Science.gov

Sample records for primary structure analysis

  1. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Structural response and failure analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorris, William J.; Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Tien; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    Non-linear analysis methods were adapted and incorporated in a finite element based DIAL code. These methods are necessary to evaluate the global response of a stiffened structure under combined in-plane and out-of-plane loading. These methods include the Arc Length method and target point analysis procedure. A new interface material model was implemented that can model elastic-plastic behavior of the bond adhesive. Direct application of this method is in skin/stiffener interface failure assessment. Addition of the AML (angle minus longitudinal or load) failure procedure and Hasin's failure criteria provides added capability in the failure predictions. Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis modules were developed as interactive pre-and post-processors. Each module provides the means of performing self-initiated finite elements based analysis of primary structures such as a flat or curved stiffened panel; a corrugated flat sandwich panel; and a curved geodesic fuselage panel. This module brings finite element analysis into the design of composite structures without the requirement for the user to know much about the techniques and procedures needed to actually perform a finite element analysis from scratch. An interactive finite element code was developed to predict bolted joint strength considering material and geometrical non-linearity. The developed method conducts an ultimate strength failure analysis using a set of material degradation models.

  2. Experiment and modal analysis on the primary mirror structure of Space Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Zhiping; Yang, Shimo; Hu, Qiqian

    2006-06-01

    Primary mirror with Φ 1m and f 3.5m is the most important optical part in Space Solar Telescope (SST), which is designed to make observations of transient and steady state solar hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic processes and is being researched and manufactured by National Astronomical Observatories. The primary mirror structure(PMS), a crucial linker for the optical and other subsystems, includes primary mirror and its supporting frame. Therefore, this part must satisfy the optical sufficient strength, stiffness, and thermal stability requirements under the space environment and in the launching process. In this paper the primary mirror structure and its connection are described. The scheme of modal analysis and experiment is built, according to the specific dynamic requirements of the primary mirror structure in Space Solar Telescope. The dynamic response on the primary mirror structure is analyzed with MSC.NASTRAN software. Comparing these results with mode parameters obtained from modal experiment analysis. Modal experiment uses freely hanging primary mirror structure, simple input multi-output, and modal parameter identification through CADA-X software. Both results provide evidences to develop this satellite design.

  3. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures. Structural response and failure analysis: ISPAN modules users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Ten; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    The ISPAN Program (Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis) is an interactive design tool that is intended to provide a means of performing simple and self contained preliminary analysis of aircraft primary structures made of composite materials. The program combines a series of modules with the finite element code DIAL as its backbone. Four ISPAN Modules were developed and are documented. These include: (1) flat stiffened panel; (2) curved stiffened panel; (3) flat tubular panel; and (4) curved geodesic panel. Users are instructed to input geometric and material properties, load information and types of analysis (linear, bifurcation buckling, or post-buckling) interactively. The program utilizing this information will generate finite element mesh and perform analysis. The output in the form of summary tables of stress or margins of safety, contour plots of loads or stress, and deflected shape plots may be generalized and used to evaluate specific design.

  4. Scorpion toxins from Centruroides noxius and Tityus serrulatus. Primary structures and sequence comparison by metric analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Possani, L D; Martin, B M; Svendsen, I; Rode, G S; Erickson, B W

    1985-01-01

    The complete primary structures of toxin II-14 from the Mexican scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann and toxin gamma from the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus Lutz and Mello have been determined. Cleavage of toxin gamma after Met-6 with CNBr produced the 55-residue peptide 7-61, which maintained the four disulphide bonds but was not toxic to mice at a dose 3 times the lethal dose of native toxin gamma. Pairwise comparison by metric analysis of segment 1-50 of toxin gamma and the corresponding segments from two other South American scorpion toxins, five North American scorpion toxins, nine North African scorpion toxins and one Central Asian scorpion toxin showed that the three Brazilian toxins are intermediate between the North American and North African toxins. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that the South American and African continents were joined by a land connection in the distant past. Images Fig. 1. PMID:4052021

  5. The human cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel: identification, primary structure and topological analysis.

    PubMed

    Tunwell, R E; Wickenden, C; Bertrand, B M; Shevchenko, V I; Walsh, M B; Allen, P D; Lai, F A

    1996-09-01

    Rapid Ca2+ efflux from intracellular stores during cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling is mediated by the ryanodine-sensitive calcium-release channel, a large homotetrameric complex present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We report here the identification, primary structure and topological analysis of the ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel from human cardiac muscle (hRyR-2). Consistent with sedimentation and immunoblotting studies on the hRyR-2 protein, sequence analysis of ten overlapping cDNA clones reveals an open reading frame of 14901 nucleotides encoding a protein of 4967 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 564 569 Da for hRyR-2. In-frame insertions corresponding to eight and ten amino acid residues were found in two of the ten cDNAs isolated, suggesting that novel, alternatively spliced transcripts of the hRyR-2 gene might exist. Six hydrophobic stretches, which are present within the hRyR-2 C-terminal 500 amino acids and are conserved in all RyR sequences, may be involved in forming the transmembrane domain that constitutes the Ca(2+)-conducting pathway, in agreement with competitive ELISA studies with a RyR-2-specific antibody. Sequence alignment of hRyR-2 with other RyR isoforms indicates a high level of overall identity within the RyR family, with the exception of two important regions that exhibit substantial variability. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the RyR-2 isoform diverged from a single ancestral gene before the RyR-1 and RyR-3 isoforms to form a distinct branch of the RyR family tree. PMID:8809036

  6. Space Shuttle Main Engine structural analysis and data reduction/evaluation. Volume 6: Primary nozzle diffuser analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foley, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    The primary nozzle diffuser routes fuel from the main fuel valve on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) to the nozzle coolant inlet mainfold, main combustion chamber coolant inlet mainfold, chamber coolant valve, and the augmented spark igniters. The diffuser also includes the fuel system purge check valve connection. A static stress analysis was performed on the diffuser because no detailed analysis was done on this part in the past. Structural concerns were in the area of the welds because approximately 10 percent are in areas inaccessible by X-ray testing devices. Flow dynamics and thermodynamics were not included in the analysis load case. Constant internal pressure at maximum SSME power was used instead. A three-dimensional, finite element method was generated using ANSYS version 4.3A on the Lockheed VAX 11/785 computer to perform the stress computations. IDEAS Supertab on a Sun 3/60 computer was used to create the finite element model. Rocketdyne drawing number RS009156 was used for the model interpretation. The flight diffuser is denoted as -101. A description of the model, boundary conditions/load case, material properties, structural analysis/results, and a summary are included for documentation.

  7. Design and analysis of supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror on a space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenjie; Chai, Wenyi; Feng, Liangjie; Yang, Wengang; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xuewu

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical stability is a significant segment for an on-axis space telescope to assure its assembly accuracy as well as the image quality in the rigorous space environment, supporting structure between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror as a main structure of the on-axis space telescope must be designed reasonably to meet the mission requirements of the space telescope. Meanwhile, in view of the limitation of the satellite launching cost, it is necessary to reduce the weight and power compensation during the supporting structure design based on the satisfaction of telescope performance. Two types of supporting structure for a space telescope are designed, one is three-tripod structure which has three tripods located on the optical bench to support the secondary mirror assemblies and keep the distance between the primary mirror and the secondary mirror, the other is barrel supporting structure which includes a tube and a secondary mirror support with four spider struts. To compare the mechanical performance and launching cost of the two kinds of supporting structure, both structural and thermal analysis model are established. The analysis results indicates that the three-tripod support is lighter, has better mechanical performance and needs less power compensation than the barrel support.

  8. Primary structure -- An important concept to distinguish primary stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Mingwan |; Li Jianguo

    1996-12-01

    A new Chinese design code JB 4732-95, Steel Pressure Vessels -- Design by Analysis, was issued in March 1995. In this paper the authors discuss some concepts and ideas which formed in the introduction and application of the design by analysis approach in China. They are: multi-possibility of stress decomposition, self-limiting stress, classification of constraints, and finally an important concept to distinguish primary stress -- primary structures.

  9. Structural analysis of xyloglucans in the primary cell walls of plants in the subclass Asteridae.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Matt; Jia, Zhonghua; Peña, Maria J; Cash, Michael; Harper, April; Blackburn, Alan R; Darvill, Alan; York, William S

    2005-08-15

    The structures of xyloglucans from several plants in the subclass Asteridae were examined to determine how their structures vary in different taxonomic orders. Xyloglucans, solubilized from plant cell walls by a sequential (enzymatic and chemical) extraction procedure, were isolated, and their structures were characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. All campanulids examined, including Lactuca sativa (lettuce, order Asterales), Tenacetum ptarmiciflorum (dusty miller, order Asterales), and Daucus carota (carrot, order Apiales), produce typical xyloglucans that have an XXXG-type branching pattern and contain alpha-d-Xylp-, beta-D-Galp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Xylp-, and alpha-L-Fucp-(1-->2)-beta-D-Galp-(1-->2)-alpha-D-Xylp- side chains. However, the lamiids produce atypical xyloglucans. For example, previous analyses showed that Capsicum annum (pepper) and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato), two species in the order Solanales, and Olea europaea (olive, order Lamiales) produce xyloglucans that contain arabinosyl and galactosyl residues, but lack fucosyl residues. The XXGG-type xyloglucans produced by Solanaceous species are less branched than the XXXG-type xyloglucan produced by Olea europaea. This study shows that Ipomoea pupurea (morning glory, order Solanales), Ocimum basilicum (basil, order Lamiales), and Plantago major (plantain, order Lamiales) all produce xyloglucans that lack fucosyl residues and have an unusual XXGGG-type branching pattern in which the basic repeating core contains five glucose subunits in the backbone. Furthermore, Neruim oleander (order Gentianales) produces an XXXG-type xyloglucan that contains arabinosyl, galactosyl, and fucosyl residues. The appearance of this intermediate xyloglucan structure in oleander has implications regarding the evolutionary development of xyloglucan structure and its role in primary plant cell walls. PMID:15975566

  10. Design and analysis of grid stiffened concepts for aircraft composite primary structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to buckling resistant design of general grid stiffened flat plates based on smeared stiffener theory for combined inplane loading is discussed. Some results from parametric studies performed to assess the validity of smeared stiffener for practical stiffener configurations and to illustrate the benefits of different stiffening concepts are given. Details of a design study are discussed where the present analysis method is used to design a grid stiffened panel for a fuselage application and verified using a finite element analysis results.

  11. Primary structure and functional analysis of the lysis genes of Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh.

    PubMed

    Henrich, B; Binishofer, B; Bläsi, U

    1995-02-01

    The lysis genes of the Lactobacillus gasseri bacteriophage phi adh were isolated by complementation of a lambda Sam mutation in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of a 1,735-bp DNA fragment revealed two adjacent coding regions of 342 bp (hol) and 951 bp (lys) in the same reading frame which appear to belong to a common transcriptional unit. Proteins corresponding to the predicted gene products, holin (12.9 kDa) and lysin (34.7 kDa), were identified by in vitro and in vivo expression of the cloned genes. The phi adh holin is a membrane-bound protein with structural similarity to lysis proteins of other phage, known to be required for the transit of murein hydrolases through the cytoplasmic membrane. The phi adh lysin shows homology with mureinolytic enzymes encoded by the Lactobacillus bulgaricus phage mv4, the Streptococcus pneumoniae phage Cp-1, Cp-7, and Cp-9, and the Lactococcus lactis phage phi LC3. Significant homology with the N termini of known muramidases suggests that phi adh lysin acts by a similar catalytic mechanism. In E. coli, the phi adh lysin seems to be associated with the total membrane fraction, from which it can be extracted with lauryl sarcosinate. Either one of the phi adh lysis proteins provoked lysis of E. coli when expressed along with holins or lysins of phage lambda or Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29. Concomitant expression of the combined holin and lysin functions of phi adh in E. coli, however, did not result in efficient cell lysis. PMID:7836307

  12. Study of Factors Preventing Children from Enrolment in Primary School in the Republic of Honduras: Analysis Using Structural Equation Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    Studies have investigated factors that impede enrolment in Honduras. However, they have not analysed individual factors as a whole or identified the relationships among them. This study used longitudinal data for 1971 children who entered primary schools from 1986 to 2000, and employed structural equation modelling to examine the factors…

  13. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS'. The global model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but has more limited capabilities for fluid-structure interaction analysis. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of the finite element code MSC.Dytranz for performing a dynamic fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the Dytran solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions to similar problems, and to the results from ANSYS simulations. Both rigid tank and flexible tank configurations were analyzed with Dytran. The response parameters of interest that are evaluated in this study are the total hydrodynamic reaction forces, the impulsive and convective mode frequencies, the waste pressures, and slosh heights

  14. Composite Crew Module: Primary Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirsch, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    In January 2007, the NASA Administrator and Associate Administrator for the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate chartered the NASA Engineering and Safety Center to design, build, and test a full-scale crew module primary structure, using carbon fiber reinforced epoxy based composite materials. The overall goal of the Composite Crew Module project was to develop a team from the NASA family with hands-on experience in composite design, manufacturing, and testing in anticipation of future space exploration systems being made of composite materials. The CCM project was planned to run concurrently with the Orion project's baseline metallic design within the Constellation Program so that features could be compared and discussed without inducing risk to the overall Program. This report discusses the project management aspects of the project including team organization, decision making, independent technical reviews, and cost and schedule management approach.

  15. Advanced textile applications for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Shah, Bharat M.; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite primary structural concepts were evaluated for low cost, damage tolerant structures. Development of advanced textile preforms for fuselage structural applications with resin transfer molding and powder epoxy materials are now under development.

  16. Advanced textile applications for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony C.; Barrie, Ronald E.; Shah, Bharat M.; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced composite primary structural concepts have been evaluated for low cost, damage tolerant structures. Development of advanced textile preforms for fuselage structural applications with resin transfer molding and powder epoxy material is now under development.

  17. Effect of the small-world structure on encoding performance in the primary visual cortex: an electrophysiological and modeling analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Li; Niu, Xiaoke; Wan, Hong

    2015-05-01

    The biological networks have been widely reported to present small-world properties. However, the effects of small-world network structure on population's encoding performance remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we applied a small world-based framework to quantify and analyze the response dynamics of cell assemblies recorded from rat primary visual cortex, and further established a population encoding model based on small world-based generalized linear model (SW-GLM). The electrophysiological experimental results show that the small world-based population responses to different topological shapes present significant variation (t test, p < 0.01; effect size: Hedge's g > 0.8), while no significant variation was found for control networks without considering their spatial connectivity (t test, p > 0.05; effect size: Hedge's g < 0.5). Furthermore, the numerical experimental results show that the predicted response under SW-GLM is more accurate and reliable compared to the control model without small-world structure, and the decoding performance is also improved about 10 % by taking the small-world structure into account. The above results suggest the important role of the small-world neural structure in encoding visual information for the neural population by providing electrophysiological and theoretical evidence, respectively. The study helps greatly to well understand the population encoding mechanisms of visual cortex. PMID:25764307

  18. Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    After an 800-foot-tall offshore oil recovery platform collapsed, the engineers at Engineering Dynamics, Inc., Kenner, LA, needed to learn the cause of the collapse, and analyze the proposed repairs. They used STAGSC-1, a NASA structural analysis program with geometric and nonlinear buckling analysis. The program allowed engineers to determine the deflected and buckling shapes of the structural elements. They could then view the proposed repairs under the pressure that caused the original collapse.

  19. HANFORD DST THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ANSYS BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-14

    M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS. The overall model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but the capabilities and limitations of ANSYS to perform fluid-structure interaction are less well understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the ANSYS solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions of similar problems and to the results from Dytran simulations. The capabilities and limitations of the finite element code Dytran for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation (Abatt 2006). In conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS analysis

  20. Composites technology for transport primary structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Victor; Hawley, Arthur; Klotzsche, Max; Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    The ACT contract activity being performed by the McDonnell Douglas Corporation is divided into two separate activities: one effort by Douglas Aircraft in Long Beach, California with a focus on Transport Primary Wing and Fuselage Structure, and the other effort by McDonnell Aircraft in St. Louis, Missouri with a focus on Advanced Combat Aircraft Center Wing-Fuselage Structure. This presentation is on the Douglas Aircraft Transport Structure portion of the ACT program called ICAPS - Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structure.

  1. Primary structure of keratinocyte transglutaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.A.; Stewart, B.E.; Qin, Q.; Rice, R.H. ); Chakravarty, R. ); Floyd, E.E.; Jetten, A.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the coding regions of human and rat keratinocyte transglutaminases (protein-glutamine: amine {gamma}-glutamyltransferase; EC 2.3.2.13) have been determined. These yield proteins of {approximately}90 kDa that are 92% identical, indicative of the conservation of important structural features. Alignments of amino acid sequences show substantial similarity among the keratinocyte transglutaminase, human clotting factor XIII catalytic subunit, guinea pig liver tissue transglutaminase, and the human erythrocyte band-4.2 protein. The keratinocyte enzyme is most similar to factor XIII, whereas the band-4.2 protein is most similar to the tissue transglutaminase. A salient feature of the keratinocyte transglutaminase is its 105-residue extension beyond the N terminus of the tissue transglutaminase. This extension and the unreltaed activation peptide of factor XIII (a 37-residue extension) appear to be added for specialized functions after divergence of the tissue transglutaminase from their common lineage.

  2. HANFORD DST THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; ABATT FG

    2007-02-14

    Revision 0A of this document contains new Appendices C and D. Appendix C contains a re-analysis of the rigid and flexible tanks at the 460 in. liquid level and was motivated by recommendations from a Project Review held on March 20-21, 2006 (Rinker et al Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968 Rev 1). Appendix D contains the benchmark solutions in support of the analyses in Appendix C.

  3. Structural health monitoring and impact detection for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosters, Eric; van Els, Thomas J.

    2010-04-01

    The increasing use of thermoplastic carbon fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) materials in the aerospace industry for primary aircraft structures, such as wing leading-edge surfaces and fuselage sections, has led to rapid growth in the field of structural health monitoring (SHM). Impact, vibration, and load can all cause failure, such as delamination and matrix cracking, in composite materials. Moreover, the internal material damage can occur without being visible to the human eye, making inspection of and clear insight into structural integrity difficult using currently available evaluation methods. Here, we describe the detection of impact and its localization in materials and structures by high-speed interrogation of multiple-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors mounted on a composite aircraft component.

  4. Thermal analysis of a 4m honeycomb telescope primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Xian, Hao

    2012-09-01

    Thermal characteristics of a 4m class honeycomb telescope primary mirror are presented. A 3 dimensional finite elements model of the primary mirror with the varying ambient air temperature as the boundary conditions is used for the numerical simulations. Every night's air temperature profile has been detected in 2009 in Gaomeigu observatory site. Four typical nights' air temperature profiles in different seasons are chose as the boundary conditions in finite element simulation. Temperature difference between primary mirror's optical surface and ambient air is studied, as well as the axial temperature difference inner the mirror blank and radial temperature difference on the optical surface. Primary mirror seeing phenomenon results from the temperature difference between primary mirror's optical surface and the ambient air is discussed. Thermal deformations due to temperature gradient of the primary mirror are analyzed by the finite element model. Axial thermal deformations on the optical surface are discussed in detail. Thermal deformation would induce the optical surface of primary mirror to distort from the normal shape, and lead to large observation image quality degradation. Primary mirror seeing with the turbulence near the optical surface would introduce wavefront aberration and deteriorate the final observation image. In order to reduce mirror seeing and thermal deformation, it is necessary to design a thermal control system for primary mirror. The thermal and structural analysis result will be valuable in designing primary mirror's thermal control system.

  5. Gender, Family Structure, and Adolescents' Primary Confidants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomaguchi, Kei M.

    2008-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (N = 4,190), this study examined adolescents' reports of primary confidants. Results showed that nearly 30% of adolescents aged 16-18 nominated mothers as primary confidants, 25% nominated romantic partners, and 20% nominated friends. Nominating romantic partners or friends was related…

  6. Elicitation of specific syntactic structures in primary progressive aphasia

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Jessica; Gesierich, Benno; Besbris, Max; Ogar, Jennifer; Henry, Maya L.; Miller, Bruce L.; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Wilson, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Many patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) are impaired in syntactic production. Because most previous studies of expressive syntax in PPA have relied on quantitative analysis of connected speech samples, which is a relatively unconstrained task, it is not well understood which specific syntactic structures are most challenging for these patients. We used an elicited syntactic production task to identify which syntactic structures pose difficulties for 31 patients with three variants of PPA: non-fluent/agrammatic, semantic and logopenic. Neurodegenerative and healthy age-matched participants were included as controls. As expected, non-fluent/agrammatic patients made the most syntactic errors. The structures that resulted in the most errors were constructions involving third person singular present agreement, and constructions involving embedded clauses. Deficits on this elicited production task were associated with atrophy of the left posterior inferior frontal gyrus. PMID:23046707

  7. Analysis of primary cilia in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Paridaen, Judith T M L; Huttner, Wieland B; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells in the developing mammalian brain are highly polarized cells that carry a primary cilium protruding into the brain ventricles. Here, cilia detect signals present in the cerebrospinal fluid that fills the ventricles. Recently, striking observations have been made regarding the dynamics of primary cilia in mitosis and cilium reformation after cell division. In neural progenitors, primary cilia are not completely disassembled during cell division, and some ciliary membrane remnant can be inherited by one daughter cell that tends to maintain a progenitor fate. Furthermore, newborn differentiating cells grow a primary cilium on their basolateral plasma membrane, in spite of them possessing apical membrane and adherens junctions, and thus change the environment to which the primary cilium is exposed. These phenomena are proposed to be involved in cell fate determination and delamination of daughter cells in conjunction with the production of neurons. Here, we describe several methods that can be used to study the structure, localization, and dynamics of primary cilia in the developing mouse brain; these include time-lapse imaging of live mouse embryonic brain tissues, and analysis of primary cilia structure and localization using correlative light- and electron- and serial-block-face scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25837388

  8. Nonlinear Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear structural analysis techniques for engine structures and components are addressed. The finite element method and boundary element method are discussed in terms of stress and structural analyses of shells, plates, and laminates.

  9. Primary Dentition Analysis: Exploring a Hidden Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vanjari, Kalasandhya; Kamatham, Rekhalakshmi; Gaddam, Kumar Raja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Accurate prediction of the mesiodistal widths (MDWs) of canines and premolars in children with primary dentition facilitates interception of malocclusion at an early age. Boston University (BU) approach is one, i.e., based on primary teeth for predicting canine and premolar dimensions. Aim: To predict the canine and premolar dimensions, in the contemporary population, using BU approach and compare with the values obtained using Tanaka-Johnston (T/J) approach. Design: Children in the age range of 7-11 years with presence of all permanent mandibular incisors and primary maxillary and mandibular canines and first molars were included in the study. Those with interproximal caries or restorations, abnormalities in shape or size and history of orthodontic treatment were excluded. Impressions of both arches were made using irreversible hydrocolloid and poured with dental stone. The MDWs of the required teeth were measured on the models using electronic digital vernier caliper from which widths of permanent canines and premolars were predicted using both T/J and BU approaches. Results: Statistically significant (p = 0.00) positive correlation (r = 0.52-0.55) was observed between T/J and BU approaches. A statistically significant (p = 0.00) strong positive correlation (r = 0.72-0.77) was observed among girls, whereas boys showed a statistically nonsignificant weak positive correlation (r=0.17-0.42) based on gender. Conclusion: Boston University approach can be further studied prospectively to make it possible as a prediction method of permanent tooth dimensions for children in primary dentition stage. How to cite this article: Nuvvula S, Vanjari K, Kamatham R, Gaddam KR. Primary Dentition Analysis: Exploring a Hidden Approach. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(1):1-4. PMID:27274146

  10. Compression Strength of Composite Primary Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1998-01-01

    Research conducted under NASA Grant NAG-1-537 focussed on the response and failure of advanced composite material structures for application to aircraft. Both experimental and analytical methods were utilized to study the fundamental mechanics of the response and failure of selected structural components subjected to quasi-static loads. Most of the structural components studied were thin-walled elements subject to compression, such that they exhibited buckling and postbuckling responses prior to catastrophic failure. Consequently, the analyses were geometrically nonlinear. Structural components studied were dropped-ply laminated plates, stiffener crippling, pressure pillowing of orthogonally stiffened cylindrical shells, axisymmetric response of pressure domes, and the static crush of semi-circular frames. Failure of these components motivated analytical studies on an interlaminar stress postprocessor for plate and shell finite element computer codes, and global/local modeling strategies in finite element modeling. These activities are summarized in the following section. References to literature published under the grant are listed on pages 5 to 10 by a letter followed by a number under the categories of journal publications, conference publications, presentations, and reports. These references are indicated in the text by their letter and number as a superscript.

  11. Analysis of the primary sequence and secondary structure of the unusually long SSU rRNA of the soil bug, Armadillidium vulgare.

    PubMed

    Choe, C P; Hancock, J M; Hwang, U W; Kim, W

    1999-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the SSU rRNA gene from the soil bug, Armadillidium vulgare (Crustacea, Isopoda), was determined. It is 3214 bp long, with a GC content of 56.3%. It is not only the longest SSU rRNA gene among Crustacea but also longer than any other SSU rRNA gene except that of the strepsipteran insect, Xenos vesparum (3316 bp). The unusually long sequence of this species is explained by the long sequences of variable regions V4 and V7, which make up more than half of the total length. RT-PCR analysis of these two regions showed that the long sequences also exist in the mature rRNA and sequence simplicity analysis revealed the presence of slippage motifs in these two regions. The putative secondary structure of the rRNA is typical for eukaryotes except for the length and shape variations of the V2, V4, V7, and V9 regions. Each of the V2, V4, and V7 regions was elongated, while the V9 region was shortened. In V2, two bulges, located between helix 8 and helix 9 and between helix 9 and helix 10, were elongated. In V4, stem E23-3 was dramatically expanded, with several small branched stems. In V7, stem 43 was branched and expanded. Comparisons with the unusually long SSU rRNAs of other organisms imply that the increase in total length of SSU rRNA is due mainly to expansion in the V4 and V7 regions. PMID:10594181

  12. Primary Structure of the Herpesvirus Ateles Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jens-Christian

    2000-01-01

    Herpesvirus ateles is an agent indigenous to spider monkeys (Ateles spp.) and causes fulminant lymphomas in various New World primates. Structural and genetic relatedness led to the classification of this virus as a member of the genus Rhadinovirus. It is most closely related to Herpesvirus saimiri. The 108,409-bp light DNA segment of the herpesvirus ateles strain 73 genome has two genes for U-RNA-like transcripts and 73 open reading frames, of which at least 6 show significant homologies to cellular genes (encoding complement control proteins, apoptosis-regulatory proteins, D-type cyclins, interleukin-8 receptors, and enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism). The left terminal region of the light DNA segment bears the putative rhadinovirus oncogene tio. PMID:10623770

  13. Urate oxidase: primary structure and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X W; Lee, C C; Muzny, D M; Caskey, C T

    1989-01-01

    Urate oxidase, or uricase (EC 1.7.3.3), is a peroxisomal enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of uric acid to allantoin in most mammals. In humans and certain other primates, however, the enzyme has been lost by some unknown mechanism. To identify the molecular basis for this loss, urate oxidase cDNA clones were isolated from pig, mouse, and baboon, and their DNA sequences were determined. The mouse urate oxidase open reading frame encodes a 303-amino acid polypeptide, while the pig and baboon urate oxidase cDNAs encode a 304-amino acid polypeptide due to a single codon deletion/insertion event. The authenticity of this single additional codon was confirmed by sequencing the mouse and pig genomic copies of the gene. The urate oxidase sequence contains a domain similar to the type 2 copper binding motif found in other copper binding proteins, suggesting that the copper ion in urate oxidase is coordinated as a type 2 structure. Based upon a comparison of the NH2-terminal peptide and deduced sequences, we propose that the maturation of pig urate oxidase involves the posttranslational cleavage of a six-amino acid peptide. Two nonsense mutations were found in the human urate oxidase gene, which confirms, at the molecular level, that the urate oxidase gene in humans is nonfunctional. The sequence comparisons favor the hypothesis that the loss of urate oxidase in humans is due to a sudden mutational event rather than a progressive mutational process. Images PMID:2594778

  14. Primary structure of Streptomyces griseus metalloendopeptidase II.

    PubMed

    Kojima, S; Kumazaki, T; Ishii, S; Miura, K

    1998-07-01

    Streptomyces griseus metalloendopeptidase II (SGMPII) is a unique protease, since it shows anomalous susceptibility to the proteinaceous "serine protease inhibitors" produced by Streptomyces, such as Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor (SSI) and its homologous proteins. In this study, we analyzed the amino acid sequence of SGMPII by analyzing various peptide fragments produced enzymatically. The sequence of SGMPII, which is composed of 334 amino acids, showed no extensive similarity to SSI-insensitive metalloproteases produced by other species of Streptomyces, except for the amino acid residues essential for catalysis and zinc binding. However, SGMPII is 35-41% similar to thermolysin and its related metalloproteases, which are not inhibited by SSI, and the residues presumed to be critical for catalysis and zinc-binding are well conserved in SGMPII. Glu137 in a "His-Glu-Xaa-His" motif of SGMPII was identified as the residue modified by CICH2 CO-DL-(N-OH)Leu-Ala-Gly-NH2, an active-site-directed irreversible inhibitor of thermolysin-like metalloproteases. Based on the sequence comparison of SGMPII and other bacterial metalloproteases, we discuss the structural basis for the differences in substrate specificity and stability between SGMPII and other thermolysin-like proteases. A possible SSI-binding locus of SGMPII is also proposed. PMID:9720222

  15. Primary structure of maize chloroplast adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Schiltz, E; Burger, S; Grafmüller, R; Deppert, W R; Haehnel, W; Wagner, E

    1994-06-15

    This paper describes the sequence of adenylate kinase (Mg-ATP+AMP<-->Mg-ADP+ADP) from maize chloroplasts. This light-inducible enzyme is important for efficient CO2 fixation in the C4 cycle, by removing and recycling AMP produced in the reversible pyruvate phosphate dikinase reaction. The complete sequence was determined by analyzing peptides from cleavages with trypsin, AspN protease and CNBr and subcleavage of a major CNBr peptide with chymotrypsin. N-terminal Edman degradation and carboxypeptidase digestion established the terminal residues. Electrospray mass spectrometry confirmed the final sequence of 222 residues (M(r) = 24867) including one cysteine and one tryptophan. The sequence shows this enzyme to be a long-variant-type adenylate kinase, the nearest relatives being adenylate kinases from Enterobacteriaceae. Alignment of the sequence with the adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli reveals 44% identical residues. Since the E. coli structure has been published recently at 0.19-nm resolution with the inhibitor adenosine(5')pentaphospho(5')adenosine (Ap5A) [Müller, C. W. & Schulz, G. E. (1992) J. Mol. Biol. 224, 159-177], catalytically essential residues could be compared and were found to be mostly conserved. Surprisingly, in the nucleotide-binding Gly-rich loop Gly-Xaa-Pro-Gly-Xaa-Gly-Lys the middle Gly is replaced by Ala. This is, however, compensated by an Ile-->Val exchange in the nearest spatial neighborhood. A Thr-->Ala exchange explains the unusual tolerance of the enzyme for pyrimidine nucleotides in the acceptor site. PMID:8026505

  16. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  17. Compression strength of composite primary structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric R.

    1994-12-01

    The linear elastic response is determined for an internally pressurized, long circular cylindrical shell stiffened on the inside by a regular arrangement of identical stringers and identical rings. Periodicity of this configuration permits the analysis of a portion of the shell wall centered over a generic stringer-ring joint; i.e., a unit cell model. The stiffeners are modeled as discrete beams, and the stringer is assumed to have a symmetrical cross section and the ring an asymmetrical section. Asymmetery causes out-of-plane bending and torsion of the ring. Displacements are assumed as truncated double Fourier series plus simple terms in the axial coordinate to account for the closed and pressure vessel effect (a non-periodic effect). The interacting line loads between the stiffeners and the inside shell wall are Lagrange multipliers in the formulation, and they are also assumed as truncated Fourier series. Displacement continuity constraints between the stiffeners and shell along the contact lines are satisfied point-wise. Equilibrium is imposed by the principle of virtual work. A composite material crown panel from the fuselage of a large transport aircraft is the numerical example. The distributions of the interacting line loads, and the out-of-plane bending moment and torque in the ring, are strongly dependent on modeling the deformations due to transverse shear and cross-sectional warping of the ring in torsion. This paper contains the results from the semiannual report on research on 'Pressure Pillowing of an Orthogonally Stiffened Cylindrical Shell'. The results of the new work are illustrated in the included appendix.

  18. Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Takane, Yoshio

    2004-01-01

    We propose an alternative method to partial least squares for path analysis with components, called generalized structured component analysis. The proposed method replaces factors by exact linear combinations of observed variables. It employs a well-defined least squares criterion to estimate model parameters. As a result, the proposed method…

  19. Equilibrium Structures of Differentially Rotating Primary Components of Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, C.; Lal, A. K.; Singh, V. P.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper a method is proposed for computing the equilibrium structures and various other observable physical parameters of the primary components of stars in binary systems assuming that the primary is more massive than the secondary and is rotating differentially about its axis. Kippenhahn and Thomas averaging approach (1970) is used in a manner earlier used by Mohan, Saxena and Agarwal (1990) to incorporate the rotational and tidal effects in the equations of stellar structure. Explicit expressions for the distortional terms appearing in the stellar structure equations have been obtained by assuming a general law of differential rotation of the typeω2 = b 0+b 1 s 2+b 2 s 4, where ω is the angular velocity of rotation of a fluid element in the star at a distance s from the axis of rotation, and b 0, b 1, b 2 are suitably chosen numerical constants. The expressions incorporate the effects of differential rotation and tidal distortions up to second order terms. The use of the proposed method has been illustrated by applying it to obtain the structures and observable parameters of certain differentially rotating primary components of the binary stars assuming the primary components to have polytropic structures.

  20. Primary structure of arabinoxylans of ispaghula husk and wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Sandra; Chaplin, Martin F; Blackwood, Anne D; Dettmar, Peter W

    2003-02-01

    The primary structures of ispaghula husk and wheat bran were investigated in order to determine how and why these fibres are among the most beneficial dietary fibres. To this end, the polysaccharide preparations have been subjected to enzymic hydrolysis and methylation analysis.The results have shown ispaghula husk and wheat bran to be very-highly-branched arabinoxylans consisting of linear f-D-(1-4)-linked xylopyranose (Xylp) backbones to which a-L-arabinofuranose (AraJ3 units are attached as side residues via a-(l13) and a-(1-02) linkages.Other substituents identified as present in wheat bran include P-D-glucuronic acid attached via the C(O)-2 position, and arabinose oligomers, consisting of two or more arabinofuranosyl residues linked via 1-2, 1-3, and 1-4 linkages. Ispaghula-husk arabinoxylan is more complex having additional side residues which include a-D-glucuronopyranose (GalAp)-(1-42)-linked-a-L-rhamnopyranose-(1-04)-0-D-Xylp, a-D-GalAp-(l-o3)-linked-a-L-Araf-(l-4)-[3-D-Xylp, and a-L-Araf-(l-43)-linked-P-D-Xylp-(1l -4)--D-Xylp. The beneficial effects of increased faecal bulk and water-holding capacity are undoubtedly related to the structures of the arabinoxylans, with differences in their efficacy to treat various functional bowel disorders due to their specific structural features. PMID:12756970

  1. JWST ISIM Primary Structure and Kinematic Mount Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszyk, Andrew; Carnahan, Tim; Hendricks, Steve; Kaprielian, Charles; Kuhn, Jonathan; Kunt, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we will review the evolution of the ISIM primary structure tube topology and kinematic mount configuration to the current baseline concept. We will also show optimization procedures used and challenges resulting from complex joints under launch loads. Two additional key ISIM structure challenges of meeting thermal distortion and stability requirements and metal-composite bonded joint survivability at cryogenic temperatures are covered in other presentations.

  2. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Alan; Palmer, Ray

    1991-01-01

    Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) has been identified by Douglas Aircraft Company (DAC) and industry to be one of the promising processes being developed today which can break the cost barrier of implementing composite primary structures into a commercial aircraft production environment. The RTM process developments and scale-up plans Douglas Aircrart will be conducting under the NASA ACT contract are discussed.

  3. Structure of Primary Mathematics Teacher Education Programs in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cañadas, María C.; Gómez, Pedro; Rico, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Spain was 1 of the 17 countries that participated in the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement's Teacher Education and Development Study in Mathematics (TEDS-M 2008). In this paper, we explore and describe the structure of Spanish primary mathematics teacher education programs. We analyzed the documents…

  4. Development of stitched/RTM composite primary structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kullerd, Susan M.; Dow, Marvin B.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) Program is to provide the technology required to gain the full benefit of weight savings and performance offered by composite primary structures. Achieving the goal is dependent on developing composite materials and structures which are damage tolerant and economical to manufacture. Researchers at NASA LaRC and Douglas Aircraft Company are investigating stitching reinforcement combined with resin transfer molding (RTM) to create structures meeting the ACT program goals. The Douglas work is being performed under a NASA contract entitled Innovative Composites Aircraft Primary Structures (ICAPS). The research is aimed at materials, processes and structural concepts for application in both transport wings and fuselages. Empirical guidelines are being established for stitching reinforcement in primary structures. New data are presented in this paper for evaluation tests of thick (90-ply) and thin (16-ply) stitched laminates, and from selection tests of RTM composite resins. Tension strength, compression strength and post-impact compression strength data are reported. Elements of a NASA LaRC program to expand the science base for stitched/RTM composites are discussed.

  5. Analysis of Geological Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Neville J.; Cosgrove, John W.

    1990-08-01

    A knowledge of structural geology is fundamental to understanding the processes by which the earth's crust has evolved. It is a subject of fundamental importance to students of geology, experienced field geologists and academic researchers as well as to petroleum and mining engineers. In contrast to many structural textbooks which dwell upon geometrical descriptions of geological structures, this book emphasises mechanical principles and the way in which they can be used to understand how and why a wide range of geological structures develop. Structures on all scales are considered but the emphasis of the book is on those that can be seen on the scale of hand specimen or outcrop. Drawing on their considerable teaching experience the authors present a coherent and lucid analysis of geological structures which will be welcomed by a wide variety of earth scientists.

  6. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Stefko, George L.; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben H.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is a general-purpose, probabilistic analysis program that computes probability of failure and probabilistic sensitivity measures of engineered systems. Because NASA/NESSUS uses highly computationally efficient and accurate analysis techniques, probabilistic solutions can be obtained even for extremely large and complex models. Once the probabilistic response is quantified, the results can be used to support risk-informed decisions regarding reliability for safety-critical and one-of-a-kind systems, as well as for maintaining a level of quality while reducing manufacturing costs for larger-quantity products. NASA/NESSUS has been successfully applied to a diverse range of problems in aerospace, gas turbine engines, biomechanics, pipelines, defense, weaponry, and infrastructure. This program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general-purpose structural analysis and lifting methods to compute the probabilistic response and reliability of engineered structures. Uncertainties in load, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include non-linear finite-element methods, heat-transfer analysis, polymer/ceramic matrix composite analysis, monolithic (conventional metallic) materials life-prediction methodologies, boundary element methods, and user-written subroutines. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is structured in a modular format with 15 elements.

  7. Formation and primary heating of the solar coronal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Shatashvili, N. L.; Miklaszewsk, R.; Nikol'Skaya, K. I.

    2010-05-01

    It is shown that the two-fluid formalism in which the bulk velocity field is treated at par with the magnetic field, has the potential of serving as an excellent model for investigating the observed coronal structures and dynamical phenomena in solar atmosphere. It is suggested that the interaction of the fluid and the magnetic aspects of a plasma may be a crucial element in creating the enormous diversity in the solar atmosphere - the structures which comprise the solar corona can be created by particle (plasma) flows observed near the Sun's surface-the primary heating of these structures is caused by the viscous dissipation of the flow kinetic energy. Explicit models (theory as well as simulation) for the formation and heating of coronal structures are worked out. Investigations show that for efficient loop formation, the primary up-flows of plasma in the chromospheres / transition region should be relatively cold and fast (as opposed to hot). It is during trapping and accumulation in closed field regions, that the flows thermalize (due to the dissipation of the short scale flow energy) leading to a bright and hot coronal structure. The formation and primary heating of a closed coronal structure (loop at the end) are simultaneous. The coronal loop, in fact, is created just when up-flows (whatever their initial temperature) enter the closed magnetic field region; heating will always take place due to the dissipation of short-scale flow energy. The heating caused by the dissipation of flow energy may, in addition, be augmented by one or several modes of secondary heating. In our model, the 'secondary heating' may occur to simply sustain (against, say, radiation losses) the hot bright loop. The emerging scenario, then, is not the filling of some hypothetical virtual loop with hot gas. The loop, in fact, is created by the interaction of the flow and the ambient field; its formation and heating are simultaneous and 'loop' has no ontological priority to the flow

  8. Structural analysis of ultra-high speed aircraft structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenzen, K. H.; Siegel, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of a hypersonic beaded skin panel were investigated under pure compression with boundary conditions similar to those found in a wing mounted condition. The primary phases of analysis reported include: (1) experimental testing of the panel to failure; (2) finite element structural analysis of the beaded panel with the computer program NASTRAN; and (3) summary of the semiclassical buckling equations for the beaded panel under purely compressive loads. A comparison of each of the analysis methods is also included.

  9. Changing English Primary Schools? A Cautionary Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Andrew; And Others

    Great Britain's 1988 Education Reform Act demonstrates the prevailing political climate's commitment to market forces and competition as a means of increasing educational productivity. This paper presents findings of the Primary Assessment Curriculum and Experience (PACE) project, which investigated the effects of the policy change on English…

  10. Structural analysis of glucans

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Glucans are most widespread polysaccharides in the nature. There is a large diversity in their molecular weight and configuration depending on the original source. According to the anomeric structure of glucose units it is possible to distinguish linear and branched α-, β- as well as mixed α,β-glucans with various glycoside bond positions and molecular masses. Isolation of glucans from raw sources needs removal of ballast compounds including proteins, lipids, polyphenols and other polysaccharides. Purity control of glucan fractions is necessary to evaluate the isolation and purification steps; more rigorous structural analyses of purified polysaccharides are required to clarify their structure. A set of spectroscopic, chemical and separation methods are used for this purpose. Among them, NMR spectroscopy is known as a powerful tool in structural analysis of glucans both in solution and in solid state. Along with chemolytic methods [methylation analysis (MA), periodate oxidation, partial chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis, etc.], correlation NMR experiments are able to determine the exact structure of tested polysaccharides. Vibration spectroscopic methods (FTIR, Raman) are sensitive to anomeric structure of glucans and can be used for purity control as well. Molecular weight distribution, homogeneity and branching of glucans can be estimated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), laser light scattering (LLS) and viscometry. PMID:25332993

  11. Novel cost controlled materials and processing for primary structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastin, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Textile laminates, developed a number of years ago, have recently been shown to be applicable to primary aircraft structures for both small and large components. Such structures have the potential to reduce acquisition costs but require advanced automated processing to keep costs controlled while verifying product reliability and assuring structural integrity, durability and affordable life-cycle costs. Recently, resin systems and graphite-reinforced woven shapes have been developed that have the potential for improved RTM processes for aircraft structures. Ciba-Geigy, Brochier Division has registered an RTM prepreg reinforcement called 'Injectex' that has shown effectivity for aircraft components. Other novel approaches discussed are thermotropic resins producing components by injection molding and ceramic polymers for long-duration hot structures. The potential of such materials and processing will be reviewed along with initial information/data available to date.

  12. COI Structural Analysis Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, Todd; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the structural analysis of the Next Generation Space Telescope Mirror System Demonstrator (NMSD) developed by Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) in support of the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) project. The mirror was submitted to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for cryogenic testing and evaluation. Once at MSFC, the mirror was lowered to approximately 40 K and the optical surface distortions were measured. Alongside this experiment, an analytical model was developed and used to compare to the test results. A NASTRAN finite element model was provided by COI and a thermal model was developed from it. Using the thermal model, steady state nodal temperatures were calculated based on the predicted environment of the large cryogenic test chamber at MSFC. This temperature distribution was applied in the structural analysis to solve for the deflections of the optical surface. Finally, these deflections were submitted for optical analysis and comparison to the interferometer test data.

  13. Design oriented structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Desirable characteristics and benefits of design oriented analysis methods are described and illustrated by presenting a synoptic description of the development and uses of the Equivalent Laminated Plate Solution (ELAPS) computer code. ELAPS is a design oriented structural analysis method which is intended for use in the early design of aircraft wing structures. Model preparation is minimized by using a few large plate segments to model the wing box structure. Computational efficiency is achieved by using a limited number of global displacement functions that encompass all segments over the wing planform. Coupling with other codes is facilitated since the output quantities such as deflections and stresses are calculated as continuous functions over the plate segments. Various aspects of the ELAPS development are discussed including the analytical formulation, verification of results by comparison with finite element analysis results, coupling with other codes, and calculation of sensitivity derivatives. The effectiveness of ELAPS for multidisciplinary design application is illustrated by describing its use in design studies of high speed civil transport wing structures.

  14. Primary structure of the human M2 mitochondrial autoantigen of primary biliary cirrhosis: Dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Coppel, R.L.; McNeilage, L.J.; Surh, C.D.; Van De Water, J.; Spithill, T.W.; Whittingham, S.; Gershwin, M.E. )

    1988-10-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic, destructive autoimmune liver disease of humans. Patient sera are characterized by a high frequency of autoantibodies to a M{sub r} 70,000 mitochondrial antigen a component of the M2 antigen complex. The authors have identified a human cDNA clone encoding the complete amino acid sequence of this autoantigen. The predicted structure has significant similarity with the dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase of the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex. The human sequence preserves the Glu-Thr-Asp-Lys-Ala motif of the lipoyl-binding site and has two potential binding sites. Expressed fragments of the cDNA react strongly with sera from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis but not with sera from patients with autoimmune chronic active hepatitis or sera from healthy subjects.

  15. Computational engine structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Johns, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    A significant research activity at the NASA Lewis Research Center is the computational simulation of complex multidisciplinary engine structural problems. This simulation is performed using computational engine structural analysis (CESA) which consists of integrated multidisciplinary computer codes in conjunction with computer post-processing for problem-specific application. A variety of the computational simulations of specific cases are described in some detail in this paper. These case studies include: (1) aeroelastic behavior of bladed rotors, (2) high velocity impact of fan blades, (3) blade-loss transient response, (4) rotor/stator/squeeze-film/bearing interaction, (5) blade-fragment/rotor-burst containment, and (6) structural behavior of advanced swept turboprops. These representative case studies are selected to demonstrate the breath of the problems analyzed and the role of the computer including post-processing and graphical display of voluminous output data.

  16. Design and analysis of large spaceborne light-weighted primary mirror and its support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Jin, Guang; Yang, Hong-bo

    2007-12-01

    With the development of the resolution of spaceborne remote sensor, the diameter of the primary mirror of spaceborne telescope becomes larger and larger. The distortion of primary mirror which is influenced by the mirror material, structure, self-weight, support system and temperature environment affects optical image quality finally. In this paper, an on-axis TMA high-resolution Cassegrain optical payload with a primary mirror whose diameter is φ 650mm was designed and the effects of the influence factors of the distortion acts on the on-axis TMA optical system primary mirror had been analyzed by means of Finite Element Analysis. During work, the technology of the primary mirror design had been summarized and general consideration of the primary mirror design technology also had been described at the same time. Considering the telescope manufacture and work station, a reasonable and optimal structure of the primary mirror sub-assembly is taken finally. In the end, the distortion of the primary mirror during its fabrication station and work station had been analyzed by integrated Finite Element Analysis Method. The results implicated the synthesis profile error (P-V value) for the primary mirror is less than λ/10 and all the indexes of the primary mirror satisfy the requirements of the optical system.

  17. Structural Analysis Made 'NESSUSary'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Everywhere you look, chances are something that was designed and tested by a computer will be in plain view. Computers are now utilized to design and test just about everything imaginable, from automobiles and airplanes to bridges and boats, and elevators and escalators to streets and skyscrapers. Computer-design engineering first emerged in the 1970s, in the automobile and aerospace industries. Since computers were in their infancy, however, architects and engineers during the time were limited to producing only designs similar to hand-drafted drawings. (At the end of 1970s, a typical computer-aided design system was a 16-bit minicomputer with a price tag of $125,000.) Eventually, computers became more affordable and related software became more sophisticated, offering designers the "bells and whistles" to go beyond the limits of basic drafting and rendering, and venture into more skillful applications. One of the major advancements was the ability to test the objects being designed for the probability of failure. This advancement was especially important for the aerospace industry, where complicated and expensive structures are designed. The ability to perform reliability and risk assessment without using extensive hardware testing is critical to design and certification. In 1984, NASA initiated the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project at Glenn Research Center to develop analysis methods and computer programs for the probabilistic structural analysis of select engine components for current Space Shuttle and future space propulsion systems. NASA envisioned that these methods and computational tools would play a critical role in establishing increased system performance and durability, and assist in structural system qualification and certification. Not only was the PSAM project beneficial to aerospace, it paved the way for a commercial risk- probability tool that is evaluating risks in diverse, down- to-Earth application

  18. Structured Data in Structural Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Donald L.; Hopkins, Stewart

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computer data structures in finite-element structural analysis programs. A number of data structure types that have been shown to be useful in such programs are introduced and described. A simple finite-element model is used to demonstrate how the given set of data structure types naturally lend themselves to developing software for the model. Different methods of implementing data structures in the context of a program are discussed.

  19. Design development of graphite primary structures enables SSTO success

    SciTech Connect

    Biagiotti, V.A.; Yahiro, J.S.; Suh, D.E.; Hodges, E.R.; Prior, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a graphite composite wing and a graphite composite intertank primary structure for application toward Single-Stage to Orbit space vehicles such as those under development in NASA{close_quote}s X-33/Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program. The trade study and designs are based on a Rockwell vertical take-off and horizontal landing (VTHL) wing-body RLV vehicle. Northrop Grumman{close_quote}s approach using a building block development technique is described. Composite Graphite/Bismaleimide (Gr/BMI) material characterization test results are presented. Unique intertank and wing composite subcomponent test article designs are described and test results to date are presented. Wing and intertank Full Scale Section Test Article (FSTA) objectives and designs are outlined. Trade studies, supporting building block testing, and FSTA demonstrations combine to develop graphite primary structure composite technology that enables developing X-33/RLV design programs to meet critical SSTO structural weight and operations performance criteria. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Development of stitched/RTM primary structures for transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Arthur V.

    1993-01-01

    This report covers work accomplished in the Innovative Composite Aircraft Primary Structure (ICAPS) program. An account is given of the design criteria and philosophy that guides the development. Wing and fuselage components used as a baseline for development are described. The major thrust of the program is to achieve a major cost breakthrough through development of stitched dry preforms and resin transfer molding (RTM), and progress on these processes is reported. A full description is provided on the fabrication of the stitched RTM wing panels. Test data are presented.

  1. A morphometric analysis of cellular differentiation in caps of primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine if patterns of cell differentiation are similar in primary and lateral roots, I performed a morphometric analysis of the ultrastructure of calyptrogen, columella, and peripheral cells in primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus. Each cell type is characterized by a unique ultrastructure, and the ultrastructural changes characteristic of cellular differentiation in root caps are organelle specific. No major structural differences exist in the structures of the composite cell types, or in patterns of cell differentiation in caps of primary vs. lateral roots.

  2. Structural analysis consultation using artificial intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Marcal, P. V.; Berke, L.

    1978-01-01

    The primary goal of consultation is definition of the best strategy to deal with a structural engineering analysis objective. The knowledge base to meet the need is designed to identify the type of numerical analysis, the needed modeling detail, and specific analysis data required. Decisions are constructed on the basis of the data in the knowledge base - material behavior, relations between geometry and structural behavior, measures of the importance of time and temperature changes - and user supplied specifics characteristics of the spectrum of analysis types, the relation between accuracy and model detail on the structure, its mechanical loadings, and its temperature states. Existing software demonstrated the feasibility of the approach, encompassing the 36 analysis classes spanning nonlinear, temperature affected, incremental analyses which track the behavior of structural systems.

  3. Structural Analysis of Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Sirovich, Lawrence; Stoeckle, Mark Y.; Zhang, Yu

    2010-01-01

    Large, recently-available genomic databases cover a wide range of life forms, suggesting opportunity for insights into genetic structure of biodiversity. In this study we refine our recently-described technique using indicator vectors to analyze and visualize nucleotide sequences. The indicator vector approach generates correlation matrices, dubbed Klee diagrams, which represent a novel way of assembling and viewing large genomic datasets. To explore its potential utility, here we apply the improved algorithm to a collection of almost 17000 DNA barcode sequences covering 12 widely-separated animal taxa, demonstrating that indicator vectors for classification gave correct assignment in all 11000 test cases. Indicator vector analysis revealed discontinuities corresponding to species- and higher-level taxonomic divisions, suggesting an efficient approach to classification of organisms from poorly-studied groups. As compared to standard distance metrics, indicator vectors preserve diagnostic character probabilities, enable automated classification of test sequences, and generate high-information density single-page displays. These results support application of indicator vectors for comparative analysis of large nucleotide data sets and raise prospect of gaining insight into broad-scale patterns in the genetic structure of biodiversity. PMID:20195371

  4. Structural Arrangement Trade Study. Volume 1: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the first of a three volume set that discusses the structural arrangement trade study plan that will identify the most suitable configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Primary Structures most suitable for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. This executive summary presents the trade study process, the selection process, requirements used, analysis performed and data generated. Conclusions and recommendations are also presented.

  5. Modeling and structural analysis of honeycomb structure mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yeping

    2012-09-01

    In development of large-scale astronomical telescopes, some promising new technology and method such as honeycomb structure mirrors and silicon carbide mirrors are applied for primary mirrors. Especially in space telescopes, the mirror lightweight design is becoming the key technology and honeycomb structure mirrors are normally required more and more to reduce the cost and increase the feasibility of the telescopes system. In this paper, a parameter FEA model of a two meters honeycomb structure mirror has been built, by using the engineering analysis software ANSYS. Through this model, the structural analysis, thermal deformation analysis and the simulation active correction of low-order frequency aberration by the finite element method have been presented.

  6. Structural and Contextual Dimensions of Iranian Primary Health Care System at Local Level

    PubMed Central

    Zanganeh Baygi, Mehdi; Seyedin, Hesam; Salehi, Masoud; Jafari Sirizi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Background: In recent years, family physician plan was established as the main strategy of health system in Iran, while organizational structure of the primary health care system has remained the same as thirty years ago. Objectives: This study was performed to illustrate structural and contextual dimensions of organizational structure and relationship between them in Iranian primary health care system at local level. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional quantitative study was conducted from January to June 2013, during which 121 questionnaires were distributed among senior and junior managers of city health centers at Medical Sciences universities in Iran. Validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by experts (CVI = 0.089 and CVR more than 0.85) and Cronbach α was utilized for reliability (α = 0.904). We used multistage sampling method in this study and analysis of the data was performed by SPSS software using different tests. Results: Local level of primary health care system in Iran had mechanical structure, but in contextual dimensions the results showed different types. There was a significant relationship between structural and contextual dimensions (r = 0.642, P value < 0.001). Goals and culture dimensions had strongest effects on structural dimensions. Conclusions: Because of the changes in goals and strategies of Iranian health system in recent years, it is urgently recommended to reform the current structure to increase efficiency and effectiveness of the system. PMID:25763257

  7. Selection process for trade study: Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document describes the selection process that will be used to identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination. The most suitable unpressurized graphite composite structures and material selections is within this configuration and will be the prototype design for subsequent design and analysis and the basis for the design and fabrication of payload bay, wing, and thrust structure full scale test articles representing segments of the prototype structures. The selection process for this TA 2 trade study is the same as that for the TA 1 trade study. As the trade study progresses additional insight may result in modifications to the selection criteria within this process. Such modifications will result in an update of this document as appropriate.

  8. Consolidation of graphite thermoplastic textile preforms for primary aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, J.; Mahon, J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of innovative cost effective material forms and processes is being considered for fabrication of future primary aircraft structures. Processes that have been identified as meeting these goals are textile preforms that use resin transfer molding (RTM) and consolidation forming. The Novel Composites for Wing and Fuselage Applications (NCWFA) program has as its objective the integration of innovative design concepts with cost effective fabrication processes to develop damage-tolerant structures that can perform at a design ultimate strain level of 6000 micro-inch/inch. In this on-going effort, design trade studies were conducted to arrive at advanced wing designs that integrate new material forms with innovative structural concepts and cost effective fabrication methods. The focus has been on minimizing part count (mechanical fasteners, clips, number of stiffeners, etc.), by using cost effective textile reinforcement concepts that provide improved damage tolerance and out-of-plane load capability, low-cost resin transfer molding processing, and thermoplastic forming concepts. The fabrication of representative Y spars by consolidation methods will be described. The Y spars were fabricated using AS4 (6K)/PEEK 150g commingled angle interlock 0/90-degree woven preforms with +45-degree commingled plies stitched using high strength Toray carbon thread and processed by autoclave consolidation.

  9. Seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Primary structures for nuclear power plants are designed to resist expected earthquakes of the site. Two intensities are referred to as Operating Basis Earthquake and Design Basis Earthquake. These structures are required to accommodate these seismic loadings without loss of their functional integrity. Thus, no plastic yield is allowed. The application of NASTRAN in analyzing some of these seismic induced structural dynamic problems is described. NASTRAN, with some modifications, can be used to analyze most structures that are subjected to seismic loads. A brief review of the formulation of seismic-induced structural dynamics is also presented. Two typical structural problems were selected to illustrate the application of the various methods of seismic structural analysis by the NASTRAN system.

  10. The Primary School as an Institution: Analysis and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Philip H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer a view of the primary school as an institution with structural properties comparable to institutions in general. Five studies will provide the basis from which such a view is developed, those by Sorokin, (1938), Perrow, (1965), Schon (1970), Taylor, "et al" (1974) and Collins and Porras, (1998). The common thread…

  11. Primary Care Quality among Different Health Care Structures in Tibet, China

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Aitian; Mao, Zongfu; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the primary care quality among different health care structures in Tibet, China. Methods. A self-administered questionnaire survey including Primary Care Assessment Tool-Tibetan version was used to obtain data from a total of 1386 patients aged over 18 years in the sampling sites in two prefectures in Tibet. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association between health care structures and primary care quality while controlling for sociodemographic and health care characteristics. Results. The services provided by township health centers were more often used by a poor, less educated, and healthy population. Compared with prefecture (77.42) and county hospitals (82.01), township health centers achieved highest total score of primary care quality (86.64). Factors that were positively and significantly associated with higher total assessment scores included not receiving inpatient service in the past year, less frequent health care visits, good self-rated health status, lower education level, and marital status. Conclusions. This study showed that township health centers patients reported better primary care quality than patients visiting prefecture and county hospitals. Government health reforms should pay more attention to THC capacity building in Tibet, especially in the area of human resource development. PMID:25861619

  12. Trade study plan for Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    This TA 2 document (with support from TA 1) describes the trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 degree inclination For this most suitable configuration the structural attachment of the wing, and the most suitable GCPS composite materials for intertank, wing, tail and thrust structure are identified. This trade study analysis uses extensive information derived in the TA 1 trade study plan and is identified within the study plan. In view of this, for convenience, the TA 1 study plan is included as an appendix to this document.

  13. Probabilistic structural analysis computer code (NESSUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    Probabilistic structural analysis has been developed to analyze the effects of fluctuating loads, variable material properties, and uncertain analytical models especially for high performance structures such as SSME turbopump blades. The computer code NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structure Under Stress) was developed to serve as a primary computation tool for the characterization of the probabilistic structural response due to the stochastic environments by statistical description. The code consists of three major modules NESSUS/PRE, NESSUS/FEM, and NESSUS/FPI. NESSUS/PRE is a preprocessor which decomposes the spatially correlated random variables into a set of uncorrelated random variables using a modal analysis method. NESSUS/FEM is a finite element module which provides structural sensitivities to all the random variables considered. NESSUS/FPI is Fast Probability Integration method by which a cumulative distribution function or a probability density function is calculated.

  14. Assessment of Student Skills for Critiquing Published Primary Scientific Literature Using a Primary Trait Analysis Scale

    PubMed Central

    VARELA, MANUEL F.; LUTNESKY, MARVIN M. F.; OSGOOD, MARCY P.

    2005-01-01

    Instructor evaluation of progressive student skills in the analysis of primary literature is critical for the development of these skills in young scientists. Students in a senior or graduate-level one-semester course in Immunology at a Masters-level comprehensive university were assessed for abilities (primary traits) to recognize and evaluate the following elements of a scientific paper: Hypothesis and Rationale, Significance, Methods, Results, Critical Thinking and Analysis, and Conclusions. We tested the hypotheses that average recognition scores vary among elements and that scores change with time differently by trait. Recognition scores (scaled 1 to 5), and differences in scores were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), regression, and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) (n = 10 papers over 103 days). By multiple comparisons testing, we found that recognition scores statistically fell into two groups: high scores (for Hypothesis and Rationale, Significance, Methods, and Conclusions) and low scores (for Results and Critical Thinking and Analysis). Recognition scores only significantly changed with time (increased) for Hypothesis and Rationale and Results. ANCOVA showed that changes in recognition scores for these elements were not significantly different in slope (F1,16 = 0.254, P = 0.621) but the Results trait was significantly lower in elevation (F1,17 = 12.456, P = 0.003). Thus, students improved with similar trajectories, but starting and ending with lower Results scores. We conclude that students have greatest difficulty evaluating Results and critically evaluating scientific validity. Our findings show extant student skills, and the significant increase in some traits shows learning. This study demonstrates that students start with variable recognition skills and that student skills may be learned at differential rates. Faculty can use these findings or the primary trait analysis scoring scale to focus on specific paper elements for which they desire

  15. System seismic analysis of an innovative primary system for a large pool type LMFBR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.C.; Wu, T.S.; Cha, B.K.; Burelbach, J.; Seidensticker, R.

    1984-01-01

    The system seismic analysis of an innovative primary system for a large pool type liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) plant is presented. In this primary system, the reactor core is supported in a way which differs significantly from that used in previous designs. The analytical model developed for this study is a three-dimensional finite element model including one-half of the primary system cut along the plane of symmetry. The model includes the deck and deck mounted components,the reactor vessel, the core support structure, the core barrel, the radial neutron shield, the redan, and the conical support skirt. The sodium contained in the primary system is treated as a lumped mass appropriately distributed among various components. The significant seismic behavior as well as the advantages of this primary system design are discussed in detail.

  16. ROOTing Out Meaning: More Morphemic Analysis for Primary Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain, Lee

    2005-01-01

    In an elementary-school professional development program, a group of primary teachers and a university consultant reviewed the research on morphemic analysis and then explored ways to give pupils in grades 1, 2, and 3 an early start on using prefixes, suffixes, and roots to construct word meaning. The teachers examined some middle-grade strategies…

  17. Is It Necessary to Dry Primary Standards before Analysis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spraggins, Jeffrey M., II; Williams, Theodore R.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) data suggests that the quantity of volatile components in primary standards is less than 1% of the initial weight and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data shows that water present in the same chemicals is below the limit of detection of the instrumentation. This suggests that the 1-2 hour drying…

  18. Mutation analysis in primary immunodeficiency diseases: case studies

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Amy P.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Niemela, Julie E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review The application of mutation analysis is becoming an integral part of the complete evaluation of patients with primary immunodeficiencies, and as such, clinicians caring for these patients must develop a better understanding of the utility and challenges of this important laboratory technology. Recent findings Genomic DNA sequencing is currently the standard approach used to characterize a possible gene mutation causing a specific primary immunodeficiency. There are clinical situations in which this approach is revealing of a genetic defect and other circumstances in which this generates a false-positive or false-negative result. One case study is presented that reviews a straightforward analysis that clarifies the genetic basis of a primary immunodeficiency, and four cases are presented that required additional studies to clarify the underlying basis of the immunodeficiency. In the latter circumstances, the rationale for additional studies is outlined and the outcome of these is presented. Summary The identification of a gene mutation as the underlying basis of a primary immunodeficiency begins with the evaluation of the clinical presentation focusing on the infection history so as to develop a differential diagnosis including potential genetic causes. The next step is to obtain specific laboratory studies, including immunologic function evaluation, and, based on these findings, to proceed with DNA sequencing of one or several selected candidate genes. Genomic DNA sequencing has certain limitations, and alternative follow-up approaches may be necessary to establish the molecular basis of the primary immunodeficiency in a given patient. PMID:19841577

  19. Predictability of gene ontology slim-terms from primary structure information in Embryophyta plant proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proteins are the key elements on the path from genetic information to the development of life. The roles played by the different proteins are difficult to uncover experimentally as this process involves complex procedures such as genetic modifications, injection of fluorescent proteins, gene knock-out methods and others. The knowledge learned from each protein is usually annotated in databases through different methods such as the proposed by The Gene Ontology (GO) consortium. Different methods have been proposed in order to predict GO terms from primary structure information, but very few are available for large-scale functional annotation of plants, and reported success rates are much less than the reported by other non-plant predictors. This paper explores the predictability of GO annotations on proteins belonging to the Embryophyta group from a set of features extracted solely from their primary amino acid sequence. Results High predictability of several GO terms was found for Molecular Function and Cellular Component. As expected, a lower degree of predictability was found on Biological Process ontology annotations, although a few biological processes were easily predicted. Proteins related to transport and transcription were particularly well predicted from primary structure information. The most discriminant features for prediction were those related to electric charges of the amino-acid sequence and hydropathicity derived features. Conclusions An analysis of GO-slim terms predictability in plants was carried out, in order to determine single categories or groups of functions that are most related with primary structure information. For each highly predictable GO term, the responsible features of such successfulness were identified and discussed. In addition to most published studies, focused on few categories or single ontologies, results in this paper comprise a complete landscape of GO predictability from primary structure encompassing 75 GO

  20. The primary structure of a non-histone chromosomal protein.

    PubMed

    Walker, J M; Hastings, J R; Johns, E W

    1977-06-15

    The primary structure of the calf thymus non-histone chromosomal protein HMG-17 has been determined. The sequence was determined mainly from data provided by the peptides obtained by cleavage with staphylococcal protease. Additional information was obtained from peptides produced by cleavage with trypsin and alpha-protease (from Crotalus atrox venom) and by partial acid hydrolysis. The protein is 89 amino acid residues in length, and has molecular weight of 9247. The N-terminal two-thirds of the molecule is highly basic, 22 of the first 58 residues being lysine or arginine, whereas only seven residues are aspartic or glutamic acid residues. In contrast, the C-terminal region of the molecule has an overall negative charge, only four of the last 31 residues being basic, whereas seven aspartic and glutamic acid residues are present. The protein is also characterised by a region of high density of proline residues, there being six proline residues between residues 31 and 40. A region of 19 residues sequence similarity with the trout-specific histone, H6, is noted together with some smaller regions of sequence similarity with histones H1 and H5. PMID:330164

  1. African Primary Care Research: Qualitative data analysis and writing results

    PubMed Central

    Govender, Indiran; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.; Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article is part of a series on African primary care research and gives practical guidance on qualitative data analysis and the presentation of qualitative findings. After an overview of qualitative methods and analytical approaches, the article focuses particularly on content analysis, using the framework method as an example. The steps of familiarisation, creating a thematic index, indexing, charting, interpretation and confirmation are described. Key concepts with regard to establishing the quality and trustworthiness of data analysis are described. Finally, an approach to the presentation of qualitative findings is given. PMID:26245437

  2. Structural brain alterations in primary open angle glaucoma: a 3T MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jieqiong; Li, Ting; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Wen, Hongwei; Li, Jianhong; Xie, Xiaobin; Yang, Diya; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Ningli; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is not only an eye disease but is also associated with degeneration of brain structures. We now investigated the pattern of visual and non-visual brain structural changes in 25 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients and 25 age-gender-matched normal controls using T1-weighted imaging. MRI images were subjected to volume-based analysis (VBA) and surface-based analysis (SBA) in the whole brain as well as ROI-based analysis of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), visual cortex (V1/2), amygdala and hippocampus. While VBA showed no significant differences in the gray matter volumes of patients, SBA revealed significantly reduced cortical thickness in the right frontal pole and ROI-based analysis volume shrinkage in LGN bilaterally, right V1 and left amygdala. Structural abnormalities were correlated with clinical parameters in a subset of the patients revealing that the left LGN volume was negatively correlated with bilateral cup-to-disk ratio (CDR), the right LGN volume was positively correlated with the mean deviation of the right visual hemifield, and the right V1 cortical thickness was negatively correlated with the right CDR in glaucoma. These results demonstrate that POAG affects both vision-related structures and non-visual cortical regions. Moreover, alterations of the brain visual structures reflect the clinical severity of glaucoma. PMID:26743811

  3. Readiness for the Patient-Centered Medical Home: Structural Capabilities of Massachusetts Primary Care Practices

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Mark W.; Safran, Dana G.; Coltin, Kathryn L.; Dresser, Marguerite

    2008-01-01

    Background The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH), a popular model for primary care reorganization, includes several structural capabilities intended to enhance quality of care. The extent to which different types of primary care practices have adopted these capabilities has not been previously studied. Objective To measure the prevalence of recommended structural capabilities among primary care practices and to determine whether prevalence varies among practices of different size (number of physicians) and administrative affiliation with networks of practices. Design Cross-sectional analysis. Participants One physician chosen at random from each of 412 primary care practices in Massachusetts was surveyed about practice capabilities during 2007. Practice size and network affiliation were obtained from an existing database. Measurements Presence of 13 structural capabilities representing 4 domains relevant to quality: patient assistance and reminders, culture of quality, enhanced access, and electronic health records (EHRs). Main Results Three hundred eight (75%) physicians responded, representing practices with a median size of 4 physicians (range 2–74). Among these practices, 64% were affiliated with 1 of 9 networks. The prevalence of surveyed capabilities ranged from 24% to 88%. Larger practice size was associated with higher prevalence for 9 of the 13 capabilities spanning all 4 domains (P < 0.05). Network affiliation was associated with higher prevalence of 5 capabilities (P < 0.05) in 3 domains. Associations were not substantively altered by statistical adjustment for other practice characteristics. Conclusions Larger and network-affiliated primary care practices are more likely than smaller, non-affiliated practices to have adopted several recommended capabilities. In order to achieve PCMH designation, smaller non-affiliated practices may require the greatest investments. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10

  4. Optimization analysis of primary mirror in large aperture telescope based on workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhengsen; Wang, Guomin

    2015-10-01

    With the diameter increasing for large aperture telescope primary mirror, the gravity caused by the increased of surface size will directly affect the quality of optical imaging, the adjustment of large aperture primary mirror will be frequent according to the requirement of observation. As the angle and the azimuth's transformation of primary mirror influences the surface shape accuracy immediately, the rational design of the primary mirror supporting structure is of crucial importance. Now the general method is to use ANSYS APDL programming, which is inconvenient and complex to fit for the different components, the calculation require much time and the analysis is lack of efficient. Taking the diameter of 1.12 m telescope primary mirror as the research objection, the paper combine the actual design parameters of SONG telescope, respectively using ANSYS WORKBENCH to employ the primary mirror axial and lateral support model in finite element method, the optimal solution is obtained by optimization design and the change rule of mirror surface deformation under inclined condition is studied. The optimization results according with the requirements of the primary mirror comprehensive error proves that the optimization analysis method is available and applicable.

  5. Primary prevention in public health: an analysis of basic assumptions.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, J; Wallack, L

    1985-01-01

    The common definition of primary prevention is straightforward; but how it is transformed into a framework to guide action is based on personal and societal feelings and beliefs about the basis for social organization. This article focuses on the two contending primary prevention strategies of health promotion and health protection. The contention between the two strategies stems from a basic disagreement about disease causality in modern society. Health promotion is based on the "lifestyle" theory of disease causality, which sees individual health status linked ultimately to personal decisions about diet, stress, and drug habits. Primary prevention, from this perspective, entails persuading individuals to forgo their risk-taking, self-destructive behavior. Health protection, on the other hand, is based on the "social-structural" theory of disease causality. This theory sees the health status of populations linked ultimately to the unequal distribution of social resources, industrial pollution, occupational stress, and "anti-health promotion" marketing practices. Primary prevention, from this perspective, requires changing existing social and, particularly, economic policies and structures. In order to provide a basis for choosing between these contending strategies, the demonstrated (i.e., past) impact of each strategy on the health of the public is examined. Two conclusions are drawn. First, the health promotion strategy shows little potential for improving the public health, because it systematically ignores the risk-imposing, other-destructive behavior of influential actors (policy-makers and institutions) in society. And second, effective primary prevention efforts entail an "upstream" approach that results in far-reaching sociopolitical and economic change. PMID:20841269

  6. Simplified Analysis Methods for Primary Load Designs at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Peter; Jetter, Robert I; Sham, Sam

    2011-01-01

    The use of simplified (reference stress) analysis methods is discussed and illustrated for primary load high temperature design. Elastic methods are the basis of the ASME Section III, Subsection NH primary load design procedure. There are practical drawbacks with this approach, particularly for complex geometries and temperature gradients. The paper describes an approach which addresses these difficulties through the use of temperature-dependent elastic-perfectly plastic analysis. Correction factors are defined to address difficulties traditionally associated with discontinuity stresses, inelastic strain concentrations and multiaxiality. A procedure is identified to provide insight into how this approach could be implemented but clearly there is additional work to be done to define and clarify the procedural steps to bring it to the point where it could be adapted into code language.

  7. Quantification of tertiary structural conservation despite primary sequence drift in the globin fold.

    PubMed

    Aronson, H E; Royer, W E; Hendrickson, W A

    1994-10-01

    The globin family of protein structures was the first for which it was recognized that tertiary structure can be highly conserved even when primary sequences have diverged to a virtually undetectable level of similarity. This principle of structural inertia in molecular evolution is now evident for many other protein families. We have performed a systematic comparison of the sequences and structures of 6 representative hemoglobin subunits as diverse in origin as plants, clams, and humans. Our analysis is based on a 97-residue helical core in common to all 6 structures. Amino acid sequence identities range from 12.4% to 42.3% in pairwise comparisons, and, despite these variations, the maximal RMS deviation in alpha-carbon positions is 3.02 A. Overall, sequence similarity and structural deviation are significantly anticorrelated, with a correlation coefficient of -0.71, but for a set of structures having under 20% pairwise identity, this anticorrelation falls to -0.38, which emphasizes the weak connection between a specific sequence and the tertiary fold. There is substantial variability in structure outside the helical core, and functional characteristics of these globins also differ appreciably. Nevertheless, despite variations in detail that the sequence dissimilarities and functional differences imply, the core structures of these globins remain remarkably preserved. PMID:7849587

  8. Advanced composite structural concepts and material technologies for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Anthony

    1991-01-01

    Structural weight savings using advanced composites have been demonstrated for many years. Most military aircraft today use these materials extensively and Europe has taken the lead in their use in commercial aircraft primary structures. A major inhibiter to the use of advanced composites in the United States is cost. Material costs are high and will remain high relative to aluminum. The key therefore lies in the significant reduction in fabrication and assembly costs. The largest cost in most structures today is assembly. As part of the NASA Advanced Composite Technology Program, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Company has a contract to explore and develop advanced structural and manufacturing concepts using advanced composites for transport aircraft. Wing and fuselage concepts and related trade studies are discussed. These concepts are intended to lower cost and weight through the use of innovative material forms, processes, structural configurations and minimization of parts. The approach to the trade studies and the downselect to the primary wing and fuselage concepts is detailed. The expectations for the development of these concepts is reviewed.

  9. Primary component analysis method and reduction of seismicity parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Qin-Zhong; Lin, Ming-Zhou; Wu, Geng-Feng; Wu, Shao-Chun

    2005-09-01

    In the paper, the primary component analysis is made using 8 seismicity parameters of earthquake frequency N (M l≥3.0), b-value, η-value, A(b)-value, Mf-value, Ac-value, C-value and D-value that reflect the characteristics of magnitude, time and space distribution of seismicity from different respects. By using the primary component analysis method, the synthesis parameter W reflecting the anomalous features of earthquake magnitude, time and space distribution can be gained. Generally, there is some relativity among the 8 parameters, but their variations are different in different periods. The earthquake prediction based on these parameters is not very well. However, the synthesis parameter W showed obvious anomalies before 13 earthquakes (M S≥5.8) occurred in North China, which indicates that the synthesis parameter W can reflect the anomalous characteristics of magnitude, time and space distribution of seismicity better. Other problems related to the conclusions drawn by the primary component analysis method are also discussed.

  10. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  11. CODSTRAN - Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRucture ANalysis) a NASA Lewis Center computer program for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures when subjected to service loads is presented. Organization, capabilities and present status are discussed. Organizational aspects include executive, input, output, analysis and composite mechanics modules. Capabilities include: durability assessment of large structures and complex structural parts from composites, structural response due to static, cyclic, transient impact and thermal loads, and criteria for static, cyclic, and dynamic fracture. At the present state of development some of CODSTRAN's analysis capabilities include composite mechanics, static failures, and lamination residual stresses. An application in which CODSTRAN is used to predict the defect growth in a flat specimen, with a center through-slit under tension is studied. When completed, CODSTRAN will account for geometry and material nonlinearities, environmental effects as well as static, cyclic and dynamic fracture.

  12. Coupled Aerodynamic-Thermal-Structural (CATS) Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Coupled Aerodynamic-Thermal-Structural (CATS) Analysis is a focused effort within the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) program to streamline multidisciplinary analysis of aeropropulsion components and assemblies. Multidisciplinary analysis of axial-flow compressor performance has been selected for the initial focus of this project. CATS will permit more accurate compressor system analysis by enabling users to include thermal and mechanical effects as an integral part of the aerodynamic analysis of the compressor primary flowpath. Thus, critical details, such as the variation of blade tip clearances and the deformation of the flowpath geometry, can be more accurately modeled and included in the aerodynamic analyses. The benefits of this coupled analysis capability are (1) performance and stall line predictions are improved by the inclusion of tip clearances and hot geometries, (2) design alternatives can be readily analyzed, and (3) higher fidelity analysis by researchers in various disciplines is possible. The goals for this project are a 10-percent improvement in stall margin predictions and a 2:1 speed-up in multidisciplinary analysis times. Working cooperatively with Pratt & Whitney, the Lewis CATS team defined the engineering processes and identified the software products necessary for streamlining these processes. The basic approach is to integrate the aerodynamic, thermal, and structural computational analyses by using data management and Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS) based data mapping. Five software products have been defined for this task: (1) a primary flowpath data mapper, (2) a two-dimensional data mapper, (3) a database interface, (4) a blade structural pre- and post-processor, and (5) a computational fluid dynamics code for aerothermal analysis of the drum rotor. Thus far (1) a cooperative agreement has been established with Pratt & Whitney, (2) a Primary Flowpath Data Mapper has been prototyped and delivered to General Electric

  13. Primary structure and tissue distribution of the orphanin FQ precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Nothacker, H P; Reinscheid, R K; Mansour, A; Henningsen, R A; Ardati, A; Monsma, F J; Watson, S J; Civelli, O

    1996-01-01

    The heptadecapeptide orphanin FQ (OFQ) is a recently discovered neuropeptide that exhibits structural features reminiscent of the opioid peptides and that is an endogenous ligand to a G protein-coupled receptor sequentially related to the opioid receptors. We have cloned both the human and rat cDNAs encoding the OFQ precursor proteins, to investigate whether the sequence relationships existing between the opioid and OFQ systems are also found at the polypeptide precursor level, in particular whether the OFQ precursor would encode several bioactive peptides as do the opioid precursors, and to study the regional distribution of OFQ sites of synthesis. The entire precursor protein displays structural homology to the opioid peptide precursors, especially preprodynorphin and preproenkephalin. The predicted amino acid sequence of the OFQ precursor contains a putative signal peptide and one copy of the OFQ sequence flanked by pairs of basic amino acid residues. Carboxyl-terminal to the OFQ sequence, the human and rat precursors contain a stretch of 28 amino acids that is 100% conserved and thus may encode novel bioactive peptides. Two peptides derived from this stretch were synthesized but were found to be unable to activate the OFQ receptor, suggesting that if they are produced in vivo, these peptides would likely recognize receptors different from the OFQ receptor. To begin analyzing the sites of OFQ mRNA synthesis, Northern analysis of human and rat tissues were carried out and showed that the OFQ precursor mRNA is mainly expressed in the brain. In situ hybridization of rat brain slices demonstrated a regional distribution pattern of the OFQ precursor mRNA, which is distinct from that of the opioid peptide precursors. These data confirm that the OFQ system differs from the opioid system at the molecular level, although the OFQ and opioid precursors may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8710930

  14. Partnerships in primary care in Australia: network structure, dynamics and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jenny M; Baeza, Juan I; Alexander, Damon

    2008-07-01

    Partnerships represent a prescriptive form of network governance, based on the idea of cooperation. This article has four aims. The first is to describe why network governance and partnerships are important now, and what one particular example - Primary Care Partnerships - is addressing. The second is to analyse the network structure of two of these partnerships, and the third is to examine network dynamics. The fourth aim is to explore relationships and sustainability over the longer term. Two government-funded and steered partnerships, which were established to increase coordination between primary care services in Victoria, Australia, were examined. Annual interviews at three points in time between 2002 and 2005 were used to explore relationships between organizations within these two partnerships. The structure of two different communication networks, based on contacts for work and contacts for strategic information, were examined using social network analysis. Tracing network structures over time highlighted partnership dynamics. The network structures changed over the three years of the study, but an important constant was the continuing centrality of the independent staff employed to manage the partnerships. Over the longer term, it seems to be more important to fund independent partnership staff, rather than people who connect partnerships to the funding agency. If partnerships are seen as valuable in improving service coordination and health outcomes, then long term rather than just start-up funding support is required. PMID:18472201

  15. Regularized Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun

    2009-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) has been proposed as a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, GSCA may suffer from multi-collinearity, i.e., high correlations among exogenous variables. GSCA has yet no remedy for this problem. Thus, a regularized extension of GSCA is proposed that integrates a ridge…

  16. Milestone 4: Thrust structure concepts and IHM screening Graphite Composite Primary Structure (GCPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-01-01

    The first part of the task was to select up to three promising thrust structure constructions and to select materials for screening tests. Part of the nondestructive evaluation and inspection (NDE/I) and integrated health management (IHM) task is to acquire and develop NDE/I sensor technologies and to integrate those sensors into the full scale test articles which will be produced under the TA2 program. Review of the anticipated fault modes and the available sensor technology data indicates that three sensor technologies should be assessed for the in-situ monitoring of the composite primary structure elements. These are: ultrasonics (dry contact), acoustic emissions, and fiber optics (embedded or attached). In fact, a combination of sensor technologies will be needed to detect and evaluate the fault modes; not only do sensor technology have specific capabilities and applicability, but the three Gr/Ep primary structures being demonstrated under the TA2 effort have differing requirements based on their respective failure modes and designs.

  17. Primary Nocturnal Enuresis: A Structural and Strategic Family Systems Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Teresa B.

    2000-01-01

    Exploration of the literature regarding primary nocturnal enuresis suggests there are various causes including genetic, biological, physiological, and psychological explanations. Treatments typically consist of medication and behavioral intervention. However, it was believed that this enuretic case was caused by psychological trauma. A series of…

  18. Structural Dynamics of Education Reforms and Quality of Primary Education in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyenje, Aida

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines Uganda's recent undertaking to reform her Primary School education System with a focus on the effect of structural dynamics of education reforms and the quality of primary education. Structural dynamics in the context of this study is in reference to the organizational composition of the education system at the government,…

  19. Analysis of primary and secondary influences on spatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Adair, J C; Na, D L; Schwartz, R L; Heilman, K M

    1998-08-01

    When attempting to determine the middle of a line, patients with neglect deviate from true center. Deviation may be induced by perceptual-attentional bias, premotor-intentional bias, or both. Using a video-based apparatus, we decoupled perceptual from premotor influences on line bisection performance in patients with hemispatial neglect to examine (a) the relationship between primary and secondary bias and (b) the relationship of bias type to lesion location. The same video-based procedure was applied to target cancellation to determine if neglect type varied as a function of task. Primary attentional-perceptual bias was found using line bisection in 14/26 subjects, most of whom had lesions involving the posterior hemisphere. Primary premotor-intentional bias on line bisection was more often associated with lesions of frontal-subcortical structures. The neglect type determined by the bisection task agreed with the results of target cancellation in most cases. Secondary bias was determined based upon whether decoupling decreased the magnitude of bisection error (concordant), increased error (discordant), or produced no significant change. Most patients showed a secondary bias, with 12/26 in the discordant group and 11/26 in the concordant group. Discordant secondary bias was more common in premotor-intentional neglect (10/12) than in perceptual-attentional neglect (2/14), whereas concordant bias was more common in the latter group (10/14) compared to the former (1/12). The nonrandom relationship between primary and secondary bias may provide a more detailed description of ways in which anatomically separate components of a cortical network contribute to spatial processing under conditions of perceptuomotor incongruity. PMID:9733554

  20. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  1. Comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Madan, V; Shyamsunder, P; Han, L; Mayakonda, A; Nagata, Y; Sundaresan, J; Kanojia, D; Yoshida, K; Ganesan, S; Hattori, N; Fulton, N; Tan, K-T; Alpermann, T; Kuo, M-C; Rostami, S; Matthews, J; Sanada, M; Liu, L-Z; Shiraishi, Y; Miyano, S; Chendamarai, E; Hou, H-A; Malnassy, G; Ma, T; Garg, M; Ding, L-W; Sun, Q-Y; Chien, W; Ikezoe, T; Lill, M; Biondi, A; Larson, R A; Powell, B L; Lübbert, M; Chng, W J; Tien, H-F; Heuser, M; Ganser, A; Koren-Michowitz, M; Kornblau, S M; Kantarjian, H M; Nowak, D; Hofmann, W-K; Yang, H; Stock, W; Ghavamzadeh, A; Alimoghaddam, K; Haferlach, T; Ogawa, S; Shih, L-Y; Mathews, V; Koeffler, H P

    2016-08-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of myeloid leukemia characterized by differentiation block at the promyelocyte stage. Besides the presence of chromosomal rearrangement t(15;17), leading to the formation of PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha) fusion, other genetic alterations have also been implicated in APL. Here, we performed comprehensive mutational analysis of primary and relapse APL to identify somatic alterations, which cooperate with PML-RARA in the pathogenesis of APL. We explored the mutational landscape using whole-exome (n=12) and subsequent targeted sequencing of 398 genes in 153 primary and 69 relapse APL. Both primary and relapse APL harbored an average of eight non-silent somatic mutations per exome. We observed recurrent alterations of FLT3, WT1, NRAS and KRAS in the newly diagnosed APL, whereas mutations in other genes commonly mutated in myeloid leukemia were rarely detected. The molecular signature of APL relapse was characterized by emergence of frequent mutations in PML and RARA genes. Our sequencing data also demonstrates incidence of loss-of-function mutations in previously unidentified genes, ARID1B and ARID1A, both of which encode for key components of the SWI/SNF complex. We show that knockdown of ARID1B in APL cell line, NB4, results in large-scale activation of gene expression and reduced in vitro differentiation potential. PMID:27063598

  2. Advances in Computational Stability Analysis of Composite Aerospace Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Degenhardt, R.; Araujo, F. C. de

    2010-09-30

    European aircraft industry demands for reduced development and operating costs. Structural weight reduction by exploitation of structural reserves in composite aerospace structures contributes to this aim, however, it requires accurate and experimentally validated stability analysis of real structures under realistic loading conditions. This paper presents different advances from the area of computational stability analysis of composite aerospace structures which contribute to that field. For stringer stiffened panels main results of the finished EU project COCOMAT are given. It investigated the exploitation of reserves in primary fibre composite fuselage structures through an accurate and reliable simulation of postbuckling and collapse. For unstiffened cylindrical composite shells a proposal for a new design method is presented.

  3. Primary gene structure and expression studies of rodent paracellin-1.

    PubMed

    Weber, S; Schlingmann, K P; Peters, M; Nejsum, L N; Nielsen, S; Engel, H; Grzeschik, K H; Seyberth, H W; Gröne, H J; Nüsing, R; Konrad, M

    2001-12-01

    The novel member of the claudin multigene family, paracellin-1/claudin-16, encoded by the gene PCLN1, is a renal tight junction protein that is involved in the paracellular transport of magnesium and calcium in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop. Mutations in human PCLN1 are associated with familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis, an autosomal recessive disease that is characterized by severe renal magnesium and calcium loss. The complete coding sequences of mouse and rat Pcln1 and the murine genomic structure are here presented. Full-length cDNAs are 939 and 1514 bp in length in mouse and rat, respectively, encoding a putative open-reading frame of 235 amino acids in both species with 99% identity. Exon-intron analysis of the human and mouse genes revealed a 100% homology of coding exon lengths and splice-site loci. By radiation hybrid mapping, the murine Pcln1 gene was assigned directly to marker D16Mit133 on mouse chromosome 16 (syntenic to a locus on human chromosome 3q27, which harbors the human PCLN1 gene). Mouse multiple-tissue Northern blot showed Pcln1 expression exclusively in the kidney. The expression profile along the nephron was analyzed by reverse transcriptase-PCR on microdissected nephron segments and immunohistochemistry of rat kidney. Paracellin-1 expression was restricted to distal tubular segments including the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, the distal tubule, and the collecting duct. The identification and characterization of the rodent Pcln1 genes provide the basis for further studies of paracellin-1 function in suitable animal models. PMID:11729235

  4. Magnetic field structure influence on primary electron cusp losses for micro-scale discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Dankongkakul, Ben; Araki, Samuel J.; Wirz, Richard E.

    2014-04-15

    An experimental effort was used to examine the primary electron loss behavior for micro-scale (≲3 cm diameter) discharges. The experiment uses an electron flood gun source and an axially aligned arrangement of ring-cusps to guide the electrons to a downstream point cusp. Measurements of the electron current collected at the point cusp show an unexpectedly complex loss pattern with azimuthally periodic structures. Additionally, in contrast to conventional theory for cusp losses, the overall radii of the measured collection areas are over an order of magnitude larger than the electron gyroradius. Comparing these results to Monte Carlo particle tracking simulations and a simplified analytical analysis shows that azimuthal asymmetries of the magnetic field far upstream of the collection surface can substantially affect the electron loss structure and overall loss area.

  5. CODSTRAN: Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is an integrated computer program being developed for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures subjected to service loads and environments. CODSTRAN is briefly described with respect to organization, capabilities and present status. Application of CODSTRAN current capability to a flat composite laminate with a center slit which was subjected to axial tension loading predicted defect growth which is in good agreement with C-scan ultrasonic test records.

  6. Imaging dendritic spines of rat primary hippocampal neurons using structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; De Luca, Giulia M R; Alatriste González, Diana K; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Xiong, Hui; Krugers, Harm; Manders, Erik M M; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are protrusions emerging from the dendrite of a neuron and represent the primary postsynaptic targets of excitatory inputs in the brain. Technological advances have identified these structures as key elements in neuron connectivity and synaptic plasticity. The quantitative analysis of spine morphology using light microscopy remains an essential problem due to technical limitations associated with light's intrinsic refraction limit. Dendritic spines can be readily identified by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy. However, measuring subtle changes in the shape and size of spines is difficult because spine dimensions other than length are usually smaller than conventional optical resolution fixed by light microscopy's theoretical resolution limit of 200 nm. Several recently developed super resolution techniques have been used to image cellular structures smaller than the 200 nm, including dendritic spines. These techniques are based on classical far-field operations and therefore allow the use of existing sample preparation methods and to image beyond the surface of a specimen. Described here is a working protocol to apply super resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to the imaging of dendritic spines in primary hippocampal neuron cultures. Possible applications of SIM overlap with those of confocal microscopy. However, the two techniques present different applicability. SIM offers higher effective lateral resolution, while confocal microscopy, due to the usage of a physical pinhole, achieves resolution improvement at the expense of removal of out of focus light. In this protocol, primary neurons are cultured on glass coverslips using a standard protocol, transfected with DNA plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins and imaged using SIM. The whole protocol described herein takes approximately 2 weeks, because dendritic spines are imaged after 16-17 days in vitro, when dendritic development is optimal. After completion of the

  7. Primary intramedullary neurocytoma: Case report and literature analysis

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Nicola; Di Bonaventura, Rina; Coli, Antonella; Fernandez, Eduardo; Meglio, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Background: Primary intramedullary neurocytoma is extremely rare. Due to its rarity, it is difficult to collect a wide series in a single institution to perform a survival analysis and give indications about prognosis and treatment. Case Description: Here, we report on a case of a 37-year-old woman with primary intramedullary neurocytoma and perform a systematic statistical analysis of cases reported in the literature. Of 21 articles found, 15 studies and the present case (22 patients) were eligible for the analysis. We studied the impact of age, sex, number of involved levels (≤2 vs. >2), entity of resection, postoperative radiotherapy (RT), proliferation index (Ki67) on the neurological outcome of patients, and on the recurrence of the tumor. Comparison of categorical variables was performed by the χ2 statistic. The Kaplan–Meier curves were plotted to calculate the progression-free survival (PFS) of these patients. P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The 1-year PFS was 95.45% and the 2-year PFS was 86.36%. A gross total resection was associated to a worsening of the neurological function with no impact on the tumor recurrence. Adjuvant RT significantly improved the neurological function. A lower Ki67 was strongly associated with a lower tumor recurrence. Conclusions: We think that the goal of the surgery should be to preserve a good neurological function even if a residual tumor has to be left. Ki67 should be always evaluated due to its impact on the prognosis. Although adjuvant RT significantly improved the neurological function, its role in preventing the tumor recurrence is not clearly defined. PMID:26673057

  8. Neutron activation analysis: A primary method of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Robert R.; Bode, Peter; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A.

    2011-03-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA), based on the comparator method, has the potential to fulfill the requirements of a primary ratio method as defined in 1998 by the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière — Métrologie en Chimie (CCQM, Consultative Committee on Amount of Substance — Metrology in Chemistry). This thesis is evidenced in this paper in three chapters by: demonstration that the method is fully physically and chemically understood; that a measurement equation can be written down in which the values of all parameters have dimensions in SI units and thus having the potential for metrological traceability to these units; that all contributions to uncertainty of measurement can be quantitatively evaluated, underpinning the metrological traceability; and that the performance of NAA in CCQM key-comparisons of trace elements in complex matrices between 2000 and 2007 is similar to the performance of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS), which had been formerly designated by the CCQM as a primary ratio method.

  9. Structural analysis of aligned RNAs.

    PubMed

    Voss, Björn

    2006-01-01

    The knowledge about classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is growing very fast and it is mainly the structure which is the common characteristic property shared by members of the same class. For correct characterization of such classes it is therefore of great importance to analyse the structural features in great detail. In this manuscript I present RNAlishapes which combines various secondary structure analysis methods, such as suboptimal folding and shape abstraction, with a comparative approach known as RNA alignment folding. RNAlishapes makes use of an extended thermodynamic model and covariance scoring, which allows to reward covariation of paired bases. Applying the algorithm to a set of bacterial trp-operon leaders using shape abstraction it was able to identify the two alternating conformations of this attenuator. Besides providing in-depth analysis methods for aligned RNAs, the tool also shows a fairly well prediction accuracy. Therefore, RNAlishapes provides the community with a powerful tool for structural analysis of classes of RNAs and is also a reasonable method for consensus structure prediction based on sequence alignments. RNAlishapes is available for online use and download at http://rna.cyanolab.de. PMID:17020924

  10. Structural Analysis of Communication Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conville, Richard L.

    This paper discusses the question of the legitimacy of applying structural analysis to actual human behavior and illustrates its legitimacy by using the reasoning in an essay by Paul Ricoeur. It then asks if the principles of communication development (obliqueness, exchange, and dying) derived from Helen Keller's experience of communication…

  11. Structural Analysis in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Lewis, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe an applied method of assessing and manipulating environmental factors influencing student behavior. The assessment procedure is called structural analysis (SA) and can be a part of a functional behavioral assessment (FBA) process or a stand-alone set of procedures for teachers to use in their classrooms.…

  12. Primary structure of a structural protein from the cuticle of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed Central

    Højrup, P; Andersen, S O; Roepstorff, P

    1986-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a structural protein isolated from pharate cuticle of the locust Locusta migratoria was determined. The protein has an unusual amino acid composition: 42% of the residues are alanine and only 14 of the 20 common amino acid residues are present. The primary structure consists of regions enriched in particular amino acid residues. The N-terminal region and a region close to the C-terminus are enriched in glycine. The rest of the protein is dominated by alanine, except for two short regions enriched in hydrophilic residues. Almost all the proline residues are situated in the alanine-rich regions in a conserved sequence 'A-A-P-A/V'. An internal duplication has taken place covering most of the protein except for the glycine-rich regions. Owing to the unusual features of the protein a combination of automated Edman degradations and plasma-desorption m.s. was used to determine the complete sequence. The protein does not show sequence homology to other proteins, but proteins divided into regions enriched in the same kind of amino acid residues have been isolated from other insect structures. PMID:3790088

  13. Structural Analysis and Design Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Collier Research and Development Corporation received a one-of-a-kind computer code for designing exotic hypersonic aircraft called ST-SIZE in the first ever Langley Research Center software copyright license agreement. Collier transformed the NASA computer code into a commercial software package called HyperSizer, which integrates with other Finite Element Modeling and Finite Analysis private-sector structural analysis program. ST-SIZE was chiefly conceived as a means to improve and speed the structural design of a future aerospace plane for Langley Hypersonic Vehicles Office. Including the NASA computer code into HyperSizer has enabled the company to also apply the software to applications other than aerospace, including improved design and construction for offices, marine structures, cargo containers, commercial and military aircraft, rail cars, and a host of everyday consumer products.

  14. Beyond Electronic Brochures: An Analysis of Singapore Primary School Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Chun; Soong, Andrew Kheng Fah

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how Singapore primary schools use their web sites, what kind of information is contained in the web sites, and how the information is presented. Based on an analysis of 176 primary school web sites, which represent all but one of the country's primary schools, findings indicate that most of Singapore's primary school…

  15. Analyzing Pre-Service Primary Teachers' Fraction Knowledge Structures through Problem Posing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Cigdem

    2015-01-01

    In this study it was aimed to determine pre-service primary teachers' knowledge structures of fraction through problem posing activities. A total of 90 pre-service primary teachers participated in this study. A problem posing test consisting of two questions was used and the participants were asked to generate as many as problems based on the…

  16. A Structured Model of Video Reproduces Primary Visual Cortical Organisation

    PubMed Central

    Berkes, Pietro; Turner, Richard E.; Sahani, Maneesh

    2009-01-01

    The visual system must learn to infer the presence of objects and features in the world from the images it encounters, and as such it must, either implicitly or explicitly, model the way these elements interact to create the image. Do the response properties of cells in the mammalian visual system reflect this constraint? To address this question, we constructed a probabilistic model in which the identity and attributes of simple visual elements were represented explicitly and learnt the parameters of this model from unparsed, natural video sequences. After learning, the behaviour and grouping of variables in the probabilistic model corresponded closely to functional and anatomical properties of simple and complex cells in the primary visual cortex (V1). In particular, feature identity variables were activated in a way that resembled the activity of complex cells, while feature attribute variables responded much like simple cells. Furthermore, the grouping of the attributes within the model closely parallelled the reported anatomical grouping of simple cells in cat V1. Thus, this generative model makes explicit an interpretation of complex and simple cells as elements in the segmentation of a visual scene into basic independent features, along with a parametrisation of their moment-by-moment appearances. We speculate that such a segmentation may form the initial stage of a hierarchical system that progressively separates the identity and appearance of more articulated visual elements, culminating in view-invariant object recognition. PMID:19730679

  17. The matrix exponential in transient structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon

    1987-01-01

    The primary usefulness of the presented theory is in the ability to represent the effects of high frequency linear response with accuracy, without requiring very small time steps in the analysis of dynamic response. The matrix exponential contains a series approximation to the dynamic model. However, unlike the usual analysis procedure which truncates the high frequency response, the approximation in the exponential matrix solution is in the time domain. By truncating the series solution to the matrix exponential short, the solution is made inaccurate after a certain time. Yet, up to that time the solution is extremely accurate, including all high frequency effects. By taking finite time increments, the exponential matrix solution can compute the response very accurately. Use of the exponential matrix in structural dynamics is demonstrated by simulating the free vibration response of multi degree of freedom models of cantilever beams.

  18. Efficient Analysis of Complex Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapania, Rakesh K.

    2000-01-01

    Last various accomplishments achieved during this project are : (1) A Survey of Neural Network (NN) applications using MATLAB NN Toolbox on structural engineering especially on equivalent continuum models (Appendix A). (2) Application of NN and GAs to simulate and synthesize substructures: 1-D and 2-D beam problems (Appendix B). (3) Development of an equivalent plate-model analysis method (EPA) for static and vibration analysis of general trapezoidal built-up wing structures composed of skins, spars and ribs. Calculation of all sorts of test cases and comparison with measurements or FEA results. (Appendix C). (4) Basic work on using second order sensitivities on simulating wing modal response, discussion of sensitivity evaluation approaches, and some results (Appendix D). (5) Establishing a general methodology of simulating the modal responses by direct application of NN and by sensitivity techniques, in a design space composed of a number of design points. Comparison is made through examples using these two methods (Appendix E). (6) Establishing a general methodology of efficient analysis of complex wing structures by indirect application of NN: the NN-aided Equivalent Plate Analysis. Training of the Neural Networks for this purpose in several cases of design spaces, which can be applicable for actual design of complex wings (Appendix F).

  19. Foundational dendritic processing that is independent of the cell type-specific structure in model primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojeong; Heckman, C J

    2015-11-16

    It has long been known that primary neurons in the brain and spinal cord exhibit very distinctive dendritic structures. However, it remains unclear whether dendritic processing for signal propagation and channel activation over dendrites is a function of the cell type-specific dendritic structure. By applying an extended analysis of signal attenuation for the physiological distributions of synaptic inputs and active channels on dendritic branches, we first demonstrate that regardless of their specific structure, all anatomically reconstructed models of primary neurons display a similar pattern of directional signal attenuation and locational channel activation over their dendrites. Then, using a novel modeling approach that allows direct comparison of the anatomically reconstructed primary neurons with their reduced models that exclusively retain anatomical dendritic signaling without being associated with structural specificity, we show that the reduced model can accurately predict dendritic excitability of the anatomical model in both passive and active mode. These results indicate that the directional signaling, locational excitability and their relationship are foundational features of dendritic processing that are independent of the cell type-specific structure across primary neurons. PMID:26463670

  20. Structural analysis of vibroacoustical processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gromov, A. P.; Myasnikov, L. L.; Myasnikova, Y. N.; Finagin, B. A.

    1973-01-01

    The method of automatic identification of acoustical signals, by means of the segmentation was used to investigate noises and vibrations in machines and mechanisms, for cybernetic diagnostics. The structural analysis consists of presentation of a noise or vibroacoustical signal as a sequence of segments, determined by the time quantization, in which each segment is characterized by specific spectral characteristics. The structural spectrum is plotted as a histogram of the segments, also as a relation of the probability density of appearance of a segment to the segment type. It is assumed that the conditions of ergodic processes are maintained.

  1. Structured Functional Principal Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Greven, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  2. Structured functional principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Greven, Sonja

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  3. Modelling the structural controls of primary kaolinite formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, R. L.; Glass, H. J.

    2016-09-01

    An abundance of kaolinite was formed within the St. Austell outcrop of the Cornubian batholith in Cornwall, southwest England, by the hydrous dissolution of feldspar crystals. The permeability of Cornish granites is low and alteration acts pervasively from discontinuity features, with montmorillonite recognised as an intermediate assemblage in partially kaolinised material. Structural features allowed fluids to channel through the impermeable granite and pervade deep into the rock. Areas of high structural control are hypothesised to link well with areas of advanced alteration. As kaolinisation results in a loss of competence, we present a method of utilising discontinuity orientations from nearby unaltered granites alongside the local tectonic history to calculate strain rates and delineate a discrete fracture network. Simulation of the discrete fracture network is demonstrated through a case study at Higher Moor, where kaolinite is actively extracted from a pit. Reconciliation of fracture connectivity and permeability against measured subsurface data show that higher values of modelled properties match with advanced kaolinisation observed in the field. This suggests that the technique may be applicable across various industries and disciplines.

  4. The primary structure of hemoglobin D from the Aldabra giant tortoise, Geochelone gigantea.

    PubMed

    Shishikura, Fumio

    2002-02-01

    The complete primary structures of alpha D-2- and beta-globin of hemoglobin D (Hb D) from the Aldabra giant tortoise, Geochelone gigantea, have been constructed by amino acid sequencing analysis in assistance with nucleotide sequencing analysis of PCR fragments amplified using degenerate oligonucleotide primers. Using computer-assisted sequence comparisons, the alpha D-2-globin shared a 92.0% sequence identity versus alpha D-globin of Geochelone carbonaria, a 75.2% versus alpha D-globin of Aves (Rhea americana) and a 62.4% versus alpha A-globin of Hb A expressed in adult red blood cells of Geochelone gigantea. Additionally, judging from their primary structures, an identical beta-globin was common to the two hemoglobin components, Hb A and Hb D. The alpha D-2- and beta-globin genes contained the three-exon and two-intron configurations and showed the characteristic of all functional vertebrate hemoglobin genes except an abnormal GC dinucleotide instead of the invariant GT at the 5' end of the second intron sequence. The introns of alpha D-2-globin gene were both small (224-bp/first intron, 227-bp/second intron) such that they were quite similar to those of adult alpha-type globins; the beta-globin gene has one small intron (approximately 130-bp) and one large intron (approximately 1590-bp). A phylogenetic tree constructed on primary structures of 7 alpha D-globins from Reptilia (4 species of turtles, 2 species of squamates, and 1 species of sphenodontids) and two embryonic alpha-like globins from Aves (Gullus gullus) and Mammals (Homo sapiens) showed the following results: (1) alpha D-globins except those of squamates were clustered, in which Sphenodon punctatus was a closer species to birds than turtles; (2) separation of the alpha A- and alpha D-globin genes occurred approximately 250 million years ago after the embryonic alpha-type globin-genes (pi' and zeta) first split off from the ancestor of alpha-type globin gene family. PMID:12012783

  5. Uncertainty Analysis of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Starnes, James H., Jr.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    2000-01-01

    A two-phase approach and a computational procedure are presented for predicting the variability in the nonlinear response of composite structures associated with variations in the geometric and material parameters of the structure. In the first phase, hierarchical sensitivity analysis is used to identify the major parameters, which have the most effect on the response quantities of interest. In the second phase, the major parameters are taken to be fuzzy parameters, and a fuzzy set analysis is used to determine the range of variation of the response, associated with preselected variations in the major parameters. The effectiveness of the procedure is demonstrated by means of a numerical example of a cylindrical panel with four T-shaped stiffeners and a circular cutout.

  6. Organizational structure and the delivery of primary care to older Americans.

    PubMed Central

    Zinn, J S; Mor, V

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how internal factors, such as organizational size, mission, ownership, and managerial communication and control structures, affect the delivery of primary care to older Americans across a wide variety of practice settings: ambulatory practices, hospitals, nursing homes, and home healthcare agencies. DESIGN: Use of the structure/process/outcome paradigm and contingency theory to examine the empirical research linking structural factors to outcomes. CONCLUSION: Using these studies as a background, we consider the implications for the provision of primary care to older Americans including the impact of evolving intraorganizational structure in healthcare organization. PMID:9618675

  7. Erroneous gambling-related beliefs as illusions of primary and secondary control: a confirmatory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Ejova, Anastasia; Delfabbro, Paul H; Navarro, Daniel J

    2015-03-01

    Different classification systems for erroneous beliefs about gambling have been proposed, consistently alluding to 'illusion of control' and 'gambler's fallacy' categories. None of these classification systems have, however, considered the how the illusion of control and the gambler's fallacy might be interrelated. In this paper, we report the findings of a confirmatory factor analysis that examines the proposal that most erroneous gambling-related beliefs can be defined in terms of Rothbaum et al.'s (J Pers Soc Psychol, doi: 10.1037/0022-3514.42.1.5 , 1982) distinction between 'primary' and 'secondary' illusory control, with the former being driven to a large extent by the well-known gambler's fallacy and the latter being driven by a complex of beliefs about supernatural forces such as God and luck. A survey consisting of 100 items derived from existing instruments was administered to 329 participants. The analysis confirmed the existence of two latent structures (beliefs in primary and secondary control), while also offering support to the idea that gambler's fallacy-style reasoning may underlie both perceived primary control and beliefs about the cyclical nature of luck, a form of perceived secondary control. The results suggest the need for a greater focus on the role of underlying processes or belief structures as factors that foster susceptibility to specific beliefs in gambling situations. Addressing and recognising the importance of these underlying factors may also have implications for cognitive therapy treatments for problem gambling. PMID:23861012

  8. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Hot-section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the startup and takeoff portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the startup transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable and, in part, because the cyclic elastic-viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies at the basic as well as the applied level. The three key program elements in the HOST structural analysis program are computations, constitutive modeling, and experiments for each research activity. Also shown are tables summarizing each of the activities.

  9. Grid Stiffened Structure Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Grid Stiffened Analysis Tool contract is contract performed by Boeing under NASA purchase order H30249D. The contract calls for a "best effort" study comprised of two tasks: (1) Create documentation for a composite grid-stiffened structure analysis tool, in the form of a Microsoft EXCEL spread sheet, that was developed by originally at Stanford University and later further developed by the Air Force, and (2) Write a program that functions as a NASTRAN pre-processor to generate an FEM code for grid-stiffened structure. In performing this contract, Task 1 was given higher priority because it enables NASA to make efficient use of a unique tool they already have; Task 2 was proposed by Boeing because it also would be beneficial to the analysis of composite grid-stiffened structures, specifically in generating models for preliminary design studies. The contract is now complete, this package includes copies of the user's documentation for Task 1 and a CD ROM & diskette with an electronic copy of the user's documentation and an updated version of the "GRID 99" spreadsheet.

  10. Primary Design and Analysis of Feeder for ITER Poloidal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Mingzhun; Song, Yuntao; Liu, Sumei; Lu, Kun; Wang, Zhongwei

    2011-10-01

    An electromagnetic (EM) analytic model for the PF feeder, applied to ITER and needed to convey the cryogenic supply and electrical power to the PF magnets, was built up. The magnetic flux density and the EM force under the worst conditions with the maximum working current in each coil were then calculated. Based on the EM analysis and theoretical calculation, the relationship between the busbar stress and the distance of neighbouring busbar supports was obtained, which provides an approach to optimize the design of the busbar supports. In order to check the feasibility of the PF feeder structure, a finite element model was built up and the ANSYS code was applied to analyze the stress and displacement. The numerical results show that the stress of the PF feeder is within the allowable limits and the structure is feasible.

  11. Primary structure of the ovine pituitary follitropin beta-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Sairam, M R; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    1981-01-01

    The complete amino acids sequence of the ovine pituitary follitropin beta-subunit was established by studying the tryptic, chymotryptic and thermolytic peptides. The N-terminal sequence of the subunit was confirmed by subjecting the oxidated protein to Edman degradation in an automated sequenator. Automated Edman degradation of the reduced and alkylated (with iodo [14C]acetamide) beta-subunit indicated that most of the molecules used in the sequence studies had lost the N-terminal serine residue. This also confirmed the location of the first five half-cystine residues in the sequence. The proposed structure shows the presence of 111 amino acid residues with the two oligosaccharide moieties linked to asparagine residues located at positions 6 and 23. Heterogeneity occurs at both the termini of the polypeptide chain. Comparison of the sequence of beta-subunit of the ovine hormone with that proposed for human follitropin beta-subunit shows the absence of any deletions in the middle of the peptide chain. Of the 13 replacements, 11 residues can be explained on the basis of a single base change in the codon. The single tryptophan residue of the follitropin occupies an identical position in all the four species that have been studied. The region corresponding to residues 63-105 of the ovine beta-subunit is highly conserved in all the species. PMID:6798969

  12. Altered structural and functional connectivity between the bilateral primary motor cortex in unilateral subcortical stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Kuang-Shi; Ning, Yan-Zhe; Fu, Cai-Hong; Liu, Hong-Wei; Han, Xiao; Cui, Fang-Yuan; Ren, Yi; Zou, Yi-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A large number of functional imaging studies have focused on the understanding of motor-related neural activities after ischemic stroke. However, the knowledge is still limited in the structural and functional changes of the interhemispheric connections of the bilateral primary motor cortices (M1s) and their potential influence on motor function recovery following stroke. Twenty-four stroke patients with right hemispheric subcortical infarcts and 25 control subjects were recruited to undergo multimodal magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Structural impairments between the bilateral M1s were measured by fractional anisotropy. Functional changes of the bilateral M1s were assessed via M1-M1 resting-state functional connectivity. Task-evoked activation analysis was applied to identify the roles of the bilateral hemispheres in motor function recovery. Compared with control subjects, unilateral subcortical stroke patients revealed significantly decreased fractional anisotropy and functional connectivity between the bilateral M1s. Stroke patients also revealed higher activations in multiple brain regions in both hemispheres and that more regions were located in the contralesional hemisphere. This study increased our understanding of the structural and functional alterations between the bilateral M1s that occur in unilateral subcortical stroke and provided further evidence for the compensatory role played by the contralesional hemisphere for these alterations during motor function recovery. PMID:27495109

  13. Molecular cloning and primary structure of human glial fibrillary acidic protein

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, S.A.; Helman, L.J.; Allison, A.; Israel, M.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate-filament (IF) protein that is highly specific for cells of astroglial lineage, although its tissue-specific role is speculative. Determination of the primary structure of this protein should be of importance for understanding the functional role it plays in astroglia. Therefore, the authors isolated a cDNA clone encoding this protein and determined its nucleotide sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence indicates that GFAP shares structural similarities-particularly in the central rod domain and to a lesser degree in the carboxyl-terminal domain-with other IF proteins found in nonepithelial cell types. Considerable sequence divergence in the amino-terminal region of GFAP suggests that the tissue-specific functions of this IF protein might be mediated through this region of the molecule. In contrast, conservation of structural characteristics and a moderate degree of sequence conservation in the carboxyl-terminal region suggest functional similarities. Blot hybridization analysis using the GFAP cDNA as a probe failed to detect GFAP mRNA in both normal and neoplastic human tissues in which IF proteins other than GFAP are known to be expressed.

  14. Probabilistic methods for structural response analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Burnside, O. H.; Cruse, T. A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses current work to develop probabilistic structural analysis methods for integration with a specially developed probabilistic finite element code. The goal is to establish distribution functions for the structural responses of stochastic structures under uncertain loadings. Several probabilistic analysis methods are proposed covering efficient structural probabilistic analysis methods, correlated random variables, and response of linear system under stationary random loading.

  15. Statistical energy analysis of complex structures, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trudell, R. W.; Yano, L. I.

    1980-01-01

    A method for estimating the structural vibration properties of complex systems in high frequency environments was investigated. The structure analyzed was the Materials Experiment Assembly, (MEA), which is a portion of the OST-2A payload for the space transportation system. Statistical energy analysis (SEA) techniques were used to model the structure and predict the structural element response to acoustic excitation. A comparison of the intial response predictions and measured acoustic test data is presented. The conclusions indicate that: the SEA predicted the response of primary structure to acoustic excitation over a wide range of frequencies; and the contribution of mechanically induced random vibration to the total MEA is not significant.

  16. Structural analysis of artificial skin equivalents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Robert; Marx, Ulrich; Walles, Heike; Schober, Lena

    2011-06-01

    Artificial skin equivalents ASEs based on primary fibroblasts and keratinocytes show a high batch variance in their structural and morphological characteristics. Due to biological fluctuations and variable donor age, the growth processes of 3D tissue structure show a non constant quality. Since theses ASEs are used as testing system for chemicals, pharmaceuticals or cosmetics it is of major interest to know detailed and significant characteristics about each individual ASE. Until now, the microscopic analysis process is based on the destructive preparation of histologies allowing only the characterization on a random basis. In this study we present analytical methods to characterise each individual ASE by Optical Coherence Tomography OCT in combination with image processing tools. Therefore, we developed a fully automated OCT device, that performs automatic measurements of microtiter plates MTPs holing the ASEs in a sterile environment. We developed image processing algorithms to characterize the surface structure which may function as an indicator for defects in the epidermal stratum corneum. Further, we analysed the tomographic morphological structure of the ASEs. The results show, that variances in the growth state as well different collagen formation is detectable. In combination with dynamic threshold levels, we found, that OCT is a well suited technology for automatically characterizing artificial skin equivalents and may partly substitute the preparation of histologies.

  17. HOST structural analysis program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johns, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    Hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines are subjected to severe thermal structural loading conditions, especially during the start up and take off portions of the engine cycle. The most severe and damaging stresses and strains are those induced by the steep thermal gradients induced during the start up transient. These transient stresses and strains are also the most difficult to predict, in part because of the temperature gradients and distributions are not well known or readily predictable, and also because the cyclic elastic viscoplastic behavior of the materials at these extremes of temperature and strain are not well known or readily predictable. A broad spectrum of structures related technology programs is underway to address these deficiencies. One element of the structures program is developing improved time varying thermal mechanical load models for the entire engine mission cycle from start up to shutdown. Another major part of the program is the development of new and improved nonlinear 3-D finite elements and associated structural analysis programs, including the development of temporal elements with time dependent properties to account for creep effects in the materials and components.

  18. Professional Learning Communities and Teacher Well-Being? A Comparative Analysis of Primary Schools in England and Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Rosemary; Vulliamy, Graham; Sarja, Anneli; Hamalainen, Seppo; Poikonen, Pirjo-Liisa

    2009-01-01

    The article is a comparative analysis of the policy and practice of professional learning communities (PLCs) in primary schools in England and Finland. The concept of PLC has become a globally fashionable one and has been explicitly advocated in policy documents in both countries. Drawing from a database of qualitative semi-structured interviews…

  19. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Thews, R.L.

    1997-10-01

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Analysis of DCC domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J.; Thews, R.L.

    1997-05-07

    Wavelet-type methods are employed for the analysis of pion field configurations that have been obtained by dynamical simulations in idealized scenarios relevant to the formation of disoriented chiral condensates. It is illustrated how the measurement of the isospin domain structure depends on the ability to zoom in on limited parts of the phase space, due to the interplay between the pion correlation length and the effective source geometry. The need for advanced analysis methods is underscored by the fact that the extracted neutral-fraction distribution would differ significantly from the ideal form, even under perfect experimental conditions, and, moreover, by the circumstance that thermal sources with suitably adjusted temperatures can lead to distributions that may be practically indistinguishable from those arising from DCC-type nonequilibrium evolutions.

  1. Surface topography regulates wnt signaling through control of primary cilia structure in mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, R. J.; Wann, A. K. T.; Thompson, C. L.; Connelly, J. T.; Knight, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The primary cilium regulates cellular signalling including influencing wnt sensitivity by sequestering β-catenin within the ciliary compartment. Topographic regulation of intracellular actin-myosin tension can control stem cell fate of which wnt is an important mediator. We hypothesized that topography influences mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) wnt signaling through the regulation of primary cilia structure and function. MSCs cultured on grooves expressed elongated primary cilia, through reduced actin organization. siRNA inhibition of anterograde intraflagellar transport (IFT88) reduced cilia length and increased active nuclear β-catenin. Conversely, increased primary cilia assembly in MSCs cultured on the grooves was associated with decreased levels of nuclear active β-catenin, axin-2 induction and proliferation, in response to wnt3a. This negative regulation, on grooved topography, was reversed by siRNA to IFT88. This indicates that subtle regulation of IFT and associated cilia structure, tunes the wnt response controlling stem cell differentiation.

  2. Cost analysis of a primary health care centre in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, A. M. Zakir

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the first-ever cost analysis of a primary health care centre in Bangladesh. The aim was to provide information on costs incurred on various health care activities available in a thana health complex, in relation to the number of patients and the intensity of use of services. Overall costs were estimated by examining records and papers and by interviewing staff. Cost apportionment was carried out in three stages. In the first stage, all direct expenditure was calculated for each activity, e.g., wards, outpatient department, tuberculosis services, etc. In the second stage, general service costs, covering water, sanitation, security, and administration were divided among the various services. In the third stage, the costs of laboratory services were distributed according to the number of examinations carried out for each service. The capital costs for 1979 were US$ 36 382, of which 84.6% were incurred on the buildings. Recurrent costs for 1979 were US$ 59 556, i.e., 62% of overall costs, reflecting the labour intensiveness of the health complex. The distribution of the costs among the various health care activities was detailed. It was found that, in general, the cost per unit of activity depended mainly on the intensity of use of the resources, e.g., unit costs incurred in the outpatient department, maternal and child health services, and subcentres were relatively low because of the high rate of utilization of services. This study has demonstrated that it is possible to estimate unit costs in a thana health complex. It is hoped that the methods used here will provide a basis for further work of a similar nature. PMID:6603921

  3. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  4. Primary structure and chain conformation of fucoidan extracted from sea cucumber Holothuria tubulosa.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yaoguang; Hu, Yanfang; Yu, Long; McClements, David Julian; Xu, Xiaoqi; Liu, Guanchen; Xue, Changhu

    2016-01-20

    Knowledge of the structure of polysaccharides is essential for understanding and controlling their functional properties. In this study, fucoidan was extracted from Holothuria tubulosa, a species of sea cucumber that has recently become commercially important. The primary structure of the H. tubulosa fucoidan was clarified using a combination of enzymatic degradation, methylation analysis, and NMR, and its chain conformation was further elucidated by utilizing high performance size exclusion chromatography combined with multiple angle laser light scattering and viscometry. The fucoidan was composed of a tetrafucose repeating unit [ → 3-α-L-Fucp2(OSO3(-))-1 → 3-α-L-Fucp2,4(OSO3(-))-1 → 3-α-L-Fucp-1 → 3-α-L-Fucp2(OSO3(-))-1 → ]. Its sulfate content was determined to be 31.2 ± 1.6% and the weight-average molecular mass was 1567.6 ± 34.1 kDa. The molecule adapted a random coil conformation in 0.15M NaCl solution (pH 7.4) at 25 °C, with a root-mean-square radius of 63.9 ± 1.8 nm and a hydrodynamic radius of 44.5 ± 4.5 nm. This is the first report on the chain conformation of sea cucumber fucoidan. PMID:26572451

  5. ANALYSIS OF PRIORITY POLLUTANTS AT A PRIMARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project investigated the source of priority pollutants, assessment of the wastewater treatment plant, and priority pollutant removal efficiency for a single Soderberg-type primary aluminum plant. Forty-eight hour composite samples were collected from the following streams: (...

  6. Analysis of the dynamics of thin primary mirrors for large astronomical telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Mccann, M.

    1973-01-01

    The NASTRAN structural analysis program was used to investigate the dynamic properties of thin primary mirrors suitable for use in large orbiting astronomical telescopes. An analysis is included of the mode shapes and modal frequencies for several thin, homogeneous, isotropic mirrors. Typical cases include two different mirror diameters, two different diameter-to-thickness ratios, and both a mirror without and a mirror with a central hole that is 22 percent of the mirror diameter. The finite-element structural model is evaluated by comparing the NASTRAN generated results with theoretical values for a simply supported, flat, circular mirror. The same model is then used for evaluating the spherical mirrors. The mode shapes and frequencies of a 0.762-meter-diameter mirror with a 60-to-1 diameter-to-thickness ratio and a three-point rigid kinematic (not overconstrained) mount are calculated and plotted for comparison with results obtained previously from the SAMIS structural analysis program for this same mirror. A static analysis is also shown for comparison with experimentally obtained influence coefficients.

  7. Dimensions and equilibrium structures of the primary component of the nonsynchronous binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathania, A.; Medupe, T.

    2014-01-01

    Rotating stars and stars in the synchronous binaries have been extensively studied in literature. However, there are only few studies that have investigated the problems of the nonsynchronous binaries. In the present paper, we have made an attempt to study the various dimensions and equilibrium structures of the primary component of the nonsynchronous binaries. We have used the first approximation theory of Limber (1963) along with the methodology as that proposed by Mohan and Saxena (1983) for the present study. The objective of this paper is to check the effect of nonsynchronism on the various dimensions and equilibrium structures of the primary components of the binary systems. The results of the present study shows that there is change in the dimensions and equilibrium structures of the primary component of the binary systems due to nonsynchronism, and this change is more appreciable when the difference between the angular velocities of rotation and revolution is large.

  8. Design and evaluation of a foam-filled hat-stiffened panel concept for aircraft primary structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.

    1993-01-01

    Geodesically stiffened structures are very efficient in carrying combined bending, torsion, and pressure loading that is typical of primary aircraft structures. They are also very damage tolerant since there are multiple load paths available to redistribute loads compared to prismatically stiffened structures. Geodesically stiffened structures utilize continuous filament composite materials which make them amenable to automated manufacturing processes to reduce cost. The current practice for geodesically stiffened structures is to use a solid blade construction for the stiffener. This stiffener configuration is not an efficient concept and there is a need to identify other stiffener configurations that are more efficient but utilize the same manufacturing process as the solid blade. This paper describes a foam-filled stiffener cross section that is more efficient than a solid-blade stiffener in the load range corresponding to primary aircraft structures. A prismatic hat-stiffener panel design is then selected for structural evaluation in uni-axial compression with and without impact damage. Experimental results for both single stiffener specimens and multi-stiffener panel specimens are presented. Finite element analysis results are presented that predict the buckling and postbuckling response of the test specimens. Analytical results for both the element and panel specimens are compared with experimental results.

  9. Progress in thermostructural analysis of space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Mahaney, J.; Pandey, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    A finite element space structures research focused on the interdisciplinary problems of heating, thermal, and structural analysis is discussed. Slender member shadowing effects, and cable stiffened structures are described.

  10. STRUCTURAL AND HIDDEN BARRIERS TO A LOCAL PRIMARY HEALTH CARE INFRASTRUCTURE: AUTONOMY, DECISIONS ABOUT PRIMARY HEALTH CARE, AND THE CENTRALITY AND SIGNIFICANCE OF POWER

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Christopher R.; Hansberry, Shantisha T.; Arrieta, Martha I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine a local primary health care infrastructure and the reality of primary health care from the perspective of residents of a small, urban community in the southern United States. Methodology/approach: Data derive from 13 semi-structured focus groups, plus three semi-structured interviews, and were analyzed inductively consistent with a grounded theory approach. Findings: Structural barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure include transportation, clinic and appointment wait time, and co-payments and health insurance. Hidden barriers consist of knowledge about local health care services, non-physician gatekeepers, and fear of medical care. Community residents have used home remedies and the emergency department at the local academic medical center to manage these structural and hidden barriers. Research limitations/implications: Findings might not generalize to primary health care infrastructures in other communities, respondent perspectives can be biased, and the data are subject to various interpretations and conceptual and thematic frameworks. Nevertheless, the structural and hidden barriers to the local primary health care infrastructure have considerably diminished the autonomy community residents have been able to exercise over their decisions about primary health care, ultimately suggesting that efforts concerned with increasing the access of medically underserved groups to primary health care in local communities should recognize the centrality and significance of power. Originality/value: This study addresses a gap in the sociological literature regarding the impact of specific barriers to primary health care among medically underserved groups. PMID:24532864

  11. [Primary prevention of adult obesity. an interdisciplinary analysis].

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Anja; Ried, Jens; Schneider, Daniel; Juttner, Clemens; Sosna, Marc; Dabrock, Peter; Lingenfelder, Michael; Voit, Wolfgang; Rief, Winfried; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2007-10-01

    The primary prevention of adult obesity requires combined efforts by stakeholders at various societal levels, based on the knowledge from multiple disciplines. The goal of the present study was, therefore, to analyze current preventive approaches and delineate implications for future prevention research and practice by integrating knowledge from genetics, law, economics, psychology, and social ethics (Figure 1). Inconclusive evidence on the etiology of obesity, a complex, multifactorial condition, likely complicates prevention, contributing to a lack of specificity regarding target groups, focus, and techniques of prevention. Given the urgency and significance of the "obesity problem" that requires immediate and effective solutions, it is recommended that the various existing and developing prevention programs are evaluated to ensure orientation at current risk factor research. Results from genetic risk factor research can be used as a rationale to increase specificity of preventive measures regarding identification of high-risk groups, timing, and goals of prevention. Further, it is important to evaluate prevention programs for systematic application of behavior modification techniques and consideration of individual risk factors and resources to ensure promotion of long-term behavior change that leads to weight maintenance and a reduction of incidence rates of obesity in adults (Figure 3). Although the primary prevention of childhood obesity may lead to a reduction of incidence rates of obesity in adults, high rates of adult-onset obesity and the related medical and psychosocial sequelae in adulthood underscore the necessity of preventive efforts for adults. Concerning the environmental basis of obesity prevention, in many countries, the institutional and legal framework of preventive approaches requires further examination in order to improve funding, coordination between multiple stakeholders, and implementation of prevention in the health-care system. Evidence

  12. Primary acoustic signal structure during free falling drop collision with a water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    Consistent optical and acoustic techniques have been used to study the structure of hydrodynamic disturbances and acoustic signals generated as a free falling drop penetrates water. The relationship between the structures of hydrodynamic and acoustic perturbations arising as a result of a falling drop contacting with the water surface and subsequent immersion into water is traced. The primary acoustic signal is characterized, in addition to stably reproduced features (steep leading edge followed by long decay with local pressure maxima), by irregular high-frequency packets, which are studied for the first time. Reproducible experimental data are used to recognize constant and variable components of the primary acoustic signal.

  13. Finding the Primary Care Providers in the Specialist-Dominant Primary Care Setting of Korea: A Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Yong; Eun, Sang Jun; Kim, Hyun Joo; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to identify private clinics that have a potential to perform the role of primary care providers (PCPs) in a primary care setting in Korea where private specialists are dominant. Methods The 2013 National Patient Sample claim data of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service in Korea was used. Two-step cluster analysis was performed using characteristics of private clinics, and patient and utilization characteristics of 27,797 private clinics. External validation of clusters was performed by assessing the association among clusters and outcomes of care provided by private clinics. Stability of clusters was cross-validated using discriminant analysis. Results The result classified more than a half of private clinics into a potential PCP cluster. These were private clinics with specialties considered to be those of primary care physicians and were more likely to be located in non-metropolitan areas than specialized PCPs were. Compared to specialized PCPs, they had a higher percentage of pediatric and geriatric patients, patients with greater disease severity, a higher percentage of patients with complex comorbidities or with simple or minor disease groups, a higher number of patients and visits, and the same or higher quality of primary care. The most important factor in explaining variations between PCP clusters was the number of simple or minor disease groups per patient. Conclusion This study identified potential PCPs and suggested the identifying criteria for PCPs. It will provide useful information for formulation of a primary care strengthening policy to policy makers in Korea as well as other countries with similar specialist-dominant primary care settings. PMID:27560181

  14. Analysis investigation of supporting and restraint conditions on the surface deformation of a collimator primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chia-Yen; You, Zhen-Ting; Huang, Bo-Kai; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2015-09-01

    For meeting the requirements of the high-precision telescopes, the design of collimator is essential. The diameter of the collimator should be larger than that of the target for the using of alignment. Special supporting structures are demanded to reduce the deformation of gravity and to control the surface deformation induced by the mounting force when inspecting large-aperture primary mirrors. By using finite element analysis, a ZERODUR® mirror of a diameter of 620 mm will be analyzed to obtain the deformation induced by the supporting structures. Zernike polynomials will also be adopted to fit the optical surface and separate corresponding aberrations. Through the studies under different boundary conditions and supporting positions of the inner ring, it is concluded that the optical performance will be excellent under a strong enough supporter.

  15. Finite element analysis of helicopter structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Application of the finite element analysis is now being expanded to three dimensional analysis of mechanical components. Examples are presented for airframe, mechanical components, and composite structure calculations. Data are detailed on the increase of model size, computer usage, and the effect on reducing stress analysis costs. Future applications for use of finite element analysis for helicopter structures are projected.

  16. Structure of the Primary Cell Walls of Suspension-Cultured Rosa glauca Cells

    PubMed Central

    Joseleau, Jean-Paul; Chambat, Gérard

    1984-01-01

    Xyloglucans, characteristic hemicellulosic polysaccharides of plant primary walls, have been isolated from Rosa glauca suspension-cultured cells. The cell wall material was fractionated by two sequences of extraction based on solubilization of the hemicelluloses in alkaline and organic solvent systems, respectively. In both cases, only a part (about 50%) of the total xyloglucan could be extracted, the rest remaining tightly associated with cellulose and necessitating the use of acid to be solubilized. Purification of xyloglucans was effected by formation of a gel in appropriate mixtures of dimethyl sulfoxide and water. Further fractionation could be achieved on a cellulose column eluted with chaotropic solvents. This demonstrated the heterogeneity of xyloglucans in the primary cell walls. Analytical data show that all fractions are constituted with the same sugars: l-arabinose, l-fucose, d-galactose, d-xylose, and d-glucose, but their relative proportions differ, particularly the ratio of glucose to xylose which varies from 1.2 to 2 within the different xyloglucans. The structure of these hemicelluloses was established by methylation analysis and shown to consist of a (1 → 4)-linked glucan backbone which carries substituents on the O-6 of glucose. Here again, the multiple forms of xyloglucans was suggested by the various patterns of substitutions found on the different fractions. The configuration of the linkages were established by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and shown to be β for the glucan backbone, α for the xylosyl and fucosyl substituents, and β for the galactosyl substituents. These configurations agree with the specific rotation of the xyloglucan. PMID:16663483

  17. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures is a major activity at Lewis Research Center. Recent activities have focused on extending the methods to include the combined uncertainties in several factors on structural response. This paper briefly describes recent progress on composite load spectra models, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic strength degradation modeling. Progress is described in terms of fundamental concepts, computer code development, and representative numerical results.

  18. X-ray fluorescence analysis of iron and manganese distribution in primary dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dučić, Tanja; Barski, Elisabeth; Salome, Murielle; Koch, Jan C; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals have been suggested to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. X-ray microscopy combined with a cryogenic setup is a powerful method for elemental imaging in low concentrations and high resolution in intact cells, eliminating the need for fixation and sectioning of the specimen. Here, we performed an elemental distribution analysis in cultured primary midbrain neurons with a step size in the order of 300 nm and ∼ 0.1 ppm sensitivity under cryo conditions by using X-ray fluorescence microscopy. We report the elemental mappings on the subcellular level in primary mouse dopaminergic (DAergic) and non-DAergic neurons after treatment with transition metals. Application of Fe2+ resulted in largely extracellular accumulation of iron without preference for the neuronal transmitter subtype. A quantification of different Fe oxidation states was performed using X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis. After treatment with Mn2+, a cytoplasmic/paranuclear localization of Mn was observed preferentially in DAergic neurons, while no prominent signal was detectable after Mn3+ treatment. Immunocytochemical analysis correlated the preferential Mn uptake to increased expression of voltage-gated calcium channels in DAergic neurons. We discuss the implications of this differential elemental distribution for the selective vulnerability of DAergic neurons and Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. PMID:23106162

  19. Probabilistic structural analysis methods development for SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The development of probabilistic structural analysis methods is a major part of the SSME Structural Durability Program and consists of three program elements: composite load spectra, probabilistic finite element structural analysis, and probabilistic structural analysis applications. Recent progress includes: (1) the effects of the uncertainties of several factors on the HPFP blade temperature pressure and torque, (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function of structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties on primitive structural variables, and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results obtained demonstrate that the structural durability of critical SSME components can be probabilistically evaluated.

  20. Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Metacognition Scale for Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Eylem; Akpinar, Ercan; Tatar, Nilgun; Ergin, Omer

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the Metacognition Scale (MS) which is designed for primary school students. The sample of the study consisted of 426 primary school students in Izmir, Turkey. In order to examine the construct validity of the MS, exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were performed. For the validity of…

  1. A Qualitative Analysis of School Concept on Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, S. Armagan

    2012-01-01

    Child drawing, known as language of thinking, is as an effective tool of expression as written language. The use of paper, composition, and colors are meaningful for professionals. In this research, it is intended to determine the primary school students' perception of the school and schemas with their drawings of school. Case study which is one…

  2. An Empirical Analysis of Primary Teacher Standards in Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Patrick; Cuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Gillis, Shelley; Thanh, Mai Thi

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an account of the development of competency standards and profiles for primary teachers in Vietnam. The development project has taken more than four years and used a combination of consultative, actuarial, and item response modeling procedures to develop and validate a scale of teacher competence. In the overall project, more…

  3. Job Satisfaction: Factor Analysis of Greek Primary School Principals' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiti, Anna; Fassoulis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors that affect the level of job satisfaction that school principals experience and, based on the findings, to suggest policies or techniques for improving it. Design/methodology/approach: Questionnaires were administered to 180 primary school heads in 13 prefectures--one from each of…

  4. An Efficient Analysis Methodology for Fluted-Core Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremont, Leonard; Schultz, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    The primary loading condition in launch-vehicle barrel sections is axial compression, and it is therefore important to understand the compression behavior of any structures, structural concepts, and materials considered in launch-vehicle designs. This understanding will necessarily come from a combination of test and analysis. However, certain potentially beneficial structures and structural concepts do not lend themselves to commonly used simplified analysis methods, and therefore innovative analysis methodologies must be developed if these structures and structural concepts are to be considered. This paper discusses such an analysis technique for the fluted-core sandwich composite structural concept. The presented technique is based on commercially available finite-element codes, and uses shell elements to capture behavior that would normally require solid elements to capture the detailed mechanical response of the structure. The shell thicknesses and offsets using this analysis technique are parameterized, and the parameters are adjusted through a heuristic procedure until this model matches the mechanical behavior of a more detailed shell-and-solid model. Additionally, the detailed shell-and-solid model can be strategically placed in a larger, global shell-only model to capture important local behavior. Comparisons between shell-only models, experiments, and more detailed shell-and-solid models show excellent agreement. The discussed analysis methodology, though only discussed in the context of fluted-core composites, is widely applicable to other concepts.

  5. Primary malignant chest wall tumors: analysis of 40 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary chest wall tumors originate from different constructions of thoracic wall. We report our multidisciplinary experience on primary thoracic tumor resection and thoracic reconstruction, the need to additional therapy and evaluating prognostic factors affecting survival. Methods We performed a retrospective review of our prospectively maintained database of 40 patients treated for malignant primary chest wall tumor from 1989 to 2009. Patients were evaluated in terms of age, sex, clinical presentation, type of imaging, tissue diagnosis methods, pathology, surgical technique, early complications, hospital mortality, prevalence of recurrence and distant metastases, additional treatment, 3 years survival and factors affecting survival. Results Male/Female (F/M) = 1, with median age of 43.72 years. Mass was the most common symptoms and the soft tissue sarcoma was the most common pathology. Resection without reconstruction was performed in 5 patients and Thirty-five patients (87.5%) had extensive resection and reconstruction with rotatory muscular flap, prosthetic mesh and/or cement. Overall, 12.5% (5/40) of patients received neoadjuvant therapy and 75% (30/40) of patients were treated with adjuvant therapy. The 3-year survival rate was 65%. Recurrences occurred in 24 patients (60%), 14 developed local recurrences, and 10 developed distant metastases. The primary treatment modality for both local and distant recurrences was surgical resection; among them, 10 underwent repeated resection, 9 adjuvant therapy and 5 were treated with lung metastasectomy. The most common site of distant metastasis was lung (n = 7). Factors that affected survival were type of pathology and evidence of distant metastasis. Conclusion Surgery with wide margin is the safe and good technique for treatment of primary chest wall tumors with acceptable morbidity and mortality. PMID:24947314

  6. An Exercise on the Determination of the Primary Structure of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leader, David P.

    1976-01-01

    Describes an exercise that extends the actual determination of the amino acid sequence of a simple dipeptide to the theoretical determination of the complete primary structure of a larger polypeptide. Includes diagrams of display cards and duplicated sheets used in the theoretical portion of the exercise. (CS)

  7. The Effectiveness of Structured Co-Operative Teaching and Learning in Greek Primary School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaldi, Stavroula; Filippatou, Diamanto; Anthopoulou, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses upon the effectiveness of structured co-operative group work on primary school students, aged between 8.5 and 9.5 years old, regarding their content knowledge, attitudes towards co-operative group work, experiential learning and open-ended curriculum as well as students' social and learning behaviour during co-operative…

  8. Resin transfer molding for advanced composite primary wing and fuselage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Alan

    1992-01-01

    The stitching and resin transfer molding (RTM) processes developed at Douglas Aircraft Co. are successfully demonstrating significant cost reductions with good damage tolerance properties. These attributes were identified as critical to application of advanced composite materials to commercial aircraft primary structures. The RTM/stitching developments, cost analyses, and test results are discussed of the NASA Advanced Composites Technology program.

  9. Bifactor Structure of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Marley W.; Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Fourth Edition (WPPSI-IV; Wechsler, 2012) represents a substantial departure from its predecessor, including omission of 4 subtests, addition of 5 new subtests, and modification of the contents of the 5 retained subtests. Wechsler (2012) explicitly assumed a higher-order structure with…

  10. Using the Text Structures of Information Books to Teach Writing in the Primary Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sarah K.; Jones, Cindy D.; Reutzel, D. Ray

    2013-01-01

    Teaching children in the primary grades the text structures and features used by authors of information text has been shown to improve comprehension of information texts and provide the scaffolding and support these children need in order to write their own information texts. As teachers implement the "English Language Arts Common Core State…

  11. Electronic structure of the primary electron donor of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutants : high field EPR study.

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarenko, N. S.; Poluektov, O. G.; Bylina, E. J.; Norris, J. R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-09-01

    High-field electron paramagnetic resonance (HF EPR) has been employed to investigate the primary electron donor electronic structure of Blastochloris viridis heterodimer mutant reaction centers (RCs). In these mutants the amino acid substitution His(M200)Leu or His(L173)Leu eliminates a ligand to the primary electron donor, resulting in the loss of a magnesium in one of the constituent bacteriochlorophylls (BChl). Thus, the native BChl/BChl homodimer primary donor is converted into a BChl/bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) heterodimer. The heterodimer primary donor radical in chemically oxidized RCs exhibits a broadened EPR line indicating a highly asymmetric distribution of the unpaired electron over both dimer constituents. Observed triplet state EPR signals confirm localization of the excitation on the BChl half of the heterodimer primary donor. Theoretical simulation of the triplet EPR lineshapes clearly shows that, in the case of mutants, triplet states are formed by an intersystem crossing mechanism in contrast to the radical pair mechanism in wild type RCs. Photooxidation of the mutant RCs results in formation of a BPhe anion radical within the heterodimer pair. The accumulation of an intradimer BPhe anion is caused by the substantial loss of interaction between constituents of the heterodimer primary donor along with an increase in the reduction potential of the heterodimer primary donor D/D{sup +} couple. This allows oxidation of the cytochrome even at cryogenic temperatures and reduction of each constituent of the heterodimer primary donor individually. Despite a low yield of primary donor radicals, the enhancement of the semiquinone-iron pair EPR signals in these mutants indicates the presence of kinetically viable electron donors.

  12. Probabilistic structural analysis methods of hot engine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1989-01-01

    Development of probabilistic structural analysis methods for hot engine structures at Lewis Research Center is presented. Three elements of the research program are: (1) composite load spectra methodology; (2) probabilistic structural analysis methodology; and (3) probabilistic structural analysis application. Recent progress includes: (1) quantification of the effects of uncertainties for several variables on high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFT) turbine blade temperature, pressure, and torque of the space shuttle main engine (SSME); (2) the evaluation of the cumulative distribution function for various structural response variables based on assumed uncertainties in primitive structural variables; and (3) evaluation of the failure probability. Collectively, the results demonstrate that the structural durability of hot engine structural components can be effectively evaluated in a formal probabilistic/reliability framework.

  13. Heterotaxy and complex structural heart defects in a mutant mouse model of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Serena Y.; Rosenthal, Julie; Zhao, Xiao-Qing; Francis, Richard J.; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Sabol, Steven L.; Linask, Kaari L.; Bracero, Luciann; Connelly, Patricia S.; Daniels, Mathew P.; Yu, Qing; Omran, Heymut; Leatherbury, Linda; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2007-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder associated with ciliary defects and situs inversus totalis, the complete mirror image reversal of internal organ situs (positioning). A variable incidence of heterotaxy, or irregular organ situs, also has been reported in PCD patients, but it is not known whether this is elicited by the PCD-causing genetic lesion. We studied a mouse model of PCD with a recessive mutation in Dnahc5, a dynein gene commonly mutated in PCD. Analysis of homozygous mutant embryos from 18 litters yielded 25% with normal organ situs, 35% with situs inversus totalis, and 40% with heterotaxy. Embryos with heterotaxy had complex structural heart defects that included discordant atrioventricular and ventricular outflow situs and atrial/pulmonary isomerisms. Variable combinations of a distinct set of cardiovascular anomalies were observed, including superior-inferior ventricles, great artery alignment defects, and interrupted inferior vena cava with azygos continuation. The surprisingly high incidence of heterotaxy led us to evaluate the diagnosis of PCD. PCD was confirmed by EM, which revealed missing outer dynein arms in the respiratory cilia. Ciliary dyskinesia was observed by videomicroscopy. These findings show that Dnahc5 is required for the specification of left-right asymmetry and suggest that the PCD-causing Dnahc5 mutation may also be associated with heterotaxy. PMID:18037990

  14. Immobilization of proteins as a tool for studying primary structure around their cysteinyl residues.

    PubMed

    Amarant, T; Bohak, Z

    1981-09-01

    The primary structure around the single cysteinyl residue of chicken pepsin was investigated by binding the protein via this residue to an insoluble carrier. Carriers stable towards reagents used for the fragmentation of proteins and sequence analysis were prepared by coupling a spacer arm to polyN-hydroxymethyl acrylamide using a thioether bond that is potentially cleavable by mercuric ions (1). Phenacyl bromide group, attached to the free end of the spacer, reacted rapidly and specifically with the cysteinyl residue of chicken pepsin. Up to 300 mg of the enzyme were bound to 1 g of carrier.The polymer-bound protein was cleaved by trypsin or by cyanogen bromide or by a sequence of both. Fragments of 40-120 amino acid residues, depending on the method of cleavage, remained attached to the polymer through the cysteinyl residue. The compositions and partial sequences of these fragments revealed that the cysteinyl residue is located within or in the vicinity of a loop in the molecule formed by a disulfide bond. PMID:24233884

  15. Transition metal complexes of 3-amino-1-nitroguanidine as laser ignitible primary explosives: structures and properties.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Niko; Joas, Manuel; Klapötke, Thomas M; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2013-12-01

    3-Amino-1-nitroguanidine (ANQ, 2) was synthesized via hydrazinolysis of nitroguanidine. By dissolving 2 in solutions containing transition metal salts, several complexes M(2+)(ANQ)2X2(H2O)y with M(2+) = Co, Ni, Cu, Zn as well as M(ANQ)2X(H2O)y with M = Ag could be isolated. In these cases, nitrate as well as perchlorate and chloride served as the respective anions X. Additionally, the ANQ complexes of Co, Ni, and Ag with dinitramide as the anion were synthesized from ANQ and silver dinitramide and by reacting the cobalt and nickel ANQ perchlorate complexes with ammonium dinitramide. The crystal structures of all described complexes were determined by low temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Additionally, they were characterized using IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The decomposition temperatures were determined by differential scanning calorimetry and the sensitivities toward impact and friction were assessed using a BAM drophammer and a BAM friction tester (BAM = Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung). Additionally, the sensitivity toward electrostatic discharge was determined on a small-scale ESD device. The potential use of the nitrate, dinitramide and perchlorate containing species as primary explosives was investigated in a laser ignition test. PMID:24236408

  16. Dynamic analysis and design of the SIRTF primary mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Ralph M.; Vukobratovich, Daniel; Pollard, L. Wayne

    1987-01-01

    The criteria and considerations for the design of the support system for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) primary mirror are presented. A flexural-gimbal-baseplate design for the 0.5 m primary mirror was developed. Preliminary studies have indicated that this design may be further improved by replacing the flexures by a post-gimbal system wherein the gimbal design accomodates both the cryogenic cool down effects, the dynamic launch loads, and manufacturing tolerance effects. Additionally, a prestressed baseplate concept had evolved and was presented for the full scale 1.0 m mirror. However, preliminary design studies indicate that this concept will not be required, and the post-gimbal-baseplate design similar to the 0.5 m alternate support system will meet the cryogenic cool down, dynamic launch load criteria, and manufacturing tolerance effects.

  17. Bacteriological analysis of necrotic pulp and fistulae in primary teeth

    PubMed Central

    FABRIS, Antônio Scalco; NAKANO, Viviane; AVILA-CAMPOS, Mario Júlio

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Primary teeth work as guides for the eruption of permanent dentition, contribute for the development of the jaws, chewing process, preparing food for digestion, and nutrient assimilation. Treatment of pulp necrosis in primary teeth is complex due to anatomical and physiological characteristics and high number of bacterial species present in endodontic infections. The bacterial presence alone or in association in necrotic pulp and fistula samples from primary teeth of boys and girls was evaluated. Material and Methods Necrotic pulp (103) and fistula (7) samples from deciduous teeth with deep caries of 110 children were evaluated. Bacterial morphotypes and species from all clinical samples were determined. Results A predominance of gram-positive cocci (81.8%) and gram-negative coccobacilli (49.1%) was observed. In 88 out of 103 pulp samples, a high prevalence of Enterococcus spp. (50%), Porphyromonas gingivalis (49%), Fusobacterium nucleatum (25%) and Prevotella nigrescens (11.4%) was observed. Porphyromonas gingivalis was detected in three out of seven fistula samples, Enterococcus spp. in two out of seven samples, and F. nucleatum, P. nigrescens and D. pneumosintes in one out of seven samples. Conclusions Our results show that Enterococcus spp. and P. gingivalis were prevalent in necrotic pulp from deciduous teeth in boys from 2 to 5 years old, and that care of the oral cavity of children up to five years of age is important. PMID:24676582

  18. Toll-like receptor 4-related immunostimulatory polysaccharides: Primary structure, activity relationships, and possible interaction models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaorui; Qi, Chunhui; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Wenxia; Zhang, Yongxiang

    2016-09-20

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 is an important polysaccharide receptor; however, the relationships between the structures and biological activities of TLR4 and polysaccharides remain unknown. Many recent findings have revealed the primary structure of TLR4/MD-2-related polysaccharides, and several three-dimensional structure models of polysaccharide-binding proteins have been reported; and these models provide insights into the mechanisms through which polysaccharides interact with TLR4. In this review, we first discuss the origins of polysaccharides related to TLR4, including polysaccharides from higher plants, fungi, bacteria, algae, and animals. We then briefly describe the glucosidic bond types of TLR4-related heteroglycans and homoglycans and describe the typical molecular weights of TLR4-related polysaccharides. The primary structures and activity relationships of polysaccharides with TLR4/MD-2 are also discussed. Finally, based on the existing interaction models of LPS with TLR4/MD-2 and linear polysaccharides with proteins, we provide insights into the possible interaction models of polysaccharide ligands with TLR4/MD-2. To our knowledge, this review is the first to summarize the primary structures and activity relationships of TLR4-related polysaccharides and the possible mechanisms of interaction for TLR4 and TLR4-related polysaccharides. PMID:27261743

  19. Metallic and Non-Metallic Materials for the Primary Support Structure

    SciTech Connect

    RA Wolf; RP Corson

    2006-02-21

    The primary support structure (PSS) is required for mechanical support of reactor module (RM) components and mounting of the RM to the spacecraft. The PSS would provide support and accept all loads associated with dynamic (e. g., launch and maneuvering) or thermally induced loading. Prior to termination of NRPCT involvement in Project Prometheus, the NRPCT Mechanical Systems team developed preliminary finite element models to gain a basic understanding of the behavior of the structure, but optimization of the models, specification of the final design, and materials selection were not completed. The Space Plant Materials team had evaluated several materials for potential use in the primary support structure, namely titanium alloys, beryllium, aluminum alloys and carbon-carbon composites. The feasibility of application of each material system was compared based on mass, stiffness, thermal expansion, and ease of fabrication. Due to insufficient data on environmental factors, such as temperatures and radiation, and limited modeling support, a final materials selection was not made.

  20. A Primary Sequence Analysis of the ARGONAUTE Protein Family in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Leal, Daniel; Castillo-Cobián, Amanda; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Isaac; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA (sRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a conserved regulatory mechanism controlling a wide diversity of developmental processes through interactions of sRNAs with proteins of the ARGONAUTE (AGO) family. On the basis of a large phylogenetic analysis that includes 206 AGO genes belonging to 23 plant species, AGO genes group into four clades corresponding to the phylogenetic distribution proposed for the ten family members of Arabidopsis thaliana. A primary analysis of the corresponding protein sequences resulted in 50 sequences of amino acids (blocks) conserved across their linear length. Protein members of the AGO4/6/8/9 and AGO1/10 clades are more conserved than members of the AGO5 and AGO2/3/7 clades. In addition to blocks containing components of the PIWI, PAZ, and DUF1785 domains, members of the AGO2/3/7 and AGO4/6/8/9 clades possess other consensus block sequences that are exclusive of members within these clades, suggesting unforeseen functional specialization revealed by their primary sequence. We also show that AGO proteins of animal and plant kingdoms share linear sequences of blocks that include motifs involved in posttranslational modifications such as those regulating AGO2 in humans and the PIWI protein AUBERGINE in Drosophila. Our results open possibilities for exploring new structural and functional aspects related to the evolution of AGO proteins within the plant kingdom, and their convergence with analogous proteins in mammals and invertebrates.

  1. National program for family planning and primary health care Pakistan: a SWOT analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The National Program for Family Planning and Primary Healthcare was launched in 1994. It is one of the largest community based programs in the world, providing primary healthcare services to about 80 million people, most of which is rural poor. The program has been instrumental in improving health related indicators of maternal and child health in the last two decades. Methods SWOT analysis was used by making recourse to the structure and dynamics of the program as well as searching the literature. SWOT analysis Strengths of the program include: comprehensive design of planning, implementation and supervision mechanisms aided by an MIS, selection and recruitments processes and evidence created through improving health impact indicators. Weaknesses identified are slow progress, poor integration of the program with health services at local levels including MIS, and de-motivational factors such as job insecurity and non-payment of salaries in time. Opportunities include further widening the coverage of services, its potential contribution to health system research, and its use in areas other than health like women empowerment and poverty alleviation. Threats the program may face are: political interference, lack of funds, social threats and implications for professional malpractices. Conclusion Strengthening of the program will necessitate a strong political commitment, sustained funding and a just remuneration to this bare foot doctor of Pakistan, the Lady Health Worker. PMID:24268037

  2. Uncertainty analysis of primary water pollutant control in China's pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zong-guo; Di, Jing-han; Zhang, Xue-ying

    2016-03-15

    The total emission control target of water pollutants (e.g., COD and NH4-N) for a certain industrial sector can be predicted and analysed using the popular technology-based bottom-up modelling. However, this methodology has obvious uncertainty regarding the attainment of mitigation targets. The primary uncertainty comes from macro-production, pollutant reduction roadmap, and technical parameters. This research takes the paper and pulp industry in China as an example, and builds 5 mitigation scenarios via different combinations of raw material structure, scale structure, procedure mitigation technology, and end-of-pipe treatment technology. Using the methodology of uncertainty analysis via Monte Carlo, random sampling was conducted over a hundred thousand times. According to key parameters, sensitive parameters that impact total emission control targets such as industrial output, technique structure, cleaner production technology, and end-of-pipe treatment technology are discussed in this article. It appears that scenario uncertainty has a larger influence on COD emission than NH4-N, hence it is recommended that a looser total emission control target for COD is necessary to increase its feasibility and availability while maintaining the status quo of NH4-N. Consequently, from uncertainty analysis, this research recognizes the sensitive products, techniques, and technologies affecting industrial water pollution. PMID:26722715

  3. Comparative structure and biomechanics of plant primary and secondary cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Jarvis, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent insights into the physical biology of plant cell walls are reviewed, summarizing the essential differences between primary and secondary cell walls and identifying crucial gaps in our knowledge of their structure and biomechanics. Unexpected parallels are identified between the mechanism of expansion of primary cell walls during growth and the mechanisms by which hydrated wood deforms under external tension. There is a particular need to revise current “cartoons” of plant cell walls to be more consistent with data from diverse approaches and to go beyond summarizing limited aspects of cell walls, serving instead as guides for future experiments and for the application of new techniques. PMID:22936943

  4. Higher plant Ca(2+)-ATPase: primary structure and regulation of mRNA abundance by salt.

    PubMed Central

    Wimmers, L E; Ewing, N N; Bennett, A B

    1992-01-01

    Calcium-dependent regulatory mechanisms participate in diverse developmentally, hormonally, and environmentally regulated processes, with the precise control of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration being critical to such mechanisms. In plant cells, P-type Ca(2+)-ATPases localized in the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum are thought to play a central role in regulating cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations. Ca(2+)-ATPase activity has been identified in isolated plant cell membranes, but the protein has not been characterized at the molecular level. We have isolated a partial-length cDNA (LCA1) and a complete genomic clone (gLCA13) encoding a putative endoplasmic reticulum-localized Ca(2+)-ATPase in tomato. The deduced amino acid sequence specifies a protein (Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase) of 1048 amino acids with a molecular mass of 116 kDa, eight probable transmembrane domains, and all of the highly conserved functional domains common to P-type cation-translocating ATPases. In addition, the protein shares approximately 50% amino acid sequence identify with animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases but less than 30% identity with other P-type ATPases. Genomic DNA blot hybridization analysis indicates that the Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase is encoded by a single gene. RNA blot hybridization analysis indicates the presence of three transcript sizes in root tissue and a single, much less abundant, transcript in leaves. Lycopersicon Ca(2+)-ATPase mRNA levels increase dramatically upon a 1-day exposure to 50 mM NaCl. Thus this report describes the primary structure of a higher-plant Ca(2+)-ATPase and the regulation of its mRNA abundance by salt stress. Images PMID:1384045

  5. Structure in Teaching Theory and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, O. Roger

    A theory of structure in teaching is presented and a system of analysis introduced which allows empirical investigation of verbal behavior in the classroom. Two kinds of structure are distinguished: "static" structure, defined as stable organized clusters of knowledge, and "kinetic" structure, defined as the sequential process of building up…

  6. Understanding self-assembled amphiphilic peptide supramolecular structures from primary structure helix propensity.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Martina K; Textor, Marcus; Reimhult, Erik

    2008-08-01

    Small amphiphilic peptides are attractive building blocks to design biocompatible supramolecular structures via self-assembly, with applications in, for example, drug delivery, tissue engineering, and nanotemplating. We address the influence of systematical changes in the amino acid sequence of such peptides on the self-assembled macromolecular structures. For cationic-head surfactant-like eight-residue peptides, the apolar tail amino acids were chosen to systematically vary the propensity to form an alpha-helical secondary structure while conserving the overall hydrophobicity of the sequence. Characterization of the supramolecular structures indicates that for short peptides a beta-sheet secondary structure correlates with ribbonlike assemblies while random-coil and alpha-helical secondary structures correlate with assembly of rods. PMID:18597507

  7. Incentive-Based Primary Care: Cost and Utilization Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Marcus J; Kadlec, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Context: In its fee-for-service funding model for primary care, British Columbia, Canada, introduced incentive payments to general practitioners as pay for performance for providing enhanced, guidelines-based care to patients with chronic conditions. Evaluation of the program was conducted at the health care system level. Objective: To examine the impact of the incentive payments on annual health care costs and hospital utilization patterns in British Columbia. Design: The study used Ministry of Health administrative data for Fiscal Year 2010–2011 for patients with diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and/or hypertension. In each disease group, cost and utilization were compared across patients who did, and did not, receive incentive-based care. Main Outcome Measures: Health care costs (eg, primary care, hospital) and utilization measures (eg, hospital days, readmissions). Results: After controlling for patients’ age, sex, service needs level, and continuity of care (defined as attachment to a general practice), the incentives reduced the net annual health care costs, in Canadian dollars, for patients with hypertension (by approximately Can$308 per patient), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (by Can$496), and congestive heart failure (by Can$96), but not diabetes (incentives cost about Can$148 more per patient). The incentives were also associated with fewer hospital days, fewer admissions and readmissions, and shorter lengths of hospital stays for all 4 groups. Conclusion: Although the available literature on pay for performance shows mixed results, we showed that the funding model used in British Columbia using incentive payments for primary care might reduce health care costs and hospital utilization. PMID:26263389

  8. Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Issues for Large Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. D. (Compiler); Amos, A. K. (Compiler); Venkayya, V. B. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    Topics concerning the modeling, analysis, and optimization of large space structures are discussed including structure-control interaction, structural and structural dynamics modeling, thermal analysis, testing, and design.

  9. Profiling antibody responses by multiparametric analysis of primary B cells.

    PubMed

    Story, Craig M; Papa, Eliseo; Hu, Chih-Chi Andrew; Ronan, Jehnna L; Herlihy, Kara; Ploegh, Hidde L; Love, J Christopher

    2008-11-18

    Determining the efficacy of a vaccine generally relies on measuring neutralizing antibodies in sera. This measure cannot elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the development of immunological memory at the cellular level, however. Quantitative profiles that detail the cellular origin, extent, and diversity of the humoral (antibody-based) immune response would improve both the assessment and development of vaccines. Here, we describe a novel approach to collect multiparametric datasets that describe the specificity, isotype, and apparent affinity of the antibodies secreted from large numbers of individual primary B cells (approximately 10(3)-10(4)). The antibody/antigen binding curves obtained by this approach can be used to classify closely related populations of cells using algorithms for data clustering, and the relationships among populations can be visualized graphically using affinity heatmaps. The technique described was used to evaluate the diversity of antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells generated during an in vivo humoral response to a series of immunizations designed to mimic a multipart vaccination. Profiles correlating primary antibody-producing cells with the molecular characteristics of their secreted antibodies should facilitate both the evaluation of candidate vaccines and, broadly, studies on the repertoires of antibodies generated in response to infectious or autoimmune diseases. PMID:19004776

  10. Structural analysis considerations for wind turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Approaches to the structural analysis of wind turbine blade designs are reviewed. Specifications and materials data are discussed along with the analysis of vibrations, loads, stresses, and failure modes.

  11. Analysis and Design of Fuselage Structures Including Residual Strength Prediction Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to develop and assess methodologies for the design and analysis of fuselage structures accounting for residual strength. Two primary objectives are included in this research activity: development of structural analysis methodology for predicting residual strength of fuselage shell-type structures; and the development of accurate, efficient analysis, design and optimization tool for fuselage shell structures. Assessment of these tools for robustness, efficient, and usage in a fuselage shell design environment will be integrated with these two primary research objectives.

  12. Primary Trait Analysis to Assess a Learner-Centered, Upper-Level Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsardary, Salar; Pontiggia, Laura; Hamid, Mohammed; Blumberg, Phyllis

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a primary trait analysis of a learner-centered, discrete mathematics course based on student-to-student instruction. The authors developed a scoring rubric for the primary traits: conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, application of understanding, and mathematical communication skills. Eleven students took an exam…

  13. Use Root Cause Analysis Teaching Strategy to Train Primary Pre-Service Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chow-chin; Tsai, Chun-wei; Hong, Jon-chao

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the Root Cause Analysis (RCA) teaching strategy on pre-service primary science teachers and instinct pre-service teachers to apply RCA teaching strategy to science curriculums. RCA Teaching Strategy is to coordinates 5 Why Method and Fishbone Diagram. The participants included 18 pre-service primary science teachers and the…

  14. Primary sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma of bone: analysis of a series.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, John B; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Dal Cin, Paola; Bredella, Miriam A; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Hornicek, Francis J; Deshpande, Vikram; Hornick, Jason L; Nielsen, G Petur

    2014-11-01

    Sclerosing epithelioid fibrosarcoma (SEF) is a rare, aggressive malignant neoplasm characterized by small nests and linear arrays of epithelioid cells embedded in a dense collagenous matrix. Very few primary SEFs of bone have been reported. Recognition is critical, as the dense extracellular collagenous matrix can be interpreted as osteoid, leading to misdiagnosis as-osteosarcoma. MUC4 and SATB2 are 2 recently characterized immunohistochemical markers for SEF and osteosarcoma, respectively. In reports to date, osteosarcomas are positive for SATB2 and negative for MUC4, whereas soft tissue SEFs have shown the opposite immunohistochemical profile (SATB2-/MUC4+). The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features of 8 primary SEFs of bone. The patients presented at a wide range of ages (25 to 73 y; median 52 y). Tumors mostly involved long bones of the extremities, with 3 cases involving the femur, 2 involving the ulna, and 1 involving the humerus. Other sites of involvement included the second rib (1) and the C6 vertebra (1). Follow-up information was available for 7 patients, 3 of whom developed metastases within 2 years of diagnosis. The other 4 patients were free of local recurrence or metastases at 1, 5, 12, and >84 months of follow-up, respectively. Radiographically, the tumors were predominantly lytic and poorly marginated. Histologically, 6 tumors showed pure SEF morphology, and 2 showed hybrid SEF/low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma morphology. Focal dystrophic mineralization was seen in 1 case but was limited to areas of necrosis. None of the tumors showed the lace-like pattern of mineralization typical of osteosarcoma. The majority (6/8) of the tumors strongly expressed MUC4. SATB2 was negative in all but 1 case, which showed variable weak to moderate staining in ∼50% of nuclei. In general, the combination of morphology, MUC4 expression, and the absence of SATB2 expression was highly useful in arriving at the

  15. Aero-Structural Interaction, Analysis, and Shape Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., III

    1999-01-01

    A multidisciplinary sensitivity analysis technique that has been shown to be independent of step-size selection is examined further. The accuracy of this step-size independent technique, which uses complex variables for determining sensitivity derivatives, has been previously established. The primary focus of this work is to validate the aero-structural analysis procedure currently being used. This validation consists of comparing computed and experimental data obtained for an Aeroelastic Research Wing (ARW-2). Since the aero-structural analysis procedure has the complex variable modifications already included into the software, sensitivity derivatives can automatically be computed. Other than for design purposes, sensitivity derivatives can be used for predicting the solution at nearby conditions. The use of sensitivity derivatives for predicting the aero-structural characteristics of this configuration is demonstrated.

  16. A corrected primary structure for dog-fish Scylliorhinus caniculus protamine Z3.

    PubMed

    Kouach, M; Jaquinod, M; Belaïche, D; Sautière, P; van Dorsselaer, A; Chevaillier, P; Briand, G

    1993-03-01

    We have redetermined the primary structure for dog-fish protamine using automated amino-acid sequencing associated to mass spectrometry techniques and report, on the basis of these findings, that the previously published amino-acid sequence is incorrect. The correct protamine sequence is 37 amino acids long and differs from the original published sequence by the C-terminal hexapeptide Arg32-Gly-Arg-Arg-Ser-Arg37. PMID:8448201

  17. Quantitative trait loci analysis of primary cell wall composition in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mouille, Grégory; Witucka-Wall, Hanna; Bruyant, Marie-Pierre; Loudet, Olivier; Pelletier, Sandra; Rihouey, Christophe; Lerouxel, Olivier; Lerouge, Patrice; Höfte, Herman; Pauly, Markus

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was used to identify genes underlying natural variation in primary cell wall composition in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The cell walls of dark-grown seedlings of a Bay-0 x Shahdara recombinant inbred line population were analyzed using three miniaturized global cell wall fingerprinting techniques: monosaccharide composition analysis by gas chromatography, xyloglucan oligosaccharide mass profiling, and whole-wall Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy. Heritable variation and transgression were observed for the arabinose-rhamnose ratio, xyloglucan side-chain composition (including O-acetylation levels), and absorbance for a subset of Fourier-transform infrared wavenumbers. In total, 33 QTL, corresponding to at least 11 different loci controlling dark-grown hypocotyl length, pectin composition, and levels of xyloglucan fucosylation and O-acetylation, were identified. One major QTL, accounting for 51% of the variation in the arabinose-rhamnose ratio, affected the number of arabinan side chains presumably attached to the pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan I, paving the way to positional cloning of the first gene underlying natural variation in pectin structure. Several QTL were found to be colocalized, which may have implications for the regulation of xyloglucan metabolism. These results demonstrate the feasibility of combining fingerprinting techniques, natural variation, and quantitative genetics to gain original insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the structure and metabolism of cell wall polysaccharides. PMID:16714406

  18. Coypu insulin. Primary structure, conformation and biological properties of a hystricomorph rodent insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, M; Blundell, T L; Horuk, R; Pitts, J E; Wood, S P; Gowan, L K; Schwabe, C; Wollmer, A; Gliemann, J; Gammeltoft, S

    1986-01-01

    Insulin from a hystricomorph rodent, coypu (Myocaster coypus), was isolated and purified to near homogeneity. Like the other insulins that have been characterized in this Suborder of Rodentia, coypu insulin also exhibits a very low (3%) biological potency, relative to pig insulin, on lipogenesis in isolated rat fat-cells. The receptor-binding affinity is significantly higher (5-8%) in rat fat-cells, in rat liver plasma membranes and in pig liver cells, indicating that the efficacy of coypu insulin on receptors is about 2-fold lower than that of pig insulin. The primary structures of the oxidized A- and B-chains were determined, and our sequence analysis confirms a previous report [Smith (1972) Diabetes 21, Suppl. 2, 457-460] that the C-terminus of the A-chain is extended by a single residue (i.e. aspartate-A22), in contrast with most other insulin sequences, which terminate at residue A21. In spite of a large number of amino acid substitutions (relative to mammalian insulins), computer-graphics model-building studies suggest a similar spatial arrangement for coypu insulin to that for pig insulin. The substitution of the zinc-co-ordinating site (B10-His----Gln) along with various substitutions on the intermolecular surfaces involved in the formation of higher aggregates are consistent with the observation that this insulin is predominantly 'monomeric' in nature. The c.d. spectrum of coypu insulin is relatively similar to those of casiragua insulin and of bovine insulin at low concentration. PMID:3541911

  19. Molecular cloning, primary structure, and expression of the human platelet/erythroleukemia cell 12-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Funk, C D; Furci, L; FitzGerald, G A

    1990-01-01

    The major pathway of arachidonic acid metabolism in human platelets proceeds via a 12-lipoxygenase enzyme; however, the biological role of the product of this reaction, 12-hydro(pero)xyeicosatetraenoic acid [12-H(P)ETE], is unknown. Using a combination of the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures, we have isolated cDNA clones encoding the human platelet/human erythroleukemia (HEL) cell 12-lipoxygenase. From the deduced primary structure, human platelet/HEL 12-lipoxygenase would encode a Mr 75,000 protein consisting of 663 amino acids. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein (pCDNA-121x) under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter was expressed in simian COS-M6 cells. Intact cells and lysed-cell supernatants were able to synthesize 12-H(P)ETE from arachidonic acid, whereas no 12-H(P)ETE synthesis was detected in mock-transfected cells. A single 2.4-kilobase mRNA was detected in erythroleukemia cells but not in several other tissues and cell lines evaluated by Northern blot analysis. Comparison of the human platelet/HEL 12-lipoxygenase sequence with that of porcine leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase revealed 65% amino acid identity to both enzymes. By contrast, the leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase is 86% identical to human reticulocyte 15-lipoxygenase. Sequence data and previously demonstrated immunochemical and biochemical evidence support the existence of distinct 12-lipoxygenase isoforms. The availability of cDNA probes for human platelet/HEL cell 12-lipoxygenase should facilitate elucidation of the biological role of this pathway. Images PMID:2377602

  20. Fast computational methods for predicting protein structure from primary amino acid sequence

    DOEpatents

    Agarwal, Pratul Kumar

    2011-07-19

    The present invention provides a method utilizing primary amino acid sequence of a protein, energy minimization, molecular dynamics and protein vibrational modes to predict three-dimensional structure of a protein. The present invention also determines possible intermediates in the protein folding pathway. The present invention has important applications to the design of novel drugs as well as protein engineering. The present invention predicts the three-dimensional structure of a protein independent of size of the protein, overcoming a significant limitation in the prior art.

  1. [Primary structure of mRNA and translation strategy of eukaryotes].

    PubMed

    Ugarova, T Iu

    1987-01-01

    The diversity of primary structures of cellular and virus mRNAs was considered from the standpoint of their functioning at the initial stops of translation. The number and reciprocal localization of the open translational frames along the mRNAs, and also the number, localization and nucleotides surroundings the initiation codons were analysed. The structural organizations of the polycistronic and other non-canonical forms of native mRNAs, translated in eukaryotic cells, were considered and classified. The possible mechanisms of translation initiation by different forms of mRNAs are discussed. PMID:3309622

  2. Design sensitivity analysis of nonlinear structural response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardoso, J. B.; Arora, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    A unified theory is described of design sensitivity analysis of linear and nonlinear structures for shape, nonshape and material selection problems. The concepts of reference volume and adjoint structure are used to develop the unified viewpoint. A general formula for design sensitivity analysis is derived. Simple analytical linear and nonlinear examples are used to interpret various terms of the formula and demonstrate its use.

  3. Characterizing primary refractory neuroblastoma: prediction of outcome by microscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Weiser, Daniel A.; Pawel, Bruce R.; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2015-03-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that starts in very early forms of nerve cells found in an embryo or fetus. It is a highly lethal cancer of sympathetic nervous system that commonly affects children of age five or younger. It accounts for a disproportionate number of childhood cancer deaths and remains a difficult cancer to eradicate despite intensive treatment that includes chemotherapy, surgery, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, radiation therapy and immunotherapy. A poorly characterized group of patients are the 15% with primary refractory neuroblastoma (PRN) which is uniformly lethal due to de novo chemotherapy resistance. The lack of response to therapy is currently assessed after multiple months of cytotoxic therapy, driving the critical need to develop pretreatment clinic-biological biomarkers that can guide precise and effective therapeutic strategies. Therefore, our guiding hypothesis is that PRN has distinct biological features present at diagnosis that can be identified for prediction modeling. During a visual analysis of PRN slides, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, we observed that patients who survived for less than three years contained large eosin-stained structures as compared to those who survived for greater than three years. So, our hypothesis is that the size of eosin stained structures can be used as a differentiating feature to characterize recurrence in neuroblastoma. To test this hypothesis, we developed an image analysis method that performs stain separation, followed by the detection of large structures stained with Eosin. On a set of 21 PRN slides, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, our image analysis method predicted the outcome with 85.7% accuracy.

  4. Enzymatic properties and primary structures of hyaluronidases from two species of lionfish (Pterois antennata and Pterois volitans).

    PubMed

    Kiriake, Aya; Madokoro, Mihoko; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2014-08-01

    Lionfish are representative venomous fish, having venomous glandular tissues in dorsal, pelvic and anal spines. Some properties and primary structures of proteinaceous toxins from the venoms of three species of lionfish, Pterois antennata, Pterois lunulata and Pterois volitans, have so far been clarified. Our recent survey established the presence of hyaluronidase, presumably a toxin-spreading factor, in the venoms of P. antennata and P. volitans. This prompted us to examine enzymatic properties and primary structures of lionfish hyaluronidases. The hyaluronidases of P. antennata and P. volitans were shown to be optimally active at pH 6.6, 37°C and 0.1 M NaCl and specifically active against hyaluronan. These enzymatic properties are almost the same as those of stonefish hyaluronidases. The primary structures (483 amino acid residues) of the lionfish hyaluronidases were elucidated by a cDNA cloning strategy using degenerate primers designed from the reported amino acid sequences of the stonefish hyaluronidases. Both lionfish hyaluronidases share as high as 99.6% of sequence identity with each other and also considerably high identities (72-77%) with the stonefish hyaluronidases but rather low identities (25-40%) with other hyaluronidases from mammals and venomous animals. In consistent with this, phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that the lionfish hyaluronidases, together with the stonefish hyaluronidases, form a cluster independently of other hyaluronidases. Nevertheless, the lionfish hyaluronidases as well as the stonefish hyaluronidases almost maintain structural features (active site, glyco_hydro_56 domain and cysteine location) observed in other hyaluronidases. PMID:24395601

  5. Imbalance between Goals and Organizational Structure in Primary Health Care in Iran- a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    ZANGANEH BAYGI, Mehdi; SEYEDIN, Hesam

    2013-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the main focus of health sector reforms in Iran is the family physician and referral system plan. Fundamental changes in the goals and strategies, has increased the necessity of the need to reform the organizational structure. This study tries to review and summarize all cases about the organizational structure of Iran and its challenges in primary health care system. Methods: This study was a systematic review of published and grey literature. We searched the relevant databases, bibliography of related papers, and laws, using appropriate search strategies and key words. The CASP tool was used by two experts to evaluate the quality of retrieved papers and inconsistencies were resolved by discussion. Results: After removal of duplicate citations, a total of 52 titles were identified through database searching, among which 30 met the inclusion criteria. Considering the research quality criteria, 14 papers were recognized qualified, which were categorized into two groups of: articles and policies. The results showed ineffectiveness of the current organizational structure at different level. The majority of the papers recommend performing reforms in the system because of changes in goals and strategies. Also, some suggest an appropriate information system to be designed in the current structures. Centralization and delegation process are the main discussions for the studies. Conclusion: Because of fundamental changes in goals and strategies, reforms in the organizational structure of primary health system in Iran especially in peripheral levels are highly recommended. PMID:24427745

  6. Primary posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty: analysis of different instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intercondylar femoral bone removal during posterior stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) makes many cruciate substituting implant designs less appealing than cruciate retaining implants. Bone stock conservation is considered fundamental in the prevision of future revision surgeries. The purpose of this study was to compare the quantity of intercondylar bone removable during PS housing preparation using three contemporary PS TKA instrumentations. Method We compared different box cutting jigs which were utilized for the PS housing of three popular PS knee prostheses. The bone removal area from every PS box cutting jig was three-dimensionally measured. Results Independently from the implant size, the cutting jig for a specific PS TKA always resected significantly less bone than the others: this difference was statistically significant, especially for small- to medium-sized total knee femoral components. Conclusion This study does not establish a clinical relevance of removing more or less bone at primary TKA, but suggests that if a PS design is indicated, it is preferable to select a model which possibly resects less distal femoral bone. PMID:25037275

  7. Chromosome 16 in primary prostate cancer: a microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Osman, I; Scher, H; Dalbagni, G; Reuter, V; Zhang, Z F; Cordon-Cardo, C

    1997-05-16

    Cytogenetic and molecular genetic analyses of prostate cancer specimens have revealed nonrandom chromosomal deletions, affecting chromosomes 7q, 8p, 10q and 16q. Based on these data, we designed this study to further characterize the altered region(s) on chromosome 16 by evaluating 16 microsatellite markers on a population composed of 32 paired normal and primary prostatic tumor samples. The 16 microsatellites selected mapped to 11 distinct loci on 16q and 5 loci on 16p. No alterations were identified affecting 16p. However, 16 of 31 (51%) informative cases showed molecular alterations in at least one of the loci analyzed on 16q, consisting of 18 deletions and 11 bandshifts. Moreover, most of the deletions clustered at 6 microsatellite loci, mapping to the 16q22.1-23.1 region. Our results suggest that microsatellite alterations on the long arm of chromosome 16 are frequent events in prostate cancer, and that the 16q22.1-23.1 region might harbor a tumor suppressor gene involved in prostate cancer. PMID:9178811

  8. Genotype analysis in Hungarian patients with multiple primary melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hatvani, Zsófia; Brodszky, Valentin; Mazán, Mercédesz; Pintér, Dóra; Hársing, Judit; Tóth, Veronika; Somlai, Beáta; Kárpáti, Sarolta

    2014-05-01

    Multiple primary melanoma patients (MPMps) have better prognosis and are more prone to genetic predisposition than single melanoma patients. We aimed to compare genetic background (CDKN2A, CDK4, MITF, MC1R) of 43 Hungarian MPMps with their clinicopathological data. We observed a higher rate of synchronous first and second melanoma (MM) (49%) and a higher frequency of non-melanoma tumor co-occurrence (42%) than reported previously. CDKN2A mutation frequency was 4.7% (E69G, R99P). We identified a new human MC1R variant (D117G) and reported MC1R variant distributions in Hungarian MMs for the first time. The rare R163Q was exceptionally common among Hungarian MPMps, a variant otherwise frequent in Asia, but not in Europe. MC1R 'R' carriers showed histopathological signs of a more progressive disease than 'r' carriers did; however, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in their second melanomas occurred significantly more frequently. Calculating 5-year overall survival, 'R' carriers showed more unfavourable prognosis (87%) than 'r' carriers did (95%). PMID:24660985

  9. Fourier Analysis and Structure Determination--Part III: X-ray Crystal Structure Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesick, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is single crystal X-ray crystal structure analysis. A common link between the NMR imaging and the traditional X-ray crystal structure analysis is reported. Claims that comparisons aid in the understanding of both techniques. (MVL)

  10. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S. K.

    1991-10-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequence of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  11. Computer applications for engineering/structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslawsky, M.; Samaddar, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    Analysts and organizations have a tendency to lock themselves into specific codes with the obvious consequences of not addressing the real problem and thus reaching the wrong conclusion. This paper discusses the role of the analyst in selecting computer codes. The participation and support of a computation division in modifying the source program, configuration management, and pre- and post-processing of codes are among the subjects discussed. Specific examples illustrating the computer code selection process are described in the following problem areas: soil structure interaction, structural analysis of nuclear reactors, analysis of waste tanks where fluid structure interaction is important, analysis of equipment, structure-structure interaction, analysis of the operation of the superconductor supercollider which includes friction and transient temperature, and 3D analysis of the 10-meter telescope being built in Hawaii. Validation and verification of computer codes and their impact on the selection process are also discussed.

  12. Modal analysis of jointed structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, D. Dane

    2012-01-01

    Structural systems are often composed of multiple components joined together at localized interfaces. Compared to a corresponding monolithic system these interfaces are designed to have little influence on the load carrying capability of the system, and the resulting change in the overall system mass and stiffness is minimal. Hence, under nominal operating conditions the mode shapes and frequencies of the dominant structural modes are relatively insensitive to the presence of the interfaces. However, the energy dissipation in such systems is strongly dependent on the joints. The microslip that occurs at each interface couples together the structural modes of the system and introduces nonlinear damping into the system, effectively altering the observed damping of the structural modes, which can then significantly alter the amplitude of the response at the resonant modal frequencies. This work develops equations of motion for a jointed structure in terms of the structural modal coordinates and implements a reduced-order description of the microslip that occurs at the interface between components. The interface is incorporated into the modal description of the system through an existing decomposition of a series-series Iwan interface model and a continuum approximation for microslip of an elastic rod. The developed framework is illustrated on several examples, including a discrete three degree-of-freedom system as well as the longitudinal deformation of a continuum beam.

  13. Fast Approximate Analysis Of Modified Antenna Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Roy

    1991-01-01

    Abbreviated algorithms developed for fast approximate analysis of effects of modifications in supporting structures upon root-mean-square (rms) path-length errors of paraboloidal-dish antennas. Involves combination of methods of structural-modification reanalysis with new extensions of correlation analysis to obtain revised rms path-length error. Full finite-element analysis, usually requires computer of substantial capacity, necessary only to obtain responses of unmodified structure to known external loads and to selected self-equilibrating "indicator" loads. Responses used in shortcut calculations, which, although theoretically "exact", simple enough to be performed on hand-held calculator. Useful in design, design-sensitivity analysis, and parametric studies.

  14. Efficiency of primary care in rural Burkina Faso. A two-stage DEA analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Providing health care services in Africa is hampered by severe scarcity of personnel, medical supplies and financial funds. Consequently, managers of health care institutions are called to measure and improve the efficiency of their facilities in order to provide the best possible services with their resources. However, very little is known about the efficiency of health care facilities in Africa and instruments of performance measurement are hardly applied in this context. Objective This study determines the relative efficiency of primary care facilities in Nouna, a rural health district in Burkina Faso. Furthermore, it analyses the factors influencing the efficiency of these institutions. Methodology We apply a two-stage Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) based on data from a comprehensive provider and household information system. In the first stage, the relative efficiency of each institution is calculated by a traditional DEA model. In the second stage, we identify the reasons for being inefficient by regression technique. Results The DEA projections suggest that inefficiency is mainly a result of poor utilization of health care facilities as they were either too big or the demand was too low. Regression results showed that distance is an important factor influencing the efficiency of a health care institution Conclusions Compared to the findings of existing one-stage DEA analyses of health facilities in Africa, the share of relatively efficient units is slightly higher. The difference might be explained by a rather homogenous structure of the primary care facilities in the Burkina Faso sample. The study also indicates that improving the accessibility of primary care facilities will have a major impact on the efficiency of these institutions. Thus, health decision-makers are called to overcome the demand-side barriers in accessing health care. PMID:22828358

  15. Structural analysis techniqes for remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    The structural analysis of remotely sensed imagery is defined and basic techniques for implementing the process are described. Structural analysis uses knowledge of the properties of an entity, its parts and their relationships, and the relationships in which it participates at a higher level to locate and recognize objects in a visual scene. The representation of structural knowledge, the development of algorithms for using the knowledge to help analyze an image, and techniques for storage and retrieval of relational models are addressed.

  16. An Analysis of Anthropometric Data on Iranian Primary School Children

    PubMed Central

    Hafezi, R; Mirmohammadi, SJ; Mehrparvar, AH; Akbari, H; Akbari, H

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anthropometric data can be used to identify the physical dimensions of equipment, furniture, etc. The use of furniture that fails to fulfill the anthropometric data of its users has a negative impact on human health. Specific anthropometric dimensions are necessary to design school furniture. Anthropometric data have been measured in many communities especially among schoolchildren. There are different ethnic groups with probably different anthropometric data in Iran, and anthropometric data can change by time, so gathering data about anthropometric dimensions is important. This study was designed to obtain anthropometric dimensions of Iranian children (Fars ethnicity) aged 7–11 years. Methods: In a cross-sectional study in Yazd, Iran, descriptive statistics as well as key percentiles for 17 static anthropometric data of primary school students (1015 males and 1015 females), were measured and compared between boys and girls. Results: The age of the students was between 6 and 11 years. Mean weight was between 21.56±5.33 kg and 36.63±9.45 kg in boys and between 20.79±3.48 kg and 35.88±9.40 kg in girls. Mean height was between 1187/02±53.98 mm and 1420.83± 69.39 mm in boys and between 1173.90±51.01mm and 1421.27±70.82 mm in girls. There was also some difference in other anthropometric data between two genders. Conclusion: Results of this study showed some differences in anthropometric data with other studies. We also observed significant gender differences in some dimensions as well. PMID:23113041

  17. Probabilistic structural analysis by extremum methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nafday, Avinash M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to demonstrate discrete extremum methods of structural analysis as a tool for structural system reliability evaluation. Specifically, linear and multiobjective linear programming models for analysis of rigid plastic frames under proportional and multiparametric loadings, respectively, are considered. Kinematic and static approaches for analysis form a primal-dual pair in each of these models and have a polyhedral format. Duality relations link extreme points and hyperplanes of these polyhedra and lead naturally to dual methods for system reliability evaluation.

  18. Formation mechanism of primary phases and eutectic structures within undercooled Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Dai, Fuping; Wei, Bingbo

    2007-08-01

    The solidification characteristics of three types of Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys with different primary phases were studied under substantial undercooling conditions. The experimental results show that primary (Pb) and SbSn phases grow in the dendritic mode, whereas primary (Sb) phase exhibits faceted growth in the form of polygonal blocks and long strips. (Pb) solid solution phase displays strong affinity with SbSn intermetallic compound so that they produce various morphologies of pseudobinary eutectics, but it can only grow in the divorced eutectic mode together with (Sb) phase. Although (Sb) solid solution phase and SbSn intermetallic compound may grow cooperatively within ternary eutectic microstructures, they seldom form pseudobinary eutectics independently. The (Pb)+(Sb)+SbSn ternary eutectic structure usually shows lamellar morphology, but appears as anomalous eutectic when its volume fraction becomes small. EDS analyses reveal that all of the three primary (Pb), (Sb) and SbSn phases exhibit conspicuous solute trapping effect during rapid solidification, which results in the remarkable extension of solute solubility.

  19. Structure of Cellulose Microfibrils in Primary Cell Walls from Collenchyma1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lynne H.; Forsyth, V. Trevor; Šturcová, Adriana; Kennedy, Craig J.; May, Roland P.; Altaner, Clemens M.; Apperley, David C.; Wess, Timothy J.; Jarvis, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    In the primary walls of growing plant cells, the glucose polymer cellulose is assembled into long microfibrils a few nanometers in diameter. The rigidity and orientation of these microfibrils control cell expansion; therefore, cellulose synthesis is a key factor in the growth and morphogenesis of plants. Celery (Apium graveolens) collenchyma is a useful model system for the study of primary wall microfibril structure because its microfibrils are oriented with unusual uniformity, facilitating spectroscopic and diffraction experiments. Using a combination of x-ray and neutron scattering methods with vibrational and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that celery collenchyma microfibrils were 2.9 to 3.0 nm in mean diameter, with a most probable structure containing 24 chains in cross section, arranged in eight hydrogen-bonded sheets of three chains, with extensive disorder in lateral packing, conformation, and hydrogen bonding. A similar 18-chain structure, and 24-chain structures of different shape, fitted the data less well. Conformational disorder was largely restricted to the surface chains, but disorder in chain packing was not. That is, in position and orientation, the surface chains conformed to the disordered lattice constituting the core of each microfibril. There was evidence that adjacent microfibrils were noncovalently aggregated together over part of their length, suggesting that the need to disrupt these aggregates might be a constraining factor in growth and in the hydrolysis of cellulose for biofuel production. PMID:23175754

  20. Thermal/structural analysis of a transpiration cooled nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.; Thompson, Jon E.; Babcock, Dale A.; Gray, Carl E., Jr.; Mouring, Chris A.

    1992-01-01

    The 8-foot High Temperature Tunnel (HTT) at LaRC is a combustion driven, high enthalpy blow down wind tunnel. In Mar. 1991, during check out of the transpiration cooled nozzle, pieces of platelets were found in the tunnel test section. It was determined that incorrect tolerancing between the platelets and the housing was the primary cause of the platelet failure. An analysis was performed to determine the tolerance layout between the platelets and the housing to meet the structural and performance criteria under a range of thermal, pressure, and bolt preload conditions. Three recommendations resulted as a product of this analysis.

  1. Mass spectrometry for pectin structure analysis.

    PubMed

    Ralet, Marie-Christine; Lerouge, Patrice; Quéméner, Bernard

    2009-09-28

    Pectin are extremely complex biopolymers made up of different structural domains. Enzymatic degradation followed by purification and structural analysis of the degradation products proved to be efficient tools for the understanding of pectin fine structure, including covalent interactions between pectic structural domains or with other cell wall polysaccharides. Due to its high sensitivity, high throughput and capacity to analyze mixtures, mass spectrometry has gained more and more importance as a tool for oligosaccharides structural characterization in the past 10 years. This review will focus on the combined use of mass spectrometry and enzymatic digestion for pectins structural characterization. PMID:19058795

  2. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures: Design/manufacturing concept assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Robert L.; Bayha, Tom D.; Davis, HU; Ingram, J. ED; Shukla, Jay G.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Wing and Fuselage Structural Design/Manufacturing Concepts have been developed and evaluated. Trade studies were performed to determine how well the concepts satisfy the program goals of 25 percent cost savings, 40 percent weight savings with aircraft resizing, and 50 percent part count reduction as compared to the aluminum Lockheed L-1011 baseline. The concepts developed using emerging technologies such as large scale resin transfer molding (RTM), automatic tow placed (ATP), braiding, out-of-autoclave and automated manufacturing processes for both thermoset and thermoplastic materials were evaluated for possible application in the design concepts. Trade studies were used to determine which concepts carry into the detailed design development subtask.

  3. Evaluation of Pactruss design characteristics critical to space station primary structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, John M.

    1987-01-01

    Several aspects of the possible application of the Pactruss concept to the primary truss structure of the space station are investigated. Estimates are made of the loads and hinge moments in deploying diagonal members as full deployment is approached. Included are the effects of beam columning and compliance of the surrounding structure. Requirements for joint design are suggested and a two-stage mid-diagonal latching hinge concept is described or analyzed. The problems with providing the experimental and theoretical tools needed for assuring reliable synchronous deployment are discussed and a first attempt at high-fidelity analytical simulation with NASTRAN is described. An alternative construction scenario in which the entire dual-keel truss structure is deployed as a single Shuttle payload is suggested.

  4. Regional structural differences across functionally parcellated Brodmann areas of human primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Panchuelo, Rosa-María; Besle, Julien; Mougin, Olivier; Gowland, Penny; Bowtell, Richard; Schluppeck, Denis; Francis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    Ultra-high-field (UHF) MRI is ideally suited for structural and functional imaging of the brain. High-resolution structural MRI can be used to map the anatomical boundaries between functional domains of the brain by identifying changes related to the pattern of myelination within cortical gray matter, opening up the possibility to study the relationship between functional domains and underlying structure in vivo. In a recent study, we demonstrated the correspondence between functional (based on retinotopic mapping) and structural (based on changes in T2(⁎)-weighted images linked to myelination) parcellations of the primary visual cortex (V1) in vivo at 7T (Sanchez-Panchuelo et al., 2012b). Here, we take advantage of the improved BOLD CNR and high spatial resolution achievable at 7T to study regional structural variations across the functionally defined areas within the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in individual subjects. Using a traveling wave fMRI paradigm to map the internal somatotopic representation of the index, middle, and ring fingers in S1, we were able to identify multiple map reversals at the tip and base, corresponding to the boundaries between Brodmann areas 3a, 3b, 1 and 2. Based on high resolution structural MRI data acquired in the same subjects, we inspected these functionally-parcellated Brodmann areas for differences in cortical thickness and MR contrast measures (magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and signal intensity in phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images) that are sensitive to myelination. Consistent area-related differences in cortical thickness and MTR/PSIR measurements were found across subjects. However these measures did not have sufficient sensitivity to allow definition of areal boundaries. PMID:23558101

  5. Static Nonlinear Analysis In Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmati, Ali

    2008-07-08

    Push-over analysis is a simple and applied approach which can be used for estimation of demand responses influenced by earthquake stimulations. The analysis is non-linear static analysis of the structure affected under increasing lateral loads and specifying the displacement--load diagram or structure capacity curve, draw the curve the base shear values and lateral deflection on the roof level of the building will be used. However, for estimation of the real behavior of the structure against earthquake, the non-linear dynamic analysis approaches and various accelerographs should be applied. Of course it should be noted that this approach especially in relation with tall buildings is complex and time consuming. In the article, the different patterns of lateral loading in push-over analysis have been compared with non-linear dynamic analysis approach so that the results represented accordingly. The researches indicated the uniformly--distributed loading is closer to real status.

  6. Design and analysis of composite structures with stress concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbo, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of an analytic procedure which can be used to provide comprehensive stress and strength analysis of composite structures with stress concentrations is given. The methodology provides designer/analysts with a user-oriented procedure which, within acceptable engineering accuracy, accounts for the effects of a wide range of application design variables. The procedure permits the strength of arbitrary laminate constructions under general bearing/bypass load conditions to be predicted with only unnotched unidirectional strength and stiffness input data required. Included is a brief discussion of the relevancy of this analysis to the design of primary aircraft structure; an overview of the analytic procedure with theory/test correlations; and an example of the use and interaction of this strength analysis relative to the design of high-load transfer bolted composite joints.

  7. A space imaging concept based on a 4m structured spun-cast borosilicate monolithic primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, S. C.; Bailey, S. H.; Bauman, S.; Cuerden, B.; Granger, Z.; Olbert, B. H.

    2010-07-01

    Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) tasked The University of Arizona Steward Observatory (UASO) to conduct an engineering study to examine the feasibility of creating a 4m space telescope based on mature borosilicate technology developed at the UASO for ground-based telescopes. UASO has completed this study and concluded that existing launch vehicles can deliver a 4m monolithic telescope system to a 500 km circular orbit and provide reliable imagery at NIIRS 7-8. An analysis of such an imager based on a lightweight, high-performance, structured 4m primary mirror cast from borosilicate glass is described. The relatively high CTE of this glass is used to advantage by maintaining mirror shape quality with a thermal figuring method. Placed in a 290 K thermal shroud (similar to the Hubble Space Telescope), the orbit averaged figure surface error is 6nm rms when earth-looking. Space-looking optical performance shows that a similar thermal conditioning scheme combined with a 270 K shroud achieves primary mirror distortion of 10 nm rms surface. Analysis shows that a 3-point bipod mount will provide launch survivability with ample margin. The primary mirror naturally maintains its shape at 1g allowing excellent end-to-end pre-launch testing with e.g. the LOTIS 6.5m Collimator. The telescope includes simple systems to measure and correct mirror shape and alignment errors incorporating technologies already proven on the LOTIS Collimator. We have sketched a notional earth-looking 4m telescope concept combined with a wide field TMA concept into a DELTA IV or ATLAS 552 EELV fairing. We have combined an initial analysis of launch and space performance of a special light-weighted honeycomb borosilicate mirror (areal density 95 kg/m2) with public domain information on the existing launch vehicles.

  8. NAPS: Network Analysis of Protein Structures.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Broto; Parekh, Nita

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, protein structures have been analysed by the secondary structure architecture and fold arrangement. An alternative approach that has shown promise is modelling proteins as a network of non-covalent interactions between amino acid residues. The network representation of proteins provide a systems approach to topological analysis of complex three-dimensional structures irrespective of secondary structure and fold type and provide insights into structure-function relationship. We have developed a web server for network based analysis of protein structures, NAPS, that facilitates quantitative and qualitative (visual) analysis of residue-residue interactions in: single chains, protein complex, modelled protein structures and trajectories (e.g. from molecular dynamics simulations). The user can specify atom type for network construction, distance range (in Å) and minimal amino acid separation along the sequence. NAPS provides users selection of node(s) and its neighbourhood based on centrality measures, physicochemical properties of amino acids or cluster of well-connected residues (k-cliques) for further analysis. Visual analysis of interacting domains and protein chains, and shortest path lengths between pair of residues are additional features that aid in functional analysis. NAPS support various analyses and visualization views for identifying functional residues, provide insight into mechanisms of protein folding, domain-domain and protein-protein interactions for understanding communication within and between proteins. URL:http://bioinf.iiit.ac.in/NAPS/. PMID:27151201

  9. Ambient modal identification of a primary-secondary structure by Fast Bayesian FFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Siu-Kui; Zhang, Feng-Liang

    2012-04-01

    The Mong Man Wai Building is a seven-storied reinforced concrete structure situated on the campus of the City University of Hong Kong. On its roof a two-storied steel frame has been recently constructed to host a new wind tunnel laboratory. The roof frame and the main building form a primary-secondary structure. The dynamic characteristics of the resulting system are of interest from a structural dynamics point of view. This paper presents work on modal identification of the structure using ambient vibration measurement. An array of tri-axial acceleration data has been obtained using a number of setups to cover all locations of interest with a limited number of sensors. Modal identification is performed using a recently developed Fast Bayesian FFT method. In addition to the most probable modal properties, their posterior uncertainties can also be assessed using the method. The posterior uncertainty of mode shape is assessed by the expected value of the Modal Assurance Criteria (MAC) of the most probable mode shape with a random mode shape consistent with the posterior distribution. The mode shapes of the overall structural system are obtained by assembling those from individual setups using a recently developed least-square method. The identification results reveal a number of interesting features about the structural system and provide important information defining the baseline modal properties of the building. Practical interpretation of the statistics of modal parameters calculated from frequentist and Bayesian context is also discussed.

  10. Sustained Attention in Children with Primary Language Impairment: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebert, Kerry Danahy; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study provides a meta-analysis of the difference between children with primary or specific language impairment (LI) and their typically developing peers on tasks of sustained attention. The meta-analysis seeks to determine whether children with LI demonstrate subclinical deficits in sustained attention and, if so, under what…

  11. Progress in manufacturing large primary aircraft structures using the stitching/RTM process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markus, Alan; Thrash, Patrick; Rohwer, Kim

    1993-01-01

    The Douglas Aircraft/NASA Act contract has been focused over the past three years at developing a materials, manufacturing, and cost base for stitched/Resin Transfer Molded (RTM) composites. The goal of the program is to develop RTM and stitching technology to provide enabling technology for application of these materials in primary aircraft structure with a high degree of confidence. Presented in this paper will be the progress to date in the area of manufacturing and associated cost values of stitched/RTM composites.

  12. Development of RTM and powder prepreg resins for subsonic aircraft primary structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Groleau, Michael R.; Bertram, James L.; Puckett, Paul M.; Maynard, Shawn J.

    1993-01-01

    Dow developed a thermoset resin which could be used to produce composites via the RTM process. The composites formed are useful at 200 F service temperatures after moisture saturation, and are tough systems that are suitable for subsonic aircraft primary structure. At NASA's request, Dow also developed a modified version of the RTM resin system which was suitable for use in producing powder prepreg. In the course of developing the RTM and powder versions of these resins, over 50 different new materials were produced and evaluated.

  13. Using data envelopment analysis to analyse the efficiency of primary care units.

    PubMed

    Deidda, Manuela; Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Francisco; Codagnone, Cristiano; Maghiros, Ioannis

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we analyse the efficiency of primary care centres (PCCs) adopting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) devices, using a new database on primary care centres in the Basque Region in Spain. Using a four-stage Data Envelopment Analysis methodology, we are able to explicitly take into account the role of ICT in affecting the efficiency of primary care centres. We understand that this is the first time that ICT enters into the determination of efficiency of the health sector. The role of exogenous factors is explicitly considered in this analysis and shows that including these variables is not neutral to the efficiency evaluation, but leads to an efficiency indicator that only encompasses the effect of managerial skills. The paper provides some useful policy implications regarding the role of ICT in improving the efficiency of primary care units. PMID:25123457

  14. Primary Structural Variation in Anaplasma marginale Msp2 Efficiently Generates Immune Escape Variants

    PubMed Central

    Paradiso, Lydia; Broschat, Shira L.; Noh, Susan M.; Palmer, Guy H.

    2015-01-01

    Antigenic variation allows microbial pathogens to evade immune clearance and establish persistent infection. Anaplasma marginale utilizes gene conversion of a repertoire of silent msp2 alleles into a single active expression site to encode unique Msp2 variants. As the genomic complement of msp2 alleles alone is insufficient to generate the number of variants required for persistence, A. marginale uses segmental gene conversion, in which oligonucleotide segments from multiple alleles are recombined into the expression site to generate a novel msp2 mosaic not represented elsewhere in the genome. Whether these segmental changes are sufficient to evade a broad antibody response is unknown. We addressed this question by identifying Msp2 variants that differed in primary structure within the immunogenic hypervariable region microdomains and tested whether they represented true antigenic variants. The minimal primary structural difference between variants was a single amino acid resulting from a codon insertion, and overall, the amino acid identity among paired microdomains ranged from 18 to 92%. Collectively, 89% of the expressed structural variants were also antigenic variants across all biological replicates, independent of a specific host major histocompatibility complex haplotype. Biological relevance is supported by the following: (i) all structural variants were expressed during infection of a natural host, (ii) the structural variation observed in the microdomains corresponded to the mean length of variants generated by segmental gene conversion, and (iii) antigenic variants were identified using a broad antibody response that developed during infection of a natural host. The findings demonstrate that segmental gene conversion efficiently generates Msp2 antigenic variants. PMID:26259814

  15. Structural, electronic and optical properties of well-known primary explosive: Mercury fulminate.

    PubMed

    Yedukondalu, N; Vaitheeswaran, G

    2015-11-28

    Mercury Fulminate (MF) is one of the well-known primary explosives since 17th century and it has rendered invaluable service over many years. However, the correct molecular and crystal structures are determined recently after 300 years of its discovery. In the present study, we report pressure dependent structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of MF. Non-local correction methods have been employed to capture the weak van der Waals interactions in layered and molecular energetic MF. Among the non-local correction methods tested, optB88-vdW method works well for the investigated compound. The obtained equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that MF is softer than the well known primary explosives Silver Fulminate (SF), silver azide and lead azide. MF exhibits anisotropic compressibility (b > a > c) under pressure, consequently the corresponding elastic moduli decrease in the following order: C22 > C11 > C33. The structural and mechanical properties suggest that MF is more sensitive to detonate along c-axis (similar to RDX) due to high compressibility of Hg⋯O non-bonded interactions along that axis. Electronic structure and optical properties were calculated including spin-orbit (SO) interactions using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. The calculated TB-mBJ electronic structures of SF and MF show that these compounds are indirect bandgap insulators. Also, SO coupling is found to be more pronounced for 4d and 5d-states of Ag and Hg atoms of SF and MF, respectively. Partial density of states and electron charge density maps were used to describe the nature of chemical bonding. Ag-C bond is more directional than Hg-C bond which makes SF to be more unstable than MF. The effect of SO coupling on optical properties has also been studied and found to be significant for both (SF and MF) of the compounds. PMID:26627968

  16. Structural, electronic and optical properties of well-known primary explosive: Mercury fulminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedukondalu, N.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury Fulminate (MF) is one of the well-known primary explosives since 17th century and it has rendered invaluable service over many years. However, the correct molecular and crystal structures are determined recently after 300 years of its discovery. In the present study, we report pressure dependent structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of MF. Non-local correction methods have been employed to capture the weak van der Waals interactions in layered and molecular energetic MF. Among the non-local correction methods tested, optB88-vdW method works well for the investigated compound. The obtained equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that MF is softer than the well known primary explosives Silver Fulminate (SF), silver azide and lead azide. MF exhibits anisotropic compressibility (b > a > c) under pressure, consequently the corresponding elastic moduli decrease in the following order: C22 > C11 > C33. The structural and mechanical properties suggest that MF is more sensitive to detonate along c-axis (similar to RDX) due to high compressibility of Hg⋯O non-bonded interactions along that axis. Electronic structure and optical properties were calculated including spin-orbit (SO) interactions using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. The calculated TB-mBJ electronic structures of SF and MF show that these compounds are indirect bandgap insulators. Also, SO coupling is found to be more pronounced for 4d and 5d-states of Ag and Hg atoms of SF and MF, respectively. Partial density of states and electron charge density maps were used to describe the nature of chemical bonding. Ag—C bond is more directional than Hg—C bond which makes SF to be more unstable than MF. The effect of SO coupling on optical properties has also been studied and found to be significant for both (SF and MF) of the compounds.

  17. Constraints and restraints in crystal structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    Immirzi, Attilio

    2009-01-01

    The widely used restraint-based approach to structural analysis using diffraction data is critiqued. The convenience of using rigid constraints, through the use of internal coordinates, is discussed. PMID:22477768

  18. Semantic Antinomies and Deep Structure Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber, Ryszard

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses constructions known as semantic antinomies, that is, the paradoxical results of false presuppositions, and how they can be dealt with by means of deep structure analysis. See FL 508 186 for availability. (CLK)

  19. Structural Dynamics and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthman, Briana L.

    2013-01-01

    This project consists of two parts, the first will be the post-flight analysis of data from a Delta IV launch vehicle, and the second will be a Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. Shock and vibration data was collected on WGS-5 (Wideband Global SATCOM- 5) which was launched on a Delta IV launch vehicle. Using CAM (CAlculation with Matrices) software, the data is to be plotted into Time History, Shock Response Spectrum, and SPL (Sound Pressure Level) curves. In this format the data is to be reviewed and compared to flight instrumentation data from previous flights of the same launch vehicle. This is done to ensure the current mission environments, such as shock, random vibration, and acoustics, are not out of family with existing flight experience. In family means the peaks on the SRS curve for WGS-5 are similar to the peaks from the previous flights and there are no major outliers. The curves from the data will then be compiled into a useful format so that is can be peer reviewed then presented before an engineering review board if required. Also, the reviewed data will be uploaded to the Engineering Review Board Information System (ERBIS) to archive. The second part of this project is conducting Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. In 2010, Merritt Island High School partnered with NASA to design, build and launch a CubeSat. The team is now called StangSat in honor of their mascot, the mustang. Over the past few years, the StangSat team has built a satellite and has now been manifested for flight on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch in 2014. To prepare for the final launch, a test flight was conducted in Mojave, California. StangSat was launched on a Prospector 18D, a high altitude rocket made by Garvey Spacecraft Corporation, along with their sister satellite CP9 built by California Polytechnic University. However, StangSat was damaged during an off nominal landing and this project will give beneficial insights into what loads the CubeSat experienced during the crash

  20. Structural arrangement trade study. Volume 3: Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS) and Graphite Composite Primary Structures (GCPS). Addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This volume is the third of a 3 volume set that addresses the structural trade study plan that will identify the most suitable structural configuration for an SSTO winged vehicle capable of delivering 25,000 lbs to a 220 nm circular orbit at 51.6 deg inclination. The most suitable Reusable Hydrogen Composite Tank System (RHCTS), and Graphite Composite Tank System (GCPS) composite materials for intertank, wing and thrust structures are identified. Vehicle resizing charts, selection criteria and back-up charts, parametric costing approach and the finite element method analysis are discussed.

  1. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  2. Research on the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingxu

    2007-12-01

    Large-aperture telescope can be used in surveying battlefield, researching landform, searching object, real-time monitoring, imaging, detecting and identifying spatial targets and so on. A large-aperture telescope for achieving high resolution power is designed to monitor spatial target and image in real time. Real-time monitoring plays an important role in military conflicts. The orbit parameter of object, quantity, geometrical shape parameter and so on can be obtained by detect spatial target. With the development of optical technology, people require larger aperture in optics-electronic (O-E) system. By increasing optical aperture, the ability of collecting light and resolution power in the system can be enhanced. But the support structure of the primary mirror of large-aperture telescope will be a very difficult problem. With the increase of primary mirror aperture, the weight of the primary mirror will become larger than before. The root mean square (rms) of the primary mirror is affected by many factors, such as deadweight, deformation of heat, environment and so on. Due to the primary mirror of telescope is an important component of telescope system. By reducing the weight of primary mirror, precision of the system is ensured. During the designing phase, one can consider the supporting project of the primary mirror synthetically and analyze it roundly according to technical requirement of optical system and the effect factors. The final structural design can be reasonable. In an astronomical telescope, the surface of reflector is an important part for collecting dark radiation of celestial bodies. Its surface shape will have an effect on collecting efficiency of telescope radiant energy directly. So the rms must be very high. Optical system of large aperture, small wavelength and small focus can receive maximal light intensity. For ground-based optical astronomical telescope, the design proposed in the paper can satisfy the requirement of the possible

  3. SPF/DB primary structure for supersonic aircraft (T-38 horizontal stabilizer)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delmundo, A. R.; Mcquilkin, F. T.; Rivas, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    The structural integrity and potential cost savings of superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) titanium structure for future Supersonic Cruise Research (SCR) and military aircraft primary structure applications was demonstrated. Using the horizontal stabilizer of the T-38 aircraft as a baseline, the structure was redesigned to the existing criteria and loads, using SPF/DB titanium technology. The general concept of using a full-depth sandwich structure which is attached to a steel spindle, was retained. Trade studies demonstrated that the optimum design should employ double-truss, sinewave core in the deepest section of the surface, making a transition to single-truss core in the thinner areas at the leading and trailing edges and at the tip. At the extreme thin edges of the surface, the single-truss core was changed to dot core to provide for gas passages during the SPF/DB process. The selected SPF/DB horizontal stabilizer design consisted of a one-piece SPF/DB sinewave truss core panel, a trunnion fitting, and reinforcing straps. The fitting and the straps were mechanically fastened to the SPF/DB panel.

  4. Thermodynamics of greenhouse systems for the northern latitudes: analysis, evaluation and prospects for primary energy saving.

    PubMed

    Bronchart, Filip; De Paepe, Michel; Dewulf, Jo; Schrevens, Eddie; Demeyer, Peter

    2013-04-15

    In Flanders and the Netherlands greenhouse production systems produce economically important quantities of vegetables, fruit and ornamentals. Indoor environmental control has resulted in high primary energy use. Until now, the research on saving primary energy in greenhouse systems has been mainly based on analysis of energy balances. However, according to the thermodynamic theory, an analysis based on the concept of exergy (free energy) and energy can result in new insights and primary energy savings. Therefore in this paper, we analyse the exergy and energy of various processes, inputs and outputs of a general greenhouse system. Also a total system analysis is then performed by linking the exergy analysis with a dynamic greenhouse climate growth simulation model. The exergy analysis indicates that some processes ("Sources") lie at the origin of several other processes, both destroying the exergy of primary energy inputs. The exergy destruction of these Sources is caused primarily by heat and vapour loss. Their impact can be compensated by exergy input from heating, solar radiation, or both. If the exergy destruction of these Sources is reduced, the necessary compensation can also be reduced. This can be accomplished through insulating the greenhouse and making the building more airtight. Other necessary Sources, namely transpiration and loss of CO2, have a low exergy destruction compared to the other Sources. They are therefore the best candidate for "pump" technologies ("vapour heat pump" and "CO2 pump") designed to have a low primary energy use. The combination of these proposed technologies results in an exergy efficient greenhouse with the highest primary energy savings. It can be concluded that exergy analyses add additional information compared to only energy analyses and it supports the development of primary energy efficient greenhouse systems. PMID:23474336

  5. Primary structures of decapod crustacean metallothioneins with special emphasis on freshwater and semi-terrestrial species.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, S N; Pedersen, K L; Højrup, P; Depledge, M H; Knudsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Cadmium injections induced only a single form of metallothionein (MT) in the midgut gland of Potamon potamios, whereas the same treatment induced two isoforms in Astacus astacus. The only difference between the two latter isoforms was that one had an extra N-terminal methionine residue. MT from P. potamios showed structural differences from other decapod crustacean MTs. It contained a Gly-Thr motif at positions 8 and 8a, which had previously been found only in certain vertebrate and molluscan MTs. Furthermore P. potamios MT contained two to three times as many glutamic acid residues as normally found in decapod crustacean MT. The primary structure of MT from the freshwater crayfish A. astacus showed a high degree of sequence identity with MT from other decapod crustaceans, especially the marine astacidean Homarus americanus, although two valine residues were unexpectedly found at positions 8 and 21, where lysine residues are normally found. PMID:8921011

  6. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Emanuel A.; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  7. Topological framework for local structure analysis in condensed matter.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Emanuel A; Han, Jian; Srolovitz, David J

    2015-10-27

    Physical systems are frequently modeled as sets of points in space, each representing the position of an atom, molecule, or mesoscale particle. As many properties of such systems depend on the underlying ordering of their constituent particles, understanding that structure is a primary objective of condensed matter research. Although perfect crystals are fully described by a set of translation and basis vectors, real-world materials are never perfect, as thermal vibrations and defects introduce significant deviation from ideal order. Meanwhile, liquids and glasses present yet more complexity. A complete understanding of structure thus remains a central, open problem. Here we propose a unified mathematical framework, based on the topology of the Voronoi cell of a particle, for classifying local structure in ordered and disordered systems that is powerful and practical. We explain the underlying reason why this topological description of local structure is better suited for structural analysis than continuous descriptions. We demonstrate the connection of this approach to the behavior of physical systems and explore how crystalline structure is compromised at elevated temperatures. We also illustrate potential applications to identifying defects in plastically deformed polycrystals at high temperatures, automating analysis of complex structures, and characterizing general disordered systems. PMID:26460045

  8. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Primary Roots of Brassica napus Seedlings with Extremely Different Primary Root Lengths Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Xiaoling; Tao, Zhangsheng; Wang, Jie; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Primary root (PR) development is a crucial developmental process that is essential for plant survival. The elucidation of the PR transcriptome provides insight into the genetic mechanism controlling PR development in crops. In this study, we performed a comparative transcriptome analysis to investigate the genome-wide gene expression profiles of the seedling PRs of four Brassica napus genotypes that were divided into two groups, short group (D43 and D61), and long group (D69 and D72), according to their extremely different primary root lengths (PRLs). The results generated 55,341,366–64,631,336 clean reads aligned to 62,562 genes (61.9% of the current annotated genes) in the B. napus genome. We provide evidence that at least 44,986 genes are actively expressed in the B. napus PR. The majority of the genes that were expressed during seedling PR development were associated with metabolism, cellular processes, response to stimulus, biological regulation, and signaling. Using a pairwise comparison approach, 509 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; absolute value of log2 fold-change ≥1 and p ≤ 0.05) between the long and short groups were revealed, including phytohormone-related genes, protein kinases and phosphatases, oxygenase, cytochrome P450 proteins, etc. Combining GO functional category, KEGG, and MapMan pathway analyses indicated that the DEGs involved in cell wall metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, secondary metabolism, protein modification and degradation, hormone pathways and signaling pathways were the main causes of the observed PRL differences. We also identified 16 differentially expressed transcription factors (TFs) involved in PR development. Taken together, these transcriptomic datasets may serve as a foundation for the identification of candidate genes and may provide valuable information for understanding the molecular and cellular events related to PR development. PMID:27594860

  9. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Primary Roots of Brassica napus Seedlings with Extremely Different Primary Root Lengths Using RNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Dun, Xiaoling; Tao, Zhangsheng; Wang, Jie; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Primary root (PR) development is a crucial developmental process that is essential for plant survival. The elucidation of the PR transcriptome provides insight into the genetic mechanism controlling PR development in crops. In this study, we performed a comparative transcriptome analysis to investigate the genome-wide gene expression profiles of the seedling PRs of four Brassica napus genotypes that were divided into two groups, short group (D43 and D61), and long group (D69 and D72), according to their extremely different primary root lengths (PRLs). The results generated 55,341,366-64,631,336 clean reads aligned to 62,562 genes (61.9% of the current annotated genes) in the B. napus genome. We provide evidence that at least 44,986 genes are actively expressed in the B. napus PR. The majority of the genes that were expressed during seedling PR development were associated with metabolism, cellular processes, response to stimulus, biological regulation, and signaling. Using a pairwise comparison approach, 509 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; absolute value of log2 fold-change ≥1 and p ≤ 0.05) between the long and short groups were revealed, including phytohormone-related genes, protein kinases and phosphatases, oxygenase, cytochrome P450 proteins, etc. Combining GO functional category, KEGG, and MapMan pathway analyses indicated that the DEGs involved in cell wall metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, secondary metabolism, protein modification and degradation, hormone pathways and signaling pathways were the main causes of the observed PRL differences. We also identified 16 differentially expressed transcription factors (TFs) involved in PR development. Taken together, these transcriptomic datasets may serve as a foundation for the identification of candidate genes and may provide valuable information for understanding the molecular and cellular events related to PR development. PMID:27594860

  10. Different Structural Changes Occur in the Blue- and Green-Absorbing Proteorhodopsin During the Primary Photoreaction†

    PubMed Central

    Amsden, Jason J.; Kralj, Joel M.; Bergo, Vladislav B.; Spudich, Elena N.; Spudich, John L.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the structural changes during the primary photoreaction in blue-absorbing proteorhodopsin (BPR), a light-driven retinylidene proton pump, using low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy. Comparison of the light induced BPR difference spectrum recorded at 80 K to that of green-absorbing proteorhodopsin (GPR) reveals that there are several differences in the BPR and GPR primary photoreactions despite the similar structure of the retinal chromophore and all-trans → 13-cis isomerization. Strong bands near 1700 cm−1 assigned previously to a change in hydrogen bonding of Asn230 in GPR are still present in BPR but in addition bands in the same region are assigned on the basis of site-directed mutagenesis to changes occurring in Gln105. In the amide II region bands are assigned on the basis of total-N15 labeling to structural changes of the protein backbone, although no such bands were previously observed for GPR. A band at 3642 cm−1 in BPR, assigned to the OH stretching mode of a water molecule on the basis of H218O substitution, appears at a different frequency than a band at 3626 cm−1 previously assigned to a water molecule in GPR. However, the substitution of Gln105 for Leu105 in BPR leads to the appearance of both bands at 3642 and 3626 cm−1 indicating the waters assigned in BPR and GPR exist in separate distinct locations and can coexist in the GPR-like Q105L mutant of BPR. These results indicate that there exist significant differences in the conformational changes occurring in these two types proteorhodopsin during the initial photoreaction despite their similar chromophores structures, which might reflect a different arrangement of water in the active site as well as substitution of a hydrophilic for hydrophobic residue at residue 105. PMID:18842006

  11. Impact analysis of composite aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Allan B.; Kushner, Alan S.

    1993-01-01

    The impact analysis of composite aircraft structures is discussed. Topics discussed include: background remarks on aircraft crashworthiness; comments on modeling strategies for crashworthiness simulation; initial study of simulation of progressive failure of an aircraft component constructed of composite material; and research direction in composite characterization for impact analysis.

  12. Structural changes in the photoactive site of proteorhodopsin during the primary photoreaction.

    PubMed

    Bergo, Vladislav; Amsden, Jason J; Spudich, Elena N; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2004-07-20

    Proteorhodopsin (PR), found in marine gamma-proteobacteria, is a newly discovered light-driven proton pump similar to bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Because of the widespread distribution of proteobacteria in the worldwide oceanic waters, this pigment may contribute significantly to the global solar energy input in the biosphere. We examined structural changes that occur during the primary photoreaction (PR --> K) of wild-type pigment and two mutants using low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy. Several vibrations detected in the 3500-3700 cm(-1) region are assigned on the basis of H(2)O --> H(2)(18)O exchange to the perturbation of one or more internal water molecules. Substitution of the negatively charged Schiff base counterion, Asp97, with the neutral asparagine caused a downshift of the ethylenic (C=C) and Schiff base (C=N) stretching modes, in agreement with the 27 nm red shift of the visible lambda(max). However, this replacement did not alter the normal all-trans to 13-cis isomerization of the chromophore or the environment of the detected water molecule(s). In contrast, substitution of Asn230, which is in a position to interact with the Schiff base, with Ala induces a 5 nm red shift of the visible lambda(max) and alters the PR chromophore structure, its isomerization to K, and the environment of the detected internal water molecules. The combination of FTIR and site-directed mutagenesis establishes that both Asp97 and Asn230 are perturbed during the primary phototransition. The environment of Asn230 is further altered during the thermal decay of K. These results suggest that significant differences exist in the conformational changes which occur in the photoactive sites of proteorhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin during the primary photoreaction. PMID:15248764

  13. Primary structure of blood coagulation factor XIIIa (fibrinoligase, transglutaminase) from human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, N; Takahashi, Y; Putnam, F W

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the primary structure of human placental factor XIIIa, an enzyme [fibrinoligase, transglutaminase, fibrin-stabilizing factor, EC 2.3.2.13 (protein-glutamine:amine gamma-glutamyltransferase)] that forms intermolecular isopeptide bonds between fibrin molecules as the last step in blood coagulation. Placental factor XIIIa is an unglycosylated polypeptide chain of 730 amino acid residues (Mr = 83,005) that appears to be identical to the a subunit of the plasma zymogen factor XIII. Ca2+-dependent activation of factor XIIIa by thrombin removes a blocked amino-terminal peptide and unmasks a reactive thiol group at Cys-314. A second specific cleavage after Lys-513 by thrombin inactivates factor XIIIa and produces an amino-terminal 56-kDa fragment and a 24-kDa fragment. The amino acid sequence of factor XIIIa is unique and does not exhibit internal homology, but its active center is similar to that of the thiol proteases. The probable Ca2+-binding site of factor XIIIa has been identified by homology to the high-affinity sites in calmodulins. Knowledge of the primary structure of factor XIIIa will aid elucidation of the mechanism of its enzymatic action and that of the many tissue transglutaminases of which it is the prototype. This will also facilitate production of factor XIIIa by recombinant DNA technology for use in treatment of congenital factor XIII deficiencies and in the postoperative healing of wounds. Images PMID:2877456

  14. Structural Analysis in a Conceptual Design Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Robinson, Jay H.; Eldred, Lloyd B.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic aircraft designers must shape the outer mold line of the aircraft to improve multiple objectives, such as mission performance, cruise efficiency, and sonic-boom signatures. Conceptual designers have demonstrated an ability to assess these objectives for a large number of candidate designs. Other critical objectives and constraints, such as weight, fuel volume, aeroelastic effects, and structural soundness, are more difficult to address during the conceptual design process. The present research adds both static structural analysis and sizing to an existing conceptual design framework. The ultimate goal is to include structural analysis in the multidisciplinary optimization of a supersonic aircraft. Progress towards that goal is discussed and demonstrated.

  15. Hot Flow Anomaly Structure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakov, A.; Vaisberg, O. L.

    2010-12-01

    Hot Flow Anomaly observed on Interball-Tail on 03.14.1996 is investigated. The normal to the interplanetary current sheet interacting with bow shock was determined in assumption of tangential discontinuity. Calculated motional electric field was directed towards current sheet. The bow shock before HFA arrival to the spacecraft was quasi-perpendicular, and was quasi-parallel after HFA passage. Respectively, of the shocks, bracketing HFA, were quasi-perpendicular before HFA passage and quasi-parallel after it. With averaged velocity of plasma within the body of HFA and duration of HFA observation we determined its size in normal to the current sheet direction as ~ 2.5 RE. HFA consists of two regions separated by thin layer with different plasma characteristics. Convection of plasma within HFA, as observed along spacecraft trajectory by subtracting averaged velocity from observed velocities, show that plasma in each of two regions is moving from separating layer. It indicates that separating layer is the site of energy deposition from interaction of the solar wind with ions reflected from the shock. This is confirmed by analysis of ion velocity distributions in this layer.

  16. Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolognese, Jeffrey; Irish, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). A STOP analysis is a multidiscipline analysis, consisting of Structural, Thermal and Optical Performance Analyses, that is performed for all space flight instruments and satellites. This course will explain the different parts of performing this analysis. The student will learn how to effectively interact with each discipline in order to accurately obtain the system analysis results.

  17. Ground-Based Lidar Measurements of Forest Canopy Structure as Predictors of Net Primary Production Across Successional Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, C. M.; Gough, C. M.; Nave, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Forest canopy structure is a key predictor of gas exchange processes that control carbon (C) uptake, including the allocation of photosynthetically fixed C to new plant biomass growth, or net primary production (NPP). Prior work suggests forest canopy structural complexity (CSC), the arrangement of leaves within a volume of canopy, changes as forests develop and is a strong predictor of NPP. However, the expressions of CSC that best predict NPP over decadal to century timescales is unknown. Our objectives were to use multiple remote sensing observations to characterize forest canopy structure in increasing dimensional complexity over a forest age gradient, and to identify which expressions of physical structure best served as proxies of NPP. The study at the University of Michigan Biological Station in Pellston, MI, USA uses two parallel forest chronosequences with different harvesting and fire disturbance histories and includes three old-growth ecosystems varying in canopy composition. We have derived several expressions of 2-D and 3-D forest canopy structure from hemispherical images, a ground-based portable canopy lidar (PCL), and a 3-D terrestrial lidar scanner (TLS), and are relating these structural metrics with NPP and light and nitrogen allocation within the canopy. Preliminary analysis shows that old-growth stands converged on a common mean CSC, but with substantially higher within-stand variation in complexity as deciduous tree species increased in forest canopy dominance. Forest stands that were more intensely disturbed were slower to recover leaf area index (LAI) as they regrew, but 2-D measures of CSC increased similarly as forests aged, regardless of disturbance history. Ongoing work will relate long-term trends in forest CSC with NPP and resource allocation to determine which forest structure remote sensing products are most useful for modeling and scaling C cycling processes through different stages of forest development.

  18. A protein structure data and analysis system.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hao; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Weber, Irene; Wang, Haibin; Yang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a protein structure data and analysis system that is only used in the lab for analyzing the proprietary data. It is capable of storing public protein data, such as the data in Protein Data Bank (PDB) [1], and life scientists' proprietary data. This toolkit is targeted at life scientists who want to maintain proprietary protein structure data (may be incomplete), to search and query publicly known protein structures and to compare their structure data with others. The comparison functions can be used to find structure differences between two proteins at atom level, especially in mutant versions of proteins. The system can also be used as a tool of choosing better protein structure template in new protein's tertiary structure prediction. The system is developed in Java and the protein data is stored in a relational database (Oracle 9i). PMID:17282836

  19. Simultaneous analysis and design. [in structural engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    Optimization techniques are increasingly being used for performing nonlinear structural analysis. The development of element by element (EBE) preconditioned conjugate gradient (CG) techniques is expected to extend this trend to linear analysis. Under these circumstances the structural design problem can be viewed as a nested optimization problem. There are computational benefits to treating this nested problem as a large single optimization problem. The response variables (such as displacements) and the structural parameters are all treated as design variables in a unified formulation which performs simultaneously the design and analysis. Two examples are used for demonstration. A seventy-two bar truss is optimized subject to linear stress constraints and a wing box structure is optimized subject to nonlinear collapse constraints. Both examples show substantial computational savings with the unified approach as compared to the traditional nested approach.

  20. Fuzzy finite element analysis of smart structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Unyime O.; Koko, Tamunoiyala S.; Orisamolu, Irewole R.; Gallant, B. Keith

    2000-06-01

    A fuzzy finite element based approach is developed for modelling smart structures with vague or imprecise uncertainties. Fuzzy sets are used to represent the uncertainties present in the piezoelectric, mechanical, thermal, and physical properties of the smart structure. In order to facilitate efficient computation, a sensitivity analysis procedure is used to streamline the number of input fuzzy variables, and the vertex fuzzy analysis technique is then used to compute the possibility distributions of the responses of the smart structural system. The methodology has been developed within the framework of the SMARTCOM computational tool for the design/analysis of smart composite structures. The methodology developed is found to be accurate and computationally efficient for solution of practical problems.

  1. Static structural analysis of shell-type structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, E. H.; Cappelli, A. P.; Kovalevsky, L.; Rish, F. L.; Verrette, R. M.

    1968-01-01

    Shell analysis manual provides methods for determining static deflections and internal load and stress distributions in shells under various loading conditions, and methods of analyzing static instability of shell structures. Also included are methods for determining the lightest shell wall for various constructions.

  2. Thermo-mechanical cyclic testing of carbon-carbon primary structure for an SSTO vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croop, Harold C.; Leger, Kenneth B.; Lowndes, Holland B.; Hahn, Steven E.; Barthel, Chris A.

    1999-01-01

    An advanced carbon-carbon structural component is being experimentally evaluated for use as primary load carrying structure for future single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicles. The component is a wing torque box section featuring an advanced, three-spar design. This design features 3D-woven, angle-interlock skins, 3D integrally woven spar webs and caps, oxidation inhibited matrix, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) oxidation protection coating, and ceramic matrix composite fasteners. The box spar caps are nested into the skins which, when processed together through the carbon-carbon processing cycle, resulted in monolithic box halves. The box half sections were then joined at the spar web intersections using ceramic matrix composite fasteners. This method of fabrication eliminated fasteners through both the upper and lower skins. Development of the carbon-carbon wing box structure was accomplished in a four phase design and fabrication effort, conducted by Boeing, Information, Space and Defense Systems, Seattle, WA, under contract to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The box is now set up for testing and will soon begin cyclic loads testing in the AFRL Structural Test Facility at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), OH. This paper discusses the latest test setup accomplishments and the results of the pre-cyclic loads testing performed to date.

  3. Primary structure and solution conditions determine conformational ensemble properties of intrinsically disordered proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Hsuan-Han Alberto

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are a class of proteins that do not exhibit well-defined three-dimensional structures. The absence of structure is intrinsic to their amino acid sequences, which are characterized by low hydrophobicity and high net charge per residue compared to folded proteins. Contradicting the classic structure-function paradigm, IDPs are capable of interacting with high specificity and affinity, often acquiring order in complex with protein and nucleic acid binding partners. This phenomenon is evident during cellular activities involving IDPs, which include transcriptional and translational regulation, cell cycle control, signal transduction, molecular assembly, and molecular recognition. Although approximately 30% of eukaryotic proteomes are intrinsically disordered, the nature of IDP conformational ensembles remains unclear. In this dissertation, we describe relationships connecting characteristics of IDP conformational ensembles to their primary structures and solution conditions. Using molecular simulations and fluorescence experiments on a set of base-rich IDPs, we find that net charge per residue segregates conformational ensembles along a globule-to-coil transition. Speculatively generalizing this result, we propose a phase diagram that predicts an IDP's average size and shape based on sequence composition and use it to generate hypotheses for a broad set of intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs). Simulations reveal that acid-rich IDRs, unlike their oppositely charged base-rich counterparts, exhibit disordered globular ensembles despite intra-chain repulsive electrostatic interactions. This apparent asymmetry is sensitive to simulation parameters for representing alkali and halide salt ions, suggesting that solution conditions modulate IDP conformational ensembles. We refine the ion parameters using a calibration procedure that relies exclusively on crystal lattice properties. Simulations with these parameters recover swollen

  4. Role of Species-Specific Primary Structure Differences in Aβ42 Assembly and Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Roychaudhuri, Robin; Zheng, Xueyun; Lomakin, Aleksey; Maiti, Panchanan; Condron, Margaret M; Benedek, George B; Bitan, Gal; Bowers, Michael T; Teplow, David B

    2015-12-16

    A variety of species express the amyloid β-protein (Aβ (the term "Aβ" refers both to Aβ40 and Aβ42, whereas "Aβ40" and "Aβ42" refer to each isoform specifically). Those species expressing Aβ with primary structure identical to that expressed in humans have been found to develop amyloid deposits and Alzheimer's disease-like neuropathology. In contrast, the Aβ sequence in mice and rats contains three amino acid substitutions, Arg5Gly, His13Arg, and Tyr10Phe, which apparently prevent the development of AD-like neuropathology. Interestingly, the brush-tailed rat, Octodon degus, expresses Aβ containing only one of these substitutions, His13Arg, and does develop AD-like pathology. We investigate here the biophysical and biological properties of Aβ peptides from humans, mice (Mus musculus), and rats (Octodon degus). We find that each peptide displays statistical coil → β-sheet secondary structure transitions, transitory formation of hydrophobic surfaces, oligomerization, formation of annuli, protofibrils, and fibrils, and an inverse correlation between rate of aggregation and aggregate size (faster aggregation produced smaller aggregates). The rank order of assembly rate was mouse > rat > Aβ42. The rank order of neurotoxicity of assemblies formed by each peptide immediately after preparation was Aβ42 > mouse ≈ rat. These data do not support long-standing hypotheses that the primary factor controlling development of AD-like neuropathology in rodents is Aβ sequence. Instead, the data support a hypothesis that assembly quaternary structure and organismal responses to toxic peptide assemblies mediate neuropathogenetic effects. The implication of this hypothesis is that a valid understanding of disease causation within a given system (organism, tissue, etc.) requires the coevaluation of both biophysical and cell biological properties of that system. PMID:26421877

  5. High resolution image analysis of cell nuclei in tissue sections of primary and metastatic carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Theissig, F; Dimmer, V; Kunze, K D

    1986-01-01

    The present study examines whether certain histological tumour types can be differentiated on account of their nuclear image with the aid of automated image analysis. For karyometric investigations three tumour types (adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and mammary carcinomas) were chosen, which occur frequently as occult primary tumours. From each type ten primary tumours with their corresponding lymph node metastases were examined. 100 cell nuclei were measured from each case using 4 micron thick paraffin sections stained with gallocyanin-chromalum. For each cell nucleus 21 contour and texture features were determined. Through the application of linear classifiers 41 out of 52 cases (25 primary tumours, 27 metastases) of these three tumour types were correctly classified. Eight cases could not be classified with certainty and only three cases were wrongly classified. In addition, within the group of adenocarcinomas differences due to localisation were detected which allow us to draw conclusions on the seat of the primary tumour. PMID:3019272

  6. Reactivity of molybdovanadophosphoric acids: Influence of the presence of vanadium in the primary and secondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Casarini, D.; Centi, G.; Lena, V.; Tvaruzkova, Z. ); Jiru, P. )

    1993-10-01

    The catalytic behavior in butadiene and n-butane oxidation of molybdovanadophosphoric acids with vanadium localized inside the primary (oxoanion) and/or the secondary structure is reported. The samples are characterized by infrared, [sup 31]P-NMR, [sup 51]V-NMR, and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopies in order to obtain information on the nature and localization of vanadium in the samples before reaction and the possible changes occurring during the course of the catalytic reaction. In particular, it is shown that vanadium localized initially in the secondary structure can exchange with the molybdenum atoms of the oxoanion during the catalytic reaction. Introduction of vanadium in the molybdophosphoric acid structure enhances the selective formation of maleic anhydride from the butadiene when vanadium is present both inside the oxoanion or localized in the secondary structure (before the catalytic tests), but the maximum in catalytic performance is found for different amounts of vanadium, depending on where the vanadium is localized initially. However, when present in the secondary structure, vanadium also has a negative influence on the activity of the heteropoly acid. On the contrary, in n-butane oxidation, the presence of vanadium enhances the rate of alkane activation due to the different rate-determining step. The presence of V ions also affects the maximum selectivity and yield to maleic anhydride from butane. V ions in the secondary structure are more selective at low conversion, while V ions inside the oxoanion are more selective at higher conversions and thus allow better maximum yields to maleic anhydride. 40 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Erbium-doped fiber amplifier elements for structural analysis sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna-Hawver, P.; Kamdar, K. D.; Mehta, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Nasta, M. H.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-01-01

    The use of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's) in optical fiber sensor systems for structural analysis is described. EDFA's were developed for primary applications as periodic regenerator amplifiers in long-distance fiber-based communication systems. Their in-line amplification performance also makes them attractive for optical fiber sensor systems which require long effective lengths or the synthesis of special length-dependent signal processing functions. Sensor geometries incorporating EDFA's in recirculating and multiple loop sensors are discussed. Noise and polarization birefringence are also considered, and the experimental development of system components is discussed.

  8. Erbium-doped fiber amplifier elements for structural analysis sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna-Hawver, P.; Kamdar, K. D.; Mehta, S.; Nagarajan, S.; Nasta, M. H.; Claus, R. O.

    1992-06-01

    The use of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA's) in optical fiber sensor systems for structural analysis is described. EDFA's were developed for primary applications as periodic regenerator amplifiers in long-distance fiber-based communication systems. Their in-line amplification performance also makes them attractive for optical fiber sensor systems which require long effective lengths or the synthesis of special length-dependent signal processing functions. Sensor geometries incorporating EDFA's in recirculating and multiple loop sensors are discussed. Noise and polarization birefringence are also considered, and the experimental development of system components is discussed.

  9. Thermal-Structural Analysis of Sunshield Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John; Parrish, Keith

    2003-01-01

    Future large infrared space telescopes, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), will require deployable sunshields to provide passive cooling for optics and instruments. Deployable sunshield structures for such applications typically consist of multiple thin-film membrane layers supported by deployable booms. The mechanical design of the sunshield must accommodate thermal strains due to layer-to-layer temperature differences as well as potentially large in-plane temperature gradients within individual film layers. This paper describes a thermal-structural analysis for predicting the stress state in a thin-film membrane subject to both mechanical thermal loads that could aid in the mechanical design of future sunshield structures. First the temperature field predicted by a thermal analysis is mapped to a structural finite element model, and then the structural response is predicted using a nonlinear static analysis. The structural model uses membrane elements in conjunction with a tension field material model to predict the response of the thin-film membrane layer. The tension field material model accounts for no-compression behavior associated with wrinkling and slackness. This approach was used to study the problem of a single membrane layer from the NASA reference concept for the JWST sunshield. Results from the analysis show that the membrane can experience a loss of tensile preload due to the presence of an in-plane temperature gradient representative of the cold-side layer temperature distribution predicted for the reference concept JWST.

  10. Impact analysis studies of clinical prediction rules relevant to primary care: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Emma; Uijen, Maike J M; Clyne, Barbara; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Keogh, Claire; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Following appropriate validation, clinical prediction rules (CPRs) should undergo impact analysis to evaluate their effect on patient care. The aim of this systematic review is to narratively review and critically appraise CPR impact analysis studies relevant to primary care. Setting Primary care. Participants Adults and children. Intervention Studies that implemented the CPR compared to usual care were included. Study design Randomised controlled trial (RCT), controlled before–after, and interrupted time series. Primary outcome Physician behaviour and/or patient outcomes. Results A total of 18 studies, incorporating 14 unique CPRs, were included. The main study design was RCT (n=13). Overall, 10 studies reported an improvement in primary outcome with CPR implementation. Of 6 musculoskeletal studies, 5 were effective in altering targeted physician behaviour in ordering imaging for patients presenting with ankle, knee and neck musculoskeletal injuries. Of 6 cardiovascular studies, 4 implemented cardiovascular risk scores, and 3 reported no impact on physician behaviour outcomes, such as prescribing and referral, or patient outcomes, such as reduction in serum lipid levels. 2 studies examined CPRs in decision-making for patients presenting with chest pain and reduced inappropriate admissions. Of 5 respiratory studies, 2 were effective in reducing antibiotic prescribing for sore throat following CPR implementation. Overall, study methodological quality was often unclear due to incomplete reporting. Conclusions Despite increasing interest in developing and validating CPRs relevant to primary care, relatively few have gone through impact analysis. To date, research has focused on a small number of CPRs across few clinical domains only. PMID:27008685

  11. Primary Care Physicians’ Use of an Electronic Medical Record System: A Cognitive Task Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hadas-Dayagi, Michal; Ziv, Amitai; Reis, Shmuel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe physicians’ patterns of using an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system; to reveal the underlying cognitive elements involved in EMR use, possible resulting errors, and influences on patient–doctor communication; to gain insight into the role of expertise in incorporating EMRs into clinical practice in general and communicative behavior in particular. DESIGN Cognitive task analysis using semi-structured interviews and field observations. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-five primary care physicians from the northern district of the largest health maintenance organization (HMO) in Israel. RESULTS The comprehensiveness, organization, and readability of data in the EMR system reduced physicians’ need to recall information from memory and the difficulty of reading handwriting. Physicians perceived EMR use as reducing the cognitive load associated with clinical tasks. Automaticity of EMR use contributed to efficiency, but sometimes resulted in errors, such as the selection of incorrect medication or the input of data into the wrong patient’s chart. EMR use interfered with patient–doctor communication. The main strategy for overcoming this problem involved separating EMR use from time spent communicating with patients. Computer mastery and enhanced physicians’ communication skills also helped. CONCLUSIONS There is a fine balance between the benefits and risks of EMR use. Automaticity, especially in combination with interruptions, emerged as the main cognitive factor contributing to errors. EMR use had a negative influence on communication, a problem that can be partially addressed by improving the spatial organization of physicians’ offices and by enhancing physicians’ computer and communication skills. PMID:19130148

  12. The morphological analysis of autophagy in primary skeletal muscle cells infected with Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Souto, Xênia Macedo; Barbosa, Helene Santos; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, one of the most widespread zoonoses in the world. During the host immune response, tissue cysts are formed, allowing the maintenance of the parasite within the host cell. Autophagy, a degradation process of cellular components, is critical for cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has been proposed that autophagy participates in host-pathogen interactions. Autophagic inducers (rapamycin or glucose plus serum deprivation) inhibited infection and parasite proliferation in a clinically relevant model of primary skeletal muscle cells (SkMC). The ultrastructural analysis showed in SkMC submitted to autophagic stimuli the presence of structures suggestive of autophagosomes close to the parasitophorous vacuole containing degraded parasites. Fluorescence microscopy results pointed out the increase in LC3 puncta in these cells after incubation with autophagic inducers. In the present study, SkMC autophagy controlled the proliferation of tachyzoites inside the cell, data reinforced by ultrastructural evidences and increased LC3 expression. PMID:27075305

  13. The primary structure of the hemoglobin of Malayan sun bear (Helarctos malayanus, Carnivora) and structural comparison to other hemoglobin sequences.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, O; Braunitzer, G; Göltenboth, R

    1987-05-01

    The complete primary structure of the alpha- and beta-chains of the hemoglobin of Malayan Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus) is presented. After cleavage of the heme-protein link and chain separation by RP-HPLC, amino-acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation in liquid- and gas-phase sequenators. An interesting result of this work is the demonstration that the hemoglobin of Malayan Sun Bear is identical to the hemoglobins of Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) and Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus tibetanus). The paper gives an updated table of identical hemoglobin chains from different species. This paper may be considered as a compilation of work on the genetic relationship of Pandas. PMID:3620104

  14. Structural, electronic and optical properties of well-known primary explosive: Mercury fulminate

    SciTech Connect

    Yedukondalu, N.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2015-11-28

    Mercury Fulminate (MF) is one of the well-known primary explosives since 17th century and it has rendered invaluable service over many years. However, the correct molecular and crystal structures are determined recently after 300 years of its discovery. In the present study, we report pressure dependent structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of MF. Non-local correction methods have been employed to capture the weak van der Waals interactions in layered and molecular energetic MF. Among the non-local correction methods tested, optB88-vdW method works well for the investigated compound. The obtained equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that MF is softer than the well known primary explosives Silver Fulminate (SF), silver azide and lead azide. MF exhibits anisotropic compressibility (b > a > c) under pressure, consequently the corresponding elastic moduli decrease in the following order: C{sub 22} > C{sub 11} > C{sub 33}. The structural and mechanical properties suggest that MF is more sensitive to detonate along c-axis (similar to RDX) due to high compressibility of Hg⋯O non-bonded interactions along that axis. Electronic structure and optical properties were calculated including spin-orbit (SO) interactions using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within recently developed Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson (TB-mBJ) potential. The calculated TB-mBJ electronic structures of SF and MF show that these compounds are indirect bandgap insulators. Also, SO coupling is found to be more pronounced for 4d and 5d-states of Ag and Hg atoms of SF and MF, respectively. Partial density of states and electron charge density maps were used to describe the nature of chemical bonding. Ag—C bond is more directional than Hg—C bond which makes SF to be more unstable than MF. The effect of SO coupling on optical properties has also been studied and found to be significant for both (SF and MF) of the compounds.

  15. Investigation of carbon dioxide emission in China by primary component analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Cheng-Ming; Liu, Lian; Guo, Hang; Liu, Guo-Dong; Li, Yuan-Wei; Deng, Shi-Huai

    2014-02-15

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is employed to investigate the relationship between CO2 emissions (COEs) stemming from fossil fuel burning and cement manufacturing and their affecting factors. Eight affecting factors, namely, Population (P), Urban Population (UP); the Output Values of Primary Industry (PIOV), Secondary Industry (SIOV), and Tertiary Industry (TIOV); and the Proportions of Primary Industry's Output Value (PPIOV), Secondary Industry's Output Value (PSIOV), and Tertiary Industry's Output Value (PTIOV), are chosen. PCA is employed to eliminate the multicollinearity of the affecting factors. Two principal components, which can explain 92.86% of the variance of the eight affecting factors, are chosen as variables in the regression analysis. Ordinary least square regression is used to estimate multiple linear regression models, in which COEs and the principal components serve as dependent and independent variables, respectively. The results are given in the following. (1) Theoretically, the carbon intensities of PIOV, SIOV, and TIOV are 2573.4693, 552.7036, and 606.0791 kt per one billion $, respectively. The incomplete statistical data, the different statistical standards, and the ideology of self sufficiency and peasantry appear to show that the carbon intensity of PIOV is higher than those of SIOV and TIOV in China. (2) PPIOV, PSIOV, and PTIOV influence the fluctuations of COE. The parameters of PPIOV, PSIOV, and PTIOV are -2706946.7564, 2557300.5450, and 3924767.9807 kt, respectively. As the economic structure of China is strongly tied to technology level, the period when PIOV plays the leading position is characterized by lagging technology and economic developing. Thus, the influence of PPIOV has a negative value. As the increase of PSIOV and PTIOV is always followed by technological innovation and economic development, PSIOV and PTIOV have the opposite influence. (3) The carbon intensities of P and UP are 1.1029 and 1.7862 kt per thousand people

  16. Insights into lignin primary structure and deconstruction from Arabidopsis thaliana COMT (caffeic acid O-methyl transferase) mutant Atomt1.

    PubMed

    Moinuddin, Syed G A; Jourdes, Michaël; Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D; Ki, Chanyoung; Cardenas, Claudia L; Kim, Kye-Won; Zhang, Dianzhong; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

    2010-09-01

    The Arabidopsis mutant Atomt1 lignin differs from native lignin in wild type plants, in terms of sinapyl (S) alcohol-derived substructures in fiber cell walls being substituted by 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol (5OHG)-derived moieties. During programmed lignin assembly, these engender formation of benzodioxane substructures due to intramolecular cyclization of their quinone methides that are transiently formed following 8-O-4' radical-radical coupling. Thioacidolytic cleavage of the 8-O-4' inter-unit linkages in the Atomt1 mutant, relative to the wild type, indicated that cleavable sinapyl (S) and coniferyl (G) alcohol-derived monomeric moieties were stoichiometrically reduced by a circa 2 : 1 ratio. Additionally, lignin degradative analysis resulted in release of a 5OHG-5OHG-G trimer from the Atomt1 mutant, which then underwent further cleavage. Significantly, the trimeric moiety released provides new insight into lignin primary structure: during polymer assembly, the first 5OHG moiety is linked via a C8-O-X inter-unit linkage, whereas subsequent addition of monomers apparently involves sequential addition of 5OHG and G moieties to the growing chain in a 2 : 1 overall stoichiometry. This quantification data thus provides further insight into how inter-unit linkage frequencies in native lignins are apparently conserved (or near conserved) during assembly in both instances, as well as providing additional impetus to resolve how the overall question of lignin macromolecular assembly is controlled in terms of both type of monomer addition and primary sequence. PMID:20652169

  17. Analysis of flexible structures under lateral impact

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, D. F.; Razavi, H.

    2012-07-01

    Three methods for analysis of flexible structures under lateral impact are presented. The first proposed method (Method A) consists of: (1) modifying an available deceleration on a rigid target with conservation principles to account for structural flexibility; and (2) transient nonlinear analysis of the structure with the corrected forcing function. The second proposed method (Method B) is similar to Method A in obtaining the forcing function but it solves the equations of motion of an idealized two-degree-of-freedom system instead of directly using conservation principles. The last method simply provides the maximum force in the structure using the conservation of energy and linear momentum. A coupled simulation is also performed in LS-DYNA and compared against the proposed methods. A case study is presented to illustrate the applicability of all three methods and the LS-DYNA simulation. (authors)

  18. Structures of xyloglucans in primary cell walls of gymnosperms, monilophytes (ferns sensu lato) and lycophytes.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yves S Y; Harris, Philip J

    2012-07-01

    Little is known about the structures of the xyloglucans in the primary cell walls of vascular plants (tracheophytes) other than angiosperms. Xyloglucan structures were examined in 13 species of gymnosperms, 13 species of monilophytes (ferns sensu lato), and two species of lycophytes. Wall preparations were obtained, extracted with 6 M sodium hydroxide, and the extracts treated with a xyloglucan-specific endo-(1→4)-β-glucanase preparation. The oligosaccharides released were analysed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry and by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. The xyloglucan oligosaccharide profiles from the gymnosperm walls were similar to those from the walls of most eudicotyledons and non-commelinid monocotyledons, indicating that the xyloglucans were fucogalactoxyloglucans, containing the fucosylated units XXFG and XLFG. The xyloglucan oligosaccharide profiles for six of the monilophyte species were similar to those of the gymnosperms, indicating they were also fucogalactoxyloglucans. Phylogenetically, these monilophyte species were from both basal and more derived orders. However, the profiles for the other monilophyte species showed various significant differences, including additional oligosaccharides. In three of the species, these additional oligosaccharides contained arabinosyl residues which were most abundant in the profile of Equisetum hyemale. The two species of lycophytes examined, Selaginella kraussiana and Lycopodium cernuum, had quite different xyloglucan oligosaccharide profiles, but neither were fucogalactoxyloglucans. The S. kraussiana profile had abundant oligosaccharides containing arabinosyl residues. The L. cernuum profile indicated the xyloglucan had a very complex structure. PMID:22537406

  19. Community structure and primary productivity of forested wetlands in western Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    Community structure and net primary productivity were measured in five forested wetlands in western Kentucky and compared with hydrologic information. A bottomland hardwood forest (H1), cypress-ash swamp (H2), and deep cypress swamp (H3) were located on the floodplain of the Ohio River and were subject to annual spring flooding. The other two sites were adjacent to a smaller, channelized stream that floods frequently, but for short periods. Only a young riparian forest (C3) is directly affected by the stream unless an unusually severe flood exceeds the levee that hydrologically isolates the stagnant cypress swamp (C4). Community structure indices were lowest in the two permanently-flooded cypress swamps. Tree biomass was 9.4 kg/m/sup 2/ at C4 and 10.2 kg/m/sup 2/ at H3. High biomass was found at H1 and H2 (30.3 and 31.2 kg/m/sup 2/) while C3 was intermediate at 18.4 kg/m/sup 2/. Other structural measures, notably stem density and mean height were closely related to biomass estimates. Low leaf to wood biomass ratios were found at H2 and C4 which suggests low nutrient availability. Nutrients are abundant at H2 due to agricultural runoff but physiological stress and aquatic macrophyte competition may limit tree uptake.

  20. Primary structure of yeast mitochondrial DNA-coded phenylalanine-tRNA.

    PubMed

    Martin, R P; Sibler, A P; Schneller, J M; Keith, G; Stahl, A J; Dirheimer, G

    1978-12-01

    Mitochondrial tRNAPhe from Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was sequenced by fingerprinting uniformly labeled 32 P-tRNA as well as by 5'-end postlabeling techniques. Its sequence was found to be: pG-C-U-U-U-U-A-U-A-G-C-U-U-A-G-D-G-G-D-A-A-A-G-C-m22G-A-U-A-A-A-phi-U-G-A-A-m1G-A-phi-U-U-A-U-U-U-A-C-A-U-G-U-A-G-U-phi-C-G-A-U-U-C-U-C-A-U-U-A-A-G-G-G-C-A-C-C-A. The secondary structure we propose, in order to maximize base pairing in the phiC stem and to allow tertiary interaction between G15 and C46, excludes U50 from base pairing giving a bulge in the phiC stem. No conclusion can be drawn concerning the endosymbiotic theory of mitochondria evolution by comparing the primary structure of mt. tRNAPhe with other sequenced tRNAsPhe. This mt.tRNAPhe lacks some of the structural elements reported to be involved in the yeast cytoplasmic phenylalanyl-tRNA ligase recognition site and cannot be aminoacylated by purified yeast cytoplasmic phenylalanyl-tRNA ligase. PMID:370774

  1. International comparison of clinicians' ability to identify depression in primary care: meta-analysis and meta-regression of predictors

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alex J; Rao, Sanjay; Vaze, Amol

    2011-01-01

    Background There are international differences in the epidemiology of depression and the performance of primary care physicians but the factors underlying these national differences are uncertain. Aim To examine the international variability in diagnostic performance of primary care physicians when diagnosing depression in primary care. Design of study A meta-analysis of unassisted clinical diagnoses against semi-structured interviews. Method A systematic literature search, critical appraisal, and pooled analysis were conducted and 25 international studies were identified involving 8917 individuals. A minimum of three independent studies per country were required to aid extrapolation. Results Clinicians in the Netherlands performed best at case finding (the ability to rule in cases of depression with minimal false positives) (AUC+ 0.735) and this was statistically significantly better than the ability of clinicians in Australia (AUC+ 0.622) and the US (AUC+ 0.653), who were the worst performers. Clinicians from Italy had intermediate case-finding abilities. Regarding screening (the ability to rule out cases of no depression with minimal false negatives) there were no strong differences. Looking at overall accuracy, primary care physicians in Italy and the Netherlands were most successful in their diagnoses and physicians from the US and Australia least successful (83.5%, 81.9%, 74.3%, and 67.0%, respectively). GPs in the UK appeared to have the lowest ability to detect depression, as a proportion of all cases of depression (45.6%; 95% CI = 27.7% to 64.2%). Several factors influenced detection accuracy including: collecting data on clinical outcomes; routinely comparing the clinical performance of staff; working in small practices; and having long waits to see a specialist. Conclusion Assuming these differences are representative, there appear to be international variations in the ability of primary care physicians to diagnose depression, but little differences in

  2. A Policy Analysis of the Delivery of Primary and Secondary School Mathematics and Science in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohandhas, Pratheepa

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers an analysis of the development and implementation of the policy to teach Science and Mathematics in English (PPSMI) in Malaysian primary schools, commencing in 2003, in the context of the 2009 reversal of the policy. The original study focused particularly on the impact of the policy on the children of the Federal Land…

  3. How Green Are European Curricula? A Comparative Analysis of Primary School Syllabi in Five European Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanish, Anna; Rank, Astrid; Seeber, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    The authors conducted a cross-national curriculum analysis as part of a European Union Comenius project regarding the implementation of an online tool to foster environmental education (EE) in primary schools. The overall goal was to determine the extent and intensity that EE is embedded in the syllabi of five European countries. To this end, the…

  4. A Meta-Analysis of Adult-Rated Child Personality and Academic Performance in Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poropat, Arthur E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Personality is reliably associated with academic performance, but personality measurement in primary education can be problematic. Young children find it difficult to accurately self-rate personality, and dominant models of adult personality may be inappropriate for children. Aims: This meta-analysis was conducted to determine the…

  5. Singing and Vocal Instruction in Primary Schools: An Analysis from Six Case Studies in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuadrado, Albina; Rusinek, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    This is an analysis of how specialist music teachers sing and teach how to sing, based on data collected from six case studies carried out in Spanish primary schools. The study aimed at understanding classroom singing practices, and in particular the provision or absence of vocal instruction in relation with teachers' singing models. The findings…

  6. Patterns of Discursive Interactions in Primary Classrooms: An Application of Social Network Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mameli, Consuelo; Mazzoni, Elvis; Molinari, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether social network analysis (SNA) is a useful method for identifying different discursive patterns in everyday classroom activities. The material analysed came from 20 teacher-led lessons that were video-recorded in small-size classes in Italian public primary schools. SNA was used to measure classroom relations…

  7. Structural analysis for a 40-story building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, L.

    1972-01-01

    NASTRAN was chosen as the principal analytical tool for structural analysis of the Illinois Center Plaza Hotel Building in Chicago, Illinois. The building is a 40-story, reinforced concrete structure utilizing a monolithic slab-column system. The displacements, member stresses, and foundation loads due to wind load, live load, and dead load were obtained through a series of NASTRAN runs. These analyses and the input technique are described.

  8. Structural analysis of FAST reflector supporting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. F.; Deng, C. G.; Li, G. Q.; He, Y. M.

    According to the deformation and movement requirements of the FAST reflector, a multi-purpose analysis, including the load-bearing behavior, deformation, construction costs of the reflector supporting structure and its model, is presented in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of steel and aluminum alloy structures are also discussed and compared through detailed design calculations under load-bearing capacity and normal working conditions.

  9. The primary structure of the aridicin aglycon as revealed by long-range J values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Luciano; Jeffs, Peter W.

    The aglycon of aridicin, which is a member of the vancomycin class of antibiotics, was analyzed by utilizing J spin-spin interactions in two-dimensional NMR experiments.This unusual heptapeptide with the molecular formula C 59H 45N 7O 19Cl 4 (MW 1296.160) has a large number of quateernary carbons in aromatic side chains. For that reason most information was obtained from delayed COSY and COLOC spectra which reveal homo- and heteronuclear connectivities via long-range J couplings. The carbon-13 spectrum was assigned completely. In addition, the primary structure of the aridicin aglycon could be deduced, with the exception of the ether linkages between the side chains A, B, and C, by solely relying on J-connectivity maps.

  10. The primary structure of the hemoglobin of spectacled bear (Tremarctos ornatus, Carnivora).

    PubMed

    Hofmann, O; Braunitzer, G

    1987-08-01

    The complete primary structure of the alpha- and beta-chains of the hemoglobin of Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus) is presented. Following cleavage of the heme-protein link and chain separation by RP-HPLC, their amino-acid sequences were determined by Edman degradation in liquid- and gas-phase sequenators. The hemoglobin of Spectacled Bear displays only five amino-acid exchanges to that of Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus, Ursinae) and Asiatic Black Bear (Ursus tibetanus, Ursinae) whereas 8 and 12 replacements, respectively, to Giant Panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and Lesser Panda (Ailurus fulgens) can be found. This clearly demonstrates that the Spectacled Bear, the most aberrant bear of the Ursidae, is somewhat intermediate between Pandas and Ursinae. PMID:3663329

  11. Primary structure of Lep d I, the main Lepidoglyphus destructor allergen.

    PubMed

    Varela, J; Ventas, P; Carreira, J; Barbas, J A; Gimenez-Gallego, G; Polo, F

    1994-10-01

    The most relevant allergen of the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Lep d I) has been characterized. Lep d I is a monomer protein of 13273 Da. The primary structure of Lep d I was determined by N-terminal Edman degradation and partially confirmed by cDNA sequencing. Sequence polymorphism was observed at six positions, with non-conservative substitutions in three of them. No potential N-glycosylation site was revealed by peptide sequencing. The 125-residue sequence of Lep d I shows approximately 40% identity (including the six cysteines) with the overlapping regions of group II allergens from the genus Dermatophagoides, which, however, do not share common allergenic epitopes with Lep d I. PMID:7925475

  12. A conserved BURP domain defines a novel group of plant proteins with unusual primary structures.

    PubMed

    Hattori, J; Boutilier, K A; van Lookeren Campagne, M M; Miki, B L

    1998-09-01

    We have identified a new class of plant proteins containing a common C-terminal region, which we have termed the BURP domain. These proteins are defined not only by the BURP domain, but also by the overall similarity in their modular construction. The BURP domain proteins consist of either three or four modules: (i) an N-terminal hydrophobic domain -- a presumptive transit peptide, joined to (ii) a short conserved segment or other short segment, (iii) an optional segment consisting of repeated units which is unique to each member, and (iv) the C-terminal BURP domain. These individual modules appear to be combined to form two main classes of BURP domain proteins. The BURP domain proteins, despite the similarities in their primary structural features, show no obvious similarities in the tissues or conditions under which they are expressed. The presence of the conserved BURP domain in diverse plant proteins suggests an important and fundamental functional role for this domain. PMID:9790599

  13. Pediatric primary care providers’ perspectives regarding hospital discharge communication: a mixed methods analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leyenaar, JoAnna K.; Bergert, Lora; Mallory, Leah A.; Engel, Richard; Rassbach, Caroline; Shen, Mark; Woehrlen, Tess; Cooperberg, David; Coghlin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Effective communication between inpatient and outpatient providers may mitigate risks of adverse events associated with hospital discharge. However, there is an absence of pediatric literature defining effective discharge communication strategies at both freestanding children’s hospitals and general hospitals. The objectives of this study were to assess associations between pediatric primary care providers’ (PCPs) reported receipt of discharge communication and referral hospital type, and to describe PCPs’ perspectives regarding effective discharge communication and areas for improvement. Methods We administered a questionnaire to PCPs referring to sixteen pediatric hospital medicine programs nationally. Multivariable models were developed to assess associations between referral hospital type and receipt and completeness of discharge communication. Open-ended questions asked respondents to describe effective strategies and areas requiring improvement regarding discharge communication. Conventional qualitative content analysis was performed to identify emergent themes. Results Responses were received from 201 PCPs, representing a response rate of 63%. While there were no differences between referral hospital type and PCP-reported receipt of discharge communication (RR 1.61,95%CI 0.97–2.67), PCPs referring to general hospitals more frequently reported completeness of discharge communication relative to those referring to freestanding children’s hospitals (RR 1.78,95%CI 1.26–2.51). Analysis of free text responses yielded four major themes: (i) structured discharge communication; (ii) direct personal communication; (iii) reliability and timeliness of communication; and (iv) communication for effective post-discharge care. Conclusions This study highlights potential differences in the experiences of PCPs referring to general hospitals and freestanding children’s hospitals, and presents valuable contextual data for future quality improvement

  14. Design and Analysis of Muon Beam Stop Support Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Okafor, Udenna

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to design and analyze support structures to be used in the installation, test and final positioning of the MBS throughout the life of the Mu2e experiment. There several requirements for the MBS imposed by both the scope of the experiment and, other components within the DS bore. The functions of the MBS are: 1. To limit the induced rates in the Tracker, the Calorimeter and the Cosmic Ray Veto due to backsplash-and-secondary interactions, and 2. To reduce radiation levels external to the Detector solenoid. The structures used in supporting the MBS will also adhere to requirements imposed by its functions. These requirements are critical to the support structures and affect design decisions. Other requirements critical to the design are imposed by the weight, positional tolerance and assembly procedure of the MBS, and also, the magnetic field and vacuum dose rate of the DS bore. A detailed breakdown of how each requirement affects the structural design can be found in chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes the design of each support structure and its attachment to the MBS while chapter 4 describes the results from structural analysis of the support structures. Chapter 5 describes evaluation for the design through testing and calculations while the conclusion in chapter 6 reports the current status at the time of this thesis submission with a plan for future work to be completed until final design and installation.

  15. Characterization of a SILAC method for proteomic analysis of primary rat microglia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Culver-Cochran, Ashley E.; Stevens, Stanley M.; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Microglia play important and dynamic roles in mediating a variety of physiological and pathological processes during the development, normal function and degeneration of the central nervous system. Application of SILAC-based proteomic analysis would greatly facilitate the identification of cellular pathways regulating the multifaceted phenotypes of microglia. We and others have successfully SILAC-labeled immortalized murine microglial cell lines in previous studies. In this study, we report the development and evaluation of a SILAC-labeled primary rat microglia model. Although the isotope labeling scheme for primary microglia is drastically different from that of immortalized cell lines, our de novo and uninterrupted primary culture labeling protocol (DUP-SILAC) resulted in sufficient incorporation of SILAC labels for mass spectrometry-based proteomic profiling. In addition, label incorporation did not alter their morphology and response to endotoxin stimulation. Proteomic analysis of the endotoxin-stimulated SILAC-labeled primary microglia identified expected as well as potentially novel activation markers and pro-inflammatory pathways that could be quantified in a more physiologically relevant cellular model system compared to immortalized cell lines. The establishment of primary microglia SILAC model will further expand our capacity for global scale proteomic profiling of pathways under various physiological and pathological conditions. Proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002759. PMID:26936193

  16. Ultrastructural analysis of primary human urethral epithelial cell cultures infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Harvey, H A; Ketterer, M R; Preston, A; Lubaroff, D; Williams, R; Apicella, M A

    1997-06-01

    In men with gonococcal urethritis, the urethral epithelial cell is a site of infection. To study the pathogenesis of gonorrhea in this cell type, we have developed a method to culture primary human urethral epithelial cells obtained at the time of urologic surgery. Fluorescent analysis demonstrated that 100% of the cells stained for keratin. Microscopic analyses indicated that these epithelial cells arrayed in a pattern similar to that seen in urethral epithelium. Using immunoelectron and confocal microscopy, we compared the infection process seen in primary cells with events occurring during natural infection of the same cell type in men with gonococcal urethritis. Immunoelectron microscopy studies of cells infected with Neisseria gonorrhoeae 1291 Opa+ P+ showed adherence of organisms to the epithelial cell membrane, pedestal formation with evidence of intimate association between the gonococcal and the epithelial cell membranes, and intracellular gonococci present in vacuoles. Confocal studies of primary urethral epithelial cells showed actin polymerization upon infection. Polyclonal antibodies to the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) demonstrated the presence of this receptor on infected cells in the primary urethral cell culture. In situ hybridization using a fluorescent-labeled probe specific to the ASGP-R mRNA demonstrated this message in uninfected and infected cells. These features were identical to those seen in urethral epithelial cells in exudates from males with gonorrhea. Infection of primary urethral cells in culture mimics events seen in natural infection and will allow detailed molecular analysis of gonococcal pathogenesis in a human epithelial cell which is commonly infected. PMID:9169783

  17. Improving transient analysis technology for aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R. J.; Chargin, Mladen

    1989-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic analyses are demanding of computer simulation capabilities. The modeling complexities of semi-monocoque construction, irregular geometry, high-performance materials, and high-accuracy analysis are present. At issue are the safety of the passengers and the integrity of the structure for a wide variety of flight-operating and emergency conditions. The technology which supports engineering of aircraft structures using computer simulation is examined. Available computer support is briefly described and improvement of accuracy and efficiency are recommended. Improved accuracy of simulation will lead to a more economical structure. Improved efficiency will result in lowering development time and expense.

  18. Functional analysis of ultra high information rates conveyed by rat vibrissal primary afferents

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, André M.; Theis, Lucas; Sengupta, Biswa; Stüttgen, Maik C.; Bethge, Matthias; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Sensory receptors determine the type and the quantity of information available for perception. Here, we quantified and characterized the information transferred by primary afferents in the rat whisker system using neural system identification. Quantification of “how much” information is conveyed by primary afferents, using the direct method (DM), a classical information theoretic tool, revealed that primary afferents transfer huge amounts of information (up to 529 bits/s). Information theoretic analysis of instantaneous spike-triggered kinematic stimulus features was used to gain functional insight on “what” is coded by primary afferents. Amongst the kinematic variables tested—position, velocity, and acceleration—primary afferent spikes encoded velocity best. The other two variables contributed to information transfer, but only if combined with velocity. We further revealed three additional characteristics that play a role in information transfer by primary afferents. Firstly, primary afferent spikes show preference for well separated multiple stimuli (i.e., well separated sets of combinations of the three instantaneous kinematic variables). Secondly, neurons are sensitive to short strips of the stimulus trajectory (up to 10 ms pre-spike time), and thirdly, they show spike patterns (precise doublet and triplet spiking). In order to deal with these complexities, we used a flexible probabilistic neuron model fitting mixtures of Gaussians to the spike triggered stimulus distributions, which quantitatively captured the contribution of the mentioned features and allowed us to achieve a full functional analysis of the total information rate indicated by the DM. We found that instantaneous position, velocity, and acceleration explained about 50% of the total information rate. Adding a 10 ms pre-spike interval of stimulus trajectory achieved 80–90%. The final 10–20% were found to be due to non-linear coding by spike bursts. PMID:24367295

  19. Structural Analysis of the Redesigned Ice/Frost Ramp Bracket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D. R.; Dawicke, D. S.; Gentz, S. J.; Roberts, P. W.; Raju, I. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the interim structural analysis of a redesigned Ice/Frost Ramp bracket for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The proposed redesigned bracket consists of mounts for attachment to the ET wall, supports for the electronic/instrument cables and propellant repressurization lines that run along the ET, an upper plate, a lower plate, and complex bolted connections. The eight nominal bolted connections are considered critical in the summarized structural analysis. Each bolted connection contains a bolt, a nut, four washers, and a non-metallic spacer and block that are designed for thermal insulation. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the bracket is developed using solid 10-node tetrahedral elements. The loading provided by the ET Project is used in the analysis. Because of the complexities associated with accurately modeling the bolted connections in the bracket, the analysis is performed using a global/local analysis procedure. The finite element analysis of the bracket identifies one of the eight bolted connections as having high stress concentrations. A local area of the bracket surrounding this bolted connection is extracted from the global model and used as a local model. Within the local model, the various components of the bolted connection are refined, and contact is introduced along the appropriate interfaces determined by the analysts. The deformations from the global model are applied as boundary conditions to the local model. The results from the global/local analysis show that while the stresses in the bolts are well within yield, the spacers fail due to compression. The primary objective of the interim structural analysis is to show concept viability for static thermal testing. The proposed design concept would undergo continued design optimization to address the identified analytical assumptions and concept shortcomings, assuming successful thermal testing.

  20. Statins and Cardiovascular Primary Prevention in CKD: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chee Kay; Gray, Laura J.; Brunskill, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Multiple meta-analyses of lipid-lowering therapies for cardiovascular primary prevention in the general population have been performed. Other meta-analyses of lipid-lowering therapies in CKD have also been performed, but not for primary prevention. This meta-analysis assesses lipid-lowering therapies for cardiovascular primary prevention in CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A systematic review and meta-analysis using a random-effects model was performed. MEDLINE was searched between January 2012 and September 2013 for new studies using predefined search criteria without language restrictions. A number of other sources including previously published meta-analyses were also reviewed. Inclusion criteria were randomized control trials of primary prevention with lipid-lowering therapy in non–end stage CKD. Results Six trials were identified, five including patients with stage 3 CKD only. These studies included 8834 participants and 32,846 person-years of follow-up. All trials were post hoc subgroup analyses of statins in the general population. Statins reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease (the prespecified primary outcome) by 41% in stages 1–3 CKD compared with placebo (pooled risk ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.48 to 0.72). For the secondary outcomes, the risk ratios were 0.66 (95% CI, 0.49 to 0.88) for total mortality, 0.55 (95% CI, 0.42 to 0.72) for coronary heart disease events, and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.28 to 1.13) for stroke. In study participants with stage 3 CKD specifically, the results were similar. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that the use of statins in CKD for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is effective. These findings are consistent with recent guidance for the use of statins in all patients with CKD. PMID:25833405

  1. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds.

    PubMed

    Silva, José A; Pompeu, Dávia G; Smolka, Marcus B; Gozzo, Fabio C; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N; Granjeiro, Paulo A; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  2. Controls of vegetation structure and net primary production in restored grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munson, Seth M.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2014-01-01

    1. Vegetation structure and net primary production (NPP) are fundamental properties of ecosystems. Understanding how restoration practices following disturbance interact with environmental factors to control these properties can provide insight on how ecosystems recover and guide management efforts. 2. We assessed the relative contribution of environmental and restoration factors in controlling vegetation structure, above- and below-ground investment in production across a chronosequence of semiarid Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields recovering from dryland wheat cropping relative to undisturbed grassland. Importantly, we determined the role of plant diversity and how seeding either native or introduced perennial grasses influenced the recovery of vegetation properties. 3. Plant basal cover increased with field age and was highest in CRP fields seeded with native perennial grasses. In contrast, fields seeded with introduced perennial grasses had tall-growing plants with relatively low basal cover. These vegetation structural characteristics interacted with precipitation, but not soil characteristics, to influence above-ground NPP (ANPP). Fields enrolled in the CRP program for >7 years supported twice as much ANPP as undisturbed shortgrass steppe in the first wet year of the study, but all CRP fields converged on a common low amount of ANPP in the following dry year and invested less than half as much as the shortgrass steppe in below-ground biomass. 4. ANPP in CRP fields seeded with native perennial grasses for more than 7 years was positively related to species richness, whereas ANPP in CRP fields seeded with introduced perennial grasses were controlled more by dominant species. 5. Synthesis and applications. Seeding with introduced, instead of native, perennial grasses had a strong direct influence on vegetation structure, including species richness, which indirectly affected NPP through time. However, the effects of restoring either native or introduced

  3. Primary Structure of a Trypsin Inhibitor (Copaifera langsdorffii Trypsin Inhibitor-1) Obtained from C. langsdorffii Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Silva, José A.; Pompeu, Dávia G.; Smolka, Marcus B.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Comar, Moacyr; Eberlin, Marcos N.; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to determine the complete sequence of the Copaifera langsdorffii trypsin inhibitor (CTI)-1 using 2-dimensional (2D)-PAGE, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) spectrometry. Spots A (CTI-1) and F (CTI-2) were submitted to enzymatic digestions with trypsin, SV8, and clostripain. The accurate mass of the peptide obtained from each digest was determined by mass spectrometry (MS) using MALDI-TOF. The most abundant peptides were purified and sequenced in a liquid chromatograph connected to an electrospray ionization-QTOF MS. When the purified trypsin inhibitor was submitted to 2D electrophoresis, different spots were observed, suggesting that the protein is composed of 2 subunits with microheterogeneity. Isoelectric points of 8.0, 8.5, and 9.0 were determined for the 11 kDa subunit and of 4.7, 4.6, and 4.3 for the 9 kDa subunit. The primary structure of CTI-1, determined from the mass of the peptide of the enzymatic digestions and the sequence obtained by MS, indicated 180 shared amino acid residues and a high degree of similarity with other Kunitz (KTI)-type inhibitors. The peptide also contained an Arg residue at the reactive site position. Its 3-dimensional structure revealed that this is because the structural discrepancies do not affect the canonical conformation of the reactive loop of the peptide. Results demonstrate that a detailed investigation of the structural particularities of CTI-1 could provide a better understanding of the mechanism of action of these proteins, as well as clarify its biologic function in the seeds. CTI-1 belongs to the KTI family and is composed of 2 polypeptide chains and only 1 disulfide bridge. PMID:26207098

  4. Structural specificity of steroids in stimulating DNA synthesis and protooncogene expression in primary rat hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Lee, C H; Edwards, A M

    2002-05-01

    Among the chemical compounds of varied structure which possess liver tumour-promoting are steroids, such as estrogens, pregnenolone derivatives and anabolic steroids. Although the mechanism(s) of tumour promotion in liver by these xenobiotics is not well understood, it is clear that growth stimulation is one important element in their action. As a basis for better defining whether steroids stimulate growth by a common mechanism or fall into sub-groups with differing actions, the effects of 46 steroids on DNA synthesis and the expression of protooncogenes c-fos and c-myc were examined in primary cultures of normal rat hepatocytes. Tentative groupings of steroids have been identified based on apparent structural requirements for stimulation of DNA synthesis, and effects of auxiliary factors in modulating this growth stimulus. For a "progestin" group, insulin appeared to be permissive for stimulation of DNA synthesis, and presence of an ester or hydroxyl group at 17alpha-position in combination with a non-polar group at C(6) appeared to be required for stimulation. For the pregnenes, dexamethasone was stimulatory. Structural requirements include a non-polar substitution at 16alpha-position and presence of a 6alpha-methyl group. Androgens were weak or ineffective stimulators of DNA synthesis. Anabolic steroids were weak to strong stimulators and alteration to A ring structure in combination with non-polar substitution at 17alpha-position appeared to be required for the activity. With the exception of the anabolic steroid, dianabol, there do not appear to be strong correlation between ability to stimulate DNA synthesis and ability to induce protooncogene expression among the steroids. This study provides a starting point for future more detailed examination of growth-stimulatory mechanism(s) of action of steroids in the liver. PMID:12127039

  5. Simplified method for nonlinear structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, A.

    1983-01-01

    A simplified inelastic analysis computer program was developed for predicting the stress-strain history of a thermomechanically cycled structure from an elastic solution. The program uses an iterative and incremental procedure to estimate the plastic strains from the material stress-strain properties and a simulated plasticity hardening model. The simplified method was exercised on a number of problems involving uniaxial and multiaxial loading, isothermal and nonisothermal conditions, and different materials and plasticity models. Good agreement was found between these analytical results and nonlinear finite element solutions for these problems. The simplified analysis program used less than 1 percent of the CPU time required for a nonlinear finite element analysis.

  6. Experimental modal analysis. [for vibrating structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allemang, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental modal analysis is extremely important with regard to verification of analytical models, identification of vibration and acoustic problems, and structural modification and sensitivity analysis. With the expanding access of the testing environment to computational power, the complexity of existing approaches, as well as the development of new approaches, to the estimation of modal parameters has grown tremendously. Currently, the state of the art in experimental modal analysis involves methods that can be grouped in four categories: forced normal mode excitation method, frequency response function method, damped complex exponential function method, and mathematical input-output model methods. The theoretical basis of each of these general approaches, with appropriate references, is reviewed briefly.

  7. Structural support, not insulation, is the primary driver for avian cup-shaped nest design

    PubMed Central

    Heenan, Caragh B.; Seymour, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    The nest micro-environment is a widely studied area of avian biology, however, the contribution of nest conductance (the inverse of insulation) to the energetics of the incubating adult and offspring has largely been overlooked. Surface-specific thermal conductance (W °C−1 cm−2) has been related to nest dimensions, wall porosity, height above-ground and altitude, but the most relevant measure is total conductance (G, W °C−1). This study is the first to analyse conductance allometrically with adult body mass (M, g), according to the form G = aMb. We propose three alternative hypotheses to explain the scaling of conductance. The exponent may emerge from: heat loss scaling (M0.48) in which G scales with the same exponent as thermal conductance of the adult bird, isometric scaling (M0.33) in which nest shape is held constant as parent mass increases, and structural scaling (M0.25) in which nests are designed to support a given adult mass. Data from 213 cup-shaped nests, from 36 Australian species weighing 8–360 g, show conductance is proportional to M0.25. This allometric exponent is significantly different from those expected for heat loss and isometric scaling and confirms the hypothesis that structural support for the eggs and incubating parent is the primary factor driving nest design. PMID:21325330

  8. Diet is the primary determinant of bacterial community structure in the guts of higher termites.

    PubMed

    Mikaelyan, Aram; Dietrich, Carsten; Köhler, Tim; Poulsen, Michael; Sillam-Dussès, David; Brune, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    The gut microbiota of termites plays critical roles in the symbiotic digestion of lignocellulose. While phylogenetically 'lower termites' are characterized by a unique association with cellulolytic flagellates, higher termites (family Termitidae) harbour exclusively prokaryotic communities in their dilated hindguts. Unlike the more primitive termite families, which primarily feed on wood, they have adapted to a variety of lignocellulosic food sources in different stages of humification, ranging from sound wood to soil organic matter. In this study, we comparatively analysed representatives of different taxonomic lineages and feeding groups of higher termites to identify the major drivers of bacterial community structure in the termite gut, using amplicon libraries of 16S rRNA genes from 18 species of higher termites. In all analyses, the wood-feeding species were clearly separated from humus and soil feeders, irrespective of their taxonomic affiliation, offering compelling evidence that diet is the primary determinant of bacterial community structure. Within each diet group, however, gut communities of termites from the same subfamily were more similar than those of distantly related species. A highly resolved classification using a curated reference database revealed only few genus-level taxa whose distribution patterns indicated specificity for certain host lineages, limiting any possible cospeciation between the gut microbiota and host to short evolutionary timescales. Rather, the observed patterns in the host-specific distribution of the bacterial lineages in termite guts are best explained by diet-related differences in the availability of microhabitats and functional niches. PMID:26348261

  9. Structural reliability analysis and seismic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.; Reich, M.; Shinozuka, M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a reliability analysis method for safety evaluation of nuclear structures. By utilizing this method, it is possible to estimate the limit state probability in the lifetime of structures and to generate analytically the fragility curves for PRA studies. The earthquake ground acceleration, in this approach, is represented by a segment of stationary Gaussian process with a zero mean and a Kanai-Tajimi Spectrum. All possible seismic hazard at a site represented by a hazard curve is also taken into consideration. Furthermore, the limit state of a structure is analytically defined and the corresponding limit state surface is then established. Finally, the fragility curve is generated and the limit state probability is evaluated. In this paper, using a realistic reinforced concrete containment as an example, results of the reliability analysis of the containment subjected to dead load, live load and ground earthquake acceleration are presented and a fragility curve for PRA studies is also constructed.

  10. Turbine blade nonlinear structural and life analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Laflen, J. H.; Halford, G. R.; Kaufman, A.

    1982-01-01

    The utility of advanced structural analysis and life prediction techniques was evaluated for the life assessment of a commercial air-cooled turbine blade with a history of tip cracking. Three dimensional, nonlinear finite element structural analyses were performed for the blade tip region. The computed strain-temperature history of the critical location was imposed on a uniaxial strain controlled test specimen to evaluate the validity of the structural analysis method. Experimental results indicated higher peak stresses and greater stress relaxation than the analytical predictions. Life predictions using the Strainrange Partitioning and Frequency Modified approaches predicted 1200 to 4420 cycles and 2700 cycles to crack initiation, respectively, compared to an observed life of 3000 cycles.

  11. Out of plane analysis for composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, P. C.; Saff, C. R.; Sanger, Kenneth B.; Mahler, M. A.; Kan, Han Pin; Kautz, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Simple two dimensional analysis techniques were developed to aid in the design of strong joints for integrally stiffened/bonded composite structures subjected to out of plane loads. It was found that most out of plane failures were due to induced stresses arising from rapid changes in load path direction or geometry, induced stresses due to changes in geometry caused by buckling, or direct stresses produced by fuel pressure or bearing loads. While the analysis techniques were developed to address a great variety of out of plane loading conditions, they were primarily derived to address the conditions described above. The methods were developed and verified using existing element test data. The methods were demonstrated using the data from a test failure of a high strain wingbox that was designed, built, and tested under a previous program. Subsequently, a set of design guidelines were assembled to assist in the design of safe, strong integral composite structures using the analysis techniques developed.

  12. Economic Evaluation of Computerized Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    This completed effort involved a technical and economic study of the capabilities of computer programs in the area of structural analysis. The applicability of the programs to NASA projects and to other users was studied. The applications in other industries was explored including both research and development and applied areas. The costs of several alternative analysis programs were compared. A literature search covered applicable technical literature including journals, trade publications and books. In addition to the literature search, several commercial companies that have developed computerized structural analysis programs were contacted and their technical brochures reviewed. These programs include SDRC I-DEAS, MSC/NASTRAN, SCADA, SUPERSAP, NISA/DISPLAY, STAAD-III, MICAS, GTSTRUDL, and STARS. These programs were briefly reviewed as applicable to NASA projects.

  13. Analysis of interstellar fragmentation structure based on IRAS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scalo, John M.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop new tools for the analysis of the structure of densely sampled maps of interstellar star-forming regions. A particular emphasis was on the recognition and characterization of nested hierarchical structure and fractal irregularity, and their relation to the level of star formation activity. The panoramic IRAS images provided data with the required range in spatial scale, greater than a factor of 100, and in column density, greater than a factor of 50. In order to construct a densely sampled column density map of a cloud complex which is both self-gravitating and not (yet?) stirred up much by star formation, a column density image of the Taurus region has been constructed from IRAS data. The primary drawback to using the IRAS data for this purpose is that it contains no velocity information, and the possible importance of projection effects must be kept in mind.

  14. Thermal Analysis of the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) 8 Meter Primary Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornsby, Linda; Stahl, H. Philip; Hopkins, Randall C.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) preliminary design concept consists of an 8 meter diameter monolithic primary mirror enclosed in an insulated, optical tube with stray light baffles and a sunshade. ATLAST will be placed in orbit about the Sun-Earth L2 and will experience constant exposure to the sun. The insulation on the optical tube and sunshade serve to cold bias the telescope which helps to minimize thermal gradients. The primary mirror will be maintained at 280K with an active thermal control system. The geometric model of the primary mirror, optical tube, sun baffles, and sunshade was developed using Thermal Desktop(R) SINDA/FLUINT(R) was used for the thermal analysis and the radiation environment was analyzed using RADCAD(R). A XX node model was executed in order to characterize the static performance and thermal stability of the mirror during maneuvers. This is important because long exposure observations, such as extra-solar terrestrial planet finding and characterization, require a very stable observatory wave front. Steady state thermal analyses served to predict mirror temperatures for several different sun angles. Transient analyses were performed in order to predict thermal time constant of the primary mirror for a 20 degree slew or 30 degree roll maneuver. This paper describes the thermal model and provides details of the geometry, thermo-optical properties, and the environment which influences the thermal performance. All assumptions that were used in the analysis are also documented. Parametric analyses are summarized for design parameters including primary mirror coatings and sunshade configuration. Estimates of mirror heater power requirements are reported. The thermal model demonstrates results for the primary mirror heated from the back side and edges using a heater system with multiple independently controlled zones.

  15. Molecular analysis of myocilin and optineurin genes in Korean primary glaucoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonhong; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Chan Kee; Chae, Hyojin; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Yonggoo; Jang, Woori; Chi, Hyun Young; Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Park, Shin Hae

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the underlying genetic influences of primary glaucoma in Korea, molecular analysis was performed in 112 sporadic cases, and results compared with healthy controls. The myocilin (MYOC) and optineurin (OPTN) genes were directly sequenced in 112 unrelated patients, including 17 with primary open-angle glaucoma, 19 with juvenile open-angle glaucoma, and 76 with normal tension glaucoma. Healthy unrelated Korean individuals (n=100) were used as the non-selected population control. A total of three MYOC and four OPTN variants potentially associated with primary glaucoma were identified in 4 and 18 patients, respectively. A novel variant of MYOC, p.Leu255Pro, was predicted to be potentially pathogenic by in silico analysis. Another, p.Thr353Ile, has been previously reported. These two missense variants were detected in patients with a family history of glaucoma. Combined heterozygous variants p.[Thr123=;Ile288=] were identified in 2 of 112 (2%) patients but not in healthy controls. Among OPTN variants, a novel variant p.Arg271Cys was identified. Homozygous p.[Thr34=;Thr34=] (4/112, 4%), homozygous p.[Met98Lys;Met98Lys] (4/112, 4%), or combined heterozygous p.[Thr34=;Arg545Gln] (9/112, 8%) was significantly associated with the development of primary glaucoma [odds ratio (OR)=8.768, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.972–38.988; relative risk=1.818, 95% CI=1.473–2.244; P=0.001]. The present study provides insight into the genetic or haplotype variants of MYOC and OPTN genes contributing to primary glaucoma. Haplotype variants identified in the present study may be regarded as potential contributing factors of primary glaucoma in Korea. Further studies, including those on additional genes, are required to elucidate the underlying pathogenic mechanism using a larger cohort to provide additional statistical power. PMID:27485216

  16. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of English and Spanish Versions of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale Among Hispanic Women in a Primary Care Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Chelsey M.; Barroso, Nicole; Rey, Yasmin; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Bagner, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although a number of studies have examined the factor structure of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in predominately White or African American samples, no published research has reported on the factor structure among Hispanic women who reside in the United States. Objective The current study examined the factor structure of the EPDS among Hispanic mothers in the United States. Method Among 220 Hispanic women, drawn from a pediatric primary care setting, with an infant aged 0 to 10 months, 6 structural models guided by the empirical literature were evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Results Results supported a 2-factor model of depression and anxiety as the best fitting model. Multigroup models supported the factorial invariance across women who completed the EDPS in English and Spanish. Conclusion These findings provide initial support for the 2-factor structure of the EPDS among Hispanic women in the United States. PMID:24807217

  17. Conformational analysis of primary ethylene ozonide by gradient and multiconfigurational scf calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoff, Peter; Almlöf, Jan; Sæbø, Svem

    1980-06-01

    Four conformers of ethylene primary ozonide have been studied by ab initio gradient and MC SCF calculations, using gaussian-type basis functions. The MC SCF results indicate that the conformers are not as close in energy as suggested from single-determinant SCF calculations. The oxygen-oxygen and carbon-oxygen half-chair structures are much lower in energy than the carbon-carbon half-chair.

  18. Downstream elements of mammalian pre-mRNA polyadenylation signals: primary, secondary and higher-order structures.

    PubMed

    Zarudnaya, Margarita I; Kolomiets, Iryna M; Potyahaylo, Andriy L; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2003-03-01

    Primary, secondary and higher-order structures of downstream elements of mammalian pre-mRNA polyadenylation signals [poly(A) signals] are re viewed. We have carried out a detailed analysis on our database of 244 human pre-mRNA poly(A) signals in order to characterize elements in their downstream regions. We suggest that the downstream region of the mammalian pre-mRNA poly(A) signal consists of various simple elements located at different distances from each other. Thus, the downstream region is not described by any precise consensus. Searching our database, we found that approximately 80% of pre-mRNAs with the AAUAAA or AUUAAA core upstream elements contain simple downstream elements, consisting of U-rich and/or 2GU/U tracts, the former occurring approximately 2-fold more often than the latter. Approximately one-third of the pre-mRNAs analyzed here contain sequences that may form G-quadruplexes. A substantial number of these sequences are located immediately downstream of the poly(A) signal. A possible role of G-rich sequences in the polyadenylation process is discussed. A model of the secondary structure of the SV40 late pre-mRNA poly(A) signal downstream region is presented. PMID:12595544

  19. The Informational Text Structure Survey (ITS[superscript 2]): An Exploration of Primary Grade Teachers' Sensitivity to Text Structure in Young Children's Informational Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reutzel, D. Ray; Jones, Cindy D.; Clark, Sarah K.; Kumar, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    There has been no research reported about if or how well primary grade teachers can identify information text structures in children's authentic informational texts. The ability to do so accurately and reliably is a prerequisite for teachers to be able to teach students how to recognize and use text structures to assist them in comprehending…

  20. Factor Structure of the Primary Scales of the Inventory of Personality Organization in a Nonclinical Sample Using Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, William D.; Levy, Kenneth N.

    2012-01-01

    Using exploratory structural equation modeling and multiple regression, we examined the factor structure and criterion relations of the primary scales of the Inventory of Personality Organization (IPO; Kernberg & Clarkin, 1995) in a nonclinical sample. Participants (N = 1,260) completed the IPO and measures of self-concept clarity, defenses,…

  1. Integrated Structural Analysis and Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    An integrated structural-analysis and structure-testing computer program is being developed in order to: Automate repetitive processes in testing and analysis; Accelerate pre-test analysis; Accelerate reporting of tests; Facilitate planning of tests; Improve execution of tests; Create a vibration, acoustics, and shock test database; and Integrate analysis and test data. The software package includes modules pertaining to sinusoidal and random vibration, shock and time replication, acoustics, base-driven modal survey, and mass properties and static/dynamic balance. The program is commanded by use of ActiveX controls. There is minimal need to generate command lines. Analysis or test files are selected by opening a Windows Explorer display. After selecting the desired input file, the program goes to a so-called analysis data process or test data process, depending on the type of input data. The status of the process is given by a Windows status bar, and when processing is complete, the data are reported in graphical, tubular, and matrix form.

  2. Valued aspects of primary palliative care: content analysis of bereaved carers' descriptions

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Gunn E; Farquhar, Morag C; Barclay, Stephen IG; Todd, Chris J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Informal carers provide the bulk of palliative home care. They largely rely on general practitioners (GPs) and district nurses to support them in this role, yet little is known about what carers themselves consider important in this support. Aim: To identify what informal carers valued in the palliative support provided by GPs and district nurses by using carers' own descriptions of such support. Design of study: Retrospective interviews. Setting: Primary care in Cambridgeshire. Method: Semi-structured interviews with bereaved carers of 48 patients with cancer and 12 patients with non-cancer diagnoses. Content analysis of carers' evaluative descriptions of GP and district nurse support. Results: The accessibility of the GP and district nurse emerged as the most important aspect of support. Enlistment of help from other agencies was also extensively mentioned, together with provision of equipment. Attitude or approach during interactions, and relationship with the professional were important, particularly regarding GP support, whereas support for the carer, information, and symptom control were mentioned less often. Data suggested that support was not as good for older patients (≥75 years), but this finding requires further investigation. Conclusion: Results largely confirmed findings of previous, quantitative research and the importance of a patient-centred approach. What emerged most strongly, however, was the central importance of accessibility of support services for lay carers responsible for end-of-life home care. This mainly concerned GP and district nurse support, but accessibility of additional care and equipment were also important. In short, carers' main focus was the basic support that enabled them to sustain care in the home. PMID:15469677

  3. Identification of primary tumors of brain metastases by infrared spectroscopic imaging and linear discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Shapoval, Larysa; Sobottka, Stephan B; Schackert, Gabriele; Salzer, Reiner

    2006-06-01

    This study applies infrared (IR) spectroscopy to distinguish normal brain tissue from brain metastases and to determine the primary tumor of four frequent brain metastases such as lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer, and renal cell carcinoma. Standard methods sometimes fail to identify the origin of brain metastases. As metastatic cells contain the molecular information of the primary tissue cells and IR spectroscopy probes the molecular fingerprint of cells, IR spectroscopy based methods constitute a new approach to determine the primary tumor of a brain metastasis. IR spectroscopic images were recorded by a FTIR spectrometer equipped with a macro sample chamber and coupled to a focal plane array detector. Unsupervised cluster analysis of IR images revealed variances within each sample and between samples of the same tissue type. Cluster averaged IR spectra of tissue classes with known diagnoses were selected to develop a metric with eight variables. These data trained a supervised classification model based on linear discriminant analysis that was used to identify the origin of 20 cryosections including one brain metastasis with an unknown primary tumor. PMID:16700626

  4. Uncertain structural dynamics of aircraft panels and fuzzy structures analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2002-11-01

    Aircraft fuselage panels, seemingly simple structures, are actually complex because of the uncertainty of the attachments of the frame stiffeners and longitudinal stringers. It is clearly important to understand the dynamics of these panels because of the subsequent radiation into the passenger cabin, even when complete information is not available for all portions of the finite-element model. Over the last few years a fuzzy structures analysis (FSA) approach has been undertaken at Penn State and NASA Langley to quantify the uncertainty in modeling aircraft panels. A new MSC.Nastran [MSC.Software Corp. (Santa Ana, CA)] Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) code was written and tested [AIAA paper 2001-1320, 42nd AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conf., Seattle, WA, 16 April 2001] and was applied to simple fuselage panel models [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 2410(A) (2001)]. Recently the work has focused on understanding the dynamics of a realistic aluminum fuselage panel, typical of today's aircraft construction. This presentation will provide an overview of the research and recent results will be given for the fuselage panel. Comparison between experiments and the FSA results will be shown for different fuzzy input parameters. [Work supported by NASA Research Cooperative Agreement NCC-1-382.

  5. Stochastic Simulation Tool for Aerospace Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F.; Moore, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Stochastic simulation refers to incorporating the effects of design tolerances and uncertainties into the design analysis model and then determining their influence on the design. A high-level evaluation of one such stochastic simulation tool, the MSC.Robust Design tool by MSC.Software Corporation, has been conducted. This stochastic simulation tool provides structural analysts with a tool to interrogate their structural design based on their mathematical description of the design problem using finite element analysis methods. This tool leverages the analyst's prior investment in finite element model development of a particular design. The original finite element model is treated as the baseline structural analysis model for the stochastic simulations that are to be performed. A Monte Carlo approach is used by MSC.Robust Design to determine the effects of scatter in design input variables on response output parameters. The tool was not designed to provide a probabilistic assessment, but to assist engineers in understanding cause and effect. It is driven by a graphical-user interface and retains the engineer-in-the-loop strategy for design evaluation and improvement. The application problem for the evaluation is chosen to be a two-dimensional shell finite element model of a Space Shuttle wing leading-edge panel under re-entry aerodynamic loading. MSC.Robust Design adds value to the analysis effort by rapidly being able to identify design input variables whose variability causes the most influence in response output parameters.

  6. Structural analysis of light aircraft using NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. T.; Bruce, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    An application of NASTRAN to the structural analysis of light aircraft was conducted to determine the cost effectiveness. A model of the Baby Ace D model homebuilt aircraft was used. The NASTRAN model of the aircraft consists of 193 grid points connected by 352 structural members. All members are either rod or beam elements, including bending of unsymmetrical cross sections and torsion of noncircular cross sections. The aerodynamic loads applied to the aircraft were in accordance with FAA regulations governing the utility category aircraft.

  7. Music Structure Analysis from Acoustic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.; Goto, Masataka

    Music is full of structure, including sections, sequences of distinct musical textures, and the repetition of phrases or entire sections. The analysis of music audio relies upon feature vectors that convey information about music texture or pitch content. Texture generally refers to the average spectral shape and statistical fluctuation, often reflecting the set of sounding instruments, e.g., strings, vocal, or drums. Pitch content reflects melody and harmony, which is often independent of texture. Structure is found in several ways. Segment boundaries can be detected by observing marked changes in locally averaged texture.

  8. Novel Genes Implicated in Embryonal, Alveolar, and Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Cytogenetic and Molecular Analysis of Primary Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Myriam; Meller, Isaac; Issakov, Josephine; Orr-Urtreger, Avi

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Rhabdomyosarcoma, the most common pediatric soft tissue sarcoma, likely results from deregulation of the skeletal myogenesis program. Although associations between PAX3, PAX7, FOXO1A, and RMS tumorigenesis are well recognized, the entire spectrum of genetic factors underlying RMS development and progression is unclear. Using a combined approach of spectral karyotyping, array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), and expression analysis, we examined 10 primary RMS tumors, including embryonal, alveolar, and the rare adult pleomorphic variant, to explore the involvement of different genes and genetic pathways in RMS tumorigenesis. A complete karyotype established for each tumor revealed a high aneuploidy level, mostly tetraploidy, with double minutes and additional structural aberrations. Quantitative expression analysis detected the overexpression of the AURKA gene in all tumors tested, suggesting a role for this mitotic regulator in the aneuploidy and chromosomal instability observed in RMS. Array-based CGH analysis in primary RMS tumors detected copy number changes of genes involved in multiple genetic pathways, including transcription factors such as MYC-related gene from lung cancer and the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion-encoding genes laminin γ-2 and p21-activated kinase-1. Our data suggest the involvement of genes encoding cell adhesion, cytoskeletal signaling, and transcriptional and cell cycle components in RMS tumorigenesis. PMID:16790082

  9. Analysis of zinc binding sites in protein crystal structures.

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, I. L.; Nadassy, K.; Wodak, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The geometrical properties of zinc binding sites in a dataset of high quality protein crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank have been examined to identify important differences between zinc sites that are directly involved in catalysis and those that play a structural role. Coordination angles in the zinc primary coordination sphere are compared with ideal values for each coordination geometry, and zinc coordination distances are compared with those in small zinc complexes from the Cambridge Structural Database as a guide of expected trends. We find that distances and angles in the primary coordination sphere are in general close to the expected (or ideal) values. Deviations occur primarily for oxygen coordinating atoms and are found to be mainly due to H-bonding of the oxygen coordinating ligand to protein residues, bidentate binding arrangements, and multi-zinc sites. We find that H-bonding of oxygen containing residues (or water) to zinc bound histidines is almost universal in our dataset and defines the elec-His-Zn motif. Analysis of the stereochemistry shows that carboxyl elec-His-Zn motifs are geometrically rigid, while water elec-His-Zn motifs show the most geometrical variation. As catalytic motifs have a higher proportion of carboxyl elec atoms than structural motifs, they provide a more rigid framework for zinc binding. This is understood biologically, as a small distortion in the zinc position in an enzyme can have serious consequences on the enzymatic reaction. We also analyze the sequence pattern of the zinc ligands and residues that provide elecs, and identify conserved hydrophobic residues in the endopeptidases that also appear to contribute to stabilizing the catalytic zinc site. A zinc binding template in protein crystal structures is derived from these observations. PMID:10082367

  10. [Legislation on primary care in Brazilian Unified National Health System: document analysis].

    PubMed

    Domingos, Carolina Milena; Nunes, Elisabete de Fátima Polo de Almeida; Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez; Mendonça, Fernanda de Freitas

    2016-03-01

    A reflection on Brazil's legislation for primary care helps understand the way health policy is implemented in the country. This study focuses on the legal provisions aimed at strengthening primary care, drawing on an analysis of documents from the Ministry of Health's priority actions, programs, and strategies. A total of 224 provisions were identified, in two groups of documents, so-called instituting provisions and complementary provisions. The former include the principles and guidelines of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) and also involve the expansion of actions. Financing was a quantitatively central theme, especially in the complementary provisions. The analysis led to reflection on the extent to which these strategies can induce linkage between health system managers and civil society in building a political project resulting in improvements and meeting the population's health needs. PMID:27027459

  11. Critical Joints in Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structures. Volume 3: Ancillary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.; Sagui, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints for composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of a comprehensive ancillary test program are summarized, consisting of single-bolt composite joint specimens tested in a variety of configurations. These tests were conducted to characterize the strength and load deflection properties that are required for multirow joint analysis. The composite material was Toray 300 fiber and Ciba-Geigy 914 resin, in the form of 0.005 and 0.01 inch thick unidirectional tape. Tests were conducted in single and double shear for loaded and unloaded hole configurations under both tensile and compressive loading. Two different layup patterns were examined. All tests were conducted at room temperature. In addition, the results of NASA Standard Toughness Test (NASA RP 1092) are reported, which were conducted for several material systems.

  12. An Analysis of the Presentation of Art in the British Primary School Curriculum and Its Implications for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Jenny; Lee, Helen; Das Gupta, Mani

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the way art is conceptualised in the British primary school curriculum and provides an historical framework that maps an evolution of ideas that have shaped the way art is presented in the modern day primary curriculum. In order to achieve this a Foucauldian style genealogical analysis is utilised to trace the…

  13. Primary structure of a sperm cell anion exchanger and its messenger ribonucleic acid expression during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Holappa, K; Mustonen, M; Parvinen, M; Vihko, P; Rajaniemi, H; Kellokumpu, S

    1999-10-01

    Chloride/bicarbonate (Cl-/HCO(3)-) exchangers are a family of proteins (anion exchanger [AE] gene family) that regulate many vital cellular processes such as intracellular pH, cell volume, and Cl- concentration. They may also be involved in the regulation of sperm cell motility and acrosome reaction during fertilization, as these two phenomena are bicarbonate dependent, and we have previously shown that a polypeptide immunologically related to erythrocyte band 3 is expressed in mammalian sperm cells. We have now identified this putative sperm cell anion exchanger as the AE2 isoform of this gene family. First, we determined its complete primary structure from the human testis lambda gt 11 cDNA library. The cloned sequence was found to consist of 3896 base pairs (bp) with an open reading frame of 3726 bp, and to be almost identical to the previously published human genomic AE2 sequence. Only four amino acid disparities were found between these two sequences. Second, our in situ hybridization analyses showed that AE2 mRNA is expressed in developing sperm cells, indicating that the cloned sequence corresponds to the sperm cell AE. Our reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses suggested further that the expression of AE2 mRNA was variable to some extent during the epithelial cell cycle. Strongest expression was observed at stages VII-XIV except for stage X, i.e., when major structural and morphological changes take place. These results suggest that the full-length AE2 isoform regulates HCO(3)- transport in mature sperm cells and thus their motility in vivo. PMID:10491633

  14. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 2. The primary structure of the gamma 1 protein chain.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Hempel, J; Kaiser, R; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    The primary structure of the gamma 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme gamma 1 gamma 1 was deduced by characterization of 36 tryptic and 2 CNBr peptides. The polypeptide chain is composed of 373 amino acid residues. gamma 1 differs from the beta 1 subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 21 positions, and from the E subunit of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase at 43 positions including a gap at position 128 as in the beta 1 subunit. All zinc-liganding residues from the E subunit of the horse protein and the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme are conserved, but like beta 1, gamma 1 also has an additional cysteine residue at position 286 (in the positional numbering system of the horse enzyme) due to a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most amino acid exchanges preserve the properties of the residues affected and are largely located on the surface of the molecules, away from the active site and the coenzyme binding region. However, eight positions with charge differences in relation to the E subunit of the horse enzyme are noticed. These result in a net positive charge increase of one in gamma 1 versus E, explaining the electrophoretic mobilities on starch gels. Of functional significance is the conservation of Ser-48 in gamma 1 relative to E. The residue is close to the active site but different (Thr-48) in the beta 1 subunit of the human enzyme. Thus, the closer structural relationship between human gamma 1 and horse E enzyme subunit than between beta 1 and E is also reflected in functionally important residues, explaining a greater similarity between gamma 1 gamma 1 and EE than between beta 1 beta 1 and EE. PMID:6391921

  15. Crystal structure of Halobacterium salinarum halorhodopsin with a partially depopulated primary chloride-binding site.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Madeleine; Schlesinger, Ramona; Heberle, Joachim; Niemann, Hartmut H

    2016-09-01

    The transmembrane pump halorhodopsin in halophilic archaea translocates chloride ions from the extracellular to the cytoplasmic side upon illumination. In the ground state a tightly bound chloride ion occupies the primary chloride-binding site (CBS I) close to the protonated Schiff base that links the retinal chromophore to the protein. The light-triggered trans-cis isomerization of retinal causes structural changes in the protein associated with movement of the chloride ion. In reverse, chemical depletion of CBS I in Natronomonas pharaonis halorhodopsin (NpHR) through deprotonation of the Schiff base results in conformational changes of the protein: a state thought to mimic late stages of the photocycle. Here, crystals of Halobacterium salinarum halorhodopsin (HsHR) were soaked at high pH to provoke deprotonation of the Schiff base and loss of chloride. The crystals changed colour from purple to yellow and the occupancy of CBS I was reduced from 1 to about 0.5. In contrast to NpHR, this chloride depletion did not cause substantial conformational changes in the protein. Nevertheless, two observations indicate that chloride depletion could eventually result in structural changes similar to those found in NpHR. Firstly, the partially chloride-depleted form of HsHR has increased normalized B factors in the region of helix C that is close to CBS I and changes its conformation in NpHR. Secondly, prolonged soaking of HsHR crystals at high pH resulted in loss of diffraction. In conclusion, the conformation of the chloride-free protein may not be compatible with this crystal form of HsHR despite a packing arrangement that hardly restrains helices E and F that presumably move during ion transport. PMID:27599860

  16. Analysis of Open TEM-Waveguide Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambousky, R.; Garbe, H.

    This work belongs to a research project on the analysis and characterization of higher order modes occurring in open TEM-waveguide structures. An open TEM waveguide, derived from a conventional GTEM cell by removing the sidewalls, is investigated. The intrinsic resonances of the electromagnetic field occurring in the test volume of the waveguide are analyzed in frequency domain by computer simulation and measurement. This resonance behavior is compared to that of more simplified wire models, describing just the planar septum of the original TEM waveguide. The influence of the number of wires used in the wire model is investigated with respect to the resonant behavior. The use of wire structures is a prerequisite for application of transmission-line super theory (TLST) for further analysis.

  17. Structure analysis for plane geometry figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Tianxiao; Lu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Keqiang; Tang, Zhi

    2013-12-01

    As there are increasing numbers of digital documents for education purpose, we realize that there is not a retrieval application for mathematic plane geometry images. In this paper, we propose a method for retrieving plane geometry figures (PGFs), which often appear in geometry books and digital documents. First, detecting algorithms are applied to detect common basic geometry shapes from a PGF image. Based on all basic shapes, we analyze the structural relationships between two basic shapes and combine some of them to a compound shape to build the PGF descriptor. Afterwards, we apply matching function to retrieve candidate PGF images with ranking. The great contribution of the paper is that we propose a structure analysis method to better describe the spatial relationships in such image composed of many overlapped shapes. Experimental results demonstrate that our analysis method and shape descriptor can obtain good retrieval results with relatively high effectiveness and efficiency.

  18. Study of galaxy structures by correlation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador-Sole, E.; Sanroma, M. )

    1989-10-01

    In a previous paper the authors presented a new method that makes it possible to infer the surface number density profile of galaxies in groups and clusters. This method is based on the correlation analysis of galaxy positions in a plate and applies to radially symmetric systems with uncorrelated positions of their particles. Here it is shown that, under these same assumptions, the method makes it possible to obtain the surface density profile of any additive positive property, as well as other related quantities, such as the line-of-sight velocity dispersion of galaxies. Moreover, the method can deal not only with structures that are radially symmetric but also with ones that are elliptically symmetric and axisymmetric. Finally, it is shown that the analogous method in one dimension makes it possible to obtain another important profile for the analysis of galaxy structures, namely, the line-of-sight velocity distribution. 5 refs.

  19. Combination of structural reliability and interval analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiping; Yang, Di; Elishakoff, Isaac

    2008-02-01

    In engineering applications, probabilistic reliability theory appears to be presently the most important method, however, in many cases precise probabilistic reliability theory cannot be considered as adequate and credible model of the real state of actual affairs. In this paper, we developed a hybrid of probabilistic and non-probabilistic reliability theory, which describes the structural uncertain parameters as interval variables when statistical data are found insufficient. By using the interval analysis, a new method for calculating the interval of the structural reliability as well as the reliability index is introduced in this paper, and the traditional probabilistic theory is incorporated with the interval analysis. Moreover, the new method preserves the useful part of the traditional probabilistic reliability theory, but removes the restriction of its strict requirement on data acquisition. Example is presented to demonstrate the feasibility and validity of the proposed theory.

  20. Does Congenital Deafness Affect the Structural and Functional Architecture of Primary Visual Cortex?

    PubMed Central

    Smittenaar, C.R.; MacSweeney, M.; Sereno, M.I.; Schwarzkopf, D.S.

    2016-01-01

    Deafness results in greater reliance on the remaining senses. It is unknown whether the cortical architecture of the intact senses is optimized to compensate for lost input. Here we performed widefield population receptive field (pRF) mapping of primary visual cortex (V1) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in hearing and congenitally deaf participants, all of whom had learnt sign language after the age of 10 years. We found larger pRFs encoding the peripheral visual field of deaf compared to hearing participants. This was likely driven by larger facilitatory center zones of the pRF profile concentrated in the near and far periphery in the deaf group. pRF density was comparable between groups, indicating pRFs overlapped more in the deaf group. This could suggest that a coarse coding strategy underlies enhanced peripheral visual skills in deaf people. Cortical thickness was also decreased in V1 in the deaf group. These findings suggest deafness causes structural and functional plasticity at the earliest stages of visual cortex. PMID:27014392

  1. Primary structure of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Final report, 9 April 1989-6 April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, J.W.

    1992-05-06

    Signals are transmitted between cells in the brain using neurotransmitters and neurotransmitter receptors. Poisons that interfere with this process stop normal brain function and often kill nerve cells. One of the neurotransmitters used in the mammalian brain is acetylcholine. We discovered that there is a large number of different nicotinic receptors for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, each with its different properties. We used recombinant DNA technology to clone and sequence the gene transcripts that encode the subunits of these receptors. From these sequences we deduced the primary structures of the nicotinic receptor subunits. We also used the cDNA clones to determine which brain loci express the respective genes. We have expressed the clones in the Xenopus oocyte and have demonstrated that each functional combination of subunits has a unique pharmacology Unlike their homologs at the neuromuscular junction, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain are exceptionally permeable to calcium. This property suggests that these receptors may play an important role in regulating calcium-dependent cytoplasmic processes and that they may be important contributors to use-dependent cell death.

  2. Concordant genetic structure in two species of woodpecker distributed across the primary West African biogeographic barriers.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jérôme; Bowie, Rauri C K

    2015-07-01

    The lowland forests of western and central tropical Africa are separated by several potential biogeographic barriers to dispersal for forest adapted vertebrates. The two primary barriers are (1) the Dahomey Gap, a savanna corridor that reaches the coast of southern Ghana, Togo and Benin, and separates the West African rainforest into the Upper (Ghana west to Guinea) and Lower Guinea (Nigeria to Uganda and Angola) forest blocks, and (2) the Lower Niger River, a large delta that separates Western and Eastern Nigeria. Previous studies on terrestrial vertebrates (lizards, mammals and birds) have highlighted a genetic break in the Dahomey Gap/Lower Niger River area although the relative importance of each barrier has not been assessed due to limitations in geographic sampling. We compared the phylogeographic history of two co-distributed sister-species of woodpeckers (Campethera caroli and C. nivosa) using data from three loci representing all inheritance modes. Our analyses revealed that both the Dahomey Gap and possibly the Lower Niger River acted as strong biogeographic barriers for the two woodpecker species, with the Lower Niger River being the first barrier to have formed, leading to three distinct populations of C. nivosa. Our divergence time analyses revealed that both these biogeographic barriers formed during the Pleistocene, supporting the Pleistocene refuge hypothesis, with the Dahomey Gap likely appearing about 0.5 myr BP. No genetic structure was recovered among sampled populations in either the Upper or the Lower Guinea Forest Block for both species, despite the considerable geographic area covered. PMID:25800284

  3. Relationships of Leaf Net Photosynthesis, Stomatal Conductance, and Mesophyll Conductance to Primary Metabolism: A Multispecies Meta-Analysis Approach.

    PubMed

    Gago, Jorge; Daloso, Danilo de Menezes; Figueroa, Carlos María; Flexas, Jaume; Fernie, Alisdair Robert; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2016-05-01

    Plant metabolism drives plant development and plant-environment responses, and data readouts from this cellular level could provide insights in the underlying molecular processes. Existing studies have already related key in vivo leaf gas-exchange parameters with structural traits and nutrient components across multiple species. However, insights in the relationships of leaf gas-exchange with leaf primary metabolism are still limited. We investigated these relationships through a multispecies meta-analysis approach based on data sets from 17 published studies describing net photosynthesis (A) and stomatal (gs) and mesophyll (gm) conductances, alongside the 53 data profiles from primary metabolism of 14 species grown in different experiments. Modeling results highlighted the conserved patterns between the different species. Consideration of species-specific effects increased the explanatory power of the models for some metabolites, including Glc-6-P, Fru-6-P, malate, fumarate, Xyl, and ribose. Significant relationships of A with sugars and phosphorylated intermediates were observed. While gs was related to sugars, organic acids, myo-inositol, and shikimate, gm showed a more complex pattern in comparison to the two other traits. Some metabolites, such as malate and Man, appeared in the models for both conductances, suggesting a metabolic coregulation between gs and gm The resulting statistical models provide the first hints for coregulation patterns involving primary metabolism plus leaf water and carbon balances that are conserved across plant species, as well as species-specific trends that can be used to determine new biotechnological targets for crop improvement. PMID:26977088

  4. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Huang, H.; Hartle, M.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the third years effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) structural analysis capability specialized for graded composite structures including large deformation and deformation position eigenanalysis technologies; (2) a thermal analyzer specialized for graded composite structures; (3) absorption of electromagnetic waves by graded composite structures; and (4) coupled structural thermal/electromagnetic analysis of graded composite structures.

  5. Structural analysis at aircraft conceptual design stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Reza

    In the past 50 years, computers have helped by augmenting human efforts with tremendous pace. The aircraft industry is not an exception. Aircraft industry is more than ever dependent on computing because of a high level of complexity and the increasing need for excellence to survive a highly competitive marketplace. Designers choose computers to perform almost every analysis task. But while doing so, existing effective, accurate and easy to use classical analytical methods are often forgotten, which can be very useful especially in the early phases of the aircraft design where concept generation and evaluation demands physical visibility of design parameters to make decisions [39, 2004]. Structural analysis methods have been used by human beings since the very early civilization. Centuries before computers were invented; the pyramids were designed and constructed by Egyptians around 2000 B.C, the Parthenon was built by the Greeks, around 240 B.C, Dujiangyan was built by the Chinese. Persepolis, Hagia Sophia, Taj Mahal, Eiffel tower are only few more examples of historical buildings, bridges and monuments that were constructed before we had any advancement made in computer aided engineering. Aircraft industry is no exception either. In the first half of the 20th century, engineers used classical method and designed civil transport aircraft such as Ford Tri Motor (1926), Lockheed Vega (1927), Lockheed 9 Orion (1931), Douglas DC-3 (1935), Douglas DC-4/C-54 Skymaster (1938), Boeing 307 (1938) and Boeing 314 Clipper (1939) and managed to become airborne without difficulty. Evidencing, while advanced numerical methods such as the finite element analysis is one of the most effective structural analysis methods; classical structural analysis methods can also be as useful especially during the early phase of a fixed wing aircraft design where major decisions are made and concept generation and evaluation demands physical visibility of design parameters to make decisions

  6. Probabilistic seismic demand analysis of nonlinear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shome, Nilesh

    Recent earthquakes in California have initiated improvement in current design philosophy and at present the civil engineering community is working towards development of performance-based earthquake engineering of structures. The objective of this study is to develop efficient, but accurate procedures for probabilistic analysis of nonlinear seismic behavior of structures. The proposed procedures help the near-term development of seismic-building assessments which require an estimation of seismic demand at a given intensity level. We also develop procedures to estimate the probability of exceedance of any specified nonlinear response level due to future ground motions at a specific site. This is referred as Probabilistic Seismic Demand Analysis (PSDA). The latter procedure prepares the way for the next stage development of seismic assessment that consider the uncertainties in nonlinear response and capacity. The proposed procedures require structure-specific nonlinear analyses for a relatively small set of recorded accelerograms and (site-specific or USGS-map-like) seismic hazard analyses. We have addressed some of the important issues of nonlinear seismic demand analysis, which are selection of records for structural analysis, the number of records to be used, scaling of records, etc. Initially these issues are studied through nonlinear analysis of structures for a number of magnitude-distance bins of records. Subsequently we introduce regression analysis of response results against spectral acceleration, magnitude, duration, etc., which helps to resolve these issues more systematically. We illustrate the demand-hazard calculations through two major example problems: a 5story and a 20-story SMRF building. Several simple, but quite accurate closed-form solutions have also been proposed to expedite the demand-hazard calculations. We find that vector-valued (e.g., 2-D) PSDA estimates demand hazard more accurately. This procedure, however, requires information about 2

  7. Probabilistic structural analysis methods and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, T. A.; Wu, Y.-T.; Dias, B.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    1988-01-01

    An advanced algorithm for simulating the probabilistic distribution of structural responses due to statistical uncertainties in loads, geometry, material properties, and boundary conditions is reported. The method effectively combines an advanced algorithm for calculating probability levels for multivariate problems (fast probability integration) together with a general-purpose finite-element code for stress, vibration, and buckling analysis. Application is made to a space propulsion system turbine blade for which the geometry and material properties are treated as random variables.

  8. Analysis of nonlinear structures via mode synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gieseke, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    An effective procedure for NASTRAN was developed that permits any number of substructures of any size to be synthesized for the purpose of developing normal modes of vibration of the complete structural system. The technique is extended to permit modal transient analysis of the subdivided system. This latter procedure permits the use of NASTRAN's ability to include nonlinear forces in the problem. The five-phase process is accomplished using standard NASTRAN rigid formats with problem-independent alter packages and DMAP sequences.

  9. Evaluation, analysis and prediction of geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Nicholas B.

    2012-08-01

    Balanced cross-sections claim to be better because they apply a rigorous set of rules to develop the conceptual model of the structures present in an area. Balanced cross-sections can be further improved and become more useful to understanding real physical problems by collection of additional data such as seismic reflection surveys, collection of additional stratigraphic data, or collection of rock fabric information. The additional information validates the initial model and provides details on deformation conditions and on local rock responses to the deformation. Although individual cross-sections are two dimensional, the objective of evaluation and analysis of deformed regions should be three dimensional whenever possible to recognize the challenges of the real world. Subsurface system analysis derived from the hydrologic community emphasizes conceptual model development through model verification, validation, uncertainty quantification, benchmarking and meta-analysis. Their approach includes many steps informally used by the structural geology community but in a much more explicit way. Newer geological applications of structural geology would benefit from this more rigorous approach for designing and doing performance predictions as technological needs become more socially sensitive such as for carbon storage sites, new areas of energy exploration in higher population density areas, or for nuclear waste storage facilities.

  10. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, M. G.; Heasler, P. G.; Hoover, K. A.; Rynes, N. J.; Thiessen, R. L.; Alfaro, J. L.

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures.

  11. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A.; Rynes, N.J.; Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L.

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA`s characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL`s RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Remote geologic structural analysis of Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, M.G.; Heasler, P.G.; Hoover, K.A. ); Rynes, N.J. ); Thiessen, R.L.; Alfaro, J.L. )

    1991-12-01

    The Remote Geologic Analysis (RGA) system was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify crustal structures that may affect seismic wave propagation from nuclear tests. Using automated methods, the RGA system identifies all valleys in a digital elevation model (DEM), fits three-dimensional vectors to valley bottoms, and catalogs all potential fracture or fault planes defined by coplanar pairs of valley vectors. The system generates a cluster hierarchy of planar features having greater-than-random density that may represent areas of anomalous topography manifesting structural control of erosional drainage development. Because RGA uses computer methods to identify zones of hypothesized control of topography, ground truth using a well-characterized test site was critical in our evaluation of RGA's characterization of inaccessible test sites for seismic verification studies. Therefore, we applied RGA to a study area centered on Yucca Flat at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and compared our results with both mapped geology and geologic structures and with seismic yield-magnitude models. This is the final report of PNL's RGA development project for peer review within the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control (OAC) seismic-verification community. In this report, we discuss the Yucca Flat study area, the analytical basis of the RGA system and its application to Yucca Flat, the results of the analysis, and the relation of the analytical results to known topography, geology, and geologic structures. 41 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Design and analysis of isostatic mounts on a spaceborne lightweight primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. Y.; Chen, Y. C.; Chang, S. T.; Huang, T. M.; Hsu, M. Y.

    2013-09-01

    The paper is aimed at obtaining the optimum isostatic mount configuration for a ZERODUR® primary mirror with a predesigned lightweight configuration on the back for a space Cassegrain telescope. The finite element analysis and Zernike polynomial fitting based on the Taguchi method are applied to the whole optimization process. Under the integrated optomechanical analysis, three isostatic mounts are bonded to the center of gravity of the mirror. Geometrical control factors and levels have been selected to minimize the optical aberrations under self-weight loading. The optimum isostatic mount with the least induced astigmatism value is finally attained under the Taguchi method.

  14. Thermal Analysis of the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System Piping During the Gas Baking Process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Harvey, Karen; Ferrada, Juan J

    2011-02-01

    A preliminary analysis has been performed examining the temperature distribution in the Divertor Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS) piping and the divertor itself during the gas baking process. During gas baking, it is required that the divertor reach a temperature of 350 C. Thermal losses in the piping and from the divertor itself require that the gas supply temperature be maintained above that temperature in order to ensure that all of the divertor components reach the required temperature. The analysis described in this report was conducted in order to estimate the required supply temperature from the gas heater.

  15. Simulation of the tensile properties of silica aerogels: the effects of cluster structure and primary particle size.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Lu, Zixing; Zhu, Man; Yuan, Zeshuai; Yang, Zhenyu; Hu, Zijun; Li, Junning

    2014-09-01

    A new two-level model is proposed to investigate the relationship between the mechanical properties and microstructure of silica aerogels. This two-level model consists of the particle-particle interaction model and the cluster structure model. The particle-particle interaction model is proposed to describe interactions between primary particles, in which the polymerization reaction between primary particles is considered. The cluster structure model represents the geometrical structure of silica aerogels, and it is established using a modified diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) algorithm. This two-level model is used to investigate the tensile behavior of silica aerogels based on the discrete element method (DEM). The numerical results show that the primary particle size has significant effects on the elastic modulus and tensile strength of silica aerogels. Moreover, the power-law relationships between tensile properties and aerogel density are dependent on the variation of the primary particle radius with density. The present results can explain the difference among different experimental exponents to a certain extent. In comparison with experimental data within a wide density range, this two-level model provides good quantitative estimations of the elastic modulus and tensile strength of silica aerogels after the size effects of the primary particle are considered. This paper provides a fundamental understanding of the relationship between the mechanical properties and microstructure of silica aerogels. The two-level model can be extended to study the mechanical properties of other aerogels and aerogel composites. PMID:25022232

  16. Analysis of waveguiding properties of VCSEL structures

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1996-09-01

    In this paper, the authors explore the feasibility of using the distributed Bragg reflector, grown on the substrate for a VCSEL (Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser), to provide waveguiding within the substrate. This waveguiding could serve as an interconnection among VCSELs in an array. Before determining the feasibility of waveguide interconnected VCSELs, two analysis methods are presented and evaluated for their applicability to this problem. The implementations in Mathematica of both these methods are included. Results of the analysis show that waveguiding in VCSEL structures is feasible. Some of the many possible uses of waveguide interconnected VCSELs are also briefly discussed. The tools and analysis presented in this report can be used to evaluate such system concepts and to do detailed design calculations.

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in penile carcinomas in Argentina: analysis of primary tumors and lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Picconi, M A; Eiján, A M; Distéfano, A L; Pueyo, S; Alonio, L V; Gorostidi, S; Teyssié, A R; Casabé, A

    2000-05-01

    Among sexually transmitted diseases, infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) has become one of the most important. On the other hand, though epidemiological data show that some HPV types are closely associated with cervical cancer, few reports have been found with reference to penile carcinoma because of its rare occurrence. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between HPV infection and penile cancer in Argentina. A retrospective study was carried out on 38 white men with penile squamous-cell carcinoma. Sixty-five archival fixed biopsies taken from 34 primary penile tumors, 25 nodal metastases, 1 skin "satellite" metastasis and 5 histologically normal lymph nodes were used as specimens. HPV detection and typing were carried out by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using generic primers, combined with single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. HPV DNA was found in 71% patients, corresponding 81% of them to "high risk" types, with predominance of HPV 18. Both primary tumors and metastases showed concordance of HPV occurrence and type in both lesions. In 3 patients, HPV 16 was detected not only in primary tumors and metastases, but also in histologically normal lymph nodes. Our data indicate that most penile carcinomas in Argentine patients are etiologically related to HPV, especially to "high risk" genital types. The agreement in HPV detection between primary tumors and metastases suggests a potential viral role in tumor progression. HPV detection in otherwise histologically normal lymph nodes might be useful as early marker of a metastatic process. PMID:10745234

  18. Introducing Pre-university Students to Primary Scientific Literature Through Argumentation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeneman, Marcel; Goedhart, Martin; Ossevoort, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Primary scientific literature is one of the most important means of communication in science, written for peers in the scientific community. Primary literature provides an authentic context for showing students how scientists support their claims. Several teaching strategies have been proposed using (adapted) scientific publications, some for secondary education, but none of these strategies focused specifically on scientific argumentation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate a strategy for teaching pre-university students to read unadapted primary scientific literature, translated into students' native language, based on a new argumentation analysis framework. This framework encompasses seven types of argumentative elements: motive, objective, main conclusion, implication, support, counterargument and refutation. During the intervention, students studied two research articles. We monitored students' reading comprehension and their opinion on the articles and activities. After the intervention, we measured students' ability to identify the argumentative elements in a third unadapted and translated research article. The presented framework enabled students to analyse the article by identifying the motive, objective, main conclusion and implication and part of the supports. Students stated that they found these activities useful. Most students understood the text on paragraph level and were able to read the article with some help for its vocabulary. We suggest that primary scientific literature has the potential to show students important aspects of the scientific process and to learn scientific vocabulary in an authentic context.

  19. Wavelet analysis of skin blood flow in dermatosurgery using primary closure with tension.

    PubMed

    Häfner, Hans-Martin; Bräuer, Kurt; Kneilling, Manfred; Moehrle, Matthias; Breuninger, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Primary closure in dermatologic surgery is state of the art in small lesions at the head, but also in larger lesions at the trunk or the extremities. Microcirculatory effects on the skin blood flow near to the wound edges affected by primary closure. Forty three patients were investigated. Before and after surgery, skin blood flow was measured using Laser Doppler Fluxmetry (LDF). During primary closure, tension in the suture was measured and the tension on the wound edges was calculated. Times series were analyzed using continuous wavelet analyses, before, after 2 h and 24 h after surgery. After three months, the cosmetic results were requested. Median horizontal diameter was 22 mm (quartiles 20/48 mm), median vertical diameter was 44 mm (quartiles 26/60 mm). Mean string force was 12.0 SD 10.2 N. During the whole course of investigation, we found no change of microcirculatory parameters such as mean LDF or any scaling level following wavelet analysis caused by primary closure. Average of the cosmetic result was 1.8. It is a relative small number of patients and the defects are located in different areas. Skin blood flow and the microcirculatory pattern is not affected in the area by the tension on wound edges and provides therefore a fast healing process without any vegetatively induced complications even if the string force is high. In dermatosurgery, wounds can be closed directly without changing the microcirculatory pattern in the direct area of the wound margins. PMID:21339630

  20. Challenges in structural analysis for deformed nuclear reactivity assessments.

    SciTech Connect

    Tallman, Tyler N.; Smith, Jeffrey A.; Villa, Daniel L.

    2010-09-01

    Launch safety calculations for past space reactor concepts have usually been limited to immersion of the reactor in water and/or sand, using nominal system geometries or in some cases simplified compaction scenarios. Deformation of the reactor core by impact during the accident sequence typically has not been considered because of the complexity of the calculation. Recent advances in codes and computing power have made such calculations feasible. The accuracy of such calculations depends primarily on the underlying structural analysis. Even though explicit structural dynamics is a mature field, nuclear reactors present significant challenges to obtain accurate deformation predictions. The presence of a working fluid is one of the primary contributors to challenges in these predictions. The fluid-structure interaction cannot be neglected because the fluid surrounds the nuclear fuel which is the most important region in the analysis. A detailed model of a small eighty-five pin reactor was built with the working fluid modeled as smoothed particle hydrodynamic (SPH) elements. Filling the complex volume covered by the working fluid with SPH elements required development of an algorithm which eliminates overlaps between hexahedral and SPH elements. The results with and without the working fluid were found to be considerably different with respect to reactivity predictions.

  1. Structural Analysis Using Computer Based Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The stiffness of a flex hose that will be used in the umbilical arms of the Space Launch Systems mobile launcher needed to be determined in order to properly qualify ground umbilical plate behavior during vehicle separation post T-0. This data is also necessary to properly size and design the motors used to retract the umbilical arms. Therefore an experiment was created to determine the stiffness of the hose. Before the test apparatus for the experiment could be built, the structure had to be analyzed to ensure it would not fail under given loading conditions. The design model was imported into the analysis software and optimized to decrease runtime while still providing accurate restlts and allow for seamless meshing. Areas exceeding the allowable stresses in the structure were located and modified before submitting the design for fabrication. In addition, a mock up of a deep space habitat and the support frame was designed and needed to be analyzed for structural integrity under different loading conditions. The load cases were provided by the customer and were applied to the structure after optimizing the geometry. Once again, weak points in the structure were located and recommended design changes were made to the customer and the process was repeated until the load conditions were met without exceeding the allowable stresses. After the stresses met the required factors of safety the designs were released for fabrication.

  2. Probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H. R.; Wu, Y.-T.; Fossum, A. F.

    1990-01-01

    A probabilistic finite element program is used to perform probabilistic analysis of a materially nonlinear structure. The program used in this study is NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structure Under Stress), under development at Southwest Research Institute. The cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the radial stress of a thick-walled cylinder under internal pressure is computed and compared with the analytical solution. In addition, sensitivity factors showing the relative importance of the input random variables are calculated. Significant plasticity is present in this problem and has a pronounced effect on the probabilistic results. The random input variables are the material yield stress and internal pressure with Weibull and normal distributions, respectively. The results verify the ability of NESSUS to compute the CDF and sensitivity factors of a materially nonlinear structure. In addition, the ability of the Advanced Mean Value (AMV) procedure to assess the probabilistic behavior of structures which exhibit a highly nonlinear response is shown. Thus, the AMV procedure can be applied with confidence to other structures which exhibit nonlinear behavior.

  3. Structural Analysis of Sandwich Foam Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Huo, X. Sharon

    2010-04-01

    The Sandwich Panel Technologies including Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) can be used to replace the conventional wooden-frame construction method. The main purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and SGI Venture, Inc. was to design a novel high R-value type of metal sandwich panelized technology. This CRADA project report presents design concept discussion and numerical analysis results from thermal performance study of this new building envelope system. The main objective of this work was to develop a basic concept of a new generation of wall panel technologies which will have R-value over R-20 will use thermal mass to improve energy performance in cooling dominated climates and will be 100% termite resistant. The main advantages of using sandwich panels are as follows: (1) better energy saving structural panels with high and uniform overall wall R-value across the elevation that could not be achieved in traditional walls; and (2) reducing the use of raw materials or need for virgin lumber. For better utilization of these Sandwich panels, engineers need to have a thorough understanding of the actual performance of the panels and system. Detailed analysis and study on the capacities and deformation of individual panels and its assembly have to be performed to achieve that goal. The major project activity was to conduct structural analysis of the stresses, strains, load capacities, and deformations of individual sandwich components under various load cases. The analysis simulated the actual loading conditions of the regular residential building and used actual material properties of the steel facings and foam.

  4. Structural Assimilation Revisited: Mexican-Origin Nativity and Cross-Ethnic Primary Ties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Susan K.

    2006-01-01

    Classical assimilation theory postulates that over time, members of immigrant groups will develop more primary ties with native members of the host society. However, lack of data has led most research to rely on the study of either spatial mobility or other secondary variables as proxies of primary ties. Using data from the Multi-City Study of…

  5. The Structure of Educational Costs: Multiproduct Cost Functions for Primary and Secondary Schools in Latin America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, Emmanuel

    1986-01-01

    Relying heavily on equations and tabular data, this paper analyzes the educational cost functions of primary and secondary schooling levels in Latin America. Economies of scale are found for both levels in Bolivian and Paraguayan urban schools; schools combining primary and secondary school services are shown to be less cost effective. (23…

  6. Primary cilium - antenna-like structure on the surface of most mammalian cell types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, J.; Sitorova, V.; Hadzi Nikolov, D.; Mokry, J.; Richter, I.; Kasaova, L.; Filip, S.; Ryska, A.; Petera, J.

    2011-12-01

    The primary cilium is a sensory solitary non-motile microtubule-based organelle protruding in the quiescent phase of the cell cycle from the surface of the majority of human cells, including embryonic cells, stem cells and stromal cells of malignant tumors. The presence of a primary cilium on the surface of a cell is transient, limited to the quiescent G1(G0) phase and the beginning of the S phase of the cell cycle. The primary cilium is formed from the mother centriole. Primary cilia are key coordinators of signaling pathways during development and tissue homeostasis and, when deffective, they are a major cause of human diseases and developmental disorders, now commonly referred to as ciliopathies. Most cancer cells do not possess a primary cilium. The loss of the primary cilium is a regular feature of neoplastic transformation in the majority of solid tumors. The primary cilium could serve as a tumor suppressor organelle. The aim of this paper was to provide a review of the current knowledge of the primary cilium.

  7. Childhood Anxiety in a Diverse Primary Care Population: Parent-Child Reports, Ethnicity and SCARED Factor Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wren, Frances J.; Berg, Eric A.; Heiden, Lynda A.; Kinnamon, Carolyn J.; Ohlson, Lirio A.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Birmaher, Boris; Bernal, M. Pilar

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore in a multiethnic primary care population the impact of child gender and of race/ethnicity on parent and child reports of school-age anxiety and on the factor structure of the Screen for Childhood Anxiety and Related Emotional Disorders (SCARED). Method: A consecutive sample of 515 children (8 to less than 13 years) and their…

  8. Analysis of N-16 concentration in primary cooling system of AP1000 power reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohanda, Anis; Waris, Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Nitrogen-16 (N-16) is one of the radiation safety parameter on the primary reactor system. The activation product, N-16, is the predominant contributor to the activity in the reactor coolant system during reactor operation. N-16 is activation product derived from activation of O-16 with fast neutron based on 16O(n,p)16N reaction. Thus study is needed and it performs to determine N-16 concentration in reactor coolant (primary coolant) in supporting radiation safety. One of the way is using analytical methode based on activation and redecay princip to obtain N-16 concentration. The analysis was performed on the configuration basis and operational of Westinghouse AP1000 power reactor in several monitoring points at coolant reactor system. The results of the calculation of N-16 concentration at the core outlet, reactor vessel outlet, pressurizer line, inlet and outlet of steam generators, primary pumps, reactor vessels inlet and core inlet are: 281, 257, 255, 250, 145, 142, 129 and 112 µCi/gram respectively. The results of analysis compared with AP1000 design control document as standard values. The verification showed very high accuracy comparation between analytical results and standard values.

  9. Analysis of N-16 concentration in primary cooling system of AP1000 power reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Rohanda, Anis; Waris, Abdul

    2015-04-16

    Nitrogen-16 (N-16) is one of the radiation safety parameter on the primary reactor system. The activation product, N-16, is the predominant contributor to the activity in the reactor coolant system during reactor operation. N-16 is activation product derived from activation of O-16 with fast neutron based on {sup 16}O(n,p){sup 16}N reaction. Thus study is needed and it performs to determine N-16 concentration in reactor coolant (primary coolant) in supporting radiation safety. One of the way is using analytical methode based on activation and redecay princip to obtain N-16 concentration. The analysis was performed on the configuration basis and operational of Westinghouse AP1000 power reactor in several monitoring points at coolant reactor system. The results of the calculation of N-16 concentration at the core outlet, reactor vessel outlet, pressurizer line, inlet and outlet of steam generators, primary pumps, reactor vessels inlet and core inlet are: 281, 257, 255, 250, 145, 142, 129 and 112 µCi/gram respectively. The results of analysis compared with AP1000 design control document as standard values. The verification showed very high accuracy comparation between analytical results and standard values.

  10. Efficacy of using Carisolv in the removal of decayed tooth structure in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Analia Veitz; Congiusta, Marie A

    2016-06-01

    Data sourcesMedline, Web of Science and Scopus were searched using a unique search strategy.Study selectionTwo authors independently reviewed and selected Clinical Trials, Randomised Clinical trials and Controlled Trials assessing the efficacy on primary dentition of Carisolv compared to traditional caries removal with drilling instruments. Only studies where total caries removal in each group was completed using Carisolv systems or rotary instruments used without any time limit were considered suitable. Studies assessing the complete caries removal by different methods from the clinical criteria selected (ie using a sharp probe) were excluded.Data extraction and synthesisThe outcomes considered for the review were: the caries removal rate (binary yes/no), the time required to complete the tissue removal (continuous) and the pain threshold during the procedure, assessed through the need for local anaesthesia by the patients (binary yes/no).For dichotomous data Odds Ratio (OR) was calculated along with 95% Confidence intervals (CIs) and for continuous data, the Mean Difference (MD) with 99% Confidence Intervals (CIs) was calculated. Meta-analysis was performed with studies analysing the same outcomes.ResultsFrom 195 studies identified, 28 were analysed. Ten met eligibility criteria. The trials included involved a total of 348 patients for 532 treated teeth. Three studies evaluated clinical efficacy in caries removal. When the data were collected in a meta-analysis no statistically significant difference was observed in regard of the clinical efficacy between Carisolv and the rotary instruments (p= 0.50, OR= 0.33 95% CI 0.01-8.22).In seven studies the length of time to perform the procedures was evaluated and data analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p < 0.01, MD 310.92, 99 % CI 234.57- 387.27) with the Carisolv system, which required a greater amount of time than the conventional drill technique. With regard to pain threshold, a near

  11. Structure function analysis of mirror fabrication and support errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvisc, Anastacia M.; Burge, James H.

    2007-09-01

    Telescopes are ultimately limited by atmospheric turbulence, which is commonly characterized by a structure function. The telescope optics will not further degrade the performance if their errors are small compared to the atmospheric effects. Any further improvement to the mirrors is not economical since there is no increased benefit to performance. Typically the telescope specification is written in terms of an image size or encircled energy and is derived from the best seeing that is expected at the site. Ideally, the fabrication and support errors should never exceed atmospheric turbulence at any spatial scale, so it is instructive to look at how these errors affect the structure function of the telescope. The fabrication and support errors are most naturally described by Zernike polynomials or by bending modes for the active mirrors. This paper illustrates an efficient technique for relating this modal analysis to wavefront structure functions. Data is provided for efficient calculation of structure function given coefficients for Zernike annular polynomials. An example of this procedure for the Giant Magellan Telescope primary mirror is described.

  12. Network-based modular latent structure analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput expression data, such as gene expression and metabolomics data, exhibit modular structures. Groups of features in each module follow a latent factor model, while between modules, the latent factors are quasi-independent. Recovering the latent factors can shed light on the hidden regulation patterns of the expression. The difficulty in detecting such modules and recovering the latent factors lies in the high dimensionality of the data, and the lack of knowledge in module membership. Methods Here we describe a method based on community detection in the co-expression network. It consists of inference-based network construction, module detection, and interacting latent factor detection from modules. Results In simulations, the method outperformed projection-based modular latent factor discovery when the input signals were not Gaussian. We also demonstrate the method's value in real data analysis. Conclusions The new method nMLSA (network-based modular latent structure analysis) is effective in detecting latent structures, and is easy to extend to non-linear cases. The method is available as R code at http://web1.sph.emory.edu/users/tyu8/nMLSA/. PMID:25435002

  13. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  14. Dissecting the Calcium-Induced Differentiation of Human Primary Keratinocytes Stem Cells by Integrative and Structural Network Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Toufighi, Kiana; Yang, Jae-Seong; Luis, Nuno Miguel; Aznar Benitah, Salvador; Lehner, Ben; Serrano, Luis; Kiel, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The molecular details underlying the time-dependent assembly of protein complexes in cellular networks, such as those that occur during differentiation, are largely unexplored. Focusing on the calcium-induced differentiation of primary human keratinocytes as a model system for a major cellular reorganization process, we look at the expression of genes whose products are involved in manually-annotated protein complexes. Clustering analyses revealed only moderate co-expression of functionally related proteins during differentiation. However, when we looked at protein complexes, we found that the majority (55%) are composed of non-dynamic and dynamic gene products (‘di-chromatic’), 19% are non-dynamic, and 26% only dynamic. Considering three-dimensional protein structures to predict steric interactions, we found that proteins encoded by dynamic genes frequently interact with a common non-dynamic protein in a mutually exclusive fashion. This suggests that during differentiation, complex assemblies may also change through variation in the abundance of proteins that compete for binding to common proteins as found in some cases for paralogous proteins. Considering the example of the TNF-α/NFκB signaling complex, we suggest that the same core complex can guide signals into diverse context-specific outputs by addition of time specific expressed subunits, while keeping other cellular functions constant. Thus, our analysis provides evidence that complex assembly with stable core components and competition could contribute to cell differentiation. PMID:25946651

  15. A novel implementation of homodyne time interval analysis method for primary vibration calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Zhou, Ling; Cai, Chenguang; Hu, Hongbo

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, the shortcomings and their causes of the conventional homodyne time interval analysis (TIA) method is described with respect to its software algorithm and hardware implementation, based on which a simplified TIA method is proposed with the help of virtual instrument technology. Equipped with an ordinary Michelson interferometer and dual channel synchronous data acquisition card, the primary vibration calibration system using the simplified method can perform measurements of complex sensitivity of accelerometers accurately, meeting the uncertainty requirements laid down in pertaining ISO standard. The validity and accuracy of the simplified TIA method is verified by simulation and comparison experiments with its performance analyzed. This simplified method is recommended to apply in national metrology institute of developing countries and industrial primary vibration calibration labs for its simplified algorithm and low requirements on hardware.

  16. SU-E-I-100: Heterogeneity Studying for Primary and Lymphoma Tumors by Using Multi-Scale Image Texture Analysis with PET-CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dengwang; Wang, Qinfen; Li, H; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is studying tumor heterogeneity of the primary and lymphoma by using multi-scale texture analysis with PET-CT images, where the tumor heterogeneity is expressed by texture features. Methods: Datasets were collected from 12 lung cancer patients, and both of primary and lymphoma tumors were detected with all these patients. All patients underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan before treatment.The regions of interest (ROI) of primary and lymphoma tumor were contoured by experienced clinical doctors. Then the ROI of primary and lymphoma tumor is extracted automatically by using Matlab software. According to the geometry size of contour structure, the images of tumor are decomposed by multi-scale method.Wavelet transform was performed on ROI structures within images by L layers sampling, and then wavelet sub-bands which have the same size of the original image are obtained. The number of sub-bands is 3L+1.The gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated within different sub-bands, thenenergy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity were extracted from GLCM.Finally, heterogeneity statistical analysis was studied for primary and lymphoma tumor using the texture features. Results: Energy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity are calculated with our experiments for heterogeneity statistical analysis.Energy for primary and lymphomatumor is equal with the same patient, while gray in-homogeneity and inertia of primaryare 2.59595±0.00855, 0.6439±0.0007 respectively. Gray in-homogeneity and inertia of lymphoma are 2.60115±0.00635, 0.64435±0.00055 respectively. The experiments showed that the volume of lymphoma is smaller than primary tumor, but thegray in-homogeneity and inertia were higher than primary tumor with the same patient, and the correlation with lymphoma tumors is zero, while the correlation with primary tumor isslightly strong. Conclusion: This studying showed that there were effective heterogeneity

  17. Molecular analysis of myocilin and optineurin genes in Korean primary glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhong; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Chan Kee; Chae, Hyojin; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Yonggoo; Jang, Woori; Chi, Hyun Young; Park, Hae-Young Lopilly; Park, Shin Hae

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the underlying genetic influences of primary glaucoma in Korea, molecular analysis was performed in 112 sporadic cases, and results compared with healthy controls. The myocilin (MYOC) and optineurin (OPTN) genes were directly sequenced in 112 unrelated patients, including 17 with primary open‑angle glaucoma, 19 with juvenile open‑angle glaucoma, and 76 with normal tension glaucoma. Healthy unrelated Korean individuals (n=100) were used as the non‑selected population control. A total of three MYOC and four OPTN variants potentially associated with primary glaucoma were identified in 4 and 18 patients, respectively. A novel variant of MYOC, p.Leu255Pro, was predicted to be potentially pathogenic by in silico analysis. Another, p.Thr353Ile, has been previously reported. These two missense variants were detected in patients with a family history of glaucoma. Combined heterozygous variants p.[Thr123=;Ile288=] were identified in 2 of 112 (2%) patients but not in healthy controls. Among OPTN variants, a novel variant p.Arg271Cys was identified. Homozygous p.[Thr34=;Thr34=] (4/112, 4%), homozygous p.[Met98Lys;Met98Lys] (4/112, 4%), or combined heterozygous p.[Thr34=;Arg545Gln] (9/112, 8%) was significantly associated with the development of primary glaucoma [odds ratio (OR)=8.768, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.972‑38.988; relative risk=1.818, 95% CI=1.473‑2.244; P=0.001]. The present study provides insight into the genetic or haplotype variants of MYOC and OPTN genes contributing to primary glaucoma. Haplotype variants identified in the present study may be regarded as potential contributing factors of primary glaucoma in Korea. Further studies, including those on additional genes, are required to elucidate the underlying pathogenic mechanism using a larger cohort to provide additional statistical power. PMID:27485216

  18. Probabilistic Computational Methods in Structural Failure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejsa, Martin; Kralik, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    Probabilistic methods are used in engineering where a computational model contains random variables. Each random variable in the probabilistic calculations contains uncertainties. Typical sources of uncertainties are properties of the material and production and/or assembly inaccuracies in the geometry or the environment where the structure should be located. The paper is focused on methods for the calculations of failure probabilities in structural failure and reliability analysis with special attention on newly developed probabilistic method: Direct Optimized Probabilistic Calculation (DOProC), which is highly efficient in terms of calculation time and the accuracy of the solution. The novelty of the proposed method lies in an optimized numerical integration that does not require any simulation technique. The algorithm has been implemented in mentioned software applications, and has been used several times in probabilistic tasks and probabilistic reliability assessments.

  19. Associated neural network independent component analysis structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keehoon; Kostrzweski, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    Detection, classification, and localization of potential security breaches in extremely high-noise environments are important for perimeter protection and threat detection both for homeland security and for military force protection. Physical Optics Corporation has developed a threat detection system to separate acoustic signatures from unknown, mixed sources embedded in extremely high-noise environments where signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) are very low. Associated neural network structures based on independent component analysis are designed to detect/separate new acoustic sources and to provide reliability information. The structures are tested through computer simulations for each critical component, including a spontaneous detection algorithm for potential threat detection without a predefined knowledge base, a fast target separation algorithm, and nonparametric methodology for quantified confidence measure. The results show that the method discussed can separate hidden acoustic sources of SNR in 5 dB noisy environments with an accuracy of 80%.

  20. WWER Expert System for Fuel Failure Analysis Using Data on Primary Coolant Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Likhanskii, V.V.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Sorokin, A.A.; Khromov, A.G.; Kanukova, V.D.; Apollonova, O.V.; Ugryumov, A.V.

    2007-07-01

    The computer expert system for fuel failure analysis of WWER during operation is presented. The diagnostics is based on the measurement of specific activity of reference nuclides in reactor primary coolant and application of a computer code for the data interpretation. The data analysis includes an evaluation of tramp uranium mass in reactor core, detection of failures by iodine and caesium spikes, evaluation of burnup of defective fuel. Evaluation of defective fuel burnup was carried out by applying the relation of caesium nuclides activity in spikes and relations of activities of gaseous fission products for steady state operational conditions. The method of burnup evaluation of defective fuel by use of fission gas activity is presented in detail. The neural-network analysis is performed for determination of failed fuel rod number and defect size. Results of the expert system application are illustrated for several fuel campaigns on operating WWER NPPs. (authors)

  1. Primary structure of O-linked carbohydrate chains in the cellulosome of different Clostridium thermocellum strains.

    PubMed

    Gerwig, G J; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F; Morag, E; Lamed, R; Bayer, E A

    1991-02-26

    The cell-free forms of the multiple cellulase-containing protein complex (cellulosome), isolated from the cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum strains YS, ATCC 27405 and LQRI, have a total carbohydrate content of 5-7% (by mass), consisting of O-linked oligosaccharide chains. The carbohydrate chains were liberated by alkaline-borohydride treatment and fractionated as oligosaccharide alditols via gel-permeation chromatography and HPLC. The fractions were investigated by 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy in combination with monosaccharide and methylation analysis and with fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). In addition to the previously described major oligosaccharide, (formula; see text) [Gerwig, G. J., de Waard, P., Kamerling, J. P., Vliegenthart, J. F. G., Morgenstern, E., Lamed, R. & Bayer, E. A. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 1027-1035], the following partial structures of this compound could be established: (formula; see text). Cell-free and cell-associated forms of the cellulosome of C. thermocellum, as determined for strain YS, have the same oligosaccharide pattern. Based on the oligosaccharide structures, a biosynthetic pathway is suggested. PMID:2001693

  2. Durability and damage tolerance of Large Composite Primary Aircraft Structure (LCPAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarty, John E.; Roeseler, William G.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis and testing addressing the key technology areas of durability and damage tolerance were completed for wing surface panels. The wing of a fuel-efficient, 200-passenger commercial transport airplane for 1990 delivery was sized using graphite-epoxy materials. Coupons of various layups used in the wing sizing were tested in tension, compression, and spectrum fatigue with typical fastener penetrations. The compression strength after barely visible impact damage was determined from coupon and structural element tests. One current material system and one toughened system were evaluated by coupon testing. The results of the coupon and element tests were used to design three distinctly different compression panels meeting the strength, stiffness, and damage-tolerance requirements of the upper wing panels. These three concepts were tested with various amounts of damage ranging from barely visible impact to through-penetration. The results of this program provide the key technology data required to assess the durability and damage-tolerance capability or advanced composites for use in commercial aircraft wing panel structure.

  3. A Lectin from the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Has a Highly Novel Primary Structure and Induces Glycan-mediated Cytotoxicity of Globotriaosylceramide-expressing Lymphoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yuki; Dohmae, Naoshi; Takio, Koji; Kawsar, Sarkar M. A.; Matsumoto, Ryo; Hasan, Imtiaj; Koide, Yasuhiro; Kanaly, Robert A.; Yasumitsu, Hidetaro; Ogawa, Yukiko; Sugawara, Shigeki; Hosono, Masahiro; Nitta, Kazuo; Hamako, Jiharu; Matsui, Taei; Ozeki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    A novel lectin structure was found for a 17-kDa α-d-galactose-binding lectin (termed “MytiLec”) isolated from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis. The complete primary structure of the lectin was determined by Edman degradation and mass spectrometric analysis. MytiLec was found to consist of 149 amino acids with a total molecular mass of 16,812.59 Da by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in good agreement with the calculated value of 16,823.22 Da. MytiLec had an N terminus of acetylthreonine and a primary structure that was highly novel in comparison with those of all known lectins in the structure database. The polypeptide structure consisted of three tandem-repeat domains of ∼50 amino acids each having 45–52% homology with each other. Frontal affinity chromatography technology indicated that MytiLec bound specifically to globotriose (Gb3; Galα1–4Galβ1–4Glc), the epitope of globotriaosylceramide. MytiLec showed a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect on human Burkitt lymphoma Raji cells (which have high surface expression of Gb3) but had no such effect on erythroleukemia K562 cells (which do not express Gb3). The cytotoxic effect of MytiLec was specifically blocked by the co-presence of an α-galactoside. MytiLec treatment of Raji cells caused increased binding of anti-annexin V antibody and incorporation of propidium iodide, which are indicators of cell membrane inversion and perforation. MytiLec is the first reported lectin having a primary structure with the highly novel triple tandem-repeat domain and showing transduction of apoptotic signaling against Burkitt lymphoma cells by interaction with a glycosphingolipid-enriched microdomain containing Gb3. PMID:23093409

  4. Geometrically nonlinear analysis of laminated elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Laminated composite plates and shells that can be used to model automobile bodies, aircraft wings and fuselages, and pressure vessels among many other were analyzed. The finite element method, a numerical technique for engineering analysis of structures, is used to model the geometry and approximate the solution. Various alternative formulations for analyzing laminated plates and shells are developed and their finite element models are tested for accuracy and economy in computation. These include the shear deformation laminate theory and degenerated 3-D elasticity theory for laminates.

  5. Forum discussion on probabilistic structural analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E.A.; Girrens, S.P.

    2000-10-01

    The use of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) has received much attention over the past several decades due in part to enhanced reliability theories, computational capabilities, and efficient algorithms. The need for this development was already present and waiting at the door step. Automotive design and manufacturing has been greatly enhanced because of PSAM and reliability methods, including reliability-based optimization. This demand was also present in the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons laboratories in support of the overarching national security responsibility of maintaining the nations nuclear stockpile in a safe and reliable state.

  6. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic and plastic deformations calculated under variety of loading conditions. Prediction of fatigue-crack-growth lives made with FatigueCrack-Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to initial crack configuration, FASTRAN predicts crack length and other parameters until complete break occurs. Loads are tensile or compressive and of variable or constant amplitude. FASTRAN incorporates linear-elastic fracture mechanics with modifications of load-interaction effects caused by crack closure. FASTRAN considered research tool, because of lengthy calculation times. FASTRAN written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution.

  7. Probabilistic Estimation of Critical Flaw Sizes in the Primary Structure Welds of the Ares I-X Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Hoge, Peter A.; Patel, B. M.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2009-01-01

    The primary structure of the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) launch vehicle is constructed of welded mild steel plates. There is some concern over the possibility of structural failure due to welding flaws. It was considered critical to quantify the impact of uncertainties in residual stress, material porosity, applied loads, and material and crack growth properties on the reliability of the welds during its pre-flight and flight. A criterion--an existing maximum size crack at the weld toe must be smaller than the maximum allowable flaw size--was established to estimate the reliability of the welds. A spectrum of maximum allowable flaw sizes was developed for different possible combinations of all of the above listed variables by performing probabilistic crack growth analyses using the ANSYS finite element analysis code in conjunction with the NASGRO crack growth code. Two alternative methods were used to account for residual stresses: (1) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 41 ksi and a limit was set on the net section flow stress during crack propagation. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if this limit was exceeded during four complete flight cycles, and (2) The mean residual stress was assumed to be 49.6 ksi (the parent material s yield strength) and the net section flow stress limit was ignored. The critical flaw size was determined by parametrically increasing the initial flaw size and detecting if catastrophic crack growth occurred during four complete flight cycles. Both surface-crack models and through-crack models were utilized to characterize cracks in the weld toe.

  8. Primary structure and carbohydrate binding specificity of a potent anti-HIV lectin isolated from the filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Okuyama, Satomi; Hori, Kanji

    2007-04-13

    The primary structure of a lectin, designated Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin (OAA), isolated from the freshwater cyanobacterium O. agardhii NIES-204 was determined by the combination of Edman degradation and electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry. OAA is a polypeptide (Mr 13,925) consisting of two tandem repeats. Interestingly, each repeat sequence of OAA showed a high degree of similarity to those of a myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus hemagglutinin, and a marine red alga Eucheuma serra lectin. A systematic binding assay with pyridylaminated oligosaccharides revealed that OAA exclusively binds to high mannose (HM)-type N-glycans but not to other N-glycans, including complex types, hybrid types, and the pentasaccharide core or oligosaccharides from glycolipids. OAA did not interact with any of free mono- and oligomannoses that are constituents of the branched oligomannosides. These results suggest that the core disaccharide, GlcNAc-GlcNAc, is also essential for binding to OAA. The binding activity of OAA to HM type N-glycans was dramatically decreased when alpha1-2 Man was attached to alpha1-3 Man branched from the alpha1-6 Man of the pentasaccharide core. This specificity of OAA for HM-type oligosaccharides is distinct from other HM-binding lectins. Kinetic analysis with an HM heptasaccharide revealed that OAA possesses two carbohydrate binding sites per molecule, with an association constant of 2.41x10(8) m-1. Furthermore, OAA potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus replication in MT-4 cells (EC50=44.5 nm). Thus, we have found a novel lectin family sharing similar structure and carbohydrate binding specificity among bacteria, cyanobacteria, and marine algae. PMID:17314091

  9. Structural reliability analysis of laminated CMC components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Palko, Joseph L.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    For laminated ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials to realize their full potential in aerospace applications, design methods and protocols are a necessity. The time independent failure response of these materials is focussed on and a reliability analysis is presented associated with the initiation of matrix cracking. A public domain computer algorithm is highlighted that was coupled with the laminate analysis of a finite element code and which serves as a design aid to analyze structural components made from laminated CMC materials. Issues relevant to the effect of the size of the component are discussed, and a parameter estimation procedure is presented. The estimation procedure allows three parameters to be calculated from a failure population that has an underlying Weibull distribution.

  10. Primary structure and regulation of vegetative specific genes of Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, C K; Manning, S S; Ken, R

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the expression and structure of several genes belonging to two classes of vegetative specific genes of the simple eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum. In amebae grown on bacteria, deactivation of all vegetative specific genes occurred at the onset of development and very little mRNA exists by 8 to 10 hours. In contrast, when cells were grown in axenic broth, the mRNA levels remained constant until a dramatic drop occurred around 10 to 12 hours. Thus, regulation of both classes of genes during the first several hours of development is dependent upon the prior growth conditions. Analysis of genomic clones has resulted in the identification of two V genes, V1 and V18, as ribosomal protein genes. Several other V genes were not found to be ribosomal protein genes, suggesting that in Dictyostelium non-ribosomal protein genes may be coordinately regulated with the ribosomal protein genes. Finally, using deletion analysis we show that the promoters of two of the V genes are composed of a constitutive positive element(s) located upstream of sequences involved in the regulated expression of these genes and within the first 545 upstream bp for V18 and 850 bp for V14. The regions involved in regulated expression were localized between -7 and -222 for V18 and -70 and -368 for V14. The sequences conferring protein synthesis sensitivity were shown to reside between -502 and -61 of the H4 promoter. Images PMID:2602140

  11. Design and evaluation of a foam-filled hat-stiffened panel concept for aircraft primary structural applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambur, Damodar R.

    1995-01-01

    A structurally efficient hat-stiffened panel concept that utilizes a structural foam as stiffener core has been designed for aircraft primary structural applications. This stiffener concept utilizes a manufacturing process that can be adapted readily to grid-stiffened structural configurations which possess inherent damage tolerance characteristics due to their multiplicity of load paths. The foam-filled hat-stiffener concept in a prismatically stiffened panel configuration is more efficient than most other stiffened panel configurations in a load range that is typical for both fuselage and wing structures. The prismatically stiffened panel concept investigated here has been designed using AS4/3502 preimpregnated tape and Rohacell foam core and evaluated for its buckling and postbuckling behavior with and without low-speed impact damage. The results from single-stiffener and multi-stiffener specimens suggest that this structural concept responds to loading as anticipated and has good damage tolerance characteristics.

  12. Effect of Placebo Conditions on Polysomnographic Parameters in Primary Insomnia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Alexander; Rief, Winfried

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Little is known about the role of placebo response in the pharmacotherapy of primary insomnia, especially about the effect of placebo intake on objectively assessed outcome variables. Our aim was therefore to conduct an effect-size analysis of placebo conditions in randomized controlled drug trials addressing primary insomnia also including polysomnography. Design: We conducted a comprehensive literature search using PubMed, PsycINFO, PSYNDEX, PQDT OPEN, OpenGREY, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane Clinical Trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. The meta-analysis used a random effects model and was based on 32 studies reporting 82 treatment conditions covering a total of 3,969 participants. Special emphasis was given to the comparison of objective and subjective outcomes and the proportion of the placebo response to the drug response. Measurements and Results: Effect sizes estimates (Hedges g) suggest that there is a small to moderate yet significant and robust placebo response reducing the symptoms of insomnia in terms of sleep onset latency (−0.35), total sleep time (0.42), wake after sleep onset (−0.29), sleep efficiency (0.31), subjective sleep onset latency (−0.29), subjective total sleep time (0.43), subjective wake after sleep onset (−0.32), subjective sleep efficiency (0.25) and sleep quality (0.31). Thus, the placebo response was also evident in objective, physiological (polysomnographic) variables. Our results indicate that 63.56% of the drug responses are achieved even in the placebo groups. Conclusions: In light of these strong placebo responses, future studies should investigate how to exploit placebo mechanisms in clinical practice. Citation: Winkler A, Rief W. Effect of placebo conditions on polysomnographic parameters in primary insomnia: a meta-analysis. SLEEP 2015;38(6):925–931. PMID:25515108

  13. Genome-wide association analysis in primary sclerosing cholangitis identifies two non-HLA susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Melum, Espen; Franke, Andre; Schramm, Christoph; Weismüller, Tobias J; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Offner, Felix A; Juran, Brian D; Laerdahl, Jon K; Labi, Verena; Björnsson, Einar; Weersma, Rinse K; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Teufel, Andreas; Rust, Christian; Ellinghaus, Eva; Balschun, Tobias; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Ellinghaus, David; Bergquist, Annika; Sauer, Peter; Ryu, Euijung; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Wedemeyer, Jochen; Lindkvist, Björn; Wittig, Michael; Porte, Robert J; Holm, Kristian; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stokkers, Pieter; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sterneck, Martina; Vermeire, Severine; Beuers, Ulrich; Villunger, Andreas; Schrumpf, Erik; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Manns, Michael P; Schreiber, Stefan; Karlsen, Tom H

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic bile duct disease affecting 2.4–7.5% of individuals with inflammatory bowel disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis of 2,466,182 SNPs in 715 individuals with PSC and 2,962 controls, followed by replication in 1,025 PSC cases and 2,174 controls. We detected non-HLA associations at rs3197999 in MST1 and rs6720394 near BCL2L11 (combined P = 1.1 × 10−16 and P = 4.1 × 10−8, respectively). PMID:21151127

  14. Genome-wide association analysis in primary sclerosing cholangitis identifies two non-HLA susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Melum, Espen; Franke, Andre; Schramm, Christoph; Weismüller, Tobias J; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Offner, Felix A; Juran, Brian D; Laerdahl, Jon K; Labi, Verena; Björnsson, Einar; Weersma, Rinse K; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Teufel, Andreas; Rust, Christian; Ellinghaus, Eva; Balschun, Tobias; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Ellinghaus, David; Bergquist, Annika; Sauer, Peter; Ryu, Euijung; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Wedemeyer, Jochen; Lindkvist, Björn; Wittig, Michael; Porte, Robert J; Holm, Kristian; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stokkers, Pieter; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sterneck, Martina; Vermeire, Severine; Beuers, Ulrich; Villunger, Andreas; Schrumpf, Erik; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Manns, Michael P; Schreiber, Stefan; Karlsen, Tom H

    2011-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic bile duct disease affecting 2.4-7.5% of individuals with inflammatory bowel disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis of 2,466,182 SNPs in 715 individuals with PSC and 2,962 controls, followed by replication in 1,025 PSC cases and 2,174 controls. We detected non-HLA associations at rs3197999 in MST1 and rs6720394 near BCL2L11 (combined P = 1.1 × 10⁻¹⁶ and P = 4.1 × 10⁻⁸, respectively). PMID:21151127

  15. Calculation of selective filters of a device for primary analysis of speech signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovskii, L. S.; Ageev, V. M.

    2014-07-01

    The amplitude-frequency responses of filters for primary analysis of speech signals, which have a low quality factor and a high rolloff factor in the high-frequency range, are calculated using the linear theory of speech production and psychoacoustic measurement data. The frequency resolution of the filter system for a sinusoidal signal is 40-200 Hz. The modulation-frequency resolution of amplitude- and frequency-modulated signals is 3-6 Hz. The aforementioned features of the calculated filters are close to the amplitudefrequency responses of biological auditory systems at the level of the eighth nerve.

  16. Recurrence rate following treatment for primary multicystic ameloblastoma: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Almeida, R de A C; Andrade, E S de S; Barbalho, J C; Vajgel, A; Vasconcelos, B C do E

    2016-03-01

    Opinions regarding the treatment of multicystic ameloblastoma are divergent due to its benign nature and the high rate of recurrence if not adequately excised. The aim of the present study was to perform a systematic review of the literature for a qualitative and quantitative assessment of studies addressing primary multicystic ameloblastoma with regard to treatment and recurrence. Searches were conducted of the Ovid Medline and Embase databases for articles published up to January 2014. Based on predefined eligibility criteria, studies were selected in a two-stage screening process conducted by two independent reviewers. Quality assessment of the selected articles was performed using the modified criteria of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager (RevMan) software. Statistical heterogeneity was investigated by performing a χ(2) test at the 5% significance level (P<0.05) and determining I(2). The relative risk of recurrence was 3.15-fold greater (95% confidence interval 1.98-5.00) when conservative treatment was performed on primary multicystic ameloblastoma in comparison to radical treatment (P<0.00001 for treatment effect; I(2)=0% and P=0.48 for heterogeneity). The findings justify the treatment of primary multicystic ameloblastoma with bone resection. PMID:26792147

  17. Chronic low back pain patient groups in primary care – A cross sectional cluster analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the heterogeneous nature of chronic low back pain (CLBP), it is necessary to identify patient groups and evaluate treatments within these groups. We aimed to identify groups of patients with CLBP in the primary care setting. Methods We performed a k-means cluster analysis on a large data set (n = 634) of primary care patients with CLBP. Variables of sociodemographic data, pain characteristics, psychological status (i.e., depression, anxiety, somatization), and the patient resources of resilience and coping strategies were included. Results We found three clusters that can be characterized as “pensioners with age-associated pain caused by degenerative diseases”, “middle-aged patients with high mental distress and poor coping resources”, and “middle-aged patients who are less pain-affected and better positioned with regard to their mental health”. Conclusions Our results supported current knowledge concerning groups of CLBP patients in primary care. In particular, we identified a group that was most disabled and distressed, and which was mainly characterized by psychological variables. As shown in our study, pain-related coping strategies and resilience were low in these patients and might be addressed in differentiating treatment strategies. Future studies should focus on the identification of this group in order to achieve effective treatment allocation. Trial registration German Clinical Trial Register DRKS00003123 PMID:24131707

  18. Rhetorical structure theory and text analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, William C.; Matthiessen, Christian M. I. M.; Thompson, Sandra A.

    1989-11-01

    Recent research on text generation has shown that there is a need for stronger linguistic theories that tell in detail how texts communicate. The prevailing theories are very difficult to compare, and it is also very difficult to see how they might be combined into stronger theories. To make comparison and combination a bit more approachable, we have created a book which is designed to encourage comparison. A dozen different authors or teams, all experienced in discourse research, are given exactly the same text to analyze. The text is an appeal for money by a lobbying organization in Washington, DC. It informs, stimulates and manipulates the reader in a fascinating way. The joint analysis is far more insightful than any one team's analysis alone. This paper is our contribution to the book. Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST), the focus of this paper, is a way to account for the functional potential of text, its capacity to achieve the purposes of speakers and produce effects in hearers. It also shows a way to distinguish coherent texts from incoherent ones, and identifies consequences of text structure.

  19. "Joyful Learning" in Rural Indian Primary Schools: An Analysis of Social Control in the Context of Child-Centred Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriprakash, Arathi

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to improve the "quality" of education for all in government primary schools in India have seen a shift towards child-centred teaching. This paper examines the "Joyful Learning" programme, an example of a pedagogic reform implemented in rural primary schools in the southern Indian state of Karnataka. Through an empirical analysis of…

  20. Ovarian metastases resection from extragenital primary sites: outcome and prognostic factor analysis of 147 patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To explore the outcomes and prognostic factors of ovarian metastasectomy intervention on overall survival from extragenital primary cancer. Methods Patients with ovarian metastases from extragenital primary cancer confirmed by laparotomy surgery and ovarian metastases resection were retrospectively collected in a single institution during an 8-year period. A total of 147 cases were identified and primary tumor sites were colorectal region (49.0%), gastric (40.8%), breast (8.2%), biliary duct (1.4%) and liver (0.7%). The pathological and clinical features were evaluated. Patients’ outcome with different primary tumor sites and predictive factors for overall survival were also investigated by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results Metachronous ovarian metastasis occurred in 92 (62.6%) and synchronous in 55 (37.4%) patients. Combined metastases occurred in 40 (27.2%). Bilateral metastasis was found in 97 (66%) patients. The median ovarian metastasis tumor size was 9 cm. There were 39 (26.5%) patients with massive ascites ≥ 1000 mL on intraoperative evaluation. With a median follow-up of 48 months, the median OS after ovarian metastasectomy for all patients was 8.2 months (95% CI 7.2-9.3 months). In univariate analyses, there is significant (8.0 months vs. 41.0 months, P = 0.000) difference in OS between patients with gastrointestinal cancer origin from breast origin, and between patients with gastric origin from colorectal origin (7.4 months vs. 8.8 months, P = 0.036). In univariate analyses, synchronous metastases, locally invasion, massive intraoperative ascites (≥ 1000 mL), and combined metastasis, were identified as significant poor prognostic factors. In multivariate analyses combined metastasis (RR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.09-2.69, P = 0.018), locally invasion (RR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.03-2.54, P = 0.038) and massive intraoperative ascites (RR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.02-2.49, P = 0.04) were independent factors for predicting unfavorable

  1. Uncertainty analysis of terrestrial net primary productivity and net biome productivity in China during 1901-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Junjiong; Zhou, Xuhui; Luo, Yiqi; Zhang, Guodong; Yan, Wei; Li, Jiaxuan; Li, Bo; Dan, Li; Fisher, Joshua B.; Gao, Zhiqiang; He, Yong; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jain, Atul K.; Mao, Jiafu; Meng, Jihua; Michalak, Anna M.; Parazoo, Nicholas C.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Sun, Rui; Tao, Fulu; Tian, Hanqin; Wei, Yaxing; Zeng, Ning; Zhu, Qiuan; Zhu, Wenquan

    2016-05-01

    Despite the importance of net primary productivity (NPP) and net biome productivity (NBP), estimates of NPP and NBP for China are highly uncertain. To investigate the main sources of uncertainty, we synthesized model estimates of NPP and NBP for China from published literature and the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). The literature-based results showed that total NPP and NBP in China were 3.35 ± 1.25 and 0.14 ± 0.094 Pg C yr-1, respectively. Classification and regression tree analysis based on literature data showed that model type was the primary source of the uncertainty, explaining 36% and 64% of the variance in NPP and NBP, respectively. Spatiotemporal scales, land cover conditions, inclusion of the N cycle, and effects of N addition also contributed to the overall uncertainty. Results based on the MsTMIP data suggested that model structures were overwhelmingly important (>90%) for the overall uncertainty compared to simulations with different combinations of time-varying global change factors. The interannual pattern of NPP was similar among diverse studies and increased by 0.012 Pg C yr-1 during 1981-2000. In addition, high uncertainty in China's NPP occurred in areas with high productivity, whereas NBP showed the opposite pattern. Our results suggest that to significantly reduce uncertainty in estimated NPP and NBP, model structures should be substantially tested on the basis of empirical results. To this end, coordinated distributed experiments with multiple global change factors might be a practical approach that can validate specific structures of different models.

  2. Sequence homology and structural analysis of the clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lacy, D B; Stevens, R C

    1999-09-01

    The clostridial neurotoxins (CNTs), comprised of tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) and the seven serotypes of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT A-G), specifically bind to neuronal cells and disrupt neurotransmitter release by cleaving proteins involved in synaptic vesicle membrane fusion. In this study, multiple CNT sequences were analyzed within the context of the 1277 residue BoNT/A crystal structure to gain insight into the events of binding, pore formation, translocation, and catalysis that are required for toxicity. A comparison of the TeNT-binding domain structure to that of BoNT/A reveals striking differences in their surface properties. Further, the solvent accessibility of a key tryptophan in the C terminus of the BoNT/A-binding domain refines the location of the ganglioside-binding site. Data collected from a single frozen crystal of BoNT/A are included in this study, revealing slight differences in the binding domain orientation as well as density for a previously unobserved translocation domain loop. This loop and the conservation of charged residues with structural proximity to putative pore-forming sequences lend insight into the CNT mechanism of pore formation and translocation. The sequence analysis of the catalytic domain revealed an area near the active-site likely to account for specificity differences between the CNTs. It revealed also a tertiary structure, highly conserved in primary sequence, which seems critical to catalysis but is 30 A from the active-site zinc ion. This observation, along with an analysis of the 54 residue "belt" from the translocation domain are discussed with respect to the mechanism of catalysis. PMID:10518945

  3. NURBS-Based Geometry for Integrated Structural Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, James H.

    1997-01-01

    This grant was initiated in April 1993 and completed in September 1996. The primary goal of the project was to exploit the emerging defacto CAD standard of Non- Uniform Rational B-spline (NURBS) based curve and surface geometry to integrate and streamline the process of turbomachinery structural analysis. We focused our efforts on critical geometric modeling challenges typically posed by the requirements of structural analysts. We developed a suite of software tools that facilitate pre- and post-processing of NURBS-based turbomachinery blade models for finite element structural analyses. We also developed tools to facilitate the modeling of blades in their manufactured (or cold) state based on nominal operating shape and conditions. All of the software developed in the course of this research is written in the C++ language using the Iris Inventor 3D graphical interface tool-kit from Silicon Graphics. In addition to enhanced modularity, improved maintainability, and efficient prototype development, this design facilitates the re-use of code developed for other NASA projects and provides a uniform and professional 'look and feel' for all applications developed by the Iowa State Team.

  4. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional inelastic analysis methodology for the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) structural components is described. The methodology is composed of: (1) composite load spectra, (2) probabilistic structural analysis methods, (3) the probabilistic finite element theory, and (4) probabilistic structural analysis. The methodology has led to significant technical progress in several important aspects of probabilistic structural analysis. The program and accomplishments to date are summarized.

  5. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for space propulsion system components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional inelastic analysis methodology for the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) structural components is described. The methodology is composed of: (1) composite load spectra, (2) probabilistic structural analysis methods, (3) the probabilistic finite element theory, and (4) probabilistic structural analysis. The methodology has led to significant technical progress in several important aspects of probabilistic structural analysis. The program and accomplishments to date are summarized.

  6. Atomic-level analysis of membrane-protein structure.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2016-06-01

    Membrane proteins are substantially more challenging than natively soluble proteins as subjects for structural analysis. Thus, membrane proteins are greatly underrepresented in structural databases. Recently, focused consortium efforts and advances in methodology for protein production, crystallographic analysis and cryo-EM analysis have accelerated the pace of atomic-level structure determination of membrane proteins. PMID:27273628

  7. A multi-sites analysis on the ozone effects on Gross Primary Production of European forests.

    PubMed

    Proietti, C; Anav, A; De Marco, A; Sicard, P; Vitale, M

    2016-06-15

    Ozone (O3) is both a greenhouse gas and a secondary air pollutant causing adverse impacts on forests ecosystems at different scales, from cellular to ecosystem level. Specifically, the phytotoxic nature of O3 can impair CO2 assimilation that, in turn affects forest productivity. This study aims to evaluate the effects of tropospheric O3 on Gross Primary Production (GPP) at 37 European forest sites during the time period 2000-2010. Due to the lack of carbon assimilation data at O3 monitoring stations (and vice-versa) this study makes a first attempt to combine high resolution MODIS Gross Primary Production (GPP) estimates and O3 measurement data. Partial Correlations, Anomalies Analysis and the Random Forests Analysis (RFA) were used to quantify the effects of tropospheric O3 concentration and its uptake on GPP and to evaluate the most important factors affecting inter-annual GPP changes. Our results showed, along a North-West/South-East European transect, a negative impact of O3 on GPP ranging from 0.4% to 30%, although a key role of meteorological parameters respect to pollutant variables in affecting GPP was found. In particular, meteorological parameters, namely air temperature (T), soil water content (SWC) and relative humidity (RH) are the most important predictors at 81% of test sites. Moreover, it is interesting to highlight a key role of SWC in the Mediterranean areas (Spanish, Italian and French test sites) confirming that, soil moisture and soil water availability affect vegetation growth and photosynthesis especially in arid or semi-arid ecosystems such as the Mediterranean climate regions. Considering the pivotal role of GPP in the global carbon balance and the O3 ability to reduce primary productivity of the forests, this study can help in assessing the O3 impacts on ecosystem services, including wood production and carbon sequestration. PMID:26971205

  8. Multimorbidity Patterns in Primary Care: Interactions among Chronic Diseases Using Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Gimeno-Feliu, Luis Andrés; González-Rubio, Francisca; Poncel-Falcó, Antonio; Sicras-Mainar, Antoni; Alcalá-Nalvaiz, José Tomás

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of this study was to identify the existence of chronic disease multimorbidity patterns in the primary care population, describing their clinical components and analysing how these patterns change and evolve over time both in women and men. The secondary objective of this study was to generate evidence regarding the pathophysiological processes underlying multimorbidity and to understand the interactions and synergies among the various diseases. Methods This observational, retrospective, multicentre study utilised information from the electronic medical records of 19 primary care centres from 2008. To identify multimorbidity patterns, an exploratory factor analysis was carried out based on the tetra-choric correlations between the diagnostic information of 275,682 patients who were over 14 years of age. The analysis was stratified by age group and sex. Results Multimorbidity was found in all age groups, and its prevalence ranged from 13% in the 15 to 44 year age group to 67% in those 65 years of age or older. Goodness-of-fit indicators revealed sample values between 0.50 and 0.71. We identified five patterns of multimorbidity: cardio-metabolic, psychiatric-substance abuse, mechanical-obesity-thyroidal, psychogeriatric and depressive. Some of these patterns were found to evolve with age, and there were differences between men and women. Conclusions Non-random associations between chronic diseases result in clinically consistent multimorbidity patterns affecting a significant proportion of the population. Underlying pathophysiological phenomena were observed upon which action can be taken both from a clinical, individual-level perspective and from a public health or population-level perspective. PMID:22393389

  9. Validation of the Chinese Handwriting Analysis System (CHAS) for primary school students in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Li-Tsang, Cecilia W P; Wong, Agnes S K; Leung, Howard W H; Cheng, Joyce S; Chiu, Billy H W; Tse, Linda F L; Chung, Raymond C K

    2013-09-01

    There are more children diagnosed with specific learning difficulties in recent years as people are more aware of these conditions. Diagnostic tool has been validated to screen out this condition from the population (SpLD test for Hong Kong children). However, for specific assessment on handwriting problem, there seems a lack of standardized and objective evaluation tool to look into the problems. The objective of this study was to validate the Chinese Handwriting Analysis System (CHAS), which is designed to measure both the process and production of handwriting. The construct validity, convergent validity, internal consistency and test-retest reliability of CHAS was analyzed using the data from 734 grade 1-6 students from 6 primary schools in Hong Kong. Principal Component Analysis revealed that measurements of CHAS loaded into 4 components which accounted for 77.73% of the variance. The correlation between the handwriting accuracy obtained from HAS and eyeballing was r=.73. Cronbach's alpha of all measurement items was .65. Except SD of writing time per character, all the measurement items regarding handwriting speed, handwriting accuracy and pen pressure showed good to excellent test-retest reliability (r=.72-.96), while measurement on the numbers of characters which exceeded grid showed moderate reliability (r=.48). Although there are still ergonomic, biomechanical or unspecified aspects which may not be determined by the system, the CHAS can definitely assist therapists in identifying primary school students with handwriting problems and implement interventions accordingly. PMID:23816625

  10. Gene expression analysis of the hepatotoxicant methapyrilene in primary rat hepatocytes: an interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Beekman, Johanna M; Boess, Franziska; Hildebrand, Heinrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Suter, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Genomics technologies are used in several disciplines, including toxicology. However, these technologies are relatively new, and their applications require further investigations. When investigators apply these technologies to in vitro experiments, two major issues need to be clarified: a) can in vitro toxicity studies, in combination with genomics analyses, be used to predict the toxicity of a compound; and b) are the generated toxicogenomics data reproducible between laboratories? These questions were addressed by an interlaboratory study with laboratories of four pharmaceutical companies. We evaluated gene expression patterns from cultured rat primary hepatocytes after a 24-hr incubation with methapyrilene (MP). Extensive data analysis showed that comparison of genomics data from different sources is complex because both experimental and statistical variability are important confounding factors. However, appropriate statistical tools allowed us to use gene expression profiles to distinguish high-dose-treated cells from vehicle-treated cells. Moreover, we correctly identified MP in an independently generated in vitro database, underlining that in vitro toxicogenomics could be a predictive tool for toxicity. From a mechanistic point of view, despite the observed site-to-site variability, there was good concordance regarding the affected biologic processes. Several subsets of regulated genes were obtained by analyzing the data sets with one method or using different statistical analysis methods. The identified genes are involved in cellular processes that are associated to the exposure of primary hepatocytes to MP. Whether they are specific for MP and are cause or consequence of the toxicity requires further investigations. PMID:16393664

  11. Performance analysis of bonded composite doublers on aircraft structures

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, D.

    1995-08-01

    Researchers contend that composite repairs (or structural reinforcement doublers) offer numerous advantages over metallic patches including corrosion resistance, light weight, high strength, elimination of rivets, and time savings in installation. Their use in commercial aviation has been stifled by uncertainties surrounding their application, subsequent inspection and long-term endurance. The process of repairing or reinforcing airplane structures is time consuming and the design is dependent upon an accompanying stress and fatigue analysis. A repair that is too stiff may result in a loss of fatigue life, continued growth of the crack being repaired, and the initiation of a new flaw in the undesirable high stress field around the patch. Uncertainties in load spectrums used to design repairs exacerbates these problems as does the use of rivets to apply conventional doublers. Many of these repair or structural reinforcement difficulties can be addressed through the use of composite doublers. Primary among unknown entities are the effects of non-optimum installations and the certification of adequate inspection procedures. This paper presents on overview of a program intended to introduce composite doubler technology to the US commercial aircraft fleet. In this project, a specific composite application has been chosen on an L-1011 aircraft in order to focus the tasks on application and operation issues. Through the use of laboratory test structures and flight demonstrations on an in-service L-1011 airplane, this study is investigating composite doubler design, fabrication, installation, structural integrity, and non-destructive evaluation. In addition to providing an overview of the L-1011 project, this paper focuses on a series of fatigue and strength tests which have been conducted in order to study the damage tolerance of composite doublers. Test results to-date are presented.

  12. DGCR8 recognizes primary transcripts of microRNAs through highly cooperative binding and formation of higher-order structures

    PubMed Central

    Faller, Michael; Toso, Daniel; Matsunaga, Michio; Atanasov, Ivo; Senturia, Rachel; Chen, Yanqiu; Zhou, Z. Hong; Guo, Feng

    2010-01-01

    DiGeorge critical region 8 (DGCR8) is essential for maturation of microRNAs (miRNAs) in animals. In the cleavage of primary transcripts of miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) by the Drosha nuclease, the DGCR8 protein directly binds and recognizes pri-miRNAs through a mechanism currently controversial. Our previous data suggest that DGCR8 trimerizes upon cooperative binding to pri-mir-30a. However, a separate study proposed a model in which a DGCR8 molecule contacts one or two pri-miRNA molecules using its two double-stranded RNA binding domains. Here, we extensively characterized the interaction between DGCR8 and pri-miRNAs using biochemical and structural methods. First, a strong correlation was observed between the association of DGCR8 with pri-mir-30a and the rate of pri-miRNA processing in vitro. Second, we show that the high binding cooperativity allows DGCR8 to distinguish pri-miRNAs from a nonspecific competitor with subtle differences in dissociation constants. The highly cooperative binding of DGCR8 to a pri-miRNA is mediated by the formation of higher-order structures, most likely a trimer of DGCR8 dimers, on the pri-miRNA. These properties are not limited to its interaction with pri-mir-30a. Furthermore, the amphipathic C-terminal helix of DGCR8 is important both for trimerization of DGCR8 on pri-miRNAs and for the cleavage of pri-miRNAs by Drosha. Finally, our three-dimensional model from electron tomography analysis of the negatively stained DGCR8–pri-mir-30a complex directly supports the trimerization model. Our study provides a molecular basis for recognition of pri-miRNAs by DGCR8. We further propose that the higher-order structures of the DGCR8–pri-miRNA complexes trigger the cleavage of pri-miRNAs by Drosha. PMID:20558544

  13. Plasmodesmata during development: re-examination of the importance of primary, secondary, and branched plasmodesmata structure versus function

    PubMed Central

    Burch-Smith, Tessa M.; Stonebloom, Solomon; Xu, Min

    2010-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) structure and function vary temporally and spatially during all stages of plant development. PD that originate during, or post, cell division are designated as primary or secondary according to classical terminology. PD structure may be simple, twinned, or branched. Studies of PD during leaf, root, and embryo development have lead to the generalization that cells in less mature tissues contain predominantly simple PD. New quantitative analyses reveal that twinned and branched PD also occur in immature tissues. New data also highlight the versatility of viral movement proteins as tags for labeling PD in immature tissues as well as PD in mature tissues. A summary of the formation and function of primary, secondary, and branched PD during leaf, trichome, embryo, apical meristem, vascular cambium, and root development underscores the remarkable and indispensible plant-specific intercellular communication system that is mediated by PD. PMID:21174132

  14. Primary and secondary organics in tropical Amazonian rainforest aerosols: Chiral analysis of 2-methyltetrols

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Nelida; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Artaxo, Paulo; Guenther, Alex B.; Krejci, R.; Noziere, Barbara; Noone, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    This work presents the application of a newly developed method to facilitate the distinction between primary and secondary organic compounds in ambient aerosols based on their chiral analysis. The organic constituents chosen for chiral analysis are the four stereomers of the 2-methyltetrols, (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)- methylerythritol and (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)- methylthreitol. Ambient PM10 aerosol samples were collected between June 2008 and June 2009 near Manaus, Brazil, in a remote tropical rainforest environment of central Amazonia. The samples were analyzed for the presence of these four stereomers because qualitatively, in a previous study, they have been demonstrated to have partly primary origins. Thus the origin of these compounds may be primary and secondary from the biosynthesis and oxidation processes of isoprene within plants and also in the atmosphere. Using authentic standards, the quantified concentrations were in average 78.2 and 72.8 ng m-3 for (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)- methylerythritol and 3.1 and 3.3 ng m-3 for (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)- methylthreitol during the dry season and 7.1, 6.5, 2.0, and 2.2 ng m-3 during the wet season, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds were found to be outside the confidence interval for racemic mixtures (enantiomeric fraction, Ef = 0.5 -0.01) in nearly all the samples, with deviations of up to 32 % (Ef = 0.61) for (2R,3S)-methylerythritol and 47 % (Ef = 0.65) for (2S,3S)-methylthreitol indicating (99% confidence level) biologically-produced 2-methyltetrols. The minimum primary origin contribution ranged between 0.19 and 29.67 ng m-3 for the 2-methylerythritols and between 0.15 and 1.2 ng m-3 for the 2-methylthreitols. The strong correlation of the diatereomers (racemic 2-methylerythritol and 2-methylthreitol) in the wet season implied a secondary origin. Assuming the maximum secondary contribution in the dry season, the secondary fraction in the wet season was 81-99 % and in the dry season, 10 - 95 %. Nevertheless, from the

  15. Recent developments in structural sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments are reviewed in two major areas of structural sensitivity analysis: sensitivity of static and transient response; and sensitivity of vibration and buckling eigenproblems. Recent developments from the standpoint of computational cost, accuracy, and ease of implementation are presented. In the area of static response, current interest is focused on sensitivity to shape variation and sensitivity of nonlinear response. Two general approaches are used for computing sensitivities: differentiation of the continuum equations followed by discretization, and the reverse approach of discretization followed by differentiation. It is shown that the choice of methods has important accuracy and implementation implications. In the area of eigenproblem sensitivity, there is a great deal of interest and significant progress in sensitivity of problems with repeated eigenvalues. In addition to reviewing recent contributions in this area, the paper raises the issue of differentiability and continuity associated with the occurrence of repeated eigenvalues.

  16. Structured analysis and modeling of complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, David R.; Dalrymple, Mathieu A.

    1992-01-01

    The Aircrew Evaluation Sustained Operations Performance (AESOP) facility at Brooks AFB, Texas, combines the realism of an operational environment with the control of a research laboratory. In recent studies we collected extensive data from the Airborne Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) Weapons Directors subjected to high and low workload Defensive Counter Air Scenarios. A critical and complex task in this environment involves committing a friendly fighter against a hostile fighter. Structured Analysis and Design techniques and computer modeling systems were applied to this task as tools for analyzing subject performance and workload. This technology is being transferred to the Man-Systems Division of NASA Johnson Space Center for application to complex mission related tasks, such as manipulating the Shuttle grappler arm.

  17. Random motion analysis of flexible satellite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. C.; Das, A.

    1978-01-01

    A singular perturbation formulation is used to study the responses of a flexible satellite when random measurement errors can occur. The random variables, at different instants of time, are assumed to be uncorrelated. Procedures for obtaining maxima and minima are described, and a variation of the linear method is developed for the formal solution of the two-point boundary-value problems represented by the variational equations. Random and deterministic solutions for the structural position coordinates are studied, and an analytic algorithm for treating the force equation of motion is developed. Since the random system indicated by the variational equation will always be asymptotically unstable, any analysis of stability must be based on the deterministic system.

  18. Purification and Structural Analysis of Desmoplakin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) is an obligate component of desmosomes, where it links the desmosomal cadherin/plakoglobin/plakophilin assembly to intermediate filaments. DP contains a large amino-terminal domain (DPNT) that binds to the cadherin/plakoglobin/plakophilin complex, a central coiled-coil domain that dimerizes the molecule, and a C-terminal domain (DPCT) that binds to intermediate filaments. DPNT contains a plakin domain, comprising a set of spectrin-like repeats. DPCT contains three plakin repeat domains, each formed by 4.5 repeats of a sequence motif known as a plakin repeat that bind to intermediate filaments. Here, we review purification, biochemical characterization, and structural analysis of the DPNT plakin domain and the DPCT plakin repeat domains. PMID:26778560

  19. Structures and Systems and Bodies and Things: Historical Research on Primary Schooling and Its Professional Relevance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recalling its origins as a research journal addressing educationists this article seeks to understand historical research published in "History of Education" as aimed at a professional audience. Primary schooling provides a significant focus as the study of education history was fostered especially in the training of elementary teachers.1 In that…

  20. Structural analysis of nucleosomal barrier to transcription

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Kulaeva, Olga I.; Volokh, Olesya; Shaytan, Alexey K.; Hsieh, Fu-Kai; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Sokolova, Olga S.; Studitsky, Vasily M.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of human and Drosophila genes are regulated at the level of transcript elongation and nucleosomes are likely targets for this regulation. However, the molecular mechanisms of formation of the nucleosomal barrier to transcribing RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and nucleosome survival during/after transcription remain unknown. Here we show that both DNA–histone interactions and Pol II backtracking contribute to formation of the barrier and that nucleosome survival during transcription likely occurs through allosterically stabilized histone–histone interactions. Structural analysis indicates that after Pol II encounters the barrier, the enzyme backtracks and nucleosomal DNA recoils on the octamer, locking Pol II in the arrested state. DNA is displaced from one of the H2A/H2B dimers that remains associated with the octamer. The data reveal the importance of intranucleosomal DNA–protein and protein–protein interactions during conformational changes in the nucleosome structure on transcription. Mechanisms of nucleosomal barrier formation and nucleosome survival during transcription are proposed. PMID:26460019

  1. Cultural aspects of primary healthcare in india: A case- based analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Delivering quality primary care to large populations is always challenging, and that is certainly the case in India. While the sheer magnitude of patients can create difficulties, not all challenges are about logistics. Sometimes patient health-seeking behaviour leads to delays in obtaining medical help for reasons that have more to do with culture, social practice and religious belief. When primary care is accessed via busy state-run outpatient departments there is often little time for the physician to investigate causes behind a patient's condition, and these factors can adversely affect patient outcomes. We consider the case of a woman with somatic symptoms seemingly triggered by psychological stresses associated with social norms and familial cultural expectations. These expectations conflict with her personal and professional aspirations, and although she eventually receives psychiatric help and her problems are addressed, initially, psycho-social factors underlying her condition posed a hurdle in terms of accessing appropriate medical care. While for many people culture, belief and social norms exert a stabilising, positive influence, in situations where someone's personal expectations differ significantly from accepted social norms, individual autonomy can be directly challenged, and in which case, something has to give. The result of such challenges can negatively impact on health and well-being, and for patients with immature defence mechanisms for dealing with inner conflict, such an experience can be damaging and ensuing somatic disturbances are often difficult to treat. Patients with culture-bound symptoms are not uncommon within primary care in India or in other Asian countries and communities. We argue that such cases need to be properly understood if satisfactory patient outcomes are to be achieved. While some causes are structural, having to do with how healthcare is accessed and delivered, others are about cultural values, social practices and

  2. Structures and Analysis of Carotenoid Molecules.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Amaya, Delia B

    2016-01-01

    Modifications of the usual C40 linear and symmetrical carotenoid skeleton give rise to a wide array of structures of carotenes and xanthophylls in plant tissues. These include acyclic, monocyclic and dicyclic carotenoids, along with hydroxy and epoxy xanthophylls and apocarotenoids. Carotenols can be unesterified or esterified (monoester) in one or two (diester) hydroxyl groups with fatty acids. E-Z isomerization increases the array of possible plant carotenoids even further. Screening and especially quantitative analysis are being carried out worldwide. Visible absorption spectrometry and near infrared reflectance spectroscopy have been used for the initial estimation of the total carotenoid content or the principal carotenoid content when large numbers of samples needed to be analyzed within a short time, as would be the case in breeding programs. Although inherently difficult, quantitative analysis of the individual carotenoids is essential. Knowledge of the sources of errors and means to avoid them has led to a large body of reliable quantitative compositional data on carotenoids. Reverse-phase HPLC with a photodiode array detector has been the preferred analytical technique, but UHPLC is increasingly employed. HPLC-MS has been used mainly for identification and NMR has been useful in unequivocally identifying geometric isomers. PMID:27485219

  3. Sustained Attention in Children with Primary Language Impairment: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Kerry Danahy; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study provides a meta-analysis of the difference between children with primary or specific language impairment (LI) and their typically developing peers on tasks of sustained attention. The meta-analysis seeks to determine if children with LI demonstrate subclinical deficits in sustained attention and, if so, under what conditions. Methods Articles that reported empirical data from the performance of children with LI, in comparison to typically developing peers, on a task assessing sustained attention were considered for inclusion. Twenty-eight effect sizes were included in the meta-analysis. Two moderator analyses addressed the effects of stimulus modality and ADHD exclusion. In addition, reaction time outcomes and the effects of task variables were summarized qualitatively. Results The meta-analysis supports the existence of sustained attention deficits in children with LI in both auditory and visual modalities, as demonstrated by reduced accuracy compared to typically developing peers. Larger effect sizes are found in tasks that use auditory and linguistic stimuli than in studies that use visual stimuli. Conclusions Future research should consider the role that sustained attention weaknesses play in LI, as well as the implications for clinical and research assessment tasks. Methodological recommendations are summarized. PMID:21646419

  4. Model-based analysis of pattern motion processing in mouse primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Dylan R.; Roth, Morgane M.; Helmchen, Fritjof; Kampa, Björn M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in sensory areas of neocortex exhibit responses tuned to specific features of the environment. In visual cortex, information about features such as edges or textures with particular orientations must be integrated to recognize a visual scene or object. Connectivity studies in rodent cortex have revealed that neurons make specific connections within sub-networks sharing common input tuning. In principle, this sub-network architecture enables local cortical circuits to integrate sensory information. However, whether feature integration indeed occurs locally in rodent primary sensory areas has not been examined directly. We studied local integration of sensory features in primary visual cortex (V1) of the mouse by presenting drifting grating and plaid stimuli, while recording the activity of neuronal populations with two-photon calcium imaging. Using a Bayesian model-based analysis framework, we classified single-cell responses as being selective for either individual grating components or for moving plaid patterns. Rather than relying on trial-averaged responses, our model-based framework takes into account single-trial responses and can easily be extended to consider any number of arbitrary predictive models. Our analysis method was able to successfully classify significantly more responses than traditional partial correlation (PC) analysis, and provides a rigorous statistical framework to rank any number of models and reject poorly performing models. We also found a large proportion of cells that respond strongly to only one stimulus class. In addition, a quarter of selectively responding neurons had more complex responses that could not be explained by any simple integration model. Our results show that a broad range of pattern integration processes already take place at the level of V1. This diversity of integration is consistent with processing of visual inputs by local sub-networks within V1 that are tuned to combinations of sensory features. PMID

  5. Primary health care contribution to improve health outcomes in Bogota-Colombia: a longitudinal ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Colombia has a highly segmented and fragmented national health system that contributes to inequitable health outcomes. In 2004 the district government of Bogota initiated a Primary Health Care (PHC) strategy to improve health care access and population health status. This study aims to analyse the contribution of the PHC strategy to the improvement of health outcomes controlling for socioeconomic variables. Methods A longitudinal ecological analysis using data from secondary sources was carried out. The analysis used data from 2003 and 2007 (one year before and 3 years after the PHC implementation). A Primary Health Care Index (PHCI) of coverage intensity was constructed. According to the PHCI, localities were classified into two groups: high and low coverage. A multivariate analysis using a Poisson regression model for each year separately and a Panel Poisson regression model to assess changes between the groups over the years was developed. Dependent variables were infant mortality rate, under-5 mortality rate, infant mortality rate due to acute diarrheal disease and pneumonia, prevalence of acute malnutrition, vaccination coverage for diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus (DPT) and prevalence of exclusive breastfeeding. The independent variable was the PHCI. Control variables were sewerage coverage, health system insurance coverage and quality of life index. Results The high PHCI localities as compared with the low PHCI localities showed significant risk reductions of under-5 mortality (13.8%) and infant mortality due to pneumonia (37.5%) between 2003 and 2007. The probability of being vaccinated for DPT also showed a significant increase of 4.9%. The risk of infant mortality and of acute malnutrition in children under-5 years was lesser in the high coverage group than in the low one; however relative changes were not statistically significant. Conclusions Despite the adverse contextual conditions and the limitations imposed by the Colombian health

  6. Array CGH analysis identifies two distinct subgroups of primary angiosarcoma of bone.

    PubMed

    Verbeke, Sofie L J; de Jong, Danielle; Bertoni, Franco; Sciot, Raf; Antonescu, Cristina R; Szuhai, Karoly; Bovée, Judith V M G

    2015-02-01

    Molecular genetic studies on vascular tumors are rare. Recently, possible involvement of MYC and KDR has been documented in a subset of angiosarcomas of soft tissue. We performed a cytogenetic analysis of primary angiosarcomas of bone (n = 13) and soft tissue (n = 5) using high density array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). Regions of interest were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Antibodies for candidate genes (SKI, MYC, KDR, and MAPK9) were selected and immunohistochemistry was performed. Six angiosarcomas of bone and four angiosarcomas of soft tissue showed chromosomal losses, gains, and high level amplifications. Cluster analysis identified two groups: a group with a complex genetic profile and a group with only few genetic aberrations. Five regions of interest were selected, which were located at chromosome bands 1p36.23, 2q32-34, 5q35, 8q24, and 17q21.32-24.2. Interphase FISH confirmed the high-level amplifications. Immunohistochemical analysis showed high expression of MYC (16/60), MAPK9 (63/69), and SKI (52/62). There were no differences between the two groups with regards to location, immunohistochemical expression nor survival. In summary, we identified two subgroups of angiosarcoma: those with few or no gross aberrations and those which show numerous genetic aberrations consisting of chromosomal losses, gains and high level amplifications or complex aberrations. The most common finding was amplification of 2q and 17q in both angiosarcoma of bone and soft tissue, suggesting overlap in tumorigenesis irrespective of their location. We show MYC amplification in primary angiosarcoma indicating this is not entirely specific for radiation-induced angiosarcoma. PMID:25231439

  7. A preliminary structural analysis of space-base living quarters modules to verify a weight-estimating technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grissom, D. S.; Schneider, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    The determination of a base line (minimum weight) design for the primary structure of the living quarters modules in an earth-orbiting space base was investigated. Although the design is preliminary in nature, the supporting analysis is sufficiently thorough to provide a reasonably accurate weight estimate of the major components that are considered to comprise the structural weight of the space base.

  8. NASTRAN analysis for a sequence of cellular primary mirrors of the 8 meter class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, F. B.; Chang, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    In examining the local flexure of large, rib structure-stiffened borosilicate glass primary mirrors for telescopes, FEMs employing fine meshes for accurate model representation have yielded useful results concerning such mirrors' unique problems. A number of the proposed mirror support methods are noted to exhibit an unexpected and troublesome amount of deflection near the outer edge during self-weight loading. The iterative application of finite element analyses is presently combined with a small amount of rib redesign at each iteration to yield improved flexure characteristics. The flexure of individual ribs near the mirror's edge suggests that a more direct loading of the outermost support points should be striven for; more material would then be placed in direct compression. A casting should be sufficiently oversized to obviate edge flexure problems.

  9. Primary structure of a human arginine-rich nuclear protein that colocalizes with spliceosome components

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, N.; McMahon, C.; Blobel, G. )

    1991-09-15

    The cDNA for a 54-kDa nuclear protein (p54) has been cloned from a human hepatoma expression library. Contained within p54 is an arginine/serine-rich region similar to segments of several proteins that participate in pre-mRNA splicing including the 70-kDa component of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and the Drosophila transformer and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins. The arginine/serine-rich region is dominated by a series of 8-amino acid imperfect repetitive motifs (consensus sequence, Arg-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg). Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides of p54 react with an {approximately}70-kDa protein on immunoblots of HeLa cell and rat liver nuclear proteins. This apparent discrepancy in mass is also observed when p54 mRNA is translated in vitro. Indirect immunofluorescence studies in HeLa cells show that p54 is distributed throughout the nucleus in a speckled pattern, with an additional diffuse labeling of the nucleus excluding the nucleoli. Double immunofluorescence experiments indicate that these punctate regions are coincident with the speckles seen in cells stained with antibodies against several constituents of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Sedimentation analysis of HeLa cell extracts on sucrose gradients showed that p54 migrates at 4-6 S, indicating that the protein is not a tightly associated component of snRNPs. Although the function of p54 is not yet known, the structure and immunolocalization data suggest that this protein may have a role in pre-mRNA processing.

  10. Latent Class Analysis of Substance Use among Adolescents Presenting to Urban Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, Kipling M.; Walton, Maureen A.; Resko, Stella; Barry, Kristen T.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Zucker, Robert A.; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Polysubstance use during adolescence is a significant public health concern; however, few studies have investigated patterns of use during this developmental window within the primary care setting. Objectives This study uses an empirical method to classify adolescents into polysubstance use groups, and examines correlates of the empirically-defined groups. Methods Data come from patients, ages 12-18 years, presenting to urban, primary care community health clinics (Federally Qualified Health Centers) in two cities in the Midwestern United States (n=1664). Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify classes of substance users. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine variables associated with class membership. Results LCA identified three classes: Class 1 (64.5%) exhibited low probabilities of all types of substance use; Class 2 (24.6%) was characterized by high probabilities of cannabis use and consequences; Class 3 (10.9%) had the highest probabilities of polysubstance use, including heavy episodic drinking and misuse of prescription drugs. Those in Class 2 and Class 3 were more likely to be older, and have poorer grades, poorer health, higher levels of psychological distress, and more sexual partners than those in Class 1. Individuals in Class 3 were also less likely to be African-American than those in Class 1. Conclusion Findings provide novel insight into the patterns of polysubstance use among adolescents presenting to low-income urban primary care clinics. Future research should examine the efficacy of interventions that address the complex patterns of substance use and concomitant health concerns among adolescents. PMID:24219231

  11. Automatic quantitative analysis of experimental primary and secondary retinal neurodegeneration: implications for optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B M; Guo, L; Brenton, J; Langley, L; Normando, E M; Cordeiro, M F

    2016-01-01

    Secondary neurodegeneration is thought to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, which potential therapies may target. However, the quantitative assessment of the degree of secondary neurodegeneration is difficult. The present study describes a novel algorithm from which estimates of primary and secondary degeneration are computed using well-established rodent models of partial optic nerve transection (pONT) and ocular hypertension (OHT). Brn3-labelled retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified in whole-retinal mounts from which RGC density, nearest neighbour distances and regularity indices were determined. The spatial distribution and rate of RGC loss were assessed and the percentage of primary and secondary degeneration in each non-overlapping segment was calculated. Mean RGC number (82 592±681) and RGC density (1695±23.3 RGC/mm2) in naïve eyes were comparable with previous studies, with an average decline in RGC density of 71±17 and 23±5% over the time course of pONT and OHT models, respectively. Spatial analysis revealed greatest RGC loss in the superior and central retina in pONT, but significant RGC loss in the inferior retina from 3 days post model induction. In comparison, there was no significant difference between superior and inferior retina after OHT induction, and RGC loss occurred mainly along the superior/inferior axis (~30%) versus the nasal–temporal axis (~15%). Intriguingly, a significant loss of RGCs was also observed in contralateral eyes in experimental OHT. In conclusion, a novel algorithm to automatically segment Brn3a-labelled retinal whole-mounts into non-overlapping segments is described, which enables automated spatial and temporal segmentation of RGCs, revealing heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of primary and secondary degenerative processes. This method provides an attractive means to rapidly determine the efficacy of neuroprotective therapies with implications for any

  12. A computer analysis program for interfacing thermal and structural codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. L.; Maffeo, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A software package has been developed to transfer three-dimensional transient thermal information accurately, efficiently, and automatically from a heat transfer analysis code to a structural analysis code. The code is called three-dimensional TRansfer ANalysis Code to Interface Thermal and Structural codes, or 3D TRANCITS. TRANCITS has the capability to couple finite difference and finite element heat transfer analysis codes to linear and nonlinear finite element structural analysis codes. TRANCITS currently supports the output of SINDA and MARC heat transfer codes directly. It will also format the thermal data output directly so that it is compatible with the input requirements of the NASTRAN and MARC structural analysis codes. Other thermal and structural codes can be interfaced using the transfer module with the neutral heat transfer input file and the neutral temperature output file. The transfer module can handle different elemental mesh densities for the heat transfer analysis and the structural analysis.

  13. Structural stability, vibrational, and bonding properties of potassium 1, 1'-dinitroamino-5, 5'-bistetrazolate: An emerging green primary explosive.

    PubMed

    Yedukondalu, N; Vaitheeswaran, G

    2015-08-14

    Potassium 1,1'-dinitroamino-5,5'-bistetrazolate (K2DNABT) is a nitrogen rich (50.3% by weight, K2C2N12O4) green primary explosive with high performance characteristics, namely, velocity of detonation (D = 8.33 km/s), detonation pressure (P = 31.7 GPa), and fast initiating power to replace existing toxic primaries. In the present work, we report density functional theory (DFT) calculations on structural, equation of state, vibrational spectra, electronic structure, and absorption spectra of K2DNABT. We have discussed the influence of weak dispersive interactions on structural and vibrational properties through the DFT-D2 method. We find anisotropic compressibility behavior (bstructural properties. The predicted equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that K2DNABT is softer than toxic lead azide and harder than the most sensitive cyanuric triazide. A complete assignment of all the vibrational modes has been made and compared with the available experimental results. The calculated zone center IR and Raman frequencies show a blue-shift which leads to a hardening of the lattice upon compression. In addition, we have also calculated the electronic structure and absorption spectra using recently developed Tran Blaha-modified Becke Johnson potential. It is found that K2DNABT is a direct band gap insulator with a band gap of 3.87 eV and the top of the valence band is mainly dominated by 2p-states of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. K2DNABT exhibits mixed ionic (between potassium and tetrazolate ions) and covalent character within tetrazolate molecule. The presence of ionic bonding suggests that the investigated compound is relatively stable and insensitive than covalent primaries. From the calculated absorption spectra, the material is found to decompose under ultra-violet light irradiation. PMID:26277146

  14. Structural stability, vibrational, and bonding properties of potassium 1, 1'-dinitroamino-5, 5'-bistetrazolate: An emerging green primary explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yedukondalu, N.; Vaitheeswaran, G.

    2015-08-01

    Potassium 1,1'-dinitroamino-5,5'-bistetrazolate (K2DNABT) is a nitrogen rich (50.3% by weight, K2C2N12O4) green primary explosive with high performance characteristics, namely, velocity of detonation (D = 8.33 km/s), detonation pressure (P = 31.7 GPa), and fast initiating power to replace existing toxic primaries. In the present work, we report density functional theory (DFT) calculations on structural, equation of state, vibrational spectra, electronic structure, and absorption spectra of K2DNABT. We have discussed the influence of weak dispersive interactions on structural and vibrational properties through the DFT-D2 method. We find anisotropic compressibility behavior (bstructural properties. The predicted equilibrium bulk modulus reveals that K2DNABT is softer than toxic lead azide and harder than the most sensitive cyanuric triazide. A complete assignment of all the vibrational modes has been made and compared with the available experimental results. The calculated zone center IR and Raman frequencies show a blue-shift which leads to a hardening of the lattice upon compression. In addition, we have also calculated the electronic structure and absorption spectra using recently developed Tran Blaha-modified Becke Johnson potential. It is found that K2DNABT is a direct band gap insulator with a band gap of 3.87 eV and the top of the valence band is mainly dominated by 2p-states of oxygen and nitrogen atoms. K2DNABT exhibits mixed ionic (between potassium and tetrazolate ions) and covalent character within tetrazolate molecule. The presence of ionic bonding suggests that the investigated compound is relatively stable and insensitive than covalent primaries. From the calculated absorption spectra, the material is found to decompose under ultra-violet light irradiation.

  15. Structure/load dependent vectors for linear structural dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Jiangning; Nguyen, Duc T.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamic solution vectors yielded by the present structure/load dependent-vectors method for large-scale linear structural dynamic analyses involving complex loadings can be used as starting vectors, so that both structure and load characteristics are encompassed by the basis vectors. The method is shown to entail fewer vectors than current alternatives for a given level of accuracy, especially in the cases of structures that have external concentrated masses. Numerical results are presented which illustrate the advantages of this dependent-vectors method relative to other reduction methods.

  16. Mechanical and structural comparison between primary tumor and lymph node metastasis cells in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, V; Lucchetti, D; Maiorana, A; Papi, M; Maulucci, G; Calapà, F; Ciasca, G; Giordano, R; Sgambato, A; De Spirito, M

    2015-07-28

    SW480 and SW620 colon carcinoma cell lines derive from primary tumour and lymph-node metastasis of the same patient, respectively. For this reason, these cells represent an ideal system to analyse phenotypic variations associated with the metastatic process. In this study we analysed SW480 and SW620 cytoskeleton remodelling by measuring the cells' mechanics and morphological properties using different microscopic techniques. We observed that different specialized functions of cells, i.e. the capacity to metastasize of elongated cells inside the primary tumour and the ability to intravasate and resist shear forces of the stream of cells derived from lymph node metastasis, are reflected in their mechanical properties. We demonstrated that, together with stiffness and adhesion between the AFM tip and the cell surface, cell shape, actin organization and surface roughness are strictly related and are finely modulated by colorectal cancer cells to better accomplish their specific tasks in cancer growth and invasion. PMID:26083581

  17. Spatiotemporal analysis of RhoA/B/C activation in primary human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinhard, Nathalie R.; van Helden, Suzanne F.; Anthony, Eloise C.; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I.; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W. J.; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the vasculature and are important for the regulation of blood pressure, vascular permeability, clotting and transendothelial migration of leukocytes and tumor cells. A group of proteins that that control the endothelial barrier function are the RhoGTPases. This study focuses on three homologous (>88%) RhoGTPases: RhoA, RhoB, RhoC of which RhoB and RhoC have been poorly characterized. Using a RhoGTPase mRNA expression analysis we identified RhoC as the highest expressed in primary human endothelial cells. Based on an existing RhoA FRET sensor we developed new RhoB/C FRET sensors to characterize their spatiotemporal activation properties. We found all these RhoGTPase sensors to respond to physiologically relevant agonists (e.g. Thrombin), reaching transient, localized FRET ratio changes up to 200%. These RhoA/B/C FRET sensors show localized GEF and GAP activity and reveal spatial activation differences between RhoA/C and RhoB. Finally, we used these sensors to monitor GEF-specific differential activation of RhoA/B/C. In summary, this study adds high-contrast RhoB/C FRET sensors to the currently available FRET sensor toolkit and uncover new insights in endothelial and RhoGTPase cell biology. This allows us to study activation and signaling by these closely related RhoGTPases with high spatiotemporal resolution in primary human cells. PMID:27147504

  18. Spatiotemporal analysis of RhoA/B/C activation in primary human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Nathalie R; van Helden, Suzanne F; Anthony, Eloise C; Yin, Taofei; Wu, Yi I; Goedhart, Joachim; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells line the vasculature and are important for the regulation of blood pressure, vascular permeability, clotting and transendothelial migration of leukocytes and tumor cells. A group of proteins that that control the endothelial barrier function are the RhoGTPases. This study focuses on three homologous (>88%) RhoGTPases: RhoA, RhoB, RhoC of which RhoB and RhoC have been poorly characterized. Using a RhoGTPase mRNA expression analysis we identified RhoC as the highest expressed in primary human endothelial cells. Based on an existing RhoA FRET sensor we developed new RhoB/C FRET sensors to characterize their spatiotemporal activation properties. We found all these RhoGTPase sensors to respond to physiologically relevant agonists (e.g. Thrombin), reaching transient, localized FRET ratio changes up to 200%. These RhoA/B/C FRET sensors show localized GEF and GAP activity and reveal spatial activation differences between RhoA/C and RhoB. Finally, we used these sensors to monitor GEF-specific differential activation of RhoA/B/C. In summary, this study adds high-contrast RhoB/C FRET sensors to the currently available FRET sensor toolkit and uncover new insights in endothelial and RhoGTPase cell biology. This allows us to study activation and signaling by these closely related RhoGTPases with high spatiotemporal resolution in primary human cells. PMID:27147504

  19. Surgical treatment of synchronous multiple primary lung cancers: a retrospective analysis of 122 patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming; He, Wenxin; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background Synchronous multiple primary lung cancers (SMPLC) become more common in clinical practice. To identify factors attributed to SMPLC treatment outcomes, we have reviewed our experiences with surgical resections of SMPLC and analyzed the treatment outcomes in this paper. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients who have been diagnosed as SMPLC and underwent surgical resection between 1990 and 2010. Based on EGFR and KRAS mutations, we identified 27 cases as SMPLC out of 50 cases, which were difficult to distinguish primary lung cancers from metastases. A total of 265 tumors from 122 patients were studied. Results The 5-year survival rate for all patients was 40.5%. There was a significant difference in the 5-year survival between smokers and never-smokers (30.8% vs. 55.6%, P=0.011). Survival rate was also different between patients with same tumor histology and those with different tumor histology (46.9% vs. 24.8%, P=0.036). In addition, Solid nodule and pneumonectomy were associated with the worse survival (P=0.026, P=0.030). Multivariable analysis identified smoking status, stage, lymph node metastasis and pneumonectomy as significant independent predictive factors for overall survival. Conclusions Surgical treatment is a safe approach for patients with SMPLC; pneumonectomy should be avoided as far as possible given the poor prognosis. Mutational status of EGFR and KRAS may be advocated as a diagnostic criteria of synchronous lung cancer rather metastasis mainly in case of adenocarcinoma histology.

  20. ARMC5 mutation analysis in patients with primary aldosteronism and bilateral adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Mulatero, P; Schiavi, F; Williams, T A; Monticone, S; Barbon, G; Opocher, G; Fallo, F

    2016-06-01

    Idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) due to bilateral adrenal hyperplasia is the most common subtype of primary aldosteronism (PA). The pathogenesis of IHA is still unknown, but the bilateral disease suggests a potential predisposing genetic alteration. Heterozygous germline mutations of armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5) have been shown to be associated with hypercortisolism due to sporadic primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia and are also observed in African-American PA patients. We investigated the presence of germline ARMC5 mutations in a group of PA patients who had bilateral computed tomography-detectable adrenal alterations. We sequenced the entire coding region of ARMC5 and all intron/exon boundaries in 39 patients (37 Caucasians and 2 black Africans) with confirmed PA (8 unilateral, 27 bilateral and 4 undetermined subtype) and bilateral adrenal lesions. We identified 11 common variants, 5 rare variants with a minor allele frequency <1% and 2 new variants not previously reported in public databases. We did not detect by in silico analysis any ARMC5 sequence variations that were predicted to alter protein function. In conclusion, ARMC5 mutations are not present in a fairly large series of Caucasian patients with PA associated to bilateral adrenal disease. Further studies are required to definitively clarify the role of ARMC5 in the pathogenesis of adrenal nodules and aldosterone excess in patients with PA. PMID:26446392

  1. Design and fabrication of a large primary reflector structure for space laser power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    MacNeal, P.; Jewett, K.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the design issues and fabrication considerations specifically related to a large twelve meter, graphite-epoxy space truss that has been developed to provide support of the primary mirror system for the SpacE Laser ENErgy (SELENE) Beam Transmission Optical System (BTOS). Details of the optical system and wavefront corrector concepts have been discussed in prior papers. Specific issues which are addressed in this paper include optical performance needs, environmental requirements, and low-cost fabrication techniques.

  2. Global-local finite element analysis of composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    The development of layered finite elements has facilitated analysis of laminated composite structures. However, the analysis of a structure containing both isotropic and composite materials remains a difficult problem. A methodology has been developed to conduct a ``global-local`` finite element analysis. A ``global`` analysis of the entire structure is conducted at the appropriate loads with the composite portions replaced with an orthotropic material of equivalent materials properties. A ``local`` layered composite analysis is then conducted on the region of interest. The displacement results from the ``global`` analysis are used as loads to the ``local`` analysis. the laminate stresses and strains can then be examined and failure criteria evaluated.

  3. Global-local finite element analysis of composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Deibler, J.E.

    1992-06-01

    The development of layered finite elements has facilitated analysis of laminated composite structures. However, the analysis of a structure containing both isotropic and composite materials remains a difficult problem. A methodology has been developed to conduct a global-local'' finite element analysis. A global'' analysis of the entire structure is conducted at the appropriate loads with the composite portions replaced with an orthotropic material of equivalent materials properties. A local'' layered composite analysis is then conducted on the region of interest. The displacement results from the global'' analysis are used as loads to the local'' analysis. the laminate stresses and strains can then be examined and failure criteria evaluated.

  4. Structural Characteristics of Migrant Farmworkers Reporting a Relationship with a Primary Care Physician.

    PubMed

    McCoy, H Virginia; Williams, Mark L; Atkinson, John S; Rubens, Muni

    2016-06-01

    Migrant farmworkers are disproportionately affected by many adverse health conditions, but access healthcare sparingly. This study of migrant farmworkers examined the distribution and general characteristics associated with having access to healthcare. Access to healthcare was measured by asking whether the participants (N = 413) had a primary care physician. Majority of participants did not have a primary care physician. Female migrant workers (AOR = 2.823 CI: 1.575-4.103) with insurance (AOR = 6.183 CI: 4.956-11.937) who lived at study site for more than 5 years (AOR = 2.728 CI: 1.936-7.837) and born in the United States (AOR = 2.648 CI: 1.373-3.338) had greater odds to have a primary care physician than recent male migrants without insurance who were born outside United States. There is a need to focus on Community Health Centers and Migrant Health Centers in tailoring their services and to widen the implementation and improve funding of Accountable Care Organizations to improve access to care of migrant farmworkers. PMID:26265029

  5. Primary Energy Efficiency Analysis of Different Separate Sensible and Latent Cooling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Separate Sensible and Latent cooling (SSLC) has been discussed in open literature as means to improve air conditioning system efficiency. The main benefit of SSLC is that it enables heat source optimization for the different forms of loads, sensible vs. latent, and as such maximizes the cycle efficiency. In this paper I use a thermodynamic analysis tool in order to analyse the performance of various SSLC technologies including: multi-evaporators two stage compression system, vapour compression system with heat activated desiccant dehumidification, and integrated vapour compression with desiccant dehumidification. A primary coefficient of performance is defined and used to judge the performance of the different SSLC technologies at the design conditions. Results showed the trade-off in performance for different sensible heat factor and regeneration temperatures.

  6. Primary ciliary dyskinesia assessment by means of optical flow analysis of phase-contrast microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Parrilla, Eduardo; Armengot, Miguel; Mata, Manuel; Sánchez-Vílchez, José Manuel; Cortijo, Julio; Hueso, José L; Riera, Jaime; Moratal, David

    2014-04-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia implies cilia with defective or total absence of motility, which may result in sinusitis, chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis and male infertility. Diagnosis can be difficult and is based on an abnormal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and beat pattern. In this paper, we present a method to determine CBF of isolated cells through the analysis of phase-contrast microscopy images, estimating cilia motion by means of an optical flow algorithm. After having analyzed 28 image sequences (14 with a normal beat pattern and 14 with a dyskinetic pattern), the normal group presented a CBF of 5.2 ± 1.6 Hz, while the dyskinetic patients presented a 1.9 ± 0.9 Hz CBF. The cutoff value to classify a dyskinetic specimen was set to 3.45 Hz (sensitivity 0.86, specificity 0.93). The presented methodology has provided excellent results to objectively diagnose PCD. PMID:24438822

  7. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Corwin Lee; Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Galyean, William Jospeh

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Warpage in Laminated Aluminium Alloy Plates for Machining of Primary Aeronautic Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, A. C.; Moreira Filho, L. A.; Menezes, M. A.

    2007-04-07

    The aim of this paper consists in presenting a method of simulating the warpage in 7xxx series aluminium alloy plates. To perform this simulation finite element software MSC.Patran and MSC.Marc were used. Another result of this analysis will be the influence on material residual stresses induced on the raw material during the rolling process upon the warpage of primary aeronautic parts, fabricated through machining (milling) at Embraer. The method used to determinate the aluminium plate residual stress was Layer Removal Test. The numerical algorithm Modified Flavenot Method was used to convert layer removal and beam deflection in stress level. With such information about the level and profile of residual stresses become possible, during the step that anticipate the manufacturing to incorporate these values in the finite-element approach for modelling warpage parts. Based on that warpage parameter surely the products are manufactured with low relative vulnerability propitiating competitiveness and price.

  9. Pathway-based analysis of primary biliary cirrhosis genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Kar, SP; Seldin, MF; Chen, W; Lu, E; Hirschfield, GM; Invernizzi, P; Heathcote, J; Cusi, D; Gershwin, ME; Siminovitch, KA; Amos, CI

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified several loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) risk. Pathway analysis complements conventional GWAS analysis. We applied the recently developed linear combination test for pathways to datasets drawn from independent PBC GWAS in Italian and Canadian subjects. Of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and BioCarta pathways tested, 25 pathways in the Italian dataset (449 cases, 940 controls) and 26 pathways in the Canadian dataset (530 cases, 398 controls) were associated with PBC susceptibility (P < 0.05). After correcting for multiple comparisons, only the eight most significant pathways in the Italian dataset had FDR < 0.25 with tumor necrosis factor/stress-related signaling emerging as the top pathway (P = 7.38 × 10−4, FDR = 0.18). Two pathways, phosphatidylinositol signaling and hedgehog signaling, were replicated in both datasets (P < 0.05), and subjected to two additional complementary pathway tests. Both pathway signals remained significant in the Italian dataset on modified gene set enrichment analysis (P < 0.05). In both GWAS, variants nominally associated with PBC were significantly overrepresented in the phosphatidylinositol pathway (Fisher exact P < 0.05). These results point to established and novel pathway-level associations with inherited predisposition to PBC that on further independent replication and functional validation, may provide fresh insights into PBC etiology. PMID:23392275

  10. Whole-Exome Sequencing and Targeted Copy Number Analysis in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christian R.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Lau, Lynette; Paton, Tara A.; Stockley, Tracy; Jobling, Rebekah K.; Ray, Peter N.; Knowles, Michael R.; Hall, David A.; Dell, Sharon D.; Kim, Raymond H.

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal-recessive disorder resulting from loss of normal ciliary function. Symptoms include neonatal respiratory distress, chronic sinusitis, bronchiectasis, situs inversus, and infertility. Clinical features may be subtle and highly variable, making the diagnosis of PCD challenging. The diagnosis can be confirmed with ciliary ultrastructure analysis and/or molecular genetic testing of 32 PCD-associated genes. However, because of this genetic heterogeneity, comprehensive molecular genetic testing is not considered the standard of care, and the most efficient molecular approach has yet to be elucidated. Here, we propose a cost-effective and time-efficient molecular genetic algorithm to solve cases of PCD. We conducted targeted copy number variation (CNV) analysis and/or whole-exome sequencing on 20 families (22 patients) from a subset of 45 families (52 patients) with a clinical diagnosis of PCD who did not have a molecular genetic diagnosis after Sanger sequencing of 12 PCD-associated genes. This combined molecular genetic approach led to the identification of 4 of 20 (20%) families with clinically significant CNVs and 7 of 20 (35%) families with biallelic pathogenic mutations in recently identified PCD genes, resulting in an increased molecular genetic diagnostic rate of 55% (11/20). In patients with a clinical diagnosis of PCD, whole-exome sequencing followed by targeted CNV analysis results in an overall molecular genetic yield of 76% (34/45). PMID:26139845

  11. ZMYND10--Mutation Analysis in Slavic Patients with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kurkowiak, Małgorzata; Ziętkiewicz, Ewa; Greber, Agnieszka; Voelkel, Katarzyna; Wojda, Alina; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Witt, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare recessive disease with a prevalence of 1/10,000; its symptoms are caused by a kinetic dysfunction of motile cilia in the respiratory epithelium, flagella in spermatozoids, and primary cilia in the embryonic node. PCD is genetically heterogeneous: genotyping the already known PCD-related genes explains the genetic basis in 60-65% of the cases, depending on the population. While identification of new genes involved in PCD pathogenesis remains crucial, the search for new, population-specific mutations causative for PCD is equally important. The Slavs remain far less characterized in this respect compared to West European populations, which significantly limits diagnostic capability. The main goal of this study was to characterize the profile of causative genetic defects in one of the PCD-causing genes, ZMYND10, in the cohort of PCD patients of Slavic origin. The study was carried out using biological material from 172 unrelated PCD individuals of Polish origin, with no causative mutation found in nine major PCD genes. While none of the previously described mutations was found using the HRM-based screening, a novel frameshift mutation (c.367delC) in ZMYND10, unique for Slavic PCD population, was found in homozygous state in two unrelated PCD patients. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the absence of outer and inner dynein arms from the ciliary axoneme, consistent with the already published ZMYND10-mutated phenotype; cDNA analysis revealed the lack of ZMYND10 mRNA, indicating nonsense-mediated decay of the truncated transcript. PMID:26824761

  12. ZMYND10 - Mutation Analysis in Slavic Patients with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Kurkowiak, Małgorzata; Ziętkiewicz, Ewa; Greber, Agnieszka; Voelkel, Katarzyna; Wojda, Alina; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Witt, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare recessive disease with a prevalence of 1/10,000; its symptoms are caused by a kinetic dysfunction of motile cilia in the respiratory epithelium, flagella in spermatozoids, and primary cilia in the embryonic node. PCD is genetically heterogeneous: genotyping the already known PCD-related genes explains the genetic basis in 60–65% of the cases, depending on the population. While identification of new genes involved in PCD pathogenesis remains crucial, the search for new, population-specific mutations causative for PCD is equally important. The Slavs remain far less characterized in this respect compared to West European populations, which significantly limits diagnostic capability. The main goal of this study was to characterize the profile of causative genetic defects in one of the PCD-causing genes, ZMYND10, in the cohort of PCD patients of Slavic origin. The study was carried out using biological material from 172 unrelated PCD individuals of Polish origin, with no causative mutation found in nine major PCD genes. While none of the previously described mutations was found using the HRM-based screening, a novel frameshift mutation (c.367delC) in ZMYND10, unique for Slavic PCD population, was found in homozygous state in two unrelated PCD patients. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the absence of outer and inner dynein arms from the ciliary axoneme, consistent with the already published ZMYND10-mutated phenotype; cDNA analysis revealed the lack of ZMYND10 mRNA, indicating nonsense-mediated decay of the truncated transcript. PMID:26824761

  13. Bryant's Empathy Index: Structure and Measurement Invariance across Gender in a Sample of Primary School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Molina, Beatriz; Pérez-Albéniz, Alicia; Giménez-Dasí, Marta; Martín-Seoane, Gema

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dimensional structure and measurement invariance of Bryant's Index of Empathy for Children and Adolescents (IECA) (Bryant, 1982) across gender in a representative sample of primary school-aged children in Spain. The sample consisted of 2,050 children (50.80% girls), with a mean age of 9.80 years (SD = 1.24), recruited from 27 primary schools. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted. The model that presented the best fit indices was Lasa, Holgado, Carrasco, and del Barrio's (2008) three-factor model: Understanding Feelings, Feelings of Sadness, and Tearful Reaction. The levels of internal consistency for the subscales ranged from .76 to .83. In addition, the results partially support the measurement invariance of the IECA across gender. When the latent means of the empathy dimensions were compared across gender, statistically significant differences were found. These results coincide with those found in the literature showing the multidimensionality of the IECA. Specifically, the findings support its three-factor structure and its invariance across gender, making it a very useful instrument for exploring the expression of empathy in primary school children. PMID:27425402

  14. The Role of Structured Cooperative Learning Groups for Enhancing Chinese Primary Students' Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Yin-Kum

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of two types of cooperative learning groups used in reciprocal teaching (RT) classes (i.e. high-structured vs. low-structured groups) for enhancing students' reading comprehension. The participants were 235 Hong Kong Chinese Grade 6 students in nine classes. Reading comprehension tests and…

  15. Playful Structure: A Novel Image of Early Years Pedagogy for Primary School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Glenda; Sproule, Liz; McGuinness, Carol; Trew, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Playful structure is a new pedagogic image representing a more balanced and integrated perspective on early years pedagogy, aiming to blend apparent dichotomies and contradictions and to sustain and evolve play-based practice beyond Year 1. Playful structure invites teachers and children to initiate and maintain a degree of playfulness in the…

  16. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Malay Version Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire Tested among Mothers of Primary School Children in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Shohaimi, Shamarina; Yoke Wei, Wong; Mohd Shariff, Zalilah

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive feeding practices questionnaire (CFPQ) is an instrument specifically developed to evaluate parental feeding practices. It has been confirmed among children in America and applied to populations in France, Norway, and New Zealand. In order to extend the application of CFPQ, we conducted a factor structure validation of the translated version of CFPQ (CFPQ-M) using confirmatory factor analysis among mothers of primary school children (N = 397) in Malaysia. Several items were modified for cultural adaptation. Of 49 items, 39 items with loading factors >0.40 were retained in the final model. The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the final model (twelve-factor model with 39 items and 2 error covariances) displayed the best fit for our sample (Chi-square = 1147; df = 634; P < 0.05; CFI = 0.900; RMSEA = 0.045; SRMR = 0.0058). The instrument with some modifications was confirmed among mothers of school children in Malaysia. The present study extends the usability of the CFPQ and enables researchers and parents to better understand the relationships between parental feeding practices and related problems such as childhood obesity. PMID:25538958

  17. Confirmatory factor analysis of the Malay version comprehensive feeding practices questionnaire tested among mothers of primary school children in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shohaimi, Shamarina; Wei, Wong Yoke; Shariff, Zalilah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive feeding practices questionnaire (CFPQ) is an instrument specifically developed to evaluate parental feeding practices. It has been confirmed among children in America and applied to populations in France, Norway, and New Zealand. In order to extend the application of CFPQ, we conducted a factor structure validation of the translated version of CFPQ (CFPQ-M) using confirmatory factor analysis among mothers of primary school children (N = 397) in Malaysia. Several items were modified for cultural adaptation. Of 49 items, 39 items with loading factors >0.40 were retained in the final model. The confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the final model (twelve-factor model with 39 items and 2 error covariances) displayed the best fit for our sample (Chi-square = 1147; df = 634; P < 0.05; CFI = 0.900; RMSEA = 0.045; SRMR = 0.0058). The instrument with some modifications was confirmed among mothers of school children in Malaysia. The present study extends the usability of the CFPQ and enables researchers and parents to better understand the relationships between parental feeding practices and related problems such as childhood obesity. PMID:25538958

  18. Characterization of coherent structures in a turbulent mixing layer by digital image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, L. P.; Hernan, M. A.; Sarohia, V.

    1985-01-01

    Digital image analysis has been applied to a shadowgraph motion picture of a helium nitrogen mixing layer in order to characterize the coherent vortex structures in the flow. Both the primary spanwise coherent vortices and secondary streamwise vortices are considered. Pattern recognition algorithms were designed to take advantage of the more pronounced features of the vortices and of their temporal coherence to isolate them and to measure their characteristics. The resulting data base permits a deterministic description of the evolution of primary and seconary vortices.

  19. Structural analysis of galactoarabinan from duckweed.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Yu, Changjiang; Zhu, Ming; Cao, Yingping; Yang, Haiyan; Zhang, Xu; Ma, Yubin; Zhou, Gongke

    2015-03-01

    A highly branched galactoarabinan named DAG1 (Mw∼4.0×10(4) Da) was purified from Lemna aequinoctialis 6000 via 70% (v/v) ethanol extraction, followed by size-exclusion chromatography on Bio-Gel P2 and Superdex 75. Methylation analysis showed that DAG1 consisted of t-Araf, (1→5)-Araf, (1→2,5)-Araf, (1→3)-Galp, and (1→3,6)-Galp in a relative proportion of approximately 6:4:3:3:3, suggesting an arabinogalactan/galactoarabinan polysacchairde. With the aid of arabinan degrading enzymes, the structure of DAG1 repeating unit was further characterized by ELISA with specific monoclonal antibodies and Yariv reagent assay. Analyses indicated that the proposed repeating unit of DAG1 had a backbone composed of seven α-(1→5)-L-arabinofuranose residues where branching occurred at O-2 with either terminal arabinoses or arabinogalactan side chain. The arabinogalactan side chain was composed of six β-(1→3)-D-galactopyranose residues, half of which were ramified at O-6 with terminal arabinoses and the last galactose was terminated with arabinose. PMID:25498703

  20. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma: Diagnosis and the Impact of Chemotherapy on Cardiac Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Maude; Grasso, Agata E; Carpenter, John-Paul; Sheppard, Mary N; Karwatowski, Stefan P; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of primary cardiac lymphoma presenting as myopericarditis and rapidly deteriorating into biventricular heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging showed extensive myocardial infiltration with typical patterns on tissue characterization CMR images, raising clinical suspicion. Diagnosis was confirmed by myocardial histologic examination. Marked regression of tumor burden was apparent after 6 cycles of anthracycline-based chemotherapy. This case illustrates that a high degree of suspicion for this rare entity is mandated to institute timely treatment. Rapid tumor lysis may induce life-threatening acute cardiac decompensation that requires intensive monitoring and support therapy. PMID:26755242

  1. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method

    SciTech Connect

    Haibo Cao

    2003-12-12

    In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation between amino acid sequences and the corresponding native structure of the protein. Some applications of this correlation were discussed in this dissertation include the domain partition and a new structural threading method as well as the performance of this method in the CASP5 competition. In the first part, they give a brief introduction to the protein folding problem. Some essential knowledge and progress from other research groups was discussed. This part includes discussions of interactions among amino acids residues, lattice HP model, and the design ability principle. In the second part, they try to establish the correlation between amino acid sequence and the corresponding native structure of the protein. This correlation was observed in the eigenvector study of protein contact matrix. They believe the correlation is universal, thus it can be used in automatic partition of protein structures into folding domains. In the third part, they discuss a threading method based on the correlation between amino acid sequences and ominant eigenvector of the structure contact-matrix. A mathematically straightforward iteration scheme provides a self-consistent optimum global sequence-structure alignment. The computational efficiency of this method makes it possible to search whole protein structure databases for structural homology without relying on sequence similarity. The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind test prediction. In the appendix, they list the overall performance of this threading method in CASP5 blind test in comparison with other existing approaches.

  2. Intrusive growth of primary and secondary phloem fibres in hemp stem determines fibre-bundle formation and structure.

    PubMed

    Snegireva, Anastasia; Chernova, Tatyana; Ageeva, Marina; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Gorshkova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibres-cells with important mechanical functions and a widely used raw material-are usually identified in microscopic sections only after reaching a significant length or after developing a thickened cell wall. We characterized the early developmental stages of hemp (Cannabis sativa) stem phloem fibres, both primary (originating from the procambium) and secondary (originating in the cambium), when they still had only a primary cell wall. We gave a major emphasis to the role of intrusive elongation, the specific type of plant cell growth by which fibres commonly attain large cell length. We could identify primary phloem fibres at a distance of only 1.2-1.5 mm from the shoot apical meristem when they grew symplastically with the surrounding tissues. Half a millimeter further downwards along the stem, fibres began their intrusive elongation, which led to a sharp increase in fibre numbers visible within the stem cross-sections. The intrusive elongation of primary phloem fibres was completed within the several distal centimetres of the growing stem, before the onset of their secondary cell wall formation. The formation of secondary phloem fibres started long after the beginning of secondary xylem formation. Our data indicate that only a small portion of the fusiform cambial initials (<10 %) give rise directly or via their derivatives to secondary phloem fibres. The key determinant of final bundle structure, both for primary and secondary phloem fibres, is intrusive growth. Through bi-directional elongation, fibres join other fibres initiated individually in other stem levels, thus forming the bundles. Our results provide the specific developmental basis for further biochemical and molecular-genetic studies of phloem fibre development in hemp, but may be applied to many other species. PMID:26019229

  3. Intrusive growth of primary and secondary phloem fibres in hemp stem determines fibre-bundle formation and structure

    PubMed Central

    Snegireva, Anastasia; Chernova, Tatyana; Ageeva, Marina; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Gorshkova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibres—cells with important mechanical functions and a widely used raw material—are usually identified in microscopic sections only after reaching a significant length or after developing a thickened cell wall. We characterized the early developmental stages of hemp (Cannabis sativa) stem phloem fibres, both primary (originating from the procambium) and secondary (originating in the cambium), when they still had only a primary cell wall. We gave a major emphasis to the role of intrusive elongation, the specific type of plant cell growth by which fibres commonly attain large cell length. We could identify primary phloem fibres at a distance of only 1.2–1.5 mm from the shoot apical meristem when they grew symplastically with the surrounding tissues. Half a millimeter further downwards along the stem, fibres began their intrusive elongation, which led to a sharp increase in fibre numbers visible within the stem cross-sections. The intrusive elongation of primary phloem fibres was completed within the several distal centimetres of the growing stem, before the onset of their secondary cell wall formation. The formation of secondary phloem fibres started long after the beginning of secondary xylem formation. Our data indicate that only a small portion of the fusiform cambial initials (<10 %) give rise directly or via their derivatives to secondary phloem fibres. The key determinant of final bundle structure, both for primary and secondary phloem fibres, is intrusive growth. Through bi-directional elongation, fibres join other fibres initiated individually in other stem levels, thus forming the bundles. Our results provide the specific developmental basis for further biochemical and molecular-genetic studies of phloem fibre development in hemp, but may be applied to many other species. PMID:26019229

  4. Structural Feasibility Analysis of a Robotically Assembled Very Large Aperture Optical Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkie, William Keats; Williams, R. Brett; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilcox, Brian H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of robotically constructing a very large aperture optical space telescope on-orbit. Since the largest engineering challenges are likely to reside in the design and assembly of the 150-m diameter primary reflector, this preliminary study focuses on this component. The same technology developed for construction of the primary would then be readily used for the smaller optical structures (secondary, tertiary, etc.). A reasonable set of ground and on-orbit loading scenarios are compiled from the literature and used to define the structural performance requirements and size the primary reflector. A surface precision analysis shows that active adjustment of the primary structure is required in order to meet stringent optical surface requirements. Two potential actuation strategies are discussed along with potential actuation devices at the current state of the art. The finding of this research effort indicate that successful technology development combined with further analysis will likely enable such a telescope to be built in the future.

  5. The role of canopy structural complexity in wood net primary production of a maturing northern deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Hardiman, Brady S; Bohrer, Gil; Gough, Christopher M; Vogel, Christoph S; Curtisi, Peter S

    2011-09-01

    The even-aged northern hardwood forests of the Upper Great Lakes Region are undergoing an ecological transition during which structural and biotic complexity is increasing. Early-successional aspen (Populus spp.) and birch (Betula papyrifera) are senescing at an accelerating rate and are being replaced by middle-successional species including northern red oak (Quercus rubra), red maple (Acer rubrum), and white pine (Pinus strobus). Canopy structural complexity may increase due to forest age, canopy disturbances, and changing species diversity. More structurally complex canopies may enhance carbon (C) sequestration in old forests. We hypothesize that these biotic and structural alterations will result in increased structural complexity of the maturing canopy with implications for forest C uptake. At the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS), we combined a decade of observations of net primary productivity (NPP), leaf area index (LAI), site index, canopy tree-species diversity, and stand age with canopy structure measurements made with portable canopy lidar (PCL) in 30 forested plots. We then evaluated the relative impact of stand characteristics on productivity through succession using data collected over a nine-year period. We found that effects of canopy structural complexity on wood NPP (NPPw) were similar in magnitude to the effects of total leaf area and site quality. Furthermore, our results suggest that the effect of stand age on NPPw is mediated primarily through its effect on canopy structural complexity. Stand-level diversity of canopy-tree species was not significantly related to either canopy structure or NPPw. We conclude that increasing canopy structural complexity provides a mechanism for the potential maintenance of productivity in aging forests. PMID:21939078

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis of Human Primary Bronchial Epithelial Cells after Chloropicrin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Pesonen, Maija; Storvik, Markus; Kokkola, Tarja; Rysä, Jaana; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Pasanen, Markku

    2015-10-19

    Chloropicrin is a vaporizing toxic irritant that poses a risk to human health if inhaled, but the mechanism of its toxicity in the respiratory tract is poorly understood. Here, we exposed human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HBEpC) to two concentrations of chloropicrin (10-50 μM) for 6 or 48 h and used genomic microarray, flow cytometry, and TEM-analysis to monitor cellular responses to the exposures. The overall number of differentially expressed transcripts with a fold-change > ± 2 compared to controls increased with longer exposure times. The initial response was activation of genes with a higher number of up- (512 by 10 μM and 408 by 40 μM chloropicrin) rather than down-regulated transcripts (40 by 10 μM and 215 by 40 μM chloropicrin) at 6 h seen with both exposure concentrations. The number of down-regulated transcripts, however, increased with the exposure time. The differentially regulated transcripts were further examined for enriched Gene Ontology Terms (GO) and KEGG-pathways. According to this analysis, the "ribosome" and "oxidative phosphorylation" were the KEGG-pathways predominantly affected by the exposure. The predominantly affected (GO) biological processes were "protein metabolic process" including "translation," "cellular protein complex assembly," and "response to unfolded protein." Furthermore, the top pathways, "NRF2-activated oxidative stress" and "Ah-receptor signaling," were enriched in our data sets by IPA-analysis. Real time qPCR assay of six selected genes agreed with the microarray analysis. In addition, chloropicrin exposure increased the numbers of late S and/or G2/M-phase cells as analyzed by flow cytometry and induced autophagy as revealed by electron microscopy. The targets identified are critical for vital cellular functions reflecting acute toxic responses and are potential causes for the reduced viability of epithelial cells after chloropicrin exposure. PMID:26352163

  7. Proteomic analysis of primary duck hepatocytes infected with duck hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver infection in human. Because of the lack of an appropriate cell culture system for supporting HBV infection efficiently, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of hepadnavirus infection remain incompletely understood. Duck heptatitis B virus (DHBV) can naturally infect primary duck hepatocytes (PDHs) that provide valuable model systems for studying hepadnavirus infection in vitro. In this report, we explored global changes in cellular protein expression in DHBV infected PDHs by two-dimension gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Results The effects of hepadnavirus infection on hepatocytes were investigated in DHBV infected PDHs by the 2-DE analysis. Proteomic profile of PDHs infected with DHBV were analyzed at 24, 72 and 120 h post-infection by comparing with uninfected PDHs, and 75 differentially expressed protein spots were revealed by 2-DE analysis. Among the selected protein spots, 51 spots were identified corresponding to 42 proteins by MS/MS analysis; most of them were matched to orthologous proteins of Gallus gallus, Anas platyrhynchos or other avian species, including alpha-enolase, lamin A, aconitase 2, cofilin-2 and annexin A2, etc. The down-regulated expression of beta-actin and annexin A2 was confirmed by Western blot analysis, and potential roles of some differentially expressed proteins in the virus-infected cells have been discussed. Conclusions Differentially expressed proteins of DHBV infected PDHs revealed by 2-DE, are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, stress responses and cytoskeleton processes etc, providing the insight to understanding of interactions between hepadnavirus and hepatocytes and molecular mechanisms of hepadnavirus pathogenesis. PMID:20529248

  8. Coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.; Chen, P. C.; Dame, L. T.; Huang, H.

    1992-01-01

    Accomplishments are described for the first year effort of a 5-year program to develop a methodology for coupled structural/thermal/electromagnetic analysis/tailoring of graded composite structures. These accomplishments include: (1) the results of the selective literature survey; (2) 8-, 16-, and 20-noded isoparametric plate and shell elements; (3) large deformation structural analysis; (4) eigenanalysis; (5) anisotropic heat transfer analysis; and (6) anisotropic electromagnetic analysis.

  9. Localizing the human primary auditory cortex in vivo using structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Wasserthal, Christian; Brechmann, André; Stadler, Jörg; Fischl, Bruce; Engel, Karin

    2014-06-01

    Currently there are no routine methods to delineate the primary auditory cortex (PAC) of humans in vivo. Due to the large differences in the location of the PAC between subjects, labels derived from post-mortem brains may be inaccurate when applied to different samples of in vivo brains. Recent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies suggested that MR-tissue properties can be used to define the location of the PAC region in vivo. The basis for such an approach is that the PAC region is more strongly myelinated than the secondary areas. We developed a fully automatic method to identify the PAC in conventional anatomical data using a combination of two complementary MR contrasts, i.e., T1 and T2, at 3T with 0.7mm isotropic resolution. Our algorithm maps the anatomical MR data to reconstructed cortical surfaces and uses a classification approach to create an artificial contrast that is highly sensitive to the effects of an increased myelination of the cortex. Consistent with the location of the PAC defined in post-mortem brains, we found a compact region on the medial two thirds of Heschl's gyrus in both hemispheres of all 39 subjects. With further improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of the anatomical data and manual correction of segmentation errors, the results suggest that the primary auditory cortex can be defined in the living brain of single subjects. PMID:23891882

  10. A transparent organic transistor structure for bidirectional stimulation and recording of primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Benfenati, Valentina; Toffanin, Stefano; Bonetti, Simone; Turatti, Guido; Pistone, Assunta; Chiappalone, Michela; Sagnella, Anna; Stefani, Andrea; Generali, Gianluca; Ruani, Giampiero; Saguatti, Davide; Zamboni, Roberto; Muccini, Michele

    2013-07-01

    Real-time stimulation and recording of neural cell bioelectrical activity could provide an unprecedented insight in understanding the functions of the nervous system, and it is crucial for developing advanced in vitro drug screening approaches. Among organic materials, suitable candidates for cell interfacing can be found that combine long-term biocompatibility and mechanical flexibility. Here, we report on transparent organic cell stimulating and sensing transistors (O-CSTs), which provide bidirectional stimulation and recording of primary neurons. We demonstrate that the device enables depolarization and hyperpolarization of the primary neuron membrane potential. The transparency of the device also allows the optical imaging of the modulation of the neuron bioelectrical activity. The maximal amplitude-to-noise ratio of the extracellular recording achieved by the O-CST device exceeds that of a microelectrode array system on the same neuronal preparation by a factor of 16. Our organic cell stimulating and sensing device paves the way to a new generation of devices for stimulation, manipulation and recording of cell bioelectrical activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23644524

  11. Association analysis between HFM1 variation and primary ovarian insufficiency in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Pu, D; Wang, C; Cao, J; Shen, Y; Jiang, H; Liu, J; Wu, B L; Zhang, W; Wu, J

    2016-05-01

    HFM1 is a meiosis-specific gene and expressed in germ-line tissues. More recently, evidence has indicated that variations in HFM1 gene could be causative for primary ovarian insufficiency (POI), also known as premature ovarian failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HFM1 gene variants and sporadic POI in Chinese women. A total of 138 POI patients and 316 healthy controls (matched for ethnic background, sex, and age of the patients) were recruited in this study. We screened the entire HFM1 coding region by direct sequencing in all subjects and identified six variants of HFM1 gene in POI group, namely c.148G>A/p.Glu50Lys, c.1241A>C/p.His414Pro, c.2325C>A/p.Phe775Leu, c.3367T>C/p.Ser1123Pro, c.3580C>T/p.Arg1194Cys, and c.1686-1G>C. The variation rate of HFM1 in POI group is significantly higher than control group (p < 0.01). The p.His414Pro and p.Arg1194Cys were predicted to be probably damaging to the HFM1 protein function, while p.Glu50Lys, p.Phe775Leu and p.Ser1123Pro mutants might not have any deleterious effect on the structure or function of the protein by online predictors. Taken together, our data suggested that HFM1 gene might be associated with primary ovarian insufficiency in Chinese population. PMID:26679638

  12. Probabilistic structural analysis methods for critical SSME propulsion components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    The development of a three-dimensional inelastic analysis methodology for the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) structural components is described. The methodology is composed of: (1) composite load spectra, (2) probabilistic structural analysis methods, (3) the probabilistic finite element theory, and (4) probabilistic structural analysis. The progress in the development of generic probabilistic models for various individual loads which consist of a steady state load, a periodic load, a random load, and a spike, is discussed. The capabilities of the Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress finite element code designed for probabilistic structural analysis of the SSME are examined. Variation principles for formulation probabilistic finite elements and a structural analysis for evaluating the geometric and material properties tolerances on the structural response of turbopump blades are being designed.

  13. Does primary productivity modulate the indirect effects of large herbivores? A global meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Daskin, Joshua H; Pringle, Robert M

    2016-07-01

    Indirect effects of large mammalian herbivores (LMH), while much less studied than those of apex predators, are increasingly recognized to exert powerful influences on communities and ecosystems. The strength of these effects is spatiotemporally variable, and several sets of authors have suggested that they are governed in part by primary productivity. However, prior theoretical and field studies have generated conflicting results and predictions, underscoring the need for a synthetic global analysis. We conducted a meta-analysis of the direction and magnitude of large mammalian herbivore-initiated indirect interactions using 67 published studies comprising 456 individual responses. We georeferenced 41 of these studies (comprising 253 responses from 33 locations on five continents) to a satellite-derived map of primary productivity. Because predator assemblages might also influence the impact of large herbivores, we conducted a similar analysis using a global map of large carnivore species richness. In general, LMH reduced the abundance of other consumer species and also tended to reduce consumer richness, although the latter effect was only marginally significant. There was a pronounced reduction in the strength of negative (i.e. suppressive, due e.g., to competition) indirect effects of LMH on consumer abundance in more productive ecosystems. In contrast, positive (facilitative) indirect effects were not significantly correlated with productivity, likely because these comprised a more heterogeneous array of mechanisms. We found no effect of carnivore species richness on herbivore-initiated indirect effect strength. Our findings help to resolve the fundamental problem of ecological contingency as it pertains to the strength of an understudied class of multitrophic interactions. Moreover, these results will aid in predicting the indirect effects of anthropogenic wildlife declines and irruptions, and how these effects might be mediated by climatically driven shifts

  14. [Professor Ling Changquan's experience in treating primary liver cancer: an analysis of herbal medication].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhen; Su, Yong-hua; Yue, Xiao-qiang

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of outpatients' medical records concerning primary liver cancer (PLC), data of 552 patients (with 2020 effective prescriptions) from the Outpatient Department of Changhai Hospital treated by Professor Ling Changquan were collected. The nature, flavor and meridian distribution of the herbs used in the prescriptions were summarized by frequency method, and the features of the herbs used according to syndrome differentiation were analyzed by logistic regression. The couple herbs used were analyzed by cluster analysis. All the data were analyzed in combination with the experience of the specialist. It showed that most of the frequently used herbs were herbs for invigorating the spleen to promote appetite, removing toxic materials to inhibit tumor growth, and activating blood circulation to dissipate blood stasis. These herbs are mostly of plain or cool nature, and mainly of sweet, bitter, or acrid taste. It also showed that the most frequently used herbs for qi deficiency were Astragalus membranaceus, Atractylodes macrocephala, and Pseudostellariae; Caulis Spatholobi and Chinese jujube for blood asthenia; Fructus Corni and Ophiopogon japonicus for yin deficiency; Agastache rugosa, Semen Plantaginis and Poria for water-dampness; cape jasmine fruit and baikal skullcap root for heat excess; peach seed and Radix Paeoniae Rubra for blood stasis; Curcuma wenyujin, Akebia trifoliata and Bupleurum chinese for qi stagnation. A total of 19 pairs of couple herbs were summarized by the cluster analysis. PMID:19063833

  15. Correlation of analysis with high level vibration test results for primary coolant piping

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. ); Costello, J.F. )

    1992-01-01

    Dynamic tests on a modified 1/2.5-scale model of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant piping were performed using a large shaking table at Tadotsu, Japan. The High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) program was part of a cooperative study between the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Brookhaven National Laboratory, NRC/BNL) and Japan (Ministry of International Trade and Industry/Nuclear Power Engineering Center). During the test program, the excitation level of each test run was gradually increased up to the limit of the shaking table and significant plastic strains, as well as cracking, were induced in the piping. To fully utilize the test results, NRC/BNL sponsored a project to develop corresponding analytical predictions for the nonlinear dynamic response of the piping for selected test runs. The analyses were performed using both simplified and detailed approaches. The simplified approaches utilize a linear solution and an approximate formulation for nonlinear dynamic effects such as the use of a deamplification factor. The detailed analyses were performed using available nonlinear finite element computer codes, including the MARC, ABAQUS, ADINA and WECAN codes. A comparison of various analysis techniques with the test results shows a higher prediction error in the detailed strain values in the overall response values. A summary of the correlation analyses was presented before the BNL. This paper presents a detailed description of the various analysis results and additional comparisons with test results.

  16. Correlation of analysis with high level vibration test results for primary coolant piping

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Costello, J.F.

    1992-05-01

    Dynamic tests on a modified 1/2.5-scale model of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant piping were performed using a large shaking table at Tadotsu, Japan. The High Level Vibration Test (HLVT) program was part of a cooperative study between the United States (Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Brookhaven National Laboratory, NRC/BNL) and Japan (Ministry of International Trade and Industry/Nuclear Power Engineering Center). During the test program, the excitation level of each test run was gradually increased up to the limit of the shaking table and significant plastic strains, as well as cracking, were induced in the piping. To fully utilize the test results, NRC/BNL sponsored a project to develop corresponding analytical predictions for the nonlinear dynamic response of the piping for selected test runs. The analyses were performed using both simplified and detailed approaches. The simplified approaches utilize a linear solution and an approximate formulation for nonlinear dynamic effects such as the use of a deamplification factor. The detailed analyses were performed using available nonlinear finite element computer codes, including the MARC, ABAQUS, ADINA and WECAN codes. A comparison of various analysis techniques with the test results shows a higher prediction error in the detailed strain values in the overall response values. A summary of the correlation analyses was presented before the BNL. This paper presents a detailed description of the various analysis results and additional comparisons with test results.

  17. Genome-wide analysis uncovers novel recurrent alterations in primary central nervous system lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Braggio, Esteban; Van Wier, Scott; Ojha, Juhi; McPhail, Ellen; Asmann, Yan W.; Egan, Jan; da Silva, Jackline Ayres; Schiff, David; Lopes, M Beatriz; Decker, Paul A; Valdez, Riccardo; Tibes, Raoul; Eckloff, Bruce; Witzig, Thomas E.; Stewart, A Keith; Fonseca, Rafael; O’Neill, Brian Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma confined to the CNS. Whether there is a PCNSL-specific genomic signature and, if so, how it differs from systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is uncertain. Experimental design We performed a comprehensive genomic study of tumor samples from 19 immunocompetent PCNSL patients. Testing comprised array-comparative genomic hybridization and whole exome sequencing. Results Biallelic inactivation of TOX and PRKCD were recurrently found in PCNSL but not in systemic DLBCL, suggesting a specific role in PCNSL pathogenesis. Additionally, we found a high prevalence of MYD88 mutations (79%) and CDKN2A biallelic loss (60%). Several genes recurrently affected in PCNSL were common with systemic DLBCL, including loss of TNFAIP3, PRDM1, GNA13, TMEM30A, TBL1XR1, B2M, CD58, activating mutations of CD79B, CARD11 and translocations IgH-BCL6. Overall, BCR/TLR/NF-κB pathways were altered in >90% of PNCSL, highlighting its value for targeted therapeutic approaches. Furthermore, integrated analysis showed enrichment of pathways associated with immune response, proliferation, apoptosis, and lymphocyte differentiation. Conclusions In summary, genome-wide analysis uncovered novel recurrent alterations, including TOX and PRKCD, helping to differentiate PCNSL from systemic DLBCL and related lymphomas. PMID:25991819

  18. Analysis and design technology for high-speed aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starnes, James H., Jr.; Camarda, Charles J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent high-speed aircraft structures research activities at NASA Langley Research Center are described. The following topics are covered: the development of analytical and numerical solutions to global and local thermal and structural problems, experimental verification of analysis methods, identification of failure mechanisms, and the incorporation of analysis methods into design and optimization strategies. The paper describes recent NASA Langley advances in analysis and design methods, structural and thermal concepts, and test methods.

  19. Surgical Complications of Primary Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhiping; Li, Ying; Wu, Yongzhong; Qu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    vitreoretinopathy (p = 0.73) and epiretinal membrane (p = 0.47) in other late post-operative complications. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that PPV could be considered as potential surgical management on primary RRD. PMID:25734450

  20. Developing an International Register of Clinical Prediction Rules for Use in Primary Care: A Descriptive Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Keogh, Claire; Wallace, Emma; O’Brien, Kirsty K.; Galvin, Rose; Smith, Susan M.; Lewis, Cliona; Cummins, Anthony; Cousins, Grainne; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Fahey, Tom

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We describe the methodology used to create a register of clinical prediction rules relevant to primary care. We also summarize the rules included in the register according to various characteristics. METHODS To identify relevant articles, we searched the MEDLINE database (PubMed) for the years 1980 to 2009 and supplemented the results with searches of secondary sources (books on clinical prediction rules) and personal resources (eg, experts in the field). The rules described in relevant articles were classified according to their clinical domain, the stage of development, and the clinical setting in which they were studied. RESULTS Our search identified clinical prediction rules reported between 1965 and 2009. The largest share of rules (37.2%) were retrieved from PubMed. The number of published rules increased substantially over the study decades. We included 745 articles in the register; many contained more than 1 clinical prediction rule study (eg, both a derivation study and a validation study), resulting in 989 individual studies. In all, 434 unique rules had gone through derivation; however, only 54.8% had been validated and merely 2.8% had undergone analysis of their impact on either the process or outcome of clinical care. The rules most commonly pertained to cardiovascular disease, respiratory, and musculoskeletal conditions. They had most often been studied in the primary care or emergency department settings. CONCLUSIONS Many clinical prediction rules have been derived, but only about half have been validated and few have been assessed for clinical impact. This lack of thorough evaluation for many rules makes it difficult to retrieve and identify those that are ready for use at the point of patient care. We plan to develop an international web-based register of clinical prediction rules and computer-based clinical decision support systems. PMID:25024245

  1. Cost analysis of store-and-forward telepsychiatry as a consultation model for primary care.

    PubMed

    Butler, Thomas N; Yellowlees, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Store-and-forward telepsychiatry, or asynchronous telepsychiatry (ATP), which allows clinical data, including video to be collected to be reviewed at a later time by a specialist, has been described as a feasible alternative to real-time telepsychiatry, or synchronous telepsychiatry (STP), as a consultation model for primary care. In theory, ATP should be economically more cost-effective than STP due to the increased flexibility of patient data collection and the substitution of the time of specialists with that of lower-cost providers. The aim of this study was to conduct a retrospective cost-analysis comparing ATP with STP and traditional in-person psychiatric consultations in the primary care setting. One hundred and twenty five ATP consultations were performed and fixed and marginal costs were calculated for each model using inputs such as equipment costs, time spent by providers and support staff, and hourly salaries. The fixed costs were $7,000 and $20,000 for ATP and STP and marginal costs were $68.18, $107.50, and $96.36, respectively, for the three groups. STP was the most expensive of the three types of consultations. ATP became the most cost-effective of the three models beyond 249 consultations. The marginal cost savings of ATP were due to substitution of low-cost providers for specialists. ATP represents a potential disruptive healthcare process that could allow more affordable care to be delivered to a larger population of patients. A full accounting of ATP's efficiency will require further studies, including prospective cost-benefit analyses from the perspectives of the patient, provider, and society. PMID:22085113

  2. Primary CNS T-cell Lymphomas: A Clinical, Morphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Molecular Analysis.

    PubMed

    Menon, Madhu P; Nicolae, Alina; Meeker, Hillary; Raffeld, Mark; Xi, Liqiang; Jegalian, Armin G; Miller, Douglas C; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphomas are relatively rare with the most common subtype being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Primary CNS T-cell lymphomas (PCNSTL) account for <5% of CNS lymphomas. We report the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular characteristics of 18 PCNSTLs. Fifteen cases were classified as peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified, 2 of which were of γδ T-cell derivation and 1 was TCR silent; there was 1 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-positive and 2 anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK-negative. Median age was 58.5 years (range, 21 to 81 y), with an M:F ratio of 11:7. Imaging results showed that 15 patients had supratentorial lesions. Regardless of subtype, necrosis and perivascular cuffing of tumor cells were frequently observed (11/18 cases). CD3 was positive in all cases but 1; 10/17 were CD8-positive, and 5/17 were CD4-positive. Most cases studied had a cytotoxic phenotype with expression of TIA1 (13/15) and granzyme-B (9/13). Polymerase chain reaction analysis of T-cell receptor γ rearrangement confirmed a T-cell clone in 14 cases with adequate DNA quality. Next-generation sequencing showed somatic mutations in 36% of cases studied; 2 had >1 mutation, and none showed overlapping mutations. These included mutations in DNMT3A, KRAS, JAK3, STAT3, STAT5B, GNB1, and TET2 genes, genes implicated previously in other T-cell neoplasms. The outcome was heterogenous; 2 patients are alive without disease, 4 are alive with disease, and 6 died of disease. In conclusion, PCNSTLs are histologically and genomically heterogenous with frequent phenotypic aberrancy and a cytotoxic phenotype in most cases. PMID:26379152

  3. Large-scale estimation and uncertainty analysis of gross primary production in Tibetan alpine grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Honglin; Liu, Min; Xiao, Xiangming; Ren, Xiaoli; Zhang, Li; Sun, Xiaomin; Yang, Yuanhe; Li, Yingnian; Zhao, Liang; Shi, Peili; Du, Mingyuan; Ma, Yaoming; Ma, Mingguo; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Guirui

    2014-03-01

    Gross primary production (GPP) is an important parameter for carbon cycle and climate change research. Previous estimations of GPP on the Tibetan Plateau were usually reported without quantitative uncertainty analyses. This study sought to quantify the uncertainty and its partitioning in GPP estimation across Tibetan alpine grasslands during 2003-2008 with the modified Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM). Monte Carlo analysis was used to provide a quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in model simulations, and Sobol' variance decomposition method was applied to determine the relative contribution of each source of uncertainty to the total uncertainty. The results showed that the modified VPM successfully reproduced the seasonal dynamics and magnitude of GPP of 10 flux tower sites on the plateau (R2 = 0.77 - 0.95, p < 0.001). The 6 year mean GPP in Tibetan alpine grasslands was estimated at 223.3 Tg C yr-1 (312.3 g C m-2 yr-1). The mean annual GPP increased from western to eastern plateau, with the increase of annual temperature and precipitation and the decrease of elevation, while the decrease of GPP from southern to northern plateau was primarily driven by air temperature. Furthermore, the mean relative uncertainty of the annual GPP was 18.30%, with larger uncertainty occurring in regions with lower GPP. Photosynthetic active radiation, enhanced vegetation index, and the maximum light use efficiency (LUE) are the primary sources of uncertainty in GPP estimation, contributing 36.84%, 26.86%, and 21.99%, respectively. This emphasizes the importance of uncertainty in driving variables as well as that of maximum LUE in LUE model simulation.

  4. Integrated Analysis Capability pilot computer program. [large space structures and data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    An integrated analysis capability (IAC) computer software package was developed for the design analysis and performance evaluation of large space systems. The IAC aids the user in coupling the required technical disciplines (initially structures, thermal and controls), providing analysis solution paths which reveal critical interactive effects in order to study loads, stability and mission performance. Existing technical software modules, having a wide existing user community, are combined with the interface software to bridge between the different technologies and mathematical modeling techniques. The package is supported by executive, data management and interactive graphics software, with primary development within the superminicomputer environment.

  5. Structural weight analysis of hypersonic aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.

    1972-01-01

    The weights of major structural components of hypersonic, liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft are estimated and discussed. The major components are the body structure, body thermal protection system tankage and wing structure. The method of estimating body structure weight is presented in detail while the weights of the other components are estimated by methods given in referenced papers. Two nominal vehicle concepts are considered. The advanced concept employs a wing-body configuration and hot structure with a nonintegral tank, while the potential concept employs an all body configuration and cold, integral pillow tankage structure. Characteristics of these two concepts are discussed and parametric data relating their weight fractions to variations in vehicle shape and size design criteria and mission requirements, and structural arrangement are presented. Although the potential concept is shown to have a weight advantage over the advanced, it involves more design uncertainties since it is farther removed in design from existing aircraft.

  6. Magnetic properties and domain structures in primary recrystallized thin-gauge Si-Fe with orientation near (110)[001

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, N.; Iwasaki, M. . Technical Development Bureau); Ushigami, Y.; Nozawa, T. . Technical Development Bureau)

    1994-07-01

    The magnetic properties and features of magnetic domain structures of newly developed grain-oriented 15--50 [mu]m thickness 3% Si-Fe with very high permeability were investigated. The induction of these materials was 1.70--1.95 T at 800 A/m. These high inductions developed low core losses. The losses of toroidal cores made of 50 [mu]m thick material were W15/400 = 8 W/kg. Despite very small primary recrystallized grain size, they consist of simple magnetic domains with 180[degree] domain walls and ac magnetization is achieved by simple main domain wall displacement.

  7. Effect of thermal power effluents on the community structure and primary production of phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, N.K.; Ambasht, R.S.; Kumar, R. )

    1993-01-01

    Effluents discharged by the coal-fired thermal power plant at Obra (22[degrees] 52[prime] N lat. and 83[degrees] 5[prime]E long.) reach into the nearby flowing Rihand river and alter the ecological features of the river ecosystem. The temperature and pH of the receiving river water increased while the transparency, dissolved oxygen, chloride, NO[sub 3]-N, and PO[sub 4]-P decreased. In the effluent zone of the river, no phytoplankton existed during a one-year study period (January to December 1987). Chlorophycean members like Spirogyra and Scenedesmus which were present in the unaffected upstream (control site) were replaced by Bacillariophycean members like Pinnularia and Nitzschia with reduced phytoplankton density in the downstream-affected water. At the control site (average of 12 months), Chlorophyta density contributed 335 unit L[sup [minus]1] to the total phytoplankton density (774 unit L[sup [minus]1]) followed by Cyanophyta (260 unit L[sup [minus]1]) and Bacillariophyta (188 unit L[sup [minus]1]). At the affected site maximum of 112, the unit L[sup [minus]1] contribution was by Bacillariophyta followed by 90 unit L[sup [minus]1] of Chlorophyta and 60 unit L[sup [minus]1] of Cyanophyta to the total phytoplankton density (221 unit L[sup [minus]1]). Phytoplankton diversity indices and primary production were reduced in the affected zone. Chloride and PO[sub 4]-P together accounted for 54% (p<0.01) of the variability of the Bacillariophyta density, while no clear influence on Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta density was observed. Total phytoplankton density was changed by 28% (p<0.05) by chloride itself. Gross and net primary productivities were significantly (p<0.01) influenced by alteration of the NO[sub 3]-N concentrations of the water. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Collagenolytic serine protease PC and trypsin PC from king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus: cDNA cloning and primary structure of the enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Rudenskaya, Galina N; Kislitsin, Yuri A; Rebrikov, Denis V

    2004-01-01

    Background In this paper, we describe cDNA cloning of a new anionic trypsin and a collagenolytic serine protease from king crab Paralithodes camtschaticus and the elucidation of their primary structures. Constructing the phylogenetic tree of these enzymes was undertaken in order to prove the evolutionary relationship between them. Results The mature trypsin PC and collagenolytic protease PC contain 237 (Mcalc 24.8 kDa) and 226 amino acid residues (Mcalc 23.5 kDa), respectively. Alignments of their amino acid sequences revealed a high degree of the trypsin PC identity to the trypsin from Penaeus vannamei (approximately 70%) and of the collagenolytic protease PC identity to the collagenase from fiddler crab Uca pugilator (76%). The phylogenetic tree of these enzymes was constructed. Conclusions Primary structures of the two mature enzymes from P. camtschaticus were obtained and compared with those of other proteolytic proteins, including some enzymes from brachyurans. A phylogenetic analysis was also carried out. These comparisons revealed that brachyurins are closely related to their vertebrate and bacterial congeners, occupy an intermediate position between them, and their study significantly contributes to the understanding of the evolution and function of serine proteases. PMID:14731305

  9. Critical joints in large composite primary aircraft structures. Volume 2: Technology demonstration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunin, Bruce L.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for critical structural joints in composite wing structure that meets all the design requirements of a 1990 commercial transport aircraft. The results of four large composite multirow bolted joint tests are presented. The tests were conducted to demonstrate the technology for critical joints in highly loaded composite structure and to verify the analytical methods that were developed throughout the program. The test consisted of a wing skin-stringer transition specimen representing a stringer runout and skin splice on the wing lower surface at the side of the fuselage attachment. All tests were static tension tests. The composite material was Toray T-300 fiber with Ciba-Geigy 914 resin in 10 mil tape form. The splice members were metallic, using combinations of aluminum and titanium. Discussions are given of the test article, instrumentation, test setup, test procedures, and test results for each of the four specimens. Some of the analytical predictions are also included.

  10. Small Titanium Oxo Clusters: Primary Structures of Titanium(IV) in Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanyun; Hou, Jie; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-04-01

    For sol-gel synthesis of titanium oxide, the titanium(IV) precursors are dissolved in water to form clear solutions. However, the solution status of titanium(IV) remains unclear. Herein three new and rare types of titanium oxo clusters are isolated from aqueous solutions of TiOSO4 and TiCl4 without using organic ligands. Our results indicate that titanium(IV) is readily hydrolyzed into oxo oligomers even in highly acidic solutions. The present clusters provide precise structural information for future characterization of the solution species and structural evolution of titanium(IV) in water and, meanwhile, are new molecular materials for photocatalysis. PMID:26990885

  11. Innovative fabrication processing of advanced composite materials concepts for primary aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassapoglou, Christos; Dinicola, Al J.; Chou, Jack C.

    1992-01-01

    The autoclave based THERM-X(sub R) process was evaluated by cocuring complex curved panels with frames and stiffeners. The process was shown to result in composite parts of high quality with good compaction at sharp radius regions and corners of intersecting parts. The structural properties of the postbuckled panels fabricated were found to be equivalent to those of conventionally tooled hand laid-up parts. Significant savings in bagging time over conventional tooling were documented. Structural details such as cocured shear ties and embedded stiffener flanges in the skin were found to suppress failure modes such as failure at corners of intersecting members and skin stiffeners separation.

  12. An integrative analysis of treatment, outcomes and prognostic factors for primary spinal anaplastic ependymomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peiqin; Sui, Mingxing; Ye, Jingliang; Wan, Zhiping; Chen, Feng; Luo, Chun

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of treatment modalities in primary spinal anaplastic ependymomas (PSAE) and identify promising prognostic factors. PSAE are rare tumors of the central nervous system with poorly understood clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes. We reviewed the literature in PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases to identify patients with PSAE. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and univariate Kaplan-Meier analysis were performed on the PSAE patients and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were assessed to evaluate the clinical outcomes. Of the 40 patients with PSAE, the tumors were mostly intramedullary (n=19; 47.5%) and frequently involved the thoracic cord (n=25; 62.5%). Eighteen patients suffered recurrence during the follow-up with a median PFS of 24 months. The 1, 2, and 5year OS rates of the PSAE patients were 91.5%, 82.1%, and 63.1%, respectively. Gross total resection (GTR) was independently associated with prolonged PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.11; p=0.004) and OS (HR 0.11; p=0.003) in the multivariate analysis. Adjuvant radiotherapy also conferred improved PFS (HR 0.15; p=0.008) and OS (HR 0.16; p=0.022). Age, sex, tumor location and chemotherapy did not influence the outcomes in this group. The results of our study suggest that GTR and adjuvant radiotherapy are strong prognostic indicators in patients with PSAE and the role of chemotherapy is yet to be defined. PMID:25769252

  13. Harms from discharge to primary care: mixed methods analysis of incident reports

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Huw; Edwards, Adrian; Hibbert, Peter; Rees, Philippa; Prosser Evans, Huw; Panesar, Sukhmeet; Carter, Ben; Parry, Gareth; Makeham, Meredith; Jones, Aled; Avery, Anthony; Sheikh, Aziz; Donaldson, Liam; Carson-Stevens, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Discharge from hospital presents significant risks to patient safety, with up to one in five patients experiencing adverse events within 3 weeks of leaving hospital. Aim To describe the frequency and types of patient safety incidents associated with discharge from secondary to primary care, and commonly described contributory factors to identify recommendations for practice. Design and setting A mixed methods analysis of 598 patient safety incident reports in England and Wales related to ‘Discharge’ from the National Reporting and Learning System. Method Detailed data coding (with 20% double-coding), data summaries generated using descriptive statistical analysis, and thematic analysis of special-case sample of reports. Incident type, contributory factors, type, and level of harm were described, informing recommendations for future practice. Results A total of 598 eligible reports were analysed. The four main themes were: errors in discharge communication (n = 151; 54% causing harm); errors in referrals to community care (n = 136; 73% causing harm); errors in medication (n = 97; 87% causing harm); and lack of provision of care adjuncts such as dressings (n = 62; 94% causing harm). Common contributory factors were staff factors (not following referral protocols); and organisational factors (lack of clear guidelines or inefficient processes). Improvement opportunities include developing and testing electronic discharge methods with agreed minimum information requirements and unified referrals systems to community care providers; and promoting a safety culture with ‘safe discharge’ checklists, discharge coordinators, and family involvement. Conclusion Significant harm was evident due to deficits in the discharge process. Interventions in this area need to be evaluated and learning shared widely. PMID:26622036

  14. Analysis of large space structures assembly: Man/machine assembly analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Procedures for analyzing large space structures assembly via three primary modes: manual, remote and automated are outlined. Data bases on each of the assembly modes and a general data base on the shuttle capabilities to support structures assembly are presented. Task element times and structure assembly component costs are given to provide a basis for determining the comparative economics of assembly alternatives. The lessons learned from simulations of space structures assembly are detailed.

  15. ESF GROUND SUPPORT - STRUCTURAL STEEL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Misiak

    1996-06-26

    The purpose and objective of this analysis are to expand the level of detail and confirm member sizes for steel sets included in the Ground Support Design Analysis, Reference 5.20. This analysis also provides bounding values and details and defines critical design attributes for alternative configurations of the steel set. One possible configuration for the steel set is presented. This analysis covers the steel set design for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) entire Main Loop 25-foot diameter tunnel.

  16. STRUCTURE OF PRIMARY PM2.5 DERIVED FROM DIESEL TRUCK EXHAUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently considering regulations on airborne particulate matter < 2.5 microns in mean diameter (PM2.5). It is important that the molecular structure and microstructure of PM2.5 from various sources be thoroughly characterized in order ...

  17. Human liver alcohol dehydrogenase. 1. The primary structure of the beta 1 beta 1 isoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Hempel, J; Bühler, R; Kaiser, R; Holmquist, B; de Zalenski, C; von Wartburg, J P; Vallee, B; Jörnvall, H

    1984-12-17

    Determination of the amino acid sequence of the beta 1 subunit from the class I (pyrazole-sensitive) human liver alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme beta 1 beta 1 revealed a 373-residue structure differing at 48 positions (including a gap) from that of the subunit of the well studied horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase EE isoenzyme. The structure deduced is compatible with known differences in composition, ultraviolet absorbance, electrophoretic mobility and catalytic properties between the horse and human enzymes. All zinc-liganding residues of the horse E subunit are strictly conserved in the human beta 1 subunit, despite an earlier report of a mutation involving Cys-46. This residue therefore remains conserved in all known alcohol dehydrogenase structures. However, the total cysteine content of the beta 1 structure is raised from 14 in the subunit of the horse enzyme to 15 by a Tyr----Cys exchange. Most exchanges are on the surface of the molecule and of a well conserved nature. Substitutions close to the catalytic centre are of interest to explain the altered substrate specificity and different catalytic activity of the beta 1 homodimer. Functionally, a Ser----Thr exchange at position 48 appears to be of special importance, since Thr-48 in beta 1 instead of Ser-48 in the horse enzyme can restrict available space. Four other substitutions also line the active-site pocket, and appear to constitute partly compensated exchanges. PMID:6391920

  18. [Conserved motifs in the primary and secondary ITS1 structures in bryophytes].

    PubMed

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatov, M S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ITS1 nucleotide sequences of 1000 moss species of 62 families, 11 liverwort species from five orders, and one hornwort Anthoceros agrestis identified five highly conserved motifs (CM1-CM5), which are presumably involved in pre-rRNA processing. Although the ITS1 sequences substantially differ in length and the extent of divergence, the conserved motifs are found in all of them. ITS1 secondary structures were constructed for 76 mosses, and main regularities at conserved motif positioning were observed. The positions of processing sites in the ITS1 secondary structure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to be similar to the positions of the conserved motifs in the ITS1 secondary structures of mosses and liverworts. In addition, a potential hairpin formation in the putative secondary structure of a pre-rRNA fragment was considered for the region between ITS1 CM4-CM5 and a highly conserved region between hairpins 49 and 50 (H49 and H50) of the 18S rRNA. PMID:26107892

  19. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have sequenced the structural gene and flanking regions for lanosterol 14oc-demethylase (14DM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. n open reading fram of 530 codons encodes a 60.7-kDa protein. hen this gene is disrupted by integrative transformation, the resulting strain requires e...

  20. Instruction in Reading Comprehension for Primary-Grade Students: "A Focus on Text Structure"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joanna P.

    2005-01-01

    The studies described here are designed to teach reading comprehension to at-risk students in the second and third grades. The focus is on text structure. First, there is an evaluation of a program that teaches students to identify themes of stories and apply those themes to real life; this instruction goes beyond the plot-level focus of typical…