filters or windows of arbitrary elemental composition may be used to filter the incident synchrotron beam. This program should be useful to predict the intensities available from many beamline configurations as well as assist in the design of new monochromator and analyzer systems. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Performance of Saga-University Beamline with Planer Undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, J.; Takahashi, K.; Kamada, M.; Ohkuma, H.; Yamamoto, S.

    2010-06-23

    A planer undulator consisted of 24 periods of an 85-mm length has been installed in a 2.7-m straight section of the SAGA-LS, in order to provide brilliant soft x-rays for advanced researches on nano-surfaces and interfaces at the Saga-university beamline BL13. The photon flux of 2x10{sup 11} photons/100 mA was obtained at 133 eV, and the available photon energy was beyond 800 eV using higher harmonics. The achieved resolving power of the varied-line-spacing (VLS) monochromator system was 8,670 at 130 eV with slits of 15 um. This agrees very well with the value of 8,790 expected from the ray-tracing calculation. The details in the performance tests will be reported, indicating the high performance of the beamline BL13 for photoelectron spectroscopy in the soft x-ray region.

  13. The crystallography beamline I711 at MAX II.

    PubMed

    Cerenius, Y; Ståhl, K; Svensson, L A; Ursby, T; Oskarsson, A; Albertsson, J; Liljas, A

    2000-07-01

    A new X-ray crystallographic beamline is operational at the MAX II synchrotron in Lund. The beamline has been in regular use since August 1998 and is used both for macro- and small molecule diffraction as well as powder diffraction experiments. The radiation source is a 1.8 T multipole wiggler. The beam is focused vertically by a bendable mirror and horizontally by an asymmetrically cut Si(111) monochromator. The wavelength range is 0.8-1.55 A with a measured flux at 1 A of more than 10(11) photons s(-1) in 0.3 mm x 0.3 mm at the sample position. The station is currently equipped with a Mar345 imaging plate, a Bruker Smart 1000 area CCD detector and a Huber imaging-plate Guinier camera. An ADSC 210 area CCD detector is planned to be installed during 2000. PMID:16609196

  14. An Undulator-Wiggler Beamline for Spectromicroscopy at SRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, R.; De Stasio, G.; Bissen, M.; Severson, M.

    2004-05-01

    A high-flux medium-energy-resolution beamline based on an existing insertion device is being constructed at SRC. The insertion device will be operated as an undulator up to ˜400 eV and as a wiggler at higher energies. The beamline will be dedicated mainly to X-ray PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (X-PEEM) and will cover the energy range 75-2000 eV. The most relevant requirement for high-resolution and high-sensitivity X-PEEM is a high flux density on the sample surface. This will allow spatial resolutions on the order of a few nanometers, and a minimum detection limit on the order of 10 parts per million, using the already existing Spectromicroscope for PHotoelectron Imaging of Nanostructures with X-rays (SPHINX). To maximize the flux at the sample position, the beamline does not include an entrance slit and has only three optical elements on the beam path: an ellipsoidal mirror, a variable-line-spacing plane grating, and a re-focusing ellipsoidal mirror. The first ellipsoidal mirror provides the converging light to one of the three gratings needed to cover the beamline energy range. The position of the fixed exit slit is at the focus of the ellipsoidal mirror when the grating is tuned to zero order. The second ellipsoidal mirror demagnifies the beam at the exit slit plane by a factor of two. More than 1012 photons/s are expected at the sample position between 100 and 1200 eV onto a spot having a FWHM of 25 μm vertical and 70 μm horizontal at a resolving power of ˜1000.

  15. An Undulator-Wiggler Beamline for Spectromicroscopy at SRC

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, R.; De Stasio, G.; Bissen, M.; Severson, M.

    2004-05-12

    A high-flux medium-energy-resolution beamline based on an existing insertion device is being constructed at SRC. The insertion device will be operated as an undulator up to {approx}400 eV and as a wiggler at higher energies. The beamline will be dedicated mainly to X-ray PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (X-PEEM) and will cover the energy range 75-2000 eV. The most relevant requirement for high-resolution and high-sensitivity X-PEEM is a high flux density on the sample surface. This will allow spatial resolutions on the order of a few nanometers, and a minimum detection limit on the order of 10 parts per million, using the already existing Spectromicroscope for PHotoelectron Imaging of Nanostructures with X-rays (SPHINX). To maximize the flux at the sample position, the beamline does not include an entrance slit and has only three optical elements on the beam path: an ellipsoidal mirror, a variable-line-spacing plane grating, and a re-focusing ellipsoidal mirror. The first ellipsoidal mirror provides the converging light to one of the three gratings needed to cover the beamline energy range. The position of the fixed exit slit is at the focus of the ellipsoidal mirror when the grating is tuned to zero order. The second ellipsoidal mirror demagnifies the beam at the exit slit plane by a factor of two. More than 1012 photons/s are expected at the sample position between 100 and 1200 eV onto a spot having a FWHM of 25 {mu}m vertical and 70 {mu}m horizontal at a resolving power of {approx}1000.

  16. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, M.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  17. MERLIN - A meV Resolution Beamline at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Ruben; Bozek, John; Chuang, Y.-D.; Howells, Malcolm; Kelez, Nicholas; Prestemon, Soren; Marks, Steve; Warwick, Tony; Hussain, Zahid; Jozwiak, Chris; Lanzara, Alessandra; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2007-01-19

    An ultra-high resolution beamline is being constructed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) for the study of low energy excitations in strongly correlated systems with the use of high-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission. This new beamline, given the acronym Merlin (for meV resolution line), will cover the energy range 10-150 eV. The monochromator has fixed entrance and exit slits and a plane mirror that can illuminate a spherical grating at the required angle of incidence (as in the SX-700 mechanism). The monochromator can be operated in two different modes. In the highest resolution mode, the energy scanning requires translating the monochromator chamber (total travel 1.1 m) as well as rotating the grating and the plane mirror in front of the grating. The resolution in this mode is practically determined by the slits width. In the second mode, the scanning requires rotating the grating and the plane mirror. This mode can be used to scan a few eV without a significant resolution loss. The source for the beamline is a 1.9 m long, 90 mm period quasi periodic EPU. The expected flux at the sample is higher than 1011 photons/s at a resolving power of 5 x 104 in the energy range 16-130 eV. A second set of gratings can be used to obtain higher flux at the expense of resolution.

  18. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids. PMID:26724005

  19. ADLIB—A simple database framework for beamline codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, C. Thomas

    1993-12-01

    There are many well developed codes available for beamline design and analysis. A significant fraction of each of these codes is devoted to processing its own unique input language for describing the problem. None of these large, complex, and powerful codes does everything. Adding a new bit of specialized physics can be a difficult task whose successful completion makes the code even larger and more complex. This paper describes an attempt to move in the opposite direction, toward a family of small, simple, single purpose physics and utility modules, linked by an open, portable, public domain database framework. These small specialized physics codes begin with the beamline parameters already loaded in the database, and accessible via the handful of subroutines that constitute ADLIB. Such codes are easier to write, and inherently organized in a manner suitable for incorporation in model based control system algorithms. Examples include programs for analyzing beamline misalignment sensitivities, for simulating and fitting beam steering data, and for translating among MARYLIE, TRANSPORT, and TRACE3D formats.

  20. MARS, a new beamline for radioactive matter studies at SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Schlutig, Sandrine; Hermange, Hervé; Sitaud, Bruno

    2009-11-01

    MARS (Multi Analyses on Radioactive Samples) beamline is the hard X-ray bending magnet beamline dedicated to the study of radioactive matter of the new French synchrotron SOLEIL. The beamline, which has been built thanks to a close partnership and support by the CEA, has been designed to provide X-rays in the energy range of 3.5 keV to 35 keV. This allows to encompass M and L absorption edges of actinides, as well as K edges of transition metals (that are present in alloys and fuel claddings) up to heavy halogens, rare gases and alkalis (fission products in nuclear fuels). The MARS project aims to extend the possibilities of synchrotron based X-ray characterizations towards a wider variety of radioactive elements and a wider variety of techniques than what is currently available at other facilities. Thus, its specific and innovative infrastructure has been optimized in order to carry out analyses on materials with activities up to 18.5 GBq per sample for α and β emitters and 2 GBq for γ and n emitters. So, today, more than 70 different elements and more than 350 different isotopes have been proposed for studies on the beamline by the involved user community. The arrangement of the different elements in the optics hutch is based on an original scheme which permits to have two alternative optical configurations (monochromatic or dispersive) depending on the nature of experiments to be performed. At least three main techniques are progressively being proposed on the three complementary end-stations located in the experimental hutch: transmission and high resolution powder diffraction (TXRD and HRXRD), standard and dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS and EDXAS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). In addition, by using the KB optics, a micro-focused beam will be available on the second station of the monochromatic branch. The beamline is currently under commissioning. The first two experimental stations, using the monochromatic branch, are scheduled to be

  1. Study of Effects of Failure of Beamline Elements and its Compensation in CW Superconducting Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J.-F.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.P.; Mishra, C.S.; Ranjan, K.; Saini, A.; /Delhi U.

    2012-05-01

    Project-X is a proposed high intensity proton facility to be built at Fermilab in United States. The first stage consists of a superconducting linac (SC) operating in continuous wave (CW) mode to accelerate a H{sup -} beam from 2.1 MeV to 3 GeV. Failure of any beamline element during operations induces a downstream mismatch of the beam which is especially severe when the failure occurs at low energy. A large mismatch causes emittance growth and ultimately results in beam losses. In a worst case scenario, the operability of the machine may be affected and long downtime may be needed to replace the failed element. To minimize possible downtime, the optics can be designed in a way that allows local retuning to make the machine operable. This paper presents studies performed to investigate retuning scenarios after failure of an accelerating cavity or a focusing magnet at critical locations in the Project-X CW superconducting linac.

  2. The beamlines of ELETTRA and their application to structural biology.

    PubMed

    Zanini, F; Lausi, A; Savoia, A

    1999-01-01

    Protein crystallographers are nowadays regular users of synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities for several applications. The goal of majority of users is simply to extract more accurate, higher resolution data from existing crystals; they use monochromatic radiation and the rotation method, in order to get a complete survey of the reciprocal space in a short time. In fact the brilliance of SR is essential, due to the weak scattering power of the samples, and because of their sensibility to radiation damage. Over the last few years, however, a general increase of interest for measurements at multiple wavelengths, which exploit the anomalous dispersion for the phase problem (multiwavelength anomalous diffraction--MAD), has generated the need of intense tuneable sources. For these applications, the emphasis is on accurate measurements of the small differences between the intensities of Bragg reflections at various energies across the absorption edge of an element present in the sample. The macromolecular diffraction beamline at ELETTRA, which is now running routinely since spring 1995, has been designed to provide a high flux--highly collimated tuneable X-rays source in the spectral range between 4 and 25 keV. The radiation source is the 57-pole wiggler, which delivers a very intense radiation up to 25 keV, and is shared and used simultaneously with the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) beamline. The front-end filter system has a cut-off energy at about 4 keV. The beamline optics consists of a pseudo-channel-cut double-crystal monochromator followed by a double focusing toroidal mirror. The tunability and the stability of the monochromator allows the user to perform MAD experiments, and for this purpose, a fluorescence probe for the exact calibration of the absorption edge is available on-line. The experimental station is based on an imaging plate area detector from MarResearch, with a sensible area of 345 mm in diameter. A cooled N2-stream is available to cool the

  3. Further measurements of bremsstrahlung from the insertion device beamlines of the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P. K.

    1998-09-16

    Bremsstrahlung is produced in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring when the positron beam interacts with the storage-ring components or with the residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum. The interaction of the positrons with the gas molecules occurs continually during storage ring operation. Bremsstrahlung is important at the insertion device straight sections because the contribution from each interaction adds up to produce a narrow mono-directional beam that travel down the beamlines. At the APS, with long storage ring beam straight paths (15.38 meters), gas bremsstrahlung in the insertion device beamlines can be significant. The preliminary results of the bremsstrahlung measurements in the insertion device beamlines of the APS was presented at SATIF3. This paper presents the results of further measurements at the two insertion device (ID) beamlines with higher statistics in the data collection. The beam current and the vacuum normalized bremsstrahlung power is fairly constant in a beamline for a given storage ring fill pattern, but may vary from beamline to beamline. The average bremsstrahlung power is measured as 118 {+-} 9 GeV/s/nT/mA at beamline 11 ID and as 36 {+-} 2 GeV/s/nT/mA at beamline 6 ID. These results, along with the results from the four previous independent bremsstrahlung measurements, enabled us to conclude upon the various reasons causing this variation.

  4. HERMES: a soft X-ray beamline dedicated to X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Belkhou, Rachid; Stanescu, Stefan; Swaraj, Sufal; Besson, Adrien; Ledoux, Milena; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Dalle, Didier

    2015-07-01

    The HERMES beamline (High Efficiency and Resolution beamline dedicated to X-ray Microscopy and Electron Spectroscopy), built at Synchrotron SOLEIL (Saint-Auban, France), is dedicated to soft X-ray microscopy. The beamline combines two complementary microscopy methods: XPEEM (X-ray Photo Emitted Electron Microscopy) and STXM (Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy) with an aim to reach spatial resolution below 20 nm and to fully exploit the local spectroscopic capabilities of the two microscopes. The availability of the two methods within the same beamline enables the users to select the appropriate approach to study their specific case in terms of sample environment, spectroscopy methods, probing depth etc. In this paper a general description of the beamline and its design are presented. The performance and specifications of the beamline will be reviewed in detail. Moreover, the article is aiming to demonstrate how the beamline performances have been specifically optimized to fulfill the specific requirements of a soft X-ray microscopy beamline in terms of flux, resolution, beam size etc. Special attention has been dedicated to overcome some limiting and hindering problems that are usually encountered on soft X-ray beamlines such as carbon contamination, thermal stability and spectral purity. PMID:26134801

  5. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  6. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton-proton collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Valle, Z. Conesa del; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Caro, A. De; Cataldo, G. de; Cuveland, J. de; Falco, A. De; Gruttola, D. De; Marco, N. De; Pasquale, S. De; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Bari, D. Di; Mauro, A. Di; Nezza, P. Di; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Dziadus, E. Gladysz; Glässel, P.; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Zamora, P. González; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.

    2015-05-01

    The measurement of primary , , and production at mid-rapidity ( 0.5) in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/ for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/ for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/ for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Furthermore, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  7. Petit-exposure at neutrino beamline (PEANUT)

    SciTech Connect

    Niwa, K.; /Nagoya U.

    2005-08-01

    from the primary neutrino interaction vertex, with their three dimensional slopes and momenta. It is also capable of electron identification with good e/{gamma} separation, due to its very fine segmentation. The OPERA ECC target modules are constructed as bricks of dimensions 12.5 x 10.0 x 7.5 cm{sup 3} in horizontal, vertical and along the beam axis. Each brick consists of series of 56 (1 mm thick) plates of passive material (lead or iron) alternated with emulsion films (43 {micro}m emulsion layer on both sides of a transparent 200 {micro}m thick plastic film). In preparation for OPERA we would like to expose the OPERA target modules to a beam of neutrinos. This will allow us to test many of our analysis procedures and techniques as well as to validate the simulation of neutrino interactions, both for the production of forward and backward particles. Although the HE (high energy) beam of NuMI would be a better match to the CNGS energy, data acquired with NuMI LE (low energy) beam would serve the same purpose, albeit more challenging. Given the high interaction rate from the NuMI beam, the test detector target mass can be kept low and additional detectors can easily be built around a small target. These measurements are not possible in the CNGS beam, since it has no short baseline hall.

  8. Proton decay theory

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Topics include minimal SU(5) predictions, gauge boson mediated proton decay, uncertainties in tau/sub p/, Higgs scalar effects, proton decay via Higgs scalars, supersymmetric SU(5), dimension 5 operators and proton decay, and Higgs scalars and proton decay. (WHK)

  9. The BALDER Beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementiev, K.; Norén, K.; Carlson, S.; Sigfridsson Clauss, K. G. V.; Persson, I.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) includes well-established methods to study the local structure around the absorbing element - extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and the effective oxidation number or to quantitatively determine the speciation of an element in a complex matrix - X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The increased brilliance and intensities available at the new generation of synchrotron light sources makes it possible to study, in-situ and in-operando, much more dilute systems with relevance for natural systems, as well as the micro-scale variability and dynamics of chemical reactions on the millisecond time-scale. The design of the BALDER beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory 3 GeV ring has focused on a high flux of photons in a wide energy range, 2.4-40 keV, where the K-edge is covered for the elements S to La, and the L 3-edge for all elements heavier than Sb. The overall design of the beamline will allow large flexibility in energy range, beam size and data collection time. The other focus of the beamline design is the possibility to perform multi-technique analyses on samples. Development of sample environment requires focus on implementation of auxiliary methods in such a way that techniques like Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and/or mass spectrometry can be performed simultaneously as the XAS study. It will be a flexible system where different instruments can be plugged in and out depending on the needs for the particular investigation. Many research areas will benefit from the properties of the wiggler based light source and the capabilities to perform in-situ and in-operando measurements, for example environmental and geochemical sciences, nuclear chemistry, catalysis, materials sciences, and cultural heritage.

  10. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  11. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  12. Implementation of the beamline controls at the Florence accelerator laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraresi, L.; Mirto, F. A.

    2008-05-01

    The new Tandetron accelerator in Florence, with many different beamlines, has required a new organization of all the control signals of the used equipment (slow control). We present our solution, which allows us the control of all the employed instruments simultaneously from a number of different workplaces. All of our equipment has been designed to be Ethernet based and this is the key to accomplish two very important requirements: simultaneous remote control from many computers and electrical isolation to achieve a lower noise level. The control of the instruments requires only one Ethernet network and no particular interfaces or drivers on the computers.

  13. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schillinger, B.; Schulz, M.; Lerche, M.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and integrated over multiple cycles. A fast MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector was used to image the water distribution within a model steam engine operating at 10 Hz frequency. Within <10 minutes integration the amount of water was measured as a function of cycle time with a sub-mm spatial resolution, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of time-resolved neutron radiography for the future applications. The neutron spectrum of the ANTARES beamline as well as transmission spectra of a Fe sample were also measured with the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique in combination with a high resolution beam chopper. The energy resolution of our setup was found to be ~ 0.8% at 5 meV and ~ 1.7% at 25 meV. The background level (most likely gammas and epithermal/fast neutrons) of the ANTARES beamline was also measured in our experiments and found to be on the scale of 3% when no filters are installed in the beam. Online supplementary data available from stacks.iop.org/jinst/10

  14. The holography endstation of beamline P10 at PETRA III

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbfleisch, S.; Osterhoff, M.; Giewekemeyer, K.; Neubauer, H.; Krueger, S. P.; Hartmann, B.; Bartels, M.; Salditt, T.; Sprung, M.; Leupold, O.; Siewert, F.

    2010-06-23

    We present the design and instrumentation of a novel holography endstation for the P10 coherence beamline at PETRA III at DESY. The experimental imaging scheme is based on a highly coherent and divergent (cone) beam illumination, achieved by fixed curvature focusing mirrors with additional spatial and coherence filtering by x-ray waveguides. The optical elements along the beam path and the instrument under construction are described. Preliminary results obtained in a similar setting under comparable parameters are given as a benchmark, and first simulations of one of the two mirrors are presented to study the effect of imperfections on the field distribution in the focal plane.

  15. LISA: the Italian CRG beamline for x-ray Absorption Spectroscopy at ESRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Trapananti, A.; Puri, A.

    2016-05-01

    LISA is the acronym of Linea Italiana per la Spettroscopia di Assorbimento di raggi X (Italian beamline for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy) and is the upgrade of the former GILDA beamline installed on the BM08 bending magnet port of European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Within this contribution a full description of the project is provided.

  16. FINAL REPORT. CONSTRUCTION OF BENDING MAGNET BEAMLINE AT THE APS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Design and construction of a bending magnet beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) by the Pacific Northwest Consortium-Collaborative Access Team (PNC-CAT). The beamline will be optimized for x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies with a major focus on environmental iss...

  17. Micro-Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy with the LUCIA Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Lagarde, P.; Flank, A.-M.; Vantelon, D.; Janousch, M.

    2007-02-02

    With the development of new synchrotron radiation machines, which have seen, in the last ten years, the emittance of the beam decreased by several orders of magnitude, new beamlines have been developed which make full use of these improvements. We describe here the LUCIA beamline, which has been implemented at the Swiss Light Source in a collaboration between PSI, SOLEIL and the CNRS.

  18. Ion-proton pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  19. Ion-proton pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-04-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  20. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  1. The macromolecular crystallography beamline I911-3 at the MAX IV laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Ursby, Thomas; Unge, Johan; Appio, Roberto; Logan, Derek T.; Fredslund, Folmer; Svensson, Christer; Larsson, Krister; Labrador, Ana; Thunnissen, Marjolein M. G. M.

    2013-01-01

    The macromolecular crystallography beamline I911-3, part of the Cassiopeia/I911 suite of beamlines, is based on a superconducting wiggler at the MAX II ring of the MAX IV Laboratory in Lund, Sweden. The beamline is energy-tunable within a range between 6 and 18 keV. I911-3 opened for users in 2005. In 2010–2011 the experimental station was completely rebuilt and refurbished such that it has become a state-of-the-art experimental station with better possibilities for rapid throughput, crystal screening and work with smaller samples. This paper describes the complete I911-3 beamline and how it is embedded in the Cassiopeia suite of beamlines. PMID:23765310

  2. Present Status of the NIMS Contract Beamline BL15XU at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, Shigenori; Tanaka, Masahiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Katsuya, Yoshio; Ishimaru, Satoshi

    2010-06-23

    The revolver undulator beamline BL15XU at SPring-8, which is the contract beamline of National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), was established for materials science using soft-and-hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). We have performed beamline reconstruction for further developments of the experiments in the research field of materials science. The flat double-crystal monochromator (DCM) with liquid nitrogen cooling, X-ray total reflection double-mirror system with (+,-) geometry, and high-energy-resolution channel-cut monochromator have been installed into the beamline. The refined beamline provides monochromatic X-rays from 2 to 36 keV. The improvement of the photon flux density at the XRD and XPS experimental stations was confirmed. The photon flux was estimated to be several 10{sup 12} photons/sec with {Delta}E/E of {approx}10{sup -4}.

  3. The Protein Micro-Crystallography Beamlines for Targeted Protein Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kunio; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    In order to collect proper diffraction data from outstanding micro-crystals, a brand-new data collection system should be designed to provide high signal-to noise ratio in diffraction images. SPring-8 and KEK-PF are currently developing two micro-beam beamlines for Targeted Proteins Research Program by MEXT of Japan. The program aims to reveal the structure and function of proteins that are difficult to solve but have great importance in both academic research and industrial application. At SPring-8, a new 1-micron beam beamline for protein micro-crystallography, RIKEN Targeted Proteins Beamline (BL32XU), is developed. At KEK-PF a new low energy micro-beam beamline, BL-1A, is dedicated for SAD micro-crystallography. The two beamlines will start operation in the end of 2010. The present status of the research and development for protein micro-crystallography will be presented.

  4. Commissioning and first results of scanning type EXAFS beamline (BL-09) at INDUS-2 synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K. Agrawal, A. Yadav, A. K. Nayak, C. Basu, S. Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.; Kane, S. R.; Garg, C. K.

    2014-04-24

    An Energy Scanning X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy beamline has recently been installed and commissioned at BL-09 bending magnet port of INDUS-2 synchrotron source, Indore. The beamline uses an UHV compatible fixed exit double crystal monochromator (DCM) with two Si (111) crystals. Two grazing incidence cylindrical mirrors are also used in this beamline; the pre-mirror is used as a collimating mirror while the post mirror is used for vertical focusing and higher harmonic rejection. In this beamline it is possible to carry out EXAFS measurements both in transmission and fluorescence mode on various types of samples, using Ionization chamber detectors and solid state drift detector respectively. In this paper, results from first experiments of the Energy Scanning EXAFS beamline are presented.

  5. Performance of beamline 9.3.1 at the ALS: Flux and resolution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Y.; Fischer, G.; Kring, J.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the ALS is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range. This beamline is the first monochromatic hard x-ray beamline in the ALS, and designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, and preservation of the high brightness from the ALS. It consists of a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator and two toroidal mirrors which are positioned before and after the monochromator. The construction of the beamline was completed in December of 1995, with imperfect mirrors. In this report, the authors describe the experimental results of absolute flux measurements and x-ray absorption measurements of gases and solid samples using the present set of mirrors.

  6. Forward production of charged pions with incident protons on nuclear targets at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, M.; Chimenti, P.; Giannini, G.; Artamonov, A.; Giani, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Grant, A.; Grossheim, A.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsukerman, I.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.; Bagulya, A.; Grichine, V.

    2009-09-15

    Measurements of the double-differential {pi}{sup {+-}} production cross section in the range of momentum 0.5{<=}p{<=}8.0 GeV/c and angle 0.025{<=}{theta}{<=}0.25 rad in collisions of protons on beryllium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, aluminum, copper, tin, tantalum, and lead are presented. The data were taken with the large-acceptance HAdRon Production (HARP) detector in the T9 beamline of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors. Thin targets of 5% of a nuclear interaction length were used. The tracking and identification of the produced particles were performed using the forward system of the HARP experiment. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/dp d{omega} mainly at four incident proton beam momenta (3, 5, 8, and 12 GeV/c). Measurements are compared with the GEANT4 and MARS Monte Carlo generators. A global parametrization is provided as an approximation of all the collected datasets, which can serve as a tool for quick yield estimates.

  7. NSLS transvenous coronary angiography beamline upgrade and advanced technology initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W. ); Thompson, A.C. ); Lavender, W.M. ); Scalia, K.; Malloy, N. ); Mangano, J.; Jacob, J. )

    1995-02-01

    Since October 1990, the coronary anatomies of a total of 16 patients (male and female) have been imaged at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) as part of the Dual Energy Digital Subtraction Transvenous Coronary Angiography research program. This program takes place in the Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF) on the X17B2 wiggler beamline. Encouraged by the success of the initial patient images, the NSLS has recently embarked on an ambitious upgrade effort. This effort covers all aspects of the X17B2 beamline and includes improved radiation shielding, a Laue monochromator assembly, a computer-controlled five motion patient scanning chair assembly, a fast low-noise image acquisition system, and a modularized patient safety system. These improvements will allow major advances in imaging patients based on ECG signal gating and multiple view imaging. Two advanced technology initiatives are underway with industrial collaborators. One will develop real-time image acquisition and display of the subtracted digital images. The second will develop a compact x-ray source of medical imaging. The source will be a linear electron accelerator creating characteristic radiation line emissions.

  8. NSLS transvenous coronary angiography beamline upgrade and advanced technology initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W.; Thompson, A.C.; Lavender, W.M.; Scalia, K.; Malloy, N.; Mangano, J.; Jacob, J.

    1994-11-01

    Since October 1990, the coronary anatomies of a total of 16 patients (male and female) have been imaged at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) as part of the Dual Energy Digital Subtraction Transvenous Coronary Angiography research program. This program takes place in the Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF) on the X17B2 wiggler beamline. Encouraged by the success of the initial patient images, the NSLS has recently embarked on an ambitious upgrade effort. This effort covers all aspects of the X17B2 beamline and includes improved radiation shielding, a Laue monochromator assembly, a computer-controlled 5 motion patient scanning chair assembly, a fast low-noise image acquisition system, and a modularized patient safety system. These improvements will allow major advances in imaging patients based on ECG signal gating and multiple view imaging. Two advanced technology initiatives are underway with industrial collaborators. One will develop real-time image acquisition and display of the subtracted digital images. The second will develop a compact x-ray source for medical imaging. The source will be a linear electron accelerator creating characteristic radiation line emissions.

  9. The Diamond Beamline I13L for Imaging and Coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, C.; Wagner, U.; Peach, A.; Singh, B.; Wilkin, G.; Jones, C.; Robinson, I. K.

    2010-06-23

    I13L is the first long beamline at Diamond dedicated to imaging and coherence. Two independent branches will operate in the energy range of 6-30 keV with spatial resolution on the micro- to nano-lengthscale. The Imaging branch is dedicated to imaging and tomography with In-line phase contrast and full-field microscopy on the micron to nano-length scale. Ultimate resolution will be achieved on the Coherence branch at I13L with imaging techniques in the reciprocal space. The experimental stations will be located about 250 m from the source, taking advantage of the coherence properties of the source. The beamline has some outstanding features such as the mini-beta layout of the storage ring's straight section. The optical layout is optimized for beam stability and high optical quality to preserve the coherent radiation. In the experimental stations several methods will be available, starting for the first user with in-line phase contrast imaging on the imaging branch and Coherent X-ray Diffraction (CXRD) on the coherence branch.

  10. Capabilities of the Extreme Conditions Beamline at PETRA III, DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Konôpková, Zuzana; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Rothkirch, Andre; Wittich, Eugen; Delitz, Jan-Torben; Ehnes, Anita

    2013-06-01

    At the end of 2010 the Extreme Conditions Beamline (ECB) at PETRA III received first beam and entered the commissioning phase. Since 2012 we are offering beamtime to general users to conduct a variety of different experiments such as powder and single diffraction in the laser/resistive heated and cryogenically cooled Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC). Particularly attractive has been our ability to conducted diffraction experiments at high energies of 60 and 77 keV for pair distribution function (PDF) studies as well as possibility to preform time resolved powder diffraction experiments at 26 and 43 keV with a maximum time resolution of 15 Hz. Within we present some of the current capabilities of the beamline as well as future plans to promote single crystal diffraction at high pressures and temperatures using both monochromatic and pink beam. Finally, we emphasis the present and future time resolved capabilities to conduct powder and single crystal diffraction experiments under dynamic compression and heating conditions in the DAC. Part of this project was funded by the ``Bundesministerium fuer Bildung und Forschung'' under contracts 05KS7RF1 and 05K10RFA ``Verbundprojekt: Messeinrichtungen fuer die Material- und Strukturforschung an PETRA III, 2: Laserheizung for ``ECB''.

  11. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  12. High pressure experiments at the XAFS Beamline, INDUS-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanan, Nitya; Lahiri, Debdutta; Garg, Nandini; Bhattacharyya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2012-07-01

    The dispersive XAFS beamline BL-08 at the INDUS-2 synchrotron radiation source, RRCAT, Indore uses a bent Si (111) crystal as dispersive-cum-focusing element and a position sensitive CCD detector to enable instantaneous measurement of the whole XAFS spectrum around the absorption edge of interest. This beamline is ideal for characterisation of materials under high pressure using Diamond Anvil Cell with ~50 μm spot size. For this setup, the theoretically determined spot size (Horizontal × Vertical) varies between 17 × 137 μm and 37 × 142 μm for the x-ray energy range 5 keV-20 keV. To reduce the vertical spot size to <50 μm, we have designed an additional focusing mirror between the polychromator and sample position. The mirror, procured from SESO (France), will be installed shortly. Meanwhile, we have developed a dummy mirror bender setup at CDM (B ARC) and have carried out feasibility tests to confirm reduction in spot size using the same. We have also conducted preliminary XAFS experiments (at BL-08) on SrRuO3 at ~16 keV, under ambient conditions and inside diamond anvil cell, in order to assess the signal intensity and quality. We have obtained reasonably good signal.

  13. The nanotomography endstation at the PETRA III Imaging Beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogurreck, M.; Wilde, F.; Herzen, J.; Beckmann, F.; Nazmov, V.; Mohr, J.; Haibel, A.; Müller, M.; Schreyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    The Imaging Beamline (IBL) operated by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG) at the newly refurbished DESY PETRA III storage ring is dedicated to radiography and tomography and provides two experimental endstations, one for micro tomography and one for nano tomography. The technical specifications aim for 3D imaging with a spatial resolution of below 100 nm. This nanometer resolution will be achieved by using different combinations of compound refractive lenses as X-ray optics. In addition, a microscopic optic for magnifying the images after the converting in visible light will be used, too. The overall setup is designed to be very flexible, which allows also the implementation of other optical elements (e.g. Fresnel zoneplates, KB mirrors) as well as the application of different magnifying techniques like cone-beam tomography or X-ray microscopy. The accessible energy range for the nano tomography is 10 - 30 keV but the beamline is designed for an energy range of 5 - 50 keV and we aim to allow the same energy range for the nano tomography in the long run.

  14. Microfocusing at the PG1 beamline at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Gerasimova, Natalia; Goderich, Rene; Mey, Tobias; Reininger, Ruben; Rübhausen, Michael; Siewert, Frank; Weigelt, Holger; Brenner, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) refocusing mirror system installed at the PG1 branch of the plane-grating monochromator beamline at the soft X-ray/XUV free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is designed to provide tight aberration-free focusing down to 4 µm x 6 µm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on the sample. Such a focal spot size is mandatory to achieve ultimate resolution and to guarantee best performance of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) off-axis parabolic double-monochromator Raman spectrometer permanently installed at the PG1 beamline as an experimental end-station. The vertical beam size on the sample of the Raman spectrometer, which operates without entrance slit, defines and limits the energy resolution of the instrument which has an unprecedented design value of 2 meV for photon energies below 70 eV and about 15 meV for higher energies up to 200 eV. In order to reach the designed focal spot size of 4 µm FWHM (vertically) and to hold the highest spectrometer resolution, special fully motorized in-vacuum manipulators for the KB mirror holders have been developed and the optics have been aligned employing wavefront-sensing techniques as well as ablative imprints analysis. Aberrations like astigmatism were minimized. In this article the design and layout of the KB mirror manipulators, the alignment procedure as well as microfocus optimization results are presented.

  15. The BESSY wiggler/undulator-TGM-5 beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Peatman, W.; Carbone, C.; Gudat, W.; Heinen, W.; Kuske, P.; Pfluger, J.; Schafers, F.; Schroeter, T.

    1989-07-01

    In actual performance, the 35 pole wiggler/undulator (W/U) at BESSY has been shown to deliver 50 to 250 times more flux than a TGM with 10 mrad of dipole radiation under otherwise comparable conditions. The beamline, laid out for photon energies from 15 to 400 eV, has been calibrated and the resolution measured at several energies. Interactions of the W/U with the storage ring have been studied and, in part, corrected for: the working point does not change in either direction (/lt/10%) as the gap is varied and the electron beam position in the ring remains constant to within 10 /mu/m and the angle of emission of the SR from the ring to within 5 /mu/rad for /ital K//le/2.7. The reduction of the lifetime of the electron beam in the ring and the change in the vertical size of the beam as a function of the gap are typical of the problems associated with the interaction of such a device on a high brightness ring. The beamline has been in normal user operation for over a year.

  16. Parametric Optimization of Undulators for NSLS-II Project Beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, O.; Bengtsson, J.; Berman, L.; Broadbent, A.; Cai, Y. Q.; Hulbert, S.; Shen, Q.; Tanabe, T.

    2010-06-01

    General optimization procedure, computation methods used, and the obtained optimal parameters of undulators for the NSLS-II project beamlines are reported. The optimization starts with high-accuracy calculation of undulator magnetic fields, using Radia magnetostatics code, for a large set of periods and vertical gaps of a given undulator type, given magnetic materials and a scalable magnet geometry. From the resulting magnetic fields, a sub-set of undulator periods and the corresponding vertical gaps, providing the required low-energy cut-off values of spectral harmonics for each particular beamline, is determined. In parallel, from the same Radia undulator models, angular magnetic kick maps are calculated, and the insertion device effect on electron beam is simulated using Tracy-2 tracking code based on symplectic integrator. After these simulations, magnet parameters are fine-tuned and the maximal acceptable undulator lengths are determined for different straight sections, as functions of minimal gap and with due regard for the electron beam vertical "stay clear" constraint in the case of in-vacuum undulators. Finally, the optimal undulator period and length are determined as the values providing maximal spectral flux among the pre-selected undulator cases, already satisfying the requirements concerning the harmonic cut-off values and the effect on electron beam.

  17. Microfocusing at the PG1 beamline at FLASH

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Gerasimova, Natalia; Goderich, Rene; Mey, Tobias; Reininger, Ruben; Rubhausen, Michael; Siewert, Frank; Weigelt, Holger; Brenner, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    The Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) refocusing mirror system installed at the PG1 branch of the plane-grating monochromator beamline at the soft X-ray/XUV free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is designed to provide tight aberration-free focusing down to 4 µm × 6 µm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on the sample. Such a focal spot size is mandatory to achieve ultimate resolution and to guarantee best performance of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) off-axis parabolic double-monochromator Raman spectrometer permanently installed at the PG1 beamline as an experimental end-station. The vertical beam size on the sample of the Raman spectrometer, which operates without entrance slit, defines andmore » limits the energy resolution of the instrument which has an unprecedented design value of 2 meV for photon energies below 70 eV and about 15 meV for higher energies up to 200 eV. In order to reach the designed focal spot size of 4 µm FWHM (vertically) and to hold the highest spectrometer resolution, special fully motorized in-vacuum manipulators for the KB mirror holders have been developed and the optics have been aligned employing wavefront-sensing techniques as well as ablative imprints analysis. Lastly, aberrations like astigmatism were minimized. In this article the design and layout of the KB mirror manipulators, the alignment procedure as well as microfocus optimization results are presented.« less

  18. Microfocusing at the PG1 beamline at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Gerasimova, Natalia; Goderich, Rene; Mey, Tobias; Reininger, Ruben; Rubhausen, Michael; Siewert, Frank; Weigelt, Holger; Brenner, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    The Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) refocusing mirror system installed at the PG1 branch of the plane-grating monochromator beamline at the soft X-ray/XUV free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is designed to provide tight aberration-free focusing down to 4 µm × 6 µm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on the sample. Such a focal spot size is mandatory to achieve ultimate resolution and to guarantee best performance of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) off-axis parabolic double-monochromator Raman spectrometer permanently installed at the PG1 beamline as an experimental end-station. The vertical beam size on the sample of the Raman spectrometer, which operates without entrance slit, defines and limits the energy resolution of the instrument which has an unprecedented design value of 2 meV for photon energies below 70 eV and about 15 meV for higher energies up to 200 eV. In order to reach the designed focal spot size of 4 µm FWHM (vertically) and to hold the highest spectrometer resolution, special fully motorized in-vacuum manipulators for the KB mirror holders have been developed and the optics have been aligned employing wavefront-sensing techniques as well as ablative imprints analysis. Lastly, aberrations like astigmatism were minimized. In this article the design and layout of the KB mirror manipulators, the alignment procedure as well as microfocus optimization results are presented.

  19. Assessment of secondary radiation and radiation protection in laser-driven proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Faby, Sebastian; Wilkens, Jan J

    2015-06-01

    This work is a feasibility study of a radiation treatment unit with laser-driven protons based on a state-of-the-art energy selection system employing four dipole magnets in a compact shielded beamline. The secondary radiation emitted from the beamline and its energy selection system and the resulting effective dose to the patient are assessed. Further, it is evaluated whether or not such a compact system could be operated in a conventional treatment vault for clinical linear accelerators under the constraint of not exceeding the effective dose limit of 1 mSv per year to the general public outside the treatment room. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 is employed to simulate the secondary radiation generated while irradiating a hypothetical tumor. The secondary radiation inevitably generated inside the patient is taken into account as well, serving as a lower limit. The results show that the secondary radiation emanating from the shielded compact therapy system would pose a serious secondary dose contamination to the patient. This is due to the broad energy spectrum and in particular the angular distribution of the laser-driven protons, which make the investigated beamline together with the employed energy selection system quite inefficient. The secondary radiation also cannot be sufficiently absorbed in a conventional linear accelerator treatment vault to enable a clinical operation. A promising result, however, is the fact that the secondary radiation generated in the patient alone could be very well shielded by a regular treatment vault, allowing the application of more than 100 fractions of 2 Gy per day with protons. It is thus theoretically possible to treat patients with protons in such treatment vaults. Nevertheless, the results show that there is a clear need for alternative more efficient energy selection solutions for laser-driven protons. PMID:25267383

  20. Shielding Design Aspects of SR Beamlines for 3-GeV And 8-GeV Class Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed; /SLAC

    2007-09-24

    Differences in synchrotron radiation beamline shielding design between the facilities of 3 GeV class and 8 GeV class are discussed with regard to SLAC SSRL and SPring-8 beamlines. Requirements of beamline shielding as well as the accelerator shielding depend on the stored electron energy, and here some factors in beamline shielding depending on the stored energy in particular, are clarified, namely the effect of build up, the effect of double scattering of photons at branch beamlines, and the spread of gas bremsstrahlung.

  1. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  2. The ELIMED transport and dosimetry beamline for laser-driven ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Scuderi, V.; Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Amico, A.; Candiano, G.; De Luca, G.; Gallo, G.; Giordanengo, S.; Guarachi, L. Fanola; Korn, G.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Manna, R.; Marchese, V.; Marchetto, F.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Pulvirenti, S.; Rizzo, D.; Sacchi, R.; Salamone, S.; Sedita, M.; Vignati, A.

    2016-09-01

    A growing interest of the scientific community towards multidisciplinary applications of laser-driven beams has led to the development of several projects aiming to demonstrate the possible use of these beams for therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, laser-accelerated particles differ from the conventional beams typically used for multiscipilinary and medical applications, due to the wide energy spread, the angular divergence and the extremely intense pulses. The peculiarities of optically accelerated beams led to develop new strategies and advanced techniques for transport, diagnostics and dosimetry of the accelerated particles. In this framework, the realization of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) beamline, developed by INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy) and that will be installed in 2017 as a part of the ELIMAIA beamline at the ELI-Beamlines (Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines) facility in Prague, has the aim to investigate the feasibility of using laser-driven ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. In this contribution, an overview of the beamline along with a detailed description of the main transport elements as well as the detectors composing the final section of the beamline will be presented.

  3. Undulator beamline of the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, B. E-mail: skycia@uoguelph.ca; Gomez, A.; Duffy, A.; Hallin, E.; Meyer, B.; Kycia, S. E-mail: skycia@uoguelph.ca

    2014-08-15

    The Brockhouse project at the Canadian Light Source plans the construction of three beamlines, two wiggler beamlines, and one undulator beamline, that will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering. In this work, we will describe the undulator beamline main components and performance parameters, obtained from ray tracing using XOP-SHADOW codes. The undulator beamline will operate from 4.95 to 21 keV, using a 20 mm period hybrid undulator placed upstream of the wiggler in the same straight section. The beamline optics design was developed in cooperation with the Brazilian Synchrotron - LNLS. The beamline will have a double crystal monochromator with the options of Si(111) or Si(311) crystal pairs followed by two mirrors in the KB configuration to focus the beam at the sample position. The high brilliance of the undulator source will produce a very high flux of ∼10{sup 13} photons/s and high energy resolution into a small focus of 170 μm horizontal and 20-60 μm vertical, depending on the optical configuration and energy chosen. Two multi-axis goniometer experimental stations with area detectors and analyzers are foreseen to enable diffraction, resonant and inelastic scattering experiments, and SAXS/WAXS experiments with high resolution and time resolving capabilities.

  4. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by glands in ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a ...

  5. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  6. What's In a Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  7. Dosimetric impact of the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams at a ProBeam facility: comparison of measurements with TPS and MC calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würl, M.; Englbrecht, F.; Parodi, K.; Hillbrand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams, the dose output depends on the size of the irradiated field or volume. While this field size dependence has already been extensively investigated by measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for single pencil beams or monoenergetic fields, reports on the relevance of this effect for analytical dose calculation models are limited. Previous studies on this topic only exist for specific beamline designs. However, the amount of large-angle scattered primary and long-range secondary particles and thus the relevance of the low-dose envelope can considerably be influenced by the particular design of the treatment nozzle. In this work, we therefore addressed the field size dependence of the dose output at the commercially available ProBeam® beamline, which is being built in several facilities worldwide. We compared treatment planning dose calculations with ionization chamber (IC) measurements and MC simulations, using an experimentally validated FLUKA MC model of the scanning beamline. To this aim, monoenergetic square fields of three energies, as well as spherical target volumes were studied, including the investigation on the influence of the lateral spot spacing on the field size dependence. For the spherical target volumes, MC as well as analytical dose calculation were found in excellent agreement with the measurements in the center of the spread-out Bragg peak. In the plateau region, the treatment planning system (TPS) tended to overestimate the dose compared to MC calculations and IC measurements by up to almost 5% for the smallest investigated sphere and for small monoenergetic square fields. Narrower spot spacing slightly enhanced the field size dependence of the dose output. The deviations in the plateau dose were found to go in the clinically safe direction, i.e. the actual deposited dose outside the target was found to be lower than predicted by the TPS. Thus, the moderate overestimation of dose to

  8. Dosimetric impact of the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams at a ProBeam facility: comparison of measurements with TPS and MC calculations.

    PubMed

    Würl, M; Englbrecht, F; Parodi, K; Hillbrand, M

    2016-01-21

    Due to the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams, the dose output depends on the size of the irradiated field or volume. While this field size dependence has already been extensively investigated by measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for single pencil beams or monoenergetic fields, reports on the relevance of this effect for analytical dose calculation models are limited. Previous studies on this topic only exist for specific beamline designs. However, the amount of large-angle scattered primary and long-range secondary particles and thus the relevance of the low-dose envelope can considerably be influenced by the particular design of the treatment nozzle. In this work, we therefore addressed the field size dependence of the dose output at the commercially available ProBeam(®) beamline, which is being built in several facilities worldwide. We compared treatment planning dose calculations with ionization chamber (IC) measurements and MC simulations, using an experimentally validated FLUKA MC model of the scanning beamline. To this aim, monoenergetic square fields of three energies, as well as spherical target volumes were studied, including the investigation on the influence of the lateral spot spacing on the field size dependence. For the spherical target volumes, MC as well as analytical dose calculation were found in excellent agreement with the measurements in the center of the spread-out Bragg peak. In the plateau region, the treatment planning system (TPS) tended to overestimate the dose compared to MC calculations and IC measurements by up to almost 5% for the smallest investigated sphere and for small monoenergetic square fields. Narrower spot spacing slightly enhanced the field size dependence of the dose output. The deviations in the plateau dose were found to go in the clinically safe direction, i.e. the actual deposited dose outside the target was found to be lower than predicted by the TPS. Thus, the moderate overestimation of dose to

  9. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. PMID:24074929

  10. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.