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Sample records for primary solidification phase

  1. Heterogeneous nucleation of the primary phase in the rapid solidification of Al-4.5wt%Cu alloy droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitre, A.; Bogno, A.-A.; Bedel, M.; Reinhart, G.; Henein, H.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on rapid solidification of Al-Cu alloys. A heterogeneous nucleation/growth model coupled with a thermal model of a falling droplet through a stagnant gas was developed. The primary undercooling as well as the number of nucleation points was compared with Al-Cu alloy droplets produced by Impulse Atomization (IA). Based on experimental results from Neutron Diffraction, secondary (eutectic) phases were obtained. Then, primary and secondary undercoolings were estimated using the metastable extensions of solidus and liquidus lines calculated by Thermo-Calc. Moreover, Synchrotron X-ray microtomography has been performed on Al-4.5wt%Cu droplets. The undercoolings are in good agreement. Results also evidence the presence of one nucleation point and are in agreement with the experimental observations.

  2. Influence of a high magnetic field on the precipitation behavior of the primary Al 3Fe phase during the solidification of a hypereutectic Al-3.31 wt% Fe alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Yudong; Esling, Claude; Jiang, Huixue; Zhao, Zhihao; Zuo, Yubo; Cui, Jianzhong

    2012-01-01

    Influences of high magnetic fields on the precipitation behavior of the primary Al 3Fe phase during the solidification of a hypereutectic Al-3.31 wt% Fe are investigated. Under the uniform field the primary crystals tend to be distributed homogeneously, whereas under the positive gradient field they move upward in the specimen. Under both cases, they tend to align with [100] parallel to the field direction. The field also induces axial bifurcation of the primary crystals, gives rise to the formation of transverse cracks in the primary crystals and increases the number of nuclei. The homogeneous distribution of the primary crystals in the uniform field and the upward movement in the gradient field are attributed to the respective magnetic viscosity resistance force and the magnetization force. The alignment results from the magnetic torque due to the magnetic anisotropy of the primary crystals. The bifurcation and the cracks are related to the thermoelectric magnetic force and the linear shrinkage coefficient difference between the Al solid solution and the primary Al 3Fe phase. The increased number of nuclei arises from the detachment of the primary crystals and the suppression of the descent of the original primary crystals in the initial material and the Fe solute diffusion by the field.

  3. Evolution of Secondary Phases Formed upon Solidification of a Ni-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Qiang; Liu, Feng; Wang, Lei; Chen, Changfeng

    2013-07-01

    The solidification of UNS N08028 alloy subjected to different cooling rates was studied, where primary austenite dendrites occur predominantly and different amounts of sigma phase form in the interdendritic regions. The solidification path and elemental segregation upon solidification were simulated using the CALPHAD method, where THERMO-CALC software packages and two classical segregation models were employed to predict the real process. It is thus revealed that the interdendritic sigma phase is formed via eutectic reaction at the last stage of solidification. On this basis, an analytical model was developed to predict the evolution of nonequilibrium eutectic phase, while the isolated morphology of sigma phase can be described using divorced eutectic theory. Size, fraction, and morphology of the sigma phase were quantitatively studied by a series of experiments; the results are in good agreement with the model prediction.

  4. Phase-field modeling of multi-phase solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, Britta; Wheeler, Adam A.

    2002-08-01

    A phase-field model for a general class of multi-phase metallic alloys is now proposed which describes both multi-phase solidification phenomena as well as polycrystalline grain structures. The model serves as a computational method to simulate the motion and kinetics of multiple phase boundaries and enables the visualization of the diffusion processes and of the phase transitions in multi-phase systems. Numerical simulations are presented which illustrate the capability of the phase-field model to recover a variety of complex experimental growth structures. In particular, the phase-field model can be used to simulate microstructure evolutions in eutectic, peritectic and monotectic alloys. In addition, polycrystalline grain structures with effects such as wetting, grain growth, symmetry properties of adjacent triple junctions in thin film samples and stability criteria at multiple junctions are described by phase-field simulations.

  5. Investigation of Melting and Solidification of Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Films via Mixed-Phase Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    Melting and solidification constitute the fundamental pathways through which a thin-film material is processed in many beam-induced crystallization methods. In this thesis, we investigate and leverage a specific beam-induced, melt-mediated crystallization approach, referred to as Mixed-Phase Solidification (MPS), to examine and scrutinize how a polycrystalline Si film undergoes the process of melting and solidification. On the one hand, we develop a more general understanding as to how such transformations can transpire in polycrystalline films. On the other hand, by investigating how the microstructure evolution is affected by the thermodynamic properties of the system, we experimentally reveal, by examining the solidified microstructure, fundamental information about such properties (i.e., the anisotropy in interfacial free energy). Specifically, the thesis consists of two primary parts: (1) conducting a thorough and extensive investigation of the MPS process itself, which includes a detailed characterization and analysis of the microstructure evolution of the film as it undergoes MPS cycles, along with additional development and refinement of a previously proposed thermodynamic model to describe the MPS melting-and-solidification process; and (2) performing MPS-based experiments that were systematically designed to reveal more information on the anisotropic nature of Si-SiO2 interfacial energy (i.e., sigma Si-SiO2). MPS is a recently developed radiative-beam-based crystallization technique capable of generating Si films with a combination of several sought-after microstructural characteristics. It was conceived, developed, and characterized within our laser crystallization laboratory at Columbia University. A preliminary thermodynamic model was also previously proposed to describe the overall melting and solidification behavior of a polycrystalline Si film during an MPS cycle, wherein the grain-orientation-dependent solid-liquid interface velocity is identified

  6. Investigation of Melting and Solidification of Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Films via Mixed-Phase Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying

    Melting and solidification constitute the fundamental pathways through which a thin-film material is processed in many beam-induced crystallization methods. In this thesis, we investigate and leverage a specific beam-induced, melt-mediated crystallization approach, referred to as Mixed-Phase Solidification (MPS), to examine and scrutinize how a polycrystalline Si film undergoes the process of melting and solidification. On the one hand, we develop a more general understanding as to how such transformations can transpire in polycrystalline films. On the other hand, by investigating how the microstructure evolution is affected by the thermodynamic properties of the system, we experimentally reveal, by examining the solidified microstructure, fundamental information about such properties (i.e., the anisotropy in interfacial free energy). Specifically, the thesis consists of two primary parts: (1) conducting a thorough and extensive investigation of the MPS process itself, which includes a detailed characterization and analysis of the microstructure evolution of the film as it undergoes MPS cycles, along with additional development and refinement of a previously proposed thermodynamic model to describe the MPS melting-and-solidification process; and (2) performing MPS-based experiments that were systematically designed to reveal more information on the anisotropic nature of Si-SiO2 interfacial energy (i.e., sigma Si-SiO2). MPS is a recently developed radiative-beam-based crystallization technique capable of generating Si films with a combination of several sought-after microstructural characteristics. It was conceived, developed, and characterized within our laser crystallization laboratory at Columbia University. A preliminary thermodynamic model was also previously proposed to describe the overall melting and solidification behavior of a polycrystalline Si film during an MPS cycle, wherein the grain-orientation-dependent solid-liquid interface velocity is identified

  7. A phase-field model for the solidification of multicomponent and multiphase alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, R. S.; Wallach, E. R.; Thomson, R. C.

    2005-05-01

    A phase-field model for the simulation of solidification of a multicomponent and multiphase systems has been developed, which is based on an earlier developed multiphase field model for binary alloys and a phase-field multicomponent model for single-solid-phase systems. After incorporation with alloy thermodynamics and commercial software for the calculation of phase equilibria, the model has been implemented to study the microstructural evolution of an Al-11.5 mol% Si-0.9 mol% Cu-0.4 mol% Fe alloy. Numerical results for the morphological evolution of primary aluminium, silicon and AlFeSi intermetallic phases agree with experimental observations very well.

  8. Kinematics of Phase Boundary Growth. Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radev, Krassimir B.

    2010-01-01

    This report aims to give consideration to the time-space evolution of the phase boundary by making use of the kinematic condition on the interface, representing the balance of the mass fluxes through the movable growing boundary, as well as the Gibbs-Thompson condition of the local phase equilibrium. The analysis has shown the determinative role of a dimensionles parameter—combination of only physical properties of the system—on the evolution of surface fluctuations.

  9. Dual-scale phase-field simulation of Mg-Al alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, A.; Shchyglo, O.; Höche, D.; Tegeler, M.; Steinbach, I.

    2015-06-01

    Phase-field simulations of the nucleation and growth of primary α-Mg phase as well as secondary, β-phase of a Mg-Al alloy are presented. The nucleation model for α- and β-Mg phases is based on the “free growth model” by Greer et al.. After the α-Mg phase solidification we study a divorced eutectic growth of α- and β-Mg phases in a zoomed in melt channel between α-phase dendrites. The simulated cooling curves and final microstructures of α-grains are compared with experiments. In order to further enhance the resolution of the interdendritic region a high-performance computing approach has been used allowing significant simulation speed gain when using supercomputing facilities.

  10. Immiscible phase incorporation during directional solidification of hypermonotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Merrick, Roger A.

    1993-01-01

    Solidification processes in immiscible samples were investigated by directly observing the events taking place at the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification. Visualization of these events was made possible through the use of a transparent metal analog system and a temperature gradient stage assembly fitted to an optical microscope. The immiscible transparent analog system utilized was the succinonitrile-glycerol system. This system has been shown to exhibit the same morphological transitions as observed in metallic alloys of monotectic composition. Both monotectic and hypermonotectic composition samples were directionally solidified in order to gain an improved understanding of the manner in which the excess hypermonotectic liquid is incorporated into the solidifying structure. The processing conditions utilized prevented sedimentation of the excess hypermonotectic liquid by directionally solidifying the samples in very thin (13 microns), horizontally oriented cells. High thermal gradient to growth rate ratios (G/R) were used in an effort to prevent constitutional supercooling and the subsequent formation of L(sub 2) droplets in advance of the solidification front during the growth of fibrous composite structures. Results demonstrated that hypermonotectic composites could be produced in samples up to two weight percent off of the monotectic composition by using a G/R ratio greater than or equal to 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2) to avoid constitutional supercooling. For hypermonotectic samples processed with G/R ratios below 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2), constitutional supercooling occurred and resulted in slight interfacial instability. For these samples, two methods of incorporation of the hypermonotectic liquid were observed and are reported. The correlation between the phase spacing, lambda, and the growth rate, R, was examined and was found to obey a relationship generally associated with a diffusion controlled coupled growth process. For

  11. Study on Solidification of Phase Change Material in Fractal Porous Metal Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Wu, Liangyu; Chen, Yongping

    2015-02-01

    The Sierpinski fractal is introduced to construct the porous metal foam. Based on this fractal description, an unsteady heat transfer model accompanied with solidification phase change in fractal porous metal foam embedded with phase change material (PCM) is developed and numerically analyzed. The heat transfer processes associated with solidification of PCM embedded in fractal structure is investigated and compared with that in single-pore structure. The results indicate that, for the solidification of phase change material in fractal porous metal foam, the PCM is dispersedly distributed in metal foam and the existence of porous metal matrix provides a fast heat flow channel both horizontally and vertically, which induces the enhancement of interstitial heat transfer between the solid matrix and PCM. The solidification performance of the PCM, which is represented by liquid fraction and solidification time, in fractal structure is superior to that in single-pore structure.

  12. On migration of primary/peritectic interface during interrupted directional solidification of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-01-01

    The migration of the primary/peritectic interface in local isothermal condition is observed in dendritic structure of Sn–Ni peritectic alloy after experiencing interrupted directional solidification. It was observed that this migration of primary Ni3Sn2/peritectic Ni3Sn4 interface towards the primary Ni3Sn2 phase was accompanied by migration of liquid film located at this interface. The migration velocity of this interface was confirmed to be much faster than that of peritectic transformation, so this migration was mostly caused by superheating of primary Ni3Sn2 phase below TP, leading to nucleation and migration of liquid film at this interface. This migration can be classified as a kind of liquid film migration (LFM), and the migration velocity at the horizontal direction has been confirmed to be much faster than that along the direction of temperature gradient. Analytical prediction has shown that the migration of liquid film could be divided into two stages depending on whether primary phase exists below TP. If the isothermal annealing time is not long enough, both the liquid film and the primary/peritectic interface migrate towards the primary phase until the superheated primary phase has all been dissolved. Then, this migration process towards higher temperature is controlled by temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM). PMID:27075006

  13. On migration of primary/peritectic interface during interrupted directional solidification of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-01-01

    The migration of the primary/peritectic interface in local isothermal condition is observed in dendritic structure of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy after experiencing interrupted directional solidification. It was observed that this migration of primary Ni3Sn2/peritectic Ni3Sn4 interface towards the primary Ni3Sn2 phase was accompanied by migration of liquid film located at this interface. The migration velocity of this interface was confirmed to be much faster than that of peritectic transformation, so this migration was mostly caused by superheating of primary Ni3Sn2 phase below TP, leading to nucleation and migration of liquid film at this interface. This migration can be classified as a kind of liquid film migration (LFM), and the migration velocity at the horizontal direction has been confirmed to be much faster than that along the direction of temperature gradient. Analytical prediction has shown that the migration of liquid film could be divided into two stages depending on whether primary phase exists below TP. If the isothermal annealing time is not long enough, both the liquid film and the primary/peritectic interface migrate towards the primary phase until the superheated primary phase has all been dissolved. Then, this migration process towards higher temperature is controlled by temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM). PMID:27075006

  14. On migration of primary/peritectic interface during interrupted directional solidification of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-04-01

    The migration of the primary/peritectic interface in local isothermal condition is observed in dendritic structure of Sn–Ni peritectic alloy after experiencing interrupted directional solidification. It was observed that this migration of primary Ni3Sn2/peritectic Ni3Sn4 interface towards the primary Ni3Sn2 phase was accompanied by migration of liquid film located at this interface. The migration velocity of this interface was confirmed to be much faster than that of peritectic transformation, so this migration was mostly caused by superheating of primary Ni3Sn2 phase below TP, leading to nucleation and migration of liquid film at this interface. This migration can be classified as a kind of liquid film migration (LFM), and the migration velocity at the horizontal direction has been confirmed to be much faster than that along the direction of temperature gradient. Analytical prediction has shown that the migration of liquid film could be divided into two stages depending on whether primary phase exists below TP. If the isothermal annealing time is not long enough, both the liquid film and the primary/peritectic interface migrate towards the primary phase until the superheated primary phase has all been dissolved. Then, this migration process towards higher temperature is controlled by temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM).

  15. Nucleation and phase selection in undercooled Fe-Cr-Ni melts. Part 2: Containerless solidification experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Volkmann, T.; Herlach, D.M.; Loeser, W.

    1997-02-01

    The solidification behavior of undercooled Fe-Cr-Ni melts of different compositions is investigated with respect to the competitive formation of {delta}-bcc (ferrite) and {gamma}-fcc phase (austenite). Containerless solidification experiments, electromagnetic levitation melting and drop tube experiments of atomized particles, show that {delta} (bcc) solidification is preferred in the highly undercooled melt even at compositions where {delta} is metastable. Time-resolved detection of the recalescence events during crystallization at different undercooling levels enable the determination of a critical undercooling for the transition to metastable bcc phase solidification in equilibrium fcc-type alloys. Measurements of the growth velocities of stable and metastable phases, as functions of melt undercooling prior to solidification, reveal that phase selection is controlled by nucleation. Phase selection diagrams for solidification processes as function of alloy composition and melt undercooling are derived from two types of experiments: X-ray phase analysis of quenched samples and in situ observations of the recalescence events of undercooled melts. The experimental results fit well with the theoretical predictions of the metastable phase diagram and the improved nucleation theory presented in an earlier article. In particular, the tendency of metastable {delta} phase formation in a wide composition range is confirmed.

  16. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  17. Solute trapping in rapid solidification of a binary dilute system: a phase-field study.

    PubMed

    Galenko, P K; Abramova, E V; Jou, D; Danilov, D A; Lebedev, V G; Herlach, D M

    2011-10-01

    The phase-field model of Echebarria, Folch, Karma, and Plapp [Phys. Rev. E 70, 061604 (2004)] is extended to the case of rapid solidification in which local nonequilibrium phenomena occur in the bulk phases and within the diffuse solid-liquid interface. Such an extension leads to the fully hyperbolic system of equations given by the atomic diffusion equation and the phase-field equation of motion. This model is applied to the problem of solute trapping, which is accompanied by the entrapment of solute atoms beyond chemical equilibrium by a rapidly moving interface. The model predicts the beginning of complete solute trapping and diffusionless solidification at a finite solidification velocity equal to the diffusion speed in bulk liquid. PMID:22181123

  18. Solidification Behavior of Polymer Solution during Membrane Preparation by Thermally Induced Phase Separation

    PubMed Central

    Ishigami, Toru; Nii, Yoko; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2014-01-01

    The solidification behavior of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) solution during membrane preparation by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) was investigated. Apparatus newly developed in our laboratory was used to quantitatively measure membrane stiffness during phase separation. In this apparatus, a cooling polymer solution, placed on a stage, is moved upwards and the surface of the polymer solution contacts a sphere attached to the tip of a needle. The displacement of a blade spring attached to the needle is then measured by a laser displacement sensor. Different phase separation modes, such as liquid-liquid (L-L) phase separation and solid-liquid (S-L) phase separation (polymer crystallization) were investigated. In the case of S-L phase separation, the stiffness of the solution surface began to increase significantly just before termination of crystallization. In contrast, L-L phase separation delayed solidification of the solution. This was because mutual contact of the spherulites was obstructed by droplets of polymer-lean phase formed during L-L phase separation. Thus, the solidification rate was slower for the L-L phase separation system than for the S-L phase separation system. PMID:24957124

  19. Numerical Modeling of HgCdTe Solidification: Effects of Phase Diagram, Double-Diffusion Convection and Microgravity Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bune, Andris V.; Gillies, Donald C.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1997-01-01

    Melt convection, along with species diffusion and segregation on the solidification interface are the primary factors responsible for species redistribution during HgCdTe crystal growth from the melt. As no direct information about convection velocity is available, numerical modeling is a logical approach to estimate convection. Furthermore influence of microgravity level, double-diffusion and material properties should be taken into account. In the present study, HgCdTe is considered as a binary alloy with melting temperature available from a phase diagram. The numerical model of convection and solidification of binary alloy is based on the general equations of heat and mass transfer in two-dimensional region. Mathematical modeling of binary alloy solidification is still a challenging numericial problem. A Rigorous mathematical approach to this problem is available only when convection is not considered at all. The proposed numerical model was developed using the finite element code FIDAP. In the present study, the numerical model is used to consider thermal, solutal convection and a double diffusion source of mass transport.

  20. In-situ Monitoring of Dynamic Phenomena during Solidification and Phase Transformation Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Patterson, Brian M.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Lee, Wah Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Tucker, Tim J.; Clarke, Kester D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Teter, David F.; Beard, Timothy V.; Hudson, Richard W.; Freibert, Franz J.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.; Farrow, Adam M.; Cross, Carl E.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Lookman, Turab; Hunter, Abigail; Choudhury, Samrat; Karma, Alain; Ott, Thomas J. Jr.; Barker, Martha R.; O'Neill, Finian; Hill, Joshua; Emigh, Megan G.

    2012-07-30

    The purpose of this project is to: (1) Directly observe phase transformations and microstructure evolution using proton (and synchrotron x-ray) radiography and tomography; (2) Constrain phase-field models for microstructure evolution; (3) Experimentally control microstructure evolution during processing to enable co-design; and (4) Advance toward the MaRIE vision. Understand microstructure evolution and chemical segregation during solidification {yields} solid-state transformations in Pu-Ga.

  1. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeong Yun

    The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification. The energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. For analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, analytical models for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these solute trapping models are not rigorously verified due to the difficulty in experimentally measuring under rapid growth conditions. Moreover, since these solute trapping models include kinetic parameters which are difficult to directly measure from experiments, application of the solute trapping models or the associated analytic rapid solidification model is limited. These theoretical models for steady state rapid solidification which incorporate the solute trapping models do not describe the interdependency of solute diffusion, interface kinetics, and alloy thermodynamics. This research program is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. Through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and

  2. Phase-field simulations of solidification in binary and ternary systems using a finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, D.; Nestler, B.

    2005-02-01

    We present adaptive finite element simulations of dendritic and eutectic solidification in binary and ternary alloys. The computations are based on a recently formulated phase-field model that is especially appropriate for modelling non-isothermal solidification in multicomponent multiphase systems. In this approach, a set of governing equations for the phase-field variables, for the concentrations of the alloy components and for the temperature has to be solved numerically, ensuring local entropy production and the conservation of mass and inner energy. To efficiently perform numerical simulations, we developed a numerical scheme to solve the governing equations using a finite element method on an adaptive non-uniform mesh with highest resolution in the regions of the phase boundaries. Simulation results of the solidification in ternary Ni60Cu40-xCrx alloys are presented investigating the influence of the alloy composition on the growth morphology and on the growth velocity. A morphology diagram is obtained that shows a transition from a dendritic to a globular structure with increasing Cr concentrations. Furthermore, we comment on 2D and 3D simulations of binary eutectic phase transformations. Regular oscillatory growth structures are observed combined with a topological change of the matrix phase in 3D. An outlook for the application of our methods to describe AlCu eutectics is given.

  3. Faceted growth of primary Al{sub 2}Cu crystals during directional solidification in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanjun; Ren, Zhongming; Shen, Yu; Wang, Qiuliang; Dai, Yinming; Wang, Hui

    2013-10-21

    The high magnetic field is widely used to modify the crystal morphology. In this work, the effect of the magnetic field on growing behavior of faceted crystals in the Al-40 wt. %Cu alloy was investigated using directional solidification technique. It was found that the faceted growth of primary Al{sub 2}Cu phase was degraded and the primary spacing was reduced upon applying the magnetic field. Additionally, the length of the mushy zone first decreased and then increased with increase of the magnetic field intensity. The quantitative analysis reveals that the shear stress induced by the fluid motion is insufficient to break the atom bonds at the solid-liquid interface. However, both of the thermoelectric magnetic convection (TEMC) and the thermoelectric magnetic force (TEMF) cause dendrites to fracture and reduce the primary spacing. The two effects also weaken the faceting growth. Moreover, the instability of the solid-liquid interface is generated by the TEMF, which further leads to degrade the faceted growth. The length of mushy zone was changed by the TEMC and reached the minimum in the magnetic field of 0.5 T, which is in good agreement with the predicted value (0.83 T)

  4. Diffusion-stress coupling in liquid phase during rapid solidification of binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to describe the diffusion-viscous stress coupling in the liquid phase during rapid solidification of binary mixtures. The model starts with a set of evolution equations for diffusion flux and viscous pressure tensor, based on extended irreversible thermodynamics. It has been demonstrated that the diffusion-stress coupling leads to non-Fickian diffusion effects in the liquid phase. With only diffusive dynamics, the model results in the nonlocal diffusion equations of parabolic type, which imply the transition to complete solute trapping only asymptotically at an infinite interface velocity. With the wavelike dynamics, the model leads to the nonlocal diffusion equations of hyperbolic type and describes the transition to complete solute trapping and diffusionless solidification at a finite interface velocity in accordance with experimental data and molecular dynamic simulation.

  5. The solidification of monotectic alloys - Microstructures and phase spacings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Hellawell, A.; Lograsso, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The microstructures of directionally grown monotectic alloys in metallic and organic systems fall into two categories those which can form aligned fibrous composite structures with even phase spacings and fiber sections, and those in which the phase distribution is coarser and less regular. This division appears to relate to the form of the phase diagram and has been rationalized by Cahn (1977, 1979) in terms of the relative surface energies between solid and two liquids to give steady state or nonsteady state profiles. The transition in growth behavior occurs when the ratio of the monotectic temperature to that of the upper consolute temperature is approximately 0.9. Differences in phase spacings between a range of monotectic and eutectic systems are discussed in terms of the expected growth interface shapes and the factors which will influence them.

  6. Control of phase boundary evolution in metal solidification for new thermodynamic parameters of the metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albu, A. F.

    2016-05-01

    The problem of controlling the phase boundary evolution in the course of solidification of metals with different thermodynamic properties is studied. The underlying mathematical model of the process is based on a three-dimensional nonstationary two-phase initial-boundary value problem of the Stefan type. The control functions are determined by optimal control problems, which are solved numerically with the help of gradient optimization methods. The gradient of the cost function is exactly computed by applying the fast automatic differentiation technique. The research results are described and analyzed. Some of them are illustrated.

  7. Phase-Field Simulation of Microstructure Evolution in Industrial A2214 Alloy During Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ming; Tang, Ying; Zhang, Lijun; Sun, Weihua; Du, Yong

    2015-07-01

    By linking to the thermodynamic and atomic mobility databases in Al alloys well established in our research group, the microstructure evolution in industrial A2214 alloy (Al-4.5Cu-0.5Mg-1.0Si, in wt pct) during solidification process was studied by means of two-dimensional phase-field simulation via MICRostructure Evolution Simulation Software in the framework of the multi-phase-field formalism. The thermophysical parameters including interfacial energies and interfacial mobilities were carefully chosen for reproducing the experimental features. The solidification sequence due to the present phase-field simulation conforms to both equilibrium calculation and Scheil simulation. The predicted microstructure reproduces the experimental data very well. These facts indicate that a quantitative phase-field simulation was achieved in the present work. Moreover, the mechanisms of characteristic patterns and microstructure formation were revealed with the aid of the phase-field simulation. In addition, the effect of cooling rate on the secondary dendrite arm spacing and microsegregation was also investigated through comprehensive comparison with the experimental data.

  8. Phase-field modeling and experimental observation of the irregular interface morphology during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Taiming

    Evolution of the complex solid-liquid interface morphology during a solidification process is an important issue in solidification theory since the morphology eventually dictates the final microstructure of the solidified material and therefore the material properties. Significant progress have been made in recent years in the study of the formation and development of regular dendritic growth, while only limited understanding is achieved for the irregular interface patterns observed in many industry processes. This dissertation focuses on the physical mechanisms of the development and transition of various irregular interface patterns, including the tilted dendritic, the seaweed, and the degenerate patterns. Both experimental observations and numerical simulation using the phase field modeling are performed. A special effort is devoted on the effects of the capillary anisotropy and the kinetic anisotropy in the evolution of the interface morphology during solidification. Experimentally, a directional solidification system is constructed to observe in situ the interface morphology by using the transparent organic material succinonitrile. With such a system, both the regular interface patterns (cellular and dendritic) and the irregular interface patterns (seaweed, degenerate and tilted dendritic) are observed. The effects of the temperature gradient and the interface velocity on the development and transition of the irregular interface patterns are investigated. It is found that the interface morphology transits from the seaweed to the tilted dendritic pattern as the interface velocity increases, while the tilted dendritic pattern may transit to the degenerate seaweed pattern as the temperature gradient increases. Under certain conditions, dendrites and seaweed coexist within the same grain. The dynamic transitions among various patterns and the effect of the solidification conditions are examined in detail. Numerically, a 2-D phase field model is developed to

  9. GPU-accelerated 3D phase-field simulations of dendrite competitive growth during directional solidification of binary alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakane, S.; Takaki, T.; Ohno, M.; Shimokawabe, T.; Aoki, T.

    2015-06-01

    Phase-field method has emerged as the most powerful numerical scheme to simulate dendrite growth. However, most phase-field simulations of dendrite growth performed so far are limited to two-dimension or single dendrite in three-dimension because of the large computational cost involved. To express actual solidification microstructures, multiple dendrites with different preferred growth directions should be computed at the same time. In this study, in order to enable large-scale phase-field dendrite growth simulations, we developed a phase-field code using multiple graphics processing units in which a quantitative phase-field method for binary alloy solidification and moving frame algorithm for directional solidification were employed. First, we performed strong and weak scaling tests for the developed parallel code. Then, dendrite competitive growth simulations in three-dimensional binary alloy bicrystal were performed and the dendrite interactions in three-dimensional space were investigated.

  10. Refinement and growth enhancement of Al2Cu phase during magnetic field assisting directional solidification of hypereutectic Al-Cu alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Yue, Sheng; Fautrelle, Yves; Lee, Peter D; Li, Xi; Zhong, Yunbo; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the magnetic fields affect the formation of reinforced phase during solidification is crucial to tailor the structure and therefor the performance of metal matrix in situ composites. In this study, a hypereutectic Al-40 wt.%Cu alloy has been directionally solidified under various axial magnetic fields and the morphology of Al2Cu phase was quantified in 3D by means of high resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. With rising magnetic fields, both increase of Al2Cu phase's total volume and decrease of each column's transverse section area were found. These results respectively indicate the growth enhancement and refinement of the primary Al2Cu phase in the magnetic field assisting directional solidification. The thermoelectric magnetic forces (TEMF) causing torque and dislocation multiplication in the faceted primary phases were thought dedicate to respectively the refinement and growth enhancement. To verify this, a real structure based 3D simulation of TEMF in Al2Cu column was carried out, and the dislocations in the Al2Cu phase obtained without and with a 10T high magnetic field were analysed by the transmission electron microscope. PMID:27091383

  11. Phase-field simulations of particle capture during the directional solidification of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufgebauer, Henning; Kundin, Julia; Emmerich, Heike; Azizi, Maral; Reimann, Christian; Friedrich, Jochen; Jauß, Thomas; Sorgenfrei, Tina; Cröll, Arne

    2016-07-01

    We present a phase-field model for particle capture during directional solidification. Its predictions for critical growth velocities for particles of different sizes are compared with experimental results for capture of silicon carbide (SiC) particles during directional solidification of silicon. The phase-field model allows us to systematically test the influence of different assumptions about attractive and repulsive forces and the capture mechanisms, including the effects of particle shape and of partial engulfment of the particle by the interface. We identify common properties of models that show agreement with experiments, trying to determine the underlying physical effects by abductive inference. We find that predictions vary only slightly between models with different repulsive forces and that the shape of the particle can have a larger effect on the critical growth velocity than the exact nature of the repulsive force or the capture process. We assess to what extent a good description of experimental critical growth velocities implies that the model accurately describes the actual physical processes and propose additional ways to test the validity of models.

  12. Specimen analysis of Skylab, M553 experiment, flight specimens, phase C.. [on metals melting containerless solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Skylab 2 flight samples were analyzed to study containerless solidification and the effects of weightlessness on the process. A record of solute redistribution processes and of solidification terracing is reported. The solute redistribution process was highly localized, and low index, crystallographic system were suggested. Samples demonstrated that under reduced pressure and gravity conditions the anticipated solid/liquid solidification process was perturbed and superseded by solid/liquid/gas reactions during melting and solidification.

  13. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these

  14. Refinement and growth enhancement of Al2Cu phase during magnetic field assisting directional solidification of hypereutectic Al-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiang; Yue, Sheng; Fautrelle, Yves; Lee, Peter D.; Li, Xi; Zhong, Yunbo; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how the magnetic fields affect the formation of reinforced phase during solidification is crucial to tailor the structure and therefor the performance of metal matrix in situ composites. In this study, a hypereutectic Al-40 wt.%Cu alloy has been directionally solidified under various axial magnetic fields and the morphology of Al2Cu phase was quantified in 3D by means of high resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. With rising magnetic fields, both increase of Al2Cu phase’s total volume and decrease of each column’s transverse section area were found. These results respectively indicate the growth enhancement and refinement of the primary Al2Cu phase in the magnetic field assisting directional solidification. The thermoelectric magnetic forces (TEMF) causing torque and dislocation multiplication in the faceted primary phases were thought dedicate to respectively the refinement and growth enhancement. To verify this, a real structure based 3D simulation of TEMF in Al2Cu column was carried out, and the dislocations in the Al2Cu phase obtained without and with a 10T high magnetic field were analysed by the transmission electron microscope.

  15. Refinement and growth enhancement of Al2Cu phase during magnetic field assisting directional solidification of hypereutectic Al-Cu alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Yue, Sheng; Fautrelle, Yves; Lee, Peter D.; Li, Xi; Zhong, Yunbo; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the magnetic fields affect the formation of reinforced phase during solidification is crucial to tailor the structure and therefor the performance of metal matrix in situ composites. In this study, a hypereutectic Al-40 wt.%Cu alloy has been directionally solidified under various axial magnetic fields and the morphology of Al2Cu phase was quantified in 3D by means of high resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. With rising magnetic fields, both increase of Al2Cu phase’s total volume and decrease of each column’s transverse section area were found. These results respectively indicate the growth enhancement and refinement of the primary Al2Cu phase in the magnetic field assisting directional solidification. The thermoelectric magnetic forces (TEMF) causing torque and dislocation multiplication in the faceted primary phases were thought dedicate to respectively the refinement and growth enhancement. To verify this, a real structure based 3D simulation of TEMF in Al2Cu column was carried out, and the dislocations in the Al2Cu phase obtained without and with a 10T high magnetic field were analysed by the transmission electron microscope. PMID:27091383

  16. Solidification of Mg-Zn-Y Alloys at 6 GPa Pressure: Nanostructure, Phases Formed, and Their Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haitao; Liu, Keming; Zhang, Li; Atrens, Andrej; Yu, Jiuming; Li, Xiaolong

    2016-06-01

    Mg-Zn-Y alloys solidified under high pressure were characterized using XRD, DTA, SEM, and TEM. After solidification at atmospheric pressure, Mg-6Zn-1Y consisted of α-Mg, Mg7Zn3, and Mg3YZn6, while Mg-6Zn-3Y consisted of α-Mg, Mg3Y2Zn3, and Mg3YZn6. After solidification at 6 GPa pressure, both alloys consisted of α-Mg, MgZn, and Mg12YZn. The size and the shape of the second-phase particles formed for atmospheric solidification were significantly different to those formed for solidification at 6 GPa pressure. In Mg-6Zn-1Y, the second-phase size decreased from 300 to 50 nm, and the shape changed from needle like to blocky. In Mg-6Zn-3Y, the size decreased from 100 to 50 nm and the shape changed from short rod like to small and round. After aging at 200 °C for 12 h, the new MgZn phase transformed into the intermediate MgZn2 phase. Increasing the aging time to 24 h caused the intermediate MgZn2 phase to transform into Mg7Zn3 with a size of 50 nm, while the Mg12YZn phase remained unchanged.

  17. Phase-field model for solidification of a monotectic alloy with convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Wheeler, A. A.; Ratke, L.; Stöcker, C.

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we discuss two phase-field models for solidification of monotectic alloys, a situation in which a liquid phase L 1 may simultaneously transform into both a new liquid phase L 2 and a solid phase S via the reaction L 1→L 2+S. The first model uses three different phase-fields to characterize the three phases in the system and, in addition, a concentration field. This construction restricts the validity of the model to describe phase transitions within the vicinity of the monotectic temperature. In contrast, the second model distinguishes the two liquid phases by their concentration using a Cahn-Hilliard type model and employs only one phase-field to characterize the system as solid or liquid. This formulation enables the second model to represent a wider temperature range of the phase diagram including the miscibility gap where the spinodal decomposition L→L 1+L 2 occurs. Both our models permit the interfaces to have temperature-dependent surface energies which may induce Marangoni convection at L 1-L 2 interfaces in non-isothermal systems. By deriving a generalized stress tensor including stresses associated with the capillary forces on the diffuse interface, we extend the two monotectic phase-field models to account for convection in both liquid phases. Together with a generalized set of Navier-Stokes equations, we give a complete set of dynamic field equations to describe monotectic systems with fluid flow. Finally, we present numerical simulations of lamellar monotectic growth structures which exhibit wetting phenomena as well as coarsening and particle pushing.

  18. Investigation of the final stages of solidification and eutectic phase formation in Re and Ru containing nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckl, A.; Rettig, R.; Cenanovic, S.; Göken, M.; Singer, R. F.

    2010-07-01

    The microstructure resulting from the final stages of solidification—commonly referred to as eutectic islands—has been analysed in detail for three nickel-base superalloys containing Re and Ru. Focused ion beam 3-D reconstruction and EBSD-analysis were used to clarify the origin of different eutectic structure types. One common type of parent 3-D eutectic structure was identified. The solidification process of the final solidifying liquid has been further investigated by electron probe microanalysis mappings along with DICTRA simulations. Two models for diffusion controlled phase transformations are shown to present a fair description of the solidification sequence.

  19. A Phase-Field Solidification Model of Almost Pure ITS-90 Fixed Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, M. J.; Pearce, J. V.

    2014-07-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric phase-field model of thermo-solutal solidification in freezing-point cells used for calibrating standard platinum resistance thermometers for realization and dissemination of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is presented. The cell is essentially a graphite crucible containing an ingot of very pure metal (of order 99.9999 %). A graphite tube is inserted along the axis of the ingot to enable immersion of the thermometer in the metal. In this study, the metal is tin (freezing temperature of ). During the freezing of these cells, a steady, reproducible temperature is realized, with a defined temperature that can be used to calibrate thermometers with uncertainties mK. The model is applied to understand the effect of experimental parameters, such as initiation technique and furnace homogeneity, on the measured freezing curve. Results show that freezing curves whose behavior is consistent with the Scheil theory of solidification can be obtained with a specific furnace temperature profile, and provided that the freeze is of a long duration, the results are consistent with previous one-dimensional models and experiments. Morphological instability is observed with the inner interface initiation technique, causing the interface to adopt a cellular structure. This elevates the measured temperature, in accordance with the Gibbs-Thomson effect. In addition, the influence of initiation techniques on the solidification behavior is examined. The model indicates that an initially smooth inner mantle can `de-wet' from the thermometer well-forming agglomerated solid droplets, following recalescence, under certain conditions. This manifests as a measured temperature depression due to the Gibbs-Thomson effect, with a magnitude of to in simulations. The temperature rises to that of the stable outer mantle as freezing progresses and the droplets re-melt. It is demonstrated that the effect occurs below a critical mantle thickness. A physical

  20. Solidification processing and phase transformations in ordered high temperature alloys. Final report, 30 March 1990-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.J.; Bendersky, L.A.; Kattner, U.R.

    1993-01-20

    Useful high temperature alloys generally have microstructures consisting of more than one phase. Multiphase microstructures are necessary to develop acceptable toughness and creep strength in high temperature intermetallic alloy matrices. The optimum microstructures must be developed by a careful selection of processing path that includes both solidification and solid state heat treatment. Research has been conducted on the rapid solidification of selected intermetallic alloys and on the phase transformation paths that occur during cooling, primarily in the Ti-Al-Nb system. This report describes research performed in the Metallurgy Division at NIST under DARPA order 7469 between 1/1/89 and 12/31/92. Various research tasks were completed and the results have been published or have been submitted for publication.... Intermetallics, Ti-Al-Nb Alloys, Phase Diagrams, Phase Transformations, Ti-Al-Ta Alloys, MoSi2 Alloys.

  1. The phase-field method: simulation of alloy dendritic solidification during recalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettinger, William J.; Warren, James A.

    1996-03-01

    An overview of the phase-field method for modeling solidification is given and results for nonisothermal alloy dendritic growth are presented. By defining a “phase-field” variable and a corresponding governing equation to describe the state (solid or liquid) in a material as a function of position and time, the diffusion equations for heat and solute can be solved without tracking the liquid-solid interface. The interfacial regions between liquid and solid involve smooth, but highly localized variations of the phase-field variable and the composition. Simple finite-difference techniques on a uniform mesh can be used to treat the evolution of complex growth patterns. However, large-scale computations are required. The method has been applied to a variety of problems, including thermally driven dendritic growth in pure materials, solute-driven isothermal dendritic growth in alloys, eutectic growth (all at high supercoolings or supersaturations), solute trapping at high velocity, and coarsening of liquid-solid mixtures. To include thermal effects in solute-driven dendritic growth in alloys, a simplified approach is presented here that neglects the spatial variation of temperature in the computational domain but provides for changes with time and thus includes recalescence. Growth morphologies and solute patterns in the liquid and solid obtained for several values of an imposed heat flux are compared to results for isothermal growth.

  2. Microsegregation and Secondary Phase Formation During Directional Solidification of the Single-Crystal Ni-Based Superalloy LEK94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Galilea, Inmaculada; Huth, Stephan; Fries, Suzana G.; Warnken, Nils; Steinbach, Ingo; Theisen, Werner

    2012-12-01

    A multicomponent phase-field method coupled to thermodynamic calculations according to the CALPHAD method was used to simulate microstructural evolution during directional solidification of the LEK94 commercial single-crystal Ni-based superalloy using a two-dimensional unit cell approximation. We demonstrate quantitative agreement of calculated microsegregation profiles and profiles determined from casting experiments as well as calculated fraction solid curves with those determined in differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements. Finally, the role of solidification rate on dendrite morphology and precipitation of the secondary phases is investigated and a new measure of the dendrite morphology is presented to quantify the effect of back diffusion on the amount of secondary phases.

  3. Phase equillibria and solidification behaviour in the vanillin- p-anisidine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. B.; Das, S. S.; Gupta, Preeti; Dwivedi, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    Phase diagram of the vanillin- p-anisidine system has been studied by the thaw melt method. Congruent melting-type phase diagram exhibiting two eutectic points was obtained. Vanillin and p-anisidine react in 1:1 M ratio and form N-(4-methoxy phenyl)-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy phenyl methanimine (NHM) and water. Heats of fusion of pure components and the eutectic mixtures ( E1 and E2) were obtained from DSC studies. Jackson's roughness parameters ( α) were calculated. Excess Gibbs free energy ( GE), excess entropy ( SE) and excess enthalpy ( HE) of mixing of pre-, post- and eutectic mixtures were also calculated by using activity coefficient data. Linear velocities of solidification of components and eutectic mixtures were determined at different undercoolings. The values of excess thermodynamic functions and linear velocity data have indicated the non-ideal nature of the eutectic mixtures. Interaction energies in the gaseous state, calculated from computer simulation, have also indicated that the eutectics are non-ideal mixtures. Microstructural studies of vanillin, p-anisidine and NHM show the formation of broken lamellar type structures. However, for the eutectic E1, an irregular type and for the eutectic E2, a lamellar type structures were obtained. The effect of impurity on the microstructures of eutectic mixtures was also studied.

  4. Mixed-Phase Solidification of Thin Silicon Films on Silicon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, Monica

    In this thesis, we present a new beam-induced melt-mediated crystallization process called mixed-phase solidification (MPS) that can produce defect-free, large-grain polycrystalline-Si films with strong (100)-surface texture (>99%) on SiO2. Such a combination of microstructural attributes makes the resulting MPS material well-suited for high-performance electronic and photovoltaic applications. A systematic parametric study of the single- and multi-scan MPS process is performed using thin Si films on SiO2 irradiated via a continuous-wave (CW) laser system. We employ an in situ microscopic viewing system to directly observe and understand melting and solidification during the MPS process. Additionally, in order to investigate the grain boundary melting phenomenon, we have conducted “rapid-quench” demarcation experiments and established a one-to-one correspondence between the in situ data and the single-/multi-scan MPS processed microstructure. The experimental results show an incremental increase in grain size and (100)-surface texture with an increase in scan number. The grain size is found to reach an apparent soft saturation value as the number of scans increases. For a given number of scans, a decrease in power or an increase in velocity is found to decrease the grain size and (100)-surface texture. Increases in film thickness lead to an increase in grain size, but a reduction in (100)-surface texturing. Based on what we have experimentally observed, as well as what has been previously established regarding the radiative-melting of Si, we propose a thermodynamic model to account for the microstructural evolution observed in the MPS process (i.e., partial-melting and solidification of polycrystalline-Si films). The model is built on two fundamental considerations: (1) the near-equilibrium environment within which thermodynamic factors dominate the transitions, and (2) the dynamically balanced, yet continuously changing, thermal surroundings. According to our

  5. Formation mechanism of primary phases and eutectic structures within undercooled Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Dai, Fuping; Wei, Bingbo

    2007-08-01

    The solidification characteristics of three types of Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys with different primary phases were studied under substantial undercooling conditions. The experimental results show that primary (Pb) and SbSn phases grow in the dendritic mode, whereas primary (Sb) phase exhibits faceted growth in the form of polygonal blocks and long strips. (Pb) solid solution phase displays strong affinity with SbSn intermetallic compound so that they produce various morphologies of pseudobinary eutectics, but it can only grow in the divorced eutectic mode together with (Sb) phase. Although (Sb) solid solution phase and SbSn intermetallic compound may grow cooperatively within ternary eutectic microstructures, they seldom form pseudobinary eutectics independently. The (Pb)+(Sb)+SbSn ternary eutectic structure usually shows lamellar morphology, but appears as anomalous eutectic when its volume fraction becomes small. EDS analyses reveal that all of the three primary (Pb), (Sb) and SbSn phases exhibit conspicuous solute trapping effect during rapid solidification, which results in the remarkable extension of solute solubility.

  6. Phase-field modelling of rapid solidification in alloy systems: Spontaneous grain refinement effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullis, A. M.

    2012-07-01

    Phase-field modelling of rapid alloy solidification, in which the rejection of latent heat from the growing solid cannot be ignored, has lagged significantly behind the modelling of conventional casting practises which can be approximated as isothermal. This is in large part due to the fact that if realistic materials properties are adopted the ratio of the thermal to solute diffusivity (the Lewis number) is typically 103 - 104, leading to severe multi-scale problems. However, use of state-of-the-art numerical techniques such as local mesh adaptivity, implicit time-stepping and a non-linear multi-grid solver allow these difficulties to be overcome. Here we describe how the application of this model, formulated in the thin-interface limit, can help to explain the long-standing phenomenon of spontaneous grain refinement in deeply undercooled melts. We find that at intermediate undercoolings the operating point parameter, σ*, may collapse to zero, resulting in the growth of non-dendritic morphologies such as doublons and 'dendritic seaweed'. Further increases in undercooling then lead to the re-establishment of stable dendritic growth. We postulate that remelting of such seaweed structures gives rise to the low undercooling instance of grain refinement observed in alloys.

  7. In-Situ X-Ray Microscopy of Phase and Composition Distributions in Metal Alloys During Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, to image the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of up to 3 gm can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions were optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid inter-face. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. Composition gradients within the specimen cause vafiations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lameilae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Keywords: x-ray, microscope, solidification, microfocus, real-time, microstructure

  8. A novel procedure for phase separation in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of the aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    March, J G; Cerdà, V

    2016-08-15

    In this paper, an alternative for handling the organic phase after a dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using organic solvents lighter than water is presented. It is based on solidification (at -18°C) of the aqueous phase obtained after centrifugation, and the decantation, collection and analysis of the liquid organic layer. The extraction of nicotine in toluene, and its determination in eggplant samples was conducted as a proof of concept. The study has been carried out using standards prepared in water and the formation of the dispersion was assisted by sonication. The organic extract was analysed using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Satisfactory analytical figures of merit as: limit of detection (0.4µgL(-1), 2ngg(-1) wet sample), limit of quantification (1.2µgL(-1), 6.5ngg(-1) wet sample), within-day precision (RSD=7%), and linearity interval (up to 384µgL(-1) nicotine) were achieved. It constituted a contribution to the handling of organic extracts after microextraction processes. PMID:27260454

  9. Estimating peak and solidification temperatures for anatectic pelitic migmatites using phase diagrams: sampling heterogeneous migmatites and confronting melt loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Brett M.; Pattison, David R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Calculating a pressure-temperature phase diagram relevant to an anatectic pelitic migmatite sampled in outcrop is challenging because it is unclear what constitutes a meaningful bulk composition. Melt loss during metamorphism may have changed the bulk composition. The heterogeneous nature of migmatites, with light and dark coloured domains (leucosome and melanosome), means a choice must be made regarding how a migmatitic outcrop should be sampled. To address these issues, migmatites were simulated using thermodynamic modelling techniques for different melting and crystallization scenarios and bulk compositions. Using phase diagrams calculated for varying proportions of simulated melanosome and leucosome, temperatures of interest were estimated and compared with known values. Our modelling suggests: (1) It is generally possible to constrain the peak temperature using phase diagrams calculated with the composition of the melanosome; the more leucosome that is incorporated, the more innaccurate the estimate. For phase diagrams calculated using a combination of leucosome and melanosome material, peak temperature estimates differ from actual peak conditions by ‑25 to +50°C. In certain of these cases, such as those involving high proportions of leucosome to melanosome, or in which solid K-feldspar was absent at peak conditions, but is now present in the rock due to later crystallization from melt, it is not possible to estimate peak temperature. (2) The solidification temperature, whether due to crystallization of the last melt or physical loss of the melt during crystallization, will fall between the peak temperature and the water-saturated solidus (~660°C) if the melt and solids chemically interacted during cooling. This temperature can be accurately constrained from the phase diagram. If the melt crystallized in chemical isolation from the melanosome, the solidification temperature is the water-saturated solidus (625-645°C); however, physical melt loss during

  10. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  11. Morphologies of Primary Silicon in Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloys: Phase-Field Simulation Supported by Key Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Wei, Ming; Zhang, Lijun; Du, Yong

    2016-04-01

    We realized a three-dimensional visualization of the morphology evolution and the growth behavior of the octahedral primary silicon in hypereutectic Al-20wtpctSi alloy during solidification in a real length scale by utilizing the phase-field simulation coupled with CALPHAD databases, and supported by key experiments. Moreover, through two-dimensional cut of the octahedral primary silicon at random angles, different morphologies observed in experiments, including triangle, square, trapezoid, rhombic, pentagon, and hexagon, were well reproduced.

  12. Modeling of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Popov, Dmitri

    1997-01-01

    Our long term goal is to develop techniques to achieve detached solidification reliably and reproducibly, in order to produce crystals with fewer defects. To achieve this goal it is necessary to understand thoroughly the physics of detached solidification. It was the primary objective of the current project to make progress toward this complete understanding. 'Me products of this grant are attached. These include 4 papers and a preliminary survey of the observations of detached solidification in space. We have successfully modeled steady state detached solidification, examined the stability of detachment, and determined the influence of buoyancy-driven convection under different conditions. Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, under the Soviet microgravity program the major objective was to achieve detached solidification with its resulting improvement in perfection and properties. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past three years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification.

  13. In-situ x-ray microscopy of phase and composition distributions in metal alloys during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1999-07-01

    This research applies a state of the art x-ray transmission microscope, to image the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of up to 2 micrometers can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions were optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in situ metallography. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integration of composition. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae form eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys.

  14. Four-phase fully-coupled mold-filling and solidification simulation for gas porosity prediction in aluminum sand casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakumeit, J.; Jana, S.; Waclawczyk, T.; Mehdizadeh, A.; Sadiki, A.; Jouani, J.

    2012-07-01

    The impact of mold-filling and oxide film enclosure on gas porosity in A356 was investigated using a three-phase, fully-coupled, mold-filling and solidification simulation. For the prediction of gas porosity, a fourth hydrogen phase was added. At the solidification front hydrogen is rejected from the solid and accumulates in the melt. Pores nucleate if the solute gas exceeds the solubility limit. Air and melt are separated by a volume of fluid interface and special treatment of the hydrogen phase convection was necessary to limit the hydrogen to the melt. Folding of the melt surface was used as a source for oxide film entrainment. These oxide films were transported with the melt and used as nucleation sites for gas porosity formation. The influence of melt flow due to filling and oxide film distribution was analyzed using a simple 3-block test geometry. The test geometry was cast in A356 and analyzed by computer tomography to validate the porosity prediction.

  15. Solidification mechanism transition of liquid Co-Cu-Ni ternary alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, D. Y.; Wang, H. P.; Dai, F. P.; Langevin, D.; Wei, B.

    2011-01-01

    We report a solidification mechanism transition of liquid ternary Co45Cu45Ni10 alloy when it solidifies at a critical undercooling of about 344 K. When undercooling at Δ T<344 K, the solidification process is characterized by primary S (Co) dendritic growth and a subsequent peritectic transition. The dendritic growth velocity of S (Co) dendrite increases with the rise of undercooling. However, once Δ T>344 K, the solidification velocity decreases with the increase of undercooling. In this case, liquid/liquid phase separation takes place prior to solidification. The minor L2 (Cu) droplets hinder the motion of the solidification front, and a monotectic transition may occur in the major L1 phase. These facts caused by metastable phase separation are responsible for the slow growth at high undercoolings.

  16. Stability of metastable phase and soft magnetic properties of bulk Fe-B nano-eutectic alloy prepared by undercooling solidification combined with CU-mold chilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changlin; Zhang, Jun; Huang, Huili; Song, Qijiao; Liu, Feng

    2015-11-01

    Bulk Fe83B17 nano-eutectic alloys were prepared by undercooling solidification combined with Cu-mold chilling method. Stable phase Fe2B and metastable phase Fe3B were found to coexist in the as-solidified microstructure. The soft magnetic properties were improved significantly by the nano-lamellar eutectic and the metastable phase and, were increased further by annealing at 1173 K for 1.5 h after which the metastable phase was decomposed completely.

  17. Numerical study of solidification of a nano-enhanced phase change material (NEPCM) in a thermal storage system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashani, S.; Ranjbar, A. A.; Madani, M. M.; Mastiani, M.; Jalaly, H.

    2013-09-01

    The effects of nanoparticle dispersion on solidification of a Cu- n-hexadecane nanofluid inside a vertical enclosure are investigated numerically for different temperatures of the left vertical wall. An enthalpy porosity technique is used to trace the solid-liquid interface. The resulting nanoparticle-enhanced phase change materials (NEPCMs) exhibit enhanced thermal conductivity in comparison to the base material. The effect of the wall temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction are studied in terms of the solid fraction and the shape of the solid-liquid phase front. It has been found that a lower wall temperature and a higher nanoparticle volume fraction result in a larger solid fraction. The increase in the heat release rate of the NEPCM shows its great potential for diverse thermal energy storage applications.

  18. Gravitational influence on eutectic solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Robert S.; Glicksman, Martin E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of gravity on eutectic solidification was investigated experimentally for Pb-Sn binary eutectic alloys. It is found that the separation of the primary crystals of the binary system from the coupled eutectic occurs over a wide range of cooling rates and gravitational fields (100-100,000 g). The separation is strongly influenced by the nucleation behavior of the particular alloy system. A mechanism for the strong phase separation is postulated on the basis of cloud convection models in atmospheric convection.

  19. An adaptive mesh method for phase-field simulation of alloy solidification in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollada, P. C.; Jimack, P. K.; Mullis, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present our computational method for binary alloy solidification which takes advantage of high performance computing where up to 1024 cores are employed. Much of the simulation at a sufficiently fine resolution is possible on a modern 12 core PC and the 1024 core simulation is only necessary for very mature dendrite and convergence testing where high resolution puts extreme demands on memory. In outline, the method uses implicit time stepping in conjunction with an iterative solver, adaptive meshing and a scheme for dividing the work load across processors. We include three dimensional results for a Lewis number of 100 and a snapshot for a mature dendrite for a Lewis number of 40.

  20. Predictions of misruns using three-phase coupled mold-filling and solidification simulations in low pressure turbine (LPT) blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, S.; Kättlitz, O.; Hediger, F.; Jakumeit, J.; Aguilar, J.

    2012-07-01

    New alloy developments such as γ-TiAl aim at weight reduction and improvement of performance capabilities of aircraft engines. A drawback of TiAl is its low fluidity, which easily leads to misruns during the casting process. In this work a three-phase mold filling and solidification simulation methodology has been established and validated against casting trials. It uses the finite-volume method and arbitrary polyhedral control volumes to solve the governing equations. A High-Resolution Interface-Capturing (HRIC) scheme has been established as state-of-the-art for modeling multiphase flows with sharp interfaces using the so called Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) model. This multiphase model has been extended to casting processes to predict velocity, pressure and temperature distribution for all three phases, namely the gas, melt and solidified phase. Since LPT blades for aircraft engine applications are of widely differing in geometry with less than 1 mm thickness at the trailing edges, the effect of surface tension and wetting angle is dominant in these wall-bounded flows during the filling stage. These effects can only be calculated correctly if the interface between the phases is sharp and mesh quality is high. For the later automatically generated body-fitted polyhedral meshes with thin prism layers are used. In addition resistance of the dendrite network to melt flow must be adequately modeled. Here, an additional source term in the momentum equation based on Kozeny-Carman relation for permeability estimation is used. A detailed analysis of filling and solidification is presented to study the performance of the simulation method.

  1. Natural convection in steady solidification - Finite element analysis of a two-phase Rayleigh-Benard problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. J.; Brown, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Galerkin finite-element approximations and Newton's method for solving free boundary problems are combined with computer-implemented techniques from nonlinear perturbation analysis to study solidification problems with natural convection in the melt. The Newton method gives rapid convergence to steady state velocity, temperature and pressure fields and melt-solid interface shapes, and forms the basis for algebraic methods for detecting multiple steady flows and assessing their stability. The power of this combination is demonstrated for a two-phase Rayleigh-Benard problem composed of melt and solid in a veritical cylinder with the thermal boundary conditions arranged so that a static melt with a flat melt-solid interface is always a solution. Multiple cellular flows bifurcating from the static state are detected and followed as Rayleigh number is varied. Changing the boundary conditions to approach those appropriate for the vertical Bridgman solidification system causes imperfections that eliminate the static state. The flow structure in the Bridgman system is related to those for the Rayleigh-Benard system by a continuous evolution of the boundary conditions.

  2. Degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics in directional solidification of non-axially oriented crystals: a phase-field study.

    PubMed

    Xing, Hui; Dong, Xianglei; Wu, Hongjing; Hao, Guanhua; Wang, Jianyuan; Chen, Changle; Jin, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a phase-field study of degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics during directional solidification of a binary alloy. Morphological selection maps in the planes of (G, Vp) and (ε4, Vp) show that lower pulling velocity, weaker anisotropic strength and higher thermal gradient can enhance the formation of the degenerate seaweed. The tip undercooling shows oscillations in seaweed growth, but it keeps at a constant value in dendritic growth. The M-S instability on the tips and the surface tension anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface are responsible for the formation of the degenerate seaweed. It is evidenced that the place where the interfacial instability occurs determines the morphological transition. The transient transition from degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite shows that dendrites are dynamically preferred over seaweed. For the tilted dendritic arrays with a large tilted angle, primary spacing is investigated by comparing predicted results with the classical scaling power law, and the growth direction is found to be less sensitive to the pulling velocity and the primary spacing. Furthermore, the effect of the initial interface wavelength on the morphological transition is investigated to perform the history dependence of morphological selection. PMID:27210816

  3. Degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics in directional solidification of non-axially oriented crystals: a phase-field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Hui; Dong, Xianglei; Wu, Hongjing; Hao, Guanhua; Wang, Jianyuan; Chen, Changle; Jin, Kexin

    2016-05-01

    We report the results of a phase-field study of degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics during directional solidification of a binary alloy. Morphological selection maps in the planes of (G, Vp) and (ε4, Vp) show that lower pulling velocity, weaker anisotropic strength and higher thermal gradient can enhance the formation of the degenerate seaweed. The tip undercooling shows oscillations in seaweed growth, but it keeps at a constant value in dendritic growth. The M-S instability on the tips and the surface tension anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface are responsible for the formation of the degenerate seaweed. It is evidenced that the place where the interfacial instability occurs determines the morphological transition. The transient transition from degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite shows that dendrites are dynamically preferred over seaweed. For the tilted dendritic arrays with a large tilted angle, primary spacing is investigated by comparing predicted results with the classical scaling power law, and the growth direction is found to be less sensitive to the pulling velocity and the primary spacing. Furthermore, the effect of the initial interface wavelength on the morphological transition is investigated to perform the history dependence of morphological selection.

  4. Degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics in directional solidification of non-axially oriented crystals: a phase-field study

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Hui; Dong, Xianglei; Wu, Hongjing; Hao, Guanhua; Wang, Jianyuan; Chen, Changle; Jin, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a phase-field study of degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics during directional solidification of a binary alloy. Morphological selection maps in the planes of (G, Vp) and (ε4, Vp) show that lower pulling velocity, weaker anisotropic strength and higher thermal gradient can enhance the formation of the degenerate seaweed. The tip undercooling shows oscillations in seaweed growth, but it keeps at a constant value in dendritic growth. The M-S instability on the tips and the surface tension anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface are responsible for the formation of the degenerate seaweed. It is evidenced that the place where the interfacial instability occurs determines the morphological transition. The transient transition from degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite shows that dendrites are dynamically preferred over seaweed. For the tilted dendritic arrays with a large tilted angle, primary spacing is investigated by comparing predicted results with the classical scaling power law, and the growth direction is found to be less sensitive to the pulling velocity and the primary spacing. Furthermore, the effect of the initial interface wavelength on the morphological transition is investigated to perform the history dependence of morphological selection. PMID:27210816

  5. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  6. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  7. Two-dimensional phase-field study of competitive grain growth during directional solidification of polycrystalline binary alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaki, Tomohiro; Ohno, Munekazu; Shibuta, Yasushi; Sakane, Shinji; Shimokawabe, Takashi; Aoki, Takayuki

    2016-05-01

    Selections of growing crystals during directional solidification of a polycrystalline binary alloy were numerically investigated using two-dimensional phase-field simulations. To accelerate the simulations, parallel graphics processing unit (GPU) simulations were performed using the GPU-rich supercomputer TSUBAME2.5 at the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Twenty simulations with a combination of five sets of different seed orientation distributions and four different temperature gradients covering dendritic and cellular growth regions were performed. The unusual grain selection phenomenon, in which the unfavorably oriented grains preferentially grow instead of the favorably oriented grains, was observed frequently. The unusual selection was more remarkable in the cellular structure than in the dendritic structure.

  8. On the Solidification and Phase Stability of a Co-Cr-Fe-Ni-Ti High-Entropy Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, An-Chou; Chang, Yao-Jen; Tsai, Che-Wei; Wang, Yen-Chun; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Kuo, Chen-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a Co1.5CrFeNi1.5Ti0.5 high-entropy alloy has been investigated for its high-temperature microstructural stability. This material is shown to possess mainly a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure; the η phase is present at the interdendritic region in the as-cast condition, and it is stable between 1073 K and 1273 K (800 °C and 1000 °C); γ' particles are found throughout the microstructures below 1073 K (800 °C). Segregation analysis has been conducted on a single crystal sample fabricated by a directional solidification process with a single crystal seed. Results show that Co, Cr, and Fe partition toward the dendritic region, while Ni and Ti partition toward the interdendritic areas. Scheil analysis indicates that the solid-liquid partitioning ratio of each element is very similar to those in typical single crystal superalloys.

  9. Modeling solute segregation during the solidification of γ-phase U-Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M. A.; Garlea, E.; Agnew, S. R.

    2016-06-01

    Using first principles calculations, it is demonstrated that solute segregation during U-Mo solidification can be modeled using the classic Brody-Fleming limited diffusion framework. The necessary supporting equations specific to the U-Mo alloy, along with careful verification of the assumptions underpinning the Brody-Fleming model are developed, allowing for concentration profile predictions as a function of alloy composition and cooling rate. The resulting model is compared to experimental solute concentration profiles, showing excellent agreement. Combined with complementary modeling of dendritic feature sizes, the solute segregation model can be used to predict the complete microstructural state of individual U-Mo volume elements based upon cooling rates, informing ideal processing routes.

  10. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  11. Solidification and fcc- to metastable hcp- phase transition in krypton under modulating dynamic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Kim, Minseob; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Cynn, Hyunchae; Jenei, Zsolt; Evans, William

    2014-03-01

    We describe high-pressure kinetic studies of the solidification, melting and fcc-hcp transitions of Krypton under dynamic loading conditions, using a dynamic-diamond anvil cell (d-DAC) coupled with time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The time-resolved diffraction patterns and dynamic pressure responses show compression-rate dependencies associated with both the decay and growth time constants of the liquid-solid and solid-liquid transitions. According to the Avrami equation, both the solidified and melting processes are spontaneous nucleation and a rod-like (1-D) growth. Furthermore, under dynamic loading conditions, Kr-hcp forms from fcc close to the melting line. The nucleation time of fcc and hcp are very fast, with little dependence of compression rates or shorter than the time resolutions. The threshold pressure for the formation of Kr-hcp is ~ 0.8 GPa at the dynamic loadings of 0.004-13 GPa/s. This work was carried out at DESY. This work was performed under the auspices of DOE by LLNL under contracts(W-7405-Eng-48 and DE-AC52-07NA27344) and funded by the LDRD(11-ERD-046). The work at WSU was funded by NSF-DMR(1203834), DTRA(HDTRA1-12-01-0020).

  12. PUREX Organic Waste Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2002-12-12

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate solidification/stabilization as an alternative treatment technology for the organic phase of the SRS spent PUREX waste using simulated waste, and to evaluate waste forms prepared with actual spent organic PUREX waste for regulatory classification.

  13. Effect of a low axial magnetic field on the primary Al 2 Cu phase growth in a directionally solidified Al-Cu hypereutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yu; Ren, Zhongming; Li, Xi; Ren, Weili; Xi, Yan

    2011-12-01

    Effect of a low axial magnetic field on the growth behavior of the primary Al 2Cu phase in the Al-40 wt% Cu hypereutectic alloy during directional solidification at a low growth speed has been investigated experimentally. The results show that the application of a low magnetic field (≤1 T) causes the primary Al 2Cu phase to become deformed and irregular opposed to the well developed strip-like primary phase in the absence of the field. The deformation of the primary phase is maximum when a 0.5 T magnetic field is applied. Moreover, it has been found that the magnetic field promotes a transition of the primary phase morphology from faceted growth to irregular cellular structure and makes the primary phase spacing decrease with the increase of the magnetic field intensity. From the macroscopic scale, the magnetic field causes the occurrence of a considerable radial macrosegregation. These experimental results may be attributed to the effects of thermoelectric magnetic force (TEMF) in the solid and thermoelectromagnetic convection (TEMC) in the liquid. Further, the model of these effects is presented and evaluated numerically. The results indicate that the numerical magnitude of the TEMF during directional solidification under a 0.5 T low axial magnetic field can be of the order of 10 3 N/m 3. The force causes TEMC at different scales to modify the distribution of solute at the interface and should be responsible for the deformation, fracture and deflection of the primary phase.

  14. An experimental verification of a criterion for forming metastable phases in containerless solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuribayashi, K.; Kato, H.; Nagayama, K.; Inatomi, Y.; Kumar, M. S. Vijaya

    2015-04-01

    On the thermodynamic condition for forming a metastable phase from undercooled melt in a containerless state, we had proposed a criterion that crystals will preferentially form if they have a smaller entropy of fusion than the entropy of fusion of equilibrium crystals (Kuribayashi et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., A 449-451, 675 (2007)). This criterion is proposed for being applied to materials that exhibit a faceted interface, such as semiconductors and oxides. However, no experimental data that support this criterion have been obtained. From this point, we used an aerodynamic levitator as a tool for forming metastable phases from undercooled melt and verified the above-mentioned criterion using LnFeO3 (Ln: lanthanide and Y) as the model material. In addition, the condition for double recalescence, which corresponds to forming metastable phases and stable phases, was discussed in terms of competitive 2D isomorphic nucleation of the metastable phase and 3D polymorphic nucleation of the stable phase.

  15. An experimental verification of a criterion for forming metastable phases in containerless solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Kuribayashi, K.; Inatomi, Y.; Kumar, M. S. Vijaya

    2015-04-21

    On the thermodynamic condition for forming a metastable phase from undercooled melt in a containerless state, we had proposed a criterion that crystals will preferentially form if they have a smaller entropy of fusion than the entropy of fusion of equilibrium crystals (Kuribayashi et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., A 449–451, 675 (2007)). This criterion is proposed for being applied to materials that exhibit a faceted interface, such as semiconductors and oxides. However, no experimental data that support this criterion have been obtained. From this point, we used an aerodynamic levitator as a tool for forming metastable phases from undercooled melt and verified the above-mentioned criterion using LnFeO{sub 3} (Ln: lanthanide and Y) as the model material. In addition, the condition for double recalescence, which corresponds to forming metastable phases and stable phases, was discussed in terms of competitive 2D isomorphic nucleation of the metastable phase and 3D polymorphic nucleation of the stable phase.

  16. Determination of monoamine neurotransmitters in human urine by carrier-mediated liquid-phase microextraction based on solidification of stripping phase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liwei; Chen, Yibang; Chen, Yejun; Ma, Ming; Tan, Yueming; Tang, Hao; Chen, Bo

    2015-11-01

    A novel method was developed for the analysis of monoamine neurotransmitters (MNTs) in human urine by carrier-mediated liquid-phase microextraction based on solidification of stripping phase method (CM-LPME-SSP) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD). By adding an appropriate carrier in organic phase, simultaneous extraction of hydrophilic analytes, MNTs, with high enrichment factors (22.6-36.1 folds) and excellent sample cleanup was achieved. A new strategy, solidifying the aqueous stripping phase in the back-extraction process, was developed to facilitate the collection of the stripping phase as small as a few microliters. Combined with HPLC-ECD analysis, the linear ranges of the established method were 0.015-2.0 μg/mL for NE, E, DA, and 0.020-2.0 μg/mL for 5-HT. The limits of detection and quantification were in the range of 5.5-10.8 ng/mL and 15-20 ng/mL, respectively. The relative recoveries were in the range of 87-108%, with intraday and interday relative standard deviations lower than 13%. This method was successfully applied to analysis of MNTs in real urine. PMID:26452833

  17. Traveling waves, two-phase fingers, and eutectic colonies in thin-sample directional solidification of a ternary eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Silvère; Faivre, Gabriel

    2000-04-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the morphological transition of lamellar eutectic growth fronts called ``formation of eutectic colonies'' by the method of thin-sample directional solidification of a transparent model alloy, CBr4-C2Cl6. This morphological transition is due to the presence in the melt of traces of chemical components other than those of the base binary alloy (impurities). In this study, we use naphthalene as an impurity. The formation of eutectic colonies has generally been viewed as an impurity-driven Mullins-Sekerka instability of the envelope of the lamellar front. This traditional view neglects the strong interaction existing between the Mullins-Sekerka process and the dynamics of the lamellar pattern. This investigation brings to light several original features of the formation of eutectic colonies, in particular, the emission of long-wavelength traveling waves, and the appearance of dendritelike structures called two-phase fingers, which are connected with this interaction. We study the part played by these phenomena in the transition to eutectic colonies as a function of the impurity concentration. Recent theoretical results on the linear stability of ternary lamellar eutectic fronts [Plapp and Karma, Phys. Rev. E 60, 6865 (1999)] shed light on some aspects of the observed phenomena.

  18. Influence of Mg on Solidification of Hypereutectic Cast Iron: X-ray Radiography Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, K.; Yasuda, Hideyuki; Sugiyama, A.; Nagira, T.; Yoshiya, M.; Morishita, K.; Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Radiography using a synchrotron radiation X-ray source was performed to examine solidification and melting behaviors in hypereutectic cast iron specimens containing 0.002 and 0.05mass pctMg. The solidification sequence in the alloy containing 0.002mass pctMg was (1) nucleation and growth of graphite particles of which transformed to a flake-like shape, (2) growth of γ-Fe dendrites, (3) nucleation of graphite particles ahead of the interface just prior to the eutectic solidification, and (4) the eutectic solidification. In contrast, (1) and (2) occurred nearly at the same time in the specimen containing 0.05 mass pct Mg. The addition of 0.05mass pctMg significantly reduced the temperature range in which the graphite particles grew as the primary phase. Image-based analysis of melting behavior showed that even 0.05 mass pct addition was sufficient to modify the phase equilibrium of the liquid, γ-Fe, and graphite phases. Thus, the observed influence of Mg on the solidification sequence was attributed to the modification of the phase equilibrium. The influence was consistently explained by considering the shift of the eutectic composition to the carbon side in the pseudo-ternary system. It was also suggested that supersaturation of carbon in the melt increased as the temperature decreased even though the primary graphite particles existed. The supersaturation may cause the nucleation of the graphite particles just before the eutectic solidification.

  19. Three Phase Primary Science. Phase Three Evaluation. Interim Report. Research Report No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Michael

    This evaluation report is concerned with Phase 3 of the Three Phase Primary Science (TPPS) course piloted in Papua, New Guinea, primary schools in 1969 and which was to be taught in all primary schools in 1973. Phase 1 is a series of activities; Phase 2, a series of simple experiments for the pupils. Phase 3 is a series of more formal experiments…

  20. Phase field simulation of a directional solidification of a ternary eutectic Mo-Si-B Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, O.; Hasemann, G.; Krüger, M.; Halle, T.

    2016-03-01

    We present a eutectic Phase-Field Model for a Mo-Si-B alloy at ternary eutectic composition (Mo-17.5Si-8B), under a constant thermal gradient. The process parameters like cooling rate and thermal gradient were obtained directly from the experimental procedure of zone melting. The equilibrium interface geometries and interface mobility were calculated using an isotropic model. The phase equilibria and the other thermodynamic parameters are obtained by linearizing the Mo-Si-B ternary phase diagram. We have investigated the effect of process parameters on the lamellar growth pattern and lamella pattern stability with respect to the Jackson-Hunt minimum undercooling spacing theory. In order to examine the generated results by the model, they were validated with experimental observed microstructures and measurements and showed to be in a good agreement with the experimental observations.

  1. Experimental study of segregation in plane front solidification and its relevance to iron meteorite solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellamuthu, R.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1983-01-01

    A directional solidification technique was developed and applied to the problem of fractional crystallization of an iron meteorite parent body. Samples of Fe-Ni alloys close to meteorite compositions and containing S, P, and C were made. The solidified structures contain secondary phases such as sulphides within the proeutectic single crystal austenite (taenite). As a result of these experiments, we propose that the secondary phases observed in iron meteorites were formed during primary solidification of austenite (taenite). The measured composition profiles of Ni, P and C in the alloys were used to explain the elemental distribution within a chemical group of iron meteorites. An analytical procedure was applied to determine the equilibrium distribution coefficients as a function of fraction solidified for Ni and P from the composition profiles. The distribution coefficients of Ni and P agree with previous values. These distribution coefficients are of particular interest in the determination of the elemental distributions in iron meteorites.

  2. Experimental study of segregation in plane front solidification and its relevance to iron meteorite solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellamuthu, R.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1983-11-01

    A directional solidification technique was developed and applied to the problem of fractional crystallization of an iron meteorite parent body. Samples of Fe-Ni alloys close to meteorite compositions and containing S, P, and C were made. The solidified structures contain secondary phases such as sulphides within the pro-eutectic single crystal austenite (taenite). As a result of these experiments, we propose that the secondary phases observed in iron meteorites were formed during primary solidification of austenite (taenite). The measured composition profiles of Ni, P and C in the alloys were used to explain the elemental distribution within a chemical group of iron meteorites. An analytical procedure was applied to determine the equilibrium distribution coefficients as a function of fraction solidified for Ni and P from the composition profiles. The distribution coefficients of Ni and P agree with previous values. These distribution coefficients are of particular interest in the determination of the elemental distributions in iron meteorites.

  3. Fundamentals of rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, Merton C.; Shiohara, Yuh

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to illustrate the continuous change that occurs in the solidification behavior of undercooled melts, as cooling rates increase from 0.0001 K/sec to about 1000 K/sec. At the higher cooling rates, more significant changes occur as the dendrite tip temperature begins to drop from the equilibrium liquidus. Discontinuous solidification behavior changes will occur if absolute stability is reached, or a metastable phase forms, or solidification proceeds to a glass rather than to a crystalline solid, or if there is significant undercooling prior to nucleation.

  4. Effects of Manganese Content on Solidification Structures, Thermal Properties, and Phase Transformation Characteristics in Fe-Mn-C Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Wang, Yu-Nan; Ruan, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Rui-Zhi; Zhu, Kai; Fan, Zheng-Jie; Wang, Ying-Chun; Li, Cheng-Bin; Jiang, Xiao-Fang

    2015-02-01

    The solidification structures and the thermal properties of Fe-Mn-C steel ingots containing different manganese contents have been investigated and the phase transformation characteristics have been revealed by Thermo-Calc to assist development of the continuous casting technology of Fe-Mn-C steels. The results show that the thermal conductivity of the 0Mn steel is higher than that of the 3Mn steel. The thermal conductivity of the 6Mn steel is the lowest in the three kinds of steels below 1023 K (750 °C) and the highest above 1173 K (900 °C). The 0Mn steel has the highest value of the proportion of equiaxed grain zone area in the three kinds of steels, whereas the 3Mn steel has the lowest value of it in the steels. Manganese has the effect of promoting the coarsening of grains. The microstructure is martensite and a little retained austenite (3.8 mass pct) in the 6Mn steel, whereas the microstructure is bainite in the 3Mn steel. The 0Mn steel is characterized by ferrite and pearlite. The mean thermal expansion coefficients of the steels are in the range from 1.0 × 10-5 to 1.6 × 10-5 K-1, and the determinations of mold tapers of the 6Mn and 3Mn steels can refer to low-carbon steel. Using RA <60 pct as the criterion, the third brittle temperature region of the 6Mn steel is 873 K to 1073 K (600 °C to 800 °C), whereas those of the 3Mn steel and the 0Mn steel are 873 K to 1123 K (600 °C to 850 °C) and 873 K to 1173 K (600 °C to 900 °C), respectively. In the 6Mn and 3Mn steels, the deformation-induced ferrite (DIF) forms in sufficient quantities cause the recovery of the ductility at the low temperature end. However, since low strains are present when straightening, sufficient quantities of DIF cannot be formed. Thus, the ductility of the 6Mn and 3Mn steels cannot be improved during the continuous casting process. Manganese has the effect of enlarging the austenite phase region and reducing the δ-ferrite phase region and α-ferrite phase region.

  5. Appearance of metastable B2 phase during solidification of Ni50Zr50 alloy: electrostatic levitation and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Quirinale, D G; Rustan, G E; Wilson, S R; Kramer, M J; Goldman, A I; Mendelev, M I

    2015-03-01

    High-energy x-ray diffraction measurements of undercooled, electrostatically levitated Ni50Zr50 liquid droplets were performed. The observed solidification pathway proceeded through the nucleation and growth of the metastable B2 phase, which persisted for several seconds before the rapid appearance of the stable B33 phase. This sequence is shown to be consistent with predictions from classical nucleation theory using data obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A plausible mechanism for the B2-B33 transformation is proposed and investigated through further MD simulations. PMID:25650946

  6. In situ identification of the metastable phase during solidification from the undercooled YFeO3 melt by fast x-ray diffractometry at 250 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagashio, K.; Kuribayashi, K.; Vijaya Kumar, M. S.; Niwata, K.; Hibiya, T.; Mizuno, A.; Watanabe, M.; Katayama, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A time-resolved x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiment at 250Hz using a synchrotron radiation source was carried out during the containerless solidification of ReFeO3 (Re =Y and Lu) in order to identify the metastable phase in situ. The metastable phase solidified primarily from the undercooled YFeO3 melt finally transformed to the stable orthorhombic YFeO3 phase during the short period of recalescence (˜0.035s ). Although the metastable phase could not be detected in the as-solidified sample by the powder XRD, the in situ diffraction pattern of the metastable phase in the YFeO3 system was consistent with that of the metastable hexagonal LuFeO3 phase.

  7. The effect of heating power on impurity formation and transport during the holding phase in a Bridgman furnace for directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, Kjerstin; Lindholm, Dag; M`Hamdi, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen and carbon are the most common impurities in multi-crystalline silicon. The general mechanism for formation and transport of O and C in the solidification furnace is as follows: oxygen from the silica crucible comes into the melt and combines with a silicon atom and evaporates at the gas/melt interface in the form of silicon oxide (SiO). Argon inert gas, injected into the furnace chamber, carries the SiO to the hot graphite fixtures, where it reacts with carbon to form carbon monoxide (CO) and silicon carbide (SiC). CO is carried by the gas to the melt free surface, where it dissociates into carbon and oxygen. Finally, during solidification oxygen and carbon are incorporated into the crystal. A global furnace model accounting for heat transfer, melt flow, gas flow and impurity transport has been applied to investigate the oxygen and carbon formation and transport in a vertical Bridgman furnace during the holding phase when the furnace is at its hottest. A case study is performed to investigate the effect of the applied heating power on the carbon and oxygen concentrations in the melt prior to solidification.

  8. Macrosegregation and Grain Formation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification Through Cross-Section Increase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghods, Masoud; Lauer, Mark; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David; Grugel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrical Al-7 wt% Silicon, Al-19 wt% Copper and Lead-6 wt% Antimony alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS) with liquid above, solid below, and gravity pointing down, in graphite crucibles having an abrupt cross-sectional increase. These alloys have similar solidification shrinkage but are expected to have different degrees of thermosolutal convection during solidification. Microstructures in the DS samples in the vicinity of the section change have been studied in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal effects and solidification shrinkage. Extensive radial and axial macrosegregation associated with cross-section change is observed. It also appears that steepling and local primary alpha-phase remelting resulting from convection are responsible for stray grain formation at the reentrant corners. Preliminary results from a numerical model, which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone, indicate that these regions are prone to solutal remelting of dendrites.

  9. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  10. EBSD Study on the Effect of a Strong Axial Magnetic Field on the Microstructure and Crystallography of Al-Ni Alloys During Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Moreau, Rene; Du, Dafan; Ren, Zhongming; Lu, Xionggang

    2016-03-01

    The effect of a strong magnetic field on the microstructure and crystallography of the primary and eutectic Al3Ni phases in Al-Ni alloys was investigated by using EBSD. The results show that the magnetic field significantly affected the microstructures and crystallography during both volume and directional solidification. As a result, the Al3Ni primary phases were aligned with the <001> crystal direction along the magnetic field and formed a layer-like structure. The magnetic field intensity, solidification temperature, growth speed, and alloy composition played important roles during the alignment process of the Al3Ni primary phase. Indeed, the alignment degree increased with the magnetic field and the solidification temperature during normal solidification. Moreover, the effect of the magnetic field on the crystallography of the Al-Al3Ni eutectic in the Al-Ni alloys was also studied. The applied magnetic field modified the orientation of the preferred growth direction of the Al3Ni eutectic fiber and the crystallographic orientation relationship of the Al-Al3Ni eutectic. The orientation of the preferred growth direction of the Al3Ni eutectic fiber depended mainly on the solidification direction and the alignment of the Al3Ni primary phase. Furthermore, a method for controlling the crystallization process by adjusting the angle between the solidification direction and the magnetic field was proposed.

  11. Variational formulation and numerical accuracy of a quantitative phase-field model for binary alloy solidification with two-sided diffusion.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Munekazu; Takaki, Tomohiro; Shibuta, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    We present the variational formulation of a quantitative phase-field model for isothermal low-speed solidification in a binary dilute alloy with diffusion in the solid. In the present formulation, cross-coupling terms between the phase field and composition field, including the so-called antitrapping current, naturally arise in the time evolution equations. One of the essential ingredients in the present formulation is the utilization of tensor diffusivity instead of scalar diffusivity. In an asymptotic analysis, it is shown that the correct mapping between the present variational model and a free-boundary problem for alloy solidification with an arbitrary value of solid diffusivity is successfully achieved in the thin-interface limit due to the cross-coupling terms and tensor diffusivity. Furthermore, we investigate the numerical performance of the variational model and also its nonvariational versions by carrying out two-dimensional simulations of free dendritic growth. The nonvariational model with tensor diffusivity shows excellent convergence of results with respect to the interface thickness. PMID:26871136

  12. Variational formulation and numerical accuracy of a quantitative phase-field model for binary alloy solidification with two-sided diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Munekazu; Takaki, Tomohiro; Shibuta, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    We present the variational formulation of a quantitative phase-field model for isothermal low-speed solidification in a binary dilute alloy with diffusion in the solid. In the present formulation, cross-coupling terms between the phase field and composition field, including the so-called antitrapping current, naturally arise in the time evolution equations. One of the essential ingredients in the present formulation is the utilization of tensor diffusivity instead of scalar diffusivity. In an asymptotic analysis, it is shown that the correct mapping between the present variational model and a free-boundary problem for alloy solidification with an arbitrary value of solid diffusivity is successfully achieved in the thin-interface limit due to the cross-coupling terms and tensor diffusivity. Furthermore, we investigate the numerical performance of the variational model and also its nonvariational versions by carrying out two-dimensional simulations of free dendritic growth. The nonvariational model with tensor diffusivity shows excellent convergence of results with respect to the interface thickness.

  13. Dispersion of fine primary inclusions of MgO and ZrO{sub 2} in Fe-10 mass pct Ni alloy and the solidification structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, Kimiaki; Suito, Hideaki

    1999-12-01

    The homogeneous dispersion of primary inclusions of MgO and ZrO{sub 2} was studied in an Fe-10 mass pct Ni alloy as a function of the holding time at 1,873 K and the cooling rate. The spatial size distribution was estimated from the planar size distribution obtained in a cross section by applying the Schwartz-Saltykov transformation. It was found that the content of insoluble Mg or Zr estimated from the size distribution agreed with that obtained from chemical analysis. The influence on the solidification macrostructure such as columnar dendrite, equiaxed dendrite, and globular crystal of dissolved Mg or Zr and inclusion particles having the mean diameter of roughly 1 {micro}m was investigated. The area fraction of globular crystals in the Mg deoxidation decreased with increasing dissolved Mg content ({gt}30 mass ppm) in the presence of MgO particles. In the Zr deoxidation, however, globular crystals were only observed in the presence of ZrO{sub 2} particles without respect to the presence of dissolved Zr.

  14. MIKES’ primary phase stepping gauge block interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byman, V.; Lassila, A.

    2015-08-01

    MIKES’ modernized phase stepping interferometer for gauge block calibration (PSIGB) will be described. The instrument is based on the well-regarded NPL-TESA gauge block interferometer from 1994. The decision to upgrade the instrument resulted from several components, such as the PC and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, having reached the end of their lifetime. In this paper modernized components, measurement method and analysis will be explained. The lasers are coupled to the instrument using single mode fiber. The instrument uses phase stepping generated by an added optical window on a controllable rotatory table in the reference arm with a recently developed nine-position phase stepping algorithm. Unwrapping is done with a robust path following algorithm. Procedures for adjusting the interferometer are explained. Determination and elimination of wavefront error, coherent noise and analysis of their influence on the results is described. Flatness and variation in length are also important parameters of gauge blocks to be characterized, and the corresponding analysis method is clarified. Uncertainty analysis for the central length, flatness and variation in length is also described. The results are compared against those of the old hardware and software. The standard uncertainty for central length measurement is u = [(9.5 nm)2 + (121 × 10-9 L)2]½, where L is measured length.

  15. Phase-field modelling of β(Ti) solidification in Ti-45at.%Al: columnar dendrite growth at various gravity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viardin, A.; Berger, R.; Sturz, L.; Apel, M.; Hecht, U.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of solutal convection on the solidification of γ titanium aluminides, specifically on β(Ti) dendrite growth, is not well known. With the aim of supporting directional solidification experiments under hyper-gravity using a large diameter centrifuge, 2D-phase field simulations of β(Ti) dendrite growth have been performed for the binary alloy Ti-45at.%Al and various gravity scenarios. Both, the direction and magnitude of the gravity vector were varied systematically in order to reveal the subtle interplay between the convective flow pattern and mushy zone characteristics. In this presentation, gravity effects are discussed for early dendrite growth. For selected cases the evolution on longer timescales is also analyse of and oscillatory modes leading to dynamically stable steady state growth are outlined. In a dedicated simulation series forced flow is superimposed, as to mimic thermally driven fluid flow expected to establish on the macroscopic scale (sample size) in the centrifugal experiments. Above a certain threshold this flow turns dominant and precludes solutally driven convective effects.

  16. The stochastic modeling of solidification structures in alloy 718 remelt ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastac, Laurentiu; Sundarraj, Suresh; Yu, Kuang-O.; Pang, Yuan

    1998-03-01

    A stochastic numerical approach was developed to model the formation of grain structure and secondary phases during the solidification of nickel-based alloy 718 remelt ingots. The significance of the present stochastic approach is that the simulated phases can be directly compared with actual phases from experiments at two different scales: grain characteristics can be visualized at the macroscale, while the amount, size, and distribution of secondary phases can be viewed at the microscale. The computer becomes a “dynamic metallographic microscope.” Stochastic modeling was applied to simulate the formation of solidification phasesprimary phase and NbC and eutectic γ-Laves secondary phases) during the solidification of vacuum-arc-remelted and electroslag-remelted alloy 718 ingots. Modeling results, such as pool profile, grain-growth pattern, grain structure (both columnar and equiaxed grains), columnar-to-equiaxed transition, grain size, and secondary dendrite arm spacing, as well as amount, size, and location of both eutectic γ-Laves and NbC phases compared well with experimental data for cast alloy 718. This research demonstrates that the stochastic approaches are relatively fast, comprehensive, and more accurate than the deterministic approaches in predicting the solidification characteristics of remelt ingots and are mature enough to be used effectively by the metal industry for process development and optimization.

  17. Nonequilibrium solidification in undercooled Ti{sub 45}Al{sub 55} melts

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, H.; Galenko, P. K.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kolbe, M.; Herlach, D. M.; Shuleshova, O.

    2008-04-01

    Ti-Al alloys are of high technological interest as light-weight high-performance materials. When produced by solidification from the liquid state, the material properties of as-solidified materials are strongly dependent on the conditions governing the solidification process. Nonequilibrium solidification from the state of an undercooled liquid may result to the formation of metastable solid materials. On the one hand undercooling under special cases may influence the phase selection behavior during solidification, and on the other hand during rapid growth of solid phases in undercooled melts nonequilibrium effects such as solute trapping and disorder trapping may occur. In the present work containerless processing by electromagnetic levitation is used to undercool Ti{sub 45}Al{sub 55} melts deeply below the liquidus temperature. The dendrite growth velocity during the solidification is measured as a function of undercooling by application of a high-speed video camera. In situ diffraction experiments at ESRF in Grenoble and microstructure investigations are performed in order to identify the primary solidified phases. The experimental findings are interpreted within current theoretical models for dendritic growth and solute trapping.

  18. Solidification Paths and Phase Components at High Temperatures of High-Zn Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloys with Different Mg and Cu Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, W. X.; Hou, L. G.; Liu, J. C.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F.; Liu, J. T.; Zhuang, L. Z.; Zhang, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    Studies were carried out systematically on a series of Al-8.5 wt pct Zn- xMg- yCu alloys ( x is about 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt pct, and y is about 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 2.9 wt pct). The effects of alloying elements Mg and Cu on the microstructures of as-cast and homogenized alloys were investigated using the computational/experimental approach. It shows that Mg(Zn,Al,Cu)2 ( σ) phase can exist in all the as-cast alloys without any observable Mg32(Al,Zn)49/Al2Mg3Zn3 ( T) or Al2CuMg ( S) phase, whereas Al2Cu ( θ) phase is prone to exist in the alloys with low Mg and high Cu contents. Thermodynamic calculation shows that the real solidification paths of the designed alloys fall in between the Scheil and the equilibrium conditions, and close to the former. After the long-time homogenization [733 K (460 °C)/168 hours] and the two-step homogenization [733 K (460 °C)/24 hours + 748 K (475 °C)/24 hours], the phase components of the designed alloys are generally consistent with the calculated phase diagrams. At 733 K (460 °C), the phase components in the thermodynamic equilibrium state are greatly influenced by Mg content, and the alloys with low Mg content are more likely to be in single-Al phase field even if the alloys contain high Cu content. At 748 K (475 °C), the dissolution of the second phases is more effective, and the phase components in the thermodynamic equilibrium state are dominated primarily by (Mg + Cu) content, except the alloys with (Mg + Cu) ≳ 4.35 wt pct, all designed alloys are in single-Al phase field.

  19. Solidification of undercooled liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, J. H.; Shiohara, Y.; Paik, J. S.; Flemmings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    During rapid solidification processing (RSP) the amount of liquid undercooling is an important factor in determining microstructural development by controlling phase selection during nucleation and morphological evolution during crystal growth. While undercooling is an inherent feature of many techniques of RSP, the deepest undercoolings and most controlled studies have been possible in carefully prepared fine droplet samples. From past work and recent advances in studies of nucleation kinetics it has become clear that the initiation of crystallization during RSP is governed usually by heterogeneous sites located at surfaces. With known nucleant sites, it has been possible to identify specific pathways of metastable phase formation and microstructural development in alloys. These advances have allowed for a clearer assessment of the interplay between undercooling, cooling rate and particle size statistics in structure formation. New approaches to the examination of growth processes have been developed to follow the thermal behavior and morphology in small samples in the period of rapid crystallization and recalescence. Based upon the new experimental information from these studies, useful models can be developed for the overall solidification process to include nucleation behavior, thermodynamic constraints, thermal history, growth kinetics, solute redistribution and resulting structures. From the refinement of knowledge concerning the underlying factors that govern RSP a basis is emerging for an effective alloy design and processing strategy.

  20. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L ..-->.. L + ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..gamma... In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions.

  1. Modelling Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Weijun

    1992-01-01

    The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  2. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The long range goal of this program is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification and to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  3. Directional solidification of superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Diane (Inventor); Alter, Wendy Sue (Inventor); Hamilton, William David (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates to the directional solidification of superalloys, in particular nickel-based superalloys, by imposition of a predetermined temperature profile in the solidification front and, depending on the desired results, a predetermined rate of advance of said solidification front, whereas castings of markedly superior fatigue resistance are produced.

  4. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  5. A phase-field-lattice Boltzmann method for modeling motion and growth of a dendrite for binary alloy solidification in the presence of melt convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Roberto; Takaki, Tomohiro; Ohno, Munekazu

    2015-10-01

    In this study, a combination of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and the phase-field method (PFM) is used for modeling simultaneous growth and motion of a dendrite during solidification. PFM is used as a numerical tool to simulate the morphological changes of the solid phase, and the fluid flow of the liquid phase is described by using LBM. The no-slip boundary condition at the liquid-solid interface is satisfied by adding a diffusive-forcing term in the LBM formulation. The equations of motion are solved for tracking the translational and rotational motion of the solid phase. The proposed method is easily implemented on a single Cartesian grid and is suitable for parallel computation. Two-dimensional benchmark computations show that the no-slip boundary condition and the shape preservation condition are satisfied in this method. Then, the present method is applied to the calculation of dendritic growth of a binary alloy under melt convection. Initially, the solid is stationary, and then, the solid moves freely due to the influence of fluid flow. Simultaneous growth and motion are effectively simulated. As a result, it is found that motion and melt convection enhance dendritic growth along the flow direction.

  6. In situ metathesis reaction combined with liquid-phase microextraction based on the solidification of sedimentary ionic liquids for the determination of pyrethroid insecticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lu; Zhang, Panjie; Shan, Wanyu; Wang, Xuan; Li, Songqing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Gao, Haixiang

    2015-11-01

    A novel dispersion liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of sedimentary ionic liquids (SSIL-DLLME), in which an in situ metathesis reaction forms an ionic liquid (IL) extraction phase, was developed to determine four pyrethroid insecticides (i.e., permethrin, cyhalothrin, fenpropathrin, and transfluthrin) in water followed by separation using high-performance liquid chromatography. In the developed method, in situ DLLME was used to enhance the extraction efficiency and yield. After centrifugation, the extraction solvent, tributyldodecylphosphonium hexafluorophosphate ([P44412][PF6]), was easily collected by solidification in the bottom of the tube. The effects of various experimental parameters, the quantity of tributyldodecylphosphonium bromide ([P44412]Br), the molar ratio of [P44412]Br to potassium hexafluorophosphate (KPF6), the ionic strength, the temperature of the sample solution, and the centrifugation time, were optimized using a Plackett-Burman design to identify the significant factors that affected the extraction efficiency. These significant factors were then optimized using a central composite design. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of the four pyrethroid insecticides at four spiked levels ranged from 87.1% to 101.7%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 0.1% to 5.5%. At concentration levels between 1 and 500 µg/L, good linearity was obtained, with coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. The limits of detection (LODs) for the four pyrethroid insecticides were in the range of 0.71-1.54 µg/L. The developed method was then successfully used for the determination of pyrethroid insecticides in environmental samples. PMID:26452797

  7. Migration of liquid phase from the primary/peritectic interface in a temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Li, XinZhong; Su, YanQing; Guo, JingJie

    2016-07-01

    The migration of the liquid droplets from the primary α/peritectic β interface at the peritectic temperature TP has been observed and analyzed in a Sn-Ni peritectic alloy. During the isothermal annealing stage of the interrupted directional solidification, a concentration gradient is established across the liquid droplets along the direction of the temperature gradient due to the temperature gradient zone melting. Simultaneous remelting/resolidification at the top/bottom of the liquid droplets by this concentration gradient have been confirmed to lead to migration of these droplets towards higher temperatures. The dependence of the migration distance of the liquid droplets on isothermal annealing time has been well predicted. Furthermore, since the lengths of the liquid droplet are not uniform along the direction of the temperature gradient, the remelting/resolidification rates which are dependent on the local morphology of liquid droplet are different at different local positions of the liquid droplets. It has been demonstrated that the morphology of the liquid droplet was also influenced by the morphologies of the liquid phase themselves. Therefore, the morphology of the liquid droplet itself changes from spherical to some kinds of irregular shapes during its migration.

  8. Progress with simple binary alloy solidification problems

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.G.; Solomon, A.D.; Alexiades, V.

    1981-01-01

    We give a preliminary report of our studies on binary alloy solidification. In what follows we state the mathematical problem, which we assume represents the solidification of a simple binary alloy; we give a very brief introduction to two component phase diagrams, whose relations we assume hold at the solidification front; we describe our phlogiston formulation of the problem, which is derived by analogy with the enthalpy method for simpler problems; we describe the finite difference scheme, with which we computer the various constituents of our phlogiston formulation; and finally we relate our computational experience with the model so far.

  9. Cross-Permeability of the Semisolid Region in Directional Solidification: A Combined Phase-Field and Lattice-Boltzmann Simulation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, B.; Haberstroh, C.; Giesselmann, N.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the results of microstructure simulations, fluid flow through the semisolid region during directional solidification of the technical Ni-base alloy 718 has been studied. Three-dimensional microstructures at different positions in the semisolid region were obtained by using a multicomponent multiphase-field model that was online coupled to a commercial thermodynamic database. For the range of five different primary dendrite distances λ 1 between 50 µm and 250 µm, the flow velocity and the permeability perpendicular to the dendrite growth direction was evaluated by using a proprietary Lattice-Boltzmann model. The commercial CFD software ANSYS FLUENT was alternatively applied for reference. Consistent values of the average flow velocity along the dendrites were obtained for both methods. From the results of the fluid flow simulations, the cross-permeability was evaluated as a function of temperature and fraction liquid for each of the five different primary dendrite distances λ 1. The obtained permeability values can be approximated by a single analytical function of the fraction liquid and λ 1 and are discussed and compared with known relations from the literature.

  10. Solidification mechanism of highly undercooled metal alloys. [tin-lead and nickel-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiohara, Y.; Chu, M. G.; Macisaac, D. G.; Flemings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on metal droplet undercooling, using Sn-25wt%Pb and Ni-34wt%Sn alloys. To achieve the high degree of undercooling, emulsification treatments were employed. Results show the fraction of supersaturated primary phase is a function of the amount of undercooling, as is the fineness of the structures. The solidification behavior of the tin-lead droplets during recalescence was analyzed using three different hypotheses; (1) solid forming throughout recalescence is of the maximum thermodynamically stable composition; (2) partitionless solidification below the T sub o temperature, and solid forming thereafter is of the maximum thermodynamically stable composition; and (3) partitionless solidification below the T sub o temperature with solid forming thereafter that is of the maximum thermodynamically metastable composition that is possible. The T sub o temperature is calculated from the equal molar free energies of the liquid solid using the regular solution approximation.

  11. Solidification microstructure formation in HK40 and HH40 alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xian-fei; Liu, Dong-fang; Guo, Pei-liang; Zheng, Yun-rong; Feng, Qiang

    2016-04-01

    The microstructure formation processes in HK40 and HH40 alloys were investigated through JmatPro calculations and quenching performed during directional solidification. The phase transition routes of HK40 and HH40 alloys were determined as L → L + γ → L + γ + M7C3 → γ + M7C3 → γ + M7C3 + M23C6→ γ + M23C6 and L → L + δ → L + δ + γ→ L + δ + γ + M23C6 δ + γ + M23C6, respectively. The solidification mode was determined to be the austenitic mode (A mode) in HK40 alloy and the ferritic-austenitic solidification mode (FA mode) in HH40 alloy. In HK40 alloy, eutectic carbides directly precipitate in a liquid and coarsen during cooling. The primary γ dendrites grow at the 60° angle to each other. On the other hand, in HH40 alloy, residual δ forms because of the incomplete transformation from δ to γ. Cr23C6 carbide is produced in solid delta ferrite δ but not directly in liquid HH40 alloy. Because of carbide formation in the solid phase and no rapid growth of the dendrite in a non-preferential direction, HH40 alloy is more resistant to cast defect formation than HK40 alloy.

  12. Effect of composition, cooling rate, and solidification velocity on the microstructural development of molybdenum-bearing stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perricone, Matthew J.

    A series of Mo-bearing stainless steel compositions ranging from 0 to 10 wt% Mo were analyzed over a range of laser welding conditions to evaluate the effect of composition, cooling rate, and solidification velocity on microstructural development. Of particular engineering interest are alloys expected to solidify as primary delta-ferrite and transform in the solid state to gamma-austenite. Such compositions are essentially immune to solidification cracking and can potentially eliminate microsegregation (due to primary ferrite solidification) while still having high toughness and no magnetic signature at room temperature (transformation to austenite). A total of 64 Fe-Ni-Cr-Mo compositions were chosen based on multi-component phase stability diagrams calculated using the CALPHAD method. Alloys were created using the arc button melting process and laser welds were prepared on each alloy at constant power and travel speeds ranging from 4.2 mm/s to 42 mm/s. The cooling rates of these processes were estimated to range from 10 °C/s for are buttons to 105 °C/s for the fastest laser welds. Microstructural analysis was completed to determine primary solidification mode and the nature of solid state transformation behavior. Good agreement was observed between experimental observations and predictions from thermodynamic calculations. No shift in solidification mode was observed from primary delta-ferrite to primary gamma-austenite in the range of welding conditions studied. Metastable microstructural features were observed in many laser weld fusion zones, as well as a massive transformation from delta-ferrite to gamma-austenite in many of the alloys exhibiting primary delta-ferrite solidification. Evidence of epitaxial massive growth without nucleation was also found in primary delta-ferrite alloys with intercellular gamma-austenite already present from a solidification reaction. The resulting single phase gamma-austenite in both cases exhibited a homogenous distribution of

  13. Modelling direction solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop an improved understanding of some phenomena of importance to directional solidification. The aim of this research is also to help predict differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and solidification in space. In this report, the validity of the Burton-Primslichter equation is explored. The influence of operating variables on grain and twin generation and propagation in single crystals of In sub (x) Ga sub (1-x) Sb is also investigated.

  14. MPS solidification model. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Maples, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Work performed on several existing solidification models for which computer codes and documentation were developed is presented. The models describe the solidification of alloys in which there is a time varying zone of coexisting solid and liquid phases; i.e., the S/L zone. The primary purpose of the models is to calculate macrosegregation in a casting or ingot which results from flow of interdendritic liquid in this S/L zone during solidification. The flow, driven by solidification contractions and by gravity acting on density gradients in the interdendritic liquid, is modeled as flow through a porous medium. In Model 1, the steady state model, the heat flow characteristics are those of steady state solidification; i.e., the S/L zone is of constant width and it moves at a constant velocity relative to the mold. In Model 2, the unsteady state model, the width and rate of movement of the S/L zone are allowed to vary with time as it moves through the ingot. Each of these models exists in two versions. Models 1 and 2 are applicable to binary alloys; models 1M and 2M are applicable to multicomponent alloys.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of solidification microstructures affected by fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Juric, D.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of fluid flow on the solidification morphology of pure materials and solute microsegregation patterns of binary alloys are studied using a computational methodology based on a front tracking/finite difference method. A general single field formulation is presented for the full coupling of phase change, fluid flow, heat and solute transport. This formulation accounts for interfacial rejection/absorption of latent heat and solute, interfacial anisotropies, discontinuities in material properties between the liquid and solid phases, shrinkage/expansion upon solidification and motion and deformation of the solid. Numerical results are presented for the two dimensional dendritic solidification of pure succinonitrile and the solidification of globulitic grains of a plutonium-gallium alloy. For both problems, comparisons are made between solidification without fluid flow and solidification within a shear flow.

  16. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  17. Low-Temperature Aging Characteristics of Type 316L Stainless Steel Welds: Dependence on Solidification Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2008-06-01

    Thermal aging embrittlement of light water reactor (LWR) components made of stainless steel cast has been recognized as a potential degradation issue, and careful attention has been paid to it. Although welds of austenitic stainless steels have γ-δ duplex microstructure, which is similar to that of the stainless steel cast, examination of the thermal aging characteristics of the stainless steel welds is very limited. In this investigation, two types of type 316L stainless steel weld metal with different solidification modes were prepared using two kinds of filler metals having tailored Ni equivalent and Cr equivalent. Differences between the two weld metals in the morphology of microstructure, in the composition of δ-ferrite, and in hardening behaviors with isothermal aging at 335 °C have been investigated. The hardness of the ferrite phase has increased with aging time, while the hardness of austenite phase has stayed the same. The mottled aspect has been observed in δ-ferrite of aged samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. These characteristics suggest that spinodal decomposition has occurred in δ-ferrite by aging at 335 °C. The age-hardening rate of δ-ferrite was faster for the primary austenite solidification mode (AF mode) sample than the primary ferrite solidification mode (FA mode) sample in the initial stage of the aging up to 2000 hours. It has been suggested that the solidification mode can affect the kinetics of spinodal decomposition.

  18. Solidification of an alloy 625 weld overlay

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.

    1996-11-01

    The solidification behavior (microsegregation, secondary phase formation, and solidification temperature range) of an Alloy 625 weld overlay deposited on 2.25Cr-1Mo steel by gas metal arc welding was investigated by light and electron optical microscopy, electron microprobe, and differential thermal analysis techniques. The overlay deposit was found to terminate solidification at {approx}1,216 C by a {gamma}/Laves eutectic-type reaction. The Laves phase was highly enriched in Nb, Mo, and Si. The solidification reaction and microsegregation potential of major alloying elements in the overlay deposit are compared to other Nb-bearing Ni base alloys and found to be very similar to those for Alloy 718. Solidification cracks observed in the overlay were attributed to the wide solidification temperature range ({approx}170 C) and formation of interdendritic ({gamma} + Laves) constituent. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the calculated and measured volume percent ({gamma} + Laves) constituent with the Scheil equation by treating the overlay system as a simple {gamma}-Nb binary and using an experimentally determined k{sub Nb} value from electron microprobe data.

  19. Analysis of macrosegregation formation and columnar-to-equiaxed transition during solidification of Al-4 wt.%Cu ingot using a 5-phase model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadein, M.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2015-05-01

    A 5-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was recently introduced to predict the as-cast structure, and a series of laboratory experiments were performed previously to verify the model. The focus of the current work is to analyze the formation of macrosegregation, which accompanies the formation of the as-cast structure including the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The as-cast structure and macrosegregation map of a cylindrical Al-4 wt.% Cu ingot poured at 800 °C are used as a reference to validate the calculations. Good agreement between the calculations and the experiment regarding both the macrosegregation and CET is achieved. Thermal-solutal convection and equiaxed crystal sedimentation in such ingot are verified to be key mechanisms governing the formation of macrosegregation. The competitive equiaxed/columnar growth, the soft and hard blocking mechanisms predominate the CET. The numerical study of grid sensitivity indicates that the global segregation pattern and CET are not significantly affected by grid size; however, some fine details of the segregation map which are predicted by fine grid (~0.5 mm) are smeared or locally averaged by the coarse grid (~2 mm). Such details were also not resolved in the measurement. Future investigations are demanding.

  20. Analysis of macrosegregation formation and columnar-to-equiaxed transition during solidification of Al-4 wt.%Cu ingot using a 5-phase model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadein, M.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2015-01-01

    A 5-phase mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was recently introduced to predict the as-cast structure, and a series of laboratory experiments were performed previously to verify the model. The focus of the current work is to analyze the formation of macrosegregation, which accompanies the formation of the as-cast structure including the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The as-cast structure and macrosegregation map of a cylindrical Al-4 wt.% Cu ingot poured at 800 °C are used as a reference to validate the calculations. Good agreement between the calculations and the experiment regarding both the macrosegregation and CET is achieved. Thermal-solutal convection and equiaxed crystal sedimentation in such ingot are verified to be key mechanisms governing the formation of macrosegregation. The competitive equiaxed/columnar growth, the soft and hard blocking mechanisms predominate the CET. The numerical study of grid sensitivity indicates that the global segregation pattern and CET are not significantly affected by grid size; however, some fine details of the segregation map which are predicted by fine grid (~0.5 mm) are smeared or locally averaged by the coarse grid (~2 mm). Such details were also not resolved in the measurement. Future investigations are demanding. PMID:26089572

  1. Solid-Phase Extraction Followed by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of Floating Organic Drop for the Determination of Parabens.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Beshare; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir

    2015-09-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop method combined with solid-phase extraction (500-mg C18 sorbent) was developed for preconcentration and determination of some parabens. The experimental parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as the type of extraction and disperser solvents, as well as their volumes, breakthrough volume, flow rate and salt addition were studied and optimized. The optimum experimental conditions found included: sample volume, 100 mL; KCl concentration, 1% (w/v); extraction solvent (1-undecanol) volume, 20 µL and disperser solvent (acetone) volume, 250 µL. Under the optimum experimental conditions, calibration graphs were linear in the range of 1-200 µg L(-1) with limits of detection ranged from 0.3 to 1.7 µg L(-1). The relative standard deviations were in the range of 1.2-3.1% (n = 5). The enrichment factors and absolute recoveries of parabens in different matrices were 245-1886 and 9.0-69.8%, respectively. The method was applied to the simultaneous determination of parabens in different matrices. The relative recoveries from water, shampoo and mouth rinse samples, which have been spiked at different levels of parabens, were 87.83-112.25%, 82.80-108.40% and 90.10-97.60%, respectively. PMID:25716984

  2. Phase sensitivity of complex cells in primary visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Hietanen, M A; Cloherty, S L; van Kleef, J P; Wang, C; Dreher, B; Ibbotson, M R

    2013-05-01

    Neurons in the primary visual cortex are often classified as either simple or complex based on the linearity (or otherwise) of their response to spatial luminance contrast. In practice, classification is typically based on Fourier analysis of a cell's response to an optimal drifting sine-wave grating. Simple cells are generally considered to be linear and produce responses modulated at the fundamental frequency of the stimulus grating. In contrast, complex cells exhibit significant nonlinearities that reduce the response at the fundamental frequency. Cells can therefore be easily and objectively classified based on the relative modulation of their responses - the ratio of the phase-sensitive response at the fundamental frequency of the stimulus (F₁) to the phase-invariant sustained response (F₀). Cells are classified as simple if F₁/F₀>1 and complex if F₁/F₀<1. This classification is broadly consistent with criteria based on the spatial organisation of cells' receptive fields and is accordingly presumed to reflect disparate functional roles of simple and complex cells in coding visual information. However, Fourier analysis of spiking responses is sensitive to the number of spikes available - F₁/F₀ increases as the number of spikes is reduced, even for phase-invariant complex cells. Moreover, many complex cells encountered in the laboratory exhibit some phase sensitivity, evident as modulation of their responses at the fundamental frequency. There currently exists no objective quantitative means of assessing the significance or otherwise of these modulations. Here we derive a statistical basis for objectively assessing whether the modulation of neuronal responses is reliable, thereby adding a level of statistical certainty to measures of phase sensitivity. We apply our statistical analysis to neuronal responses to moving sine-wave gratings recorded from 367 cells in cat primary visual cortex. We find that approximately 60% of complex cells exhibit

  3. Stability of eutectic interface during directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.H.

    1996-04-23

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys shows different types of eutectic morphologies. These include lamellar, rod, oscillating and tilting modes. The growth of these morphologies occurs with a macroscopically planar interface. However, under certain conditions, the planar eutectic front becomes unstable and gives rise to a cellular or a dendritic structure. This instability leads to the cellular/dendritic structure of either a primary phase or a two-phase structure. The objective of this work is to develop a fundamental understanding of the instability of eutectic structure into cellular/dendritic structures of a single phase and of two-phases. Experimental studies have been carried out to examine the transition from a planar to two-phase cellular and dendritic structures in a ceramic system of Alumina-Zirconia (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}) and in a transparent organic system of carbon tetrabromide and hexachloroethane (CBr{sub 4}-C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}). Several aspects of eutectic interface stability have been examined.

  4. Phase-field modeling of the columnar-to-equiaxed transition in neopentylglycol-camphor alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viardin, A.; Sturz, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Apel, M.

    2011-12-01

    We have performed phase field simulations in order to explore the effect of equiaxed grain nucleation undercooling on the columnar to equiaxed transition "CET" in the NPG-DC alloy system. Our phase field model is based on the multiphase-field method. The simulation parameters are adapted to a microgravity experiment performed under purely diffusive growth conditions. The experimental investigation is made during the sounding rocket campaign TEXUS-47.

  5. Solidification of Au-Cu-Si alloys investigated by a combinatorial approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Shiyan; Schroers, Jan; Gregoire, John; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2012-06-01

    Composition libraries of Au-Cu-Si films comprising 800 composition patches were fabricated through co-sputtering deposition from elemental targets. The gold composition varies between 47% (compositions are in atomic percentage) and 81%, copper between 8% and 40%, and silicon between 6% and 36% within the library. We designed and used a high-throughput optical characterization method to detect melting and solidification based on changes in the film's contrast; further microscopy characterization reveals the microstructure. This approach reveals the composition dependence of the nucleation temperature and primary phase, which allows us to draw conclusions about glass forming ability and to identify bulk metallic glass forming compositions. Our solidification results suggest that the best glass forming composition coincides with the composition at which a transition from one primary phase to another occurs. We show that in general this transition is not at the eutectic composition but at the lowest nucleation temperature.

  6. X-ray nano-diffraction study of Sr intermetallic phase during solidification of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Gorny, Anton; Shankar, Sumanth; Cai, Zhonghou

    2014-02-17

    The evolution of strontium (Sr) containing intermetallic phase in the eutectic reaction of Sr-modified Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy was studied with high energy synchrotron beam source for nano-diffraction experiments and x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping. Contrary to popular belief, Sr does not seem to interfere with the Twin Plane Re-entrant Edge (TPRE) growth mechanism of eutectic Si, but evolves as the Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Sr phase during the eutectic reaction at the boundary between the eutectic Si and Al grains.

  7. Influence of Sigma Phase on Pitting Resistance Depending on Solidification Mode in AISI316L Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, A. Y.; Lee, H. W.

    2012-06-01

    The pitting corrosion resistances were investigated in the AISI 316L stainless steel weld metals with respect to the sigma phase precipitation in a 0.1 M NaCl solution. The modified flux-cored arc welding filler wires were fabricated at various chromium and nickel equivalent ratios using the flux-cored arc welding process. As the Cr/Ni equivalent ratio increased, the precipitated σ phase content increased in the temperature range of 923 K to 1123 K (650 °C to 850 °C), and the specimen that was aged at 1123 K (850 °C) precipitated the σ phase rapidly. The hardness increased with increasing sigma contents. During the potentiodynamic anodic polarization test, the specimens that were aged at 923 K to 1123 K (650 °C to 850 °C) exhibited lower pitting potentials than the as-weld metal. Additionally, the specimens that were aged for longer times exhibited lower pitting potentials. The pits occurred preferentially in the ductility dip cracking in specimen 1, whereas intergranular pits occurred in the sigma phase regions along the vermicular ferrite and acicular ferrite grain boundaries in specimens 2 and 3.

  8. Parabolic aircraft solidification experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L. (Principal Investigator); Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Susan

    1996-01-01

    A number of solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental environment which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Two techniques of interest are directional solidification and isothermal casting. Because of the wide-spread use of these experimental techniques in space-based research, several MSAD experiments have been manifested for space flight. In addition to the microstructural analysis for interpretation of the experimental results from previous work with parabolic flights, it has become apparent that a better understanding of the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible. Our university has performed in several experimental studies such as this in recent years. The most recent was in visualizing the effect of convective flow phenomena on the KC-135 and prior to that were several successive contracts to perform directional solidification and isothermal casting experiments on the KC-135. Included in this work was the modification and utilization of the Convective Flow Analyzer (CFA), the Aircraft Isothermal Casting Furnace (ICF), and the Three-Zone Directional Solidification Furnace. These studies have contributed heavily to the mission of the Microgravity Science and Applications' Materials Science Program.

  9. Solidification of hypermonotectic Al-In alloys under microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potard, C.

    1982-01-01

    Four samples of the Al-In system having monotectic and hypermonotectic compositions that were solidified under microgravity during the NASA-SPAR IX flight of January 20, 1981, are considered. The experimental thermal and physicochemical conditions that were actually achieved are analyzed. Radiographic and metallographic observations of the samples reveal a nonregular dispersed primary phase inside the monotectic matrix. These observations are discussed in relation to capillarity and solidification aspects. A key finding is the preservation of a certain degree of dispersion of the indium primary phase. This result differs fundamentally from the results obtained under microgravity conditions on the same system and compositions (Gelles and Markworth, 1980; Alborn and Loehberg, 1979). The results are seen as clearly establishing that the space environment can be used to obtain dispersed structures from hypermonotectic alloys.

  10. Microsegregation during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the directional solidification of alloys, solute inhomogeneities transverse to the growth direction arise due to morphological instabilities (leading to cellular or dendritic growth) and/or due to convection in the melt. In the absence of convection, the conditions for the onset of morphological instability are given by the linear stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka. For ordinary solidification rates, the predictions of linear stability analysis are similar to the constitutional supercooling criterion. However, at very rapid solidification rates, linear stability analysis predicts a vast increase in stabilization in comparison to constitutional supercooling.

  11. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.

    1994-01-01

    This grant, NAG8-831, was a continuation of a previous grant, NAG8-541. The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis in the recently completed grant was on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification of InSb and InSb-GaSb alloys. In particular, the objective was to determine the influence of spin-up/spin-down (ACRT), electric current pulses and vibrations on compositional homogeneity and grain size.

  12. Solute trapping and diffusionless solidification in a binary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galenko, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Numerous experimental data on the rapid solidification of binary systems exhibit the formation of metastable solid phases with initial (nominal) chemical composition. This fact is explained by complete solute trapping leading to diffusionless (chemically partitionless) solidification at a finite growth velocity of crystals. Special attention is paid to developing a model of rapid solidification which describes a transition from chemically partitioned to diffusionless growth of crystals. Analytical treatments lead to the condition for complete solute trapping which directly follows from the analysis of the solute diffusion around the solid-liquid interface and atomic attachment and detachment at the interface. The resulting equations for the flux balance at the interface take into account two kinetic parameters: diffusion speed VDI on the interface and diffusion speed VD in bulk phases. The model describes experimental data on nonequilibrium solute partitioning in solidification of Si-As alloys for the whole range of solidification velocity investigated.

  13. Solidification process in melt spun Nd-Fe-B type magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.

    1998-02-23

    A generalized solidification model has been developed based on a systematic investigation on the microstructure of melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Melt spinning was conducted on initial stoichiometric and TiC added Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (2-14-1) compositions to produce under, optimally and over quenched microstructures. Microstructural characterization was carried out by TEM, SEM, Optical microscopy, XRD, DTA, VSM and DC SQUID techniques. By taking the dendritic breakup during recalescence into consideration, this generalized model has successfully explained the solidification process of the melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Challenging the conventional homogeneous nucleation models, the new model explains the fine and uniform equiaxed 2-14-1 microstructure in optimally quenched ribbons as a result of the breakup of the 2-14-1 dendrites which nucleate heterogeneously from the wheel surface and grow dendritically across the ribbon thickness due to the recalescence. Besides this dendritic breakup feature, the under quenched microstructure is further featured with another growth front starting with the primary solidification of Fe phase near the free side, which results in a coarsely grained microstructure with Fe dendritic inclusions and overall variation in microstructure across the ribbon thickness. In addition, because a epitaxy exists between the Fe phase and the 2-14-1, the so-formed coarse 2-14-1 grains may be textured. C-axis texturing was observed in under quenched ribbons. As a constraint to solidification models in this system, the cause and characteristics of this phenomenon has been studied in detail to test the authors proposed model, and agreement has been found. An extension has also been made to understand the solidification process when TiC is added, which suggests that Ti and C slow down the growth front of both Fe and 2-14-1 phase.

  14. Directional Solidification of Eutectic Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayir, Ali

    2001-01-01

    Two major problems associated with structural ceramics are lack of damage tolerance and insufficient strength and creep resistance at very high temperatures of interest for aerospace application. This work demonstrated that the directionally solidified eutectics can have unique poly-phase microstructures and mechanical properties superior to either constituent alone. The constraining effect of unique eutectic microstructures result in higher resistance to slow crack growth and creep. Prospect of achieving superior properties through controlled solidification are presented and this technology can also be beneficial to produce new class of materials.

  15. Mesoscopic modelling of columnar solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Založnik, M.; Viardin, A.; Souhar, Y.; Combeau, H.; Apel, M.

    2016-03-01

    We used two complementary modeling approaches for the simulation of columnar growth in directional solidification of organic alloys: a phase-field model and a mesoscopic envelope model of dendritic growth. While the phase-field method captures the details of the dendritic structure and of the growth dynamics, the mesoscopic model approximates the complex dendritic morphology by its envelope. The envelope growth is deduced from the velocities of the dendrite tips, calculated by an analytical LGK-type tip model that is matched to the heat and concentration fields in the stagnant film around the envelope. The computational cost of the mesoscopic model is several orders of magnitude lower and can bridge the gap between phase-field and macroscopic models. We demonstrate the applicability of the mesoscopic model to columnar growth and discuss its possibilities and limitations by comparisons with phase-field simulations for the same conditions.

  16. Phase selection in the containerless solidification of undercooled CaO {center_dot} 6Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} melts

    SciTech Connect

    Li Mingjun; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko

    2004-07-12

    The CaO {center_dot} 6Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} melts were solidified on an aero-acoustic levitator under a containerless processing condition at various undercoolings. A high-speed video was operated to monitor the recalescence behavior, from which the growth velocity as a function of melt undercooling was determined. The microstructures were observed and the crystalline phases were identified using the X-ray diffraction technique, indicting that the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was solidified when the melt temperature was higher than the peritectic temperature, T{sub p}. When the melt was undercooled below T{sub p}, the CaO {center_dot} 6Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (CA{sub 6}) peritectic phase was crystallized directly from the undercooled melts. With respect to the direct formation of the peritectic phase, further analysis from the viewpoints of competitive nucleation indicated that the minimum free energy principle may be applied to elucidate the nucleation of CA{sub 6} phase. In terms of the competitive growth behavior, the interface attachment kinetics for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CA{sub 6} phases are calculated by using the classical BCT model indicating that although the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase doped by CaO has about four times larger interface kinetic coefficient than that of the CA{sub 6} peritectic phase, the growth kinetics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the melt with the CaO {center_dot} 6Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} chemical composition is not sufficiently high to replace the CA{sub 6} phase as the primary phase. Therefore, once CA{sub 6} is nucleated, it can develop into a macro crystal as the primary phase. The competitive nucleation and growth behavior in the CA{sub 6} system is different from those in other well-studied peritectic alloys and the present investigation on the phase formation will be an essential supplement to the phase selection theory.

  17. Conditions Of Directional Solidification Affect Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, D. D.; Alter, W. S.; Hamilton, W. D.; Parr, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of gradient of temperature and rate of solidification on microstructure and fatigue properties of nickel-based superalloy MAR-M246(Hf). Enhancement of properties extends lifespans of objects, including turbo-pump blades of Space Shuttle Main Engines. Results indicate significant improvements in fatigue properties derived through manipulation of parameters of directional solidification. Particularly MAR-M246(Hf) for turbine blades contains small, well-dispersed blocky carbide and microstructure with small distances between dendrite arms, and without eutectic phase.

  18. Rapid solidification under local nonequilibrium conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, S. L.

    1997-06-01

    The effects of local nonequilibrium solute diffusion on a solute concentration field, solute partitioning, interface temperature, and absolute stability limit have been considered. The model incorporates two diffusive speeds, VDb, the bulk-liquid diffusive speed, and VDi, the interface diffusive speed, as the most important parameters governing the solute concentration in the liquid phase and solute partitioning. The analysis of the model predicts a transition from diffusion-controlled solidification to purely thermally controlled regimes, which occurs abruptly when the interface velocity V equals the bulk liquid diffusive speed VDb. The abrupt change in the solidification mechanism is described by the velocity-dependent effective diffusion coefficient D*=D(1-V2/V2Db) and the generalized partition coefficient K*. If V>VDb, then D*=0 and K*=1. This implies an undistributed diffusion field in the liquid (diffusionless solidification) and complete solute trapping at V>VDb.

  19. Interrupted and Isothermal Solidification Studies of Low and Medium Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottore, N. S.; Garcia, C. I.; Deardo, A. J.

    1991-08-01

    Low and medium carbon steels experience multiple phase transformations during solidification and subsequent cooling. The sequence, extent, and nature of the different transformations have a significant bearing on the microstructural evolution that occurs in the steel. The change in microstructure with temperature is very important, since it may influence the hot ductility of the steel during casting and/or rolling and the subsequent response of the material to thermoprocessing. The aim of this investigation was to gain a better understanding of the development of the as-cast structure in low and medium carbon steels. Of particular interest is the origin of the large austenite grains frequently associated with poor hot ductility. Interrupted and isothermal solidification experiments were therefore conducted to study the nonequilibrium and near-equilibrium structures which form at different stages of the freezing process. The results of the investigation established delta-ferrite as the primary solidifying phase in low carbon steels. Austenite forms as the secondary phase by nucleation at the solidification (delta-ferrite) boundaries. While excessive austenite grain coarsening is suppressed by the coexistence of the second phases delta-ferrite or liquid, this suppression occurs over only a limited temperature range, just below the peritectic temperature. Subsequent cooling leads to very large austenite grains, ranging up to 5 mm in diameter, in steels of low carbon content.

  20. Flight Planning for the International Space Station - Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification (LODESTARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, Merton C.; Matson, Douglas M.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2003-01-01

    During rapid solidification, a molten sample is cooled below its equilibrium solidification temperature to form a metastable liquid. Once nucleation is initiated, growth of the solid phase proceeds and can be seen as a sudden rise in temperature. The heat of fusion is rejected ahead of the growing dendrites into the undercooled liquid in a process known as recalescence. Fe-Cr-Ni alloys may form several equilibrium phases and the hypoeutectic alloys, with compositions near the commercially important 316 stainless steel alloy, are observed to solidify by way of a two-step process known as double recalescence. During double recalescence, the first temperature rise is associated with formation of the metastable ferritic solid phase with subsequent conversion to the stable austenitic phase during the second temperature rise. Selection of which phase grows into the undercooled melt during primary solidification may be accomplished by choice of the appropriate nucleation trigger material or by control of the processing parameters during rapid solidification. Due to the highly reactive nature of the molten sample material and in order to avoid contamination of the undercooled melt, a containerless electromagnetic levitation (EML) processing technique is used. In ground-based EML, the same forces that support the weight of the sample against gravity also drive convection in the liquid sample. However, in microgravity, the force required to position the sample is greatly reduced, so convection may be controlled over a wide range of internal flows. Space Shuttle experiments have shown that the double recalescence behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys changes between ground and space EML experiments. This program is aimed at understanding how melt convection influences phase selection and the evolution of rapid solidification microstructures.

  1. Solidification of eutectic system alloys in space (M-19)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohno, Atsumi

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that in the liquid state eutectic alloys are theoretically homogeneous under 1 g conditions. However, the homogeneous solidified structure of this alloy is not obtained because thermal convection and non-equilibrium solidification occur. The present investigators have clarified the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic system alloys under 1 g conditions by using the in situ observation method; in particular, the primary crystals of the eutectic system alloys never nucleated in the liquid, but instead did so on the mold wall, and the crystals separated from the mold wall by fluid motion caused by thermal convection. They also found that the equiaxed eutectic grains (eutectic cells) are formed on the primary crystals. In this case, the leading phase of the eutectic must agree with the phase of the primary crystals. In space, no thermal convection occurs so that primary crystals should not move from the mold wall and should not appear inside the solidified structure. Therefore no equiaxed eutectic grains will be formed under microgravity conditions. Past space experiments concerning eutectic alloys were classified into two types of experiments: one with respect to the solidification mechanisms of the eutectic alloys and the other to the unidirectional solidification of this alloy. The former type of experiment has the problem that the solidified structures between microgravity and 1 g conditions show little difference. This is why the flight samples were prepared by the ordinary cast techniques on Earth. Therefore it is impossible to ascertain whether or not the nucleation and growth of primary crystals in the melt occur and if primary crystals influence the formation of the equiaxed eutectic grains. In this experiment, hypo- and hyper-eutectic aluminum copper alloys which are near eutectic point are used. The chemical compositions of the samples are Al-32.4mass%Cu (Hypo-eutectic) and Al-33.5mass%Cu (hyper-eutectic). Long rods for the samples are

  2. Melt Flow Control in the Directional Solidification of Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabaras, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    Our main project objectives are to develop computational techniques based on inverse problem theory that can be used to design directional solidification processes that lead to desired temperature gradient and growth conditions at the freezing front at various levels of gravity. It is known that control of these conditions plays a significant role in the selection of the form and scale of the obtained solidification microstructures. Emphasis is given on the control of the effects of various melt flow mechanisms on the local to the solidification front conditions. The thermal boundary conditions (furnace design) as well as the magnitude and direction of an externally applied magnetic field are the main design variables. We will highlight computational design models for sharp front solidification models and briefly discuss work in progress toward the development of design techniques for multi-phase volume-averaging based solidification models.

  3. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1987-01-01

    An improved understanding of the phenomena of importance to directional solidification is attempted to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis is now on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection. A correlation is sought between heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneities using naphthalene doped with anthracene. The influence of spin-up/spin-down is determined on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide. The effect is determined of imposed melting - freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide. The mechanism behind the increase of grain size caused by using spin-up/spin-down in directional solidification of mercury cadimum telluride is sought.

  4. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  5. Dispersive solid-phase extraction followed by vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic droplet for the determination of benzoylurea insecticides in soil and sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Lu, Ying; Zhong, Zhihui; Liu, Hanyang; Pan, Weiliang; Zhou, Guangming; Chen, Junhua

    2016-04-01

    A novel dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet was developed for the determination of eight benzoylurea insecticides in soil and sewage sludge samples before high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The analytes were first extracted from the soil and sludge samples into acetone under optimized pretreatment conditions. Clean-up of the extract was conducted by dispersive solid-phase extraction using activated carbon as the sorbent. The vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet procedure was performed by using 1-undecanol with lower density than water as the extraction solvent, and the acetone contained in the solution also acted as dispersive solvent. Under the optimum conditions, the linearity of the method was in the range 2-500 ng/g with correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9993-0.9999. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.08-0.56 ng/g. The relative standard deviations varied from 2.16 to 6.26% (n = 5). The enrichment factors ranged from 104 to 118. The extraction recoveries ranged from 81.05 to 97.82% for all of the analytes. The good performance has demonstrated that the proposed methodology has a strong potential for application in the multiresidue analysis of complex matrices. PMID:26888089

  6. Kinetics of fiber solidification

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, C.; Lucas, A.; Derré, A.; Zakri, C.; Moisan, S.; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  7. Kinetics of fiber solidification.

    PubMed

    Mercader, C; Lucas, A; Derré, A; Zakri, C; Moisan, S; Maugey, M; Poulin, P

    2010-10-26

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  8. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter: Integrating Results From the Primary Science Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, R. W.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) recently completed its one-Mars-year Primary Science Phase, observing the Martian atmosphere, surface and subsurface with 7 science investigations using 6 science instruments and tracking of the spacecraft as it orbited Mars. In addition, an eighth investigation made use of the onboard accelerometers during a 5-month period of MRO aerobraking to characterize upper atmospheric structure. Hallmarks-and challenges-of the MRO science mission have been: 1) unprecedented spatial resolution at all wavelengths used when observing from orbit; 2) coordinated imaging of local areas; and 3) the balancing of mapping, regional survey, and targeted observation of selected locales, frequently including repeat observations for stereo or for change detection. This talk will give an overview of the data return, including coverage in various observing modes, and will review how the various data sets have combined to provide new perspectives in our attempts to understand Mars, its present climate and its past evolution. Examples include the combination of surface compositional and morphologic information--on scales comparable to those examined by a terrestrial field geologist-to understand modification of the surface, revelations of the interior structure of the polar ice caps and of ice-rich deposits elsewhere which illuminate climate changes in recent geologic time, and monitoring of modern day variations, particularly as they reveal seasonal and inter-annual redistribution of dust and water, but also as they characterize ongoing mass wasting and cratering of the surface. Together, these all point to a complex history of change on Mars, with alternating episodes of significant water activity early in the planet's history, but with some water activity occurring in later geologic times, including the modern era.

  9. Structure of alloys and diagram of phase equilibria of the Zr-Ru-Ir system. II. Solidification pattern of alloys of the partial system Ru-ZrRu-ZrIr-Ir

    SciTech Connect

    Eremenko, V.N.; Khoruzhaya, V.G.; Shtepa, T.D.

    1985-10-01

    The authors constructed the solidification diagram of alloys of the partial system Ru-ZrRu-ZrIr-Ir using data on the structure of alloys in the as-cast condition, yielded from metallographic examinations, microhardness determinations, and x-ray phase analyses together with results of an investigation of the solidus surface of the system. No ternary compounds were detected in the system. In accordance with the four three-phase regions found on the solidus surface, in the Ru-ZrRu-ZrIr-Ir system there are four invariant equilibria involving the participation of liquid, each of which is an equilibrium of the peritectic type. Their temperatures fall toward the Zr-Ru side of the composition triangle.

  10. Quantification of microsegregation during rapid solidification of Al-Cu powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Arvind; Nenein, Hani; Conlon, Kelly

    2006-05-01

    A new technique is introduced to quantify microsegregation during rapid solidification. The quantification involves calculation of the average solute solubility in the primary phase during solidification of an Al-Cu binary alloy. The calculation is based on using volume percent eutectic and weight percent of second phase (in the eutectic), which were obtained experimentally. Neutron diffraction experiments and stereology calculation on scanning electron microscope images were done on impulse atomized Al-Cu alloys of three compositions (nominal), 5 wt pct Cu, 10 wt pct Cu, and 17 wt pct Cu, atomized under N2 and He gas. Neutron diffraction experiments yielded weight percent CuAl2 data and stereology yielded volume percent eutectic data. These two data were first used to determine the weight percent eutectic. Using the weight percent eutectic and weight percent CuAl2 in mass and volume balance equations, the average solute solubility in the primary phase could be calculated. The experimental results of the amount of eutectic, tomography results from previous work, and results from the calculations suggest that the atomized droplets are in metastable state during the nucleation undercooling of the primary phase, and the effect of metastability propagates through to the eutectic formation stage. The metastable effect is more pronounced in alloys with higher solute composition.

  11. Effect of the cooling rate on the mechanism and the kinetics of the phase transformations in solidification of W-Mo high-speed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nizhnikovskaya, P.F.; Kalinushkin, E.P.; Arshava, E.V.; Yakushev, O.S.

    1988-03-01

    The stop-quenching solidification of steel R6M5, R6M5F3, R6M5K5 was studied. The furnace was a horizontal-type vacuum with a quenching tank provided with a thyristor system. The specimens were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy and also by electron microprobe. The method of stop-quenching was found to increase the cooling rate for a fuller completion of the peritectic reaction, establish a connection between the peritectic and the eutectic reaction in high speed steels, and broaden the temperature range of peritic transformation under conditions of accelerated heat removal.

  12. Solidification microstructures: A conceptual approach

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.; Kurz, W.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed theoretical models have been developed in the literature to correlate microstructural characteristics as a function of processing parameters. These results are examined with a broad perspective to show that various laws for microstructural transitions and microstructural spacings can be represented in terms of three simple characteristic lengths of the important physical processes. Initially, the important physical processes of solute and thermal transport and capillarity effect are considered, and they are related to the microstructural lengths such as dendrite tip radius, primary and secondary spacing, and eutectic spacing. It is shown that these microstructural lengths are simply given by the geometric mean of the characteristic lengths of physical processes that are important in a given problem. New characteristic lengths that become important under rapid solidification are then developed, and how these characteristic lengths influence microstructural transition and microstructural scales is also discussed.

  13. Simulations of rapid pressure-induced solidification in molten metals

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, M V; Streitz, F H

    2003-10-14

    The process of interest in this study is the solidification of a molten metal subjected to rapid pressurization. Most details about solidification occurring when the liquid-solid coexistence line is suddenly transversed along the pressure axis remain unknown. We present preliminary results from an ongoing study of this process for both simple models of metals (Cu) and more sophisticated material models (MGPT potentials for Ta). Atomistic (molecular dynamics) simulations are used to extract details such as the time and length scales that govern these processes. Starting with relatively simple potential models, we demonstrate how molecular dynamics can be used to study solidification. Local and global order parameters that aid in characterizing the phase have been identified, and the dependence of the solidification time on the phase space distance between the final (P,T) state and the coexistence line has been characterized.

  14. Directional solidification studies in Ni-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Je-hyun

    1993-05-01

    Three solid phases are involved in the phase equilibria of the intermetallic compound Ni{sub 3}Al near its melting point, {beta}, {gamma}{prime}(Ni{sub 3}Al), and {gamma}. The generally-accepted phase diagram involves a eutectic reaction between {beta}{prime} and {gamma}, but some recent studies agree with an older diagram due to Schramm, which has a eutectic reaction between the {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases. The phase equilibria near Ni{sub 3}Al compositions was evaluated using quenched directional solidification experiments, that preserve the microstructures tonned at the solidification front, and using diffusion couple experiments. These experiments show that eutectic forms between {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases, as in the Schramm diagram. Growth and phase transformations of these three phases are also studied in the directional solidification experiments. Microstructure analysis shows that etching of Ni{sub 3}Al({gamma}{prime}) is very sensitive to small composition variations and crystallographic orientation changes. The eutectic solidification study confirms that the equilibrium eutectic is {gamma}{prime}+{beta}, and that the metastable {gamma}+{beta} eutectic might be also produced in this system according to the impurities, solidification rates, and composition variations.

  15. The sequence of intermetallic formation and solidification pathway of an Al–13Mg–7Si–2Cu in-situ composite

    SciTech Connect

    Farahany, Saeed; Nordin, Nur Azmah; Ourdjini, Ali; Abu Bakar, TutyAsma; Hamzah, Esah; Idris, Mohd Hasbullah; Hekmat-Ardakan, Alireza

    2014-12-15

    The phase transformation sequence and solidification behaviour of an Al–13Mg–7Si–2Cu in-situ composite was examined using a combination of computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis and interrupted quenching techniques. Five different phases were identified by analysing the derivative cooling curves, the X-ray diffraction profile, optical and scanning electron microscopy images and the corresponding energy dispersive spectroscopy. It has been found that the solidification of this alloy begins with primary Mg{sub 2}Si precipitation and continues with the formation of eutectic Al–Mg{sub 2}Si, followed by Al{sub 5}FeSi and simultaneous precipitation of Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 6} and Al{sub 2}Cu complex intermetallic phases. The formation of the last three intermetallic compounds changes the solidification behaviour of these composites remarkably due to their complex eutectic formation reactions. The solidification of the alloy, calculated using the Factsage thermochemical analysis software, has demonstrated a good agreement with the experiments in terms of compound prediction, their weight fractions and reaction temperatures. - Highlights: • Solidification path of a commercial Al-13Mg-7Si-2Cu composite was characterized. • Five different phases were identified and then confirmed with EDS and XRD results. • Mg{sub 2}Si, Al-Mg{sub 2}Si,Al{sub 5}FeSi (β),Al{sub 5}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 8}Si{sub 6} (Q) and Al{sub 2}Cu(θ) precipitated respectively. • Solidification was predicted using the Factsage thermochemical analysis software.

  16. Boundary-integral simulations of containerless solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajaev, Vladimir S.; Davis, Stephen H.

    2003-05-01

    We carry out boundary-integral simulations of a two-dimensional liquid droplet surrounded by air and solidified from a cool point on the boundary. There are three interfaces in the problem: solid-liquid, air-liquid, and air-solid. All three evolve in time in such a way that certain tri-junction conditions must be satisfied. Our numerical method describes the quasi-steady evolution of the interfaces in the limit of zero surface energy on the solidification front. A new iterative technique is developed to describe the interface evolution when mass and total energy are conserved and the local tri-junction conditions are satisfied at every instant in time. A method is also developed for efficient numerical integration over the interfaces by taking advantage of analytical formulas for Green's functions. We start the simulations by studying the case of equal densities of the solid and liquid. This allows us to verify the numerical method and obtain some estimates of the speed of the solidification front. Solid-liquid interface flattening is observed at the intermediate stages of solidification. When the densities of the two phases are different, elongated solidified particles are observed when the solid density is smaller than the liquid density. At the final stages of solidification, a corner is formed in agreement with observations in related experiments.

  17. Eutectic-Free Superalloy Made By Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Dianne

    1995-01-01

    By suitable control of thermal conditions in directional-solidification process, supperalloy structural and machine components (e.g., turbine blades) cast with microstructures enhancing resistance to fatigue. Specific version of process and thermal conditions chosen to reduce micro-segregation during solidification and to minimize or eliminate script carbide and eutectic-phase inclusions, which are brittle inclusions found to decrease resistance to fatigue.

  18. The liquidus phase relations in the MgO-FeO-SiO2 ternary system in the deep lower mantle: Implication for the solidification of a basal magma ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, A.; Nomura, R.; Hirose, K.

    2015-12-01

    The large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) observed in the lowermost mantle represent anomalously dense bodies, which may have been formed as a consequence of solidification of a basal magma ocean [Labrosse et al., 2007 Nature; Nomura et al., 2011 Nature]. Recent melting experiments have demonstrated that 1) MgSiO3-rich perovskite (bridgmanite) is the first phase to crystallize from melts with a wide range of (Mg+Fe)/Si ratios in the middle to deep lower mantle and 2) iron is preferentially partitioned into melt rather than solid [Tateno et al., 2014 JGR], suggesting that melts evolve towards an FeO-rich and SiO2-poor composition upon crystallization. However, the mineral assemblage and chemical composition of LLSVPs still remain largely uncertain. Here we carried out melting experiments at both shallow and deep lower mantle pressures using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC), in order to examine the melting phase equilibria in the MgO-FeO-SiO2 ternary system. A focused ion beam (FIB) and field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA) were used for textural and chemical characterization of samples recovered from the DAC. They exhibited a melting texture with quenched partial melt at the hottest part and one or two solid phases at its outside. Our result demonstrate that a crystallizing solid assemblage changes from bridgmanite, bridgmanite + (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase, SiO2 seifertite + FeO-rich (Mg,Fe)O magnesiowüstite, and to seifertite + FeO upon fractional crystallization from a pyrolitic melt at the core-mantle boundary pressure. These also suggest that a residual melt left after extensive solidification is strongly enrich in FeO and thus exceedingly heavy and stable at the base of the mantle, which possibly represents an ultralow velocity zone (ULVZ).

  19. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The long range goal is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis during the period of this grant was on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneties were correlated using naphthalene doped with azulene. In addition the influence of spin-up/spin-down on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide and the effect of imposed melting-freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide are discussed.

  20. Microwave solidification project overview

    SciTech Connect

    Sprenger, G.

    1993-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant Microwave Solidification Project has application potential to the Mixed Waste Treatment Project and the The Mixed Waste Integrated Program. The technical areas being addressed include (1) waste destruction and stabilization; (2) final waste form; and (3) front-end waste handling and feed preparation. This document covers need for such a program; technology description; significance; regulatory requirements; and accomplishments to date. A list of significant reports published under this project is included.

  1. Nuclear waste solidification

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  2. 30 CFR 250.916 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the... Structures Platform Verification Program § 250.916 What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase... appropriate for the intended service life at the proposed location. (b) Primary duties of the CVA during...

  3. The influence of processing parameters on microstructural development of low-weight-percent primary, pro-eutectic, dendritic alloys during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Kim, Shinwoo; Woodward, Tracey; Wang, T. G.

    1992-01-01

    Alloy compositions centering about Sn- 5 to 15 wt pct Al and Pb- 4 to 20 wt pct Cu have been directionally solidified as a function of growth rate and orientation with respect to earth's gravity vector. The effect of these processing variables on macrosegregation is presented, and the consequence of a structural transition from primary columnar to equiaxed dendritic growth is examined. Effects detrimental to microstructure and attributed to density variations are shown to be minimized by a novel processing technique. In view of the ground-based results, some considerations follow regarding what might be gained by solidifying these alloys in a microgravity environment.

  4. Investigation of solidification in zero-gravity environment; M553 sphere forming experiment. Phase C: Evaluation of Skylab specimens. [physical and mechanical properties of metal spheres formed under weightless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattamis, T. Z.

    1973-01-01

    Results on specimen evaluation and discussion of solidification behavior in each case are reported in the following order: (1) specimen SL-1.6, (2) specimen SL-2.8, (3) specimen SL-2.4, (4) specimen SL-1.10 and (5) specimen SL-1.11. Comparison is made with ground-processed specimens of similar composition, whenever pertinent and meaningful. Among the nondestructive evaluation methods the measurement of sphericity was conducted by micrometric and shadowgraphic techniques. The intricate shape of specimens in some cases appeared difficult to define. In measuring the density, liquid penetration inside cavities that outcrop on the surface was avoided by sealing off these cavities. Among the destructive evaluation methods the use of the Quantimet 720 required particular attention, because of the small difference in contrast between second phases and micropores. With regard to microporosity microvoids in the core of some specimens were so fine that X-ray microradiography had to be used.

  5. Microstructural Development during Directional Solidification of Peritectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the microstructures produced through solidification in peritectic systems has yet to be achieved, even though a large number of industrially and scientifically significant materials are in this class. One type of microstructure frequently observed during directional solidification consists of alternating layers of primary solid and peritectic solid oriented perpendicular to the growth direction. This layer formation is usually reported for alloy compositions within the two-phase region of the peritectic isotherm and for temperature gradient and growth rate conditions that result in a planar solid-liquid interface. Layered growth in peritectic alloys has not previously been characterized on a quantitative basis, nor has a mechanism for its formation been verified. The mechanisms that have been proposed for layer formation can be categorized as either extrinsic or intrinsic to the alloy system. The extrinsic mechanisms rely on externally induced perturbations to the system for layer formation, such as temperature oscillations, growth velocity variations, or vibrations. The intrinsic mechanisms approach layer formation as an alternative type of two phase growth that is inherent for certain peritectic systems and solidification conditions. Convective mixing of the liquid is an additional variable which can strongly influence the development and appearance of layers due to the requisite slow growth rate. The first quantitative description of layer formation is a model recently developed by Trivedi based on the intrinsic mechanism of cyclic accumulation and depiction of solute in the liquid ahead of the interface, linked to repeated nucleation events in the absence of convection. The objective of this research is to characterize the layered microstructures developed during ground-based experiments in which external influences have been minimized as much as possible and to compare these results to the current the model. Also, the differences

  6. Simultaneous Observation of Melt Flow and Motion of Equiaxed Crystals During Solidification Using a Dual Phase Particle Image Velocimetry Technique. Part II: Relative Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharicha, Abdellah; Stefan-Kharicha, Mihaela; Ludwig, Andreas; Wu, Menghuai

    2013-02-01

    A two-camera Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique is applied to study the flow pattern and the equiaxed crystal motion during an equiaxed/columnar solidification process of Ammonium Chloride in a die cast cell. This technique is able to measure simultaneously the liquid and the equiaxed grain velocity pattern as already shown in Part I of this paper. The interaction between the equiaxed grains and the melt flow was explored by means of relative velocities. In single isolated configurations, the settling velocity of equiaxed crystal was found to be 41 times smaller than spheres of equivalent size. The coupling between the fluid flow and the equiaxed crystals was found to be important in areas of high crystal density. Chaotic and turbulent behaviors are found to be damped in regions of high equiaxed crystal density.

  7. Understanding the solidification and microstructure evolution during CSC-MIG welding of Fe–Cr–B-based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sorour, A.A. Chromik, R.R. Gauvin, R. Jung, I.-H. Brochu, M.

    2013-12-15

    The present is a study of the solidification and microstructure of Fe–28.2%Cr–3.8%B–1.5%Si–1.5%Mn (wt.%) alloy deposited onto a 1020 plain carbon steel substrate using the controlled short-circuit metal inert gas welding process. The as-solidified alloy was a metal matrix composite with a hypereutectic microstructure. Thermodynamic calculation based on the Scheil–Gulliver model showed that a primary (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase formed first during solidification, followed by an eutectic formation of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase and a body-centered cubic Fe-based solid solution matrix, which contained Cr, Mn and Si. Microstructure analysis confirmed the formation of these phases and showed that the shape of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase was irregular plate. As the welding heat input increased, the weld dilution increased and thus the volume fraction of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates decreased while other microstructural characteristics were similar. - Highlights: • We deposit Fe–Cr–B-based alloy onto plain carbon steel using the CSC-MIG process. • We model the solidification behavior using thermodynamic calculation. • As deposited alloy consists of (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates embedded in Fe-based matrix. • We study the effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure.

  8. MPS Solidification Model. Volume 2: Operating guide and software documentation for the unsteady model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of solidification Model 2 is described and documentation of the software associated with the model is provided. Model 2 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of unsteady horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The solidification program allows interactive modification of calculation parameters as well as selection of graphical and tabular output. In batch mode, parameter values are input in card image form and output consists of printed tables of solidification functions. The operational aspects of Model 2 that differ substantially from Model 1 are described. The global flow diagrams and data structures of Model 2 are included. The primary program documentation is the code itself.

  9. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  10. Modeling of detached and unsteady eutectic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri I.

    Detached solidification provides a new possibility to grow crystals with improved quality. However, it has not been reproducible. The first part of this dissertation is dedicated to discussion of the mechanisms and conditions that would help to bring detached solidification from a space laboratory to a terrestrial factory. The possibility of a steady-state gap during detached solidification was proved by solving the mass transport and Navier-Stokes equations. A high contact angle of the melt with the ampoule wall, appreciable gas atmosphere, and a low freezing rate are needed to obtain detachment. Stability analysis showed that mass transfer of volatile species from the melt into the gap and heat transfer stabilize detached configuration. In vertical solidification on earth, a convex freezing interface was shown to provide enhanced transport of volatile species towards the gap, and, therefore, supports detachment. The influence of convection on eutectic microstructure selection has been a question for many years. Both experiment and theory have shown that buoyancy-driven convection alone is not enough to explain the difference in microstructure of earth- and space-grown eutectics. The second part of this dissertation is devoted to a study of the influence of temperature oscillations on microstructure selection. Two different models were chosen. The first, a sharp-interface model, was able to give a solution for the excess compositional undercooling for different leading conditions of both lamellar and rod eutectics. The limitation of this model is that it's not able to set the conditions for catastrophic morphological changes. Application of the principle of minimum entropy production to stationary eutectic growth predicts a decrease in eutectic spacing due to freezing rate oscillations. The second, a phase-field model, was developed for the evolution of the microstructure. This phase-field model correctly describes unsteady eutectic solidification, as well as

  11. Directional solidification and characterization of near eutectic Sm2CO17/Co alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirich, Ronald G.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of directional solidification processing on the microstructural, compositional, and magnetic properties of near eutectic Co-Sm alloys (about 9 at. pct Sm) have been studied. Initial investigations have been performed at modest thermal gradients in the liquid, G(L) less than 60 C/cm and over a range of furnace (solidification) velocities, V = 0.8 45.4 cm/h. The primary dendrite spacing for near eutectic Sm2Co17/Co scaled with 1/sq rt V and varied from about 50 microns for V greater than or equal to 20 cm/h to hundreds of microns for V less than 10 cm/h, while the rod eutectic diameter and interrod spacing were an order of magnitude smaller. For both dendritic and cooperative growth, the associated permanent magnet properties were rather poor, e.g., remanence less than 4 kG and coercive force less than 1 kOe for the smallest dendrite and rod diameter dimensions encountered, although the magnetic hardness for the rod eutetic was larger than for the dendritic microstructure. Magnetization as a function of sample orientation indicated that the easy axis of magnetization was primarily along the direction of solidification for both ferromagnetic phases.

  12. Undercooling of materials during solidification in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical research program was undertaken on the under cooling and solidification of materials under variable external field conditions. A catalog of theories and models of nucleation of solid phases in the melt is provided, as is a discussion of the relation of undercooling to intermolecular potentials, the dependence of growth rate on undercooling, the influence of undercooling on liquid-solid interface stability and solid structure, the direct effects of external fields on melts, the relation of solid physical properties to structure and the role of nucleants in solidification. Results of the theoretical analysis of several experiments related to the space processing applications program are given, and recommendations for future experiments and further theoretical developments along with procedures for correlation of theory and experiment are specified.

  13. Transport Phenomena During Equiaxed Solidification of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in modeling of transport phenomena during dendritic alloy solidification is reviewed. Starting from the basic theorems of volume averaging, a general multiphase modeling framework is outlined. This framework allows for the incorporation of a variety of microscale phenomena in the macroscopic transport equations. For the case of diffusion dominated solidification, a simplified set of model equations is examined in detail and validated through comparisons with numerous experimental data for both columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth. This provides a critical assessment of the various model assumptions. Models that include melt flow and solid phase transport are also discussed, although their validation is still at an early stage. Several numerical results are presented that illustrate some of the profound effects of convective transport on the final compositional and structural characteristics of a solidified part. Important issues that deserve continuing attention are identified.

  14. Solidification phenomena of binary organic mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, K.

    1982-01-01

    The coalescence rates and motion of liquid bubbles in binary organic mixtures were studied. Several factors such as temperature gradient, composition gradient, interfacial tension, and densities of the two phases play important roles in separation of phases of immiscible liquids. An attempt was made to study the effect of initial compositions on separation rates of well-dispersed organic mixtures at different temperatures and, ultimately, on the homogeneity of solidification of the immiscible binary organic liquids. These organic mixtures serve as models for metallic pseudo binary systems under study. Two specific systems were investigated: ethyl salicylate - diethyl glycol and succinonitrile - water.

  15. Cellular solidification in a monotectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile-glycerol, SN-G, transparent organic monotectic alloy is studied with particular attention to cellular growth. The phase diagram is determined, near the monotectic composition, with greater accuracy than previous studies. A solidification interface stability diagram is determined for planar growth. The planar-to-cellular transition is compared to predictions from the Burton, Primm, Schlichter theory. A new technique to determine the solute segregation by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is developed. Proposed models that involve the cellular interface for alignment of monotectic second-phase spheres or rods are compared with observations.

  16. Solidification of Al Alloys Under Electromagnetic Pulses and Characterization of the 3D Microstructures Using Synchrotron X-ray Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuwong, Theerapatt; Zhang, Wei; Kazinczi, Peter Lobo; Bodey, Andrew J.; Rau, Christoph; Mi, Jiawei

    2015-07-01

    A novel programmable electromagnetic pulse device was developed and used to study the solidification of Al-15 pct Cu and Al-35 pct Cu alloys. The pulsed magnetic fluxes and Lorentz forces generated inside the solidifying melts were simulated using finite element methods, and their effects on the solidification microstructures were characterized using electron microscopy and synchrotron X-ray tomography. Using a discharging voltage of 120 V, a pulsed magnetic field with the peak Lorentz force of ~1.6 N was generated inside the solidifying Al-Cu melts which were showed sufficiently enough to disrupt the growth of the primary Al dendrites and the Al2Cu intermetallic phases. The microstructures exhibit a strong correlation to the characteristics of the applied pulse, forming a periodical pattern that resonates the frequency of the applied electromagnetic field.

  17. Thermal-Microstructural Analysis of Anodic and Electrolytic Copper Solidification: Simulation and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Jorge Sebastián; Celentano, Diego Javier; Cruchaga, Marcela Andrea

    2011-06-01

    This work analyzes the solidification process of anodic and electrolytic copper. The aim of this study is to perform an experimental validation of numerical results computed using a proposed thermal formulation including microstructural evolution. To this end, a set of experiments is carried out testing primary and eutectic phase formation in copper. To evaluate the formation of different microstructural phases, anodic copper (99.80 pct purity, approximately) and electrolytic copper (99.99 pct purity, approximately) are used. Primary and eutectic phases evolve in anodic copper; meanwhile, only a primary phase is obtained in electrolytic copper. The effect of heat extraction conditions is evaluated using sand, graphite, and steel molds to promote different cooling rates. The proposed microstructural model takes into account nucleation and grain growth laws based on thermal undercooling together with microstructural evolution. The primary copper evolution model is based on solute diffusion at the grain scale and on the dendrite top-growing kinetic; meanwhile, the eutectic evolution is assumed proportional to the copper initial composition and eutectic undercooling. The corresponding numerical formulation is solved in the framework of the finite-element method. Finally, the computed temperature histories and final values for the grain density and radius, including primary or dendritic phase and eutectic solid volumetric fractions, are all compared and validated with the experimental measurements.

  18. Effect of Ce melt treatment on solidification path of ZA8 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, R.; Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    The solidification path of ZA8 alloy with Ce addition was characterized using Newtonian technique of thermal analysis. The solidification events were determined using cooling curve and its first derivative curve. The microstructure and chemical composition of various phases in the alloy were studied using EDS, SEM and XRD techniques. It was found that the addition of Ce did not cause formation of new phases. However, it hinders the nucleation of stable β dendrites in the alloy. The presence of Ce promotes the eutectoid phase transformation and increases the hardness of the alloy. Latent heat of solidification and heat of eutectoid transformation were found to increase on Ce addition. The upward solidification of the alloy against Cu chill was analysed. Chilling had significant influence on solidification parameters, and caused refinement of the microstructure. The addition of Ce to the melt had no effect during chill casting of the alloy.

  19. Experimental Verification of Solidification Stress Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, C W; Morrison, M C; SImpson, M F; Bateman, K J

    2012-04-01

    A research program is being conducted to develop a crack-free ceramic waste form (CWF) to be used for long term encasement of fission products and actinides resulting from processing spent nuclear fuel. Cracking usually occurs in the cooldown phase of the glass or ceramic formations. A crack-free formation should have more resistance to leaching than one with many cracks. In the research leading up to producing a CWF, a model was developed that proposes a permanent stress develops when the melt solidifies and that this stress can cause failure as the CWF nears room temperature. This paper reports on how the formation, CWF2, confirms the existence of this stress. The solidification stress is in addition to and of opposite sign of the thermal stress. Its derivation is reported on in Ref. 1. Cracking of the CWF would occur at low temperatures if solidification stress exists but at high temperatures if it doesn’t. If solidification stress occurs, then the cooldown rate during solidification should be reduced. If not, it should be reduced when the thermal stresses are highest. Recording cracking sounds confirm the existence of this solidification stress since cracking occurred during the low temperature phase of the cooldown. As a side purpose of this paper, a cooldown rate is proposed that should eliminate cracking in the next experiment, CWF3. CWF2 is a prototype vertical ceramic waste cylinder formed over a period of 10 days by heating a mixture of 75% zeolite, 25% glass frit in an argon atmosphere furnace through melting to 925 C and then cooling through solidification to room temperature. It is approximately 1 m high, 0.5 m in diameter, weighs about 400 kg, and is formed in a stainless steel can 0.5 cm thick. This cylinder developed many cracks on cooldown. At least 15 loud cracks were recorded over a period of 4 days at the end of cooldown when the temperatures were below 400 C. The CWF2 surface and centerline temperatures at mid height were measured which

  20. Flow Effects during Directional Solidification of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Murray, B. T.; McFadden, G. B.; Andrews, J. B.

    2000-11-01

    In monotectic alloy solidification, two phases, a solid phase, α, and a liquid phase, L_2, grow cooperatively from a single liquid phase L_1. For example, during the directional solidification of the aluminum-indium monotectic system, a solid-liquid two-phase structure consisting of liquid indium rods in an aluminum rich solid matrix can be grown from an aluminum-indium melt. The indium rods subsequently solidify at a lower temperature, forming a composite material. Theoretical models developed to quantitatively predict the inter-rod spacing observed in monotectic systems are largely based on diffusive solute transport. The role played by transport due to fluid flow is not well understood. Bulk flow may result from density change upon solidification or buoyancy-driven thermosolutal convection due to the thermal and solutal gradients inherent to the solidification process. We have developed numerical models to investigate the impact of an imposed flow on the solute field in the L1 phase. In addition, we propose to model the coupled flow at the L_1--L2 interface driven by surface tension variation. For monotectic growth, since phase equilibrium is maintained at the L_1--L2 interface, the temperature, compositions, pressures, and interface curvature are related by thermodynamic constraints that do not apply in a simple mechanical system.

  1. Undercooling and solidification of Al-50 at. pct Si Alloy by electromagnetic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. P.; Herlach, D. M.; Vandyoussefi, M.; Greer, A. L.

    2004-02-01

    Electromagnetic levitation is applied to achieve containerless solidification of 10-mm-diameter droplets of Al-50 at. pct Si. A maximum undercooling of 320 K is obtained. Phase morphologies on the droplet surfaces and on the deeply etched sections of the samples solidified at different undercoolings are examined by scanning electron microscopy. The primary silicon shows well-developed faceted dendrites at a small undercooling, but a fine granular form at a large undercooling. Stratified deposits of aluminum are found within the primary silicon plates, arising from solute pileup during growth. The microstructural refinement at a large undercooling has its origins in solute restriction of crystal growth and in fragmentation of the primary silicon dendrites. The form of the Al-Si eutectic is also found to be changed into an anomalous form at a large undercooling.

  2. 30 CFR 250.917 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the fabrication phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the fabrication phase? 250.917 Section 250.917 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... duties during the fabrication phase? (a) The CVA must use good engineering judgement and practices...

  3. 30 CFR 250.918 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the installation phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the installation phase? 250.918 Section 250.918 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... duties during the installation phase? (a) The CVA must use good engineering judgment and practice...

  4. 30 CFR 250.916 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase? 250.916 Section 250.916 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... duties during the design phase? (a) The CVA must use good engineering judgement and practices...

  5. Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Transient Dentritic Solidification Experiment (TDSE) is being developed as a candidate for flight aboard the International Space Station. TDSE will study the growth of dentrites (treelike crystalline structures) in a transparent material (succinonitrile or SCN) that mimics the behavior of widely used iron-based metals. Basic work by three Space Shuttle flights (STS-62, STS-75, and STS-87) of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. The TDSE is similar to IDGE, but will maintain a constant temperature while varying pressure on the dentrites. Shown here is a cutaway of the isothermal bath containing its growth cell at the heart of the TDSE. The principal investigator is Matthew Koss of College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, MA. Note: an Acrobat PDF version is available from http://microgravity.nasa.gov/gallery

  6. Low Melt Height Solidification of Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montakhab, Mehdi; Bacak, Mert; Balikci, Ercan

    2016-06-01

    Effect of a reduced melt height in the directional solidification of a superalloy has been investigated by two methods: vertical Bridgman (VB) and vertical Bridgman with a submerged baffle (VBSB). The latter is a relatively new technique and provides a reduced melt height ahead of the solidifying interface. A low melt height leads to a larger primary dendrite arm spacing but a lower mushy length, melt-back transition length, and porosity. The VBSB technique yields up to 38 pct reduction in the porosity. This may improve a component's mechanical strength especially in a creep-fatigue type dynamic loading.

  7. Solidification and Microstructural Evolution of Hypereutectic Al-15Si-4Cu-Mg Alloys with High Magnesium Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebib, M.; Ajersch, F.; Samuel, A. M.; Chen, X.-G.

    2013-09-01

    The low coefficient of thermal expansion and good wear resistance of hypereutectic Al-Si-Mg alloys with high Mg contents, together with the increasing demand for lightweight materials in engine applications have generated an increasing interest in these materials in the automotive industry. In the interests of pursuing the development of new wear-resistant alloys, the current study was undertaken to investigate the effects of Mg additions ranging from 6 to 15 pct on the solidification behavior of hypereutectic Al-15Si-4Cu-Mg alloy using thermodynamic calculations, thermal analysis, and extensive microstructural examination. The Mg level strongly influenced the microstructural evolution of the primary Mg2Si phase as well as the solidification behavior. Thermodynamic predictions using ThermoCalc software reported the occurrence of six reactions, comprising the formation of primary Mg2Si; two pre-eutectic binary reactions, forming either Mg2Si + Si or Mg2Si + α-Al phases; the main ternary eutectic reaction forming Mg2Si + Si + α-Al; and two post-eutectic reactions resulting in the precipitation of the Q-Al5Mg8Cu2Si6 and θ-Al2Cu phases, respectively. Microstructures of the four alloys studied confirmed the presence of these phases, in addition to that of the π-Al8Mg3FeSi6 (π-Fe) phase. The presence of the π-Fe phase was also confirmed by thermal analysis. The morphology of the primary Mg2Si phase changed from an octahedral to a dendrite form at 12.52 pct Mg. Any further Mg addition only coarsened the dendrites. Image analysis measurements revealed a close correlation between the measured and calculated phase fractions of the primary Mg2Si and Si phases. ThermoCalc and Scheil calculations show good agreement with the experimental results obtained from microstructural and thermal analyses.

  8. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST, SOLIDITECH, INC. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS VOL II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of the Soliditech, Inc. solidification/stabilization demonstration was to develop reliable performance and cost information. he demonstration took palce at the Imperial Oil Company/Champion Chemical Company Superfund site in Morganiville, New Jersey. ontamin...

  9. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST, SOLIDITECH, INC. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS VOL I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of the Soliditech, Inc. solidification/stabilization demonstration was to develop reliable performance and cost information. he demonstration took palce at the Imperial Oil Company/Champion Chemical Company Superfund site in Morganiville, New Jersey. Contami...

  10. The Solidification Mode of Fe-Mn-Al-C Lightweight Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chan-Young; Lee, Young-Kook

    2014-09-01

    Solidification behavior and solid-state transformation were investigated in Fe-Mn-Al-C lightweight steel. The solidification mode of the Fe-9.3Mn-5.6Al-0.2C (wt.%) lightweight steel was predicted to be the F mode (liquid → liquid + δ-ferrite → δ-ferrite → δ-ferrite + γ-austenite), according to the classification of the solidification modes of stainless steels. However, the microstructures of an ingot of the lightweight steel showed that the solidification occurred by the FA mode (liquid → liquid + δ-ferrite → liquid + δ-ferrite + γ-austenite → δ-ferrite + γ-austenite). To examine the difference between predicted and actual solidification modes, some specimens were annealed at various temperatures ranging from 1200°C to 1450°C for 10 min and then quenched. The microstructures of the annealed specimens exhibited that there were the narrow ranges of single δ-ferrite and solidification sections. This result indicates that the solidification mode of the present steel was the F mode, matching well with the predicted solidification mode. The reason for the FA mode, which was observed in the ingot, was because the liquid passed by a narrow solidification section and a single δ-ferrite region, and it directly entered the dual-phase region of δ-ferrite and γ-austenite during cooling.

  11. An enthalpy method for modeling eutectic solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Anirban; Kiran, Apoorva; Karagadde, Shyamprasad; Dutta, Pradip

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new micro-scale model for solidification of eutectic alloys. The model is based on the enthalpy method and simulates the growth of adjacent α and β phases from a melt of eutectic composition in a two-dimensional Eulerian framework. The evolution of the two phases is obtained from the solution of volume averaged energy and species transport equations which are formulated using the nodal enthalpy and concentration potential values. The three phases are tracked using the β-phase fraction and the liquid fraction values in all the computational nodes. Solutal convection flow field in the domain is obtained from the solution of volume-averaged momentum and continuity equations. The governing equations are solved using a coupled explicit-implicit scheme. The model is qualitatively validated with Jackson-Hunt theory. Results show expected eutectic growth pattern and proper species transfer and diffusion field ahead of the interface. Capabilities of the model such as lamella width selection, division of lamella into thinner lamellae and the presence of solutal convection are successfully demonstrated. The present model can potentially be incorporated into the existing framework of enthalpy based micro-scale dendritic solidification models thus leading to an efficient generalized microstructure evolution model.

  12. Stabilization/Solidification Remediation Method for Contaminated Soil: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Azmi, M. A. M.; Nabila, A. T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) is typically a process that involves a mixing of waste with binders to reduce the volume of contaminant leachability by means of physical and chemical characteristics to convert waste in the environment that goes to landfill or others possibly channels. Stabilization is attempts to reduce the solubility or chemical reactivity of the waste by changing the physical and chemical properties. While, solidification attempt to convert the waste into easily handled solids with low hazardous level. These two processes are often discussed together since they have a similar purpose of improvement than containment of potential pollutants in treated wastes. The primary objective of this review is to investigate the materials used as a binder in Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) method as well as the ability of these binders to remediate the contaminated soils especially by heavy metals.

  13. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  14. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  15. Liquidus Temperature and Primary Crystallization Phases in High-Zirconia High-Level Waste Borosilicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Plaisted, Trevor J.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Vienna, John D.; Jiricka, Antonin

    1999-12-09

    Liquidus temperature (TL) studies of high-Zr high-level waste (HLW) borosilicate glasses have identified three primary phases: baddelyite (ZrO2), zircon (ZrSiO4), and alkali-zirconium silicates, such as parakeldyshite (Na2ZrSi2O7). Using published TL data for HLW glasses with these primary phases, we have computed partial specific TLs for major glass components. On the Na2O-SiO2-ZrO2 submixture, we have determined approximate positions of the boundaries between the baddelyite, zircon, and parakeldyshite primary phase fields. The maximum that can dissolve at 1150?C in a borosilicate HLW glass subjected to common processability and acceptability constraints appears to be 16.5 mass% ZrO2.

  16. Microwave detection of the primary ozonide of ethylene in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zozom, J.; Gillies, C. W.; Suenram, R. D.; Lovas, F. J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary ozonide of ethylene ? has been observed and studied in the gas phase for the first time. A specially designed low-temperature absorption cell was employed in which the primary ozonide was prepared in situ by the low-temperature reaction of ozone with ethylene. An assignment of the rotational spectrum and electric dipole moment measurements have established the oxygen envelope conformation (C s symmetry) to the lowest-energy form for this elusive chemical species.

  17. Advanced cement solidification system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Kuribayashi, H.; Todo, F.

    1993-12-31

    In order to easily and economically store and transport radioactive waste generated at nuclear power stations, it is essential to reduce the waste volume to the maximum extent. It is also necessary to transform the waste into a stable form for final disposal which will maintain its chemical and physical stability over a long period of time. For this purpose, the Advanced Cement Solidification Process (AC-process) was developed. The AC-process, which utilizes portland cement, can be applied to several kinds of waste such as boric acid waste, laboratory drain waste, incineration ash and spent ion exchange resin. In this paper, the key point of the AC-process, the pretreatment concept for each waste, is described. The AC-process has been adopted for two Japanese PWR stations: the Genkai Nuclear Power Station (Kyushu Electric Power Co.) and the Ikata Nuclear Power Station (Shikoku Electric Power Co.). Construction work has almost finished and commissioning tests are under way at both power stations.

  18. Solidification in a Supercomputer: From Crystal Nuclei to Dendrite Assemblages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuta, Yasushi; Ohno, Munekazu; Takaki, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    Thanks to the recent progress in high-performance computational environments, the range of applications of computational metallurgy is expanding rapidly. In this paper, cutting-edge simulations of solidification from atomic to microstructural levels performed on a graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture are introduced with a brief introduction to advances in computational studies on solidification. In particular, million-atom molecular dynamics simulations captured the spontaneous evolution of anisotropy in a solid nucleus in an undercooled melt and homogeneous nucleation without any inducing factor, which is followed by grain growth. At the microstructural level, the quantitative phase-field model has been gaining importance as a powerful tool for predicting solidification microstructures. In this paper, the convergence behavior of simulation results obtained with this model is discussed, in detail. Such convergence ensures the reliability of results of phase-field simulations. Using the quantitative phase-field model, the competitive growth of dendrite assemblages during the directional solidification of a binary alloy bicrystal at the millimeter scale is examined by performing two- and three-dimensional large-scale simulations by multi-GPU computation on the supercomputer, TSUBAME2.5. This cutting-edge approach using a GPU supercomputer is opening a new phase in computational metallurgy.

  19. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending.

  20. A mixture of massive and feathery microstructures of Ti48Al2Cr2Nb alloy by high undercooled solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Hu, Rui Kou, Hongchao; Zhang, Tiebang; Wang, Jun; Li, Jinshan

    2015-02-15

    A mixture of massive and feathery microstructures was observed in Ti48Al2Cr2Nb alloy subjected to the undercooled solidification rather than the heat treatments in most cases. Double recalescence events and primary β solidification confirmed that massive γ phase did not directly nucleate from the undercooled melt but formed during the solid-state transformations. It is believed that small white areas (aluminium-poor) along lamellar grain boundaries may be closely related to the formation of massive γ phase and feathery γ phase. High dislocation density and stacking faults were detected in massive γ phase by transmission electron microscopy. The high energy of defects and undercooling in the solid state phase transformation can provide sufficiently high driving force for the nucleation of massive γ phase. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • A mixture of massive and feathery microstructures was observed. • Massive γ formed during the solid-state transformations. • Defects and undercooling provide driving force for the nucleation of massive γ.

  1. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e). PMID:25159375

  2. Numerical simulation of freckle formation in directional solidification of binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felicelli, Sergio D.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Poirier, David R.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model of solidification is presented which simulates the formation of segregation models known as 'freckles' during directional solidification of binary alloys. The growth of the two-phase or dendritic zone is calculated by solving the coupled equations of momentum, energy, and solute transport, as well as maintaining the thermodynamic constraints dictated by the phase diagram of the alloy. Calculations for lead-tin alloys show that the thermosolutal convection in the dendritic zone during solidification can produce heavily localized inhomogeneities in the composition of the final alloy.

  3. Solidification analysis of a centrifugal atomizer using the Al-32.7wt.% Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.G.

    1998-02-23

    A centrifugal atomizer (spinning disk variety) was designed and constructed for the production of spherical metal powders, 100--1,000 microns in diameter in an inert atmosphere. Initial atomization experiments revealed the need for a better understanding of how the liquid metal was atomized and how the liquid droplets solidified. To investigate particle atomization, Ag was atomized in air and the process recorded on high-speed film. To investigate particle solidification, Al-32.7 wt.% Cu was atomized under inert atmosphere and the subsequent particles were examined microscopically to determine solidification structure and rate. This dissertation details the experimental procedures used in producing the Al-Cu eutectic alloy particles, examination of the particle microstructures, and determination of the solidification characteristics (e.g., solidification rate) of various phases. Finally, correlations are proposed between the operation of the centrifugal atomizer and the observed solidification spacings.

  4. 30 CFR 250.916 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase? 250.916 Section 250.916 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Platforms and Structures Platform...

  5. Teachers' Beliefs on Foreign Language Teaching Practices in Early Phases of Primary Education: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caner, Mustafa; Subasi, Gonca; Kara, Selma

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether teacher beliefs would play a role in their actual practices while teaching target language in early phases of primary education, principally, in kindergarten and first grades in a state school. As it is a very broad research area, the researchers exclusively analyzed teaching practices and teaching…

  6. LIQUIDUS TEMPERATURE OF HIGH-LEVEL WASTE BOROSILICATE GLASSES WITH SPINEL PRIMARY PHASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquidus temperatures (TL) were measured for high-level waste (HLW) borosilicate glasses covering a Savannah River composition region. The primary crystallization phase for most glasses was spinel, a solid solution of trevorite (NiFe2O4) with other oxides (FeO, MnO, and Cr2O3). T...

  7. LIQUIDUS TEMPERATURE AND PRIMARY CRYSTALLIZATION PHASES IN HIGH-ZIRCONIA HIGH-LEVEL WASTE BOROSILICATE GLASSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquidus temperature (TL) studies of high-Zr high-level waste (HLW) borosilicate glasseshave identified three primary phases: baddelyite (ZrO2), zircon (ZrSiO4), and alkali-zirconiumsilicates, such as parakeldyshite (Na2ZrSi2O7). Using published TL data for HLW glasses withthe...

  8. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  9. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  10. The solidification microstructure of Al-Cu-Si alloys metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Garbellini, O.; Palacio, H.; Biloni, H.

    1998-12-31

    The relationship between solidification microstructure and fluidity in MMC was studied. The composites were fabricated by infiltration of liquid metal into a alumina SAFFIL fibers preform under a gas pressure, using alloys of the AlCuSi system as matrices. The fluidity was measured in terms of classic foundry practice (i.e., the distance of flow liquid metal into the preform, while solidifying). The characterization of solidification microstructure in the cast composite was analyzed and correlated with the results of fluidity. The attention was particularly focused on such effects as the presence or absence of selective nucleation, the refinement of certain solidifying phases in the presence of fibers and their influence on microstructure formation and segregation of certain elements present in the liquid at the fiber matrix interface. By comparing reinforced and non reinforced zones, it was shown that the presence of fibers resulted in a refinement of the dendritic arm spacing of the {alpha}Al phase, with nucleation of Si on the fibers and without nucleation of primary Al dendrites. The results were discussed and compared with the microstructures and fluidity test of the unreinforced Al-Cu-Si alloys.

  11. Containerless processing and rapid solidification of Nb-Si alloys of hypereutectic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.; Robinson, M. B.; Bertero, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    A combination of bulk undercooling in an electromagnetic levitation apparatus and splat quenching between two copper plates is used to process Nb-Si alloys in order to maximize rapid solidification conditions and minimize the effects of recalescence, with emphasis on the solidification of characteristics of alloys in the 21 to 27 at. pct Si range of composition. SEM and TEM as well as X-ray diffraction are used to characterize the microstructures of the processed samples. In the range of compositions studied, the splat-quenched drops always formed the tetragonal Nb3Si phase directly from the liquid. Drops solidified in the coil were characterized by the presence of the primary intermetallic Nb5Si3 and the absence of both peritectic Nb3Si and the equilibrium eutectic. In these cases, a metastable alpha-Nb + beta-Nb5Si3 eutectic formed. The results are discussed in terms of possible metastable configurations of the Nb-Si phase diagram as well as concepts of nucleation and growth kinetics applied to the Nb3Si and Nb5Si3 intermetallics.

  12. Rapid solidification of metallic particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    In order to maximize the heat transfer coefficient the most important variable in rapid solidification is the powder particle size. The finer the particle size, the higher the solidification rate. Efforts to decrease the particle size diameter offer the greatest payoff in attained quench rate. The velocity of the liquid droplet in the atmosphere is the second most important variable. Unfortunately the choices of gas atmospheres are sharply limited both because of conductivity and cost. Nitrogen and argon stand out as the preferred gases, nitrogen where reactions are unimportant and argon where reaction with nitrogen may be important. In gas atomization, helium offers up to an order of magnitude increase in solidification rate over argon and nitrogen. By contrast, atomization in vacuum drops the quench rate several orders of magnitude.

  13. Curvature effects in rapid alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Massimo

    2001-04-01

    The growth of a cylindrical or spherical crystal into its undercooled melt is a process whose description is complicated by the lack of a stationary regime. A simple approach to the problem, justified for low growth rates and widely used in the past for both pure substances and alloy solidification, is based on a quasistatic approximation which assumes an instantaneous adaptation of the diffusional field to the interface configuration. For alloy solidification, assuming isothermal conditions and local interface equilibrium, this simplified model predicts a diffusion controlled growth, with the radius of the crystal increasing asymptotically as ~t1/2. However, as pointed out by recent investigations, thermal diffusion and nonequilibrium effects enter as essential ingredients in rapid alloy solidification. In the present paper we use the phase-field model to simulate the cylindrical and spherical growth of a solid germ into a supersaturated alloy melt. The problem is treated in its full time-dependent characteristics, accounting for nonequilibrium effects as well as for the rejection of both heat and solute away from the advancing front. We observe a complex behavior and a rich variety of dynamic regimes: in different regions of parameter space the growth rate is limited by diffusion (either thermal or chemical) or is kinetic controlled. Traversing the boundaries which limit these regions, the process undergoes sharp transitions which leave a trace in the solidified alloy. For realistic values of the Lewis number, thermal effects drive the process into a a diffusive regime, in which the rate limiting mechanism is the rejection of solute.

  14. Dispersive liquid-phase microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplet coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography for the determination of Sudan dyes in foodstuffs and water samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Yuming

    2014-06-25

    Dispersive liquid-phase microextraction with solidification of floating organic drop (SFO-DLPME) is one of the most interesting sample preparation techniques developed in recent years. In this paper, a new, rapid, and efficient SFO-DLPME coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was established for the extraction and sensitive detection of banned Sudan dyes, namely, Sudan I, Sudan II, Sudan III, and Sudan IV, in foodstuff and water samples. Various factors, such as the type and volume of extractants and dispersants, pH and volume of sample solution, extraction time and temperature, ion strength, and humic acid concentration, were investigated and optimized to achieve optimal extraction of Sudan dyes in one single step. After optimization of extraction conditions using 1-dodecanol as an extractant and ethanol as a dispersant, the developed procedure was applied for extraction of the target Sudan dyes from 2 g of food samples and 10 mL of the spiked water samples. Under the optimized conditions, all Sudan dyes could be easily extracted by the proposed SFO-DLPME method. Limits of detection of the four Sudan dyes obtained were 0.10-0.20 ng g(-1) and 0.03 μg L(-1) when 2 g of foodstuff samples and 10 mL of water samples were adopted, respectively. The inter- and intraday reproducibilities were below 4.8% for analysis of Sudan dyes in foodstuffs. The method was satisfactorily used for the detection of Sudan dyes, and the recoveries of the target for the spiked foodstuff and water samples ranged from 92.6 to 106.6% and from 91.1 to 108.6%, respectively. These results indicated that the proposed method is simple, rapid, sensitive, and suitable for the pre-concentration and detection of the target dyes in foodstuff samples. PMID:24894629

  15. Quantifying hydrate solidification front advancing using method of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Kehua; DiCarlo, David; Flemings, Peter B.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a one-dimensional analytical solution based on the method of characteristics to explore hydrate formation from gas injection into brine-saturated sediments within the hydrate stability zone. Our solution includes fully coupled multiphase and multicomponent flow and the associated advective transport in a homogeneous system. Our solution shows that hydrate saturation is controlled by the initial thermodynamic state of the system and changed by the gas fractional flow. Hydrate saturation in gas-rich systems can be estimated by 1-cl0/cle when Darcy flow dominates, where cl0 is the initial mass fraction of salt in brine, and cle is the mass fraction of salt in brine at three-phase (gas, liquid, and hydrate) equilibrium. Hydrate saturation is constant, gas saturation and gas flux decrease, and liquid saturation and liquid flux increase with the distance from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front. The total gas and liquid flux is constant from the gas inlet to the hydrate solidification front and decreases abruptly at the hydrate solidification front due to gas inclusion into the hydrate phase. The advancing velocity of the hydrate solidification front decreases with hydrate saturation at a fixed gas inflow rate. This analytical solution illuminates how hydrate is formed by gas injection (methane, CO2, ethane, propane) at both the laboratory and field scales.

  16. Uncertainty Quantification in Solidification Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2015-06-01

    Numerical models have been used to simulate solidification processes, to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to a few or single experiments, in which agreement is dependent on both model and experimental uncertainty. As a first step to quantifying the uncertainty in the models, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis were performed on a simple steady state 1D solidification model of continuous casting of weld filler rod. This model includes conduction, advection, and release of latent heat was developed for use in uncertainty quantification in the calculation of the position of the liquidus and solidus and the solidification time. Using this model, a Smolyak sparse grid algorithm constructed a response surface that fit model outputs based on the range of uncertainty in the inputs to the model. The response surface was then used to determine the probability density functions (PDF's) of the model outputs and sensitivities of the inputs. This process was done for a linear fraction solid and temperature relationship, for which there is an analytical solution, and a Scheil relationship. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient 2D model of solidification in a rectangular domain.

  17. Directional Solidification Of Monotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhindaw, B. K.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Singh, A. K.; Curreri, P. A.

    1990-01-01

    Conditions promoting formation of aligned fibers sought. Report describes experiments in directional solidification of Cu/Pb and Bi/Ga monotectic alloys. Study motivated by need to understand physical mechanism governing formation of rodlike or fiberlike aligned structures in solidifying alloy and to determine process conditions favoring such structures.

  18. Modelling the solidification of hypermonotectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Menghuai; Ludwig, Andreas; Ratke, Lorenz

    2003-09-01

    A two-phase model is developed to simulate the decomposition and spatial phase separation (microstructure evolution) during solidification of hypermonotectic alloys. The minority liquid phase, decomposing in morphology of droplets from the parent melt, is treated as the second phase, L2, while the parent melt, including the solidified monotectic matrix, is the first phase, L1. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, solute and enthalpy for both phases, and an additional transport equation for the droplets are solved. Nucleation of the droplets, diffusion-controlled growth (coarsening) and dissolution of the droplets, interphase interactions such as Marangoni (thermocapillary) force, Stokes force, solute partitioning and heat release of decomposition are modelled by the corresponding source and exchange terms in the conservation equations. The monotectic reaction is modelled by adding the latent heat on the L1 phase and applying a suitable large viscosity to the solidified monotectic matrix. The simulation results of a two-dimensional square casting with hypermonotectic composition (Al-10 wt.% Bi) under normal terrestrial and weightless conditions are presented and discussed.

  19. Flight Planning for the International Space Station-Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Matson, D. M.; Loser, W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper is an overview of the status and science for the LODESTARS (Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification) research project. The program is aimed at understanding how melt convection influences phase selection and the evolution of rapid solidification microstructures.

  20. Characterization of Rapidly Solidified Al-27 Si Hypereutectic Alloy: Effect of Solidification Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhiyong; Wang, Richu; Zhang, Chun; Peng, Chaoqun; Xie, Lichuan; Wang, Linqian

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-27wt.%Si hypereutectic alloy was fabricated by gas atomization, and its characterization as a function of particle size was investigated. A relationship between the particle size and solidification condition was established to understand the microstructural characteristics. While the irregular primary Si phase transformed to quasi-spherical shape, and its size decreased gradually with the particle size, the primary Si morphology similar to that in ingot metallurgy sample was found from the deep-etched images. In the fine powder, the eutectic Si phase formed a network structure densely distributed in the matrix, while a tangled dendritic formed at the surface. From the distribution of the Si phase, it is suggested that the microstructure inhomogeneity increased as the particle size decreases. The structural distortion of the Al matrix was observed from x-ray diffraction patterns and differential scanning calorimetry curves. From the calculated results, an undercooling of 33 K (or interface velocity of 8 mm/s) was sufficient to suppress the primary Si to less than 2 μm in the present composition. The microhardness increased significantly while the particle size decreases. The microstructure and properties of the bulk material consolidated by hot pressing of the powders obtained were also conducted.

  1. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  2. Multi-crystalline silicon solidification under controlled forced convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cablea, M.; Zaidat, K.; Gagnoud, A.; Nouri, A.; Chichignoud, G.; Delannoy, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-crystalline silicon wafers have a lower production cost compared to mono-crystalline wafers. This comes at the price of reduced quality in terms of electrical properties and as a result the solar cells made from such materials have a reduced efficiency. The presence of different impurities in the bulk material plays an important role during the solidification process. The impurities are related to different defects (dislocations, grain boundaries) encountered in multi-crystalline wafers. Applying an alternative magnetic field during the solidification process has various benefits. Impurities concentration in the final ingot could be reduced, especially metallic species, due to a convective term added in the liquid that reduces the concentration of impurities in the solute boundary layer. Another aspect is the solidification interface shape that is influenced by the electromagnetic stirring. A vertical Bridgman type furnace was used in order to study the solidification process of Si under the influence of a travelling magnetic field able to induce a convective flow in the liquid. The furnace was equipped with a Bitter type three-phase electromagnet that provides the required magnetic field. A numerical model of the furnace was developed in ANSYS Fluent commercial software. This paper presents experimental and numerical results of this approach, where interface markings were performed.

  3. Choosing a cost functional and a difference scheme in the optimal control of metal solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albu, A. V.; Zubov, V. I.

    2011-01-01

    The optimal control of solidification in metal casting is considered. The underlying mathematical model is based on a three-dimensional two-phase initial-boundary value problem of the Stefan type. The study is focused on choosing a cost functional in the optimal control of solidification and choosing a difference scheme for solving the direct problem. The results of the study are described and analyzed.

  4. An analytical model for solute redistribution during solidification of planar, columnar, or equiaxed morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Existing models for solute redistribution (microsegregation) during solidification were reviewed. There are no analytical models that take into account limited diffusion in both the liquid and the solid phases. A new analytical mathematical model for solute redistribution was developed. Diffusion in liquid and in solid was considered. This model does not require a prescribed movement of the interface. It can be used for one-dimensional (1-D) (plate), two-dimensional (cylinder), or three-dimensional (3-D) (sphere) calculations. Thus, it is possible to calculate microsegregation at the level of primary or secondary arm spacing for columnar dendrites or for equiaxed dendrites. The solution was compared with calculations based on existing models, as well as with some available experimental data for the segregation of base elements in as cast Al-4.9 wt pct Cu, INCONEL 718, 625, and plain carbon (0.13 wt pct C) steel.

  5. An analytical model for solute redistribution during solidification of planar, columnar, or equiaxed morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1993-09-01

    Existing models for solute redistribution (microsegregation) during solidification were reviewed. There are no analytical models that take into account limited diffusion in both the liquid and the solid phases. A new analytical mathematical model for solute redistribution was developed. Diffusion in liquid and in solid was considered. This model does not require a prescribed movement of the interface. It can be used for one-dimensional (1-D) (plate), two-dimensional (cylinder), or three-dimensional (3-D) (sphere) calculations. Thus, it is possible to calculate microsegregation at the level of primary or secondary arm spacing for columnar dendrites or for equiaxed dendrites. The solution was compared with calculations based on existing models, as well as with some available experimental data for the segregation of base elements in as cast Al-4. 9 wt pct Cu, INCONEL 718, 625, and plain carbon (0. 13 wt pct C) steel.

  6. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created a demand for new fabrication methods with an emphasis on simple, low-cost techniques. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) is an unconventional approach in comparison to low-temperature biomimetic approaches. A technical challenge for DSE is producing microstructural architectures on the nanometer scale. In both processes, the driving force is the minimization of Gibb's free energy. Selfassembly by biomimetic approaches depends on weak interaction forces between organic molecules to define the architectural structure. The architectural structure for solidification depends on strong chemical bonding between atoms. Constituents partition into atomic-level arrangements at the liquid-solid interface to form polyphase structures, and this atomic-level arrangement at the liquid-solid interface is controlled by atomic diffusion and total undercooling due to composition (diffusion), kinetics, and curvature of the boundary phases. Judicious selection of the materials system and control of the total undercooling are the keys to producing structures on the nanometer scale. The silicon-titanium silicide (Si-TiSi2) eutectic forms a rod structure under isothermal cooling conditions. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, directional solidification was employed along with a thermal gradient to promote uniform rods oriented with the thermal gradient. The preceding photomicrograph shows the typical transverse microstructure of a solidified Si-TiSi2 eutectic composition. The dark and light gray regions are Si and TiSi2, respectively. Preferred rod orientation along the thermal gradient was poor. The ordered TiSi2 rods have a narrow distribution in diameter of 2 to 3 m, as shown. The rod diameter showed a weak dependence on process conditions. Anisotropic etch behavior between different phases provides the opportunity to fabricate structures with high aspect ratios. The photomicrographs show the resulting microstructure after a wet chemical etch and a

  7. Microstructural Evolution and Compressive Properties of Two-Phase Nb-Fe Alloys Containing the C14 Laves Phase NbFe2 Intermetallic Compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. W.; Wang, X. B.; Wang, W. X.; Li, S. M.; Gong, D. Q.; Fu, H. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Microstructural evolution and compressive properties of two-phase Nb-Fe binary alloys based on the C14 Laves phase NbFe2 were characterized at both the hypo- and hypereutectic compositions. The experimental results indicated that the microstructures of the two alloys consisted of fully eutectics containing Fe and NbFe2 phases at the bottom of the ingots corresponding to the largest solidification rates. With the decrease of solidification rate, the microstructures developed into primary Fe (NbFe2) dendrites plus eutectics in the middle and top parts of the ingots. The microstructural evolutions along the axis of the ingots were analyzed by considering the competitive growth between the primary phase and eutectic as well as using microstructure selection models based on the maximum interface temperature criterion. Furthermore, the compressive properties of the two alloys were measured and the enhancements were explained in terms of the second Fe phase and halo toughening mechanisms.

  8. Experimental Study on the Anisotropic Stress-Strain Behavior of Polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga in Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yao; Shi, Tao; Zhu, Yuping; Li, Zongbin; Deng, Tao; Bai, Guonan

    2016-03-01

    A polycrystalline Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloy produced by directional solidification is the subject of this research paper. The compressive stress-strain curves of the material for different cutting angles to the solidification direction are tested. The martensite Young's modulus, macroscopic reorientation strain, and phase transition critical stress are analyzed experimentally. The results show that mechanical behaviors in the loading-unloading cycle of the material present nonlinear and anisotropic characteristics, which are all closely related to the material's orientation to the solidification direction. The martensite Young's modulus, macroscopic reorientation strain, and phase transition critical stress achieve maximum values in the solidification direction. A 50° orientation to the solidification direction is the cut-off direction of the mechanical properties, where the martensite Young's modulus and reorientation start critical stress reach minimum values. The present study is expected to provide sound guidance for practical applications.

  9. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of melt segregation effects were studied: (1) evaporative segregation, or segregation due to surface evaporation; and (2) freezing segregation, or segregation due to liquid-solid phase transformation. These segregation effects are closely related. In fact, evaporative segregation always precedes freezing segregation to some degree and must often be studied prior to performing meaningful solidification experiments. This is particularly true since evaporation may cause the melt composition, at least at the critical surface regions or layers to be affected manyfold within seconds so that the surface region or layer melting point and other thermophysical properties, nucleation characteristics, base for undercooling, and critical velocity to avoid constitutional supercooling, may be completely unexpected. An important objective was, therefore, to develop the necessary normal evaporation equations for predicting the compositional changes within specified times at temperature and to correlate these equations with actual experimental data collected from the literature.

  10. Cellular monotectic model solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile (sn) was purified to a superior level using a fractional recrystallization method. The melting point of the best twice recrystallized sn was not raised by following with double distillation. This was tested using differential scanning calorimetry. The peak shape on melting also proved that double distillation after double recrystallization did not improve the quality. Stability and phase diagrams for succinonitrile and glycerol are presented.

  11. A level set simulation of dendritic solidification of multi-component alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Lijian; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    A level set method combining features of front tracking methods and fixed domain methods is presented to model microstructure evolution in the solidification of multi-component alloys. Phase boundaries are tracked by solving the multi-phase level set equations. Diffused interfaces are constructed from these tracked phase boundaries using the level set functions. Based on the assumed diffused interfaces, volume-averaging techniques are applied for energy, species and momentum transport. Microstructure evolution in multi-component alloy systems is predicted using realistic material parameters. The methodology avoids the difficulty of parameter identification needed in other diffused interface models, and allows easy application to various practical alloy systems. Techniques including fast marching, narrow band computing and adaptive meshing are utilized to speed up computations. Several numerical examples are considered to validate the method and examine its potential for modeling solidification of practical alloy systems. These examples include two- and three-dimensional solidification of a binary alloy in an undercooled melt, a study of planar/cellular/dendritic transition in the solidification of a Ni-Cu alloy, and eutectic and peritectic solidification of an Fe-C system. Adaptive mesh refinement in the rapidly varying interface region makes the method practical for coupling the microstructure evolution at the meso-scale with buoyancy driven flow in the macro-scale, which is shown in the solidification of a Ni-Al-Ta ternary alloy.

  12. Evaluation of Formation and Evolution of Microporosity in Anodic Copper Solidification Processes: Simulation and Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Jorge Sebastian; Cruchaga, Marcela Andrea; Celentano, Diego Javier

    2013-06-01

    The current study analyzes the formation and evolution of microporosity during the solidification of anodic cooper. The aim of this study is to develop a thermofluid-formulation including microstructural evolution and to perform experiments to validate some measured variables with the respective numerical predictions. To this end, a set of experiments is carried out in copper testing primary and eutectic phase formation together with porosity evolution. To evaluate the formation of different microstructural phases and porosity, anodic copper (99.80 pct purity, approximately) is poured into different types of molds. The effect of heat extraction on the thermofluid-microstructural response is evaluated using graphite and steel molds to promote different cooling rates. The microporosity depends on the microstructural formation; hence the microstructure needs to be firstly described. The proposed microstructural model takes into account nucleation and grain growth laws based on thermal undercooling together with microstructural evolution. The primary phase evolution model is based on both solute diffusion at the grain scale and the dendrite tip growth kinetics, while the eutectic evolution is assumed proportional to the copper initial composition and eutectic undercooling. The microporosity model accounts for the partial pressures of gases and the solute distribution in the liquid and solid phases. The corresponding numerical formulation is solved in the framework of the finite element method. Finally, the computed temperature, solid, and liquid volumetric fractions, and pressure histories together with the final values for the radius, density, and pore volumetric fraction, are all compared and validated with the experimental measurements.

  13. Property measurements and solidification studies by electrostatic levitation.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Paul-François; Yu, Jianding; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Yoda, Shinichi

    2004-11-01

    The National Space Development Agency of Japan has recently developed several electrostatic levitation furnaces and implemented new techniques and procedures for property measurement, solidification studies, and atomic structure research. In addition to the contamination-free environment for undercooled and liquid metals and semiconductors, the newly developed facilities possess the unique capabilities of handling ceramics and high vapor pressure materials, reducing processing time, and imaging high luminosity samples. These are exemplified in this paper with the successful processing of BaTiO(3). This allowed measurement of the density of high temperature solid, liquid, and undercooled phases. Furthermore, the material resulting from containerless solidification consisted of micrometer-size particles and a glass-like phase exhibiting a giant dielectric constant exceeding 100,000. PMID:15644375

  14. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  15. Two-phase performance of scale models of a primary coolant pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, P.S.; Swift, W.L.

    1982-09-01

    Scale models of PWR primary coolant pumps were tested in steady and transient two-phase flows in order to generate a data base to aid in the development and assessment of pump performance models for use in computer codes for the analysis of postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accidents (LOCA). This report summarizes and unifies the single and two-phase air/water and steam/water performance data on the relatively high specific speed pumps (4200 rpm (US gpm) /sup 1/2//ft /sup 3/4/) tested in these programs. These data are compared with those acquired from tests on the lower specific speed Semiscale pump (926 rpm (US gpm)/sup 1/2//ft/sup 3/4/) to better understand the mechanism of performance degradation with increasing void fraction. The study revealed that scaling down the size of the pump while maintaining the same design specific speed produces very similar performance characteristics both in single and two-phase flows. Effects due to size and operating speed were not discernible within the range of test conditions and within experimental uncertainties. System pressure appears to affect the rate of degradation as a function of void fraction. The report includes a survey of the existing two-phase pump performance correlations. A correlation synthesized from the B and W, C-E and Creare two-phase data is also presented.

  16. Shifts of Gamma Phase across Primary Visual Cortical Sites Reflect Dynamic Stimulus-Modulated Information Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Besserve, Michel; Lowe, Scott C.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Panzeri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Distributed neural processing likely entails the capability of networks to reconfigure dynamically the directionality and strength of their functional connections. Yet, the neural mechanisms that may allow such dynamic routing of the information flow are not yet fully understood. We investigated the role of gamma band (50–80 Hz) oscillations in transient modulations of communication among neural populations by using measures of direction-specific causal information transfer. We found that the local phase of gamma-band rhythmic activity exerted a stimulus-modulated and spatially-asymmetric directed effect on the firing rate of spatially separated populations within the primary visual cortex. The relationships between gamma phases at different sites (phase shifts) could be described as a stimulus-modulated gamma-band wave propagating along the spatial directions with the largest information transfer. We observed transient stimulus-related changes in the spatial configuration of phases (compatible with changes in direction of gamma wave propagation) accompanied by a relative increase of the amount of information flowing along the instantaneous direction of the gamma wave. These effects were specific to the gamma-band and suggest that the time-varying relationships between gamma phases at different locations mark, and possibly causally mediate, the dynamic reconfiguration of functional connections. PMID:26394205

  17. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  18. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    SciTech Connect

    Halim Meco

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  19. A multiphase solute diffusion model for dendritic alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.Y.; Beckermann, C.

    1993-12-01

    A solute diffusion model, aimed at predicting microstructure formation in metal castings, is proposed for dendritic solidification of alloys. The model accounts for the different length scales existing in a dendritic structure. This is accomplished by utilizing a multiphase approach, in which not only the various physical phases but also phases associated with different length scales are considered separately. The macroscopic conservation equations are derived for each phase using the volume averaging technique, with constitutive relations developed for the interfacial transfer terms. It is shown that the multiphase model can rigorously incorporate the growth of dendrite tips and coarsening of dendrite arms. In addition, the distinction of different length scales enables the inclusion of realistic descriptions of the dendrite topology and relations to key metallurgical parameters. Another novel aspect of the model is that a single set of conservation equations for solute diffusion is developed for both equiaxed and columnar dendritic solidification. Finally, illustrative calculations for equiaxed, columnar, and mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification are carried out to provide quantitative comparisons with previous studies, and a variety of fundamental phenomena such as recalescence, dendrite tip undercooling, and columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) are predicted.

  20. Cementite Solidification in Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, J. J.; Sinatora, A.; Albertin, E.

    2014-06-01

    Two hypereutectic cast irons (5.01 pct Cr and 5.19 pct V) were cast and the polished surfaces of test pieces were deep-etched and analyzed via scanning electron microscopy. The results show that graphite lamellae intersect the cementite and a thin austenite film nucleates and grows on the cementite plates. For both compositions, graphite and cementite can coexist as equilibrium phases, with the former always nucleating and growing first. The eutectic carbides grow from the austenite dendrites in a direction perpendicular to the primary plates.

  1. Analysis of histone post translational modifications in primary monocyte derived macrophages using reverse phase×reverse phase chromatography in conjunction with porous graphitic carbon stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Minshull, Thomas C; Cole, Joby; Dockrell, David H; Read, Robert C; Dickman, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    A two dimensional-liquid chromatography (2D-LC) based approach was developed for the identification and quantification of histone post translational modifications in conjunction with mass spectrometry analysis. Using a bottom-up strategy, offline 2D-LC was developed using reverse phase chromatography. A porous graphitic carbon stationary phase in the first dimension and a C18 stationary phase in the second dimension interfaced with mass spectrometry was used to analyse global levels of histone post translational modifications in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. The results demonstrated that 84 different histone peptide proteoforms, with modifications at 18 different sites including combinatorial marks were identified, representing an increase in the identification of histone peptides by 65% and 51% compared to two different 1D-LC approaches on the same mass spectrometer. The use of the porous graphitic stationary phase in the first dimension resulted in efficient separation of histone peptides across the gradient, with good resolution and is orthogonal to the online C18 reverse phase chromatography. Overall, more histone peptides were identified using the 2D-LC approach compared to conventional 1D-LC approaches. In addition, a bioinformatic pipeline was developed in-house to enable the high throughput efficient and accurate quantification of fractionated histone peptides. The automation of a section of the downstream analysis pipeline increased the throughput of the 2D-LC-MS/MS approach for the quantification of histone post translational modifications. PMID:27260198

  2. Heat-Transfer Measurements in the Primary Cooling Phase of the Direct-Chill Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, Etienne J. F. R.; Baserinia, Amir R.; Ng, Harry; Wells, Mary A.; Weckman, David C.

    2012-10-01

    Thermal modeling of the direct-chill casting process requires accurate knowledge of (1) the different boundary conditions in the primary mold and secondary direct water-spray cooling regimes and (2) their variability with respect to process parameters. In this study, heat transfer in the primary cooling zone was investigated by using temperature measurements made with subsurface thermocouples in the mold as input to an inverse heat conduction algorithm. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to investigate the primary cooling of AA3003 and AA4045 aluminum alloy ingots cast at speeds ranging between 1.58 and 2.10 mm/s. The average heat flux values were calculated for the steady-state phase of the casting process, and an effective heat-transfer coefficient for the global primary cooling process was derived that included convection at the mold surfaces and conduction through the mold wall. Effective heat-transfer coefficients were evaluated at different points along the mold height and compared with values from a previously derived computational fluid dynamics model of the direct-chill casting process that were based on predictions of the air gap thickness between the mold and ingot. The current experimental results closely matched the values previously predicted by the air gap models. The effective heat-transfer coefficient for primary cooling was also found to increase slightly with the casting speed and was higher near the mold top (up to 824 W/m2·K) where the molten aluminum first comes in contact with the mold than near the bottom (as low as 242 W/m2·K) where an air gap forms between the ingot and mold because of thermal contraction of the ingot. These results are consistent with previous studies.

  3. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  4. Laboratory micro- and nanoscale X-ray tomographic investigation of Al–7 at.%Cu solidification structures

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, B.M. Henderson, K.C.; Gibbs, P.J.; Imhoff, S.D.; Clarke, A.J.

    2014-09-15

    X-ray computed tomography across multiple length scales provides an opportunity to non-destructively visualize and quantify the micro- to nano-scale microstructural features of solidification structures in three dimensions. Aluminum–7 at.%copper samples were directionally solidified at three cooling rates (0.44, 0.67, and 1.33 °C/s), resulting in systematic changes in the as-solidified microstructure, which are difficult to quantify using traditional microscopic techniques. The cooling rate of a material affects its ultimate microstructure, and characterizing that microstructure is key to predicting and understanding its bulk properties. Here, two different laboratory X-ray computed tomography instruments were used to characterize as-solidified microstructures, including micro-scale computed tomography with approximately 1 mm field-of-view, ∼ 1.7 μm resolution, and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography ∼ 65 μm FOV, 150 nm resolution. Micro-scale X-ray radiography and computed tomography enabled a quantitative investigation of changes in the primary dendritic solidification structure with increasing cooling rate. Nano-scale absorption contrast X-ray computed tomography resolved the distinct phases of the lamellar eutectic structure and three dimensional measurements of the ∼ 1 μm interlamellar spacing. It is found that the lamella eutectic structure thickness is inversely proportional to the cooling rate. Nano-scale Zernike phase contrast was also used to image voids at eutectic colony boundaries. The application and resolution of these two instruments are discussed with respect to the resolvable features of the solidification structures. - Highlights: • Al–Cu eutectic is a model system for studying solidification microstructure. • X-ray computed tomography provides a 3D picture of these complex structures. • Micro-scale tomography images the primary and secondary dendritic structures. • Nano-scale tomography images the eutectic lamella and

  5. Flight Planning for the International Space Station-Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Matson, D. M.; Loser, W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper is an overview of the status and science for the LODESTARS research project. The program is aimed at understanding how melt convection influences phase selection and the evolution of rapid solidification microstructures

  6. Geometrical thermodynamics analysis of the change in the Gibbs energy during the nonequilibrium solidification of eutectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, V. D.; Sobolev, A. Yu.; Sobol', O. V.; Frolova, S. A.; Shchebetovskaya, N. V.

    2015-09-01

    Geometrical thermodynamics is used to analyze the possible dependences of the Gibbs energy on temperature and component concentration in the two-phase region during nonequilibrium solidification of eutectic alloys.

  7. Effect of traveling magnetic field on separation and purification of Si from Al-Si melt during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Q. C.; Jie, J. C.; Liu, S. C.; Wang, T. M.; Yin, G. M.; Li, T. J.

    2015-11-01

    Separation and purification of the Si crystal during solidification process of hypereutectic Al-30Si melt under traveling magnetic field (TMF) were investigated in the present study. The results showed that under a proper condition the Si-rich layer can be formed in the periphery of the ingot while the inner microstructure is mainly the Al-Si eutectic structure. The intense melt flow carries the bulk liquid with higher Si content to promote the growth of the primary Si phase which is first precipitated close to the inner wall of the crucible with a relatively lower temperature, which resulting in the remarkable segregation of the primary Si phase. The impurity contents of the refined Si can be reduced to a very low level. The typical metallic impurities have removal fraction higher than 99.5%. In addition, there is a significant difference in the P contents between the primary and eutectic Si phases, which might be ascribed to the formation of AlP phase that acts as the heterogeneous nucleation sites. Furthermore, a considerable amount of Fe-containing particles with a size about 100-300 nm is found inside the eutectic Si phase, indicating an unintended entrapment of Fe in Si.

  8. Nanoparticle Capture During Directional Solidification of Nano-Sized SiC Particle-Reinforced AZ91D Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiaobo; Liu, Hongchang; Li, Wenzhen; Gao, Weiming; Li, Qiushu

    2015-05-01

    The capture/push behavior of a particle in front of a solidification interface was analyzed theoretically and experimentally in this work. Van der Waals force, viscous force, and force due to interfacial energy played important roles in the particle capture/push process. Directional solidification experiments were conducted with nano-sized SiC particle-reinforced AZ91D composites to observe the distribution of nanoparticles in different solidification morphologies under varied cooling rates. When the composite solidified with plane manner, the nanoparticles could be captured by the solidification front and distributed uniformly in the matrix. When solidified with columnar or equiaxial manners, the nanoparticles could be captured by the solidification front but distributed uniformly only in the grain boundary as a result of the difference in interfacial energy and wettability between SiC/α-Mg and SiC/eutectic phase. Theoretical prediction of particle capture was in agreement with the experiment results. PMID:26505023

  9. Experimental determination of systems suitable for study as monotectic binary metallic alloy solidification models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Transparent binary metallic alloy solidification models are important in attempts to understand the processes causing liquid-liquid and solid-liquid phase transformations in metallic alloy systems. These models permit visual observation of the phase transformation and the processes proceding solidification. The number of these transparent monotectic binary models needs to be expanded to distinguish between the unique and general phenomena observed. The expansion of the number of accurately determined monotectic phase diagrams of model systems, and contribution to a data base for eventual use with UNIFAC group contribution methods is examined.

  10. Microstructure Evolution and Rapid Solidification Behavior of Blended Nickel-Based Superalloy Powders Fabricated by Laser Powder Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Gauvin, R.; Brochu, M.

    2016-04-01

    Laser powder deposition was performed on a substrate of Inconel 738 using blended powders of Mar M247 and Amdry DF3 with a ratio of 4:1 for repairing purposes. In the as-deposited condition, continuous secondary phases composed of γ-Ni3B eutectics and discrete (Cr, W)B borides were observed in inter-dendritic regions, and time-dependent nucleation simulation results confirmed that (Cr, W)B was the primary secondary phase formed during rapid solidification. Supersaturated solid solution of B was detected in the γ solid solution dendritic cores. The Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi model was performed to predict the interfacial morphology and correlate the solidification front velocity (SFV) with dendrite tip radius. It was observed from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy that the dendrite tip radius of the upper region was in the range of 15 to 30 nm, which yielded a SFV of approx 30 cm/s. The continuous growth model for solute trapping behavior developed by Aziz and Kaplan was used to determine that the effective partition coefficient of B was approximately 0.025. Finally, the feasibility of the modeling results were rationalized with the Clyne-Kurz segregation simulation of B, where Clyne-Kurz prediction using a partition coefficient of 0.025 was in good agreement with the electron probe microanalysis results.