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Sample records for primary water experimental

  1. Imaging of primary and secondary radiation-Modelling and experimental results of a radioactive source and a water phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, K. A. A.; Taylor, G. C.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper the contribution of primary and secondary radiation from a water phantom to a pinhole volume, as a result of three neutron sources (Cf, AmBe and 5 MeV mono-energetic) and two gamma sources (Cs and Co), is separately estimated using the PTRAC particle tracking option available in MCNP. Also in this paper imaging of the mixed radiation field produced by a Van de Graaf accelerator (when a water phantom is present) is described. In the model, a spherical tally volume, 2 cm in diameter, was placed equidistantly from a radioactive source and 30×30×15 cm3 water phantom. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to investigate the level of primary and secondary radiation contributing to the pinhole volume directly from the source and from interactions in the phantom respectively. The spatial distribution of counts clearly discriminated the source and the phantom. The results have shown that the percentage of neutrons reflected from the phantom with energies above 1 MeV increases with mean energy of the source. This method has significant potential to characterise secondary radiation in proton therapy, where it would help to verify the location and the energy delivered during the treatment.

  2. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of primary paper sludge using a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst: Experimental vs thermodynamic equilibrium results.

    PubMed

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-02-01

    H2, CH4, CO and CO2 yields were measured during supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of primary paper waste sludge (PWS) at 450°C. Comparing these yields with calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values offer an improved understanding of conditions required to produce near-equilibrium yields. Experiments were conducted at different catalyst loads (0-1g/gPWS) and different reaction times (15-120min) in a batch reactor, using either K2CO3 or Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 as catalyst. K2CO3 up to 1g/gPWS increased the H2 yield significantly to 7.5mol/kgPWS. However, these yields and composition were far from equilibrium values, with carbon efficiency (CE) and energy recovery (ER) of only 29% and 20%, respectively. Addition of 0.5-1g/gPWS Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 resulted in high H2 and CH4 yields (6.8 and 14.8mol/kgPWS), CE of 84-90%, ER of 83% and a gas composition relatively close to the equilibrium values (at hold times of 60-120min). PMID:26638140

  3. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1964-04-01

    A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

  4. Primary production in Southern Ocean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Worthen, Denise; Schnell, Anthony; Lizotte, Michael P.

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Ocean forms a link between major ocean basins, is the site of deep and intermediate water ventilation, and is one of the few areas where macronutrients are underutilized by phytoplankton. Paradoxically, prior estimates of annual primary production are insufficient to support the Antarctic food web. Here we present results from a primary production algorithm based upon monthly climatological phytoplankton pigment concentrations from the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS). Phytoplankton production was forced using monthly temperature profiles and a radiative transfer model that computed changes in photosynthetically usable radiation at each CZCS pixel location. Average daily productivity (g C m-2 d-1) and total monthly production (Tg C month-1) were calculated for each of five geographic sectors (defined by longitude) and three ecological provinces (defined by sea ice coverage and bathymetry as the pelagic province, the marginal ice zone, and the shelf). Annual primary production in the Southern Ocean (south of 50°S) was calculated to be 4414 Tg C yr-1, 4-5 times higher than previous estimates made from in situ data. Primary production was greatest in the month of December (816 Tg C month-1) and in the pelagic province (contributing 88.6% of the annual primary production). Because of their small size the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and the shelf contributed only 9.5% and 1.8%, respectively, despite exhibiting higher daily production rates. The Ross Sea was the most productive region, accounting for 28% of annual production. The fourfold increase in the estimate of primary production for the Southern Ocean likely makes the notion of an "Antarctic paradox" (primary production insufficient to support the populations of Southern Ocean grazers, including krill, copepods, microzooplankton, etc.) obsolete.

  5. The water dimer I: Experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Anamika; Cole, William T. S.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    As the archetype of water hydrogen bonding, the water dimer has been studied extensively by both theory and experiment for nearly seven decades. In this article, we present a detailed chronological review of the experimental dimer studies and the insights into the complex nature of water and hydrogen bonding gained from them. A subsequent letter will review the corresponding theoretical advances.

  6. Children's Understanding of Experimental Contrast and Experimental Control: An Inventory for Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterhaus, Christopher; Koerber, Susanne; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Experimentation skills are a central component of scientific thinking, and many studies have investigated whether and when primary-school children develop adequate experimentation strategies. However, the answers to these questions vary substantially depending on the type of task that is used: while discovery tasks, which require children to…

  7. On the experimental investigation on primary atomization of liquid streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumouchel, Christophe

    2008-09-01

    The production of a liquid spray can be summarized as the succession of the following three steps; the liquid flow ejection, the primary breakup mechanism and the secondary breakup mechanism. The intermediate step—the primary breakup mechanism—covers the early liquid flow deformation down to the production of the first isolated liquid fragments. This step is very important and requires to be fully understood since it constitutes the link between the flow issuing from the atomizer and the final spray. This paper reviews the experimental investigations dedicated to this early atomization step. Several situations are considered: cylindrical liquid jets, flat liquid sheets, air-assisted cylindrical liquid jets and air-assisted flat liquid sheets. Each fluid stream adopts several atomization regimes according to the operating conditions. These regimes as well as the significant parameters they depend on are listed. The main instability mechanisms, which control primary breakup processes, are rather well described. This review points out the internal geometrical nozzle characteristics and internal flow details that influence the atomization mechanisms. The contributions of these characteristics, which require further investigations to be fully identified and quantified, are believed to be the main reason of experimental discrepancies and explain a lack of universal primary breakup regime categorizations.

  8. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  9. Unlocking water markets: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Rabotyagov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Water markets are frequently referred to as a promising approach to alleviate stress on water systems, especially as future hydrologic assessments suggest increasing demand and less reliable supply. Yet, despite decades of advocacy by water resource economists, water markets (leases and sales of water rights between willing buyers and sellers) have largely failed to develop in the western US. Although there are a number of explanations for this failure, we explore one potential reason that has received less attention : farmers as sellers may have preferences for different elements of a water market transaction that are not captured in the relative comparison of their profits from farming and their profits from agreeing to a deal. We test this explanation by recruiting irrigators with senior water rights in the upper Yakima River Basin in Washington state to participate in a series of experimental auctions. In concept, the Yakima Basin is well situated for water market transactions as it has significant water shortages for junior water users ~15% of years and projections show these are likely to increase in the future. Participants were asked a series of questions about the operation of a hypothetical 100-acre timothy hay farm including the type of buyer, how the water bank is managed, the lease type, and the offer price. Results from 7 sessions with irrigators (n=49) and a comparison group of undergraduates (n=38) show that irrigators are more likely to accept split-season than full-season leases (controlling for differences in farm profits) and are more likely to accept a lease from an irrigation district and less likely to accept an offer from a Developer. Most notably, we find farmers were far more likely than students to reject offers from buyers even though it would increase their winnings from the experiment. These results could be used in ongoing water supply policy debates in the Yakima Basin to simulate the amount of water that could be freed by water

  10. THF water hydrate crystallization: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Surya; Groysman, Alexander; Myerson, Allan S.

    1999-08-01

    Supersaturated solutions of THF-water hydrate system were experimentally studied before and during crystallization, to examine the system's behavior in the metastable zone and observe any anomalies suggesting cluster formation. Nucleation induction time measurements, with and without additives, were performed to screen potential growth inhibitors. Shifts in the onset points of crystallization for water and THF-water mixtures with additives were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Aspartame was among one of the few successfully screened inhibitors. Preliminary on-line crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements were performed on this system to monitor the crystal size during crystallization. The CSD data was also used to compute the hydrate crystal growth rates, which were found to be in the order of 145 μm/h.

  11. Environment, Teacher Manual, Primary, Idea 3, Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Project, Grafton, IL.

    The Environmental Education Project Center has developed these guidelines for teaching a unit in environmental studies. It is their intention that the teacher and student cooperatively plan the approach and content to be used during the course of study. In this unit about water, teacher resource information and student material are combined to…

  12. Primary acoustic signal structure during free falling drop collision with a water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    Consistent optical and acoustic techniques have been used to study the structure of hydrodynamic disturbances and acoustic signals generated as a free falling drop penetrates water. The relationship between the structures of hydrodynamic and acoustic perturbations arising as a result of a falling drop contacting with the water surface and subsequent immersion into water is traced. The primary acoustic signal is characterized, in addition to stably reproduced features (steep leading edge followed by long decay with local pressure maxima), by irregular high-frequency packets, which are studied for the first time. Reproducible experimental data are used to recognize constant and variable components of the primary acoustic signal.

  13. Experimental demonstration of water based tunable metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odit, Mikhail; Kapitanova, Polina; Andryieuski, Andrei; Belov, Pavel; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2016-07-01

    A simple dynamically tunable metasurface (two-dimensional metamaterial) operating at microwave frequencies is developed and experimentally investigated. Conceptually, the simplicity of the approach is granted by reconfigurable properties of unit cells partially filled with distilled water. The transmission spectra of the metasurface for linear and circular polarizations of the incident wave were experimentally measured under the metasurface rotation around a horizontal axis. The changes in the transmission coefficient magnitude up to 8 dB at 1.25 GHz are reported while rotating the metasurface by the 90° angle. The proposed approach manifests the cheap and accessible route for the electromagnetic wave control in the microwave region with the help of metasurfaces.

  14. Environmental Science. An Experimental Programme for Primary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linke, R. D.

    An experimental course covering some of the fundamental principles and terminology associated with environmental science and the application of these principles to various contemporary problems is summarized in this report. The course involved a series of lectures together with a program of specific seminar and discussion topics presented by the…

  15. Response of plant community structure and primary productivity to experimental drought and flooding in an Alaskan fen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchill, A.C.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, Anthony; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.

    2014-01-01

    Northern peatlands represent a long-term net sink for atmospheric CO2, but these ecosystems can shift from net carbon (C) sinks to sources based on changing climate and environmental conditions. In particular, changes in water availability associated with climate control peatland vegetation and carbon uptake processes. We examined the influence of changing hydrology on plant species abundance and ecosystem primary production in an Alaskan fen by manipulating the water table in field treatments to mimic either sustained flooding (raised water table) or drought (lowered water table) conditions for 6 years. We found that water table treatments altered plant species abundance by increasing sedge and grass cover in the raised water table treatment and reducing moss cover while increasing vascular green area in the lowered water table treatment. Gross primary productivity was lower in the lowered treatment than in the other plots, although there were no differences in total biomass or vascular net primary productivity among the treatments. Overall, our results indicate that vegetation abundance was more sensitive to variation in water table than total biomass and vascular biomass accrual. Finally, in our experimental peatland, drought had stronger consequences for change in vegetation abundance and ecosystem function than sustained flooding.

  16. Primary simulation and experimental results of a coaxial plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Huang, J.; Han, J.; Zhang, Z.; Quan, R.; Wang, L.; Yang, X.; Feng, C.

    A coaxial plasma accelerator with a compressing coil is developed to simulate the impacting and erosion effect of space debris on exposed materials of spacecrafts During its adjustment operation some measurements are conducted including discharging current by Rogowski coil average plasma speed in the coaxial gun by magnetic coils and ejected particle speed by piezoelectric sensor etc In concert with the experiment a primary physical model is constructed in which only the coaxial gun is taken into account with the compressor coil not considered for its unimportant contribution to the plasma ejection speed The calculation results by the model agree well with the diagnostic results considering some assumptions for simplification Based on the simulation result some important suggestions for optimum design and adjustment of the accelerator are obtained for its later operation

  17. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  18. Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a National Primary School HIV Intervention in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a primary-school HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper primary-school pupils in Kenya. A quasi-experimental mixed qualitative-quantitative pre- and 18-month post-design using 40 intervention and 40 matched control schools demonstrated significant…

  19. Water movement through an experimental soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (???1 x 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 x 15 x 0.9m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20,037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water break through at the base of the liner occurs. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.5 x 10-9, 4.0 x 10-8, and 5.0 x 10-8 cm s-1 based on measurements of water infiltration into the liner by large- and small-ring infiltrometers and a water balance analysis, respectively. Also investigated in this research was the variability of the liner's hydraulic properties and estimates of the transit times for water and tracers. Small variances exhibited by small-ring flux data suggested that the liner was homogeneous with respect to infiltration fluxes. The predictions of water and tracer breakthrough at the base of the liner ranged from 2.4-12.6 y, depending on the method of calculation and assumptions made. The liner appeared to be saturated to a depth between 18 and 33 cm at the end of the first year of monitoring. Transit time calculations cannot be verified yet, since breakthrough has not occurred. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement established by the U.S. EPA.A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (??? 1 ?? 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20.037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water

  20. Experimental Activities in Primary School to Learn about Microbes in an Oral Health Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mafra, Paulo; Lima, Nelson; Carvalho, Graça S.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental science activities in primary school enable important cross-curricular learning. In this study, experimental activities on microbiology were carried out by 16 pupils in a Portuguese grade-4 classroom (9-10?years old) and were focused on two problem-questions related to microbiology and health: (1) do your teeth carry microbes? (2) why…

  1. Water safety education among primary school children in Grenada.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Rachele; Giganti, Mark J; Weiner, Allison; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a common cause of death among children. Successful prevention interventions currently used in developed countries are often not transferable into developing countries due to differences in both environment and resources. In this study, we adapted a water safety education programme developed by the American Red Cross for primary school students in Grenada. Water safety knowledge before and after the training session was assessed using a nine-question evaluation tool. Following the training, a survey was administered to all teachers to assess the adaptability and effectiveness of the WHALE Tales training. Fifty-six students (30% males) completed the training. The age range was between 5 and 12 years old. Participants' water safety knowledge increased 15% (p < 0.01). Mean scores of correct answers increased for every grade level, ranging from a 5% increase for first graders to 33% increase for second graders. The findings from this study suggested that implementation of such a programme is effective. With cultural modifications and outsourcing, we believe this adapted programme would be successful in Grenada and other similar settings. PMID:22950942

  2. Discriminating secondary from primary water in volcanic glass using thermogravimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachetti, T.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Gardner, J. E.; Shea, T.; Daniller-Varghese, M.

    2013-12-01

    Matrix-glass water in pyroclasts can include both primary (magmatic) and secondary (meteoric) water. Quantitative discrimination between magmatic and meteoric water is essential to interpret magma degassing processes, but remains challenging. Analyses of D/H isotopic ratios or water speciation help assess whether a texturally intact glass has been rehydrated, but we yet to correct for the extent of rehydration quantitatively, largely because the diffusivity of water at low temperatures (<400°C) is poorly understood. We present new results on the rehydration of rhyolitic pumices using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA quantifies precisely the mass lost from volatile exsolution (almost exclusively water in our case, as determined by both mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy) from a given sample heated to a specified temperature at specified rate. TGA has been used previously to discriminate between magmatic and meteoric water in silicic glasses, under the assumption that exsolution of meteoric water only occurs at T<550°C. Analyzed samples include crystal-free rhyolitic Plinian pumices from Glass Mountain (1.1 ka), Valles Caldera (50-60 ka) and Long Valley caldera (760 ka). All samples were crushed to <125 μm grains, and analyzed by TGA for temperatures up to 1000°C, using a heating rate of 20°C/min. The total weight loss attributed to water ranges from 1.3 wt% in pumice from Glass Mountain to >4.5 wt% in pumice from Valles Caldera. For all samples, >80% of the total water is lost far below 550°C, the first derivative of the mass loss always showing a major degassing peak between 210-320°C, followed by a smaller peak between 430-670°C. Moreover, the TGA curve of an obsidian from Glass Mountain, first dehydrated by heating the sample to 1000°C, and then experimentally hydrated to 3.9 wt% at high temperature and pressure (i.e., containing only ';magmatic' water), also shows that ~85% of the water is lost below 550°C, with a major peak around 380

  3. Experimental Study of Sudden Solidification of Supercooled Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The two independent methods of measurement of the mass of ice created at sudden solidification of supercooled water are described. One is based on the calorimetric measurement of heat that is necessary for melting the ice and the second interprets the volume change that accompanies the water freezing. Experimental results are compared with the…

  4. Upper Washita River Experimental Watersheds: Nutrient Water Quality Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality datasets were acquired by the USDA-ARS in three large research watersheds in Oklahoma: the Southern Great Plains Research Watershed (SGPRW), and the Little Washita River and Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental Watersheds (LWREW and FCREW, respectively). Water quality data in the SGPRW we...

  5. Does surface roughness influence the primary stability of acetabular cups? A numerical and experimental biomechanical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Sophie; Galland, Alexandre; Rosa, Benoît; Le Corroller, Thomas; Pithioux, Martine; Argenson, Jean-Noël; Chabrand, Patrick; Parratte, Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    Most acetabular cups implanted today are press-fit impacted cementless. Anchorage begins with the primary stability given by insertion of a slightly oversized cup. This primary stability is key to obtaining bone ingrowth and secondary stability. We tested the hypothesis that primary stability of the cup is related to surface roughness of the implant, using both an experimental and a numerical models to analyze how three levels of surface roughness (micro, macro and combined) affect the primary stability of the cup. We also investigated the effect of differences in diameter between the cup and its substrate, and of insertion force, on the cups' primary stability. The results of our study show that primary stability depends on the surface roughness of the cup. The presence of macro-roughness on the peripheral ring is found to decrease primary stability; there was excessive abrasion of the substrate, damaging it and leading to poor primary stability. Numerical modeling indicates that oversizing the cup compared to its substrate has an impact on primary stability, as has insertion force. PMID:25080896

  6. An experimental study on recovering heat from domestic drain water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Mohamad; Al Shaer, Ali; Haddad, Ahmad; Khaled, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    This paper concerns an experimental study on a system of heat recovery applied to domestic drain water pipes. The concept suggested consists of using the heat still present in the drain water as a preheating/heating source to the cold water supply of the building. To proceed, an appropriate experimental setup is developed and a coil heat exchanger is used as heat transfer device in the recovery system. Several scenarios are simulated and corresponding parameters are recorded and analyzed. It was shown that the suggested recovery concept can considerably preheat the cold water supply and then decrease the energy consumption. Particularly, up to 8.6 kW of heat were recovered when the cold water supply is initially at 3 °C.

  7. An Experimental Project on Energy Education for Rural Women, Primary School Children and Teachers Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathak, Yogini; Mankodi, Hina

    One of the University of Baroda's (India) Rural/Tribal Block Placement Program's major aims during the year 1988-89 was to develop energy consciousness in women, primary school children and teachers. An experimental project was designed for a rural Indian village. The objectives were to obtain information on rural energy resources; assess the role…

  8. Experimental Observation of Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinhua; Yang, Jiong; Zi, Jian; Chan, C. T.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array of resonators composing of bottom-mounted split tubes, resulting in the prohibition of water wave propagation. It is found that when negative gravity occurs, the averaged displacement of water surface in a unit cell of the array has a phase difference of π to that along the boundary of the unit cell, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide a mechanism to block water waves and may find applications in wave energy conversion and coastal protection. PMID:23715132

  9. Experimental studies toward the characterization of Inmetro's circulating water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. M.; Alho, A. T. P.; Garcia, D. A.; Farias, M. H.; Massari, P. L.; Silva, V. V. S.

    2016-07-01

    Circulating water channels are facilities which can be used for conducting environmental, metrological and engineering studies. The Brazilian National Institute of Metrology-INMETRO has a water channel of innovative design, and the present work deals with the prior experimental investigation of its hydrodynamics performance. By using the optical technique PIV - Particle Image Velocimetry, under certain conditions, the velocity profile behavior in a region inside the channel was analyzed in order to evaluate the scope of applicability of such bench.

  10. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  11. Experimental study of the constituents of space wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.; Colombo, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    This report presents experimental data, obtained under controlled conditions, which quantify the various constituents of human origin that may be expected in space wash water. The experiments were conducted with a simulated crew of two male and two female subjects. The data show that the expected wash water contaminants originating from human secretions are substantially lower than theoretical projections indicated. The data presented are immediately useful and may have considerable impact on the tradeoff comparisons among various unit processes and systems under consideration by NASA for recycling space wash water.

  12. No evidence of complementary water use along a plant species richness gradient in temperate experimental grasslands.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Dörte; Gockele, Annette; Ravenek, Janneke M; Roscher, Christiane; Strecker, Tanja; Weigelt, Alexandra; Buchmann, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Niche complementarity in resource use has been proposed as a key mechanism to explain the positive effects of increasing plant species richness on ecosystem processes, in particular on primary productivity. Since hardly any information is available for niche complementarity in water use, we tested the effects of plant diversity on spatial and temporal complementarity in water uptake in experimental grasslands by using stable water isotopes. We hypothesized that water uptake from deeper soil depths increases in more diverse compared to low diverse plant species mixtures. We labeled soil water in 8 cm (with 18O) and 28 cm depth (with ²H) three times during the 2011 growing season in 40 temperate grassland communities of varying species richness (2, 4, 8 and 16 species) and functional group number and composition (legumes, grasses, tall herbs, small herbs). Stable isotope analyses of xylem and soil water allowed identifying the preferential depth of water uptake. Higher enrichment in 18O of xylem water than in ²H suggested that the main water uptake was in the upper soil layer. Furthermore, our results revealed no differences in root water uptake among communities with different species richness, different number of functional groups or with time. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis of increased complementarity in water use in more diverse than in less diverse communities of temperate grassland species. PMID:25587998

  13. Treatment Technology to Meet the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations for Inorganics: Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorg, Thomas J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This article is the third in a series summarizing existing treatment technology to meet the inorganic National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations. This report deals specifically with treatment methods for removing cadmium, lead, and silver from drinking water. (CS)

  14. Impact of environmental traders on water markets: An experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisdell, John G.

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a series of economic experiments in which an environmental agency with a stochastic demand function enters an existing water market to buy or sell water for instream use. Previous experimental studies have examined the use of tenders to reduce water extractions and social suasion to maintain aggregate flow levels and compared imposing minimum flow restrictions with subsidizing downstream water use and the allocation of tradeable minimum flow rights. The important contribution of this paper is that it explores the consequence of having an environmental agency enter an existing water market. In this paper we explore the consequences of (1) formally allocating tradeable water rights to the environmental agency, (2) allocating funding to purchase water as required, and (3) having the trading actions of the environmental agency a matter of public record. The research, while contextualized to water markets in this paper, addresses an important and timely issue that could have implication beyond water markets. In pollution permit markets, for example, there is the question of what the impact on the market would be if a government agency were to begin buying back permits, particularly if this represented a relatively large volume of trades and entered into such purchases on a needs basis.

  15. The Strategy to Survive Primary Malaria Infection: An Experimental Study on Behavioural Changes in Parasitized Birds

    PubMed Central

    Mukhin, Andrey; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Platonova, Elena; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Vakoliuk, Irina; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Haemosporida, Plasmodium) are of cosmopolitan distribution, and they have a significant impact on vertebrate host fitness. Experimental studies show that high parasitemia often develops during primary malaria infections. However, field studies only occasionally reveal high parasitemia in free-living birds sampled using the traditional methods of mist-netting or trapping, and light chronic infections predominate. The reason for this discrepancy between field observation and experimental data remains insufficiently understood. Since mist-netting is a passive capture method, two main parameters determine its success in sampling infected birds in wildlife, i. e. the presence of parasitized birds at a study site and their mobility. In other words, the trapping probability depends on the survival rate of birds and their locomotor activity during infection. Here we test (1) the mortality rate of wild birds infected with Plasmodium relictum (the lineage pSGS1), (2) the changes in their behaviour during presence of an aerial predator, and (3) the changes in their locomotor activity at the stage of high primary parasitemia.We show that some behavioural features which might affect a bird's survival during a predator attack (time of reaction, speed of flush flight and take off angle) did not change significantly during primary infection. However, the locomotor activity of infected birds was almost halved compared to control (non-infected) birds during the peak of parasitemia. We report (1) the markedly reduced mobility and (2) the 20% mortality rate caused by P. relictum and conclude that these factors are responsible for the underrepresentation of birds in mist nets and traps during the stage of high primary parasitemia in wildlife. This study indicates that the widespread parasite, P. relictum (pSGS1) influences the behaviour of birds during primary parasitemia. Experimental studies combined with field observations are needed to better understand the

  16. The Strategy to Survive Primary Malaria Infection: An Experimental Study on Behavioural Changes in Parasitized Birds.

    PubMed

    Mukhin, Andrey; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Platonova, Elena; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Vakoliuk, Irina; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Haemosporida, Plasmodium) are of cosmopolitan distribution, and they have a significant impact on vertebrate host fitness. Experimental studies show that high parasitemia often develops during primary malaria infections. However, field studies only occasionally reveal high parasitemia in free-living birds sampled using the traditional methods of mist-netting or trapping, and light chronic infections predominate. The reason for this discrepancy between field observation and experimental data remains insufficiently understood. Since mist-netting is a passive capture method, two main parameters determine its success in sampling infected birds in wildlife, i. e. the presence of parasitized birds at a study site and their mobility. In other words, the trapping probability depends on the survival rate of birds and their locomotor activity during infection. Here we test (1) the mortality rate of wild birds infected with Plasmodium relictum (the lineage pSGS1), (2) the changes in their behaviour during presence of an aerial predator, and (3) the changes in their locomotor activity at the stage of high primary parasitemia.We show that some behavioural features which might affect a bird's survival during a predator attack (time of reaction, speed of flush flight and take off angle) did not change significantly during primary infection. However, the locomotor activity of infected birds was almost halved compared to control (non-infected) birds during the peak of parasitemia. We report (1) the markedly reduced mobility and (2) the 20% mortality rate caused by P. relictum and conclude that these factors are responsible for the underrepresentation of birds in mist nets and traps during the stage of high primary parasitemia in wildlife. This study indicates that the widespread parasite, P. relictum (pSGS1) influences the behaviour of birds during primary parasitemia. Experimental studies combined with field observations are needed to better understand the

  17. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  18. Modeling primary dendrite arm spacings in resistance spot welds; Part 2: Experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, J.E. )

    1994-05-01

    Hold time sensitivity is a potential concern when cold-rolled high-strength low-alloy sheet steels are used in resistance spot welded applications. Hold time sensitivity is defined by cracking, which occurs along the faying surface of the weld on peel testing when conventional hold times are used, and does not occur when reduces hold times are used. Hold time sensitivity is related to solidification cracking in the steel; however, it is believed that steel hardenability may also play a role. As an aid to understanding of solidification cracking in resistance spot welds, it is necessary to have an understanding of how the solidification structure develops. In this work, solidification structures in resistance spot welds have been characterized by the primary dendrite spacing. In Part 1 of this work, primary dendrite spacings were modeled by using a combination of numerical thermal modeling and closed-form primary dendrite spacings modeling. Numerical thermal modeling was used to predict solidification conditions in these welds. These solidification conditions were then used in the primary dendrite spacings model to predict the local spacings. In this paper, experimental studies were conducted to examine the validity of the modeling described in the previous paper. Experimentally, primary dendrite spacings were characterized for three grades of cold-rolled HSLA steel with nominal compositions of 0.05C-0.3Mn, 0.1C-1Mn and 0.15C-1.5Mn. For each steel, three separate thicknesses (nominally 0.8, 1.25 and 2.0 mm) were investigated. Primary dendrite spacings were determined at nominally the weld faying surface from deep-etched micrographs using an area-averaging technique.

  19. Availability of primary or juvenile water for ordinary uses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuinness, C.L.; Poland, J.F.

    1954-01-01

    Progressive depletion of the water supplies of many of the desert valleys of the Southwest, both because of recurrent droughts and because of overdevelopment, has focused increasing attention on the possibilities of developing supplementary water supplies from sources that are immune to drought, or at least whose development will not interfere with an existing supply now being utilized. Among the possibilities that are the subject of research by scientific organizations and other agencies are conversion of sea water and other saline water, salvage of water now used by phreatophytes (water-loving plants) of low economic value, and induced precipitation (rain-making).

  20. Primary School Pupils' Perceptions of Water in the Context of STS Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havu-Nuutinen, Sari; Karkkainen, Sirpa; Keinonen, Tuula

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on pupils' perceptions of water issues. The instructional situations take place in a Finnish primary school and aim at introducing the Science-Technology-Society (STS) study approach. The primary aim of this study is, in the context of STS instruction, to describe issues that pupils associate with water. This paper involves…

  1. Numerical and Experimental Quantification of coupled water and water vapor fluxes in very dry soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions with deep groundwater and very dry soils, vapor movement in the vadose zone may be a major component in the total water flux. Therefore, the coupled movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat transport in the unsaturated zone should be explicitly considered to quantify subsurface water fluxes in such regions. Only few studies focused on the importance of vapor water diffusion in dry soils and in many water flow studies in soil it was neglected. We are interested in the importance of water vapor diffusion and condensation in very dry sand. A version of Hydrus-1D capable of solving the coupled water vapor and heat transport equations will be used to do the numerical modeling. The soil hydraulic properties will be experimentally determined. A soil column experiment was developed with negligible liquid flow in order to isolate vapor flux for testing. We have used different values of initial water contents trying to generate different scenarios to assess the role of the water vapor transport in arid and semi-arid soils and how it changes the soil water content using different soil hydraulic parametrization functions. In the session a preliminary experimental and modelling results of vapor and water fluxes will be presented.

  2. The impact of educational videotapes on water contact behaviour of primary school students in the Dongting Lakes region, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, L; Manderson, L; Tempongko, M S; Wei, W; Aiguo, P

    2000-08-01

    Multimedia has become increasingly important in educational programmes in schools in all societies, and has potential value for health education. We developed a video and a comic book on the transmission and prevention of schistosomiasis for use in primary schools in endemic areas of China. The material was designed to increase children's knowledge of schistosomiasis as an environmental disease and to encourage them to reduce their contact with unsafe water sources. To test the effectiveness of the video and booklet, a quasi-experimental study was conducted among 1,739 children in 50 primary schools in the Dongting Lake region. A self-administered questionnaire pre- and post-intervention showed a significant increase in knowledge about schistosomiasis in the intervention schools. Significantly, this change was associated with a decrease in contact with unsafe water sources, as established from water contact observations. This behavioural change suggests the value of short, targeted educational interventions to decrease risk of infection. PMID:10995095

  3. Optimization of the water chemistry of the primary coolant at nuclear power plants with VVER

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, L. F.; Kruglova, T. K.; Sinitsyn, V. P.

    2005-01-15

    Results of the use of automatic hydrogen-content meter for controlling the parameter of 'hydrogen' in the primary coolant circuit of the Kola nuclear power plant are presented. It is shown that the correlation between the 'hydrogen' parameter in the coolant and the 'hydrazine' parameter in the makeup water can be used for controlling the water chemistry of the primary coolant system, which should make it possible to optimize the water chemistry at different power levels.

  4. Experimental nanocalorimetry of protonated and deprotonated water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Boulon, Julien; Braud, Isabelle; Zamith, Sébastien; Labastie, Pierre; L’Hermite, Jean-Marc; CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse

    2014-04-28

    An experimental nanocalorimetric study of mass selected protonated (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +} and deprotonated (H{sub 2}O){sub n−1}OH{sup −} water clusters is reported in the size range n = 20–118. Water cluster's heat capacities exhibit a change of slope at size dependent temperatures varying from 90 to 140 K, which is ascribed to phase or structural transition. For both anionic and cationic species, these transition temperatures strongly vary at small sizes, with higher amplitude for protonated than for deprotonated clusters, and change more smoothly above roughly n ≈ 35. There is a correlation between bonding energies and transition temperatures, which is split in two components for protonated clusters while only one component is observed for deprotonated clusters. These features are tentatively interpreted in terms of structural properties of water clusters.

  5. Experimental long term evolution of breathers in water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Oceanic rogue waves may occur, due to the modulation instability, also referred to as the Benjamin-Feir instability. This instability can be also discussed within the framework of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS), which describes the dynamics of unstable packets in deep-water. In particular, through exact breather solutions of the NLS. Breathers are currently under intensive study, since their recent experimental observation in optics, water waves and in plasma proved the validity of the NLS to describe strong localizations in nonlinear dispersive media. We present evolution characteristics of breather, propagating over a long propagation distance in deep-water. In addition, we present several analytical and promising techniques, based on the theory of nonlinear wave theory, how an early stage of breather dynamics may be detected, before the occurrence of strong wave focusing.

  6. Primary Datasets for Case Studies of River-Water Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulder, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Level 6 (final-year BSc) students undertook case studies on between-site and temporal variation in river-water quality. They used professionally-collected datasets supplied by the Environment Agency. The exercise gave students the experience of working with large, real-world datasets and led to their understanding how the quality of river water is…

  7. Calculation of water-bearing primary basalt and estimation of source mantle conditions beneath arcs: PRIMACALC2 model for WINDOWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Ariskin, Alexey A.

    2014-04-01

    present a new method for estimating the composition of water-bearing primary arc basalt and its source mantle conditions. The PRIMACALC2 model uses a thermodynamic fractional crystallization model COMAGMAT3.72 and runs with an Excel macro to examine the mantle equilibrium and trace element calculations of a primary basalt. COMAGMAT3.72 calculates magma fractionation in 0-10 kb at various compositions, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and water content, but is only applicable for forward calculations. PRIMACALC2 first calculates the provisional composition of a primary basalt from an observed magma. The basalt composition is then calculated by COMAGMAT3.72 for crystallization. Differences in elemental concentrations between observed and the closest-match calculated magmas are then adjusted in the primary basalt. Further iteration continues until the calculated magma composition converges with the observed magma, resulting in the primary basalt composition. Once the fitting is satisfied, back calculations of trace elements are made using stepwise addition of fractionated minerals. Mantle equilibrium of the primary basalt is tested using the Fo-NiO relationship of olivine in equilibrium with the primary basalt, and thus with the source mantle. Source mantle pressure, temperature, and degree of melting are estimated using petrogenetic grids based on experimental data obtained in anhydrous systems. Mantle melting temperature in a hydrous system is computed by adjusting T with a parameterization for a water-bearing system. PRIMACALC2 can be used either in dry or water-bearing arc magmas and is also applicable to mid-ocean ridge basalts and nonalkalic ocean island basalts.

  8. Primary cell cultures from sea urchin ovaries: a new experimental tool.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Silvia; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Sugni, Michela; Candia Carnevali, M Daniela

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, primary cell cultures from ovaries of the edible sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus were developed in order to provide a simple and versatile experimental tool for researches in echinoderm reproductive biology. Ovary cell phenotypes were identified and characterized by different microscopic techniques. Although cell cultures could be produced from ovaries at all stages of maturation, the cells appeared healthier and viable, displaying a higher survival rate, when ovaries at early stages of gametogenesis were used. In terms of culture medium, ovarian cells were successfully cultured in modified Leibovitz-15 medium, whereas poor results were obtained in minimum essential medium Eagle and medium 199. Different substrates were tested, but ovarian cells completely adhered only on poly-L-lysine. To improve in vitro conditions and stimulate cell proliferation, different serum-supplements were tested. Fetal calf serum and an originally developed pluteus extract were detrimental to cell survival, apparently accelerating processes of cell death. In contrast, cells cultured with sea urchin egg extract appeared larger and healthier, displaying an increased longevity that allowed maintaining them for up to 1 month. Overall, our study provides new experimental bases and procedures for producing successfully long-term primary cell cultures from sea urchin ovaries offering a good potential to study echinoid oogenesis in a controlled system and to investigate different aspects of echinoderm endocrinology and reproductive biology. PMID:24002666

  9. Quasi-experimental evaluation of a national primary school HIV intervention in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary

    2007-05-01

    This study examined the impact of a primary-school HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper primary-school pupils in Kenya. A quasi-experimental mixed qualitative-quantitative pre- and 18-month post-design using 40 intervention and 40 matched control schools demonstrated significant program impact on targeted objectives of (1) adequate program delivery and, for standard 6 and 7 pupils (ages 11-16 years), (2) increased HIV-related knowledge; (3) increased communication with parents and teachers about HIV and sexuality; (4) increased assistance to fellow pupils to avoid sexual activity; (5) increased self-efficacy related to abstinence and condom use; (6) decreased exposure to HIV through delayed first intercourse, decreased sexual activity and increased condom. Results support the conclusions that the existing infrastructure is adequate for national roll-out of the program; that the program has its most beneficial effect on sexually inexperienced youth and should therefore be implemented with the youngest age groups possible; and that gains are gender specific, with boys reporting increased condom use while girls are more likely to decrease or delay sexual activity. Based on these results, the program began national roll-out to all primary schools in 2005. By June 2006, the program was operating in 11,000 of the country's nearly 19,000 schools. PMID:17689323

  10. Experimentally determined water storage capacity in the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferot, A.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.

    2010-12-01

    Trace amounts of hydrogen dissolved as defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) in the mantle are believed to play a key role in physical and chemical processes in the Earth’s upper mantle. Hence, the estimation of water storage in mantle phases and solubility mechanisms are important in order to better understand the effect of water. Experimental data on water solubility in NAMs are available for upper mantle minerals such as olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. However, the majority of studies are based on the study of single phases, and at temperatures or pressures that are too low for the Earth’s upper mantle. The aim of this study is to constrain the combined effects of pressure, temperature and composition on water solubility in olivine and orthopyroxene under upper mantle conditions. The solubility of water in coexisting orthopyroxene and olivine was investigated by simultaneously synthesizing the two phases at high pressure and high temperature in a multi-anvil press. Experiments were performed under water-saturated conditions in the MSH systems with Fe and Al at 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 9 GPa and temperatures between 1175 and 1400°C. Integrated OH absorbances were determined using polarized infrared spectroscopy on doubly polished thin sections of randomly oriented crystals. Water solubility in olivine increases with pressure and decreases with temperature as has been described previously (Bali et al., 2008). The aluminum content strongly decreases in olivine with pressure from 0.09 wt% at 2.5 GPa and 1250°C to 0.04 wt% at 9 GPa and 1175°C. The incorporation of this trivalent cation in the system enhances water solubility in olivine even if present in trace amounts, however this behavior appears to reverse at high pressure. The effect of temperature on water solubility follows a bell-shaped curve with a maximum solubility in olivine and orthopyroxene at 1250°C. Aluminum is incorporated in orthopyroxene following the Tschermak substitution and strongly

  11. Water cluster-deuterium oxide collisions: An experimental glimpse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The wealth of cluster research now found in the literature is just beginning to bridge the gap between the study of molecule, surface, and condensed matter physics. Recent advances in experimental technology have opened up new windows into the world of cluster-molecule collision dynamics. This thesis is an attempt to present a glimpse into the collision dynamics of the water cluster-deuterium oxide system. An analysis of the potential reaction channels is presented and the cluster size dependence of the reaction cross section is detailed. An interpretation of this cluster size dependence is proposed.

  12. Transit time of mixed high pressure injection water and primary loop water in pressurized water reactor cold legs

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, B.H.; Oh, S.; Rothe, P.H.

    1984-03-01

    During an overcooling transient in a pressurized water reactor, cold water from the high pressure injection (HPI) mixes with the hot primary coolant in the cold leg. The transit time is a gauge for the assessment of the time and the velocity of the mixed flow that passes through the cold leg to the downcomer. Existing data from mixing tests at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/CREARE and EPRI/SAI facilities are analyzed. By means of models for HPI jet entrainment as well as the propagation of a gravity current, dimensionless correlations have been developed for the transit time and cold water front velocity at stagnant loop flow conditions. Based on this transit time correlation for stagnant loop flow and the limiting condition for large loop flow, a general correlation has been developed to account for the loop flow effect on transit time. These correlations unify a wide range of data obtained from five geometrically different test sections with two fluids (pure water and saline solution). In addition to the geometric factors, the governing dimensionless parameters for the transit time are the HPI jet Froude number, the Froude number for the cold-leg channel, and the ratio of loop flow to HPI flow.

  13. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Morphology and Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2004-12-01

    A research program on primary stress corrosion crack (PWSCC) is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this program, the material degradation problem in Alloys 600, 182, and 82 is being investigated with objectives that include compling a knowledge base on all cracking in nickel based materials at all degradation sites in nuclear power plants, assessing NDE methods using mockups to quantify the detection, sizing, and using mockups to quantify the detection sizing and characterization of tight cracks, and determining the role of welding processes in degradation. In this paper, the resuts of the initial literature searchs are presented. The relevant data on crack properties such as shape and orientation are presented and their impace on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability is discussed.

  14. Primary infection protects pigs against re-infection with Lawsonia intracellularis in experimental challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Riber, Ulla; Cordes, Henriette; Boutrup, Torsten S; Jensen, Tim K; Heegaard, Peter M H; Jungersen, Gregers

    2011-05-01

    In two separate trials pigs were experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis at 5-6 weeks of age followed by antibiotic treatment and resolution of the primary infection and then re-inoculated at 12-13 weeks of age. A treatment-control group of pigs received the primary infection and antibiotic treatment only, and served as control for the antibiotic treatment of the primary infection. A challenge-control group of pigs received the second inoculation dose only at 12-13 weeks of age to control infectivity of the challenge-dose and susceptibility of pigs to L. intracellularis at this age. Pigs were monitored for shedding of L. intracellularis in faeces by PCR, and for the development of antibodies and responses of acute phase proteins in serum. The presence of L. intracellularis antigen in the intestinal mucosa was examined in post mortem samples by immunohistochemistry. In both trials primary infected pigs were protected from infection after challenge inoculation as evidenced by absence of faecal shedding of L. intracellularis, lack of changes in acute phase protein concentrations after challenge and with low levels of bacterial antigen in the intestinal mucosa of re-inoculated pigs comparable to that of the treatment-control pigs. In contrast, challenge-control pigs shed L. intracellularis in faeces, had L. intracellularis antigen extensively present within all layers of the intestinal mucosa and developed a significant acute phase protein response in serum after the experimental infection. The acute phase protein response to L. intracellularis infection was detected as an increased rise in the serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and haptoglobin from day-6 post infection, and increased serum concentrations of haptoglobin were generally seen 2-3 weeks after inoculation both at 5-6 and 12-13 weeks of age. In conclusion substantial protection against L. intracellularis infection was found in the re-inoculated pigs in contrast to the development of

  15. Hypoglycemic and antioxidant potential of coconut water in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Preetha, P P; Devi, V Girija; Rajamohan, T

    2012-07-01

    Coconut water is a natural nutritious beverage that contains several biologically active compounds. The present study aims to evaluate the hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects of mature coconut water (MCW) on alloxan-induced diabetes in experimental rats. The experimental animals were divided into four groups - normal control, normal rats treated with MCW, diabetic control and diabetic rats treated with MCW. The blood glucose, plasma insulin, hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, activities of the various antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) and lipid peroxidation markers (malondialdehyde, hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes) were evaluated in all the groups. The results indicate that the diabetic animals treated with MCW had decreased blood glucose levels and reduced oxidative stress induced by alloxan, which was evident from the increased activities of the antioxidant enzymes and the decreased levels of the lipid peroxidation products. The overall results indicate that MCW significantly attenuated hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, indicating the therapeutic potential of MCW. PMID:22576019

  16. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  17. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  18. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  19. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  20. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  1. Automatic quantitative analysis of experimental primary and secondary retinal neurodegeneration: implications for optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B M; Guo, L; Brenton, J; Langley, L; Normando, E M; Cordeiro, M F

    2016-01-01

    Secondary neurodegeneration is thought to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, which potential therapies may target. However, the quantitative assessment of the degree of secondary neurodegeneration is difficult. The present study describes a novel algorithm from which estimates of primary and secondary degeneration are computed using well-established rodent models of partial optic nerve transection (pONT) and ocular hypertension (OHT). Brn3-labelled retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified in whole-retinal mounts from which RGC density, nearest neighbour distances and regularity indices were determined. The spatial distribution and rate of RGC loss were assessed and the percentage of primary and secondary degeneration in each non-overlapping segment was calculated. Mean RGC number (82 592±681) and RGC density (1695±23.3 RGC/mm2) in naïve eyes were comparable with previous studies, with an average decline in RGC density of 71±17 and 23±5% over the time course of pONT and OHT models, respectively. Spatial analysis revealed greatest RGC loss in the superior and central retina in pONT, but significant RGC loss in the inferior retina from 3 days post model induction. In comparison, there was no significant difference between superior and inferior retina after OHT induction, and RGC loss occurred mainly along the superior/inferior axis (~30%) versus the nasal–temporal axis (~15%). Intriguingly, a significant loss of RGCs was also observed in contralateral eyes in experimental OHT. In conclusion, a novel algorithm to automatically segment Brn3a-labelled retinal whole-mounts into non-overlapping segments is described, which enables automated spatial and temporal segmentation of RGCs, revealing heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of primary and secondary degenerative processes. This method provides an attractive means to rapidly determine the efficacy of neuroprotective therapies with implications for any

  2. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (< 1 g) facilitates determining the solute transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  4. MANUAL OF TREATMENT TECHNIQUES FOR MEETING THE INTERIM PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following the passage on December 16, 1974, of Public Law 93-523, The Safe Drinking Water Act, the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations were promulgated on December 24, 1975, to take effect June 24, 1977. These regulations set Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) for ten inorga...

  5. Perceptions of the Water Cycle among Primary School Children in Botswana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taiwo, A. A.; Motswiri, M. J.; Masene, R.

    1999-01-01

    Describes qualitative and quantitative methods used to elucidate the nature of the perception of the water cycle held by Botswana primary-grade pupils in three different geographic areas. Concludes that the students' perception of the water cycle was positively influenced by schooling but negatively impacted upon, to some extent, by the untutored…

  6. Experimental Sarcocystis hominis infection in a water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Chen, X W; Zuo, Y X; Hu, J J

    2003-04-01

    A water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was fed 5.0 x 10(5) Sarcocystis hominis sporocysts from a human volunteer who had ingested S. hominis cysts from naturally infected cattle. A necropsy was performed on the buffalo 119 days after inoculation, and a large number of microscopic sarcocysts (approximately 5,000/g) were found in skeletal muscles. Ultrastructurally, the sarcocyst wall from buffalo muscles has upright villar protrusions measuring about 5.6 x 0.8 microm with numerous microtubules that run from the base to the apex. Sarcocysts from this buffalo were infective to 2 human volunteers, confirming their identity as S. hominis. Therefore, we believe that buffaloes can act experimentally as the intermediate host for S. hominis. PMID:12760663

  7. Modeling the electrochemistry of the primary circuits of light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuch, A.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Kriksunov, L.; Arioka, K.

    1994-12-31

    To model the corrosion behaviors of the heat transport circuits of light water reactors, a mixed potential model (NTM) has been developed and applied to both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Using the data generated by the GE/UKEA-Harwell radiolysis model, electrochemical potentials (ECPs) have been calculated for the heat transport circuits of eight BWRs operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). By modeling the corrosion behaviors of these reactors, the effectiveness of HWC at limiting IGSCC and IASCC can be determined. For simulating PWR primary circuits, a chemical-radiolysis model (developed by the authors) was used to generate input parameters for the MPM. Corrosion potentials of Type 304 and 316 SSs in PWR primary environments were calculated using the NTM and were found to be in good agreement with the corrosion potentials measured in the laboratory for simulated PWR primary environments.

  8. Experimental Study of Water Transport through Hydrophilic Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate one of the fundamental aspects of Nanofluidics, which is the experimental study of water transport through nanoscale hydrophilic conduits. A new method based on spontaneous filling and a novel hybrid nanochannel design is developed to measure the pure mass flow resistance of single nanofluidic channels/tubes. This method does not require any pressure and flow sensors and also does not rely on any theoretical estimations, holding the potential to be standards for nanofluidic flow characterization. We have used this method to measure the pure mass flow resistance of single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our experimental results quantify the increased mass flow resistance as a function of nanochannel height, showing a 45% increase for a 7nm channel compared with classical hydrodynamics, and suggest that the increased resistance is possibly due to formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. It has been further shown that this method can reliably measure a wide range of pure mass flow resistances of nanoscale conduits, and thus is promising for advancing studies of liquid transport in hydrophobic graphene nanochannels, CNTs, as well as nanoporous media. The work is supported by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF # 54118-DNI7) and the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  9. Microbial Biodiversity: Approaches to Experimental Design and Hypothesis Testing in Primary Scientific Literature from 1975 to 1999

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Cindy E.; Bardin, Marc; Berge, Odile; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Fromin, Nathalie; Girardin, Hélène; Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Lebaron, Philippe; Thiéry, Jean M.; Troussellier, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Research interest in microbial biodiversity over the past 25 years has increased markedly as microbiologists have become interested in the significance of biodiversity for ecological processes and as the industrial, medical, and agricultural applications of this diversity have evolved. One major challenge for studies of microbial habitats is how to account for the diversity of extremely large and heterogeneous populations with samples that represent only a very small fraction of these populations. This review presents an analysis of the way in which the field of microbial biodiversity has exploited sampling, experimental design, and the process of hypothesis testing to meet this challenge. This review is based on a systematic analysis of 753 publications randomly sampled from the primary scientific literature from 1975 to 1999 concerning the microbial biodiversity of eight habitats related to water, soil, plants, and food. These publications illustrate a dominant and growing interest in questions concerning the effect of specific environmental factors on microbial biodiversity, the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of this biodiversity, and quantitative measures of population structure for most of the habitats covered here. Nevertheless, our analysis reveals that descriptions of sampling strategies or other information concerning the representativeness of the sample are often missing from publications, that there is very limited use of statistical tests of hypotheses, and that only a very few publications report the results of multiple independent tests of hypotheses. Examples are cited of different approaches and constraints to experimental design and hypothesis testing in studies of microbial biodiversity. To prompt a more rigorous approach to unambiguous evaluation of the impact of microbial biodiversity on ecological processes, we present guidelines for reporting information about experimental design, sampling strategies, and analyses of results in

  10. Water-Free Shale Stimulation: Experimental Studies of Electrofracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.; Geilikman, M. B.; Gardner, W. P.; Broome, S. T.; Glover, S.; Williamson, K.; Su, J.

    2015-12-01

    Electrofracturing is a water-free stimulation method that might be applicable to hydrocarbon reservoirs. This method of dynamic fragmentation uses high-voltage pulses applied to rock via a pair of electrodes. Fragmentation occurs through two general processes (Cho et al, 2006): 1) electrohydraulic shock and 2) internal breakdown inside bulk solid dielectrics. In the first process, electrical current passing through brackish or salty water found naturally in the formation generates a shock wave of sufficient magnitude to crush/fail the rock as the wave travels through it. In the second process, the electric current flows through the rock preferentially along mineral interfaces; tensile and branching cracks are induced at the boundary interfaces either by heating and differential expansion, or by a shock wave induced by the electrical impulse itself. Both processes have been examined experimentally on rocks and on concrete starting in the late 1980's.In light of the "shale revolution" that has reinvigorated the North American petroleum resource base over the last decade, we developed a laboratory based experimental system to study coupled deformation and gas flow during high-voltage pulse application at elevated confining pressure (to 70 MPa). We deformed twelve samples using 6.5 μs full width at half maximum exponential voltage pulses from 80 to 200 kV. Exponential decay loading was shown to fracture shale at pressure, producing a 5-8 order-of-magnitude increase in permeability (initiating in the nD range) with significant fracturing. Fractures were documented using CT and SEM. The preponderance of fractures are parallel to bedding with fractures often extending from end to end in the samples, which were up to 9 cm in length. The bedding-parallel fractures are adjacent to, or off centered to, the input pulse location. Fractures oblique to bedding planes are present as well, but are fewer in number. The test system, and experimental and observational methods and

  11. Experimental study of choking flow of water at supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, Altan

    Future nuclear reactors will operate at a coolant pressure close to 25 MPa and at outlet temperatures ranging from 500°C to 625°C. As a result, the outlet flow enthalpy in future Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWR) will be much higher than those of actual ones which can increase overall nuclear plant efficiencies up to 48%. However, under such flow conditions, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water is not fully known, e.g., pressure drop, forced convection and heat transfer deterioration, critical and blowdown flow rate, etc. Up to now, only a very limited number of studies have been performed under supercritical conditions. Moreover, these studies are conducted at conditions that are not representative of future SCWRs. In addition, existing choked flow data have been collected from experiments at atmospheric discharge pressure conditions and in most cases by using working fluids different than water which constrain researchers to analyze the data correctly. In particular, the knowledge of critical (choked) discharge of supercritical fluids is mandatory to perform nuclear reactor safety analyses and to design key mechanical components (e.g., control and safety relief valves, etc.). Hence, an experimental supercritical water facility has been built at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal which allows researchers to perform choking flow experiments under supercritical conditions. The facility can also be used to carry out heat transfer and pressure drop experiments under supercritical conditions. In this thesis, we present the results obtained at this facility using a test section that contains a 1 mm inside diameter, 3.17 mm long orifice plate with sharp edges. Thus, 545 choking flow of water data points are obtained under supercritical conditions for flow pressures ranging from 22.1 MPa to 32.1 MPa, flow temperatures ranging from 50°C to 502°C and for discharge pressures from 0.1 MPa to 3.6 MPa. Obtained data are compared with the data given in

  12. Procedures for the reconstruction, primary culture and experimental use of rainbow trout gill epithelia.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Sabine; Stott, Lucy C; Hogstrand, Christer; Wood, Chris M; Kelly, Scott P; Pärt, Peter; Owen, Stewart F; Bury, Nic R

    2016-03-01

    This protocol describes how to reconstruct and culture the freshwater rainbow trout gill epithelium on flat permeable membrane supports within cell culture inserts. The protocol describes gill cell isolation, cultured gill epithelium formation, maintenance, monitoring and preparation for use in experimental procedures. To produce a heterogeneous gill epithelium, as seen in vivo, seeding of isolated gill cells twice over a 2-d period is required. As a consequence, this is termed the double-seeded insert technique. Approximately 5-12 d after cell isolation and seeding, preparations develop electrically tight gill epithelia that can withstand freshwater on the apical cell surface. The system can be used to study freshwater gill physiology, and it is a humane alternative for toxicity testing, bioaccumulation studies and environmental water quality monitoring. PMID:26866792

  13. Response of millet and sorghum to a varying water supply around the primary and nodal roots

    PubMed Central

    Rostamza, M.; Richards, R. A.; Watt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Cereals have two root systems. The primary system originates from the embryo when the seed germinates and can support the plant until it produces grain. The nodal system can emerge from stem nodes throughout the plant's life; its value for yield is unclear and depends on the environment. The aim of this study was to test the role of nodal roots of sorghum and millet in plant growth in response to variation in soil moisture. Sorghum and millet were chosen as both are adapted to dry conditions. Methods Sorghum and millet were grown in a split-pot system that allowed the primary and nodal roots to be watered separately. Key Results When primary and nodal roots were watered (12 % soil water content; SWC), millet nodal roots were seven times longer than those of sorghum and six times longer than millet plants in dry treatments, mainly from an 8-fold increase in branch root length. When soil was allowed to dry in both compartments, millet nodal roots responded and grew 20 % longer branch roots than in the well-watered control. Sorghum nodal roots were unchanged. When only primary roots received water, nodal roots of both species emerged and elongated into extremely dry soil (0·6–1·5 % SWC), possibly with phloem-delivered water from the primary roots in the moist inner pot. Nodal roots were thick, short, branchless and vertical, indicating a tropism that was more pronounced in millet. Total nodal root length increased in both species when the dry soil was covered with plastic, suggesting that stubble retention or leaf mulching could facilitate nodal roots reaching deeper moist layers in dry climates. Greater nodal root length in millet than in sorghum was associated with increased shoot biomass, water uptake and water use efficiency (shoot mass per water). Millet had a more plastic response than sorghum to moisture around the nodal roots due to (1) faster growth and progression through ontogeny for earlier nodal root branch length and (2

  14. Does Improved Water Access Increase Child School Attendance? A Quasi-Experimental Approach From Rural Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Y.; Cook, J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of improved water access on child school attendance using two years of primary panel data from a quasi-experimental study in Oromiya, Ethiopia. A predominant form of child labor in rural poor households in least developed countries is water collection. Girls are often the primary water collectors for households, and because of the time intensive nature of water collection improved water access may allow for time to be reallocated to schooling (Rosen and Vincent 1999; Nankhuni and Findeis 2004). Understanding how improved water access may increase schooling for girls has important development policy implications. Indeed, abundant research on returns to education suggests increased schooling for girls is tied to improved future child and maternal health, economic opportunities, and lower fertility rates (Handa 1996; Schultz 1998; Michaelowa 2000). The literature to date finds that improved water access leads to increased schooling; however, there still exists a clear gap in the literature for understanding this relationship for two reasons. First, only four studies have directly examined the relationship between improved water access and schooling in sub-Saharan Africa, and analyses have been limited due to the use of cross-sectional data and research designs (Nankhuni and Findeis 2004; Koolwal and Van de Walle 2010; Ndiritu and Nyangan 2011; Nauges and Strand 2011). Indeed, only two studies have attempted to control for the endogenous nature of water access. Second, all studies use a binary school enrollment indicator from household surveys, which may suffer from response bias and may be an imperfect measure for actual schooling. Respondents may feel pressured to report that their children are enrolled in school if, like in Ethiopia, there are compulsory education laws. This may result in an overestimation of school enrollment. In addition, most children from rural poor households combine work and school, and a binary indicator does

  15. Aquaporin 4-specific T cells and NMO-IgG cause primary retinal damage in experimental NMO/SD.

    PubMed

    Zeka, Bleranda; Hastermann, Maria; Kaufmann, Nathalie; Schanda, Kathrin; Pende, Marko; Misu, Tatsuro; Rommer, Paulus; Fujihara, Kazuo; Nakashima, Ichiro; Dahle, Charlotte; Leutmezer, Fritz; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica/spectrum disorder (NMO/SD) is a severe, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In the majority of patients, it is associated with the presence of pathogenic serum autoantibodies (the so-called NMO-IgGs) directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4), and with the formation of large, astrocyte-destructive lesions in spinal cord and optic nerves. A large number of recent studies using optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated that damage to optic nerves in NMO/SD is also associated with retinal injury, as evidenced by retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning and microcystic inner nuclear layer abnormalities. These studies concluded that retinal injury in NMO/SD patients results from secondary neurodegeneration triggered by optic neuritis.However, the eye also contains cells expressing AQP4, i.e., Müller cells and astrocytes in the retina, epithelial cells of the ciliary body, and epithelial cells of the iris, which raised the question whether the eye can also be a primary target in NMO/SD. Here, we addressed this point in experimental NMO/SD (ENMO) induced in Lewis rat by transfer of AQP4268-285-specific T cells and NMO-IgG.We show that these animals show retinitis and subsequent dysfunction/damage of retinal axons and neurons, and that this pathology occurs independently of the action of NMO-IgG. We further show that in the retinae of ENMO animals Müller cell side branches lose AQP4 reactivity, while retinal astrocytes and Müller cell processes in the RNFL/ganglionic cell layers are spared. These changes only occur in the presence of both AQP4268-285-specific T cells and NMO-IgG.Cumulatively, our data show that damage to retinal cells can be a primary event in NMO/SD. PMID:27503347

  16. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: II. Experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-04-20

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol-water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0-1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol-water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s(-1)-10 K h(-1)) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χg. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χg ≥ 0.20), ice (χg ≤ 0.32), and/or "distorted ice" (0 < χg ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χg ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol-water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χg ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χg < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χg ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χg < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χg ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χg ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χg ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol-water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex "phase" behavior of glassy binary

  17. Glass polymorphism in glycerol–water mixtures: II. Experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A.; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol–water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0–1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol–water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s–1–10 K h–1) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ g. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χ g ≥ 0.20), ice (χ g ≤ 0.32), and/or “distorted ice” (0 < χ g ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ g ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol–water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ g ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ g < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ g ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ g < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ g ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ g ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ g ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol–water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex

  18. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ˜10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132-300 tungsten wires with 5-10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (˜50 TW) and total radiated energy (˜500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  19. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  20. Experimental constraints on CO2 and H2O in the Martian mantle and primary magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, John R.; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Cocheo, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    We present new data on the stability of hornblende in a Martian mantle composition, on CO2 solubility in iron-rich basaltic magmas, and on the solubility of H2O in an alkalic basaltic magma. These new data are combined with a summary of data from the literature to present a summary of the current state of our estimates of solubilities of H2O and CO2 in probable Martian magmas and the stability of hornblende in a slightly hydrous mantle. The new results suggest that hornblende stability is not sensitive to the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio (mg#) of the mantle, that is the results for terrestrial mantle compositions are similar to the more iron-rich Martian composition. Likewise, CO2 solubility in iron-rich tholeiitic basaltic magmas is similar to iron-poor terrestrial compositions. The solubility of H2O has been measured in an alkalic basaltic (basanite) composition for the first time, and it is significantly lower than predicted for models of water solubility in magmas. The lack of mg# dependence observed in hornblende stability and on CO2 solubility that in many cases terrestrial results can be applied to Martian compositions. This conclusion does not apply to other phenomena such as primary magma compositions and major mantle mineral mineralogy.

  1. Experimental infrared measurements for hydrocarbon pollutant determination in subterranean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay-Ekuakille, A.; Palamara, I.; Caratelli, D.; Morabito, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Subterranean waters are often polluted by industrial and anthropic effluents that are drained in subsoil. To prevent and control pollution, legislations of different developed countries require an online monitoring measurement, especially for detecting organic solvents (chlorinated and unchlorinated ones). Online measurements include both real-time and no real-time measurements. In general, it is difficult to implement real-time measurements in stricto sensu for online acquisitions on aqueous effluents since they need to be processed by a modeling. This research presents an experimental measurement system based on infrared (IR) spectroscopy for aqueous effluents containing hydrocarbons and capable of displaying excellent values of pollutant concentrations even in instable conditions; the system is able to detect pollutants either in laminar or turbulent flow. The results show the possibility of avoiding the use of "Pitot tube" that is employed to create a stagnation point in order to convert kinetic energy into potential one. This conversion allows the transformation of a turbulent flow in a laminar flow making easy measurement of pollutants included in an aqueous effluent. Obviously, "Pitot tube" is also used for other fluid effluents. The obtained results have been compared with those produced by means of sophisticated IR instrumentation for laboratory applications.

  2. Experimental Studies of Nanobubbles at Solid-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua

    2013-11-01

    When a hydrophobic substrate is in contact with water, gas bubbles thinner than 100 nm can form at the interface and stay for long time under ambient conditions. These nanobubbles have significant influence on a range of interfacial processes. For example, they give rise to hydrodynamic slip on the boundary, initiate the rupture of thin liquid films, facilitate the long-ranged interactions between hydrophobic surfaces, and enhance the attachment of a macroscopic bubble to the substrate. Experimentally, it is nontrivial to characterize such small fragile bubbles and unravel their fundamental physical properties. Based on our established procedure for the nanobubble formation, we have systematically studied the formation, stability and response of nanobubbles to external fields (e.g. sonication, pressure drop and temperature rise). By following the bubble morphology by atomic force microscopy, we show that the loss or gain of the nanobubble volume is achieved mainly by the change in the bubble height. The pinning on the three-phase boundary has significant implication on the properties of nanobubbles under various conditions. This talk will cover the effects of the substrate structures on the nanobubble formation, and the response of nanobubbles to the gas dissolution, the temperature increase, the extended gentle ultrasound or the substantial pressure drop in the environment. We acknowledge the support from Australian Research Council (FFT120100473).

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium 0.05 Fluoride 1.4-2.4 Lead 0.05 Mercury 0.002 Nitrate (as N) 10 Selenium 0.01 Silver 0.05 Endrin 0.0002...

  4. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  5. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    This dissertation summarizes results of an experimental exploration of heat transfer during vaporization of a water droplet deposited on a nanostructured surface at a temperature approaching and exceeding the Leidenfrost point for the surface and at lower surface temperatures 10-40 degrees C above the saturated temperature of the water droplet at approximately 101 kPa. The results of these experiments were compared to those performed on bare smooth copper and aluminum surfaces in this and other studies. The nanostructured surfaces were composed of a vast array of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals grown by hydrothermal synthesis on a smooth copper substrate having an average surface roughness of approximately 0.06 micrometer. Various nanostructured surface array geometries were produced on the copper substrate by performing the hydrothermal synthesis for 4, 10 and 24 hours. The individual nanostructures were randomly-oriented and, depending on hydrothermal synthesis time, had a mean diameter of about 500-700 nm, a mean length of 1.7-3.3 micrometers,and porosities of approximately 0.04-0.58. Surface wetting was characterized by macroscopic measurements of contact angle based on the droplet profile and calculations based on measurements of liquid film spread area. Scanning electron microscope imaging was used to document the nanoscale features of the surface before and after the experiments. The nanostructured surfaces grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 4 and 24 hours exhibited contact angles of approximately 10, whereas the surfaces grown for 10 hours were superhydrophilic, exhibiting contact angles typically less than 3 degrees. In single droplet deposition experiments at 101 kPa, a high-speed video camera was used to document the droplet-surface interaction. Distilled and degassed water droplets ranging in size from 2.5-4.0 mm were deposited onto the surface from heights ranging from approximately 0.2-8.1 cm, such that Weber numbers spanned a range of approximately 0

  6. Primary events regulating stem growth at low water potentials. [Glycine max (L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Boyer, J.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Cell enlargement is inhibited by inadequate water. As a first step toward understanding the mechanism, all the physical parameters affecting enlargement were monitored to identify those that changed first, particularly in coincidence with the inhibition. The osmotic potential, turgor, yield threshold turgor, growth-induced water potential, wall extensibility, and conductance to water were measured in the elongating region, and the water potential was measured in the xylem of stems of dark-grown soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedlings. The results indicate that the primary event during the growth inhibition was the change in the growth-induced water potential. Because the growth limitation subsequently shifted to the low wall extensibility and tissue conductance for water, the initial change in potential may have set in motion subsequent metabolic changes that altered the characteristics of the wall and cell membranes.

  7. Proceedings: 1987 EPRI Workshop on Mechanisms of Primary Water Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    Representatives from utilities, vendors, universities, government agencies, and EPRI reviewed recent research on stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing in primary water. Participants agreed that, although the mechanism involved in cracking is uncertain, identifying the rate-limiting step is more important than understanding the complete mechanism.

  8. Young Scientists Explore Air, Land, and Water Life. Book 3 Primary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Linda

    Designed to present interesting facts about science and to heighten the curiosity of primary age students, this book contains activities about the natural world and numerous black and white illustrations. The activities focus on familiar animals that are found in the air, on land, and in the water. A duckling named Little Mac Mallard introduces…

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES...

  10. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:23864952

  11. Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of the Physics of Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Fernandez-Francos, J.; Galdo-Vega, M.

    2010-01-01

    A simple rocket can be made using a plastic bottle filled with a volume of water and pressurized air. When opened, the air pressure pushes the water out of the bottle. This causes an increase in the bottle momentum so that it can be propelled to fairly long distances or heights. Water rockets are widely used as an educational activity, and several…

  12. Experimental research of "microcable in a microconduct" system stability to effect of freezing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vladimir A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Gavryushin, Sergey A.; Nikulin, Aleksey G.; Praporshchikov, Denis E.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental researches of "optical microcable in a microduct" system stability to effect of freezing water are presented. It is shown this system is steadier to water freezing in comparison to lighten optical cable in protective polymer tube.

  13. National primary drinking water regulations: Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2002-01-14

    In this document, EPA is finalizing the Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT1ESWTR). The purposes of the LT1ESWTR are to improve control of microbial pathogens, specifically the protozoan Cryptosporidium, in drinking water and address risk trade- offs with disinfection byproducts. The rule will require systems to meet strengthened filtration requirements as well as to calculate levels of microbial inactivation to ensure that microbial protection is not jeopardized if systems make changes to comply with disinfection requirements of the Stage 1 Disinfection and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The LT1ESWTR applies to public water systems that use surface water or ground water under the direct influence of surface water and serve fewer than 10,000 persons. The LT1ESWTR builds upon the framework established for systems serving a population of 10,000 or more in the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (IESWTR). This rule was proposed in combination with the Filter Backwash Recycling Rule (FBRR) in April 2000. PMID:11800007

  14. Learning to Teach Geography for Primary Education: Results of an Experimental Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankman, Marian; Schoonenboom, Judith; van der Schee, Joop; Boogaard, Marianne; Volman, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Students training to become primary school teachers appear to have little awareness of the core concepts of geography (teaching). To ensure that future primary school teachers are able to develop their pupils' geographical awareness, a six weeks programme was developed. The characteristics of this programme -- named Consciously Teaching Geography…

  15. An experimental investigation on diffusion of water in haplogranitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.; Behrens, Harald

    1997-02-01

    The diffusivity of water has been investigated for a haplogranitic melt of anhydrous composition Qz28Ab38Or34 (in wt %) at temperatures of 800-1200°C and at pressures of 0.5-5.0 kbar using the diffusion couple technique. Water contents of the starting glass pairs varied between 0 and 9 wt %. Concentration-distance profiles for the different water species (molecular water and hydroxyl groups) were determined by near-infrared microspectroscopy. Because the water speciation of the melt is not quenchable (Nowak 1995; Nowak and Behrens 1995; Shen and Keppler 1995), the diffusivities of the individual species can not be evaluated directly from these profiles. Therefore, apparent chemical diffusion coefficients of water ( D water) were determined from the total water profiles using a modified Boltzmann-Matano analysis. The diffusivity of water increases linearly with water content <3 wt % but exponentially at higher water contents. The activation energy decreases from 64 ± 10 kJ/mole for 0.5 wt % water to 46 ± 5 kJ/mole for 4 wt % water but remains constant at higher water contents. A small but systematic decrease of D water with pressure indicates an average activation volume of about 9 cm3/mole. The diffusivity (in cm2/s) can be calculated for given water content (in wt %), T (in K) and P (in kbar) by in the ranges 1073 K ≤ T ≤ 1473 K; 0.5 kbar ≤ P≤ 5␣kbar; 0.5 wt % ≤ C water ≤ 6 wt %. The absence of alkali concentration gradients in the glasses after the experiments shows that interdiffusion of alkali and H+ or H3O+ gives no contribution to the transport of water in aluminosilicate melts. The H/D interdiffusion coefficients obtained at 800°C and 5 kbar using glass pieces with almost the same molar content of either water or deuterium oxide are almost identical to the chemical diffusivities of water. This indicates that protons are transported by the neutral component H2O under these conditions.

  16. Improving the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water by electropolishing treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangdong; Lu, Zhanpeng; Ru, Xiangkun; Chen, Junjie; Xiao, Qian; Tian, Yongwu

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of 316L stainless steel specimens after emery paper grounding, mechanical polishing, and electropolishing were investigated in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water at 310 °C for 120 and 500 h. Electropolishing afforded improved oxidation resistance especially during the early immersion stages. Duplex oxide films comprising a coarse Fe-rich outer layer and a fine Cr-rich inner layer formed on all specimens after 500 h of immersion. Only a compact layer was observed on the electropolished specimen after 120 h of immersion. The enrichment of chromium in the electropolished layer contributed to the passivity and protectiveness of the specimen.

  17. Experimental determination of the absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton beam using a water calorimeter and an ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnebin, Solange; Twerenbold, Damian; Pedroni, Eros; Meer, David; Zenklusen, Silvan; Bula, Christian

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose to water is the reference physical quantity for the energy absorbed in tissue when exposed to beams of ionizing radiation in radiotherapy. The SI unit of absorbed dose to water is the gray (Gy = 1 J/kg). Ionization chambers are used as the dosimeters of choice in the clinical environment because they show a high reproducibility and are easy to use. However, ionization chambers have to be calibrated in order to convert the measured electrical charge into absorbed dose to water. In addition, protocols require these conversion factors to be SI traceable to a primary standard of absorbed dose to water. We present experimental results where the ionization chamber used for the dosimetry for the scanned proton beam facility at PSI is compared with the direct determination of absorbed dose to water from the METAS primary standard water calorimeter. The agreement of 3.2% of the dose values measured by the two techniques are within their respective statistical uncertainties.

  18. Upwelling-Induced Primary Productivity in Coastal Waters of the Black Sea: Impact on Algorithms for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Joel C.; Brink, Kenneth K.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen; Sosik, Heidi M.

    1997-01-01

    This research program was a collaborative effort to investigate the impact of rapid changes in the water column during coastal upwelling, on biological and optical properties. These properties are important for constructing region or event-specific algorithms for remote sensing of pigment concentration and primary productivity and for comparing these algorithms with those used for the development of large scale maps from ocean color. We successfully achieved the primary objective of this research project which was to study in situ the dynamics of rapid spatial and temporal changes in properties of the water column during, coastal upwelling off the Crimean Coast in the Black Sea. The work was a collaborative effort between a group of biological and physical oceanographers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and from two oceanographic research institutions in the Crimea, Ukraine, located near the study site, the Marine Hydrophysical Institute (MHI) and the Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas (IBSS). The site was an ideal experimental model, both from a technical and economic standpoint, because of the predictable summer upwelling that occurs in the region and because of the availability of both a ship on call and laboratory and remote sensing facilities at the nearby marine institutes. We used a combination of shipboard measurements and remote sensing to investigate the physical evolution of rapid upwelling events and their impact on photoplankton and water column optical properties. The field work involved a two day cruise for mooring, deployment and a three day baseline survey cruise, followed by an eleven day primary cruise during, a summer upwelling event (anticipated by monitoring local winds and tracked by remote sensing imaging). An MHI ship was outfitted and used for these purposes.

  19. Is litter decomposition 'primed' by primary producer-release of labile carbon in terrestrial and aquatic experimental systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, A. Margarida P. M.; Kritzberg, Emma S.; Rousk, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    It is possible that recalcitrant organic matter (ROM) can be 'activated' by inputs of labile organic matter (LOM) through the priming effect (PE). Investigating the PE is of major importance to fully understand the microbial use of ROM and its role on carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In aquatic ecosystems it is thought that the PE is triggered by periphytic algae release of LOM. Analogously, in terrestrial systems it is hypothesized that the LOM released in plant rhizospheres, or from the green crusts on the surface of agricultural soils, stimulate the activity and growth of ROM decomposers. Most previous studies on PE have utilised pulse additions of single substrates at high concentrations. However, to achieve an assessment of the true importance of the PE, it is important to simulate a realistic delivery of LOM. We investigated, in a series of 2-week laboratory experiments, how primary producer (PP)-release of LOM influence litter degradation in terrestrial and aquatic experimental systems. We used soil (terrestrial) and pond water (aquatic) microbial communities to which litter was added under light and dark conditions. In addition, glucose was added at PP delivery rates in dark treatments to test if the putative PE in light systems could be reproduced. We observed an initial peak of bacterial growth rate followed by an overall decrease over time with no treatment differences. In light treatments, periphytic algae growth and increased fungal production was stimulated when bacterial growth declined. In contrast, both fungal growth and algal production were negligible in dark treatments. This reveals a direct positive influence of photosynthesis on fungal growth. To investigate if PP LOM supplements, and the associated fungal growth, translate into a modulated litter decomposition, we are using stable isotopes to track the use of litter and algal-derived carbon by determining the δ13C in produced CO2. Fungi and bacteria

  20. An experimental investigation of the interaction of primary and secondary stresses in fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Yahr, G.T.

    1996-02-01

    If the load is not relieved as a structure starts to yield, the induced stress is defined as primary stress. If the load relaxes, as a structure begins yield the induced stress is defined as secondary stress. In design it is not uncommon to give more weight to primary stresses than to secondary stresses. However, knowing when this is good design practice and when it is not good design practice represents a problem. In particular, the fuel plates in operating reactors contain both primary stresses and secondary stresses and to properly assess a design there is a need to assign design weights to the stresses. Tests were conducted on reactor fuel plates intended for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) to determine the potential of giving different design weights to the primary and secondary stresses. The results of these tests and the conclusion that the stresses should be weighted the same are given in this paper.

  1. Experimental study of water adsorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-01-19

    Two carbons of different origins (wood and coal) were oxidized with nitric acid. The materials were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. Boehm titration, and potentiometric titration. The water adsorption isotherms were measured at various temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From these isotherms heats of adsorption were calculated using virial equation. The results showed that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by surface chemical heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. The shapes of heats obtained indicate strong water-water interactions as a result of adsorption on secondary sites and cluster formation. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol) was obtained.

  2. Water erosion monitoring and experimentation for global change studies

    SciTech Connect

    Poesen, J.W.; Boardman, J.; Wilcox, B.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the need for monitoring the effects of climatic change on soil erosion. The importance of monitoring not only runoff, but monitoring and experimental studies at the larger scale of hillslope and catchments is stressed.

  3. Extensive tissue-specific transcriptomic plasticity in maize primary roots upon water deficit.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Lithio, Andrew; Brandt, Ronny; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Water deficit is the most important environmental constraint severely limiting global crop growth and productivity. This study investigated early transcriptome changes in maize (Zea mays L.) primary root tissues in response to moderate water deficit conditions by RNA-Sequencing. Differential gene expression analyses revealed a high degree of plasticity of the water deficit response. The activity status of genes (active/inactive) was determined by a Bayesian hierarchical model. In total, 70% of expressed genes were constitutively active in all tissues. In contrast, <3% (50 genes) of water deficit-responsive genes (1915) were consistently regulated in all tissues, while >75% (1501 genes) were specifically regulated in a single root tissue. Water deficit-responsive genes were most numerous in the cortex of the mature root zone and in the elongation zone. The most prominent functional categories among differentially expressed genes in all tissues were 'transcriptional regulation' and 'hormone metabolism', indicating global reprogramming of cellular metabolism as an adaptation to water deficit. Additionally, the most significant transcriptomic changes in the root tip were associated with cell wall reorganization, leading to continued root growth despite water deficit conditions. This study provides insight into tissue-specific water deficit responses and will be a resource for future genetic analyses and breeding strategies to develop more drought-tolerant maize cultivars. PMID:26463995

  4. Extensive tissue-specific transcriptomic plasticity in maize primary roots upon water deficit

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Lithio, Andrew; Brandt, Ronny; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is the most important environmental constraint severely limiting global crop growth and productivity. This study investigated early transcriptome changes in maize (Zea mays L.) primary root tissues in response to moderate water deficit conditions by RNA-Sequencing. Differential gene expression analyses revealed a high degree of plasticity of the water deficit response. The activity status of genes (active/inactive) was determined by a Bayesian hierarchical model. In total, 70% of expressed genes were constitutively active in all tissues. In contrast, <3% (50 genes) of water deficit-responsive genes (1915) were consistently regulated in all tissues, while >75% (1501 genes) were specifically regulated in a single root tissue. Water deficit-responsive genes were most numerous in the cortex of the mature root zone and in the elongation zone. The most prominent functional categories among differentially expressed genes in all tissues were ‘transcriptional regulation’ and ‘hormone metabolism’, indicating global reprogramming of cellular metabolism as an adaptation to water deficit. Additionally, the most significant transcriptomic changes in the root tip were associated with cell wall reorganization, leading to continued root growth despite water deficit conditions. This study provides insight into tissue-specific water deficit responses and will be a resource for future genetic analyses and breeding strategies to develop more drought-tolerant maize cultivars. PMID:26463995

  5. Biodiversity effects on the water balance of an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimer, Sophia; Kreutziger, Yvonne; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Beßler, Holger; Engels, Christof; Oelmann, Yvonne; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wirth, Christian; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Plant species richness increases aboveground biomass production in biodiversity experiments. Biomass production depends on and feeds back to the water balance, but it remains unclear how plant species richness influences soil water contents and water fluxes (actual evapotranspiration (ETa), downward flux (DF), and upward flux (UF)). Our objective was to determine the effects of plant species and functional richness and functional identity on soil water contents and water fluxes for two soil depths (0-0.3 and 0.3.-0.7 m). To achieve this, we used a water balance model in connection with Bayesian hierarchical modeling. We monitored soil water contents on 86 plots of a grassland plant diversity experiment in Jena, Germany between July 2002 and January 2006. In the field experiment, plant species richness (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) and functional group composition (0-4 functional groups: legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall herbs, non-leguminous small herbs) were manipulated in a factorial design. Climate data (air temperature, precipitation, wind velocity, relative humidity, global radiation, soil moisture) was measured at a central climate station between July 2002 and December 2007. Root biomass data from July 2006 was available per plot. Missing water contents per plot and depth were estimated in weekly resolution for the years 2003-2007 with a Bayesian hierarchical model using measured water contents per plot and centrally measured soil moisture. To obtain ETa, DF, and UF of the two different soil depths, we modified a soil water balance model which had been developed for our study site. The model is based on changes in soil water content between subsequent observation dates and modeled potential evapotranspiration which was partitioned between soil layers according to percentage of root biomass. The presence of specific functional groups significantly changed water contents and fluxes with partly opposing effects in the two soil depths. Presence of grasses

  6. Experimental reconstruction of excitation energies of primary hot isotopes in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Lin, W.; Liu, X.; Huang, M.; Zhang, S.; Chen, Z.; Wang, J.; Wada, R.; Kowalski, S.; Keutgen, T.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Bottosso, C.; Bonasera, A.; Natowitz, J. B.; Materna, T.; Qin, L.; Sahu, P. K.; Schmidt, K. J.

    2013-09-01

    The excitation energies of the primary hot isotopes in multifragmentation events are experimentally reconstructed in the reaction system 64Zn + 112Sn at 40 MeV/nucleon. A kinematical focusing method is employed to evaluate the multiplicities of the evaporated light particles associated with isotopically identified fragments with 3≤Z≤14. Angular distributions of the velocity spectra of light charged particles and neutrons associated with trigger isotopes are examined. A moving source fit is used to separate the kinematically correlated particles, evaporated from the parents of the detected isotopes, from the uncorrelated particles originating from other sources. The latter are evaluated experimentally relative to those in coincidence with the Li isotopes. A parameter, k, is used to adjust the yield of the uncorrelated particles for different trigger isotopes. For each experimentally detected isotope, the multiplicities, apparent temperatures, and k values for n, p, d, t, and α particles are extracted. Using the extracted values, the excitation energies of the primary hot isotopes are reconstructed employing a Monte Carlo method. The extracted excitation energies are in the range of 1 to 4 MeV/nucleon but show a significant decreasing trend as a function of A for a given Z of the isotopes. The results are compared with those of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) and statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) simulations. While some of the experimental characteristics are predicted partially by each model, neither simulation reproduces the overall characteristics of the experimental results.

  7. Experimental research on water-jet guided laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Wang, Yang; Yang, Lijun; Chu, Jiecheng

    2007-01-01

    The water-jet guided laser processing is a new compound micro-machining process in which the laser beam passes through the water-jet by full reflection onto the workpiece. In this paper, a new key component:the coupling unit was designed and which would form a long, slim, high-pressure and stable water-jet. The couple unit made the fluid field in the chamber symmetry; the coupling quality of the laser beam and the water-jet could be easily detected by CCD camera. For its excellent surface quality, the nozzle with a \\fgr 0.18mm hole got better machining effect than other nozzles. Aiming at finding optimum machining parameters, experiments were carried out. The results showed the attenuation of laser energy bore relation to water-jet stability. The energy intensity distributed over the water-jet cross section nearly homogeneous and the laser energy nearly did not decrease in long working distance. When water-jet pressure was high, efficient cooling of the workpiece prevented burrs, cracks and heat affected zone from forming. During cutting Si wafer process, nearly no cracking was found; Adjusting reasonable laser parameters grooving 65Mn, the machining accuracy would combine with the speed.

  8. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  9. Water weakening during semibrittle flow and faulting of experimentally deformed quartz sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Hirth, G.

    2015-12-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were conducted on Fontainebleau sandstone at temperatures to 900°C and effective pressures to 175 MPa with varying water contents. Both yield and peak strengths associated with semibrittle faulting decrease linearly with an increase in intragranular water concentration (COH); COH is determined from infrared spectroscopy. Microstructural observations and the influence of strain rate, temperature, and COH on peak strength suggest that transient semibrittle flow is accommodated through cataclasis assisted by stress-corrosion microcracking. The roles of the experimental variables on the constitutive behavior are similar to those reported for subcritical cracking of quartz single crystals. At high COH, microstructural observations indicate an increase in the relative contribution of mm-scale distributed shear fractures (bands) to axial strain, reflecting a reduction in grain-scale fracture toughness. This is consistent with the inference that highly dissipative shear fractures lead to the observed reduction in strength at high COH. Stress vs. strain rate data for transient semibrittle flow show temperature-dependent rate behavior, and are well fit by an exponential law with an activation enthalpy of 185 to 250 kJ/mol and Peierls stress of 2.5 to 7.5 GPa. Using these constraints, we infer that stress-corrosion cracking is rate-limited by the dislocation activity at crack tips. Correlation of microscale COH maps to microstructures suggests that intragranular water in the undeformed sandstone is associated mainly with clusters of fluid inclusions, resulting in a highly nonuniform distribution of COH both within and between grains. Axially deformed samples show a reduction in the median and variability of COH over a range of length scales. We observe that a local reduction in COH correlates with fluid inclusions that are decrepitated and crosscut by intragranular fractures. We conclude that intragranular fracture is the primary mechanism of

  10. Water supply and not nitrate concentration determines primary root growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Nick; Whalley, W Richard; Lindsey, Keith; Miller, Anthony J

    2011-10-01

    Understanding how root system architecture (RSA) adapts to changing nitrogen and water availability is important for improving acquisition. A sand rhizotron system was developed to study RSA in a porous substrate under tightly regulated nutrient supply. The RSA of Arabidopsis seedlings under differing nitrate (NO₃⁻) and water supplies in agar and sand was described. The hydraulic conductivity of the root environment was manipulated by using altered sand particle size and matric potentials. Ion-selective microelectrodes were used to quantify NO₃⁻ at the surface of growing primary roots in sands of different particle sizes. Differences in RSA were observed between seedlings grown on agar and sand, and the influence of NO₃⁻ (0.1-10.0 mm) and water on RSA was determined. Primary root length (PRL) was a function of water flux and independent of NO₃⁻. The percentage of roots with laterals correlated with water flux, whereas NO₃⁻ supply was important for basal root (BR) growth. In agar and sand, the NO₃⁻ activities at the root surface were higher than those supplied in the nutrient solution. The sand rhizotron system is a useful tool for the study of RSA, providing a porous growth environment that can be used to simulate the effects of hydraulic conductivity on growth. PMID:21707650

  11. Experimental remote sensing of subsurface temperature in natural ocean water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.; Caputo, B.; Johnson, R. L.; Hoge, F. E.

    1977-01-01

    The first successful depth-resolved remote sensing measurements of subsurface ocean water temperature were obtained by spectral analysis of the 3400 per cm O-H stretching Raman band of liquid water. Raman spectral data were obtained from a research vessel at various depths from the surface to 10 meters below the surface in a tidal estuary. The temperature inferred from the spectra was consistent with ground truth temperature to within the shot noise limited accuracy of plus or minus 2 C. The performance of a future fully developed airborne laser Raman water temperature measurement system is estimated on the basis of these first tests.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Thermodynamics of the Reaction of Titania and Water at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quynhgiao N.; Myers, Dwight L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The transpiration method was used to determine the volatility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in water vapor-containing environments at temperatures between 1473 and 1673 K. Water contents ranged from 0 to 76 mole % in oxygen or argon carrier gases for 20 to 250 hr exposure times. Results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor to volatilization and the primary reaction for volatilization in this temperature range is: TiO2(s) + H2O(g) = TiO(OH)2(g). Data were analyzed with both the second and third law methods to extract an enthalpy and entropy of formation. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of TiO(OH)2(g) were computed using B3LYP density functional theory, and the enthalpy of formation was computed using the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with a perturbative correction for connected triple substitutions [CCSD(T)]. Thermal functions are calculated using both a structure with bent and linear hydroxyl groups. Calculated second and third heats show closer agreement with the linear hydroxyl group, suggesting more experimental and computational spectroscopic and structural work is needed on this system.

  13. Experimental Analysis of the Mechanism of Hearing under Water

    PubMed Central

    Chordekar, Shai; Kishon-Rabin, Liat; Kriksunov, Leonid; Adelman, Cahtia; Sohmer, Haim

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of human hearing under water is debated. Some suggest it is by air conduction (AC), others by bone conduction (BC), and others by a combination of AC and BC. A clinical bone vibrator applied to soft tissue sites on the head, neck, and thorax also elicits hearing by a mechanism called soft tissue conduction (STC) or nonosseous BC. The present study was designed to test whether underwater hearing at low intensities is by AC or by osseous BC based on bone vibrations or by nonosseous BC (STC). Thresholds of normal hearing participants to bone vibrator stimulation with their forehead in air were recorded and again when forehead and bone vibrator were under water. A vibrometer detected vibrations of a dry human skull in all similar conditions (in air and under water) but not when water was the intermediary between the sound source and the skull forehead. Therefore, the intensities required to induce vibrations of the dry skull in water were significantly higher than the underwater hearing thresholds of the participants, under conditions when hearing by AC and osseous BC is not likely. The results support the hypothesis that hearing under water at low sound intensities may be attributed to nonosseous BC (STC). PMID:26770975

  14. Primary and Secondary Aerosol Investigation from Different Sea-Waters in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'anna, B.; Marchand, N.; Sellegri, K.; Sempéré, R.; Mas, S.; George, C.; Meme, A.; Frihi, A.; Pey, J.; Schwier, A.; Delmont, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminate the contribution of Primary and Secondary Aerosol formed at the sea-air interface from background level of the aerosol. We therefore decided to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment provided by a 2m3simulation chamber, using freshly collected sea-water samples from the SEMEX site (43°15'64 N, 05°20'01 E) near Marseille bay. Two types of experiments were conducted for 4 weeks testing 3 different sea-waters. Primary sea-aerosol was generated by bubble-bursting method, then introduced in the simulation chamber and exposed to atmospheric oxidants (O3, OH) and light to simulated primary aerosol aging. A second set of experiments focused on secondary particle formation upon illumination and/or ozone exposure of the sea-water surface (15l of sea-water were deposited in a pyrex container located inside the simulation chamber). New particle formation was only observed for relatively high DOC level of the sea-water sample. Particles detection and analysis was followed by a PSM (1nm size), a CPC (2.5nm size), a SMPS (granulometry), a CCN chamber for hygroscopicity studies, a TOF-AMS (Aerodyne) for chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction. Off-line analysis included TEM-EDX samples for morphology and size distribution studies and a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer) for the molecular identification of the organic fraction. VOCs were measured on-line by PTR-HR-MS. The seawater samples were filtered at 60μm before use and were daily analyzed for chemical (colored dissolved organic matter, particulate matter and related polar compounds, transparent polysaccharides and nutrients concentration) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton) analyses.

  15. Antimicrobial effect of ozonated water, sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine gluconate in primary molar root canals

    PubMed Central

    Goztas, Zeynep; Onat, Halenur; Tosun, Gul; Sener, Yagmur; Hadimli, Hasan Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the antimicrobial effect of ozonated water, ozonated water with ultrasonication, sodium hypochloride and chlorhexidine (CHX) in human primary root canals contaminated by Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis). Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight extracted human primary molar teeth were used. Crowns were cut off using a diamond saw under water-cooling. One hundred roots were obtained and mechanically prepared. The roots were then sterilized by autoclaving in water for 15 min at 121°C. All samples were contaminated with E. faecalis for 24 h and the root canals were randomly divided into five groups (n = 20). Group I: 25 mg/L of Ozonated water (O3aq), Group II: 25 mg/L of O3aq with ultrasonication, Group III: 2.5% Sodium hypochloride (NaOCl), Group IV: 2% CHX and Group V: Positive control. The canal of each specimen was irrigated for 4 min and positive control was untreated. All root canals were agitated with sterile saline solution. The saline solution was collected from canals with sterile paper points. For each specimen, the paper points were transposed to eppendorf vials containing 2 ml of brain heart infusion. According to bacterial proliferation, the mean values of optical density were achieved by ELİSA (Biotek EL ×800, Absorbance Microplate Reader, ABD) and the data were analyzed. Results: NaOCI, CHX and two types of O3aq were found statistically different than positive control group. NaOCI irrigation was found significantly most effective. Conclusions: NaOCl, CHX and O3aq applications provide antibacterial effect in vitro conditions in primary root canals. PMID:25512726

  16. Carbon dioxide flux and net primary production of a boreal treed bog: responses to warming and water table manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, T. M.; Perkins, M.; Kaing, E.; Strack, M.

    2014-09-01

    Mid-latitude treed bogs are significant carbon (C) stocks and are highly sensitive to global climate change. In a dry continental treed bog, we compared three sites; control, recent (1-3 years; experimental) and older drained (10-13 years; drained) with water levels at 38, 74 and 120 cm below the surface, respectively. At each site we measured carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and tree root respiration (Rr) (across hummock-hollow microtopography of the forest floor) and net primary production (NPP) of trees during the growing seasons (May to October) of 2011-2013. The carbon (C) balance was calculated by adding net CO2 exchange of the forest floor (NEff-Rr) to the NPP of the trees. From cooler and wetter 2011 to driest and warmest 2013, The control site was a~C sink of 92, 70 and 76 g m-2, experimental site was a C source of 14, 57 and 135 g m-2, and drained site was a progressively smaller source of 26, 23 and 13 g m-2, respectively. Although all microforms at the experimental site had large net CO2 emissions, the longer-term drainage and deeper water level at the drained site resulted in the replacement of mosses with vascular plants (shrubs) at the hummocks and lichens at the hollows leading to the highest CO2 uptake at drained hummocks and significant losses at hollows. The tree NPP was highest at the drained site. We also quantified the impact of climatic warming at all water table treatments by equipping additional plots with open-top chambers (OTCs) that caused a passive warming on average of ∼1 °C and differential air warming of ∼6 °C (at mid-day full sun) across the study years. Warming significantly enhanced the shrub growth and CO2 sink function of the drained hummocks (exceeding the cumulative respiration losses at hollows induced by the lowered water level × warming). There was an interaction of water level with warming across hummocks that resulted in largest net CO2 uptake at warmed drained hummocks. Thus in 2013, the warming treatment enhanced

  17. Experimental shock lithification of water-bearing rock powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Keil, K.; See, T.

    1982-01-01

    The geology and morphology of the terrestrial planets and their moons have been profoundly affected by impact cratering. Some of these bodies contain substantial quantities of water or ice in their regoliths. It is pointed out that the effects of impacts into water-bearing target rocks are not well understood, and may be significantly different from those produced by identical impacts on a desiccated surface. The present investigation has the objective to determine the effects of water on targets of powdered rock and to seek evidence of impact-induced hydration or clay formation. Samples of andesitic basalt were crushed and sieved, and experiments were conducted on the material smaller than 150 micrometers. These experiments show that the water content of a powdered rock target can strongly affect its physical condition following an impact. A relatively small component (5-15 wt %) of water or ice in planetary surface material could inhibit or prevent lithification throughout much of the shocked volume at an impact site.

  18. Theoretical and Experimental Study of the Primary Current Distribution in Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez Aranda, Armando I.; Henquin, Eduardo R.; Torres, Israel Rodriguez; Bisang, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described to determine the primary current distribution in parallel-plate electrochemical reactors. The electrolyte is simulated by conductive paper and the electrodes are segmented to measure the current distribution. Experiments are reported with the electrolyte confined to the interelectrode gap, where the current…

  19. Desert Life, Experimental Edition Prepared for Testing in the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelby, Betty; And Others

    This unit and teacher's guide were prepared for use with primary grade children. The activities include the construction of a desert terrarium, the study of cacti, and the use of animal sort cards. A special section is devoted to the way parents can help with the unit. A detailed list of needed materials is provided in the guide. This work was…

  20. Development of Alternative Reductant Application in Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domae, Masafumi; Kawamura, Hirotaka; Ohira, Taku

    In primary coolant of pressurized water reactors, high concentration dissolved hydrogen (DH) has been added, to prevent generation of oxidizing species through radiolysis of the coolant. Recently, number of ageing plants is increasing and utilities are concerned about primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Some researchers consider that occurrence of PWSCC and crack propagation rate are affected by the DH concentration. The authors consider that one of possible mitigation methods toward PWSCC is use of alternative reductant in place of hydrogen. Because from the radiation chemical aspect aliphatic alcohols are typical scavengers of the oxidizing radical generated through the radiolysis of water, they are promising candidates of the alternative reductant. In the present work, possible alternatives of hydrogen were screened, and methanol was selected as the best candidate. Corrosion tests of type 304 stainless steels were carried out in high temperature water at 320°C without irradiation under two conditions: (1) DH 1.5 ppm (part per million) and (2) methanol 2.9 ppm. Electrochemical corrosion potential of the stainless steel specimens was measured during the immersion tests. After the immersion tests for 1500 h, surface morphology of the stainless steel specimens was observed by scanning probe microscope. Major component of the oxide film formed on the stainless steel specimens was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. From comparison of the test results, it is concluded that addition of 2.9 ppm methanol has almost the same effect on corrosion environment as DH 1.5 ppm addition.

  1. Primary production of coral ecosystems in the Vietnamese coastal and adjacent marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tac-An, Nguyen; Minh-Thu, Phan; Cherbadji, I. I.; Propp, M. V.; Odintsov, V. S.; Propp, L. H.

    2013-11-01

    Coral reef ecosystems in coastal waters and islands of Vietnam have high primary production. Average gross primary production (GPP) in coral reef waters was 0.39 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of corals ranged from 3.12 to 4.37 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of benthic microalgae in coral reefs ranged from 2 to 10 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of macro-algae was 2.34 g C m-2 day-1. Therefore, the total of GPP of whole coral reef ecosystems could reach 7.85 to 17.10 g C m-2 day-1. Almost all values of the ratio of photosynthesis to respiration in the water bodies are higher than 1, which means these regions are autotrophic systems. Wire variation of GPP in coral reefs was contributed by species abundance of coral and organisms, nutrient supports and environmental characteristics of coral ecosystems. Coral reefs play an important ecological role of biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in waters around the reefs. These results contribute valuable information for the protection, conservation and sustainable exploitation of the natural resources in coral reef ecosystems in Vietnam.

  2. Phenotypic responses of wild barley to experimentally imposed water stress.

    PubMed

    Ivandic, V; Hackett, C A; Zhang, Z J; Staub, J E; Nevo, E; Thomas, W T; Forster, B P

    2000-12-01

    Responses to water stress within a population of wild barley from Tabigha, Israel, were examined. The population's distribution spans two soil types: Terra Rossa (TR) and Basalt (B). Seeds were collected from plants along a 100 m transect; 24 genotypes were sampled from TR and 28 from B. Due to different soil water-holding capacities, plants growing on TR naturally experience more intense drought than plants growing on B. In a glasshouse experiment, water was withheld from plants for two periods (10 d and 14 d) after flag leaf emergence. A total of 15 agronomic, morphological, developmental, and fertility related traits were examined by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Ten of these traits were significantly affected by the treatment. A high degree of phenotypic variation was found in the population with significant genotypextreatment and soil typextreatment interactions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using combined control and stress treatment data sets. The first three principal components (pc) explained 88.8% of the variation existing in the population with pc1 (47.9%) comprising yield-related and morphological traits, pc2 (22.9%) developmental characteristics and pc3 (18.0%) fertility-related traits. The relative performance of individual genotypes was determined and water stress tolerant genotypes identified. TR genotypes were significantly less affected by the imposed water stress than B genotypes. Moreover, TR genotypes showed accelerated development under water deficit conditions. Data indicate that specific genotypes demonstrating differential responses may be useful for comparative physiological studies, and that TR genotypes exhibiting yield stability may have value for breeding barley better adapted to drought. PMID:11141176

  3. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Primary Roots of Alhagi sparsifolia in Response to Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xinwu; Zhang, Chao; Jia, Shirong; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Background Alhagi sparsifolia is a typical desert phreatophyte and has evolved to withstand extreme dry, cold and hot weather. While A. sparsifolia represents an ideal model to study the molecular mechanism of plant adaption to abiotic stress, no research has been done in this aspect to date. Here we took advantage of Illumina platform to survey transcriptome in primary roots of A. sparsifolia under water stress conditions in aim to facilitate the exploration of its genetic basis for drought tolerance. Methodology and Principal Findings We sequenced four primary roots samples individually collected at 0, 6, 24 and 30h from the A. sparsifolia seedlings in the course of 24h of water stress following 6h of rehydration. The resulting 38,763,230, 67,511,150, 49,259,804 and 54,744,906 clean reads were pooled and assembled into 33,255 unigenes with an average length of 1,057 bp. All-unigenes were subjected to functional annotation by searching against the public databases. Based on the established transcriptome database, we further evaluated the gene expression profiles in the four different primary roots samples, and identified numbers of differently expressed genes (DEGs) reflecting the early response to water stress (6h vs. 0h), the late response to water stress (24h vs. 0h) and the response to post water stress rehydration (30h vs. 24h). Moreover, the DEGs specifically regulated at 6, 24 and 30h were captured in order to depict the dynamic changes of gene expression during water stress and subsequent rehydration. Functional categorization of the DEGs indicated the activation of oxidoreductase system, and particularly emphasized the significance of the ‘Glutathione metabolism pathway’ in response to water stress. Conclusions This is the first description of the genetic makeup of A. sparsifolia, thus providing a substantial contribution to the sequence resources for this species. The identified DEGs offer a deep insight into the molecular mechanism of A. sparsifolia

  4. Upper Washita River experimental watersheds: Multiyear stability of soil water content profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scaling in situ soil water content time series data to a large spatial domain is a key element of watershed environmental monitoring and modeling. The primary method of estimating and monitoring large-scale soil water content distributions is via in situ networks. It is critical to establish the s...

  5. WATER TEMPERATURE DYNAMICS IN EXPERIMENTAL FIELD CHANNELS: ANALYSIS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is on water temperature dynamics in the shallow field channels of the USEPA Monticello Ecological Research Station (MERS). The hydraulic and temperature environment in the MERS channels was measured and simulated to provide some background for several biological studie...

  6. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the physics of water rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Fernández-Francos, J.; Galdo-Vega, M.

    2010-09-01

    A simple rocket can be made using a plastic bottle filled with a volume of water and pressurized air. When opened, the air pressure pushes the water out of the bottle. This causes an increase in the bottle momentum so that it can be propelled to fairly long distances or heights. Water rockets are widely used as an educational activity, and several mathematical models have been proposed to investigate and predict their physics. However, the real equations that describe the physics of the rockets are so complicated that certain assumptions are usually made to obtain models that are easier to use. These models provide relatively good predictions but fail in describing the complex physics of the flow. This paper presents a detailed theoretical analysis of the physics of water rockets that concludes with the proposal of a physical model. The validity of the model is checked by a series of field tests. The tests showed maximum differences with predictions of about 6%. The proposed model is finally used to investigate the temporal evolution of some significant variables during the propulsion and flight of the rocket. The experience and procedure described in this paper can be proposed to graduate students and also at undergraduate level if certain simplifications are assumed in the general equations.

  7. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  8. Growth of the Maize Primary Root at Low Water Potentials 1

    PubMed Central

    Voetberg, Gary S.; Sharp, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Seedlings of maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 × Mo 17) growing at low water potentials in vermiculite contained greatly increased proline concentrations in the primary root growth zone. Proline levels were particularly high toward the apex, where elongation rates have been shown to be completely maintained over a wide range of water potentials. Proline concentration increased even in quite mild treatments and reached 120 millimolal in the apical millimeter of roots growing at a water potential of −1.6 megapascal. This accounted for almost half of the osmotic adjustment in this region. Increases in concentration of other amino acids and glycinebetaine were comparatively small. We have assessed the relative contributions of increased rates of proline deposition and decreased tissue volume expansion to the increases in proline concentration. Proline content profiles were combined with published growth velocity distributions to calculate net proline deposition rate profiles using the continuity equation. At low water potential, proline deposition per unit length increased by up to 10-fold in the apical region of the growth zone compared to roots at high water potential. This response accounted for most of the increase in proline concentration in this region. The results suggest that osmotic adjustment due to increased proline deposition plays an important role in the maintenance of root elongation at low water potentials. PMID:16668308

  9. Use of TV in space science activities - Some considerations. [onboard primary experimental data recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, T. C.

    1977-01-01

    Advantages in the use of TV on board satellites as the primary data-recording system in a manned space laboratory when certain types of experiments are flown are indicated. Real-time or near-real-time validation, elimination of film weight, improved depth of field and low-light sensitivity, and better adaptability to computer and electronic processing of data are spelled out as advantages of TV over photographic techniques, say, in fluid dynamics experiments, and weightlessness studies.

  10. MICROBIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS RECEIVING GROUNDWATER AND SURFACE WATER AS THE PRIMARY SOURCES OF WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Earlier descriptions of water distribution systems (WDS) microbial communities have relied on culturing techniques. These techniques are known to be highly selective in nature, but more importantly, they tend to grossly underestimate the microbial diversity of most environments. ...

  11. Combustion of oil on water: an experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    1982-02-01

    This study determined how well crude and fuel oils burn on water. Objectives were: (1) to measure the burning rates for several oils; (2) to determine whether adding heat improves the oils' combustibility; (3) to identify the conditions necessary to ignite fuels known to be difficult to ignite on ocean waters (e.g., diesel and Bunker C fuel oils); and (4) to evaluate the accuracy of an oil-burning model proposed by Thompson, Dawson, and Goodier (1979). Observations were made about how weathering and the thickness of the oil layer affect the combustion of crude and fuel oils. Nine oils commonly transported on the world's major waterways were tested. Burns were first conducted in Oklahoma under warm-weather conditions (approx. 30/sup 0/C) and later in Ohio under cold-weather conditions (approx. 0/sup 0/C to 10/sup 0/C).

  12. Experimental study of hydrogen production by direct decomposition of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgen, E.; Galindo, J.; Baykara, S. Z.

    The hydrogen production by direct decomposition of water in a solar furnace is studied. The set-up is a horizontal axis system consisting of two 1.0 kW parabolic concentrators, both powered by a single heliostat. A temperature of 3000 K is possible. The water is fed to the reactor installed at the focal space of the concentrator, and the steam is decomposed at about 2500 K. The reactor consisted of a cylindrical cavity type refractory receiver covered with a silica cupola. The steam was introduced at a known rate into the cavity and the product gases were quenched. After the condensation of steam, hydrogen and oxygen were collected in a reservoir. Results indicate that with an optimized system, it is possible to produce hydrogen at about 70 percent rate of the theoretical value at the temperature level studied.

  13. Experimental Values of the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, P. T.

    1951-01-01

    The results of surface-tension measurements for supercooled water are presented. A total of 702 individual measurements of surface tension of triple-distilled water were made in the temperature range, 27 to -22.2 C, with 404 of these measurements at temperatures below 0 C. The increase in magnitude of surface tension with decreasing temperature, as indicated by measurements above 0 C, continues to -22.2 C. The inflection point in the surface-tension - temperature relation in the vicinity of 0 C, as indicated by the International Critical Table values for temperatures down to -8 C, is substantiated by the measurements in the temperature range, 0 to -22.2 C. The surface tension increases at approximately a linear rate from a value of 76.96+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -8 C to 79.67+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -22.2 C.

  14. Advanced TEM characterization of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennour, M.; Laghoutaris, P.; Guerre, C.; Molins, R.

    2009-09-01

    Advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques were carried out in order to investigate stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 600 U-bend samples exposed in simulated PWR primary water at 330 °C. Using high-resolution imaging and fine-probe chemical analysis methods, ultrafine size oxides present inside cracks and intergranular attacks were nanoscale characterized. Results revealed predominance of Cr 2O 3 oxide and Ni-rich metal zones at the majority of encountered crack tip areas and at leading edge of intergranular attacks. However, NiO-structure oxide was predominant far from crack tip zones and within cracks propagating along twin boundaries and inside grains. These observations permit to suggest a mechanism for intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water. Indeed, the results suggest that stress corrosion cracking is depending on chromium oxide growth in the grain boundary. Oxide growth seems to be dependent on oxygen diffusion in porous oxide and chromium diffusion in strained alloy and in grain boundary beyond crack tip. Strain could promote transport kinetic and oxide formation by increasing defaults rate like dislocations.

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.

    1945-01-01

    The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed.

  16. Microstructural characterization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2013-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracks in Alloy 600 compact tension specimens tested at 325 °C in a simulated primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor were analyzed using microscopic equipment. Oxygen diffused into the grain boundaries just ahead of the crack tips from the external primary water. As a result of oxygen penetration, Cr oxides were precipitated on the crack tips and the attacked grain boundaries. The oxide layer in the crack interior was revealed to consist of double (inner and outer) layers. Cr oxides were found in the inner layer, with NiO and (Ni,Cr) spinels in the outer layer. Cr depletion (or Ni enrichment) zones were created in the attacked grain boundary, the crack tip, and the interface between the crack and matrix, which means that the formation of Cr oxides was due to the Cr diffusion from the surrounding matrix. The oxygen penetration and resultant metallurgical changes around the crack tip are believed to be significant factors affecting the PWSCC initiation and growth behaviors of Alloy 600. For interpretation of color in Fig. 4, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.

  17. Major element chemistry of surface- and ground waters in basaltic terrain, N-Iceland.: I. primary mineral saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnórsson, Stefán; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Stefánsson, Andri; Andrésdóttir, Audur; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árny E.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution describes primary basalt mineral saturation in surface- and up to 90°C ground waters in a tholeiite flood basalt region in northern Iceland. It is based on data on 253 water samples and the mineralogical composition of the associated basalts. Surface waters are significantly under-saturated with plagioclase and olivine of the compositions occurring in the study area, saturation index (SI) values ranging from -1 to -10 and -5 to -20, respectively. With few exceptions these waters are also significantly under-saturated with pigeonite and augite of all compositions (SI = -1 to -7) and with ilmenite (SI = -0.5 to -6). The surface waters are generally over-saturated with respect to the titano-magnetite of the compositions occurring in the basalts of the study area, the range in SI being from -2 to +10. For crystalline OH-apatite, SI values in surface waters range from strong under-saturation (-10) to strong over-saturation (+5) but for crystalline F-apatite they lie in the range 0 to 15. Systematic under-saturation is, on the other hand, observed for "amorphous apatite," i.e. an apatite of the kind Clark (1955) prepared by mixing Ca(OH) 2 and H 3PO 4 solutions. Like surface waters, ground waters are under-saturated with plagioclase and olivine, its degree increasing with increasing Ca content of the plagioclase and increasing Fe content of the olivine, the SI values being -2 to -7 and 0 to -4 for the Ca-richest and Ca-poorest plagioclase, respectively, and about -3 to -18 and 0 to -15 for forsterite and fayalite, respectively. Ground waters are generally close to saturation with pigeonite and augite of all compositions. However, some non-thermal ground waters in highland areas are strongly under-saturated. Above 25°C the ground waters are ilmenite under-saturated but generally over-saturated at lower temperatures. These waters are titano-magnetite over-saturated at temperatures below 70°C, the SI values decreasing with increasing temperature from

  18. Primary experimental results of wire-array Z-pinches on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Ren, X. D. Dan, J. K. Wang, K. L. Zhang, S. Q. Li, J. Xu, Q. Cai, H. C. Duan, S. C. Ouyang, K. Chen, G. H. Ji, C. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a multiterawatt pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. In this paper, primary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 14.4-26.4 mm, and consisting of 132∼276 tungsten wires with 5∼10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to determine the characteristics of x-ray radiations and to obtain self-emitting images of imploding plasmas. X-ray power up to 80 TW with ∼3 ns FWMH is achieved by using nested wire arrays. The total x-ray energy exceeds 500 kJ and the peak radiation temperature is about 150 eV. Typical velocity of imploding plasmas goes around 3∼5×10{sup 7} cm/s and the radial convergence ratio is between 10 and 20.

  19. Experimental study on the behavior of primary human osteoblasts on laser-cused pure titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Jutta; Friedrichs, Jens; Werner, Carsten; Davids, Andreas; Weise, Hartmut; Lesche, Raoul; Weber, Anke; Range, Ursula; Meißner, Heike; Lauer, Günther; Reitemeier, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Mandibular tumor resection can lead to a mandibular segmental defect. LaserCUSING® is used to produce a mandibular implant, designed to be identical to the shape of the mandibular defect. Novel microrough surfaces result from this generative technology. In the current study, the behavior of human osteoblasts on untreated laser-cused titanium specimens or on specimens conditioned with different blasting agents was analyzed. The conditioning of these specimens resulted in surfaces with graded roughness. White light confocal microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface of the specimens and to quantify the initial adhesion of primary human osteoblasts to the specimens, respectively. Furthermore, cell growth, viability, apoptosis as well as mineralization of the specimens were analyzed over a time-period of 2 months. Compared to specimens that were treated with blasting agents, untreated specimens had the highest surface roughness. Quantitative SCFS measurements demonstrated that the adhesion of human primary osteoblasts was the highest on these specimens. Additionally, the untreated specimens allowed the highest number of osteoblasts to colonize. Mineralization studies showed increasing calcium and phosphor elemental composition for all specimen series. It can be concluded that untreated laser-cused titanium specimens are superior to promote the initial adhesion and subsequent colonization by osteoblast cells. PMID:23775939

  20. Experimental study on mixing efficiency in water supply rectangular tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; Medina, V.; Mujal, A.

    2009-04-01

    Phenomenon of mixing in drinking water storage tanks and reservoirs has a direct effect on the quality of water. Creation of poor mixing zones and volume stratification can have negative effects in public health. The design of a storage tank must consider the conditions of the inlet and outlets, and also their orientation (vertical or horizontal) to prevent the formation of these zones. Experiments done in a reduced scaled-model with a rectangular base and three different inlets (two waterfalls and a pipe inlet) had the objective to decide which of these inlets achieved the best mixing efficiency. Four situations were considered while three entrances, two unsteady: filling and drawing, and two steady with different outlets. Moreover the effects of columns that support the roof of the tank were studied by running the three entrances with and without columns in the four situations. Neglecting the viscous scale effects, the time taken to mix the volume stored depends on the distance between the inlet and the opposite wall as though as its orientation. Taking into account the whole tank columns have a negative effect on mixing efficiency although they divide the flux and create local zones of turbulence around them, increasing local mixing. Using a digital treating image technique the results are found in a quantitative way.

  1. Proceedings: Primary water stress corrosion cracking: 1989 EPRI remedial measures workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.A. )

    1990-04-01

    A meeting on PWSCC Remedial Measures'' was organized to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas and plans with regard to development and application of remedial measures directed against the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) phenomenon affecting alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Topics discussed included: utility experience and strategies; nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for PWSCC; technical topics ranging from predictive methods for occurrence of PWSCC to results of corrosion tests; and services provided by vendors that can help prevent the occurrence of PWSCC or can help address problems caused by PWSCC once it occurs.

  2. CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE OF ALLOY 152 AND 52 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2009-12-01

    The crack growth response of alloy 152 and 52 weld metals has been measured in simulated PWR primary water at both high (325-350 C) and low (50 C) temperatures. Tests were performed on samples machined from alloy 152 or 52 mockup welds. Propagation rates under cycle + hold and constant K conditions at high temperatures show stable, but extremely low SCC growth rates. The most significant intergranular cracking occurred during cycling at 50 C, particularly for the alloy 152 weld metal at high stress intensity.

  3. Laminar burning velocities at high pressure for primary reference fuels and gasoline: Experimental and numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzembeck, S.; Peters, N.; Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H.

    2009-02-15

    Spherical flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, PRF 87 and gasoline/air mixtures are experimentally investigated to determine laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths under engine-relevant conditions by using the constant volume bomb method. Data are obtained for an initial temperature of 373 K, equivalence ratios varying from {phi}=0.7 to {phi}=1.2, and initial pressures from 10 to 25 bar. To track the flame front in the vessel a dark field He-Ne laser Schlieren measurement technique and digital image processing were used. The propagating speed with respect to the burned gases and the stretch rate are determined from the rate of change of the flame radius. The laminar burning velocities are obtained through a linear extrapolation to zero stretch. The experimentally determined Markstein numbers are compared to theoretical predictions. A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for n-heptane and iso-octane was derived from the Lawrence Livermore comprehensive mechanisms. This mechanism was validated for ignition delay times and flame propagation at low and high pressures. In summary an overall good agreement with the various experimental data sets used in the validation was obtained. (author)

  4. Simulation of Water Balance and Forest Treatment Effects at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wemple, Beverley C.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2005-10-30

    The watershed model DHSVM was applied to the small watersheds WS1,2,3 in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest (HJA), Oregon and tested for skill in simulating observed forest treatment effects on streamflow. These watersheds in the rain-snow transition zone underwent road and clearcut treatments during 1959-66 and subsequent natural regeneration. DHSVM was applied with 10 m and 1 hr resolution to 1958-98, most of the period of record. Water balance for old-growth WS2 indicated that evapotranspiration and streamflow were unlikely to be the only loss terms, and groundwater recharge was included to account for about 12% of precipitation; this term was assumed zero in previous studies. After limited calibration, overall efficiency in simulating hourly streamflow exceeded 0.7, and mean annual error was less than 10%. Model skill decreased at the margins, with overprediction of low flows and underprediction of high flows. However, statistical analyses of simulated and observed peakflows yielded similar characterizations of treatment effects. Primary simulation weaknesses were snowpack accumulation, snowmelt under rain-on-snow conditions, and production of quickflow. This challenging test of DHSVM moved the model closer to a practical tool for forest management.

  5. Numerical and experimental study on the flow distribution in a water manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gwansik; Jong Lee, Pil; Kang, Jong Hoon

    2016-03-01

    This study presents water distribution analysis of the device for spraying cooling water through specific nozzles numerically and experimentally. Numerical analysis was performed using the 3-D incompressible, multi-phase flow model, for different Reynolds numbers of 4 × 105, 8 × 105. Experimental analysis was performed at real-size, under the same conditions. The calculated results and the measured results for the distribution of flow were matched relatively well. The distribution of the nozzle flow depends on the Reynolds number.

  6. Experimental observation of rainbow scattering by a coated cylinder: twin primary rainbows and thin-film interference.

    PubMed

    Adler, C L; Lock, J A; Nash, J K; Saunders, K W

    2001-03-20

    We experimentally examine the primary rainbow created by the illumination of a coated cylinder. We present a simple technique for varying the coating thickness over a wide range of values, and we see evidence for two different scattering regimes. In one, where the coating thickness is large, twin rainbows are produced. In the second, where the coating is thin enough to act as a thin film, a single rainbow is produced whose intensity varies periodically as the coating thickness varies. We find good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. PMID:18357147

  7. Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, Michael; Anderson, Mark; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2013-01-16

    This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Primary and Secondary Features in High-Mach-Number Shock-Bubble Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Devesh; Niederhaus, John; Motl, Bradley; Anderson, Mark; Oakley, Jason; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Experiments to study the compression and unstable evolution of an isolated soap-film bubble containing helium, subjected to a strong planar shock wave (M=2.95) in ambient nitrogen, have been performed in a vertical shock tube of square internal cross section using planar laser diagnostics. The early phase of the interaction process is dominated by the formation of a primary vortex ring due to the baroclinic source of vorticity deposited during the shock-bubble interaction, and the mass transfer from the body of the bubble to the vortex ring. The late time (long after shock interaction) study reveals the presence of a secondary baroclinic source of vorticity at high Mach number which is responsible for the formation of counterrotating secondary and tertiary vortex rings and the subsequent larger rate of elongation of the bubble.

  9. Experimental studies on the impact properties of water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, F. G.; Lin, D. N. C.; Hatzes, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies on the impact of ice particles at very low velocity were continued. These measurements have applications in the dynamics of Saturn's rings. Initially data were obtained on the coefficient of restitution for ice spheres of one radius of curvature. The type of measurements were expanded to include restitution data for balls with a variety of surfaces as well as sticking forces between ice particles. Significant improvements were made to this experiment, the most important being the construction of a new apparatus. The new apparatus consists of a smaller version of the disk pendulum and a stainless steel, double-walled cryostat. The apparatus has proved to be a significant improvement over the old one. Measurements can now be made at temperatures near 90 K, comparable to the temperature of the environment of Saturn's rings, and with much greater temperature stability. It was found that a roughened contact surface or the presence of frost can cause a much larger change in the restitution measure than the geometrical effect of the radius of curvature.

  10. Improvement of PNPI experimental industrial plant based on CECE process for heavy water detritiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S. D.; Alekseev, I. A.; Fedorchenko, O. A.; Vasyanina, T. V.; Konoplev, K. A.; Arkhipov, E. A.; Uborsky, V. V.

    2008-07-15

    An updated experimental industrial plant of PNPI for the development of CECE technology is described. Experimental results for heavy water detritiation in different operating modes are shown. The effect of pressure, temperatures and gas flow rate on the detritiation factor for the CECE process is presented. (authors)

  11. Mechanism for the primary transformation of acetaminophen in a soil/water system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuanzhou; Lan, Zhonghui; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Yingbao

    2016-07-01

    The transformation of acetaminophen (APAP) in a soil/water system was systematically investigated by a combination of kinetic studies and a quantitative analysis of the reaction intermediates. Biotransformation was the predominant pathway for the elimination of APAP, whereas hydrolysis or other chemical transformation, and adsorption processes made almost no contribution to the transformation under a dark incubation. Bacillus aryabhattai strain 1-Sj-5-2-5-M, Klebsiella pneumoniae strain S001, and Bacillus subtilis strain HJ5 were the main bacteria identified in the biotransformation of APAP. The soil-to-water ratio and soil preincubation were able to alter the transformation kinetic pattern. Light irradiation promoted the overall transformation kinetics through enhanced biotransformation and extra photosensitized chemical reactions. The transformation pathways were strongly dependent on the initial concentration of APAP. The main primary transformation products were APAP oligomers and p-aminophenol, with the initial addition of 26.5 and 530 μM APAP, respectively. APAP oligomers accounted for more than 95% of transformed APAP, indicating that almost no bound residues were generated through the transformation of APAP in the soil/water system. The potential environmental risks of APAP could increase following the transformation of APAP in the soil/water system because of the higher toxicity of the transformation intermediates. PMID:27107139

  12. Estimation of water quality and plant primary production in Arctic wetlands using ground based spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, C.; Lougheed, V.; Tweedie, C.

    2010-12-01

    Wetlands represent a significant portion of the Arctic tundra landscape, which is experiencing warming at an unprecedented rate. Understanding of primary production in these ecosystems is essential for assessing carbon fluxes and climate change effects. Remote sensing techniques are known to be accurate and cost effective to monitor aquatic vegetation and water quality parameters; however, their utility in mapping these ecosystems is unknown. We used a handheld hyperspectral radiometer (Unispec, PP Systems) to measure reflectance across the visible and near-infrared spectrum (400-1100nm) of two predominant aquatic graminoid species (Carex aquatilis and Arctophila fulva) along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient in tundra ponds of Barrow, Alaska. Spectral measurements were validated with in situ biomass harvest and water quality monitoring (e.g DOC, nutrients, algal chlorophyll). Reflectance of the two plant species exhibited spectral differences in the near-infrared portion of the spectrum. These reflectance measurements were also associated with water quality and plant biomass. Future efforts will involve the extrapolation of these ground based observations to a regional level using airborne and satellite imagery. This study advances large scale quantification and monitoring of water quality and aquatic plant production in the Arctic tundra and aids understanding of anthropogenic and climate effects in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

  13. Experimental critical parameters of plutonium metal cylinders flooded with water

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Forty-nine critical configurations are reported for experiments involving arrays of 3 kg plutonium metal cylinders moderated and reflected by water. Thirty-four of these describe systems assembled in the laboratory, while 15 others are derived critical parameters inferred from 46 subcritical cases. The arrays included 2x2xN, N = 2, 3, 4, and 5, in one program and 3x3x3 configurations in a later study. All were three-dimensional, nearly square arrays with equal horizontal lattice spacings but a different vertical lattice spacing. Horizontal spacings ranged from units in contact to 180 mm center-to-center; and vertical spacings ranged from about 80 mm to almost 400 mm center-to-center. Several nearly-equilateral 3x3x3 arrays exhibit an extremely sensitive dependence upon horizontal separation for identical vertical spacings. A line array of unreflected and essentially unmoderated canned plutonium metal units appeared to be well subcritical based on measurements made to assure safety during the manual assembly operations. All experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the mid-1970s and early 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant`s Critical Mass Laboratory.

  14. Influence of the Orinoco River on the primary production of eastern Caribbean surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Ramón; López, José M.; Morell, Julio; Corredor, Jorge E.; Castillo, Carlos E.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of the Orinoco River on the primary production in eastern Caribbean waters was investigated using fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF) and ocean color remote sensing. FRRF-based carbon fixation rates significantly correlated with independent estimates based on the 14C uptake method (r = 0.92, n = 9). Satellite-derived estimates of primary production, using the Carbon Based Productivity Method (CbPM), moderately correlated with in situ FRRF-based measurements. These estimates varied with river plume dilution gradients, with the highest rates associated with waters under river plume influence (CbPM 631 mg C m-2 d-1 and FRRF 570 mg C m-2 d-1). A time series of satellite-derived estimates (2002-2011) revealed seasonal variations associated with river discharge and climate driven fluctuations. Regional integrated productivity of about 2.80 Tg C yr-1 was calculated based on the average spatial coverage of the Orinoco River plume over the last decade.

  15. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, D. J.; Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2015-09-01

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year (WY) 2014. It is the sixth report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011), a report released June 2012 examined water year 2011 (Poch et al. 2012), a report released April 2013 examined water year 2012 (Poch et al. 2013), and a report released June 2014 examined water year 2013 (Graziano et al. 2014).

  16. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J.

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  17. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ponist, S.; Drafi, F.; Kuncirova, V.; Mihalova, D.; Rackova, L.; Danisovic, L.; Ondrejickova, O.; Tumova, I.; Trunova, O.; Fedorova, T.; Bauerova, K.

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  18. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ponist, S; Drafi, F; Kuncirova, V; Mihalova, D; Rackova, L; Danisovic, L; Ondrejickova, O; Tumova, I; Trunova, O; Fedorova, T; Bauerova, K

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  19. FEM Analysis and Experimental Verification of the Integral Forging Process for AP1000 Primary Coolant Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun

    2016-08-01

    AP1000 primary coolant pipes must be manufactured by integral forging technology according to the designer—Westinghouse Electric Co. The characteristics of these large, special-shaped pipes create nonuniform temperatures, effective stress, and effective strain during shaping of the pipes. This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element simulation (3D FEM) of the integral forging process, and qualitatively evaluates the likelihood of forging defects. By analyzing the evolution histories of the three field variables, we concluded that the initial forging temperature should be strictly controlled within the interval 1123 K to 1423 K (850 °C to 1150 °C) to avoid second-phase precipitation. In the hard deformation zones, small strains do not contribute to recrystallization resulting in coarse grains. Conversely, in the free deformation zone, the large strains can contribute to the dynamic recrystallization, favoring grain refinement and closure of voids. Cracks are likely to appear, however, on the workpiece surface when forging leads to large deformations. Based on the simulation results, an eligible workpiece with good mechanical properties, few macroscopic defects, and favorable grain size has been successfully forged by experiments at an industrial scale, which validates the FEM simulation.

  20. The exchange of water between the Faroe Shelf and the surrounding waters and its effect on the primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasen, Sólvá Karadóttir; Hansen, Bogi; Larsen, Karin Margretha Húsgarð; Hátún, Hjálmar

    2016-01-01

    The interannual variation of the spring bloom and its effect on the marine ecosystem on the Faroe Shelf has been observed for a couple of decades. However, the mechanism controlling the spring bloom has so far not been known and attempts to explain the mechanism have mostly ruled out possibilities. The Faroe Shelf is to a variable degree isolated from the surrounding waters by a tidal front. It has previously been suggested that variations in the density difference across the front and how water masses are transferred across it affect the spring primary production, which is thought to be a driver of the shelf ecosystem. Using air-sea heat flux data and sea temperature observations on the shelf and off the shelf, we estimate the cross-frontal volume exchange in January-April and find that it increases with the tidal current speed and decreases with the cross-frontal temperature difference. Using the observed exchange rates, we show that the phytoplankton growth rate may be reduced by more than 0.05 day- 1 when the exchange is intense and off-shelf production is still low. Based on frontal dynamics theory, we suggest that the cross-frontal exchange rate in the above mentioned period is determined by the rate of vertical turbulent diffusion through the front. A simple theoretical model is found to support this hypothesis qualitatively as well as quantitatively. This supports that variations in horizontal exchange are an important controlling factor of the initial spring bloom and that the horizontal exchange during the winter can be determined by vertical turbulent diffusion. Our results will be relevant for the primary production in other similar systems of small geographical extent and also for other problems involving cross-shelf exchange, such as oil spill dispersal.

  1. Water weakening in experimentally deformed milky quartz single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunitz, H.; Thust, A.; Kilian, R.; Heilbronner, R.; Behrens, H.; Tarantola, A.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural single crystals of quartz have been experimentally deformed in two orientations: (1) normal to one prism-plane, (2) In O+ orientation at temperatures of 900 and 1000°C, pressures of 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, and strain rates of ~1 x 10-6s-1. The starting material is milky quartz, consisting of dry quartz (H2O contents of <150 H/106Si) with fluid inclusions (FI). During pressurization many FI´s decrepitate. Cracks heal and small neonate FI´s form, increasing the number of FI´s drastically. During subsequent deformation, the size of FI´s is further reduced (down to ~10 nm). Sample deformation occurs by dominant dislocation glide on selected slip systems, accompanied by some dynamic recovery. Strongly deformed regions show FTIR spectra with a pointed broad absorption band in the ~3400 cm-1 region as a superposition of molecular H2O bands and three discrete absorption bands (at 3367, 3400, and 3434 cm-1). In addition, there is a discrete absorption band at 3585 cm-1, which only occurs in deformed regions. The 3585 cm-1 band is reduced or even disappears after annealing. This band is polarized and represents structurally bound H, its H-content is estimated to be 1-3% of the total H2O-content and appears to be associated with dislocations. The H2O weakening effect in our FI-bearing natural quartz crystals is assigned to the processes of dislocation generation and multiplication at small FI´s. The deformation processes in these crystals represent a recycling of H2O between FI´s, dislocation generation at very small fluid inclusions, incorporation of structurally bound H into dislocation cores, and release of H2O from dislocations back into FI´s during recovery. Cracking and crack healing play an important role in the recycling process and imply a close interrelationship between brittle and crystal plastic deformation. The H2O weakening by this process is of a disequilibrium nature and thus depends on the amount of H2O available.

  2. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2012-07-16

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and

  3. Understanding flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide for organic dyes from water: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Peng; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Yayun; Shi, Xiaoyang; Lü, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xi

    2015-11-01

    Flocculation treatment processes play an important role in water and wastewater pretreatment. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the possibility of using graphene oxide (GO) as a flocculant to remove methylene blue (MB) from water. Experimental results show that GO can remove almost all MB from aqueous solutions at its optimal dosages and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that MB cations quickly congregate around GO in water. Furthermore, PIXEL energy contribution analysis reveals that most of the strong interactions between GO and MB are of a van der Waals (London dispersion) character. These results offer new insights for shedding light on the molecular mechanism of interaction between GO and organic pollutants.

  4. Effects of experimental water table and temperature manipulations on ecosystem CO2 fluxes in an Alaskan rich fen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Waddington, J.M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Peatlands store 30% of the world's terrestrial soil carbon (C) and those located at northern latitudes are expected to experience rapid climate warming. We monitored growing season carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes across a factorial design of in situ water table (control, drought, and flooded plots) and soil warming (control vs. warming via open top chambers) treatments for 2 years in a rich fen located just outside the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest in interior Alaska. The drought (lowered water table position) treatment was a weak sink or small source of atmospheric CO2 compared to the moderate atmospheric CO2 sink at our control. This change in net ecosystem exchange was due to lower gross primary production and light-saturated photosynthesis rather than increased ecosystem respiration. The flooded (raised water table position) treatment was a greater CO2 sink in 2006 due largely to increased early season gross primary production and higher light-saturated photosynthesis. Although flooding did not have substantial effects on rates of ecosystem respiration, this water table treatment had lower maximum respiration rates and a higher temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration than the control plot. Surface soil warming increased both ecosystem respiration and gross primary production by approximately 16% compared to control (ambient temperature) plots, with no net effect on net ecosystem exchange. Results from this rich fen manipulation suggest that fast responses to drought will include reduced ecosystem C storage driven by plant stress, whereas inundation will increase ecosystem C storage by stimulating plant growth. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Experimental study of iron and multivitamin drops on enamel microhardness of primary tooth

    PubMed Central

    Pasdar, Nilgoon; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Mottaghi, Fattane; Tavassoli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Iron and multivitamin drops are being frequently prescribed in children less than 2 years of age. Due to their low pH levels, these drops may lead to the softening of enamel and accelerate the destructive process. The aim of the present study was to investigate the enamel microhardness of primary teeth after exposing them to iron and multivitamin drops. Materials and Methods: Forty healthy anterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 10 samples each. Samples were exposed to two iron drops of Kharazmi (Iran) and Ironorm (UK) and two multivitamin drops of Shahdarou (Iran) and Eurovit (Germany) for 5 min. The surface microhardness was measured before and after exposure and data processing was done using statistical paired t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. The surface structure of the teeth was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: In all groups, microhardness was decreased, but it was not significant in Eurovit multivitamin group (P = 0.088). The reduction rate in Kharazmi iron group was significant compared to that in other groups (P < 0.005). Hardness reduction percent for Kharazmi iron drop was 28/12 ± 47/43. In SEM analysis, irregular granular appearance was observed in the enamel exposed to Kharazmi iron drop. Conclusion: The results showed that all the studied drugs have the potential to cause erosion; this potential is the most in Kharazmi iron drop and the least in Eurovit multivitamin drops. Therefore, after using these kinds of drops, preventive measures should be used in children. PMID:26759808

  6. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces. PMID:27339861

  7. Swashplateless Helicopter Experimental Investigation: Primary Control with Trailing Edge Flaps Actuated with Piezobenders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copp, Peter

    Helicopter rotor primary control is conventionally carried out using a swashplate with pitch links. Eliminating the swashplate promises to reduce the helicopter's parasitic power in high speed forward flight, as well as may lead to a hydraulic-less vehicle. A Mach-scale swashplateless rotor is designed with integrated piezobender-actuated trailing edge flaps and systematically tested on the benchtop, in the vacuum chamber and on the hoverstand. The blade is nominally based on the UH-60 rotor with a hover tip Mach number of 0.64. The blade diameter is 66 inches requiring 2400 RPM for Mach scale simulation. The rotor hub is modified to reduce the blade fundamental torsional frequency to less than 2.0/rev by replacing the rigid pitch links with linear springs, which results in an increase of the blade pitching response to the trailing edge flaps. Piezoelectric multilayer benders provide the necessary bandwidth, stroke and stiffness to drive the flaps for primary control while fitting inside the blade profile and withstanding the high centrifugal forces. This work focuses on several key issues. A piezobender designed from a soft piezoelectric material, PZT-5K4, is constructed. The new material is used to construct multi-layer benders with increased stroke for the same stiffness relative to hard materials such as PZT-5H2. Each layer has a thickness of 10 mils. The soft material with gold electrodes requires a different bonding method than hard material with nickel electrodes. With this new bonding method, the measured stiffness matches precisely the predicted stiffness for a 12 layer bender with 1.26 inch length and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 1.04 lb/mil. The final in-blade bender has a length of 1.38 inches and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 0.325 lb/mil and stroke of 20.2 mils for an energy output of 66.3 lb-mil. The behavior of piezobenders under very high electric fields is investigated. High field means +18.9 kV/cm (limited by arcing in air) and -3.54k

  8. Addressing the sexual problems of Iranian women in a primary health care setting: A quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Rostamkhani, Fatemeh; Jafari, Fatemeh; Ozgoli, Giti; Shakeri, Masomeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization emphasizes on integration of sexual health into primary health care services, educating people and health care workers about sexuality, and promoting optimal sexual health. Despite the high prevalence of sexual problems, these problems are poorly managed in primary health care services. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of the first two steps of PLISSIT (Permission, Limited Information, Specific Suggestions, Intensive Treatment) model for handling of women sexual problems in a primary health care setting. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study that was carried out in Zanjan, northwest of Iran. Eighty women who had got married in the past 5 years and had sexual problem were randomly assigned to control and intervention groups. The intervention group received consultation based on PLISSIT model by a trained midwife and the control group received routine services. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire was used for assessing and tracking any changes in sexual function. Data were collected at three points: Before consultation and 2 and 4 weeks after consultation. Paired t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for comparison of scores within groups. Results: Significant improvement was found in FSFI sub-domain scores, including sexual desire (P < 0.0001), arousal (P < 0.0001), lubrication (P < 0.0001), orgasm (P = 0.005), satisfaction (P = 0.005), pain (P < 0.0001), and FSFI total score (P < 0.0001) in the intervention group compared to the control group. Conclusions: This study showed that PLISSIT model can meet the sexual health needs of clients in a primary health care setting and it can be used easily by health workers in this setting for addressing sexual complaints and dysfunctions. PMID:25709703

  9. Antibody and inflammatory responses in laying hens with experimental primary infections of Ascaridia galli.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Atxutegi, C; Gandolfi, B; Arangüena, T; Sepúlveda, R; Arévalo, M; Simón, F

    2009-04-01

    Ascaridia galli, an intestinal nematode that affects hens and other domestic and wild birds, causes economic losses in avian exploitations. The present work shows that A. galli stimulates a strong antibody response as well as an intense inflammatory reaction, in the intestinal mucous of experimentally infected Lohmann Brown laying hens. IgG antibodies against soluble extracts of A. galli embrionated eggs and adult worms, were detected in both blood and yolks eggs from infected hens during a period of 105 days after the infection. This indicates that hens transfer to their offspring a part of the IgG antibodies produced when they become infected. The antigens responsible for the stimulation of specific IgG were molecules of 30-34, 44-54 and 58-90 kDa, while in the yolk eggs of infected hens a reactivity directed against antigens of molecular weight (M(w)) lower than 50 kDa was detected. Histology revealed traumatic lesions with leukocyte infiltration, and inflammation of the intestinal wall of the infected hens after 105 days of initial infection. The possible influence of the immune and inflammatory response on the population dynamics of the parasite is discussed. PMID:19167166

  10. Vitamins and nutrients as primary treatments in experimental brain injury: Clinical implications for nutraceutical therapies.

    PubMed

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Peterson, Todd C; Martens, Kris M; Hoane, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    With the numerous failures of pharmaceuticals to treat traumatic brain injury in humans, more researchers have become interested in combination therapies. This is largely due to the multimodal nature of damage from injury, which causes excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, edema, neuroinflammation and cell death. Polydrug treatments have the potential to target multiple aspects of the secondary injury cascade, while many previous therapies focused on one particular aspect. Of specific note are vitamins, minerals and nutrients that can be utilized to supplement other therapies. Many of these have low toxicity, are already FDA approved and have minimal interactions with other drugs, making them attractive targets for therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, interest in supplementation and supraphysiologic dosing of nutrients for brain injury has increased and indeed many vitamins and nutrients now have a considerable body of the literature backing their use. Here, we review several of the prominent therapies in the category of nutraceutical treatment for brain injury in experimental models, including vitamins (B2, B3, B6, B9, C, D, E), herbs and traditional medicines (ginseng, Gingko biloba), flavonoids, and other nutrients (magnesium, zinc, carnitine, omega-3 fatty acids). While there is still much work to be done, several of these have strong potential for clinical therapies, particularly with regard to polydrug regimens. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26723564

  11. The role of intergranular chromium carbides on intergranular oxidation of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaslain, F. O. M.; Le, H. T.; Duhamel, C.; Guerre, C.; Laghoutaris, P.

    2016-02-01

    Alloy 600 is used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) but is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Intergranular chromium carbides have been found beneficial to reduce PWSCC. Focussed ion beam coupled with scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) 3D tomography has been used to reconstruct the morphology of grain boundary oxide penetrations and their interaction with intergranular Cr carbides in Alloy 600 subjected to a PWR environment. In presence of intergranular Cr carbides, the intergranular oxide penetrations are less deep but larger than without carbide. However, the intergranular oxide volumes normalized by the grain boundary length for both samples are similar, which suggest that intergranular oxidation growth rate is not affected by carbides. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the intergranular oxide consists mainly in a spinel-type oxide containing nickel and chromium, except in the vicinity of Cr carbides where Cr2O3 was evidenced. The formation of chromium oxide may explain the lower intergranular oxide depth observed in grain boundaries containing Cr carbides.

  12. Experimental treatment of Epstein-Barr virus-associated primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sameek; Peng, Ruoqi; Baiocchi, Robert A; Bhatt, Darshna; Vourganti, Srinivas; Grecula, John; Gupta, Nilendu; Eisenbeis, Charles F; Nuovo, Gerard J; Yang, Weilian; Schmalbrock, Petra; Ferketich, Amy; Moeschberger, Melvin; Porcu, Pierluigi; Barth, Rolf F; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2003-03-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) that arises in immune-deficient patients is an aggressive B-cell neoplasm that is universally associated with the EBV. Patients with EBV(+) PCNSL face a particularly poor prognosis with median survival times of 2-12 months despite aggressive management with radiation therapy. We have developed a preclinical model of EBV(+) PCNSL to explore strategies that specifically target EBV-infected B lymphoblasts in vivo. Stereotactic implantation of EBV-transformed human lymphoblastoid B-cell lines into the caudate nucleus of the nude rat resulted in lethal CNS tumor burden manifested by the onset of focal neurological symptoms within 21 days. Histological evaluation at autopsy revealed a multifocal, perivascular human EBV(+) lymphoblastic B-cell infiltrate that displayed a latency type III EBV gene expression profile similar to PCNSL that develops in some immune-deficient patients. Radiation (1600 cGy) of lymphoblastoid B-cell lines resulted in up-regulation of the EBV thymidine kinase (EBV-TK) transcript and sensitization of these cells to drug-induced apoptosis using nucleoside analogs. Enhanced expression of EBV-TK mRNA in EBV(+) PCNSL tumors by radiation therapy occurred in a dose-dependent fashion. In vivo trials using the nude rat PCNSL model demonstrated significantly improved mean survival time (MST) with single fraction whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and antiviral therapy consisting of zidovudine (AZT) and ganciclovir (GCV; MST 41.3 +/- 3.3 days; P = 0.05), compared with either antiviral therapy (MST 32.1 +/- 1.1 days) or WBRT alone (MST 22 +/- 0.8 days). We found constitutive and abundant EBV-TK mRNA expression in a stereotactic core biopsy specimen from a solid organ transplant patient with EBV(+) PCNSL. Withdrawal of immunosuppression did not result in disease regression. This patient achieved a complete response after therapy with high-dose AZT and GCV in the absence of WBRT, and remains in remission on oral

  13. Design-development and operation of the Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) facility, 1955--1967

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Wimunc, E.A.; Whittington, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    The Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) was designed, built, and operated to provide experience and engineering data that would demonstrate the feasibility of the direct-cycle, boiling-water reactor and be applicable to improved, larger nuclear power stations; and was based on information obtained in the first test boiling-water reactors, the BORAX series. EBWR initially produced 20 MW(t), 5 MW(e); later modified and upgraded, as described and illustrated, it was operated at up to 100 MW(t). The facility fulfilled its primary mission -- demonstrating the practicality of the direct-boiling concept -- and, in fact, was the prototype of some of the first commercial plants and of reactor programs in some other countries. After successful completion of the Water-Cooled Reactor Program, EBWR was utilized in the joint Argonne-Hanford Plutonium Recycle Program to develop data for the utilization of plutonium as a fuel in light- water thermal systems. Final shutdown of the EBWR facility followed the termination of the latter program. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Parameterizing ecosystem light use efficiency and water use efficiency to estimate maize gross primary production and evapotranspiration using MODIS EVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying global carbon and water balances requires accurate estimation of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET), respectively, across space and time. Models that are based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE) and water use efficiency (WUE) have emerged as efficient met...

  15. 76 FR 33756 - Notice of Approval of the Primacy Application for National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Regulations: (1) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (January 4, 2006, 71 FR 388) and (2) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (January 5, 2006, 71 FR 654). During the review of... AGENCY Notice of Approval of the Primacy Application for National Primary Drinking Water Regulations...

  16. Carbon and oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf: role of water column primary production and respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a multi-year study of the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) to better understand the linkages between water column net metabolism and the formation of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen <2 ml O2 L-1) in the region. Rates of water column community respiration (R) and primary p...

  17. Incorporating Social and Human Capital into an Experimental Approach to Urban Water Resources Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    To test the benefits of decentralized Green Infrastructure (GI) in an urban setting, we aimed to install GI in the Shepherd Creek Watershed of Cincinnati. The primary stressor in Shepherd Creek is stormwater runoff. An assessment of the total impervious surface area in the waters...

  18. Primary production export flux in Marguerite Bay (Antarctic Peninsula): Linking upper water-column production to sediment trap flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Keith; Jickells, Timothy D.; Carson, Damien S.; Clarke, Andrew; Meredith, Michael P.; Brandon, Mark A.; Wallace, Margaret I.; Ussher, Simon J.; Hendry, Katharine R.

    2013-05-01

    A study was carried out to assess primary production and associated export flux in the coastal waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula at an oceanographic time-series site. New, i.e., exportable, primary production in the upper water-column was estimated in two ways; by nutrient deficit measurements, and by primary production rate measurements using separate 14C-labelled radioisotope and 15N-labelled stable isotope uptake incubations. The resulting average annual exportable primary production estimates at the time-series site from nutrient deficit and primary production rates were 13 and 16 mol C m-2, respectively. Regenerated primary production was measured using 15N-labelled ammonium and urea uptake, and was low throughout the sampling period. The exportable primary production measurements were compared with sediment trap flux measurements from 2 locations; the time-series site and at a site 40 km away in deeper water. Results showed ˜1% of the upper mixed layer exportable primary production was exported to traps at 200 m depth at the time-series site (total water column depth 520 m). The maximum particle flux rate to sediment traps at the deeper offshore site (total water column depth 820 m) was lower than the flux at the coastal time-series site. Flux of particulate organic carbon was similar throughout the spring-summer high flux period for both sites. Remineralisation of particulate organic matter predominantly occurred in the upper water-column (<200 m depth), with minimal remineralisation below 200 m, at both sites. This highly productive region on the Western Antarctic Peninsula is therefore best characterised as 'high recycling, low export'.

  19. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays. An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength. Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%. Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%. The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water

  20. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at

  1. SWAP Modeling Results of Monitored Soil Water Moisture Data of Irrigation Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Garsia-Orenes, F.; van den Elsen, E.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    In arid and semiarid zones of the Mediterranean regions a shortage of fresh water resources constitutes some time dramatic problem. In these regions with growing population and the scarce of rainfall irregularity in time during growing season an efficient use of water irrigation became a main challenge for future extensive agriculture development. In the frame of FP6 Water-Reuse project 516731 project a special field experimentation has been carried out in Alicante Region of Spain (Location UTM X: 693.809, Y: 4.279.922, Z: 626) on a Sandy Typic Xerofkuvent (Soil Survey Staff, 1999), Calcaric Fluvisol (WRB, FAO, 1989). with aim to investigate water regime in water repellent soils under irrigation of vine Vitus Labrusca. During field experimentation from 2006 till 2008 on 9 plots, there the same regime of irrigation water application was maintained, a monitoring of weather parameters was done by automatic meteorological station as well as a monitoring of soil water moisture was done by set of data-loggers and TDR-soil moisture sensors ECO-2 installed at different depts. SWAP model was used to simulate water regime of irrigated plots. Empirical coefficients of van Genuchten-Mualem's equations were calculated by pedotransfer functions derived from HYPRES data base using measured values of bulk density, organic matter content and soil texture. Testing of validity of the use of estimated curves was done by comparison with unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters of water retention and hydraulic conductivity measured in vitro by Wind's method on soil samples. Calibration of SWAP model for each plot was done on measured soil moisture data of irrigation events by adjusting a value of saturated hydraulic coefficient. Verification of the SWAP model was done by full range of experimental data. Similarity and non-similarity of the water regime at experimental plots as well as results of verification of SWAP model were analyzed

  2. Influence of localized plasticity on oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels under primary water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cissé, Sarata; Laffont, Lydia; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Tanguy, Benoit; Andrieu, Eric

    2013-02-01

    The sensitivity of precipitation-strengthened A286 austenitic stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking was studied by means of slow-strain-rate tests. First, alloy cold working by low cycle fatigue (LCF) was investigated. Fatigue tests under plastic strain control were performed at different strain levels (Δɛp/2 = 0.2%, 0.5%, 0.8% and 2%) to establish correlations between stress softening and the deformation microstructure resulting from the LCF tests. Deformed microstructures were identified through TEM investigations. The interaction between oxidation and localized deformation bands was also studied and it resulted that localized deformation bands are not preferential oxide growth channels. The pre-cycling of the alloy did not modify its oxidation behaviour. However, intergranular oxidation in the subsurface under the oxide layer formed after exposure to PWR primary water was shown.

  3. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Corwin Lee; Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Galyean, William Jospeh

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  4. Experimental study of natural convection enhancement using a Fe3O4-water based magnetic nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Stoian, Floriana D; Holotescu, Sorin

    2012-10-01

    The effect of nanoparticles dispersed in a carrier fluid on the natural convection heat transfer is still raising controversies. While the reported experimental results show no improvement or even worsening of the heat transfer performance of nanofluids, the numerical simulations show an increase of the heat transfer coefficient, at least for certain ranges of Ra number. We report an experimental investigation regarding the natural convection heat transfer performance of a Fe3O4-water based nanofluid, in a cylindrical enclosure. The fluid was heated linearly from the bottom wall using an electric heater and cooled from the upper wall by a constant flow of water, such that a constant temperature difference between the upper and bottom walls was obtained at steady-state. The experiment was also carried out using water, in order to observe the effect of the addition of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the heat transfer coefficient. Several regimes were tested, both for water and nanofluid. The experimental results showed that values obtained for the heat transfer coefficient for Fe3O4-water nanofluid were higher than those for water, at the same temperature difference. The present experimental results are also compared with our previous work and the reference literature. PMID:23421199

  5. Materials Reliability Program: Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MRP-137)

    SciTech Connect

    R.Kilian

    2004-12-01

    Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In recent comprehensive review of laboratory, component and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program, flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not considered in laboratory studies but applicable in plant operating environments. Available data for carbon/low-alloy steel piping components suggest that high flow is beneficial regarding the effects of a reactor water environment. Similar information is lacking for stainless steel piping materials. This report documents progress made to date in an extensive testing program underway to evaluate the effects of flow rate on the corrosion fatigue of 304L stainless steel under simulated PWR primary water environmental conditions.

  6. Water balance of rice plots under three different water treatments: monitoring activity and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaradia, Enrico Antonio; Romani, Marco; Facchi, Arianna; Gharsallah, Olfa; Cesari de Maria, Sandra; Ferrari, Daniele; Masseroni, Daniele; Rienzner, Michele; Battista Bischetti, Gian; Gandolfi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    In the agricultural seasons 2012 and 2013, a broad monitoring activity was carried out at the Rice Research Centre of Ente Nazionale Risi (CRR-ENR) located in Castello d'Agogna (PV, Italy) with the purpose of comparing the water balance components of paddy rice (Gladio cv.) under different water regimes and assessing the possibility of reducing the high water inputs related to the conventional practice of continuous submergence. The experiments were laid out in six plots of about 20 m x 80 m each, with two replicates for each of the following water regimes: i) continuous flooding with wet-seeded rice (FLD), ii) continuous flooding from around the 3-leaf stage with dry-seeded rice (3L-FLD), and iii) surface irrigation every 7-10 days with dry-seeded rice (IRR). One out of the two replicates of each treatment was instrumented with: water inflow and outflow meters, set of piezometers, set of tensiometers and multi-sensor moisture probes. Moreover, an eddy covariance station was installed on the bund between the treatments FLD and IRR. Data were automatically recorded and sent by a wireless connection to a PC, so as to be remotely controlled thanks to the development of a Java interface. Furthermore, periodic measurements of crop biometric parameters (LAI, crop height and rooting depth) were performed in both 2012 and 2013 (11 and 14 campaigns respectively). Cumulative water balance components from dry-seeding (3L-FLD and IRR), or flooding (FLD), to harvest were calculated for each plot by either measurements (i.e. rainfall, irrigation and surface drainage) or estimations (i.e. difference in the field water storage, evaporation from both the soil and the water surface and transpiration), whereas the sum of percolation and capillary rise (i.e. the 'net percolation') was obtained as the residual term of the water balance. Incidentally, indices of water application efficiency (evapotranspiration over net water input) and water productivity (grain production over net water

  7. Experimental Study on the Effect of the Ultrasonic Wave on the Freezing of the Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozumi, Tsutomu; Saito, Akio; Okawa, Seiji; Matsui, Tatsuyuki

    In order to confirm the effect of ultrasonic wave on the freezing of supercooled water, various level of ultrasonic waves were applied to the supercooled water. The frequencies of the waves applied were 28kHz, 40kHz, 45kHz, 50kHz, and 1MHz. In order to clarify the mechanism of the effect of the ultrasonic wave, several factors were examined changing the experimental conditions and the results were compared each other; the factors were the existence of a free surface or oil -water interface, the volume of water, the purity of water and the existence of metal bar inserted. Each test section was cooled at a constant cooling rate and the ultrasonic waves were applied to each test section continuously, varying the frequency and the intensity. The experiments were carried out until the water in the test section solidified. The degree of supercooling at the freezing is determined by measuring the temperature just before a rapid increment of temperature due to freezing. It was found that the existence of a free surface and insertion of a metal bar with an addition to the ultrasonic wave have effects on the freezing of supercooled water. On the other hand, if oil-water interface or no metal bar insertion was selected as the experimental condition, there was no influence of the ultrasonic wave on the freezing of the supercooled water even the frequency and the intensity were varied.

  8. Uncertainty analysis of primary water pollutant control in China's pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zong-guo; Di, Jing-han; Zhang, Xue-ying

    2016-03-15

    The total emission control target of water pollutants (e.g., COD and NH4-N) for a certain industrial sector can be predicted and analysed using the popular technology-based bottom-up modelling. However, this methodology has obvious uncertainty regarding the attainment of mitigation targets. The primary uncertainty comes from macro-production, pollutant reduction roadmap, and technical parameters. This research takes the paper and pulp industry in China as an example, and builds 5 mitigation scenarios via different combinations of raw material structure, scale structure, procedure mitigation technology, and end-of-pipe treatment technology. Using the methodology of uncertainty analysis via Monte Carlo, random sampling was conducted over a hundred thousand times. According to key parameters, sensitive parameters that impact total emission control targets such as industrial output, technique structure, cleaner production technology, and end-of-pipe treatment technology are discussed in this article. It appears that scenario uncertainty has a larger influence on COD emission than NH4-N, hence it is recommended that a looser total emission control target for COD is necessary to increase its feasibility and availability while maintaining the status quo of NH4-N. Consequently, from uncertainty analysis, this research recognizes the sensitive products, techniques, and technologies affecting industrial water pollution. PMID:26722715

  9. Experimental Confirmation of Water Column Natural Resonance Migration in a BBDB Device.

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L; Gunawan, Budi; Holmes, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Experiments were conducted with a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) oscillating water column wave energy conversion device with a scaling factor of 50 at HMRC at University College Cork, Ireland. Results were compared to numerical performance models. This work experimentally verified the migration of the natural resonance location of the water column due to hydrodynamic coupling for a floating non- axisymmetric device without a power conversion chain PCC present. In addition, the experimental results verified the performance model with a PCC of the same non- axisymmetric device when both floating and grounded.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of the Cooling Performance of Water Spraying Systems during a Fire

    PubMed Central

    Chen, YaoHan; Su, ChungHwei; Tseng, JoMing; Li, WunJie

    2015-01-01

    The water spray systems are effective protection systems in the confined or unconfined spaces to avoid the damage to building structures since the high temperature when fires occur. NFPA 15 and 502 have suggested respectively that the factories or vehicle tunnels install water spray systems to protect the machinery and structures. This study discussed the cooling effect of water spray systems in experimental and numerical analyses. The actual combustion of woods were compared with the numerical simulations. The results showed that although the flame continued, the cooling effects by water spraying process within 120 seconds were obvious. The results also indicated that the simulation results of the fifth version Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) overestimated the space temperature before water spraying in the case of the same water spray system. PMID:25723519

  11. Experimental and numerical analysis of the cooling performance of water spraying systems during a fire.

    PubMed

    Chen, YaoHan; Su, ChungHwei; Tseng, JoMing; Li, WunJie

    2015-01-01

    The water spray systems are effective protection systems in the confined or unconfined spaces to avoid the damage to building structures since the high temperature when fires occur. NFPA 15 and 502 have suggested respectively that the factories or vehicle tunnels install water spray systems to protect the machinery and structures. This study discussed the cooling effect of water spray systems in experimental and numerical analyses. The actual combustion of woods were compared with the numerical simulations. The results showed that although the flame continued, the cooling effects by water spraying process within 120 seconds were obvious. The results also indicated that the simulation results of the fifth version Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) overestimated the space temperature before water spraying in the case of the same water spray system. PMID:25723519

  12. Experimental determination of the transport number of water in Nafion 117 membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.F.; Newman, J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    The transport number of water in Nafion 117 membrane over a wide range of water contents is determined experimentally using a concentration cell. The transport number of water, the ratio f[sup m][sub o]/Z[sub o], is about 1.4 for a membrane equilibrated with saturated water vapor at 25[degrees]C, decreases slowly as the membrane is dehydrated, and falls sharply toward zero as the concentration of water approaches zero. In this paper, the relationship between the transference number, the transport number, and the electro-osmotic drag coefficient is presented, and their relevance to water management is solid-polymer-electrolyte fuel cells is discussed. Results are compared with other data available in the literature and with the theoretical maximum.

  13. An experimental test of voluntary strategies to promote urban water demand management.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Kelly S; Spinks, Anneliese; Russell, Sally; McCrea, Rod; Stewart, Rodney; Gardner, John

    2013-01-15

    In light of the current and future threats to global water security the current research focuses on trialing interventions to promote urban water conservation. We report an experimental study designed to test the long-term impact of three different interventions on household water consumption in South East Queensland. Participants from 221 households were recruited and completed an initial survey, and their houses were fitted with smart water meters which measured total water usage at 5 s intervals. Households were allocated into one of four conditions: a control group and three interventions groups (water saving information alone, information plus a descriptive norm manipulation, and information plus tailored end-user feedback). The study is the first to use smart water metering technology as a tool for behaviour change as well as a way to test the effectiveness of demand management interventions. Growth curve modelling revealed that compared to the control, the three intervention groups all showed reduced levels of household consumption (an average reduction of 11.3 L per person per day) over the course of the interventions, and for some months afterwards. All interventions led to significant water savings, but long-term household usage data showed that in all cases, the reduction in water use resulting from the interventions eventually dissipated, with water consumption returning to pre-intervention levels after approximately 12 months. Implications for water demand management programs are discussed. PMID:23168251

  14. Radiological sampling and analytical methods for National Primary Drinking Water Regulations.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R L; Hahne, R M; Kahn, B; McCurdy, D; Mellor, R A; Moore, W S; Sedlet, J; Whittaker, E

    1985-05-01

    Radiological sampling and analysis performed under the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations were evaluated for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Drinking Water to consider whether any changes should be recommended. The authors reviewed the analytical screening scheme; sample collection, storage and analysis procedures; selection of analytical methods; reliability of results; and possible future needs. The main problem in the program has been dependence on a screening scheme of gross alpha-particle activity measurement and 226Ra analysis for predicting elevated 228Ra levels to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for Ra. In some aquifers, 228Ra levels have been found to be unrelated to 226Ra levels. Several alternatives are discussed to eliminate this problem. A secondary problem is that the measurement for assuring compliance with the MCL for gross alpha-particle activity minus Ra, Rn and U uses chemical U analysis and assumes equilibrium of 238U and 234U. Because some ground waters are known to be at disequilibrium, radiometric U analysis is needed for those gross alpha-particle activities and chemical U values that could result in an erroneous conclusion relative to the MCL. In addition, studies were recommended for determining analytical uncertainties and assuring reliable sampling and sample maintenance; improvements in the system for accepting methods were suggested; and methods were identified for several radionuclides not currently in the analytical program that may be needed to assure absence of elevated radiation doses and could be useful for identifying trace contaminants. PMID:3988523

  15. A vegetation sensitivity approximation for gross primary production in water limited conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claesson, Jonas; Nycander, Jonas

    2013-04-01

    The most severe impact of climate change on vegetation growth and agriculture is likely to occur under water-limited conditions. Under such conditions the plants optimize the inward flux of CO2 and the outward flux of water vapor (the transpiration) by regulating the size of the stomata openings. Higher temperature increases water loss through transpiration, forcing the plants to diminish the stomata openings, which decreases photosynthesis. This is counteracted by higher CO2 concentration, which allows plants to maintain the inward flux of CO2 through the smaller openings. These two counteracting effects, combined with the change in precipitation, determine the net change of biological productivity in a changed climate. Here, a vegetation sensitivity approximation (VSA) is introduced, in order to understand and estimate the combined effect of changed temperature, CO2-concentration and precipitation on gross primary production (GPP) to first order. According to the VSA, we have: ( ) ?CO2atm ν GP P = ?0 P Here ?CO2atm is the atmospheric CO2 concentration, ?0 is the baseline for atmospheric CO2 concentration, P is precipitation and ν is defined by: -s- ν = 1 - 11°C where s is the climate sensitivity i.e. the increase in temperature when atmospheric CO2 is doubled. The VSA is based on the physical laws of gas flux through the stomata openings, and is only valid under water-limited conditions. It assumes that the temperature depends logarithmically on the CO2 concentration with a given climate sensitivity. Transpiration is assumed to be a constant fraction of precipitation, which is reasonable under water-limited conditions. The VSA is compared to simulations with the dynamic vegetation model LPJ. The agreement is reasonable, and the deviations can be understood by comparison with Köppen's definition of arid climate: in an arid climate growth increases more according to LPJ than according to the VSA, and in non-arid conditions the reverse is true. Both the VSA and

  16. Experimental research of fluorescence spectra of watercress stressed by lack or excess of watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullo, O. A.; Fedotov, Yu. V.; Belov, M. L.; Gorodnichev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental laboratory investigations of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of watercress were conducted. The fluorescence spectra were excited by a YAG:Nd laser emitting at 532 nm. The laboratory setup was described and fluorescence spectra of watercress in stressed states caused by lack and excess of water were presented. It was established that the influence of stress caused by lack and excess of watering is manifested in changes of fluorescence spectra.

  17. Experimental Analysis of the Feasibility of Polydisperse Droplet Water Flow Using at Fire Extinguishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitkov, Ivan S.; Zabelin, Maxim V.; Zhdanova, Alena O.

    2016-02-01

    With use of modern diagnostic methods the experimental researches of the process of the sprayed water evaporation at its movement through a flame of the fixed height was conducted. The change ranges of the main integrated evaporation characteristics of the sprayed water droplets (rates, sizes, concentration in a flow) are established. It is shown that at the extinguishing of fires the most expedient decision is the use of polydisperse droplet flows.

  18. Cattle-derived microbial input to source water catchments: An experimental assessment of stream crossing modification.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Andrew; Rolls, Robert J; Ryder, Darren; Watkinson, Andrew; Mackenzie, Mark

    2015-06-01

    The provision of safe drinking water is a global issue, and animal production is recognized as a significant potential origin of human infectious pathogenic microorganisms within source water catchments. On-farm management can be used to mitigate livestock-derived microbial pollution in source water catchments to reduce the risk of contamination to potable water supplies. We applied a modified Before-After Control Impact (BACI) design to test if restricting the access of livestock to direct contact with streams prevented longitudinal increases in the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria and suspended solids. Significant longitudinal increases in pollutant concentrations were detected between upstream and downstream reaches of the control crossing, whereas such increases were not detected at the treatment crossing. Therefore, while the crossing upgrade was effective in preventing cattle-derived point source pollution by between 112 and 158%, diffuse source pollution to water supplies from livestock is not ameliorated by this intervention alone. Our findings indicate that stream crossings that prevent direct contact between livestock and waterways provide a simple method for reducing pollutant loads in source water catchments, which ultimately minimises the likelihood of pathogenic microorganisms passing through source water catchments and the drinking water supply system. The efficacy of the catchment as a primary barrier to pathogenic risks to drinking water supplies would be improved with the integration of management interventions that minimise direct contact between livestock and waterways, combined with the mitigation of diffuse sources of livestock-derived faecal matter from farmland runoff to the aquatic environment. PMID:25841195

  19. Cenozoic magmatism of north Victoria Land, Antarctica: an experimental study on the mantle source of a primary basanite from the McMurdo Volcanic Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Freda, C.; Misiti, V.; Perinelli, C.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes of the McMurdo Vocanic Group (MMVG) (Antarctica) dot the eastern shoulder of Ross Sea Rift System giving rise to alkaline transitional volcanic suites which in north Victoria Land are emplaced since Early Cenozoic. Geochemical geological, geophysical and geochronological data on Cenozoic volcanic activity in NVL suggest that the region is a site of passive astenospheric rise, rather than affected by a thermally active mantle plume. Furthermore the comparison of geochemical and isotopical data of basic lavas with those provided by mantle xenoliths they carry to the surface, document the compositional heterogeneity of sublithospheric mantle caused by the coupled action of partial melting and metasomatism. In particular the metasomatic episode is probably linked to the amagmatic extensional event that affected the West Antarctic Rift System in the Late Cretaceous. The astenospheric melts generated during this event, moving through the upper mantle, can have crystallized as veins or may have led to the formation of metasomatic minerals such as amphibole or phlogopite. In this scenario the mineralogical and chemical composition of sources responsible for Cenozoic magmatism, amphibole-bearing spinel-peridotite versus pyroxenite in the garnet stability field, it is still a matter of debate. To shed light on this argument a previous experimental study on a basanite of MMVG, representative of primary magma (Orlando et al., 2000) has been integrated with new experimental investigation on the same basanitic composition. The preliminary experiments were conducted to pressures of 1.0 - 2.0GPa in the presence of 0-1% of added water and indicate olivine on the liquidus at 1.0 GPa that is substitute by clinopyroxene at 2.0GPa. The addition of 1% of water induces a decrease of liquidus temperature of about 40°C shifting its value in the T range (1280-1310°C) the same that was inferred by melt inclusions hosted in the olivine phenocrysts of the studied basanite.

  20. Experimental Evaluation the Effectiveness of Water Mist Fire Extinguishing Systems at Oil and Gas Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyashina, G. S.; Medvedev, V. V.; Shevyrev, S. A.; Vysokomornaya, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    Currently mist water is one of the most promising areas of fire protection. We performed an experimental study of phase transformations drops of water mist (range 50 - 500 microns) in motion in a high-temperature (500 - 2000 K) typical products of combustion of petroleum products (gasoline, kerosene, acetone, alcohol). We used high speed (the speed of shooting at least 105 frames per second) and optical methods of recording streams of liquid and gas medium. We determined the effect of the parameters of the test process (the initial temperature and the initial droplet size) at the rate of evaporation of atomized water under these conditions.

  1. A Combined Experimental and Molecular Dynamics Study of Iodide-Based Ionic Liquid and Water Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Stella D; Nofen, Elizabeth M; Chen, Haobo; Ngan, Miranda; Shindel, Benjamin; Yu, Hongyu; Dai, Lenore L

    2015-07-16

    Iodide-based ionic liquids have been widely employed as iodide sources in electrolytes for applications utilizing the triiodide/iodide redox couple. While adding a low-viscosity solvent such as water to ionic liquids can greatly enhance their usefulness, mixtures of highly viscous iodide-containing ILs with water have never been studied. This paper investigates, for the first time, mixtures of water and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide ([BMIM][I]) through a combined experimental and molecular dynamics study. The density, melting point, viscosity, and conductivity of these mixtures were measured by experiment. The composition region below 50% water by mole was found to differ dramatically from the region above 50% water, with trends in density and melting point differing before and after that point. Water was found to have a profound effect on viscosity and conductivity of the IL, and the effect of hydrogen bonding was discussed. Molecular dynamics simulations representing the same mixture compositions were performed. Molecular ordering was observed, as were changes in this ordering corresponding to water content. Molecular ordering was related to the experimentally measured mixture properties, providing a possible explanation for the two distinct composition regions identified by experiment. PMID:26090562

  2. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a representative lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated at various power levels in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to anchor a CFD model. Performance of a water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted by CFD models anchored to test data. The accompanying viewgraph presentation includes the following topics: 1) Testbed Configuration; 2) Core Heater Placement and Instrumentation; 3) Thermocouple Placement; 4) Core Thermocouple Placement; 5) Outer Tank Thermocouple Placement; 6) Integrated Testbed; 7) Methodology; 8) Experimental Results: Core Temperatures; 9) Experimental Results; Outer Tank Temperatures; 10) CFD Modeling; 11) CFD Model: Anchored to Experimental Results (1-g); 12) CFD MOdel: Prediction for 1/6-g; and 13) CFD Model: Comparison of 1-g to 1/6-g.

  3. Water, energy and carbon flux observations from ARS watersheds and agro-ecosystem experimental sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several ARS watershed locations and long term experimental/monitoring sites have been measuring water, energy and carbon fluxes using the eddy covariance technique. Several sites have been collecting flux data for 5 to 10 years, while other locations have recently started a monitoring program. The...

  4. Long-term carbon dioxide and water flux database, Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, Arizona, USA 1850

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present the carbon dioxide and water flux data along with associated meteorological data collected by USDA Agricultural Research Service, Southwest Watershed Research Center, on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) from 1997 through 2006. Measurements were collected from a shrub and gr...

  5. Experimental Evaluation of the Drag Coefficient of Water Rockets by a Simple Free-Fall Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E. Arguelles-Diaz, K.; Fernandez-Oro, J.

    2009-01-01

    The flight trajectory of a water rocket can be reasonably calculated if the magnitude of the drag coefficient is known. The experimental determination of this coefficient with enough precision is usually quite difficult, but in this paper we propose a simple free-fall experiment for undergraduate students to reasonably estimate the drag…

  6. Water-polysaccharide interactions in the primary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana from polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water (1)H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide (13)C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water-pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water-cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water-polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water-pectin spin diffusion precedes water-cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins. PMID:24984197

  7. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR WATER FORMATION VIA OZONE HYDROGENATION ON DUST GRAINS AT 10 K

    SciTech Connect

    Mokrane, H.; Chaabouni, H.; Accolla, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.; Chehrouri, M.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2009-11-10

    The formation of water molecules from the reaction between ozone (O{sub 3}) and D-atoms is studied experimentally for the first time. Ozone is deposited on non-porous amorphous solid water ice (H{sub 2}O), and D-atoms are then sent onto the sample held at 10 K. HDO molecules are detected during the desorption of the whole substrate where isotope mixing takes place, indicating that water synthesis has occurred. The efficiency of water formation via hydrogenation of ozone is of the same order of magnitude as that found for reactions involving O-atoms or O{sub 2} molecules and exhibits no apparent activation barrier. These experiments validate the assumption made by models using ozone as one of the precursors of water formation via solid-state chemistry on interstellar dust grains.

  8. Seasonal Shifts in Primary Water Source Type: A Comparison of Largely Pastoral Communities in Uganda and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Amber L; Zwickle, Adam; Namanya, Judith; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Mwita, Emiliana

    2016-02-01

    Many water-related illnesses show an increase during the wet season. This is often due to fecal contamination from runoff, yet, it is unknown whether seasonal changes in water availability may also play a role in increased illness via changes in the type of primary water source used by households. Very little is known about the dynamic aspects of access to water and changes in source type across seasons, particularly in semi-arid regions with annual water scarcity. The research questions in this study were: (1) To what degree do households in Uganda (UG) and Tanzania (TZ) change primary water source type between wet and dry seasons?; and (2) How might seasonal changes relate to water quality and health? Using spatial survey data from 92 households each in UG and TZ this study found that, from wet to dry season, 26% (UG) and 9% (TZ) of households switched from a source with higher risk of contamination to a source with lower risk. By comparison, only 20% (UG) and 0% (TZ) of households switched from a source with lower risk of contamination to a source with higher risk of contamination. This research suggests that one pathway through which water-related disease prevalence may differ across seasons is the use of water sources with higher risk contamination, and that households with access to sources with lower risks of contamination sometimes choose to use more contaminated sources. PMID:26828507

  9. Seasonal Shifts in Primary Water Source Type: A Comparison of Largely Pastoral Communities in Uganda and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Amber L.; Zwickle, Adam; Namanya, Judith; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Mwita, Emiliana

    2016-01-01

    Many water-related illnesses show an increase during the wet season. This is often due to fecal contamination from runoff, yet, it is unknown whether seasonal changes in water availability may also play a role in increased illness via changes in the type of primary water source used by households. Very little is known about the dynamic aspects of access to water and changes in source type across seasons, particularly in semi-arid regions with annual water scarcity. The research questions in this study were: (1) To what degree do households in Uganda (UG) and Tanzania (TZ) change primary water source type between wet and dry seasons?; and (2) How might seasonal changes relate to water quality and health? Using spatial survey data from 92 households each in UG and TZ this study found that, from wet to dry season, 26% (UG) and 9% (TZ) of households switched from a source with higher risk of contamination to a source with lower risk. By comparison, only 20% (UG) and 0% (TZ) of households switched from a source with lower risk of contamination to a source with higher risk of contamination. This research suggests that one pathway through which water-related disease prevalence may differ across seasons is the use of water sources with higher risk contamination, and that households with access to sources with lower risks of contamination sometimes choose to use more contaminated sources. PMID:26828507

  10. Experimental simulation of the water cooling of corium spread over the floor of a BWR containment

    SciTech Connect

    Morage, F.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with an experimental investigation of the cooling effect of water collected on the surface of corium released onto the floor of a BWR drywell. In the present experiments, the actual reactor materials were replaced by simulant materials. Specifically, the results are shown for Freon-11 film boiling over liquid Wood`s metal spread above a solid porous surface through which argon gas was injected. An analysis of the obtained experimental data revealed that the actual film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and the water above the pool should be more efficient than predicted by using standard correlations for boiling over solid surfaces. This effect will be further augmented by the gas released due to the ablation of concrete floor beneath the corium and percolating towards its upper surface and into through the water layer above.

  11. Primary portal vein hypoplasia and SLC2A9 mutation associated with urate urolithiasis in a Spanish water dog

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Laura; Hammond, Gawain; Mclauchlan, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a Spanish water dog with an ammonium urate urethrolith which was diagnosed with primary portal vein hypoplasia and was found to be homozygous for the mutated SLC2A9 gene. This is the first Spanish water dog described with the SLC2A9 mutation and the first case of concurrent portal vascular abnormalities and SLC2A9 mutation. PMID:26538670

  12. Assessing Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Morphology and Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2005-12-01

    A research program on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this program, the material degradation problem in Alloys 600, 182 and 82 is being investigated, with objectives that include compiling a knowledge base on all cracking in nickel-base materials at all degradation sites in nuclear power plants, assessing nondestructive evaluation methods using mockups to quantify the detection, sizing, and characterization of tight cracks, determining the role of material parameters, such as welding processes, in the degradation. This work is being conducted as a part of an international cooperative research project that has been set up to leverage efforts in several countries to address a significant and common problem. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is leading this cooperative project to address this generic problem in a systematic manner over the next four years. In this paper, published information on the failure history of Alloys 600, 182, and 82 is compiled and presented. The configurations of the welded assemblies that contain these alloys are shown to be important considerations for NDE reliability measurements. The product forms and the welding processes represented in the degraded components are described. The relevant data on crack morphology parameters such as shape and orientation are presented, and their impact on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability is discussed.

  13. The Life-Cycle Costs of School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan Primary Schools.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kelly T; Mwaki, Alex; Adhiambo, Dorothy; Cheney-Coker, Malaika; Muga, Richard; Freeman, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programs in schools can increase the health, dignity and comfort of students and teachers. Understanding the costs of WASH facilities and services in schools is one essential piece for policy makers to utilize when budgeting for schools and helping to make WASH programs more sustainable. In this study we collected data from NGO and government offices, local hardware shops and 89 rural primary schools across three Kenyan counties. Current expenditures on WASH, from school and external (NGO, government, parent) sources, averaged 1.83 USD per student per year. After reviewing current expenditures, estimated costs of operations and maintenance for bringing schools up to basic WASH standards, were calculated to be 3.03 USD per student per year. This includes recurrent costs, but not the cost of installing or setting up WASH infrastructure, which was 18,916 USD per school, for a school of 400 students (4.92 USD per student, per year). These findings demonstrate the need for increases in allocations to schools in Kenya, and stricter guidance on how money should be spent on WASH inputs to enable all schools to provide basic WASH for all students. PMID:27355962

  14. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, M

    1987-01-01

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated.

  15. The Life-Cycle Costs of School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan Primary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kelly T.; Mwaki, Alex; Adhiambo, Dorothy; Cheney-Coker, Malaika; Muga, Richard; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programs in schools can increase the health, dignity and comfort of students and teachers. Understanding the costs of WASH facilities and services in schools is one essential piece for policy makers to utilize when budgeting for schools and helping to make WASH programs more sustainable. In this study we collected data from NGO and government offices, local hardware shops and 89 rural primary schools across three Kenyan counties. Current expenditures on WASH, from school and external (NGO, government, parent) sources, averaged 1.83 USD per student per year. After reviewing current expenditures, estimated costs of operations and maintenance for bringing schools up to basic WASH standards, were calculated to be 3.03 USD per student per year. This includes recurrent costs, but not the cost of installing or setting up WASH infrastructure, which was 18,916 USD per school, for a school of 400 students (4.92 USD per student, per year). These findings demonstrate the need for increases in allocations to schools in Kenya, and stricter guidance on how money should be spent on WASH inputs to enable all schools to provide basic WASH for all students. PMID:27355962

  16. Water use efficiency of net primary production in global terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lei; Wang, Fei; Mu, Xingmin; Jin, Kai; Sun, Wenyi; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Guangju

    2015-07-01

    The carbon and water cycles of terrestrial ecosystems, which are strongly coupled via water use efficiency (WUE), are influenced by global climate change. To explore the relationship between the carbon and water cycles and predict the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to study the WUE in global terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, the 13-year WUE (i.e., net primary production (NPP)/evapotranspiration (ET)) of global terrestrial ecosystems was calculated based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) NPP (MOD17A3) and ET (MOD16A3) products from 2000 to 2012. The results indicate that the annual average WUE decreased but not significantly, and the 13-year mean value was 868.88 mg C m -2 mm -1. The variation trend of WUE value for each pixel differed greatly across the terrestrial ecosystems. A significant variation ( P<0.05) occurred in about 18.50% of the land surface. WUE was spatially distributed from 0 to 2541 mg C m -2 mm -1, and 58.78% of the WUE values were concentrated in the interval of 600-1200 mg C m -2 mm -1. The WUE increased from north to south in Africa and Oceania and from east to west in Europe and South America. Both latitudinal and longitudinal gradients existed in Asia and North America. The following trends in the WUE of different continents and Köppen-Geiger climates were observed: Europe (1129.71 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Oceania (1084.46 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Africa (893.51 mg C m -2 mm -1)> South America (893.07 mg C m -2 mm -1)> North America (870.79 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Asia (738.98 mg C m -2 mm -1) and warm temperate climates (1094 mg C m -2 mm -1)> snowy climates (862 mg C m -2 mm -1)> arid climates (785 mg C m -2 mm -1)> equatorial climates (732 mg C m -2 mm -1)> polar climates (435 mg C m -2 mm -1). Based on the WUE value and the present or future rainfall, the maximum carbon that fixed in one region may be theoretically calculated. Also, under the background of global climatic change, WUE may

  17. Experimental and Numerical Simulation of Water Vapor Adsorption and Diffusion in Shale Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Cihan, A.; Wan, J.; Zheng, L.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in deep horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have lead to large increases in production from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. Despite the success of this technology, uncertainties associated with basic transport processes require understanding in order to improve efficiency and minimize environmental impacts. The hydraulic fracturing process introduces large volumes of water into shale gas reservoirs. Most of the fracturing water remains in reservoirs to interfere with gas production. The quantification of the amount of water retained in shale gas reservoirs is crucial for predicting gas shale formation productivity and for optimizing extraction conditions. In this study, water vapor adsorption isotherms were gravimetrically measured on granular fractions of Woodford formation shales sieved after crushing. The isotherms were obtained at 30℃ and 50℃, for relative humidities from 11.1% to 97.0%. Water adsorption in these shale grains conformed to the typeⅡisotherm, and were nearly identical for the two experimental temperatures. In order to better understand the isotherms, a computational model based on the Maxwell-Stefan Diffusion equations (MSDM) was constructed to analyze the water adsorption and gas diffusion in shale grains. Based on the experimental results, the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) isotherm model for gas adsorption was included in the model.

  18. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: The experimental and data analysis perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taschin, A.; Bartolini, P.; Eramo, R.; Righini, R.; Torre, R.

    2014-08-01

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information.

  19. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: the experimental and data analysis perspective.

    PubMed

    Taschin, A; Bartolini, P; Eramo, R; Righini, R; Torre, R

    2014-08-28

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information. PMID:25173021

  20. Comparison of GEANT4 very low energy cross section models with experimental data in water

    SciTech Connect

    Incerti, S.; Ivanchenko, A.; Karamitros, M.; Mantero, A.; Moretto, P.; Tran, H. N.; Mascialino, B.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Bernal, M. A.; Francis, Z.; Villagrasa, C.; Baldacchino, G.; Gueye, P.; Capra, R.; Nieminen, P.; Zacharatou, C.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The GEANT4 general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is able to simulate physical interaction processes of electrons, hydrogen and helium atoms with charge states (H{sup 0}, H{sup +}) and (He{sup 0}, He{sup +}, He{sup 2+}), respectively, in liquid water, the main component of biological systems, down to the electron volt regime and the submicrometer scale, providing GEANT4 users with the so-called ''GEANT4-DNA'' physics models suitable for microdosimetry simulation applications. The corresponding software has been recently re-engineered in order to provide GEANT4 users with a coherent and unique approach to the simulation of electromagnetic interactions within the GEANT4 toolkit framework (since GEANT4 version 9.3 beta). This work presents a quantitative comparison of these physics models with a collection of experimental data in water collected from the literature. Methods: An evaluation of the closeness between the total and differential cross section models available in the GEANT4 toolkit for microdosimetry and experimental reference data is performed using a dedicated statistical toolkit that includes the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. The authors used experimental data acquired in water vapor as direct measurements in the liquid phase are not yet available in the literature. Comparisons with several recommendations are also presented. Results: The authors have assessed the compatibility of experimental data with GEANT4 microdosimetry models by means of quantitative methods. The results show that microdosimetric measurements in liquid water are necessary to assess quantitatively the validity of the software implementation for the liquid water phase. Nevertheless, a comparison with existing experimental data in water vapor provides a qualitative appreciation of the plausibility of the simulation models. The existing reference data themselves should undergo a critical interpretation and selection, as some of the series exhibit significant

  1. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy of carbonaceous chondrites: Implications for water quantification and primary composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garenne, A.; Beck, P.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Brissaud, O.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.; Bonal, L.; Beck, C.; Howard, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we measured bidirectional reflectance spectra (0.5-4.0 μm) of 24 CMs, five CRs, one CI, one CV, and one C2 carbonaceous chondrites. These meteorites are known to have experienced an important variability in their relative degrees of aqueous alteration degree (Rubin et al. [2007]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2361-2382; Howard et al. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard et al. [2011]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 2735-2751; Alexander et al. [2013]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 123, 244-260). These measurements were performed on meteorite powders inside an environmental cell under a primary vacuum and heated at 60 °C in order to minimize adsorbed terrestrial water. This protocol allows controlling of atmospheric conditions (i.e. humidity) in order to avoid contamination by terrestrial water. We discuss various spectral metrics (e.g. reflectance, band depth, single-scattering albedo, …) in the light of recent bulk composition characterization (Howard et al. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard et al. [2015]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 149, 206-222; Alexander et al. [2012]. Science 337, 721; Beck et al. [2014]. Icarus 229, 263-277; Garenne et al. [2014]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 137, 93-112). This study reveals variability of reflectance among meteorite groups. The reflectance is not correlated with carbon or hydrogen abundance neither with measured grain size distribution. We suggest that it is rather controlled by the nature of accreted components, in particular the initial matrix/chondrule proportion. Band depth, integrated band depth, mean optical path length, normalized optical path length, effective single-particle absorption thickness were calculated on the so called 3-μm band for reflectance spectra and for single scattering albedo spectra. They were compared with hydrated phase proportions from previous study on the same meteorites by thermogravimetric analyses and infrared spectroscopy in transmission. We find

  2. Experimental manipulation of water levels in two French riverine grassland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oorschot, Mark; van Gaalen, Nils; Maltby, Ed; Mockler, Natalie; Spink, Andrew; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.

    2000-01-01

    In this experimental study, we simulated the effects of different river flooding regimes on soil nutrient availability, decomposition and plant production in floodplain grasslands. This was done to investigate the influences of soil water contents on nutrient cycling. Water levels were manipulated in mesocosms with intact soil turfs from two French floodplain grasslands. Three water levels were established: a `wet' (water level at the soil surface), an `intermediate' (water level at -20 cm) and a `dry' treatment (water level at -120 cm). With increasing soil moisture, soil pH became more neutral, while redox-potential and oxygen concentration decreased. The `dry' treatment showed much lower values for process rates in soil and vegetation than the `intermediate' and `wet' treatments. Regressions showed that soil C-evolution and N-mineralization were positively related to soil moisture content. Not all mineralized N was available for plant uptake in the wet treatment, as a considerable part was denitrified here. Denitrification was especially high as soil water contents increased to levels above field capacity, where redox-potentials sharply dropped. Further, soil P availability was higher under wet conditions. In the `dry' treatment, soil water content was close to the wilting point and plant production was low. In the `intermediate' treatment, plant production was most likely limited by nitrogen. The `wet' treatment did not result in a further increase in plant production. Dam construction and river bed degradation can result in lower river levels and summer drought on floodplains. This experimental study suggests that summer drought on floodplain soils reduces decomposition of soil organic matter, nutrient availability, denitrification, plant production and nutrient uptake. This can affect the capacity of floodplains to remove or retain nutrients from river water in a negative way.

  3. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    PubMed

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress. PMID:27341663

  4. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  5. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  10. Genetic variability of oxalate oxidase activity and elongation in water-stressed primary roots of diverse maize and rice lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work on maize primary roots under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. In association with these responses, several proteins related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, part...

  11. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    REID, ROBERT S.; PEARSON, J. BOSIE; STEWART, ERIC T.

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  12. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-30

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  13. Theoretical and experimental investigation of a novel built-in-storage solar water heater

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptan, I.N.; Kilic, A.

    1996-11-01

    In this work, a novel built-in-storage type solar water heater of about 871 capacity has been investigated theoretically and experimentally for the case of no draw-off. The solar water heater which performs the dual function of absorbing and storing hot water is made of 5 pipes, each of length 1.8 m and diameter 12 cm. A baffle plate is placed inside each pipe. The experiments have been performed inside the laboratory using an artificial Sun consisting of 27 lamps. The water temperatures have been measured at various locations in the system. In the theoretical study, transient performance of the system is predicted by solving the mathematical model consisting of energy balance equations written for each control volume comprising one length of pipe. These equations are converted to finite difference form and then solved by a personal computer. The experimental results have been compared with the numerical model and a good agreement has been found between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions. 24 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An experimental study of freezing of supercooled water droplet on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Mendig, C.; Schulz, M.; Sinapius, M.; Prykhodko, O. A.

    2016-05-01

    Results of experimental investigations of the freezing of immobile water droplet on an aluminum plate are presented. The process was studied with the aid of a high-speed photo camera. The freezing of supercooled water contained in the surface droplet proceeds in a few stages: (i) preliminary heating of water and nucleation of ice microcrystals, (ii) relatively fast formation of the ice-liquid system with a transition to the state of thermodynamic equilibrium near the freezing temperature, and (iii) slow process of complete freezing. The rate and duration of each stage and the time of delay between the moment of action upon the supercooled droplet and the onset of freezing are estimated. Processes of supercooled and nonsupercooled water solidification are compared.

  15. Experimental study of the water jet induced by underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koita, T.; Zhu, Y.; Sun, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation on the effects of explosion depth and tube width on the water jet induced by an underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube. The water jet formation and bubble structure were evaluated from the images recorded by a high-speed video camera. Two typical patterns of jet formation and four general patterns of bubble implosion were observed, depending on the explosion depth and tube width. The velocity of the water jet was calculated from the recorded images. The jet velocity was observed to depend on not only the explosion depth and energy, but also on the tube width. We proposed an empirical formula defining the water jet velocity in the tube as a function of the tube width and explosion depth and energy.

  16. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. B.; Reid, R.; Sadasivan, P.; Stewart, E.

    2007-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. A representative lunar surface reactor design is evaluated at various power levels in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The evaluation compares the experimental data from the WST to CFD models. Performance of a water shield on the lunar surface is predicted by CFD models anchored to test data, and by matching relevant dimensionless parameters.

  17. Experimental investigation of over-expanded supersonic steam jet submerged in quiescent water

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xin-Zhuang; Yan, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jun; Pan, Dong-Dong; Liu, Guang-Yao

    2010-01-15

    This study was designed to determine the behaviour of an over-expanded supersonic steam jet in quiescent water. Only two shapes of steam plume were observed and an analytical model was constructed. The axial and radial temperature distributions were measured in the steam plume and in the surrounding water. The flow pattern and temperature distributions were influenced mainly by steam mass flux and water temperature. The results confirmed the occurrence of compression and expansion waves in the steam plume, and indicated that the temperature distributions reflected the steam plume shapes. The axial temperature distributions in the forepart of the steam plume were independent of water temperature. Empirical correlations were found that predicted the dimensionless axial and radial temperatures of the turbulent jet region. Moreover, prediction of the steam plume length by the dimensionless axial temperature showed good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  18. Biofilm formation in an experimental water distribution system: the contamination of non-touch sensor taps and the implication for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ginny; Stevenson, David; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Parks, Simon; Ngabo, Didier; Bennett, Allan M; Walker, Jimmy T

    2015-01-01

    Hospital tap water is a recognised source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. U.K. guidance documents recommend measures to control/minimise the risk of P. aeruginosa in augmented care units but these are based on limited scientific evidence. An experimental water distribution system was designed to investigate colonisation of hospital tap components. P. aeruginosa was injected into 27 individual tap 'assemblies'. Taps were subsequently flushed twice daily and contamination levels monitored over two years. Tap assemblies were systematically dismantled and assessed microbiologically and the effect of removing potentially contaminated components was determined. P. aeruginosa was repeatedly recovered from the tap water at levels above the augmented care alert level. The organism was recovered from all dismantled solenoid valves with colonisation of the ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) diaphragm confirmed by microscopy. Removing the solenoid valves reduced P. aeruginosa counts in the water to below detectable levels. This effect was immediate and sustained, implicating the solenoid diaphragm as the primary contamination source. PMID:26652665

  19. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  20. Water age and stream solute dynamics at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (US)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, Gianluca; Benettin, Paolo; McGuire, Kevin; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The contribution discusses experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA) to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is used to model both conservative and weathering-derived solutes. Based on the available information about the hydrology of the site, an integrated transport model was developed and used to estimate the relevant hydrochemical fluxes. The model was designed to reproduce the deuterium content of streamflow and allowed for the estimate of catchment water storage and dynamic travel time distributions (TTDs). Within this framework, dissolved silicon and sodium concentration in streamflow were simulated by implementing first-order chemical kinetics based explicitly on dynamic TTD, thus upscaling local geochemical processes to catchment scale. Our results highlight the key role of water stored within the subsoil glacial material in both the short-term and long-term solute circulation at Hubbard Brook. The analysis of the results provided by the calibrated model allowed a robust estimate of the emerging concentration-discharge relationship, streamflow age distributions (including the fraction of event water) and storage size, and their evolution in time due to hydrologic variability.

  1. On the growth of homogeneously nucleated water droplets in nitrogen: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, M. A. L. J.; Sachteleben, E.; Hrubý, J.; Smeulders, D. M. J.

    2014-07-01

    A pulse-expansion wave tube method to determine homogeneous nucleation rates of water droplets has been improved. In particular, by accounting for background scattering, the experimental light scattering can be fitted extremely well with the Mie scattering theory. This results in an accurate determination of the droplet growth curve, which is well defined owing to the sharp monodispersity of the droplet cloud generated by the nucleation pulse method. With this method, water condensation is effectively decoupled in birth (nucleation) and growth of droplets. Droplet growth curves yield information on the diffusion coefficient, which only depends on pressure and temperature and on the supersaturation of the individual experiments. Here, we propose to use this information in the interpretation of nucleation rate data. Experimental results are given for homogeneous nucleation rates of supercooled water droplets at nucleation temperature 240 K and pressure 1.0 MPa and for growth of supercooled water droplets at temperature 247 K and pressure 1.1 MPa. The supersaturation was varied between 10 and 14, resulting in nucleation rates varying between 10 m s and 10 m s. For the diffusion coefficient, a value of 1.51 0.03 mm s was found (247 K, 1.1 MPa) in agreement with previously reported results. It is discussed how the information from droplet growth data can be used to assess the quality of the individual water nucleation experiments.

  2. Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

    2007-04-18

    Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate controlling sub

  3. Experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of water mist automated fire extinguishing systems for oil transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, D. O.; Nyashina, G. S.; Strizhak, P. A.; Volkov, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental investigation of regularities of carryover of water mist droplets (radius of 50 - 500 μm) by high temperature (500 - 1800 K) products of combustion of typical petroleum products (oil, gasoline, kerosene, etc.) was carried out. The panoramic optical methods and high-speed hardware and software systems were used. Speeds of droplets after mixing with oncoming high temperature gases were determined. Conditions of continuation of droplets movement through combustion products with preservation of initial trajectory in spite of intensive evaporation and braking were found. The predictive evaluation of effectiveness of water mist use for extinguishing of fires involving oil and typical petroleum products.

  4. An experimental investigation of the burning characteristics of water-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.H.; Chen, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the combustion characteristics of droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-hexadecane and iso-octane emulsified with various amount of water and freely falling in a furnace of controlled temperature. Results demonstrate the intricate influences of water emulsification on the ignition, extinction and micro-explosion of the droplet response, and that the droplet burning time can be significantly reduced through judicious fuel blending so as to minimize the ignition delay and advance the onset of micro-explosion.

  5. Structural properties of geminal dicationic ionic liquid/water mixtures: a theoretical and experimental insight.

    PubMed

    Serva, Alessandra; Migliorati, Valentina; Lapi, Andrea; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Arcovito, Alessandro; D'Angelo, Paola

    2016-06-28

    The structural behavior of geminal dicationic ionic liquid 1,n-bis[3-methylimidazolium-1-yl] alkane bromide ([Cn(mim)2]Br2)/water mixtures has been studied using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The properties of the mixtures are investigated as a function of both water concentration and alkyl-bridge chain length. The very good agreement between the EXAFS experimental data and the theoretical curves calculated from the MD structural results has proven the validity of the theoretical framework used for all of the investigated systems. In all the solutions the water molecules are preferentially coordinated with the Br(-) ion, even if a complex network of interactions among dications, anions and water molecules takes place. The local molecular arrangement around the bromide ion is found to change with increasing water content, as more and more water molecules are accomodated in the Br(-) first coordination shell. Moreover, with the decrease of the alkyl-bridge chain length, the interactions between dications and anions increase, with Br(-) forming a bridge between the two imidazolium rings of the same dication. On the other hand, in [Cn(mim)2]Br2/water mixtures with long alkyl-bridge chains peculiar internal arrangements of the dications are found, leading to different structural features of geminal dicationic ionic liquids as compared to their monocationic counterparts. PMID:27272477

  6. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies.

    PubMed Central

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Bull, R; Holdsworth, G

    1986-01-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increases in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. For example, after 3 months of exposure to deionized water or water containing 15 ppm monochloramine, plasma cholesterol was 1266 +/- 172 and 2049 +/- 212 mg/dl, respectively, a difference of 783 mg/dl. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. We suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3456597

  7. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Bull, R; Holdsworth, G

    1986-03-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increases in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. For example, after 3 months of exposure to deionized water or water containing 15 ppm monochloramine, plasma cholesterol was 1266 +/- 172 and 2049 +/- 212 mg/dl, respectively, a difference of 783 mg/dl. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. We suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3456597

  8. Screening and Quantification of Aliphatic Primary Alkyl Corrosion Inhibitor Amines in Water Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Damon, Deidre E; Barrett, Richard M; Syed, S U; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-01-19

    Direct analysis and identification of long chain aliphatic primary diamine Duomeen O (n-oleyl-1,3-diaminopropane), corrosion inhibitor in raw water samples taken from a large medium pressure water tube boiler plant water samples at low LODs (<0.1 pg) has been demonstrated for the first time, without any sample preparation using paper spray mass spectrometry (PS-MS). The presence of Duomeen O in water samples was confirmed via tandem mass spectrometry using collision-induced dissociation and supported by exact mass measurement and reactive paper spray experiments using an LTQ Orbitrap Exactive instrument. Data shown herein indicate that paper spray ambient ionization can be readily used as a rapid and robust method for in situ direct analysis of polymanine corrosion inhibitors in an industrial water boiler plant and other related samples in the water treatment industry. This approach was applied for the analysis of three complex water samples including feedwater, condensate water, and boiler water, all collected from large medium pressure (MP) water tube boiler plants, known to be dosed with varying amounts of polyamine and amine corrosion inhibitor components. Polyamine chemistry is widely used for example in large high pressure (HP) boilers operating in municipal waste and recycling facilities to prevent corrosion of metals. The samples used in this study are from such a facility in Coventry waste treatment facility, U.K., which has 3 × 40 tonne/hour boilers operating at 17.5 bar. PMID:26727190

  9. The First Association of a Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Death with Culturable Naegleria fowleri in Tap Water from a U.S. Treated Public Drinking Water System

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Jennifer R.; Ratard, Raoult C.; Hill, Vincent R.; Sokol, Theresa; Causey, Jonathan Jake; Yoder, Jonathan S.; Mirani, Gayatri; Mull, Bonnie; Mukerjee, Kimberly A.; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Doucet, Meggie; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Poole, Charla N.; Akingbola, Olugbenga A.; Ritter, Jana; Xiong, Zhenggang; da Silva, Alexandre; Roellig, Dawn; Van Dyke, Russell; Stern, Harlan; Xiao, Lihua; Beach, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Naegleria fowleri is a climate-sensitive, thermophilic ameba found in warm, freshwater lakes and rivers. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is almost universally fatal, occurs when N. fowleri–containing water enters the nose, typically during swimming, and N. fowleri migrates to the brain via the olfactory nerve. In August 2013, a 4-year-old child died of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology in a Louisiana hospital. Methods Clinical and environmental testing and a case investigation were initiated to determine the cause of death and to identify potential exposures. Results Based on testing of CSF and brain specimens, the child was diagnosed with PAM. His only reported water exposure was tap water; in particular, tap water that was used to supply water to a lawn water slide on which the child had played extensively prior to becoming ill. Water samples were collected from both the home and the water distribution system that supplied the home and tested; N. fowleri were identified in water samples from both the home and the water distribution system. Conclusions This case is the first reported PAM death associated with culturable N. fowleri in tap water from a U.S. treated drinking water system. This case occurred in the context of an expanding geographic range for PAM beyond southern tier states with recent case reports from Minnesota, Kansas, and Indiana. This case also highlights the role of adequate disinfection throughout drinking water distribution systems and the importance of maintaining vigilance when operating drinking water systems using source waters with elevated temperatures. PMID:25595746

  10. Experimental, Numerical, and Analytical Slosh Dynamics of Water and Liquid Nitrogen in a Spherical Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, Jedediah Morse

    2016-01-01

    Understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid slosh dynamics is critical to safety and improving performance of space missions when a significant percentage of the spacecraft's mass is a liquid. Computational fluid dynamics simulations can be used to predict the dynamics of slosh, but these programs require extensive validation. Many experimental and numerical studies of water slosh have been conducted. However, slosh data for cryogenic liquids is lacking. Water and cryogenic liquid nitrogen are used in various ground-based tests with a spherical tank to characterize damping, slosh mode frequencies, and slosh forces. A single ring baffle is installed in the tank for some of the tests. Analytical models for slosh modes, slosh forces, and baffle damping are constructed based on prior work. Select experiments are simulated using a commercial CFD software, and the numerical results are compared to the analytical and experimental results for the purposes of validation and methodology-improvement.

  11. Wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry: theory and experimental applications to glucose detection in water.

    PubMed

    Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2011-10-01

    A differential photothermal radiometry method, wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR), has been developed theoretically and experimentally for noninvasive, noncontact biological analyte detection, such as blood glucose monitoring. WM-DPTR features analyte specificity and sensitivity by combining laser excitation by two out-of-phase modulated beams at wavelengths near the peak and the base line of a prominent and isolated mid-IR analyte absorption band (here the carbon-oxygen-carbon bond in the pyran ring of the glucose molecule). A theoretical photothermal model of WM-DPTR signal generation and detection has been developed. Simulation results on water-glucose phantoms with the human blood range (0-300 mg/dl) glucose concentration demonstrated high sensitivity and resolution to meet wide clinical detection requirements. The model has also been validated by experimental data of the glucose-water system obtained using WM-DPTR. PMID:22181185

  12. Nondestructive experimental determination of bimaterial rectangular cantilever spring constants in water

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, David E.; Kim, Dae Jung; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.; Weeks, Brandon L.; Pitchimani, Rajasekar

    2008-08-15

    In order to address the issue of spring constant calibration in viscous fluids such as water, a new method is presented that allows for the experimental calibration of bimaterial cantilever spring constants. This method is based on modeling rectangular cantilever beam bending as a function of changing temperature. The temperature change is accomplished by heating water as it flows around the cantilever beams in an enclosed compartment. The optical static method of detection is used to measure the deflection of cantilever at the free end. Experimentally determined results are compared to Sader's method and to the Thermotune method most commonly used in cantilever calibrations. Results indicate that the new bimaterial thermal expansion method is accurate within 15%-20% of the actual cantilever spring constant, which is comparable to other nondestructive calibration techniques.

  13. Nondestructive experimental determination of bimaterial rectangular cantilever spring constants in water.

    PubMed

    Snow, David E; Weeks, Brandon L; Kim, Dae Jung; Pitchimani, Rajasekar; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J

    2008-08-01

    In order to address the issue of spring constant calibration in viscous fluids such as water, a new method is presented that allows for the experimental calibration of bimaterial cantilever spring constants. This method is based on modeling rectangular cantilever beam bending as a function of changing temperature. The temperature change is accomplished by heating water as it flows around the cantilever beams in an enclosed compartment. The optical static method of detection is used to measure the deflection of cantilever at the free end. Experimentally determined results are compared to Sader's method and to the Thermotune method most commonly used in cantilever calibrations. Results indicate that the new bimaterial thermal expansion method is accurate within 15%-20% of the actual cantilever spring constant, which is comparable to other nondestructive calibration techniques. PMID:19044356

  14. LBE water interaction in sub-critical reactors: First experimental and modelling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampichetti, A.; Agostini, P.; Benamati, G.; Bandini, G.; Pellini, D.; Forgione, N.; Oriolo, F.; Ambrosini, W.

    2008-06-01

    This paper concerns the study of the phenomena involved in the interaction between LBE and pressurised water which could occur in some hypothetical accidents in accelerator driven system type reactors. The LIFUS 5 facility was designed and built at ENEA-Brasimone to reproduce this kind of interaction in a wide range of conditions. The first test of the experimental program was carried out injecting water at 70 bar and 235 °C in a reaction vessel containing LBE at 1 bar and 350 °C. A pressurisation up to 80 bar was observed in the test section during the considered transient. The SIMMER III code was used to simulate the performed test. The calculated data agree in a satisfactory way with the experimental results giving confidence in the possibility to use this code for safety analyses of heavy liquid metal cooled reactors.

  15. Wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry: Theory and experimental applications to glucose detection in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2011-10-01

    A differential photothermal radiometry method, wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR), has been developed theoretically and experimentally for noninvasive, noncontact biological analyte detection, such as blood glucose monitoring. WM-DPTR features analyte specificity and sensitivity by combining laser excitation by two out-of-phase modulated beams at wavelengths near the peak and the base line of a prominent and isolated mid-IR analyte absorption band (here the carbon-oxygen-carbon bond in the pyran ring of the glucose molecule). A theoretical photothermal model of WM-DPTR signal generation and detection has been developed. Simulation results on water-glucose phantoms with the human blood range (0-300 mg/dl) glucose concentration demonstrated high sensitivity and resolution to meet wide clinical detection requirements. The model has also been validated by experimental data of the glucose-water system obtained using WM-DPTR.

  16. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Stratmann, G.; Peter, T.

    2014-09-01

    This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200-273 K). Water activity (aw) at low temperatures (T) is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature-dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids) and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for T < 270 K and T < 260 K, respectively. These measurements show that the temperature trend of aw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high-temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice

  17. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Stratmann, G.; Peter, T.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200-273 K). Water activity (aw) at low temperatures (T) is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids) and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for T<270 K and T<260 K, respectively. These measurements show that the temperature trend of aw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice

  18. Experimental study of the critical mode of steam-water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulyupin, A. N.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of static pressure in the critical mode of steam-water flow from long pipes of diameter 50.2 and 100.1 mm at various distances from their outlet section. The measurements were performed at flow rates and enthalpies of the mixture characteristic of geothermal coolants. It is found that the mixture flow rates obtained experimentally significantly exceed the estimation results obtained using well-known models.

  19. In-situ tuff water migration/heater experiment: experimental plan

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, J.K.

    1980-08-01

    Tuffs on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are currently under investigation as a potential isolation medium for heat-producing nuclear wastes. The National Academy of Sciences has concurred in our identification of the potentially large water content ({le}40 vol %) of tuffs as one of the important issues affecting their suitability for a repository. This Experimental Plan describes an in-situ experiment intended as an initial assessment of water generation/migration in response to a thermal input. The experiment will be conducted in the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff in Tunnel U12g (G-Tunnel) located in the north-central region of the NTS. While the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff is not a potential repository medium, it has physical, thermal, and mechanical properties very similar to those tuffs currently under consideration and is accessible at depth (400 m below the surface) in an existing facility. Other goals of the experiment are to support computer-code and instrumentation development, and to measure in-situ thermal properties. The experimental array consists of a central electrical heater, 1.2 m long x 10.2 cm diameter, surrounded by three holes for measuring water-migration behavior, two holes for measuring temperature profiles, one hole for measuring thermally induced stress in the rock, and one hole perpendicular to the heater to measure displacement with a laser. This Experimental Plan describes the experimental objectives, the technical issues, the site, the experimental array, thermal and thermomechanical modeling results, the instrumentation, the data-acquisition system, posttest characterization, and the organizational details.

  20. A cardiovascular educational intervention for primary care professionals in Spain: positive impact in a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Hermida, Enrique; Pita-Fernandez, Salvador; Palazon-Bru, Antonio; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Pallares-Carratala, Vicente; Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Carratala-Munuera, Concepcion; Lopez-Pineda, Adriana; Navarro, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine general practice data collection can help identify patients at risk of cardiovascular disease. Aim To determine whether a training programme for primary care professionals improves the recording of cardiovascular disease risk factors in electronic health records. Design and setting A quasi-experimental study without random assignment of professionals. This was an educational intervention study, consisting of an online-classroom 1-year training programme, and carried out in the Valencian community in Spain. Method The prevalence rates of recording of cardiovascular factors (recorded every 6 months over a 4-year period) were compared between intervention and control group. Clinical relevance was calculated by absolute risk reduction (ARR), relative risk reduction (RRR), and number of patients needed-to-attend (NNA), to avoid under-recording, with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Linear regression models were used for each of the variables. Results Of the 941 professionals initially registered, 78.1% completed the programme. The ARR ranged from 1.87% (95% CI = 1.79 to 1.94) in the diagnosis of diabetes to 15.27% (95% CI = 15.14 to 15.40) in the recording of basal blood glucose. The NNA ranged from 7 in blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose recording to 54 in the diagnosis of diabetes. The RRR ranged from 26.7% in the diagnosis of diabetes to 177.1% in the recording of the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The rates of change were greater in the intervention group and the differences were significant for recording of cholesterol (P<0.001), basal blood glucose (P<0.001), smoking (P<0.001), alcohol (P<0.001), microalbuminuria (P = 0.001), abdominal circumference (P<0.001), and SCORE (P<0.001). Conclusion The education programme had a beneficial effect at the end of the follow-up that was significant and clinically relevant. PMID:25548314

  1. Experimental characterization of the water transport properties of PEM fuel cells diffusion media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Sole, Joshua D.; Hernandez-Guerrero, Abel; Ellis, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    A full experimental characterization of the liquid water transport properties of Toray TGP-090 paper is carried out in this work. Porosity, capillary pressure curves (capillary pressure-saturation relationships), absolute permeability, and relative permeability are obtained via experimental procedures. Porosity was determined using two methods, both aimed to obtain the solid volume of the network of fibers comprising the carbon paper. Capillary pressure curves were obtained using a gas displacement porosimeter where liquid water is injected using a syringe pump and the capillary pressure is recorded using a differential pressure transducer. Absolute and relative permeability were also measured with an apparatus designed at Virginia Tech. Absolute permeability was calculated at different flow rates using nitrogen. On the other hand, relative permeability was a more complicated task to carry out giving the complexity (two-phase flow condition) of this property. All of the water transport properties of Toray TGP-090 were studied under the effects of wet-proofing (PTFE treatment) and compression. Some observations were that wet-proofing reduces the porosity of the raw material, increases the hydrophobicity (Pc-S curves), and reduces the permeability of the material. Similar effects were observed for compression, where compressed material exhibited trends similar to those of wet-proofing effects. The results presented here will allow a more accurate modeling of PEMFCs, providing an experimentally verified alternative to the assumptions frequently employed.

  2. Modelling and experimental verification of a water alleviation system for the NASP. [National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. James

    1992-01-01

    One possible low speed propulsion system for the National Aerospace Plane is a liquid air cycle engine (LACE). The LACE system uses the heat sink in the liquid hydrogen propellant to liquefy air in a heat exchanger which is then pumped up to high pressure and used as the oxidizer in a hydrogen liquid air rocket. The inlet airstream must be dehumidified or moisture could freeze on the cryogenic heat exchangers and block them. The main objective of this research has been to develop a computer simulation of the cold tube/antifreeze-spray water alleviation system and to verify the model with experimental data. An experimental facility has been built and humid air tests were conducted on a generic heat exchanger to obtain condensing data for code development. The paper describes the experimental setup, outlines the method of calculation used in the code, and presents comparisons of the calculations and measurements. Cause of discrepancies between the model and data are explained.

  3. Simulation and experimental study of rheological properties of CeO2-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loya, Adil; Stair, Jacqueline L.; Ren, Guogang

    2015-10-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles offer great merits over controlling rheological, thermal, chemical and physical properties of solutions. The effectiveness of a nanoparticle to modify the properties of a fluid depends on its diffusive properties with respect to the fluid. In this study, rheological properties of aqueous fluids (i.e. water) were enhanced with the addition of CeO2 nanoparticles. This study was characterized by the outcomes of simulation and experimental results of nanofluids. The movement of nanoparticles in the fluidic media was simulated by a large-scale molecular thermal dynamic program (i.e. LAMMPS). The COMPASS force field was employed with smoothed particle hydrodynamic potential (SPH) and discrete particle dynamics potential (DPD). However, this study develops the understanding of how the rheological properties are affected due to the addition of nanoparticles in a fluid and the way DPD and SPH can be used for accurately estimating the rheological properties with Brownian effect. The rheological results of the simulation were confirmed by the convergence of the stress autocorrelation function, whereas experimental properties were measured using a rheometer. These rheological values of simulation were obtained and agreed within 5 % of the experimental values; they were identified and treated with a number of iterations and experimental tests. The results of the experiment and simulation show that 10 % CeO2 nanoparticles dispersion in water has a viscosity of 2.0-3.3 mPas.

  4. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2011-08-22

    Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

  5. Evaluation of hollow-fiber ultrafiltration primary concentration of pathogens and secondary concentration of viruses from water.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Eric R; Hamilton, Douglas W; See, Mary Jean; Wymer, Larry

    2011-09-01

    Tangential flow hollow-fiber ultrafiltration (HFUF) was evaluated for virus and Cryptosporidium parvum concentration from water. Recovery of viruses at a low filtration rate was found to be significantly greater than at a higher filtration rate, with the recoveries of bacteriophage MS2 at high and low filtration rates shown to be 64.7% and 98.7%, respectively. Poliovirus recoveries from tap water were similar to MS2, with recoveries of 62.9% and 104.5% for high and low filtration rates, respectively. C. parvum, which was only tested at high filtration rates, had an average recovery was 105.1%. In addition to the optimization of the primary concentration technique, this study also compared several secondary concentration procedures. The highest recovery (89.5%) of poliovirus from tap water concentrates was obtained when a beef extract-celite method was used and the virus was eluted from the celite with phosphate buffered saline, pH 9.0. When HFUF primary concentration and the optimal secondary concentration methods were combined, an average recovery of 97.0 ± 35.6% or 89.3 ± 19.3%, depending on spike level, was achieved for poliovirus. This study demonstrated that HFUF primary concentration method is effective at recovering MS2, poliovirus and C. parvum from large volumes of water and that beef extract-celite method is an effective secondary concentration method for the poliovirus tested. PMID:21664379

  6. Experimental dehydration of natural obsidian and estimation of DH2O at low water contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jambon, A.; Zhang, Y.; Stolper, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    Water diffusion experiments were carried out by dehydrating rhyolitic obsidian from Valles Caldera (New Mexico, USA) at 510-980 degrees C. The starting glass wafers contained approximately 0.114 wt% total water, lower than any glasses previously investigated for water diffusion. Weight loss due to dehydration was measured as a function of experiment duration, which permits determination of mean bulk water diffusivity, mean Dw. These diffusivities are in the range of 2.6 to 18 X 10(-14) m2/s and can be fit with the following Arrhenius equation: ln mean Dw (m2/s) = -(25.10 +/- 1.29) - (46,480 +/- 11,400) (J/mol) / RT, except for two replicate runs at 510 degrees C which give mean Dw values much lower than that defined by the above equation. When interpreted according to a model of water speciation in which molecular H2O is the diffusing species with concentration-independent diffusivity while OH units do not contribute to the transport but react to provide H2O, the data (except for the 510 degrees C data) are in agreement with extrapolation from previous results and hence extend the previous data base and provide a test of the applicability of the model to very low water contents. Mean bulk water diffusivities are about two orders of magnitude less than molecular H2O diffusivities because the fraction of molecular H2O out of total water is very small at 0.114 wt% total water and less. The 510 degrees C experimental results can be interpreted as due to slow kinetics of OH to H2O interconversion at low temperatures.

  7. Experimental dehydration of natural obsidian and estimation of DH2O at low water contents.

    PubMed

    Jambon, A; Zhang, Y; Stolper, E M

    1992-01-01

    Water diffusion experiments were carried out by dehydrating rhyolitic obsidian from Valles Caldera (New Mexico, USA) at 510-980 degrees C. The starting glass wafers contained approximately 0.114 wt% total water, lower than any glasses previously investigated for water diffusion. Weight loss due to dehydration was measured as a function of experiment duration, which permits determination of mean bulk water diffusivity, mean Dw. These diffusivities are in the range of 2.6 to 18 X 10(-14) m2/s and can be fit with the following Arrhenius equation: ln mean Dw (m2/s) = -(25.10 +/- 1.29) - (46,480 +/- 11,400) (J/mol) / RT, except for two replicate runs at 510 degrees C which give mean Dw values much lower than that defined by the above equation. When interpreted according to a model of water speciation in which molecular H2O is the diffusing species with concentration-independent diffusivity while OH units do not contribute to the transport but react to provide H2O, the data (except for the 510 degrees C data) are in agreement with extrapolation from previous results and hence extend the previous data base and provide a test of the applicability of the model to very low water contents. Mean bulk water diffusivities are about two orders of magnitude less than molecular H2O diffusivities because the fraction of molecular H2O out of total water is very small at 0.114 wt% total water and less. The 510 degrees C experimental results can be interpreted as due to slow kinetics of OH to H2O interconversion at low temperatures. PMID:11537205

  8. Experimental and Analytical Study of Lead-Bismuth-Water Direct Contact Boiling Two-Phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novitrian; Dostal, Vaclav; Takahashi, Minoru

    The characteristics of lead-bismuth(Pb-Bi)-water boiling two-phase flow were investigated experimentally and analytically using a Pb-Bi-water direct contact boiling two-phase flow loop. Pb-Bi flow rates and void fraction were measured in a vertical circular tube at conditions of system pressure 7MPa, liquid metal temperature 460°C and injected water temperature 220°C. The drift-flux model with the assumption that bubble sizes were dependent on the fluid surface tension and the density ratio of Pb-Bi to steam-water mixture was chosen and modified by the best fit to the measured void fraction. Pb-Bi flow rates were analytically estimated using balance condition between buoyancy force and pressure losses, where the buoyancy force was calculated from void fraction estimated using the modified drift-flux model. The deviation of the analytical results of the flow rates from the experimental ones was less than 10%.

  9. Combustion behavior of single coal-water slurry droplets, Part 1: Experimental techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Metghalchi, M.; Wise, D.

    1991-12-31

    Techniques to produce single droplets of coal-water slurries have been developed in order to study the combustion behavior of the slurries. All stages of slurry combustion are of interest to the present study, however, emphasis will be given to the combustion of the solid agglomerate char which remains upon the termination of the water evaporation and the devolatilization periods. An experimental facility is under construction where combustion of coal-water slurries will be monitored in a variety of furnace temperatures and oxidizing atmospheres. The effect of the initial size of the slurry droplet and the solids loading (coal to water ratio) will be investigated. A drop tube, laminar flow furnace coupled to a near-infrared, ratio pyrometer win be used to monitor temperature-time histories of single particles from ignition to extinction. This paper describes the experimental built-up to this date and presents results obtained by numerical analysis that help understanding the convective and radiating environment in the furnace.

  10. Experimental evidence for a liquid-liquid crossover in deeply cooled confined water.

    PubMed

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-21

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis. PMID:25479506

  11. An Experimental Method for Measuring Water Droplet Impingement Efficiency on Two- and Three-dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Zumwalt, G. W.; Elangonan, R.; Freund, G. A., Jr.; Breer, M.; Whitmer, L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental method was developed to determine the droplet impingement characteristics on 2-D and 3-D bodies. The experimental results provide the essential droplet impingement data required to validate water droplet trajectory codes, which are used in the analysis of aircraft icing. A body, whose water droplet impingement characteristics are required, is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper, and is exposed to an air stream containing a water dye solution spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips, using an automated reflectometer. Models tested include a 4-inch diameter cylinder, a NACA 652015 airfoil section, a MS(1)-0317 supercritical airfoil section, three simulated ice shapes, an axisymmetric inlet and a Boeing 737-300 inlet model. Detailed descriptions of the dye tracer technique, instrumentation, data reduction method and the results obtained are presented. Analytical predictions of collection efficiency characteristics for most test configurations are included for comparison.

  12. Experimental vs. modeled water use in mature Norway spruce (Picea abies) exposed to elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Leuzinger, Sebastian; Bader, Martin K.-F.

    2012-01-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO2 have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behavior is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO2 concentration, which form the core of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we provide first results from a free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment with naturally growing, mature (35 m) Picea abies (L.) (Norway spruce) and compare them to simulations by the DGVM LPJ-GUESS. We monitored sap flow, stem water deficit, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential, and soil moisture in five 35–40 m tall CO2-treated (550 ppm) trees over two seasons. Using LPJ-GUESS, we simulated this experiment using climate data from a nearby weather station. While the model predicted a stable reduction of transpiration of between 9% and 18% (at concentrations of 550–700 ppm atmospheric CO2), the combined evidence from various methods characterizing water use in our experimental trees suggest no changes in response to future CO2 concentrations. The discrepancy between the modeled and the experimental results may be a scaling issue: while dynamic vegetation models correctly predict leaf-level responses, they may not sufficiently account for the processes involved at the canopy and ecosystem scale, which could offset the first-order stomatal response. PMID:23087696

  13. Experimental vs. modeled water use in mature Norway spruce (Picea abies) exposed to elevated CO(2).

    PubMed

    Leuzinger, Sebastian; Bader, Martin K-F

    2012-01-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO(2) have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behavior is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO(2) concentration, which form the core of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we provide first results from a free air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) experiment with naturally growing, mature (35 m) Picea abies (L.) (Norway spruce) and compare them to simulations by the DGVM LPJ-GUESS. We monitored sap flow, stem water deficit, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential, and soil moisture in five 35-40 m tall CO(2)-treated (550 ppm) trees over two seasons. Using LPJ-GUESS, we simulated this experiment using climate data from a nearby weather station. While the model predicted a stable reduction of transpiration of between 9% and 18% (at concentrations of 550-700 ppm atmospheric CO(2)), the combined evidence from various methods characterizing water use in our experimental trees suggest no changes in response to future CO(2) concentrations. The discrepancy between the modeled and the experimental results may be a scaling issue: while dynamic vegetation models correctly predict leaf-level responses, they may not sufficiently account for the processes involved at the canopy and ecosystem scale, which could offset the first-order stomatal response. PMID:23087696

  14. Experimental investigation of added mass effects on a Francis turbine runner in still water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, C. G.; Egusquiza, E.; Escaler, X.; Liang, Q. W.; Avellan, F.

    2006-07-01

    The mechanical design of hydraulic turbines is conditioned by the dynamic response of the runner that is usually estimated by a computational model. Nevertheless, the runner has complex boundary conditions that are difficult to include in the computational model. One of these boundary conditions is the water in which the runner is submerged. The effect of the added mass and damping of water can modify considerably the natural frequencies of the runner. An experimental investigation in a reduced scale model of a turbine runner, using modal analysis, was carried out. Several impact tests with the runner freely suspended in air and in water were done. The response was measured with accelerometers located in different positions of the runner. From the modal analysis, the natural frequencies, damping ratios, and mode-shapes were determined. The same mode-shapes obtained in air were obtained in water but with lower natural frequencies and higher damping ratios in water. The difference in the natural frequencies is shown to be dependant basically on the added mass effect of the water and not on its added damping. This difference also depends on the geometry of the mode, presenting different values for different mode-shapes. Using nondimensional values, the reduction in the natural frequencies can be extrapolated to other Francis runners presenting similar geometrical characteristics.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation of water removal from DMAZ liquid fuel by an adsorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Shahram; Vaferi, Behzad

    2015-07-01

    2-dimethylaminoethylazide (DMAZ) is a new liquid fuel that has made significant progress in bio/mono propellant rocket engines in recent years. Purification of DMAZ fuel by reducing its water content using various adsorbents including zeolites, calcium chloride and nano-particles is experimentally and theoretically investigated. The highest water adsorption of 92.6% from the DMAZ solution is obtained by the CaCl2 adsorbent within 10 min. Four different artificial neural networks (ANN) are examined to correlate an extent of removed water from the DMAZ solution to its affecting parameters. The performed regression analysis indicated that water initial concentration (WIC), adsorbent types, solution temperature, contact time and adsorbent dosage are the most important affecting variables for water sorption from the DMAZ solution. The accomplished statistical analysis demonstrated a multi-layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) with seven hidden neurons and is the most accurate approach for modeling the considered task. The obtained results showed that the proposed MLPNN model could be successfully employed for accurate prediction of an amount of water removal from the DMAZ fuel solution by the adsorption process.

  16. Experimental and numerical simulations of heat transfers between flowing water and a frozen porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Nicolas; Grenier, Christophe; Costard, François

    2015-04-01

    In permafrost-affected regions, hydrological changes due to global warming are still under investigation. But yet, we can already foresee from recent studies that for example, the variability and intensity of surface/subsurface flow are likely to be affected by permafrost degradation. The feedback induced by such changes on permafrost degradation is still not clearly assessed. Of particular interest are lake and river's taliks. A talik is a permanently unfrozen zone that lies below rivers or lakes. They are likely to play a key role in the formerly presented interactions, given that they are the only paths for groundwater flow in permafrost regions. Thus heat transfers on a regional scale are influenced by groundwater circulation. The aim of our study is therefore to investigate the evolution of river's taliks. In addition, they are the only perennial liquid water resources in continuous permafrost environments. The issue associated is to what extent can taliks develop into the future because of climate change and how likely are they to become open taliks, connecting sub-permafrost water with surface water with potentially strong geochemical changes? We developed a multidisciplinary approach coupling field investigation, experimental studies in a cold room and numerical modeling. The field investigation concerns Central Yakutia, Siberia, where we have installed instruments to monitor ground temperatures and water pressure in a small river's talik between two thermokarst lakes. We present here the results corresponding to the cold room experimental work, associating numerical modeling and laboratory experiments in order to look after the main parameters controlling river's talik installation and validate our numerical simulation approach. In a cold room at GEOPS, where a metric scale channel is filled with a porous medium (sand or silty-clay), we are able to control air, water and permafrost initial temperature, but also water flow. At initial time, the "river

  17. Automation of water bacteriological analysis: running test of an experimental prototype.

    PubMed Central

    Trinel, P A; Hanoune, N; Leclerc, H

    1980-01-01

    The experimental apparatus described enables continuous and automatic bacteriological water examination. It ensures the analysis and detection of Escherichia coli by incubation of the water samples and then detection of glutamic acid decarboxylase in coils according to the Technicon principles. The analysis is rapid: it is performed within 13 h with a sensitivity of better than 1 bacterium/100 ml, and 120 samples of 100 ml of water are examined in 24 h. Laboratory experiments and field testing showed that this prototype ensured a specific and sensitive analysis. They also provided information about the frequency of maintenance necessary to retain its efficiency. This device would allow, under the same conditions, the examination of liquid food products. Images PMID:6994648

  18. Experimental study on bi-phase flow Air-Oil in Water Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, Davide; Poesio, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    Bi-phase slug flow oil-in-water emulsion [5%-20%] and air through a horizontal pipe (inner diameter 22mm) is experimentally studied. A test with water and air has been performed as comparison. First we create and analyze the flow pattern map to identify slug flow liquid and air inlet conditions. Flow maps are similar for all the used liquid. A video analysis procedure using an high speed camera has been created to obtain all the characteristics of unit slugs: slug velocity, slug length, bubble velocity, bubbles length and slug frequency. We compare translational velocity and frequency with models finding a good agreement. We calculate the pdfs of the lengths to find the correlations between mean values and STD on different air and liquid superficial velocities. We also perform pressure measurements along the pipe. We conclude that the percentage of oil-in- water has no influence on results in terms of velocity, lengths, frequency and pressure drop.

  19. Contaminated water delivery as a simple and effective method of experimental Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Hope; Pham, Oanh H.; Benoun, Joseph M.; Ravesloot-Chávez, Marietta M.; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In most infectious disease models, it is assumed that gavage needle infection is the most reliable means of pathogen delivery to the gastrointestinal tract. However, this methodology can cause esophageal tearing and induces stress in experimental animals, both of which have the potential to impact early infection and the subsequent immune response. Materials and Methods C57BL/6 mice were orally infected with virulent Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344 either by intragastric gavage preceded by sodium bicarbonate, or by contamination of drinking water. Results We demonstrate that water contamination delivery of Salmonella is equivalent to gavage inoculation in providing a consistent model of infection. Furthermore, exposure of mice to contaminated drinking water for as little as 4 hours allowed maximal mucosal and systemic infection, suggesting an abbreviated window exists for natural intestinal entry. Conclusions Together, these data question the need for gavage delivery for infection with oral pathogens. PMID:26439708

  20. Pressurized water extraction of isoflavones by experimental design from soybean flour and Soybean Protein Isolate.

    PubMed

    Moras, Benjamin; Rey, Stéphane; Vilarem, Gérard; Pontalier, Pierre-Yves

    2017-01-01

    A Doehlert experimental design was conducted and surface response methodology was used to determine the effect of temperature, contact time and solid liquid ratio on isoflavone extraction from soybean flour or Soybean Protein Isolate in pressurized water system. The optimal conditions conducted gave an extraction yield of 85% from soybean flour. For Soybean Protein Isolate compared to soybean flour, the isoflavone extraction yield is 61%. This difference could be explained by higher aglycon content, while aglycon appears to be the least extracted isoflavone by pressurized water. The solid liquid ratio in the ASE cell was the overriding factor in obtaining high yields with both soybean products, while temperature has less influence. A high temperature causes conversion of the malonyls-glucosides and glucosides isoflavone derivatives into glucosides or aglycons forms. pressurized water extraction showed a high solubilization of protein material up to 95% of inserted Soybean Protein Isolate. PMID:27507441

  1. Experimental determination of solvent-water partition coefficients and Abraham parameters for munition constituents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuzhen; Kuo, Dave T F; Allen, Herbert E; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-10-01

    There is concern about the environmental fate and effects of munition constituents (MCs). Polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs) that employ Abraham solute parameters can aid in evaluating the risk of MCs to the environment. However, poor predictions using pp-LFERs and ABSOLV estimated Abraham solute parameters are found for some key physico-chemical properties. In this work, the Abraham solute parameters are determined using experimental partition coefficients in various solvent-water systems. The compounds investigated include hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5- nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 4-nitroanisole. The solvents in the solvent-water systems are hexane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, octanol, and toluene. The only available reported solvent-water partition coefficients are for octanol-water for some of the investigated compounds and they are in good agreement with the experimental measurements from this study. Solvent-water partition coefficients fitted using experimentally derived solute parameters from this study have significantly smaller root mean square errors (RMSE = 0.38) than predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters (RMSE = 3.56) for the investigated compounds. Additionally, the predictions for various physico-chemical properties using the experimentally derived solute parameters agree with available literature reported values with prediction errors within 0.79 log units except for water solubility of RDX and HMX with errors of 1.48 and 2.16 log units respectively. However, predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters have larger prediction errors of up to 7.68 log units. This large discrepancy is probably due to the missing R2NNO2

  2. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-04-21

    also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were $11.9 million.

  3. Science in an Integrated Primary School Project on Water: Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Describes water-related activities in an elementary school science project. These activities focus on electric generators, rainfall, erosion, floating, water conservation, and other areas. Brief comments on developing such a project are included. (JN)

  4. COMPARISON OF FILTRATION METHODS FOR PRIMARY RECOVERY OF CRYPTOSPORIIDUM PARVUM FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waterborne disease outbreaks from contaminated drinking water have been linked to the protozoan parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum. To improve monitoring for this agent, the USEPA developed Method 1622 for isolation and detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Method 1622 i...

  5. Experimental Studies on the Measurement of Oil-water Two-phase Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Longbo; Zhang, Hongjian; Hua, Yuefang; Zhou, Hongliang

    2007-06-01

    Oil-water two-phase flow measurement was investigated with a Venturi meter and double-U Coriolis meter in this work. Based on the Venturi differential pressure and the quality of two-phase flow, a model for measuring oil-water mass flow rate was developed, in which fluid asymmetry of oil-water two-phase flow was considered. However, measuring the quality of two-phase flow on-line is rather difficult at present. Though double-U Coriolis meter can provide accurate measurement of two-phase flow, it can not provide desired respective mass flow rate. Therefore, a double-parameter measurement method with Venturi meter and double-U Coriolis meter is proposed. According to the flow rate requirement of Venturi, a new flow regime identification method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) has been developed for the separated flow and the dispersed flow. With the Venturi model developed in this paper and mass flow rate of oil-water mixture measured with double-U Coriolis meter, mixture mass flow rate, oil mass flow rate and water mass flow rate could be obtained by the correlation. Experiments of flow rate measurement of oil-water two-phase flow were carried out in the horizontal tube with 25mm inner diameter. The water fraction range is from 5% to 95%. Experimental results showed that the flow regime could be identified well with SVM, and the relative error of the total mass flow rate and respective mass flow rate of oil-water two-phase flow was less than ±1.5% and ±10%, respectively.

  6. Computational and experimental platform for understanding and optimizing water flux and salt rejection in nanoporous membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan B.

    2010-09-01

    Affordable clean water is both a global and a national security issue as lack of it can cause death, disease, and international tension. Furthermore, efficient water filtration reduces the demand for energy, another national issue. The best current solution to clean water lies in reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that remove salts from water with applied pressure, but widely used polymeric membrane technology is energy intensive and produces water depleted in useful electrolytes. Furthermore incremental improvements, based on engineering solutions rather than new materials, have yielded only modest gains in performance over the last 25 years. We have pursued a creative and innovative new approach to membrane design and development for cheap desalination membranes by approaching the problem at the molecular level of pore design. Our inspiration comes from natural biological channels, which permit faster water transport than current reverse osmosis membranes and selectively pass healthy ions. Aiming for an order-of-magnitude improvement over mature polymer technology carries significant inherent risks. The success of our fundamental research effort lies in our exploiting, extending, and integrating recent advances by our team in theory, modeling, nano-fabrication and platform development. A combined theoretical and experimental platform has been developed to understand the interplay between water flux and ion rejection in precisely-defined nano-channels. Our innovative functionalization of solid state nanoporous membranes with organic protein-mimetic polymers achieves 3-fold improvement in water flux over commercial RO membranes and has yielded a pending patent and industrial interest. Our success has generated useful contributions to energy storage, nanoscience, and membrane technology research and development important for national health and prosperity.

  7. Thirty-Month Quasi-Experimental Evaluation Follow-Up of a National Primary School HIV Intervention in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary

    2010-01-01

    School-based programmes to combat the spread of HIV have been demonstrated to be effective over the short-term (i.e. 6-24 months), but few studies have addressed the sustainability of such interventions. Primary School Action for Better Health (PSABH) is an intervention delivered in upper primary-school grades in Kenya using regular classroom…

  8. 75 FR 40925 - National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Revisions to the Total Coliform Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... Environmental Technology Verification FR Federal Register GW Ground Water GWR Ground Water Rule GWS Ground Water..., 68 FR 42908, July 18, 2003). The purpose of the review was to identify new health risk assessments... Review 1 determination published in July 2003 (USEPA 2003, 68 FR 42908, July 18, 2003), EPA stated...

  9. Increased expression of host iron-binding proteins precedes iron accumulation and calcification of primary lung lesions in experimental tuberculosis in the guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Basaraba, Randall J.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Eschelbach, Ellie K.; Reisenhauer, Claire; Tolnay, Airn E.; C.Taraba, Lauren; Shanley, Crystal A.; Smith, Erin A.; Bedwell, Cathy L.; Chlipala, Elizabeth A.; Orme, Ian M.

    2008-01-01

    The growth and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis depends on its ability to scavenge host iron, an essential and limited micronutrient in vivo. In this study we show that ferric iron accumulates both intra- and extra-cellularly in the primary lung lesions of guinea pigs aerosol-infected with the H37Rv strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Iron accumulated within macrophages at the periphery of the primary granulomatous lesions while extra-cellular ferric iron was concentrated in areas of lesion necrosis. Accumulation of iron within primary lesions was preceded by an increase in expression of heavy chain (H) ferritin, lactoferrin and receptors for transferrin, primarily by macrophages and granulocytes. The increased expression of intra-cellular H ferritin and extra-cellular lactoferrin, more so than transferrin receptor, paralleled the development of necrosis within primary lesions. The deposition of extra-cellular ferric iron within necrotic foci coincided with the accumulation of calcium and phosphorus and other cations in the form of dystrophic calcification. Primary lung lesions from guinea pigs vaccinated with Mycobactrium bovis BCG prior to experimental infection, had reduced iron accumulation as well as H ferritin, lactoferrin and transferrin receptor expression. The amelioration of primary lesion necrosis and dystrophic calcification by BCG vaccination was coincident with the lack of extra-cellular ferric iron and lactoferrin accumulation. These data demonstrate that BCG vaccination ameliorates primary lesion necrosis, dystrophic mineralization and iron accumulation, in part by down-regulating the expression of macrophage H ferritin, lactoferrin and transferrin receptors, in vivo. PMID:17942369

  10. Experimental and predicted cavitation performance of an 80.6 deg helical inducer in high temperature water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovich, G.

    1972-01-01

    The cavitating performance of a stainless steel 80.6 degree flat-plate helical inducer was investigated in water over a range of liquid temperatures and flow coefficients. A semi-empirical prediction method was used to compare predicted values of required net positive suction head in water with experimental values obtained in water. Good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental data in water. The required net positive suction head in water decreased with increasing temperature and increased with flow coefficient, similar to that observed for a like inducer in liquid hydrogen.

  11. Experimental study of the fragmentation and quench behavior of corium melts in water

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.K.; Blomquist, C.A.; Spencer, B.W.; McUmber, L.M.; Schneider, J.P.; Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of molten core materials with water has been investigated for the pour stream mixing mode. This interaction plays a crucial role during the later stages of in-vessel core melt progression inside a light water reactor such as during the TMI-2 accident. The key issues which arise during the molten core relocation include: (1) the thermal attack and possible damage to the RPV lower head from the impinging molten fuel stream and/or the debris bed, (2) the molten fuel relocation pathways including the effects of redistribution due to core support structure and the reactor lower internals, (3) the quench rate of the molten fuel through the water in the lower plasma, (4) the steam generation and hydrogen generation during the interaction, (5) the transient pressurization of the primary system, and (6) the possibility of a steam explosion. In order to understand these issues, a series of six experiments (designated CCM-1 through -6) was performed in which molten corium passed through a deep pool of water in a long, slender pour stream mode. Results discussed include the transient temperatures and pressures, the rate and magnitude of steam/hydrogen generation, and the posttest debris characteristics. 9 refs., 29 figs.

  12. Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Redalje, Donald G.; Lohrenz, Stevern E.

    2001-02-12

    In this project we determined primary production and optical variability in the shelf and slope waters off of Cape Hatteras, N.C. These processes were addressed in conjunction with other Ocean Margins Program investigators, during the Spring Transition period and during Summer. We found that there were significant differences in measured parameters between Spring and Summer, enabling us to develop seasonally specific carbon production and ecosystem models as well as seasonal and regional algorithm improvements for use in remote sensing applications.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. One of the most critical issues for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. The establishment of man on the moon will require power from greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are extremely we11 suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), Boron Carbide, and others. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to remove the potential for radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. MSFC has developed the experience and fac necessary to do this evaluation in the Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  14. A green roof experimental site in the Mediterranean climate: the storm water quality issue.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, Ilaria; Palla, Anna; Lanza, Luca G; La Barbera, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Since 2007, the University of Genoa has been carrying out a monitoring programme to investigate the hydrologic response of green roofs in the Mediterranean climate by installing a green roof experimental site. In order to assess the influence of green roofs on the storm water runoff quality, water chemistry data have been included in the monitoring programme since 2010, providing rainfall and outflow data. For atmospheric source, the bulk deposition is collected to evaluate the role of the overall atmospheric deposition in storm water runoff quality. For subsurface outflow, a maximum of 24 composite samples are taken on an event basis, thus aiming at a full characterization of the outflow hydrograph. Water chemistry data reveal that the pollutant loads associated with green roof outflow is low; in particular, solids and metal concentrations are lower than values generally observed in storm water runoff from traditional rooftops. The concentration values of chemical oxygen demand, total dissolved solids, Fe, Ca and K measured in the subsurface outflow are significantly higher than those observed in the bulk deposition (p < 0.05). With respect to the atmospheric deposition, the green roof behaviour as a sink/source of pollutants is investigated based on both concentration and mass. PMID:24056443

  15. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Bull, R.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increase in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. The authors suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Spectral changes in conifers subjected to air pollution and water stress: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of leaf anatomy, moisture and pigment content, and number of leaf layers on spectral reflectance in healthy, pollution-stressed, and water-stressed conifer needles were examined experimentally. Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron gigantea) were exposed to ozone and acid mist treatments in fumigation chambers; red pine (Pinus resinosa) needles were artificially dried. Infrared reflectance from stacked needles rose with free water loss. In an air-drying experiment, cell volume reductions induced by loss of turgor caused near-infrared reflectance (TM band 4) to drop after most free water was lost. Under acid mist fumigation, stunting of tissue development similarly reduced band 4 reflectance. Both artificial drying and pollutant fumigation caused a blue shift of the red edge of spectral reflectance curves in conifers, attributable to chlorophyll denaturation. Thematic mapper band ratio 4/3 fell and 5/4 rose with increasing pollution stress on artificial drying. Loss of water by air-drying, freeze-drying, or oven-drying enhanced spectral features, due in part to greater scattering and reduced water absorption. Grinding of the leaf tissue further enhanced the spectral features by increasing reflecting surfaces and path length. In a leaf-stacking experiment, an asymptote in visible and infrared reflectance was reached at 7-8 needle layers of red pine.

  17. Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, Evelyn; Craddick, William G; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Wendt, Robert L; Woodbury, Professor Keith A.

    2007-09-01

    In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program

  18. Experimental reconstruction of three-dimensional hydrodynamic loading in water entry problems through particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalalisendi, Mohammad; Shams, Adel; Panciroli, Riccardo; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-02-01

    Predicting the hydrodynamic loading during water impact is of fundamental importance for the design of offshore and aerospace structures. Here, we experimentally characterize the 3D hydrodynamic loading on a rigid wedge vertically impacting a quiescent water surface. Planar particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field on several planes, along the width and the length of the impacting wedge. Such data are ultimately utilized to estimate the 3D velocity field in the whole fluid domain, where the pressure field is reconstructed from the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Experimental results confirm that the velocity field is nearly 2D at the mid-span of the wedge, while the axial velocity along the length of the wedge becomes significant in the proximity of the edges. The variation of the fluid flow along the length of the wedge regulates the hydrodynamic loading experienced during the impact. Specifically, the hydrodynamic loading is maximized at the mid-span of the wedge and considerably decreases toward the edges. The method proposed in this study can find application in several areas of experimental fluid mechanics, where the analysis of unsteady 3D fluid-structure interactions is of interest.

  19. Experimental oxygen isotope fractionation between siderite-water and phosphoric acid liberated CO2-siderite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carothers, W.W.; Adami, L.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium fractionation of O isotopes between synthetic siderite and water has been measured at temperatures ranging from 33?? to 197??C. The fractionation between siderite and water over this temperature range can be represented by the equation: 103 ln ?? = 3.13 ?? 106T-2 - 3.50. Comparison between the experimental and theoretical fractionations is favorable only at approximately 200??C; at lower temperatures, they generally differ by up to 2 permil. Siderite was prepared by the slow addition of ferrous chloride solutions to sodium bicarbonate solutions at the experimental temperatures. It was also used to determine the O isotope fractionation factors between phosphoric acid liberated CO2 and siderite. The fractionation factors for this pair at 25?? and 50??C are 1.01175 and 1.01075, respectively. Preliminary results of the measured C isotope fractionation between siderite and Co2 also indicate C isotopic equilibrium during precipitation of siderite. The measured distribution of 13C between siderite and CO2 coincides with the theoretical values only at about 120??C. Experimental and theoretical C fractionations differ up to 3 permil at higher and lower temperatures. ?? 1988.

  20. Experimental and numerical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and pollution interactions under tidal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Bockelmann-Evans, Bettina; Schaefer, Florian; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Nanou-Giannarou, Aikaterini; Stamou, Anastasios; Falconer, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Surface water and groundwater are integral components of the hydrologic continuum and the interaction between them affects both their quantity and quality. However, surface water and groundwater are often considered as two separate systems and are analysed independently. This separation is partly due to the different time scales, which apply in surface water and groundwater flows and partly due to the difficulties in measuring and modelling their interactions (Winter et al., 1998). Coastal areas in particular are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes. Accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands, for example, requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades a large number of mathematical models and field methods have been developed in order to quantify the interaction between groundwater and hydraulically connected surface water bodies. Field studies may provide the best data (Hughes, 1995) but are usually expensive and involve too many parameters. In addition, the interpretation of field measurements and linking with modelling tools often proves to be difficult. In contrast, experimental studies are less expensive and provide controlled data. However, experimental studies of surface water-groundwater interaction are less frequently encountered in the literature than filed studies (e.g. Ebrahimi et al., 2007; Kuan et al., 2012; Sparks et al., 2013). To this end, an experimental model has been constructed at the Hyder Hydraulics Laboratory at Cardiff University to enable measurements to be made of groundwater transport through a sand embankment between a tidal water body such as an estuary and a non-tidal water body such as a wetland. The transport behaviour of a conservative tracer was studied for a constant water level on the wetland side of the embankment, while running a

  1. Experimental investigation of Hover flowfields in water at the McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saripalli, K. R.; Kroutil, J. C.; Vanhorn, J. R.

    1987-06-01

    A new experimental facility, the Hover Research Facility (HRF), is designed to study the flowfields generated by hovering vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft and helicopters. Water is used as the working medium because of its inherent advantages in flow visualization and laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) measurements. The applications of the Hover Research Facility include: (1) experimental investigation of twin-jet impingement flow with application to VTOL aircraft; (2) visualization of the flowfield around a fully contoured, model supersonic fighter/attack short takeoff and vertical landing (STOVL) aircraft; and (3) performance testing of a No Tail Rotor (NOTAR) helicopter in hover mode by use of a scale model. Flow visualization and quantitative LDV data on these experiments are presented.

  2. Experimental study of steam condensation on water in countercurrent flow in presence of inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Althof, J.

    1984-08-01

    Experimental results of investigating steam condensation on water in the presence of (noncondensable) inert gases at low temperatures and pressures relevant to open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems are reported. Seven different condenser configurations were tested. The experimental data are correlated using a liquid flow fraction and a vent fraction to yield simple relationships of condenser performance over a wide range of test conditions. Performance maps and envelopes are provided for evaluating the relative merits of tested configurations. The height of transfer unit (HTU) for condensation ranges from 0.2 to 0.3 m among the various condenser geometries. Also reported are the pressure-loss coefficients for all the tested geometries.

  3. Water permeability of primary mouse keratinocyte cultures grown at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cumpstone, M.B.; Kennedy, A.H.; Harmon, C.S.; Potts, R.O.

    1989-04-01

    In order to study the development of the epidermal permeability barrier in vitro, tritiated water (HTO) flux was measured across murine keratinocytes cultured at the air-liquid interface. Using a micro-diffusion technique, it was shown that air-liquid cultures form areas where the water diffusion is comparable to that of intact neonatal mouse skin. When water permeability is measured over a large area of the culture surface, however, significantly higher flux is obtained. These results show that under the culture conditions used, areas of water barrier comparable to intact neonatal mouse skin coexist with regions of less complete barrier formation.

  4. Preliminary results of an experimental study of the interactions of basalt glass and a water vapor atmosphere: Implications for weathering on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazer, J. J.; Bates, J. K.; Bradley, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    Models of weathering processes on the surface of Mars invoke hydrothermal alteration as the primary mechanism responsible for clay formation. Previous experimental studies of basalt glass interactions with water under hydrothermal conditions demonstrate that phyllosilicates and zeolites are the primary alteration minerals. Gas-solid weathering is thought to be less thermodynamically favorable and relatively unimportant, however, the experimental alteration of basalt glass under vapor ion conditions (large SA/V) can result in the formation of clay minerals, zeolites, and hydrated calcium silicates. We have undertaken a study of the reacted layers formed on basalt glasses experimentally altered under vapor hydration conditions to resolve this issue. High SA/V ratios promote reaction product buildup in solution and promote alteration mineral formation. It was previously shown that these reaction conditions promote weathering processes similar to those found in nature for tektite glasses, rhyolitic glasses, and basalt glasses. The hydration of basalt glass is described for 100 percent relative humidity experiments at temperatures of 150, 175, and 200 C for up to 400 days. Preliminary characterization of the alteration layers with analytical electron and scanning microscopy suggest that the reaction mechanism includes precipitation of a smectite clay on the outermost surface of the glass. Between the clay and the unreacted glass is an amorphous gel-like phase (palagonite). Our results provide an experimental basis for proposing that basalt glass interactions with vapor atmospheres can be an important source of clay minerals.

  5. Summary of experimental data for critical arrays of water moderated Fast Test Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.; Mincey, J.F.; Primm, R.T. III

    1981-05-01

    A research program, funded by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was initiated at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to acquire experimental data on heterogeneous water moderated arrays of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins. The objective of this program is to provide critical experiment data for validating calculational techniques used in criticality assessments of reprocessing equipment containing FTR-type fuels. Consequently, the experiments were designed to permit accurate definition in Monte Carlo computer codes currently used in these assessments. Square and triangular pitched lattices of fuel have been constructed under a variety of conditions covering the range from undermoderated to overmoderated arrays. Experiments were conducted composed of arrays which were water reflected, partially concrete reflected, and arrays with interspersed solid neutron absorbers. The absorbers utilized were Boral, and cadmium plates and gadolinium cylindrical rods. Data from non-CFRP sponsored subcritical experiments (previously performed at Hanford) also are included.

  6. Project plan for the decontamination and decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.

    1989-12-01

    In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A modern vs. Permian black shale - the hydrography, primary productivity, and water-column chemistry of deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Perkins, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    The sediment currently accumulating in the Cariaco Basin, on the continental shelf of Venezuela, has an elevated organic-carbon content of approximately 5%; is accumulating under O2-depleted bottom-water conditions (SO42- reduction); is composed dominantly of foraminiferal calcite, diatomaceous silica, clay, and silt; and is dark greenish gray in color. Upon lithification, it will become a black shale. Recent studies have established the hydrography of the basin and the level of primary productivity and bottom-water redox conditions. These properties are used to model accumulation rates of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn on the seafloor. The model rates agree closely with measured rates for the uppermost surface sediment.The model is applied to the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation, a phosphate deposit of Permian age in the northwest United States. It too has all of the requisite properties of a black shale. Although the deposit is a world-class phosphorite, it is composed mostly of phosphatic mudstone and siltstone, chert, limestone, and dolomite. It has organic-carbon concentrations of up to 15%, is strongly enriched in several trace elements above a terrigenous contribution and is black. The trace-element accumulation defines a mean primary productivity in the photic zone of the Phosphoria Basin as moderate, at 500 g m-2 year-1 organic carbon, comparable to primary productivity in the Cariaco Basin. The source of nutrient-enriched water that was imported into the Phosphoria Basin, upwelled into the photic zone, and supported primary productivity was an O2 minimum zone of the open ocean. The depth range over which the water was imported would have been between approximately 100 and 600 m. The mean residence time of bottom water in the basin was approximately 4 years vs. 100 years in the Cariaco Basin. The bottom water was O2 depleted, but it was denitrifying, or NO3- reducing, rather than SO42- reducing. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  9. Experimental evaluation of sorptive removal of fluoride from drinking water using iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebede, Beekam; Beyene, Abebe; Fufa, Fekadu; Megersa, Moa; Behm, Michael

    2016-03-01

    High concentrations of fluoride in drinking water is a public health concern globally and of critical importance in the Rift Valley region. As a low-cost water treatment option, the defluoridation capacity of locally available iron ore was investigated. Residence time, pH, agitation rate, particle size of the adsorbent, sorbent dose, initial fluoride concentration and the effect of co-existing anions were assessed. The sorption kinetics was found to follow pseudo-first-order rate and the experimental equilibrium sorption data fitted reasonably well to the Freundlich model. The sorption capacity of iron ore for fluoride was 1.72 mg/g and the equilibrium was attained after 120 min at the optimum pH of 6. The sorption study was also carried out at natural pH conditions using natural ground water samples and the fluoride level was reduced from 14.22 to 1.17 mg/L (below the WHO maximum permissible limit). Overall, we concluded that iron ore can be used in water treatment for fluoride removal in the Rift Valley region and beyond.

  10. Experimental and analytical study of condensation of ammonia-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Kuru, W.C.; Chen, F.C.; Domingo, N.; HuangFu, E.P.

    1997-06-01

    The need for more energy efficient power generation and recent environmental issues of CFCs prompted the development of combined steam and Kalina cycle power systems, and advanced ammonia/water absorption heat pumps. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, a theoretical analysis was carried for the condensation of ammonia/water mixtures on a vertical tube. A set of equations was formulated and a calculation algorithm was developed to predict the local rate of heat and mass fluxes for binary ammonia-water systems. The predicted rate of condensation was compared with the experimental data obtained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for a mixture of 90% ammonia and 10% water. The role of diffusion in simultaneous heat and mass transfer associated with condensation was analyzed by comparing the results from three limiting cases, which include equilibrium conditions, and liquid-phase diffusion of finite and infinite values. The results showed that the vapor-phase diffusion is a controlling mechanism.

  11. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between molten aluminum and water

    SciTech Connect

    Farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    The possibility of rapid physical and chemical aluminum/water interactions during a core melt accident in a noncommercial reactor (e.g., HFIR, ATR) has resulted in extensive research to determine the mechanism by which these interactions occur and propagate on an explosive time scale. These events have been reported in nuclear testing facilities, i.e., during SPERT 1D experiment, and also in aluminum casting industries. Although rapid chemical reactions between molten aluminum and water have been subject of many studies, very few reliable measurements of the extent of the chemical reactions have thus far been made. We have modified an existing 1-D shock tube facility to perform experiments in order to determine the extent of the explosive thermal/chemical interactions between molton aluminum and water by measuring important physical quantities such as the maximum dynamic pressure and the amount of the generated hydrogen. Experimental results show that transient pressures greater than 69 MPa with a rise time of less than 125 {mu}sec can occur as the result of the chemical reaction of 4.2 grams of molton aluminum (approximately 15% of the total mass of the fuel of 28 grams) at 980 C with room temperature water.

  12. Theoretical and experimental investigation of the interactions between [emim]Ac and water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhen-Dong; Chi, Zhen; Gu, Wen-Xiu; Gu, Sheng-Ming; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2012-05-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, atom in molecules (AIM) theory, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis and infrared (IR) spectroscopy were performed to investigate the interactions between water molecules and ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([emim]Ac). It was found that [emim]Ac interacts with water molecules mainly via H-bonds, and the anionic part of [emim]Ac plays a major role in the interaction with H2O. The energies of H-bonds were estimated from spectral shifts of hydroxy antisymmetric stretching vibration. Moreover, the experimental results also indicated that hydroxy of water mainly interacts with the COO- of [emim]Ac. Further studies indicated that the intensity of hydroxy stretching vibrations tend to be stronger with the increase of the concentration of water. In addition, the frequency of hydroxy stretching vibrations showed clearly red-shift, and the COO- vibrational frequency gradually shifted to the lower wavenumber region, which were indicative of extended hydrogen bonded network.

  13. Experimental evidence for the formation of liquid saline water on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Erik; Martínez, Germán M; Elliott, Harvey M; Rennó, Nilton O

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for deliquescence of perchlorate salts has been discovered in the Martian polar region while possible brine flows have been observed in the equatorial region. This appears to contradict the idea that bulk deliquescence is too slow to occur during the short periods of the Martian diurnal cycle during which conditions are favorable for it. We conduct laboratory experiments to study the formation of liquid brines at Mars environmental conditions. We find that when water vapor is the only source of water, bulk deliquescence of perchlorates is not rapid enough to occur during the short periods of the day during which the temperature is above the salts' eutectic value, and the humidity is above the salts' deliquescence value. However, when the salts are in contact with water ice, liquid brine forms in minutes, indicating that aqueous solutions could form temporarily where salts and ice coexist on the Martian surface and in the shallow subsurface. Key Points The formation of brines at Martian conditions was studied experimentally Bulk deliquescence from water vapor is too slow to occur diurnally on Mars Brines form in minutes when salts are placed in direct contact with ice PMID:25821267

  14. Aboveground net primary production responses to water availability in the Chihuhuan Desert: importance of legacy effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In arid ecosystems, current year precipitation explains a small proportion of annual aboveground net primary production (ANPP). Precipitation that occurred in previous years may be responsible for the observed difference between actual and expected ANPP, a concept that we called legacy. Thus, previo...

  15. Integrated economic and experimental framework for screening of primary recovery technologies for high cell density CHO cultures

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Daria; Stonier, Adam; Pain, David; Titchener‐Hooker, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increases in mammalian cell culture titres and densities have placed significant demands on primary recovery operation performance. This article presents a methodology which aims to screen rapidly and evaluate primary recovery technologies for their scope for technically feasible and cost‐effective operation in the context of high cell density mammalian cell cultures. It was applied to assess the performance of current (centrifugation and depth filtration options) and alternative (tangential flow filtration (TFF)) primary recovery strategies. Cell culture test materials (CCTM) were generated to simulate the most demanding cell culture conditions selected as a screening challenge for the technologies. The performance of these technology options was assessed using lab scale and ultra scale‐down (USD) mimics requiring 25–110mL volumes for centrifugation and depth filtration and TFF screening experiments respectively. A centrifugation and depth filtration combination as well as both of the alternative technologies met the performance selection criteria. A detailed process economics evaluation was carried out at three scales of manufacturing (2,000L, 10,000L, 20,000L), where alternative primary recovery options were shown to potentially provide a more cost‐effective primary recovery process in the future. This assessment process and the study results can aid technology selection to identify the most effective option for a specific scenario. PMID:27067803

  16. Integrated economic and experimental framework for screening of primary recovery technologies for high cell density CHO cultures.

    PubMed

    Popova, Daria; Stonier, Adam; Pain, David; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J; Farid, Suzanne S

    2016-07-01

    Increases in mammalian cell culture titres and densities have placed significant demands on primary recovery operation performance. This article presents a methodology which aims to screen rapidly and evaluate primary recovery technologies for their scope for technically feasible and cost-effective operation in the context of high cell density mammalian cell cultures. It was applied to assess the performance of current (centrifugation and depth filtration options) and alternative (tangential flow filtration (TFF)) primary recovery strategies. Cell culture test materials (CCTM) were generated to simulate the most demanding cell culture conditions selected as a screening challenge for the technologies. The performance of these technology options was assessed using lab scale and ultra scale-down (USD) mimics requiring 25-110mL volumes for centrifugation and depth filtration and TFF screening experiments respectively. A centrifugation and depth filtration combination as well as both of the alternative technologies met the performance selection criteria. A detailed process economics evaluation was carried out at three scales of manufacturing (2,000L, 10,000L, 20,000L), where alternative primary recovery options were shown to potentially provide a more cost-effective primary recovery process in the future. This assessment process and the study results can aid technology selection to identify the most effective option for a specific scenario. PMID:27067803

  17. Water contents of Roberts Victor xenolithic eclogites: primary and metasomatic controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jin-Xiang; Li, Pei; Griffin, William L.; Xia, Qun-Ke; Gréau, Yoann; Pearson, Norman J.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.

    2014-12-01

    A suite of eclogites from the Roberts Victor kimberlite has been extensively characterized in terms of petrology and geochemical compositions (Gréau et al. in Geochim Cosmochim Acta 75(22):6927-6954, 2011; Huang et al. in Lithos 142-143:161-181, 2012a). In the present study, the water contents of eclogitic garnet and omphacite were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. Garnet does not contain measureable OH in any sample. The water content of omphacite in the studied eclogites ranges from 211 to 1,496 ppm. Mantle metasomatism has modified the water content of some of the eclogites, while others retain water contents characteristic of their original environment. The OH contents of the metasomatized eclogites may be mainly controlled by the H2O fugacity and mineral compositions. The OH contents of the non-metasomatized samples are interpreted to be more sensitive to their mantle equilibration temperature, pressure, and the local fugacities of H2O and O2. The calculated water content of the metasomatic medium is similar to that of carbonatitic-kimberlitic melts/fluids. Eclogites contain more water than peridotites recorded in the literature (341 ± 161 vs 122 ± 54 ppm) and represent an important water reservoir in the lithospheric mantle wherever they occur. This is an important parameter to be considered in the interpretation of mantle processes and geophysical data such as seismic wave speeds and electrical conductivity, and in geodynamic modeling.

  18. Jarosite-water oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionations: preliminary experimental data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, R.O.; Stoffregen, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stable isotope studies of alunite have added a powerful tool for understanding geochemical processes in the surficial environment. Jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6], like alunite, is a common mineral in the weathered portions of many sulfide-bearing ore deposits and mine drainages where its formation reflects acidic conditions produced by the oxidation of sulfides. This paper describes oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionations in jarosite-water experiments over a temperature range of 100?? to 250??C and the extrapolation of the results to surface conditions. It also includes some general observations on the exchange reaction mechanism that are important for evaluating how well natural samples of jarosite retain primary isotopic compositions. -from Authors

  19. Modelling and experimental investigation on the application of water super adsorbents in waste air biofilters.

    PubMed

    Danaee, Soroosh; Fazaelipoor, Mohammad Hassan; Gholami, Abdollah; Ataei, Seyed Ahmad; Afzali, Daryoush

    2015-01-01

    In this research work, a synthetic water super absorbent polymer was included in the bed of a perlite-based biofilter for the removal of ethanol from air. The performance of this biofilter was compared with the performance of a control perlite-based biofilter lacking the water super absorbent. With the empty bed residence time of 2 min, both biofilters were able to remove more than 90% of the entering pollutant with the concentration of 1 g /m3, when regular moistening was applied. After last irrigation on day 23, the performance of the control biofilter was unchanged until day 35. From day 36 onwards, the control biofilter lost its activity gradually and became totally inactive on day 45. The performance of the super absorbent containing biofilter, however, was unchanged until day 58 before starting to lose its activity. A mechanistic model was developed to describe the performance of a biofilter under drying effects. The model could predict the trends of experimental results reasonably well. The model was also applied to predict the trends of experimental data from a published paper on the removal of hexane in a perlite/super absorbent containing biofilter. PMID:25347218

  20. Functioning of a Shallow-Water Sediment System during Experimental Warming and Nutrient Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Alsterberg, Christian; Sundbäck, Kristina; Hulth, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Effects of warming and nutrient enrichment on intact unvegetated shallow-water sediment were investigated for 5 weeks in the autumn under simulated natural field conditions, with a main focus on trophic state and benthic nitrogen cycling. In a flow-through system, sediment was exposed to either seawater at ambient temperature or seawater heated 4°C above ambient, with either natural or nutrient enriched water. Sediment–water fluxes of oxygen and inorganic nutrients, nitrogen mineralization, and denitrification were measured. Warming resulted in an earlier shift to net heterotrophy due to increased community respiration; primary production was not affected by temperature but (slightly) by nutrient enrichment. The heterotrophic state was, however, not further strengthened by warming, but was rather weakened, probably because increased mineralization induced a shortage of labile organic matter. Climate-related warming of seawater during autumn could therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, induce shorter but more intensive heterotrophic periods in shallow-water sediments, followed by longer autotrophic periods. Increased nitrogen mineralization and subsequent effluxes of ammonium during warming suggested a preferential response of organisms driving nitrogen mineralization when compared to sinks of ammonium such as nitrification and algal assimilation. Warming and nutrient enrichment resulted in non-additive effects on nitrogen mineralization and denitrification (synergism), as well as on benthic fluxes of phosphate (antagonism). The mode of interaction appears to be related to the trophic level of the organisms that are the main drivers of the affected processes. Despite the weak response of benthic microalgae to both warming and nutrient enrichment, the assimilation of nitrogen by microalgae was similar in magnitude to rates of nitrogen mineralization. This implies a sustained filter function and retention capacity of nutrients by the sediment. PMID

  1. Functioning of a shallow-water sediment system during experimental warming and nutrient enrichment.

    PubMed

    Alsterberg, Christian; Sundbäck, Kristina; Hulth, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Effects of warming and nutrient enrichment on intact unvegetated shallow-water sediment were investigated for 5 weeks in the autumn under simulated natural field conditions, with a main focus on trophic state and benthic nitrogen cycling. In a flow-through system, sediment was exposed to either seawater at ambient temperature or seawater heated 4°C above ambient, with either natural or nutrient enriched water. Sediment-water fluxes of oxygen and inorganic nutrients, nitrogen mineralization, and denitrification were measured. Warming resulted in an earlier shift to net heterotrophy due to increased community respiration; primary production was not affected by temperature but (slightly) by nutrient enrichment. The heterotrophic state was, however, not further strengthened by warming, but was rather weakened, probably because increased mineralization induced a shortage of labile organic matter. Climate-related warming of seawater during autumn could therefore, in contrast to previous predictions, induce shorter but more intensive heterotrophic periods in shallow-water sediments, followed by longer autotrophic periods. Increased nitrogen mineralization and subsequent effluxes of ammonium during warming suggested a preferential response of organisms driving nitrogen mineralization when compared to sinks of ammonium such as nitrification and algal assimilation. Warming and nutrient enrichment resulted in non-additive effects on nitrogen mineralization and denitrification (synergism), as well as on benthic fluxes of phosphate (antagonism). The mode of interaction appears to be related to the trophic level of the organisms that are the main drivers of the affected processes. Despite the weak response of benthic microalgae to both warming and nutrient enrichment, the assimilation of nitrogen by microalgae was similar in magnitude to rates of nitrogen mineralization. This implies a sustained filter function and retention capacity of nutrients by the sediment. PMID:23240032

  2. Experimental support and estimate of the accuracy of the water flow model in structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, M.

    2003-04-01

    The set of models of water flow and solute transport was developed. It takes into account spatial and time variability of soil properties and a complex structure of a soil pore space. However, its limited by physically justified methods of experimental definition of parameters. The important stage of the work with the models is checking their adequacy to described processes. It is possible only at a presence of the qualitative experi-mental data received under conditions, reproduced by model. According to this, the aim of the work is the support of methods of experimental maintenance of water flow models with taking into account of structure of soil porosity and evaluation of conditions of application of mathematical models of a dif-ferent level. The field experiments were conducted in Suzdal (Russia, Vladimirskaja oblast), in June and July 1997. The soil cover of this region has high complexity, in which grey forest soils are dominant. Genetic horizons of the grey forest soils are well structured, this causes the presence in soil profile the macropores. The field investigation consisted of three big parts: (1) the morphological research of the genetic horizons of the grey forest soil; (2) investigation of the soil filtration properties by the tube with a constant head and vacuum-infiltrometer methods; (3) study of water movement at different intensity of the irrigation. Experiments were conducted on three sets called <А>, <В > and <С>. The plots had 1m x 1m a size and were equipped with the hole for measurement of soil water content by the neutron hygrometer and by the tensiometers. In labo-ratory conditions the following properties of soil were determined: density of soil, texture, porosity of the aggregates, shrinkage characteristics of soil fraction in diameter of 3-5 mm. For the simulation the model "MACRO" (Jarvis et al, 1991) was used in the work. Adequacy of the model descriptions of the field data were estimated by visual comparison of measured and

  3. Experimental setup for precise investigation of raindrop impacted thin water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Kinnell, Peter I. A.; Greenwood, Philip; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2015-04-01

    Experimental setups with rainfall simulators over soil flumes are a widely-used method to study laboratory-based erosion processes. Small scale processes, such as splash, sheet, and interrill erosion mechanisms, can be studied with a very high degree of precision and accuracy. However, a major problem when performing investigations on raindrop impacted thin water flows is that accurate measurements of key erosion variables are difficult to obtain. In many investigations, important values are, therefore, not directly measured, but inferred from easier to determine parameters. For example rainfall intensity, plot dimension, and flow discharge are recorded during an experiment to rather crudely estimate velocity and depth of flow. Since water depth and flow velocity vary spatially and temporally during experiments with non-controlled flow conditions, this lack of measurement accuracy clearly reduces the explanatory power of the experimental data. Another example for this imprecision is the use of pressure nozzles for this kind of high accuracy experiments. The main problem associated with spray-type nozzles is that they produce a wide spectrum of drop sizes. In order to characterise simulated rainfall from nozzles, certain parameters, such as mean volumetric drop diameter (d50), are generally used. Knowing that different drop sizes have different effects on particle detachment when impacting on thin water layers of certain depth, it is apparent that this parameter of average drop size is not suitable for the detection of precise relations of, for instance, drop size, flow depth, and particle detachment. Although simulated rainfall from nozzles has a more natural drop size distribution, this use of roughly calculated metadata, instead of accurately measured parameters, is one of the main reasons why it is still not possible to deduce exact physical formulas to precisely model soil erosion mechanisms. In order to be able to control and manipulate the key factors of the

  4. Water budget comparison of global climate models and experimental data in Onça Creek basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, D. C. D.; Marin, I. S. P.; Wendland, E.

    2014-09-01

    Groundwater is an important part of the hydrological cycle, accounting for more than 25% of human needs on the global scale. As a result of aquifer overexploitation associated with climate change, even in the most conservative future climate scenarios, mean water-table levels can experience drastic drops. Although there are efforts to include groundwater dynamics in global climate models (GCMs), its influence is still not taken into full account in GCM water budgets, although it is as important as the other water sources considered. To assess the role of percolation in the water balance, we compared the water budget from climate forcing scenarios using 10 GCMs with the water budget from experimental data of a basin in São Paulo state, Brazil. We used the delta factor approach to correct the bias of the model's temperature and precipitation for a control period from 1970 to 1999, and calculated evapotranspiration using the Thornthwaite method. Experimental data for runoff and interception were derived for the basin's representative crops (sugar cane and pasture) for both water budgets. As the GCMs ignore subsurface flow and the only input considered is precipitation and snow melt, the excess surface water is assumed to be redistributed among the other water budget components. The experimental data shows that there is enough available water for infiltration, indicating that recharge cannot be ignored in the water balance. This leads to the possibility of the models' overestimating the other components to compensate for the ignored recharge.

  5. Growth of volcanic ash aggregates in the presence of liquid water and ice: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Muirhead, James D.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Cimarelli, Corrado

    2012-11-01

    Key processes influencing the aggregation of volcanic ash and hydrometeors are examined with an experimental method employing vibratory pan aggregation. Mechanisms of aggregation in the presence of hail and ice pellets, liquid water (≤30 wt%), and mixed water phases are investigated at temperatures of 18 and -20 °C. The experimentally generated aggregates, examined in hand sample, impregnated thin sections, SEM imagery, and X-ray microtomography, closely match natural examples from phreatomagmatic phases of the 27 ka Oruanui and 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruptions. Laser diffraction particle size analysis of parent ash and aggregates is also used to calculate the first experimentally derived aggregation coefficients that account for changing liquid water contents and subzero temperatures. These indicate that dry conditions (<5-10 wt% liquid) promote strongly size selective collection of sub-63 μm particles into aggregates (given by aggregation coefficients >1). In contrast, liquid-saturated conditions (>15-20 wt% liquid) promote less size selective processes. Crystalline ice was also capable of preferentially selecting volcanic ash <31 μm under liquid-free conditions in a two-stage process of electrostatic attraction followed by ice sintering. However, this did not accumulate more than a monolayer of ash at the ice surface. These quantitative relationships may be used to predict the timescales and characteristics of aggregation, such as aggregate size spectra, densities, and constituent particle size characteristics, when the initial size distribution and water content of a volcanic cloud are known. The presence of an irregularly shaped, millimeter-scale vacuole at the center of natural aggregates was also replicated during interaction of ash and melting ice pellets, followed by sublimation. Fine-grained rims were formed by adding moist aggregates to a dry mixture of sub-31 μm ash, which adhered by electrostatic forces and sparse liquid bridges. From this, we

  6. Can product water footprints indicate the hydrological impact of primary production? - A case study of New Zealand kiwifruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deurer, M.; Green, S. R.; Clothier, B. E.; Mowat, A.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryWater footprints have been discussed as indicators for the influence of primary products on water scarcity and water quality. We assessed the impact of New Zealand kiwifruit on the scarcity and quality of freshwater resources and evaluated how the green-, blue- and grey-water footprints represented this impact. Water scarcity relates to the freshwater stored in soil and groundwater over a yearly timeframe. We found a negligible net change in soil water, as the freshwater in the soil is replenished every year by rain. The dynamics of freshwater in soil is indicated by the green-water footprint. Kiwifruit production has no impact on freshwater scarcity in soils, and we suggest, therefore, discarding the green-water footprint in this and similar studies. The groundwater recharge below kiwifruit orchards showed a large regional variation. A net depletion of groundwater resources occurs only in two kiwifruit growing regions, and only when the orchards are over-irrigated. The blue-water footprint indicates the status of the freshwater resources stored in the groundwater. We compared two different concepts. Our hydrologically based concept (Approach 1) quantifies the net change in the resources, whereas the Water Footprint Network (Approach 2) only accounts for the consumption. The blue-water footprint calculated by Approach 1 could explain 97% and by Approach 2 only 63% of the regional variation of net groundwater recharge below kiwifruit orchards. The values of the blue-water footprints are, on a regional average, about -500 L and 100 L per tray of kiwifruit with Approaches 1 and 2, respectively. According to Approach 1, a tray of kiwifruit delivers a net groundwater recharge of 500 L per tray, whereas according to Approach 2 the production of a tray of kiwifruit consumes 100 L of groundwater. Only Approach 1 contains all the hydrological processes making up the water balance that relates to groundwater. We assessed the impact of regional kiwifruit production on

  7. Influence of Water with Modified Isotope Structure on Development of Radiation Damage in Experimental Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakov, D. V.; Fedorenko, B. S.; Sinyak, Yu. E.

    begin table htbp begin center begin tabular p 442pt hline As the duration of space missions increases the problem of durability of space crews and their resistivity to space flight factors becomes more important The purpose of the present work was to study the radioprotective effects of lowered deuterium content water in experimental animals after repeated exposures to low doses of gamma radiation Both male and female adult mice of NAAoN57Al6 F1 and BALB c lines were exposed to 0 25 0 5 and 1 0 Gy of 60 Co gamma rays by multiple fractions The dose rate was 0 32 Gy min Starting from one month prior to the first irradiation fraction till the end of the experiment the animals were only supplied with lowered deuterium content water ad libitum The control group of mice consumed tap water only The mice were sacrificed by means of cervical dislocation within one month after finishing the last irradiation fraction The following parameters were registered the weight of body thymus and spleen number of leucocytes blood formula number of caryocytes in femur bone marrow cytogenetic lesions in nucleated bone marrow cells The water with lowered deuterium content was produced by means of electrolysis with a special device in the Institute for Biomedical Problems par A long-term consumption of water with lowered deuterium content by irradiated mice was found to result in lower levels of depletion of peripheral blood leucocytes and bone marrow cells in a decrease in the yield of cytogenetic aberrations and in a less intensive reduction of the mass

  8. Experimental lighting of water velocity around macropores in a porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassabatere, L.; Lenoir, T.; Peyneau, P.; Lamy, E.; Bechet, B.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Simionovici, A.; Manceau, A.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, much attention and concern have been given to problems associated with contaminant transport on both surface and ground-water systems. Through the vadose zone, it is difficult to predict water and solute transport due, in part, to the structure heterogeneity of natural soil formations. The difficulty is compounded in soils that contain preferential flow path due to the presence of cracks, structural peds, wormholes, and root channels. The importance of macropore flow for solute transport has been demonstrated by means of breakthrough experiments on undisturbed soil columns amended with artificial macropores. Lamy et al. (2009) clearly stated that macropores enhanced solute transport leading to an earlier breakthrough with a substantial tailing at the outlet of the columns. These authors also showed that the experimental breakthrough curves could not be properly modelled unless flow was regarded as enhanced in the matrix surrounding the macropore. Yet, they did not provide any experimental evidence for such hypothesis; and very few studies focused on such evidence. The objective of this work is to give experimental evidence to verify this statement. Columns, 5 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length, were made of a silt/cement and of a sand/cement mix with a thin stick located along their vertical axis. After cementation, the stick was removed, leading to a continuous macropore of 500 μm in radius through the whole system. An iodine solution has been injected through these columns and then, they have been scanned using the 8.3.10 beamline of the Advanced Light Source, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in order to obtain the 3D image-distribution of iodine. The experimental data reveal the presence of iodine in a significant part of the matrix surrounding the macropore and enlightens the extension of the preferential flow around the macropore. . Such experimental data clearly underscores the need to consider enhanced flow in a portion of the

  9. Experimental study of Cu-water nanofluid forced convective flow inside a louvered channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshvaght-Aliabadi, M.; Hormozi, F.; Zamzamian, A.

    2015-03-01

    Heat transfer enhancement plays a very important role for energy saving in plate-fin heat exchangers. In the present study, the influences of simultaneous utilization of a louvered plate-fin channel and copper-base deionized water nanofluid on performance of these exchangers are experimentally explored. The effects of flow rate (2-5 l/min) and nanoparticles weight fraction (0-0.4 %) on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics are determined. Experimental results indicate that the use of louvered channel instead of the plain one can improve the heat transfer performance. Likewise, addition of small amounts of copper nanoparticles to the base fluid augments the convective heat transfer coefficient remarkably. The maximum rise of 21.7 % in the convective heat transfer coefficient is observed for the 0.4 % wt nanofluid compared to the base fluid. Also, pumping power for the base fluid and nanofluids are calculated based on the measured pressure drop in the louvered channel. The average increase in pumping power is 11.8 % for the nanofluid with 0.4 % wt compared to the base fluid. Applied performance criterion shows a maximum performance index of 1.167 for the nanofluid with 0.1 % wt Finally, two correlations are proposed for Nusselt number and friction factor which fit the experimental data with in ±10 %.

  10. Experimental study of Cu-water nanofluid forced convective flow inside a louvered channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshvaght-Aliabadi, M.; Hormozi, F.; Zamzamian, A.

    2014-09-01

    Heat transfer enhancement plays a very important role for energy saving in plate-fin heat exchangers. In the present study, the influences of simultaneous utilization of a louvered plate-fin channel and copper-base deionized water nanofluid on performance of these exchangers are experimentally explored. The effects of flow rate (2-5 l/min) and nanoparticles weight fraction (0-0.4 %) on heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics are determined. Experimental results indicate that the use of louvered channel instead of the plain one can improve the heat transfer performance. Likewise, addition of small amounts of copper nanoparticles to the base fluid augments the convective heat transfer coefficient remarkably. The maximum rise of 21.7 % in the convective heat transfer coefficient is observed for the 0.4 % wt nanofluid compared to the base fluid. Also, pumping power for the base fluid and nanofluids are calculated based on the measured pressure drop in the louvered channel. The average increase in pumping power is 11.8 % for the nanofluid with 0.4 % wt compared to the base fluid. Applied performance criterion shows a maximum performance index of 1.167 for the nanofluid with 0.1 % wt Finally, two correlations are proposed for Nusselt number and friction factor which fit the experimental data with in ±10 %.

  11. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  12. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  13. Experimental evaluation of the drag coefficient of water rockets by a simple free-fall test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Argüelles-Díaz, K.; Fernández-Oro, J.

    2009-09-01

    The flight trajectory of a water rocket can be reasonably calculated if the magnitude of the drag coefficient is known. The experimental determination of this coefficient with enough precision is usually quite difficult, but in this paper we propose a simple free-fall experiment for undergraduate students to reasonably estimate the drag coefficient of water rockets made from plastic soft drink bottles. The experiment is performed using relatively small fall distances (only about 14 m) in addition with a simple digital-sound-recording device. The fall time is inferred from the recorded signal with quite good precision, and it is subsequently introduced as an input of a Matlab® program that estimates the magnitude of the drag coefficient. This procedure was tested first with a toy ball, obtaining a result with a deviation from the typical sphere value of only about 3%. For the particular water rocket used in the present investigation, a drag coefficient of 0.345 was estimated.

  14. Experimental study of residence time distributions of ball-mill circuits grinding coal-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Ohtake, A.; Austin, L.G.

    2008-08-15

    Residence time distributions (RTDs) were estimated by water tracing in a number of wet overflow ball mills (diameters 0.38 to 4.65 m) producing dense, coal-water slurries. In open-circuit mills of 0.38 m diameter and various length-diameter (LID) ratios, the mean residence times of solid were also determined from measured mill holdups. Holdup increased with increased mill feed rate, but the mean residence times of coal and water were still equal to each other. The experimental residence time distributions were fitted to the Mori-Jimbo-Yamazaki semi-infinite, axial mixing model, and the dimensionless mixing coefficient was determined for each of 25 tests in single- and two-compartment mills. This coefficient was found to be independent to the feed rate but linearly proportional to the D/L ratio. The mixing coefficient was smaller for two-compartment mills than for single-compartment mills, showing that there was reduced mixing introduced by the diaphragm separating the compartments. Equations are given to scale residence time distributions for changes in mill diameter and length.

  15. An investigation on characterizing dense coal-water slurry with ultrasound: theoretical and experimental method

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, M.H.; Su, M.X.; Dong, L.L.; Shang, Z.T.; Cai, X.S.

    2010-07-01

    Particle size distribution and concentration in particulate two-phase flow are important parameters in a wide variety of industrial areas. For the purpose of online characterization in dense coal-water slurries, ultrasonic methods have many advantages such as avoiding dilution, the capability for being used in real time, and noninvasive testing, while light-based techniques are not capable of providing information because optical methods often require the slurry to be diluted. In this article, the modified Urick equation including temperature modification, which can be used to determine the concentration by means of the measurement of ultrasonic velocity in a coal-water slurry, is evaluated on the basis of theoretical analysis and experimental study. A combination of the coupled-phase model and the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer law is employed in this work, and the attenuation spectrum is measured within the frequency region from 3 to 12 MHz. Particle size distributions of the coal-water slurry at different volume fractions are obtained with the optimum regularization technique. Therefore, the ultrasonic technique presented in this work brings the possibility of using ultrasound for online measurements of dense slurries.

  16. Experimental demonstration of radicaloid character in a RuV=O intermediate in catalytic water oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Alperovich, Igor; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    Water oxidation is the key half reaction in artificial photosynthesis. An absence of detailed mechanistic insight impedes design of new catalysts that are more reactive and more robust. A proposed paradigm leading to enhanced reactivity is the existence of oxyl radical intermediates capable of rapid water activation, but there is a dearth of experimental validation. Here, we show the radicaloid nature of an intermediate reactive toward formation of the O-O bond by assessing the spin density on the oxyl group by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). In the study, an 17O-labeled form of a highly oxidized, short-lived intermediate in the catalytic cycle of the water oxidation catalyst cis,cis-[(2,2-bipyridine)2(H2O)RuIIIORuIII(OH2)(bpy)2]4+ was investigated. It contains Ru centers in oxidation states [4,5], has at least one RuV = O unit, and shows |Axx| = 60G 17O hyperfine splittings (hfs) consistent with the high spin density of a radicaloid. Destabilization of π-bonding in the d3 RuV = O fragment is responsible for the high spin density on the oxygen and its high reactivity. PMID:23417296

  17. Influence of stress intensity and loading mode on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in primary waters of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R.B.; Szklarska-Smialowska, Z. . Fontana Corrosion Center)

    1994-05-01

    The steam generator in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) of a nuclear power plant consists mainly of a shell made of carbon (C) steel and tubes made of alloy 600 (UNS N06600). However, alloy 600 suffers environmentally induced cracking with exposure to high-temperature primary water. The susceptibility of alloy 600 to integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was investigated as a function of the level of applied stresses and mode of loading. Constant load tests were conducted with specimens prepared from thin wall tubes, and constant deformation tests were conducted using specimens prepared from plates. With tubes exposed to primary water at 330 C, the crack propagation rate (CPR) was found to increase from 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]11] m/s at a stress intensity (K[sub i]) of 10 MPa[radical]m to 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]9] at K[sub i] = 60 MPa[radical]m. CPR obtained using compact specimens prepared from plates were 1 order of magnitude lower than values measured in tubes at the same temperature and in the same solution at each stress intensity. The corollary was that values of crack propagation and threshold stress intensities obtained using compact specimens could not be extrapolated to the behavior of thin wall tubes.

  18. Landslides falling onto a shallow erodible substrate or water layer: an experimental and numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, G. B.; De Blasio, F. V.; Locatelli, M.; Imposimato, S.; Roddeman, D.

    2015-09-01

    Landslides often collapse in areas covered by alluvial deposits forming an erodible layer. This erodible substrate may deform plastically under the intense shear stress of the landslide mass. In other cases, the collapse occurs onto a water basin or tidal flat, creating impulse water waves whilst the landslide may be lubricated by a water layer underneath. In either cases the presence of a medium underneath the landslide will change its dynamics introducing complex processes. While frictional, dry masses and taluses generally hamper the landslide motion. In this work, we present some experiments mimicking the collapse of a landslide onto shallow erodible or water layers. The landslide is simulated with a granular material (sand or gravel) flowing on an incline (35-66°) followed by a horizontal sector covered with a granular bed 1 to 2 cm thick or with a 0.5-1 cm of water. Monitoring evolution in time allows us to describe in detail the process of fluidization of the material at impact, the generation of impact waves, and the erosion process. Concerning impact on a sand layer, the apparent friction coefficient (H/L) is found to increase with the chute slope angle and with the thickness of the erodible layer, and to decrease with the volume. At low slope angles, the material accumulates backwards in a shock wave mode, while at larger slope angles (>45°) it accumulates by prograding forward. A granular avalanche falling from the slope is partially reflected at the sharp slope break where erosion occurs and then propagates initially as a wave partially eroding the superficial material. Folding and thrusting occur within the dense shear flow and the erodible layer. Experiments with a water layer show that the dynamics depends much on the permeability of the granular avalanche. FEM numerical simulations replicate and allow to describe and understand both the spreading and the erosion, and internal deformation recorded in the erodible layer. Experimental findings are

  19. An experimental study of hydromagmatic fragmentation through energetic, non-explosive magma-water mixing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.; Spieler, O.; Downey, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the first experimental investigation of non-explosive hydromagmatic fragmentation during energetic mixing with water. We mix magma and water by two methods: (1) pouring a basaltic melt between two converging water sprays; and (2) jetting basaltic melt at high pressure (3??MPa) through a nozzle into a tank of stagnant water. These experiments involved shear at relative velocities of ~ 5-16??m/s and vigorous mixing for less than a second, providing sufficient time for glassy rinds to grow but insufficient time for clot interiors to cool. In resulting fragments, we examined the gross morphology, which reflects fluid deformation during mixing, and surface textures, which reflect the growth and disruption of glassy rinds. We find major differences in both fragment morphology and surface texture between experiments. Water-spray experiments produced Pele's hair, thin bubble shards, melt droplets, and angular, fracture-bound droplet pieces. Melt-jet experiments produced mostly coarse (> 1??mm diameter), wavy fluidal fragments with broken ends. Fluidal surfaces of fragments produced by water-spray experiments were generally shiny under reflected light and, in microscopic examination, smooth down to micron scale, implying no disruption of glassy rinds, except for (a) rare flaking on Pele's hair that was bent prior to solidification; or (b) cracking and alligator-skin textures on segments of melt balls that had expanded before complete cooling. In contrast, textures of fluidal surfaces on fragments produced by melt-jet experiments are dull in reflected light and, in scanning electron images, exhibit ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in stripes. Adhering to these surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material microns to tens of microns in diameter. In the water-spray fragments, we interpret the scarcity of disrupted surface rinds to result from lack of bending after surfaces formed. In the

  20. An experimental study of hydromagmatic fragmentation through energetic, non-explosive magma-water mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, L. G.; Spieler, O.; Downey, W. S.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we report the first experimental investigation of non-explosive hydromagmatic fragmentation during energetic mixing with water. We mix magma and water by two methods: (1) pouring a basaltic melt between two converging water sprays; and (2) jetting basaltic melt at high pressure (3 MPa) through a nozzle into a tank of stagnant water. These experiments involved shear at relative velocities of ~ 5-16 m/s and vigorous mixing for less than a second, providing sufficient time for glassy rinds to grow but insufficient time for clot interiors to cool. In resulting fragments, we examined the gross morphology, which reflects fluid deformation during mixing, and surface textures, which reflect the growth and disruption of glassy rinds. We find major differences in both fragment morphology and surface texture between experiments. Water-spray experiments produced Pele's hair, thin bubble shards, melt droplets, and angular, fracture-bound droplet pieces. Melt-jet experiments produced mostly coarse (> 1 mm diameter), wavy fluidal fragments with broken ends. Fluidal surfaces of fragments produced by water-spray experiments were generally shiny under reflected light and, in microscopic examination, smooth down to micron scale, implying no disruption of glassy rinds, except for (a) rare flaking on Pele's hair that was bent prior to solidification; or (b) cracking and alligator-skin textures on segments of melt balls that had expanded before complete cooling. In contrast, textures of fluidal surfaces on fragments produced by melt-jet experiments are dull in reflected light and, in scanning electron images, exhibit ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in stripes. Adhering to these surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material microns to tens of microns in diameter. In the water-spray fragments, we interpret the scarcity of disrupted surface rinds to result from lack of bending after surfaces formed. In the melt

  1. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N2 fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N2-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N2 fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism. PMID:23440170

  2. Experimental feature in the primary-proton flux at energies above 10 TeV according to the results of searches for primary particles in nuclear emulsions exposed in the stratosphere (RUNJOB Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2008-02-15

    In the RUNJOB experiment, a long-term exposure of x-ray emulsion chambers in the stratosphere from 1995 to 1999 with the aim of studying the composition and spectra of primary cosmic particles in the energy range 10-1000 TeV per nucleon revealed about 50% proton tracks. The remaining events of the proton group did not feature any candidate for a track of a singly charged particle within the search region determined from measurements of the coordinates of background nuclei going close to the sought track. Methodological factors that could explain this experimental observation are considered. A possible physical reason associated with the presence of a neutral component in the flux of primary protons in the energy region above 10 TeV is also analyzed.

  3. Building an understanding of water use innovation adoption processes through farmer-driven experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdy, Jody D.; Jewitt, Graham P. W.; Lorentz, Simon A.

    Smallholder farmers in Southern Africa are faced with the challenge of securing their livelihoods within the context of a wide variety of biophysical and socio-economic constraints. Agriculture is inherently risky, particularly in regions prone to drought or dry spells, and risk-averse farmers may be viewed by researchers or extension agents as reluctant to invest in agricultural innovations that have potential to improve their livelihoods. However, farmers themselves are more interested in personal livelihood security than any other stakeholder and it is the farmers’ perceptions of needs, investment options and risks that drive their decision-making process. A holistic approach to agricultural innovation development and extension is needed to address both socio-economic and biophysical dynamics that influence adoption and dissemination of innovations. This paper, presents a methodology for involving farmers from the Bergville district of South Africa in the process of innovation development through facilitation of farmer-driven gardening experiments. Facilitating farmer-driven experimentation allows farmers to methodically assess the value of innovations they choose to study while providing researchers with a venue for learning about socio-economic as well as biophysical influences on farmers’ decisions. With this knowledge, researchers can focus on developing innovations that are socially and economically appropriate and therefore, more readily adoptable. The participatory process gave farmers the tools they needed to make informed decisions through critical thinking and analysis and improved their confidence in explaining the function of innovations to others. Researchers were able to use farmers’ manually collected data and observations to supplement laboratory generated and electronically recorded information about soil water dynamics to understand water balances associated with different garden bed designs, and to investigate whether trench beds, drip

  4. Experimental petrology of peridotites, including effects of water and carbon on melting in the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David H.

    2015-02-01

    For over 50 years, the use of high-pressure piston/cylinder apparatus combined with an increasing diversity of microbeam analytical techniques has enabled the study of mantle peridotite compositions and of magmas derived by melting in the upper mantle. The experimental studies have been guided by the petrology and geochemistry of peridotites from diverse settings and by the remarkable range of mantle-derived magma types. Recent experimental study using FTIR spectroscopy to monitor water content of minerals has shown that fertile lherzolite (MORB-source upper mantle) at ~1,000 °C can store ~200 ppm H2O in defect sites in nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxenes, garnet and spinel). Water in excess of 200 ppm stabilizes amphibole (pargasite) at P < 3 GPa up to the lherzolite solidus. However, at P > 3 GPa, water in excess of 200 ppm appears as an aqueous vapour phase and this depresses the temperature of the upper mantle solidus. Provided the uppermost mantle (lithosphere) has H2O < 4,000 ppm, the mantle solidus has a distinctive P, T shape. The temperature of the vapour- undersaturated or dehydration solidus is approximately constant at 1,100 °C at pressures up to ~3 GPa and then decreases sharply to ~1,010 °C. The strongly negative d T/d P of the vapour-undersaturated solidus of fertile lherzolite from 2.8 to 3 GPa provides the basis for understanding the lithosphere/asthenosphere boundary. Through upward migration of near-solidus hydrous silicate melt, the asthenosphere becomes geochemically zoned with the `enriched' intraplate basalt source (>500 ppm H2O) overlying the `depleted' MORB source (~200 ppm H2O). From the study of primitive MOR picrites, the modern mantle potential temperature for MORB petrogenesis is ~1,430 °C. The intersection of the 1,430 °C adiabat with the vapour-saturated lherzolite solidus at ~230 km suggests that upwelling beneath mid-ocean ridges begins around this depth. In intraplate volcanism, diapiric upwelling begins from

  5. Small Titanium Oxo Clusters: Primary Structures of Titanium(IV) in Water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanyun; Hou, Jie; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-04-01

    For sol-gel synthesis of titanium oxide, the titanium(IV) precursors are dissolved in water to form clear solutions. However, the solution status of titanium(IV) remains unclear. Herein three new and rare types of titanium oxo clusters are isolated from aqueous solutions of TiOSO4 and TiCl4 without using organic ligands. Our results indicate that titanium(IV) is readily hydrolyzed into oxo oligomers even in highly acidic solutions. The present clusters provide precise structural information for future characterization of the solution species and structural evolution of titanium(IV) in water and, meanwhile, are new molecular materials for photocatalysis. PMID:26990885

  6. Pathogenesis of solute-free water retention in experimental ascitic cirrhosis: is vasopressin the only culprit?

    PubMed

    Sansoè, Giovanni; Aragno, Manuela; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Parola, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Catecholamines trigger proximal tubular fluid retention and reduce renal excretion of solute-free water. In advanced cirrhosis, non-osmotic hypersecretion of vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone or ADH) is considered the cause of dilutional hyponatraemia, but ADH V2 receptor antagonists are not beneficial in long-term treatment of ascites. To test the hypothesis that water retention in experimental ascitic cirrhosis might depend primarily on adrenergic hyper-function, hormonal status, renal function and tubular free-water reabsorption (TFWR) were assessed in six groups of rats with ascitic cirrhosis: rats with cirrhosis due to 13-week CCl4 (carbon tetrachloride) administration (group G1); cirrhotic rats receiving daily diuretics (0.5 mg/kg furosemide plus 2 mg/kg K(+)-canrenoate) from the 11th to the 13th week of CCl4 (G2), diuretics associated with guanfacine oral prodrug (α2A-adrenergic receptor agonist and sympatholytic agent) at 2 (G3), 7 (G4) or 10 (G5) mg/kg, or with SSP-004240F1 (V2 receptor antagonist) at 1 mg/kg (G6). Natriuresis was lower in G1 than in G2, G4 and G6 (all P<0.05). Guanfacine, added to diuretics (i.e. G3 compared with G2), reduced serum noradrenaline from 423±22 to 211±41 ng/l (P<0.05), plasma renin activity (PRA) from 35±8 to 9±2 ng/ml/h (P<0.05) and TFWR from 45±8 to 20±6 μl/min (P<0.01). TFWR correlated with plasma aldosterone (r=0.51, P<0.01) and urinary potassium excretion (r=0.90, P<0.001). In ascitic cirrhosis, reduced volaemia, use of diuretics (especially furosemide) and adrenergic hyper-function cause tubular retention of water. Suitable doses of sympatholytic agents are effective aquaretics. PMID:26519424

  7. Transport behaviour of xenobiotic micropollutants in surface waters - an experimental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, Marc; Kuch, Bertram; Rügner, Hermann; Dobramysl, Lorenz; Grathwohl, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Xenobiotics are substances that do not exist in natural systems but are increasingly produced by industrial processes and introduced into the environment. While many of these compounds are eliminated in waste water treatment plants, some are only barely degraded and are discharged into receiving water bodies. Often little is known about their acute or chronic toxicity and even less about their persistence or transport behaviour in aquatic systems. In the present study, the stability and turnover of selected micropollutants along a 7.5 km long segment of the River Ammer in Southwest Germany was investigated (catchment area 134 km²). This stream carries a proportion of treated wastewater which is clearly above the average in German rivers, mainly supplied by a major waste water treatment plant at the upstream end of the studied stream segment. An experimental mass balance approach was chosen where in- and outflow of water and target compounds into and out of the balanced stream segment was measured during base flow conditions. To cover a complete diurnal cycle of wastewater input, pooled samples were collected every 2 h over a sampling period of 24 h. A comparison of bulk mass fluxes showed that carbamazepine, a pharmaceutical, and phosphorous flame retardants, such as TCPP, behave conservative under the given conditions. Some retention was observed for the disinfectant product Triclosan and some polycyclic musk fragrances (e.g., HHCB). TAED, a bleaching activator used in detergents, was completely eliminated along the stream segment. The outcome of the experiment demonstrates the very different persistence of some widely-used micropollutants in aquatic systems. However, the mechanisms involved in their attenuation as well as the fate of the most persistent compounds still remain subject to further research.

  8. Heat and Water Transfer at the Land-Atmosphere Interface - Interweaving Experimental and Modeling Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Trautz, A.; Cihan, A.; Wallen, B.

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of vegetation, evaporation occurs entirely from the soil and can lead to considerable water losses. Considering the increase of water limited environments throughout the world and their potential for expansion over the coming years, it is critical that we are able to properly understand and model evaporation. Evaporation is affected by atmospheric conditions (e.g., humidity, temperature, wind velocity, solar radiation) and soil thermal and hydraulic properties (e.g., thermal and hydraulic conductivity, porosity), all of which are strongly coupled. However, for most conventional models, many of these mechanisms are crudely parameterized and inconsistent with current physical understanding due to the complexity of the problem in field scenarios and the scarcity of field or laboratory data capable of testing and refining energy and mass transfer theories. In this work, we investigated different physical processes that are often overlooked in models of flux exchange and how these processes may become significant in modeling arid and semi-arid environments. A non-isothermal model that allows for the coupling of single-phase (gas) two-component (air and water vapor) atmospheric flow and two-phase (gas, liquid) two-component (air and water vapor) flow in porous media was modified to better account for dry soil conditions. Numerical results were tested with precision experimental data. Results demonstrate that proper coupling of the thermal and mass flux processes allows us to better understand vapor transport and phase change processes that control shallow subsurface soil moisture and ultimately improve models predicting mass and energy fluxes.

  9. Experimental and numerical simulations of heat transfers between flowing water and a horizontal frozen porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, N.; Costard, F.; Grenier, C. F.

    2013-12-01

    In permafrost-affected regions, hydrological changes due to global warming are still under investigation. But yet, we can already foresee from recent studies that for example, the variability and intensity of surface/subsurface flow are likely to be affected by permafrost degradation. And the feedback induced by such changes on permafrost degradation is still not clearly assessed. Of particular interest are lake and river-taliks. A talik is a permanently unfrozen zone that lies below rivers or lake. They should play a key role in these interactions given that they are the only paths for groundwater flow in permafrost regions. Thus heat transfers on a regional scale are potentially influenced by groundwater circulation. The aim of our study is therefore to investigate the evolution of river taliks. We developed a multidisciplinary approach coupling field investigation, experimental studies in a cold room and numerical modeling. In Central Yakutia, Siberia, where permafrost is continuous, we recently installed instruments to monitor ground temperature and water pressure in a river talik between two thermokarst lakes. We present here the coupling of numerical modeling and laboratory experiments in order to look after the main parameters controlling river-talik installation. In a cold room at IDES, where a metric scale channel is filled with sand as a porous medium, we are able to control air, water and permafrost temperature, but also water flow, so that we can test various parameter sets for a miniaturized river. These results are confronted with a numerical model developed at the LSCE with Cast3m (www-cast3m.cea.fr), that couples heat and water transfer. In particular, expressions for river-talik heat exchange terms are investigated. A further step will come in the near future with results from field investigation providing the full complexity of a natural system. Keywords: Talik, River, Numerical Modeling, Cold Room, Permafrost.

  10. TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY TO MEET THE INTERIM PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS, PART 2. ARSENIC AND SELENIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA established drinking water regulations for ten inorganic substances and radionuclides that became effective on June 24, 1977. As a result of these new regulations, many communities may be required to construct new treatment facilities or to modify existing ones. This paper on...

  11. TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY TO MEET THE INTERIM PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS FOR INORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA established drinking water regulations for ten inorganic substances and radionuclides that became effective on June 24, 1977. As a result of these regulations, many communities may be required to construct new treatment facilities or to modify or improve on existing ones....

  12. TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY TO MEET THE INTERIM PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS FOR INORGANICS: PART 4

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA established drinking water regulations for ten inorganic substances and radionuclides that became effective on June 24, 1977. As a result of these new regulations, many communities may be required to construct new treatment facilities or to modify existing ones. This paper on...

  13. The Design and Development of a Simulation to Teach Water Conservation to Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Information and Communications Technology (ICT) plays a dominant role in enhancing teaching and learning. Similar advances have been made in the use of multimedia in the classroom. These advances are coupled with newer developmental tools and techniques. This paper examines the design and development of a simulation on water conservation. Science…

  14. 75 FR 53267 - National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Revisions to the Total Coliform Rule; Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... the Total Coliform Rule; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is extending by.... ADDRESSES: Comments may be submitted by mail to: Water Docket, Environmental Protection Agency, Mail...

  15. Come on in, the Water is Fine: Achieving Mainstream Relevance through Integration with Primary Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Friman, Patrick C

    2010-01-01

    Behavior analysis is a generic science, and Skinner's vision for it was that it would become a mainstream force, relevant for most if not all human concerns, major and minor. Clearly his vision has not been realized. Determining why this is the case would require a complex multifactorial analysis. One likely factor is that the majority of its basic science findings have been obtained from the study of rats and pigeons. Another likely factor, one directly addressed by this paper, is that the majority of its applied science findings have been obtained from the study of people in only one tail of the normal distribution. Regardless, those outside the field see the relevance of behavior analysis to general human affairs as very limited. Whether the path behavior analysis is on will lead to widespread perception of mainstream relevance anytime soon seems doubtful. An alternative route would involve integrating it with a field that has already made the trip successfully. A premier example involves primary medical care. This paper argues for the integration of behavior analysis with pediatric primary care, sketches a method for its accomplishment, and uses diurnal enuresis to illustrate the requirements of the method. PMID:22479124

  16. Ocular and orbital trauma from water balloon slingshots: a clinical, epidemiological, experimental, and theoretical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, J D; Johnson, D A; Ballal, D R; Bullock, R J

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the clinical findings of 17 patients with ocular/orbital injuries produced by launched water balloons; to determine water balloon kinetic energies in experimental and theoretical studies. METHODS: Six case histories are presented, 1 case was retrieved from the medical literature, and 10 cases were reported to the National Injury Information Clearinghouse of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission. The energies were determined by field trials and calculations. RESULTS: Injuries included orbital contusions and hematomas, facial hypesthesia, eyelid lacerations, subconjunctival hemorrhages, corneal edema and abrasion, hyphemas, traumatic iritis, iris sphincter ruptures, iris atrophy, angle recession, iridodialyses, traumatic cataract, vitreous hemorrhages, retinal hemorrhages, macular hole formation, optic atrophy, and bony orbital wall fractures. Epidemiological analysis revealed that children and young adults, more often males, were injured, most commonly in the warm weather months (May through September). In field trials, maximum water balloon velocities ranged from 38 to 41 m/sec (85 to 92 mph) with kinetic energies from 176 to 245 J; by calculation, maximum velocities ranged from 42 to 54 m/sec (95 to 121 mph) with kinetic energies from 141 to 232 J. In a field demonstration a 300-g water balloon launched horizontally from a distance of 20 ft exploded a 12-kg watermelon. Classic physics calculations are presented to explain the complex bio-mechanical interactions between the water balloon and the eye. CONCLUSION: Kinetic energies of launched water balloons are comparable to or greater than kinetic energies experienced with a variety of common objects, including file bullets, which are well known to cause serious ocular and orbital injuries. In addition, these energies are far in excess of those required to perforate a cornea (0.7 to 1.7 J), rupture a globe (1 to 5.3 J), or fracture the bony orbit (1.8 to 14.7 j). Thus, this study

  17. Primary production and chlorophyll distributions in the subtropical and tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean in the autumn of 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, V. I.; Gagarin, V. I.; Demidov, A. B.; Burenkov, V. I.; Stunzhas, P. A.

    2007-06-01

    In October and November 2002, high and relatively high values of the chlorophyll a concentration at the sea surface ( C chl) were observed in the English Channel (0.47 mg/m3), in the waters of the North Atlantic Current (0.25 mg/m3), in the tropical and subtropical anticyclonic gyres (0.07-0.42 mg/m3), and also in the southwestern region of the southern subtropical anticyclonic gyre (usually 0.11-0.23 mg/m3). The central regions of the southern subtropical anticyclonic gyre (SATG) and the North Atlantic tropical gyre (NATR) were characterized by lower values of C chl (0.02-0.08 mg/m3 for the SATG and 0.07-0.14 mg/m3 for the NATR). At most of the SATG stations, the values of the surface primary production ( C phs) varied from 2.5 to 5.5 mg C/m3 per day and were mainly defined by the fluctuations of C chl ( r = +0.78) rather than by those of the assimilation number ( r = +0.54). The low assimilation activity of phytoplankton in these waters (1.3-4.6 mg chl a per hour) pointed to a lack of nutrients. An analysis of the variability of their concentration and the composition of photosynthetic pigments showed that, in the waters north of 30° N, the growth of phytoplankton was mostly restricted by the deficiency of nitrogen, while, in more southern areas, at the majority of stations (about 60%), the phosphorus concentrations were the minimum. At the low concentrations of nitrates and nitrites, ammonium represented itself as a buffer that prevented planktonic algae from extreme degrees of nitric starvation. In the tropical waters and in the waters of the SATG, the primary production throughout the water column varied from 240 to 380 mg C/m2 30° per day. This level of productivity at stations with low values of C chl (<0.08 mg/m3) was provided by a well-developed deep chlorophyll maximum and a high transparency of the water. The light curves of photosynthesis based on in situ measurements point to the high efficiency of utilizing the penetrating solar radiation by

  18. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  19. Experimental Investigations on the Characteristics of the Ammonia-Water Absorption Refrigerator for Low Temperature Solution Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Toshitaka; Kimijima, Shinji; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    This report refers to some static characteristics of the ammonia-water absorption refrigerator for low temperature refrigerating process which needs the temperature below the freezing point. Especially, the influence of evaporating temperature and cooling water temperature is clarified by the experimental investigation. In addition to this, the validity of constructed simulation model of this absorption refrigerator is mentioned. The validity of simulation model is verified by the comparison of experimental results and calculation. To examine the characteristics, we conducted the performance test using the trial product of which the standard cooling capacity is 175kW. The performance is estimated according to cooling capacity and COP. As a result, the effects of the evaporating temperature and cooling water temperature on the cooling performance are clarified by the experimental research. Furthermore, the calculation of the static characteristics predicted by the simulation model is in good agreements with the experimental results.

  20. Experimental investigation of the wake behind a model of wind turbine in a water flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okulov, V. L.; Naumov, I. N.; Kabardin, I.; Mikkelsen, R.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The flow behind the model of wind turbine rotor is investigated experimentally in a water flume using Particle Image Velocimetry. The study carried out involves rotors of three bladed wind turbine designed using Glauert's optimization. The transitional regime, generally characterized as in between the regime governed by stable organized vortical structures and the turbulent wake, develops from disturbances of the tip and root vorticies through vortex paring and further complex behaviour towards the fully turbulent wake. Our PIV measurements pay special attention to the onset of the instabilities. The near wake characteristics (development of expansion, tip vortex position, deficit velocity and rotation in the wake) have been measured for different tip speed ratio to compare with main assumptions and conclusions of various rotor theories.

  1. Experimental investigation of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation designed to evaluate and better define the overall characteristics of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe was conducted. The results from various rates of restart heat addition and channel blockage, indicate that upon breakthrough the depressurization of the evaporator may result in an effective heat transport capacity far in excess of the steady-state transport limit. The resulting transient conditions imposed on the heat pipe by the effective increased heat transport capacity can cause a loss of liquid in the evaporator and potential dryout. Evidence is presented which indicates that in order to prevent either temporary or permanent dryout, sufficient liquid inventory must be present in the evaporator wicking structure to accommodate the increased transient thermal load and allow sufficient time for the capillary wicking structure to reprime.

  2. Pre-Service Primary Science Teachers' Understandings of the Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Solid-Liquid Phase Transition of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalcin, Fatma Aggul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore pre-service primary teachers' understandings of the effect of temperature and pressure on the solid-liquid phase transition of water. In the study a survey approach was used, and the sample consisted of one-hundred and three, third year pre-service primary science teachers. As a tool for data collection, a test…

  3. Whole-Body Water Flow Stimulation to the Lower Limbs Modulates Excitability of Primary Motor Cortical Regions Innervating the Hands: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Daisuke; Yamashiro, Koya; Onishi, Hideaki; Baba, Yasuhiro; Nakazawa, Sho; Shimoyama, Yoshimitsu; Maruyama, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Whole-body water immersion (WI) has been reported to change sensorimotor integration. However, primary motor cortical excitability is not affected by low-intensity afferent input. Here we explored the effects of whole-body WI and water flow stimulation (WF) on corticospinal excitability and intracortical circuits. Eight healthy subjects participated in this study. We measured the amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) produced by single transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses and examined conditioned MEP amplitudes by paired-pulse TMS. We evaluated short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) using the paired-TMS technique before and after 15-min intervention periods. Two interventions used were whole-body WI with water flow to the lower limbs (whole-body WF) and whole-body WI without water flow to the lower limbs (whole-body WI). The experimental sequence included a baseline TMS assessment (T0), intervention for 15 min, a second TMS assessment immediately after intervention (T1), a 10 min resting period, a third TMS assessment (T2), a 10 min resting period, a fourth TMS assessment (T3), a 10 min resting period, and the final TMS assessment (T4). SICI and ICF were evaluated using a conditioning stimulus of 90% active motor threshold and a test stimulus adjusted to produce MEPs of approximately 1–1.2 mV, and were tested at intrastimulus intervals of 3 and 10 ms, respectively. Whole-body WF significantly increased MEP amplitude by single-pulse TMS and led to a decrease in SICI in the contralateral motor cortex at T1, T2 and T3. Whole-body WF also induced increased corticospinal excitability and decreased SICI. In contrast, whole-body WI did not change corticospinal excitability or intracortical circuits. PMID:25025129

  4. Water-clear cell parathyroid adenoma causing primary hyperparathyroidism in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Hitomi; Iihara, Masatoshi; Okamoto, Takahiro; Obara, Takao

    2007-01-01

    Water-clear cell parathyroid adenoma is an exceedingly rare tumor, composed exclusively of tumor cells with abundant foamy cytoplasm. A combination of hyperparathyroidism and neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is also a rare phenomenon. We report an 18-year-old woman with primary hyperparathyroidism caused by water-clear cell parathyroid adenoma in association with NF1. She had renal stones, hypercalcemia, and an elevated plasma level of intact parathyroid hormone. Physical examination revealed a palpable tumor in the right neck, and café-au-lait spots distributed over her entire body. An ultrasound examination showed an isoechoic mass in the right thyroid lobe. Thallium-technetium subtraction scintigraphy showed high thallium accumulation in the right thyroid lobe area. A surgical exploration revealed the palpable mass to be a parathyroid tumor. The pathological features were consistent with water-clear parathyroid adenoma. This is the first reported case of water-clear cell parathyroid adenoma associated with NF1. PMID:17879040

  5. An Experimental Study in Oral Language Readiness in Paradigmatic Language Behavior in Two Primary Classes of Learning Disabled Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartelli, Lora Marie

    Four randomly selected classes of learning-disabled children (N = 46) participated in a study of the effect of paradigmatic training in oral language skills on specific reading abilities. Two classes used the Key to Learning series as the experimental treatment, and two classes served as a control group. Tests of reading skills and of paradigmatic…

  6. The CTFA Evaluation of Alternatives Program: an evaluation of in vitro alternatives to the Draize primary eye irritation test. (Phase II) oil/water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Gettings, S D; Dipasquale, L C; Bagley, D M; Casterton, P L; Chudkowski, M; Curren, R D; Demetrulias, J L; Feder, P I; Galli, C L; Gay, R

    1994-10-01

    The Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association (CTFA) Evaluation of Alternatives Program is an evaluation of the relationship between Draize ocular safety test data and comparable data from a selection of in vitro tests. In Phase II, 18 representative oil/water-based personal-care formulations were subjected to the Draize primary eye safety test and 30 in vitro assay protocols (14 different types of in vitro endpoints were evaluated; the remainder were protocol variations). Correlation of in vitro with in vivo data was evaluated using analysis of sensitivity/specificity and statistical analysis of the relationship between maximum average Draize score (MAS) and in vitro endpoint. Regression modelling is the primary approach adopted in the CTFA Program for evaluating in vitro assay performance. The objective of regression analysis is to predict MAS for a given test material (and to place upper and lower prediction interval bounds on the range in which the MAS is anticipated to fall with high probability) conditional on observing an in vitro assay score for that material. The degree of confidence in prediction is quantified in terms of the relative widths of prediction intervals constructed about the fitted regression curves: the narrower the prediction interval, the more predictive of the Draize score is the in vitro test result. 16 assays were shown to have the greatest agreement with the Draize procedure and were therefore selected for regression analysis. Based on the magnitude of the 95% prediction bounds of each of the 16 selected assays over the range of test data, it may be inferred that prediction of MAS values from experimentally determined in vitro scores is more accurate for oil/water-based formulations with lower rather than higher irritancy potential. The assays selected for modelling in Phase II generally exhibited weaker relationships with MAS than those selected in Phase I (evaluated using hydroalcoholic formulations), even though several assays

  7. Direct energy recovery from primary and secondary sludges by supercritical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Svanström, M; Modell, M; Tester, J

    2004-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) oxidizes organic and biological materials virtually completely to benign products without the need for stack gas scrubbing. Heavy metals are recovered as stabilized solid, along with the sand and clay that is present in the feed. The technology has been under development for twenty years. The major obstacle to commercialization has been developing reactors that are not clogged by inorganic solid deposits. That problem has been solved by using tubular reactors with fluid velocities that are high enough to keep solids in suspension. Recently, system designs have been created that reduce the cost of processing sewage sludges below that of incineration. At 10 wt- % dry solids, sludge can be oxidized with virtually complete recovery of the sludge heating value as hot water or high-pressure steam. Liquid carbon dioxide of high purity can be recovered from the gaseous effluent and excess oxygen can be recovered for recycle. The net effect is to reduce the stack to a harmless vent with minimal flow rate of a clean gas. Complete simulations have been developed using physical property models that accurately simulate the thermodynamic properties of sub- and supercritical water in mixtures with O2, N2, CO2, and organics. Capital and operating cost estimates are given for sewage sludge treatment, which are less costly than incineration. The scenario of direct recovery of energy from sludges has inherent benefits compared to other gasification or liquefaction options. PMID:15259956

  8. Hydrogen-enriched water restoration of impaired calcium propagation by arsenic in primary keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei-Tai; Chiu, Yi-Ching; Lee, Chih-Hung; Yoshioka, Tohru; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2013-11-01

    Endemic contamination of artesian water for drinking by arsenic is known to cause several human cancers, including cancers of the skin, bladder, and lungs. In skin, multiple arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) can develop into invasive cancers after decades of arsenic exposure. The characteristic histological features of As-BD include full-layer epidermal dysplasia, apoptosis, and abnormal proliferation. Calcium propagation is an essential cellular event contributing to keratinocyte differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, all of which occur in As-BD. This study investigated how arsenic interferes calcium propagation of skin keratinocytes through ROS production and whether hydrogen-enriched water would restore arsenic-impaired calcium propagation. Arsenic was found to induce oxidative stress and inhibit ATP- and thapsigaragin-induced calcium propagation. Pretreatment of arsenic-treated keratinocytes by hydrogen-enriched water or beta-mercaptoethanol with potent anti-oxidative effects partially restored the propagation of calcium by ATP and by thapsigaragin. It was concluded that arsenic may impair calcium propagation, likely through oxidative stress and interactions with thiol groups in membrane proteins.

  9. Interaction of cinnamic acid derivatives with β-cyclodextrin in water: experimental and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benguo; Zeng, Jie; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yonglan; Ma, Hanjun; Mo, Haizhen; Liang, Guizhao

    2016-03-01

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) can be used to improve the solubility and stability of cinnamic acid derivatives (CAs). However, there was no detailed report about understanding the effects of the substituent groups in the benzene ring on the inclusion behavior between CAs and CDs in aqueous solution. Here, the interaction of β-CD with CAs, including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid, in water was investigated by phase-solubility method, UV, fluorescence, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, together with ONIOM (our Own N-layer Integrated Orbital molecular Mechanics)-based QM/MM (Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics) calculations. Experimental results demonstrated that CAs could form 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex with β-CD by non-covalent bonds, and that the maximum apparent stability constants were found in caffeic acid (176M(-1)) followed by p-coumaric acid (160M(-1)) and ferulic acid (133M(-1)). Moreover, our calculations reasonably illustrated the binding orientations of β-CD with CAs determined by experimental observations. PMID:26471667

  10. Experimental Testing of Water Disinfection Models under Varying Hydraulic and Kinetic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Edmilson C; Rauen, William B; Fonseca, Ismênia; Figueiredo, Iene

    2016-06-01

    The concomitant effects of hydraulics and reaction kinetics on the disinfection efficiency (DE) of Chlorine Contact Tank (CCT) setups were experimentally assessed, to test the predictive-ability of first order kinetics models: Chick-Watson (C-W), C-t rule and Wehner-Wilhelm (W-W). Prototype tests were conducted using river water characterised for quality parameters, chlorine demand and inactivation rates of total and thermotolerant coliform. Poor, average and superior CCT baffling conditions were assessed by tracer experimentation and for their DE under three chlorine dosages. The models' DE predictive-ability was comparable and high for superior baffling, but decreased differently with the hydraulic efficiency (maximum errors of +15.3% with W-W, +26.0% with C-W and -36.6% with C-t). The positive bias shown by W-W renders it unsafe for CCT design, so the results favoured the C-t rule as the preferred analytical tool of comparable complexity. Potential refinements to these models that could lead to operational savings are identified. PMID:26773311

  11. Experimental study of high-speed imaging detection system for small bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Peng; Yang, Kecheng; Xia, Min; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Small bubbles are widely present in the marine environment, the presence of small bubbles generated by whitecaps, microorganisms, ships sailing will greatly affect the optical properties of seawater. A lot of work has been carried out around the detection of small bubbles, this article will introduce a method of detecting small bubbles underwater with the way of high-speed imaging underwater. The optical mechanisms to measure the parameters of small bubbles are mainly high-speed photography, laser interferometry and holography. The advantages of high-speed photography are intuitive and low cost, the experimenters can real-time monitor the shooting circumstances, and can obtain more detailed parameters concerning the small bubbles. The paper also discusses an experimental method of high-speed imaging for small bubbles in water, that is to get a cooperative target in the back of the bubbles, then shoot the bubbles, and a lot of experiments with the two methods have been done. In order to compare the imaging quality of the two sets of experiments intuitively, the histograms and the results of edge detecting of the pictures have been given. After compared the results, it is found that the images are clearer and higher in contrast in the case of there is a cooperative target behind the bubbles, and with the imaging rate of the high-speed camera increases, the image quality is significantly reduced.

  12. Water quality and quantity assessment of pervious pavements performance in experimental car park areas.

    PubMed

    Sañudo-Fontaneda, Luis A; Charlesworth, Susanne M; Castro-Fresno, Daniel; Andres-Valeri, Valerio C A; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Pervious pavements have become one of the most used sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) techniques in car parks. This research paper presents the results of monitoring water quality from several experimental car park areas designed and constructed in Spain with bays made of interlocking concrete block pavement, porous asphalt, polymer-modified porous concrete and reinforced grass with plastic and concrete cells. Moreover, two different sub-base materials were used (limestone aggregates and basic oxygen furnace slag). This study therefore encompasses the majority of the materials used as permeable surfaces and sub-base layers all over the world. Effluent from the test bays was monitored for dissolved oxygen, pH, electric conductivity, total suspended solids, turbidity and total petroleum hydrocarbons in order to analyze the behaviour shown by each combination of surface and sub-base materials. In addition, permeability tests were undertaken in all car parks using the 'Laboratorio Caminos Santander' permeameter and the Cantabrian Portable Infiltrometer. All results are presented together with the influence of surface and sub-base materials on water quality indicators using bivariate correlation statistical analysis at a confidence level of 95%. The polymer-modified porous concrete surface course in combination with limestone aggregate sub-base presented the best performance. PMID:24718346

  13. A combined experimental and computational study of the molecular interactions between anionic ibuprofen and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Escobar, Andy; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Guerra, Doris; Hadad, C. Z.; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we report a detailed study of the microsolvation of anionic ibuprofen, Ibu-. Stochastic explorations of the configurational spaces for the interactions of Ibu- with up to three water molecules at the DFT level lead to very rich and complex potential energy surfaces. Our results suggest that instead of only one preponderant structure, a collection of isomers with very similar energies would have significant contributions to the properties of the solvated drug. One of these properties is the shift on the vibrational frequencies of the asymmetric stretching band of the carboxylate group in hydrated Ibu- with respect to the anhydrous drug, whose experimental values are nicely reproduced using the weighted contribution of the structures. We found at least three types of stabilizing interactions, including conventional CO_2^-\\cdotsH2O, H2O⋯H2O charge assisted hydrogen bonds (HBs), and less common H2O⋯H-C and H2O⋯π interactions. Biological water molecules, those in direct contact with Ibu-, prefer to cluster around the carboxylate oxygen atoms via cyclic or bridged charge assisted hydrogen bonds. Many of those interactions are strongly affected by the formal carboxylate charge, resulting in "enhanced" HBs with increased strengths and degree of covalency. We found striking similarities between this case and the microsolvation of dymethylphosphate, which lead us to hypothesize that since microsolvation of phosphatidylcholine depends mainly on the formal charge of its ionic PO_2^- group in the polar head, then microsolvation of anionic ibuprofen and interactions of water molecules with eukaryotic cell membranes are governed by the same types of physical interactions.

  14. A combined experimental and computational study of the molecular interactions between anionic ibuprofen and water

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata-Escobar, Andy; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Guerra, Doris; Hadad, C. Z.; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report a detailed study of the microsolvation of anionic ibuprofen, Ibu{sup −}. Stochastic explorations of the configurational spaces for the interactions of Ibu{sup −} with up to three water molecules at the DFT level lead to very rich and complex potential energy surfaces. Our results suggest that instead of only one preponderant structure, a collection of isomers with very similar energies would have significant contributions to the properties of the solvated drug. One of these properties is the shift on the vibrational frequencies of the asymmetric stretching band of the carboxylate group in hydrated Ibu{sup −} with respect to the anhydrous drug, whose experimental values are nicely reproduced using the weighted contribution of the structures. We found at least three types of stabilizing interactions, including conventional CO {sub 2}{sup −}⋯H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O⋯H{sub 2}O charge assisted hydrogen bonds (HBs), and less common H{sub 2}O⋯H–C and H{sub 2}O⋯π interactions. Biological water molecules, those in direct contact with Ibu{sup −}, prefer to cluster around the carboxylate oxygen atoms via cyclic or bridged charge assisted hydrogen bonds. Many of those interactions are strongly affected by the formal carboxylate charge, resulting in “enhanced” HBs with increased strengths and degree of covalency. We found striking similarities between this case and the microsolvation of dymethylphosphate, which lead us to hypothesize that since microsolvation of phosphatidylcholine depends mainly on the formal charge of its ionic PO {sub 2}{sup −} group in the polar head, then microsolvation of anionic ibuprofen and interactions of water molecules with eukaryotic cell membranes are governed by the same types of physical interactions.

  15. Water temperature affects pathogenicity of different betanodavirus genotypes in experimentally challenged Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Toffan, Anna; Panzarin, Valentina; Toson, Marica; Cecchettin, Krizia; Pascoli, Francesco

    2016-05-26

    Betanodaviruses are the causative agents of a highly infectious disease of fish known as viral nervous necrosis (VNN). To date, 4 different nervous necrosis virus (NNV) genotypes have been described, but natural reassortant viruses have also been detected, which further increase viral variability. Water temperature plays an important role in determining the appearance and the severity of VNN disease. We assessed the effect of temperature (20°, 25° and 30°C) on mortality and virus load in the brain of European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax experimentally infected with 4 genetically different betanodaviruses, namely red-spotted grouper NNV (RGNNV), striped jack NNV (SJNNV) and the reassortant strains RGNNV/SJNNV and SJNNV/RGNNV. The RGNNV/SJNNV virus possesses the polymerase gene of RGNNV and the coat protein gene of SJNNV, and vice versa for the SJNNV/RGNNV virus. The obtained results showed that the RGNNV strain is the most pathogenic for juvenile sea bass, but clinical disease and mortality appeared only at higher temperatures. The SJNNV strain is weakly pathogenic for D. labrax regardless of the temperature used, while virus replication was detected in the brain of survivors only at 20°C. Finally, reassortant strains caused low mortality, independent of the temperature used, but the viral load in the brain was strongly influenced by water temperature and the genetic type of the polymerase gene. Taken together, these data show that nodavirus replication in vivo is a composite process regulated by both the genetic features of the viral strain and water temperatures. PMID:27225206

  16. Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Predict the Glass-Water Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.

    2011-10-01

    The use of mineral and glass dissolution rates measured in laboratory experiments to predict the weathering of primary minerals and volcanic and nuclear waste glasses in field studies requires the construction of rate models that accurately describe the weathering process over geologic timescales. Additionally, the need to model the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass for the purpose of estimating radionuclide release rates requires that rate models be validated with long-term experiments. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)], thereby reducing the duration required to evaluate long-term performance. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that mimics the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitors the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. A one-dimensional reactive chemical transport simulation of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year-long PUF experiment was conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct bench scale laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over the length of the experiment. Over the 1.5-year-long test duration, the rate decreased from 0.2 to 0.01 g/(m2 day) based on B release for low-activity waste glass LAWA44. The observed decrease is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the decrease observed under static conditions with the SON68 glass (estimated to be a decrease by four orders of magnitude) and suggests that the gel-layer properties are less protective under these dynamic

  17. Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Predict the Glass-Water Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M; Bacon, Diana

    2011-01-01

    The use of mineral and glass dissolution rates measured in laboratory experiments to predict the weathering of primary minerals and volcanic and nuclear waste glasses in field studies requires the construction of rate models that accurately describe the weathering process over geologic time-scales. Additionally, the need to model the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass for the purpose of estimating radionuclide release rates requires that rate models are validated with long-term experiments. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test-B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)], thereby reducing the duration required to evaluate long-term performance. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that mimics the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitors the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. A one-dimensional reactive chemical transport simulation of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year long PUF experiment was conducted with the subsurface transport over reactive multi-phases code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct bench-scale laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over the length of the experiment. Over the 1.5-year long test duration, the rate decreased from 0.2 to 0.01 g/(m2 d) base on B release. The observed decrease is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the decrease observed under static conditions with the SON68 glass (estimated to be a decrease by 4 orders of magnitude) and suggest the gel-layer properties are less protective under these dynamic conditions.

  18. Photo-active and dynamical properties of hematite (Fe2O3)-water interfaces: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    English, Niall J; Rahman, Mahfujur; Wadnerkar, Nitin; MacElroy, J M D

    2014-07-28

    The dynamical properties of physically and chemically adsorbed water molecules at pristine hematite-(001) surfaces have been studied by means of equilibrium Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) in the NVT ensemble at 298 K. The dissociation of water molecules to form chemically adsorbed species was scrutinised, in addition to 'hopping' or swapping events of protons between water molecules. Particular foci have been dynamical properties of the adsorbed water molecules and OH(-) and H3O(+) ions, the hydrogen bonds between protons in water molecules and the bridging oxygen atoms at the hematite surface, as well as the interactions between oxygen atoms in adsorbed water molecules and iron atoms at the hematite surface. Experimental results for photoelectrical current generation complement simulation findings of water dissociation. PMID:24525830

  19. Carbon dioxide flux and net primary production of a boreal treed bog: Responses to warming and water-table-lowering simulations of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, T. M.; Perkins, M.; Kaing, E.; Strack, M.

    2015-02-01

    Midlatitude treed bogs represent significant carbon (C) stocks and are highly sensitive to global climate change. In a dry continental treed bog, we compared three sites: control, recent (1-3 years; experimental) and older drained (10-13 years), with water levels at 38, 74 and 120 cm below the surface, respectively. At each site we measured carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and estimated tree root respiration (Rr; across hummock-hollow microtopography of the forest floor) and net primary production (NPP) of trees during the growing seasons (May to October) of 2011-2013. The CO2-C balance was calculated by adding the net CO2 exchange of the forest floor (NEff-Rr) to the NPP of the trees. From cooler and wetter 2011 to the driest and the warmest 2013, the control site was a CO2-C sink of 92, 70 and 76 g m-2, the experimental site was a CO2-C source of 14, 57 and 135 g m-2, and the drained site was a progressively smaller source of 26, 23 and 13 g CO2-C m-2. The short-term drainage at the experimental site resulted in small changes in vegetation coverage and large net CO2 emissions at the microforms. In contrast, the longer-term drainage and deeper water level at the drained site resulted in the replacement of mosses with vascular plants (shrubs) on the hummocks and lichen in the hollows leading to the highest CO2 uptake at the drained hummocks and significant losses in the hollows. The tree NPP (including above- and below-ground growth and litter fall) in 2011 and 2012 was significantly higher at the drained site (92 and 83 g C m-2) than at the experimental (58 and 55 g C m-2) and control (52 and 46 g C m-2) sites. We also quantified the impact of climatic warming at all water table treatments by equipping additional plots with open-top chambers (OTCs) that caused a passive warming on average of ~ 1 °C and differential air warming of ~ 6 °C at midday full sun over the study years. Warming significantly enhanced shrub growth and the CO2 sink function of the drained

  20. Sorption and desorption of atrazine and diuron onto water dispersible soil primary size fractions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Keller, Arturo A

    2009-03-01

    In this study, a low energy separation method was employed to separate water dispersible clay-, silt-, and sand-sized fractions. The batch equilibrium method was used to conduct atrazine and diuron sorption/desorption experiments with the bulk soils and their size fractions separately. A Freundlich sorption model provided the best fit for all sorption and desorption data. A mass balance calculation, taking into account the pesticide concentration differences in the size fraction and bulk soil, showed that pesticide sorption onto the different size fractions reproduces well the total amount of the pesticide sorbed onto the bulk soils. Due to their higher soil organic carbon content, the clay fractions were much more effective sorbents for the pesticides than the bulk soils, silt, and sand fractions. For all soils, the amount of the pesticide sorbed onto the clay fractions was more than 20% of the total amount of the pesticide sorbed by the bulk soils even though the clay fractions in these soils were only 5.3-14.0% (by weight). The clay fractions had the highest desorption hysteresis among all size fractions and the bulk soils, followed by silt fractions, implying the clay fractions had the strongest bound and least desorbable pesticide molecules. Our results suggest that attention should be paid to the pesticide sorbed to the smallest colloids, the water dispersible fraction, which can be potentially mobilized under field conditions, leading to wide spreading of contamination. PMID:19147172

  1. Kinetic and Statistical Analysis of Primary Circuit Water Chemistry Data in a VVER Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Gabor; Tilky, Peter; Horvath, Akos; Pinter, Tamas; Schiller, Robert

    2001-12-15

    The results of chemical and radiochemical analyses of the primary circuit coolant liquid, obtained between 1995 and 1999 at the four VVER-type blocks of the Paks (Hungary) nuclear power station, are assessed. A model has been developed regarding the pressure vessel with its auxiliary parts plus the fuel elements as the zone, with the six steam generators as one single unit. The stream from the steam generator is split, with its larger part returning to the zone through the main circulating pump and the smaller one passing through the purifier column. Based on this flowchart, the formation kinetics of corrosion products and of radioactive substances are evaluated. Correlation analysis is applied to reveal any eventual interdependence of the processes, whereas the range-per-scatter (R/S) method is used to characterize the random or deterministic nature of a process. The evaluation of the t {yields} {infinity} limits of the kinetic equations enables one to conclude that (a) the total amount of corrosion products per element during one cycle is almost always <15 kg and (b) the zone acts as a highly efficient filter with an efficiency of {approx}1. The R/S results show that the fluctuations in the concentrations of the corrosion products are persistent; this finding indicates that random effects play here little if any role and that the processes in the coolant are under control. Correlation analyses show that the variations of the concentrations are practically uncorrelated and that the processes are independent of each other.

  2. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  3. An MMP13-Selective Inhibitor Delays Primary Tumor Growth and the Onset of Tumor-Associated Osteolytic Lesions in Experimental Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manisha; Huang, Dexing; Blick, Tony; Connor, Andrea; Reiter, Lawrence A.; Hardink, Joel R.; Lynch, Conor C.; Waltham, Mark; Thompson, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13)-selective inhibitor, 5-(4-{4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-oxazol-2-yl]phenoxy}phenoxy)-5-(2-methoxyethyl) pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (Cmpd-1), on the primary tumor growth and breast cancer-associated bone remodeling using xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. We used human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated into the mammary fat pad and left ventricle of BALB/c Nu/Nu mice, respectively, and spontaneously metastasizing 4T1.2-Luc mouse mammary cells inoculated into mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. In a prevention setting, treatment with Cmpd-1 markedly delayed the growth of primary tumors in both models, and reduced the onset and severity of osteolytic lesions in the MDA-MB-231 intracardiac model. Intervention treatment with Cmpd-1 on established MDA-MB-231 primary tumors also significantly inhibited subsequent growth. In contrast, no effects of Cmpd-1 were observed on soft organ metastatic burden following intracardiac or mammary fat pad inoculations of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1.2-Luc cells respectively. MMP13 immunostaining of clinical primary breast tumors and experimental mice tumors revealed intra-tumoral and stromal expression in most tumors, and vasculature expression in all. MMP13 was also detected in osteoblasts in clinical samples of breast-to-bone metastases. The data suggest that MMP13-selective inhibitors, which lack musculoskeletal side effects, may have therapeutic potential both in primary breast cancer and cancer-induced bone osteolysis. PMID:22253746

  4. Liquid chromatographic determination of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, p-toluenesulfonamide, in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Verdel K.; Davis, Ruth A.

    1997-01-01

    N-sodium-N-chloro-rho-toluenesulfonamide (chloramine-T) effectively controls bacterial gill disease (BGD) in cultured fishes, BGD, a common disease of hatchery-reared salmonids, causes more fish losses than any other disease among these species. This study describes a liquid chromatographic (LC) method that is capable of direct, simultaneous analysis of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, rho-toluenesulfonamide (rho-TSA), in water. The procedure involves reversed-phase (C-18) LC analysis with ion suppression, using 0.01 M phosphate buffer at pH 3. The mobile phase is phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (60 + 40) at 1 mL/min. Both chemicals can be detected with a UV spectrophotometer at 229 nm; the method is linear up to 40 mg, chloramine-T or rho-TSA/L. Mean recoveries were 96.4 +/- 6.1% for water samples fortified with 0.03 mg chloramine-T/L and 95.3 +/- 4.6% for water samples fortified with 0.005 mg rho-TSA/L. Limits of detection without sample enrichment for chloramine-T and rho-TSA are 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L, respectively.

  5. Liquid chromatographic determination of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, p-toluenesulfonamide, in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Davis, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    N-sodium-N-chloro-rho-toluenesulfonamide (chloramine-T) effectively controls bacterial gill disease (BGD) in cultured fishes, BGD, a common disease of hatchery-reared salmonids, causes more fish losses than any other disease among these species, This study describes a liquid chromatographic (LC) method that is capable of direct, simultaneous analysis of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, rho-toluenesulfonamide (rho-TSA), in water. The procedure involves reversed-phase (C-18) LC analysis with ion suppression, using 0.01 M phosphate buffer at pH 3. The mobile phase is phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (60 + 40) at 1 mL/min. Both chemicals can be detected with a UV spectrophotometer at 229 nm; the method is linear up to 40 mg, chloramine-T or rho-TSA/L. Mean recoveries were 96.4 +/- 6.1% for water samples fortified with 0.03 mg chloramine-T/L and 95.3 +/- 4.6% for water samples fortified with 0.005 mg rho-TSA/L. Limits of detection without sample enrichment for chloramine-T and rho-TSA are 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L, respectively.

  6. Effect of Water Stress on Cortical Cell Division Rates within the Apical Meristem of Primary Roots of Maize.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, M. M.; Silk, W. K.; Burman, P.

    1997-01-01

    We characterized the effect of water stress on cell division rates within the meristem of the primary root of maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. As usual in growth kinematics, cell number density is found by counting the number of cells per small unit length of the root; growth velocity is the rate of displacement of a cellular particle found at a given distance from the apex; and the cell flux, representing the rate at which cells are moving past a spatial point, is defined as the product of velocity and cell number density. The local cell division rate is estimated by summing the derivative of cell density with respect to time, and the derivative of the cell flux with respect to distance. Relatively long (2-h) intervals were required for time-lapse photography to resolve growth velocity within the meristem. Water stress caused meristematic cells to be longer and reduced the rates of cell division, per unit length of tissue and per cell, throughout most of the meristem. Peak cell division rate was 8.2 cells mm-1 h-1 (0.10 cells cell-1 h-1) at 0.8 mm from the apex for cells under water stress, compared with 13 cells mm-1 h-1 (0.14 cells cell-1 h-1) at 1.0 mm for controls. PMID:12223725

  7. [EXPERIMENTAL GROUNDS ON POSSIBILITY TO MAKE AND TO USE PREDICTION MODELS OF PESTICIDES DESIGN STANDARD IN THE WATER OF PONDS USED FOR HOUSEHOLD AND DRINKING WATER SUPPLY].

    PubMed

    Vavrinevych, O P; Omel'chuk, S T

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account the fact that current calculation methods for substantiation of standards in the water of water reservoirs valid in Ukraine are outdated the aim of our research was to scientifically substantiate the possibility to make and to use prediction models of pesticides design standard in the water of ponds used for household and drinking water supply. Array of experimentally substantiated and approved to use in Ukraine maximum allowable concentrations (MAC) of organic pesticides active ingredients in the water was analyzed (n = 201). Analysis of dependence between MAC value of pesticides in the water and its physical and chemical properties, indices of ecotoxicological hazard and persistency in the water was carried out using correlation and regression analysis methods. Twelve regression equations to establish design value of pesticides MAC in the water were proposed on the grounds of performed analysis. The results of reliability testing of proposed procedure on pesticides design tentatively allowable levels (TAL) in the water indicate on needs to apply the least value of TAL obtained in the process of calculations using proposed equations. It was proved that mathematical models proposed for prediction of pesticide design standard in the water are adequate and significant by Fisher's test (P < 0.05). Proposed algorithm allows considerably simplify procedure of obtaining temporary hygienic standard in the water for new pesticides. PMID:27491169

  8. Toward Obtaining the Experimental Constraints on the Role of Water on Melting Under the Lower Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amulele, G.; Lee, K. K.; Karato, S.

    2012-12-01

    Water and other volatile components (such as carbon dioxide) are known to have important influence on the melting behavior of silicates. The role of these components on the melting under the upper mantle conditions is now reasonably well understood. Recent experimental studies in our lab as well as some of the previous studies do show that water has an important influence on the melting relationship under the lower mantle conditions. The influence of water is not only to reduce the solidus but also to change the composition of the melt to (Mg,Fe)O rich. Quantifying these observations is essential in the understanding of chemical evolution of Earth and other planets. However, there are several challenges in performing these experimental studies. In this presentation, we discuss the issue of quantifying the water effects with special attention to the capability of preserving water content during the high pressure-temperature experiments. The issue of the preservation of water is important firstly because water could escape from a capsule during an experiment, and secondly because the melt is unquenchable in a commonly used processes under the lower mantle conditions. A commonly used practice is to identify the deficit of EPMA measurement from 100% to the water content, but there is no sound basis for this practice. In this presentation, we will show some preliminary results of our new approach to quantify the water content from the high-pressure run products containing melts.

  9. The Effects of Metallurgical Factors on PWSCC Crack Growth Rates in TT Alloy 690 in Simulated PWR Primary Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Watanabe, Masashi; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking growth rates (PWSCCGRs) in highly cold-worked thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 have been recently reported as exhibiting significant heat-to-heat variability. Authors hypothesized that these significant differences could be due to the metallurgical characteristics of each heat. In order to confirm this hypothesis, the effect of fundamental metallurgical characteristics on PWSCCGR measurements in cold-worked TT Alloy 690 has been investigated. The following new observations were made in this study: (1) Microcracks and voids were observed in or near eutectic crystals of grain boundary (GB) M23C6 carbides (primary carbides) after cold rolling, but were not observed before cold rolling. These primary carbides with microcracks and voids were observed in both lightly forged and as-cast and cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 (heat A) as well as in a cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 (heat Y) that simulated the chemical composition and carbide banded structure of the material previously tested by Paraventi and Moshier. However, this was not observed in precipitated (secondary) M23C6 GB carbides in heavily forged and cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 heat A and a cold-rolled commercial TT Alloy 690. (2) From microstructural analyses carried out on the various TT Alloy 690 test materials before and after cold rolling, the amount of eutectic crystals (primary carbides and nitrides) M23C6 and TiN depended on the chemical composition. In particular, the amount of M23C6 depended on the fabrication process. Microcracks and voids in or near the M23C6 and TiN precipitates were generated by the cold rolling process. (3) The PWSCCGRs observed in TT Alloy 690 were different for each heat and fabrication process. The PWSCCGR decreased with increasing Vickers hardness of each heat. However, for the same heats and fabrication processes, the PWSCCGR increased with increasing Vickers hardness due to cold work. Thus, the PWSCCGR must be affected not only by hardness (or

  10. Impacts of climate and land use change on ecosystem hydrology and net primary productivity: Linking water availability to food security in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangal, S. R. S.; Tian, H.; Pan, S.; Zhang, B.; Yang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The nexus approach to food, water and energy security in Asia is extremely important and relevant as the region has to feed two-third of the world's population and accounts for 59% of the global water consumption. The distribution pattern of food, water and energy resources have been shaped by the legacy effect of both natural and anthropogenic disturbances and therefore are vulnerable to climate change and human activities including land use/cover change (LUCC) and land management (irrigation and nitrogen fertilization). In this study, we used the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM) to examine the effects of climate change, land use/cover change, and land management practices (irrigation and nitrogen fertilization) on the spatiotemporal trends and variability in water availability and its role in limiting net primary productivity (NPP) and food security in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Our specific objectives are to quantify how climate change, LUCC and other environmental changes have interactively affected carbon and water dynamics across the Asian region. In particular, we separated the Asian region into several sub-region based on the primary limiting factor - water, food and energy. We then quantified how changes in environmental factors have altered the water and food resources during the past century. We particularly focused on Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and water cycle (Evapotranspiration, discharge, and runoff) as a measure of available food and water resources, respectively while understanding the linkage between food and water resources in Asia.

  11. [The use of potassium-magnesium-sodium chloride-sulfate mineral water and direct current (experimental research)].

    PubMed

    Mishchuk, A V; Gereliuk, I P

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate a therapeutic potential of a test treatment of chronic hepatitis with mineral water followed by hepatic galvanization, the authors have conducted an experimental study on 38 rats. The animals were divided into 4 experimental and 4 control groups. Experimental animals of groups 1 and 2 underwent galvanization of the liver 1 hour after the intake of mineral water in combination with 22Na-labelled sodium chloride, of group 3 in combination with 35S-labelled sodium sulfate, of group 4--with labelled rubidium. Control animals were treated according to the same schedule but galvanization. The study of the hepatic tissue of the sacrificed rats evidenced that oral administration of mineral water followed in an hour by hepatic galvanization results in a significant elevation of hepatic content of labelled sulphur and rubidium, whereas the level of labelled sodium remained unchanged. The data obtained by the authors need to be confirmed in further clinical trials. PMID:2800438

  12. Correlations between ab initio and experimental data for isolated H-bonded complexes of water with nitrogen bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, G.; Smets, J.; Adamowicz, L.; McCarthy, W.; Van Bael, M. K.; Houben, L.; Schoone, K.

    1997-06-01

    Correlations between selected ab initio predicted and experimentally observed properties of 1:1 H-bonded complexes of pyridines, pyrimidines, and imidazoles with water are investigated. Relationships are found between the experimental properties of proton affinity and water frequency shift, and the ab initio calculated bond distances, interaction energies and water frequency shifts. It is also found that well-defined relations can be established between calculated and observed properties for the pyridine complexes, but these cannot be reliably extended to the other N-base systems. The similarities demonstrate that the presently available ab initio methods are useful in predicting the experimental behaviour of H-bonded systems, but only for closely related molecules.

  13. A Review of the Experimental and Modeling Development of a Water Phase Change Heat Exchanger for Future Exploration Support Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas; Leimkuehler, Thomas; Ramaswamy, Balasubramaniam; Nayagam, Vedha; Hasan, Mohammad; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Water affords manifold benefits for human space exploration. Its properties make it useful for the storage of thermal energy as a Phase Change Material (PCM) in thermal control systems, in radiation shielding against Solar Particle Events (SPE) for the protection of crew members, and it is indisputably necessary for human life support. This paper envisions a single application for water which addresses these benefits for future exploration support vehicles and it describes recent experimental and modeling work that has been performed in order to arrive at a description of the thermal behavior of such a system. Experimental units have been developed and tested which permit the evaluation of the many parameters of design for such a system with emphasis on the latent energy content, temperature rise, mass, and interstitial material geometry. The experimental results are used to develop a robust and well correlated model which is intended to guide future design efforts toward the multi-purposed water PCM heat exchanger envisioned.

  14. Modeling the radiolysis of supercritical water by fast neutrons: density dependence of the yields of primary species at 400°c.

    PubMed

    Butarbutar, Sofia Loren; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Guzonas, David A; Stuart, Craig R; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2014-12-01

    A reliable understanding of radiolysis processes in supercritical water (SCW)-cooled reactors is crucial to developing chemistry control strategies that minimize the corrosion and degradation of materials. However, directly measuring the chemistry in reactor cores is difficult due to the extreme conditions of high temperature and pressure and mixed neutron and gamma-radiation fields, which are incompatible with normal chemical instrumentation. Thus, chemical models and computer simulations are an important route of investigation for predicting the detailed radiation chemistry of the coolant in a SCW reactor and the consequences for materials. Surprisingly, information on the fast neutron radiolysis of water at high temperatures is limited, and even more so for fast neutron irradiation of SCW. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the G values for the primary species e(-)aq, H(•), H2, (•)OH and H2O2 formed from the radiolysis of pure, deaerated SCW (H2O) by 2 MeV monoenergetic neutrons at 400°C as a function of water density in the range of ∼0.15-0.6 g/cm(3). The 2 MeV neutron was taken as representative of a fast neutron flux in a reactor. For light water, the moderation of these neutrons after knock-on collisions with water molecules generated mostly recoil protons of 1.264, 0.465, 0.171 and 0.063 MeV. Neglecting oxygen ion recoils and assuming that the most significant contribution to the radiolysis came from these first four recoil protons, the fast neutron yields were estimated as the sum of the G values for these protons after appropriate weightings were applied according to their energy. Calculated yields were compared with available experimental data and with data obtained for low-LET radiation. Most interestingly, the reaction of H(•) atoms with water was found to play a critical role in the formation yields of H2 and (•)OH at 400°C. Recent work has underscored the potential importance of this reaction above 200°C, but its

  15. The LuNa project: experimental didactic modules exploiting portable setups to teach optics in primary and secondary schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondani, Maria; Allevi, Alessia; Nardo, Luca; Favale, Fabrizio

    2014-07-01

    The "LuNa" (La natura della Luce nella luce della Natura - The nature of Light in the light of Nature) Project is devoted to the experimental teaching of optics in the different school grades. The basic idea of the Project is that the history of optics and the debate about the nature of light are a meaningful example of how science proceeds in the development of a physical model. Moreover optical phenomena can be presented at different levels of complexity in order to be accessible to students of different age. At the core of the Project are several portable setups that support experimental and partially interactive lectures covering all the aspects of optical phenomena, from geometrical optics to single-photon interference passing through atmospheric optics, spectroscopy, holography and theory of perception. When possible, the setups are realized with simple and easy to find materials so as to be reproducible by teachers and students. Of course, for the most complicated setups (interferometers and holography) research materials are used. Each module is calibrated to fit teachers' requirements either to be included in the curricula of their classes or to be used as an expansion of the optics program.

  16. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Water: Performance and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, Darius D.

    This experimental study investigated the thermal hydraulic behavior and boiling mechanisms present in a scaled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). The experimental facility reflects a ¼ scale model of one conceptual design for decay heat removal in advanced GenIV nuclear reactors. Radiant heaters supply up to 25 kW/m2 onto a three parallel riser tube and cooling panel test section assembly, representative of a 5° sector model of the full scale concept. Derived similarity relations have preserved the thermal hydraulic flow patterns and integral system response, ensuring relevant data and similarity among scales. Attention will first be given to the characterization of design features, form and heat losses, nominal behavior, repeatability, and data uncertainty. Then, tests performed in single-phase have evaluated the steady-state behavior. Following, the transition to saturation and subsequent boiling allowed investigations onto four parametric effects at two-phase flow and will be the primary focus area of remaining analysis. Baseline conditions at two-phase flow were defined by 15.19 kW of heated power and 80% coolant inventory, and resulted in semi-periodic system oscillations by the mechanism of hydrostatic head fluctuations. Void generation was the result of adiabatic expansion of the fluid due to a reduction in hydrostatic head pressure, a phenomena similar to flashing. At higher powers of 17.84 and 20.49 kW, this effect was augmented, creating large flow excursions that followed a smooth and sinusoidal shaped path. Stabilization can occur if the steam outflow condition incorporates a nominal restriction, as it will serve to buffer the short time scale excursions of the gas space pressure and dampen oscillations. The influences of an inlet restriction, imposed by an orifice plate, introduced subcooling boiling within the heated core and resulted in chaotic interactions among the parallel risers. The penultimate parametric examined effects of boil-off and

  17. Testing geochemical models of bentonite pore water evolution against laboratory experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, David; Arthur, Randy; Watson, Claire; Wilson, James; Strömberg, Bo

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. Previous modelling approaches have tended to ignore clay dissolution-precipitation reactions, a consequence of which is that montmorillonite is theoretically preserved indefinitely in the repository system. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid evolution model, that incorporates clay dissolution-precipitation reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using different computer codes (Geochemist’s Workbench, PHREEQC, and QPAC) to test the applicability of this model. Thermodynamic data for the Gibb’s free energy of formation of MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods (‘Polymer’ and ‘Vieillard’ Models). Simulations of ‘end-point’ pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO 2 (with log PCO 2 values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second set of calculations investigated disequilibrium between clay and pore fluid in laboratory squeezing cell tests involving pure water (pH = 9.0) or a 1 M NaOH solution (pH = 12.1). Simulations carried out for 100 days (the same timescale as the experiments) showed that smectite remained far from equilibrium throughout, and that the lowering of pH due to smectite hydrolysis was trivial. However, extending the

  18. Primary description of surface water phytoplankton pigment patterns in the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, R. K.; Anil, A. C.; Narale, D. D.; Chitari, R. R.; Kulkarni, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in surface water phytoplankton pigment distribution in the Bay of Bengal were studied during the spring intermonsoon (SpIM, February-April) and the commencement of the summer monsoon (CSM, May-June), using pigment and diagnostic indices. The Prokaryotic pigment index (Prok DP) was dominant at all the oceanic stations whereas the Flagellate pigment index (Flag DP) was dominant at the near coastal stations. However, during the commencement of summer monsoon, an oscillation in the dominance of Prok DP and Flag DP was observed in the central oceanic bay, whereas flagellates and diatoms were dominant at the near coastal stations. This change in pigment pattern is possibly related to the influence of rainfall. Comparison of pigment data with microscopic cell counts indicated a significant relationship between the diatom pigment index (Diat DP) and diatom abundance. However, the relationship between the dinoflagellate pigment index (Dino DP) and dinoflagellate abundance was not significant. Studies coupling pigment composition analysis with microscopic analysis of phytoplankton in natural conditions should thus be a prerequisite in establishing valid biogeochemical and ecosystem models.

  19. Landscape configuration is the primary driver of impacts on water quality associated with agricultural expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Hamel, Perrine; Sharp, Richard; Kowal, Virgina; Wolny, Stacie; Sim, Sarah; Mueller, Carina

    2016-07-01

    Corporations and other multinational institutions are increasingly looking to evaluate their innovation and procurement decisions over a range of environmental criteria, including impacts on ecosystem services according to the spatial configuration of activities on the landscape. We have developed a spatially explicit approach and modeled a hypothetical corporate supply chain decision representing contrasting patterns of land-use change in four regions of the globe. This illustrates the effect of introducing spatial considerations in the analysis of ecosystem services, specifically sediment retention. We explored a wide variety of contexts (Iowa, USA; Mato Grosso, Brazil; and Jiangxi and Heilongjiang in China) and these show that per-area representation of impacts based on the physical characterization of a region can be misleading. We found two- to five-fold differences in sediment export for the same amount of habitat conversion within regions characterized by similar physical traits. These differences were mainly determined by the distance between land use changes and streams. The influence of landscape configuration is so dramatic that it can override wide variation in erosion potential driven by physical factors like soil type, slope, and climate. To minimize damage to spatially-dependent ecosystem services like water purification, sustainable sourcing strategies should not assume a direct correlation between impact and area but rather allow for possible nonlinearity in impacts, especially in regions with little remaining habitat and highly variable hydrological connectivity.

  20. Primary disassembly of Light Water Breeder Reactor modules for core evaluation (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, R.J.; Miller, E.L.

    1987-10-01

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to disassemble LWBR fuel modules for subsequent proof-of-breeding (POB) and core examination operations. Included are discussions of module handling fixtures and equipment, the underwater milling machine and bandsaw assemblies, and the associated design and operation of this equipment for LWBR fuel module disassembly.

  1. Fibrin glue protection of primary anastomosis in the obstructed left colon. An experimental study on the rat.

    PubMed

    Hulkko, O A; Haukipuro, K A; Laitinen, S T

    1988-01-01

    A left-sided colon obstruction was produced with a polypropylene sling in 65 rats. Colon resection and primary anastomosis were performed three days later. The animals were then randomly allocated to the FG (fibrin glue) group receiving sealing of the anastomosis with 0.4 ml of fibrin glue (Beriplast R), or to the NG (non-glue) group. The anastomoses were assessed 30 min, two days and four days later. Adhesion formation was similar in both groups. The number of macroscopic or radiological leakages did not differ either. At 30 min the mean bursting pressure was 74.6 +/- 8.6 (SD) mmHg in the FG group and 58.3 +/- 21.6 mmHg in NG (non-glue) group (p less than 0.05, Mann-Whitney test). Later on the strength of the anastomoses was equal in both groups. We conclude that the initial sealing of weak points in the anastomoses was beneficial but the inherent strength per se could not be enhanced. PMID:2451367

  2. Coupling gross primary production and transpiration for a consistent estimate of canopy water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yebra, Marta; van Dijk, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of transpiration or evapotranspiration per unit gross (GPP) or net CO2 uptake) is key in all areas of plant production and forest management applications. Therefore, mutually consistent estimates of GPP and transpiration are needed to analysed WUE without introducing any artefacts that might arise by combining independently derived GPP and ET estimates. GPP and transpiration are physiologically linked at ecosystem level by the canopy conductance (Gc). Estimates of Gc can be obtained by scaling stomatal conductance (Kelliher et al. 1995) or inferred from ecosystem level measurements of gas exchange (Baldocchi et al., 2008). To derive large-scale or indeed global estimates of Gc, satellite remote sensing based methods are needed. In a previous study, we used water vapour flux estimates derived from eddy covariance flux tower measurements at 16 Fluxnet sites world-wide to develop a method to estimate Gc using MODIS reflectance observations (Yebra et al. 2013). We combined those estimates with the Penman-Monteith combination equation to derive transpiration (T). The resulting T estimates compared favourably with flux tower estimates (R2=0.82, RMSE=29.8 W m-2). Moreover, the method allowed a single parameterisation for all land cover types, which avoids artefacts resulting from land cover classification. In subsequent research (Yebra et al, in preparation) we used the same satellite-derived Gc values within a process-based but simple canopy GPP model to constrain GPP predictions. The developed model uses a 'big-leaf' description of the plant canopy to estimate the mean GPP flux as the lesser of a conductance-limited and radiation-limited GPP rate. The conductance-limited rate was derived assuming that transport of CO2 from the bulk air to the intercellular leaf space is limited by molecular diffusion through the stomata. The radiation-limited rate was estimated assuming that it is proportional to the absorbed photosynthetically

  3. Modeling the underwater light field fluctuations in coastal oceanic waters: Validation with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundarabalan, Balasubramanian; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Ahn, Yu-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    Modeling of the wave-induced underwater light fluctuations at near-surface depths in coastal oceanic waters is challenging because of the surface roughness and strong anisotropic effects of the light field. In the present work, a simple and computationally efficient radiative transfer model is used for the wind-driven sea surface for simulating underwater light fields such as downwelling irradiance ( E d ), upwelling irradiance ( E u ), and upwelling radiance ( L u ) in a spatial domain. It is an extension of our previous work that essentially combines the air-sea interface of the wind-driven sea surface with transmittance and reflectance along with the diffuse and direct components of the homogenous and inhomogeneous water column. The present model simulates underwater light fields for any possible values of absorption and backscattering coefficients. To assess the performance of the model, the E d , E u , and L u profiles predicted by the model are compared with experimental data from relatively clear and turbid coastal waters. Statistical results show significantly low mean relative differences regardless of the wavelength. Comparison of the simulated and in-situ time series data measured over rough sea surfaces demonstrates that model-observation agreement is good for the present model. The Hydrolight model when implemented with the modified bottom reflectance and phase function provides significantly better results than the original Hydrolight model without consideration of the bottom slope and vertically varying phase function. However, these results are non-spatial and have errors fluctuating at different wavelengths. To further demonstrate the efficiency of the present model, spatial distribution patterns of the underwater light fields are simulated based on the measured data from a coastal station for different solar zenith angles (under sunny condition). Simulated wave-induced fluctuations of the underwater lights fields show a good consistency with in

  4. Experimental studies of alunite: II. Rates of alunite-water alkali and isotope exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffregen, R.E.; Rye, R.O.; Wasserman, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rates of alkali exchange between alunite and water have been measured in hydrothermal experiments of 1 hour to 259 days duration at 150 to 400??C. Examination of run products by scanning electron microscope indicates that the reaction takes place by dissolution-reprecipitation. This exchange is modeled with an empirical rate equation which assumes a linear decrease in mineral surface area with percent exchange (f) and a linear dependence of the rate on the square root of the affinity for the alkali exchange reaction. This equation provides a good fit of the experimental data for f = 17% to 90% and yields log rate constants which range from -6.25 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 400??C to - 11.7 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 200??C. The variation in these rates with temperature is given by the equation log k* = -8.17(1000/T(K)) + 5.54 (r2 = 0.987) which yields an activation energy of 37.4 ?? 1.5 kcal/mol. For comparison, data from O'Neil and Taylor (1967) and Merigoux (1968) modeled with a pseudo-second-order rate expression give an activation energy of 36.1 ?? 2.9 kcal/mol for alkali-feldspar water Na-K exchange. In the absence of coupled alkali exchange, oxygen isotope exchange between alunite and water also occurs by dissolution-reprecipitation but rates are one to three orders of magnitude lower than those for alkali exchange. In fine-grained alunites, significant D-H exchange occurs by hydrogen diffusion at temperatures as low as 100??C. Computed hydrogen diffusion coefficients range from -15.7 to -17.3 cm2s-1 and suggest that the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion may be as low as 6 kcal/mol. These experiments indicate that rates of alkali exchange in the relatively coarse-grained alunites typical of hydrothermal ore deposits are insignificant, and support the reliability of K-Ar age data from such samples. However, the fine-grained alunites typical of low temperature settings may be susceptible to limited alkali exchange at surficial conditions which could cause

  5. Simultaneous flow of water and solutes through geological membranes-I. Experimental investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Berry, F.A.P.

    1973-01-01

    The relative retardation by geological membranes of cations and anions generally present in subsurface waters was investigated using a high pressure and high temperature 'filtration cell'. The solutions were forced through different clays and a disaggregated shale subjected to compaction pressures up to 9500 psi and to temperatures from 20 to 70??C. The overall efficiences measured increased with increase of exchange capacity of the material used and with decrease in concentration of the input solution. The efficiency of a given membrane increased with increasing compaction pressure but decreased slightly at higher temperatures for solutions of the same ionic concentration. The results further show that geological membranes are specific for different dissolved species. The retardation sequences varied depending on the material used and on experimental conditions. The sequences for monovalent and divalent cations at laboratory temperatures were generally as follows: Li < Na < NH3 < K < Rb < Cs Mg < Ca < Sr < Ba. The sequences for anions at room temperature were variable, but at 70??C, the sequence was: HCO3 < I < B < SO4 < Cl < Br. Monovalent cations contrary to some field data were generally retarded with respect to divalent cations. The differences in the filtration ratios among the divalent cations were smaller than those between the monovalent cations. The passage rate of B, HCO3, I and NH3 was greatly increased at 70??C. ?? 1973.

  6. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between oxide and silicide nuclear fuels with water

    SciTech Connect

    farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    Given some transient power/cooling mismatch is a nuclear reactor and its inability to establish the necessary core cooling, energetic fuel-coolant interactions (FCI`s commonly called `vapor explosions`) could occur as a result of the core melting and coolant contact. Although a large number of studies have been done on energetic FCI`s, very few experiments have been performed with the actual fuel materials postulated to be produced in severe accidents. Because of the scarcity of well-characterized FCI data for uranium allows in noncommercial reactors (cermet and silicide fuels), we have conducted a series of experiments to provide a data base for the foregoing materials. An existing 1-D shock-tube facility was modified to handle depleted radioactive materials (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al). Our objectives have been to determine the effects of the initial fuel composition and temperature and the driving pressure (triggering) on the explosion work output, dynamic pressures, transient temperatures, and the hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate limited energetics, mainly thermal interactions, for these fuel materials as compared to aluminum where more chemical reactions occur between the molten aluminum and water.

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E.; Aldana, J.

    1997-03-01

    The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

  8. The experimental study of Cr6+ contaminated water remediation by zero-valent nano-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. N.; Liu, A. P.; Chen, Q. F.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, researchers have developed a number of new types of zero-valent nano-Fe remediation materials applied in the remediation of contaminated soil and water, which has attracted wide attentions. This paper selected soil leaching wastewater severely contaminated by chromium as target of the study and chose zero-valent nano-Fe, Na2SO3 and NaHSO3 for comparison experiments to study the effects on removing Cr6+ under experimental conditions of different pH values, dosages and reaction times. As is shown in the experiments, zero-valent nano-Fe has the highest removal rates for Cr6+, while the reaction of Na2SO3 is the slowest under the same conditions. However, both removal rates are prone to be stable after 10 min. Dosages do not make a distinct difference and the pH value has the least effect on the repair of zero-valent nano-Fe.

  9. Experimental investigation on liquid film asymmetry in air-water horizontal annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Andriyanto; Deendarlianto, Indarto, Neo, Fredrick

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetry of circumferential liquid film thickness distribution in an air-water horizontal annular flow has been experimentally investigated using superficial gas and liquid velocity of 10 - 40 m/s and 0.025 to 0.4 m/s, respectively. In general, the film at the bottom of the pipe will be thicker than that of the side and the top. The asymmetry parameter could be expressed in the ratio of average film thickness to the bottom film thickness or the ratio of the top-to-bottom film thickness. Measurement using compact multiple probe instrument shows that the circumferential film thickness distribution is strongly affected by superficial gas velocity. The higher gas velocity results in the more uniform liquid film circumferential distribution. In comparison to the existing correlations, the asymmetry parameter resulted from the experiment shows a good agreement. It is also shown from the experiment that a less symmetry of film thickness distribution is resulted when the gravity force is dominant. A more symmetry distribution is resulted when the inertial force takes control.

  10. Experimental burial inhibits methanogenesis and anaerobic decomposition in water-saturated peats.

    PubMed

    Blodau, Christian; Siems, Melanie; Beer, Julia

    2011-12-01

    A mechanistic understanding of carbon (C) sequestration and methane (CH(4)) production is of great interest due to the importance of these processes for the global C budget. Here we demonstrate experimentally, by means of column experiments, that burial of water saturated, anoxic bog peat leads to inactivation of anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis. This effect can be related to the slowness of diffusive transport of solutes and evolving energetic constraints on anaerobic respiration. Burial lowered decomposition constants in homogenized peat sand mixtures from about 10(-5) to 10(-7) yr(-1), which is considerably slower than previously assumed, and methanogenesis slowed down in a similar manner. The latter effect could be related to acetoclastic methanogenesis approaching a minimum energy quantum of -25 kJ mol(-1) (CH(4)). Given the robustness of hydraulic properties that locate the oxic-anoxic boundary near the peatland surface and constrain solute transport deeper into the peat, this effect has likely been critical for building the peatland C store and will continue supporting long-term C sequestration in northern peatlands even under moderately changing climatic conditions. PMID:21958021

  11. The water maze paradigm in experimental studies of chronic cognitive disorders: Theory, protocols, analysis, and inference.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Minesh; Xu, Josie; Sakic, Boris

    2016-09-01

    An instrumental step in assessing the validity of animal models of chronic cognitive disorders is to document disease-related deficits in learning/memory capacity. The water maze (WM) is a popular paradigm because of its low cost, relatively simple protocol and short procedure time. Despite being broadly accepted as a spatial learning task, inference of generalized, bona fide "cognitive" dysfunction can be challenging because task accomplishment is also reliant on non-cognitive processes. We review theoretical background, testing procedures, confounding factors, as well as approaches to data analysis and interpretation. We also describe an extended protocol that has proven useful in detecting early performance deficits in murine models of neuropsychiatric lupus and Alzheimer's disease. Lastly, we highlight the need for standardization of inferential criteria on "cognitive" dysfunction in experimental rodents and exclusion of preparations of a limited scientific merit. A deeper appreciation for the multifactorial nature of performance in WM may also help to reveal other deficits that herald the onset of neurodegenerative brain disorders. PMID:27229758

  12. Hydrogen-rich water improves neurological functional recovery in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Liu, Ming-Dong; Pu, Ying-Yan; Wang, Dan; Xie, Yu; Xue, Gai-Ci; Jiang, Yong; Yang, Qian-Qian; Sun, Xue-Jun; Cao, Li

    2016-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The high costs, inconvenient administration, and side effects of current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs often lead to poor adherence to the long-term treatment of MS. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, we explored the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) on the progress of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for MS. We found that prophylactic administration of both 0.36mM and 0.89mM HRW was able to delay EAE onset and reduce maximum clinical scores. Moreover, 0.89mM HRW also reduced disease severity, CNS infiltration, and demyelination when administered after the onset of disease. Furthermore, HRW treatment prevented infiltration of CD4(+) T lymphocytes into the CNS and inhibited Th17 cell development without affecting Th1 cell populations. Because HRW is non-toxic, inexpensive, easily administered, and can readily cross the blood-brain barrier, our experiments suggest that HRW may have great potential in the treatment of MS. PMID:27138092

  13. Effects of ammonium effluents on planktonic primary production and decomposition in a coastal brackish water environment I. Nutrient balance of the water body and effluent tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamminen, T.

    Effects of ammonium discharge on the regulation of photosynthetic production was studied from June to October 1979 in the Archipelago Sea, near the entrance of the Gulf of Finland. Sampled were the inner archipelago loaded with ammonium-rich industry effluents and some stations towards the open sea. Acute effects of effluent on natural algal and bacterial communities were tested by measurements of primary productivity and heterotrophic activity. Effluent tests were also conducted with a test alga ( Chorella sp.). Nutrient ratios and AGP tests indicated that nitrogen was the principal limiting nutrient for algal growth even in the ammonium-loaded regions. Therefore, the discharge causes a considerable eutrophication in the area. Effluent concentrations from 0.01 to 1% stimulated primary productivity of natural algal communities up to 230% of the control, whereas 10% concentrations were toxic. Test algae tolerated also 10% of effluent in some cases, and showed stimulations up to 960% of the control. No stimulation of heterotrophic activity was usually detected in effluent tests, and the threshold of toxicity was considerably lower than with algae. The effect of effluents on heterotrophic bacteria of the water body is therefore likely to be mediated through autotrophic production.

  14. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-06-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa•s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa.

  15. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0-450 kPa (0-800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146-220 kPa and 221-290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0-145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85-145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  16. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  17. Improving daily water yield in the Little River Experimental Watershed: SWAT adjustments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrologic models are being used to evaluate watershed scale water quantity and quality impacts of land cover, land use, and climate change. Water quality estimates depend heavily on accurate assessment of water yield. This study was conducted to improve Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydro...

  18. Effect of surface state on the oxidation behavior of welded 308L in simulated nominal primary water of PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jiazhen; Zhu, Ruolin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The oxidation behavior of 308L weld metal (WM) with different surface state in the simulated nominal primary water of pressurized water reactor (PWR) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyzer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After 480 h immersion, a duplex oxide film composed of a Fe-rich outer layer (Fe3O4, Fe2O3 and a small amount of NiFe2O4, Ni(OH)2, Cr(OH)3 and (Ni, Fe)Cr2O4) and a Cr-rich inner layer (FeCr2O4 and NiCr2O4) can be formed on the 308L WM samples with different surface state. The surface state has no influence on the phase composition of the oxide films but obviously affects the thickness of the oxide films and the morphology of the oxides (number & size). With increasing the density of dislocations and subgrain boundaries in the cold-worked superficial layer, the thickness of the oxide film, the number and size of the oxides decrease.

  19. Indoor/outdoor of PM10 relationships and its water-soluble ions composition in selected primary schools in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Noorlin; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of PM10 and water-soluble ions were carried out on indoor and outdoor PM10 (particles > 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter) aerosols sampled at selected primary schools of Kuala Lumpur (S1) and Putrajaya (S2), respectively. Samples were collected using a low volume sampler on Teflon filters. The water-soluble ions chloride (Cl-), nitrate (NO3-), sulfate (SO42-), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+) and ammonium (NH4+) was analyzed using ion chromatography. The results showed that the indoor PM10 mass concentrations in S1 and S2 were 96.6 and 69.5 μg/m3, while the outdoor PM10 mass concentrations were 80.1 and 85.2 μg/m3, respectively. This indicated that NO3- were the most dominant ions, followed by SO42-, Ca2+, K+ and Na+, while Cl-, Mg2+ and Na+ were present at low concentrations. Pearson's correlation test applied to all the data showed high correlation between SO42- and NO3-, indicating a common anthropogenic origin. In addition, the correlations between Na+ and Ca2+ indicated crustal origins that significantly contributed to human exposure.

  20. An experimental study of the kinetics of lherzolite and basalt interaction: Effect of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Liang, Y.; Xu, W.

    2012-12-01

    Melt-rock reaction happens in the asthenospheric mantle when interstitial melt and its host mantle rock are out of chemical equilibrium. It occurs in almost all major active tectonic regimes within the upper mantle and is responsible or partially responsible for a range of petrologic and geochemical observations. Significant progresses have been made in understanding the kinetics of melt-peridotite interaction in anhydrous systems through laboratory peridotite reactive dissolution experiments. The present study focuses on the effect of water on melt-peridotite interaction, a topic that is especially relevant to magma transport in the mantle wedge. A series of hydrous basalt-lherzolite interaction experiments were conducted at 1250-1385°C and 0.8-2 GPa (3 hrs) using Au-Pd lined Mo capsules. To minimize Fe-loss, we first pre-saturated the Au-Pd-Mo capsule with the reacting melt at T-P conditions identical to dissolution runs, although Fe-unsaturated Au-Pd-Mo capsules were also used in a set of preliminary experiments. Starting material for the reacting hydrous basalt is a hornblende-bearing garnet pyroxenite (~13% Hb). For comparison, an anhydrous basalt-lherzolite dissolution experiment was also conducted at 1385°C and 2 GPa (6 hrs) using the same starting composition but a graphite-lined Mo capsule that cannot retain water in the experimental charge. In the hydrous experiments, the starting pyroxenite is completely molten and the spinel lherzolite is partially molten. A layer (100-760 μm) of mostly orthopyroxene (opx) + melt is formed between the reacting melt and starting lherzolite that has transformed into a clinopyroxene depleted harzburgite. The opx grains in the high-porosity orthopyroxenite layer are euhedral and significantly larger than olivine and opx in the harzburgite. Furthermore, these opx grains are chemically zoned, and have small olivine inclusions, suggesting the growth of opx is at the expense of olivine. The opx rims are lower in MgO and SiO2

  1. Hydrogeologic and water-quality data for the explosive experimental area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, E.C.; Bell, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic and water-quality data were collected at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site at Dahlgren, Virginia, as part of a hydrogeologic assessment of the shallow aquifer system begun in 1993. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted this study to provide the U.S. Navy with hydrogeologic data to aid in the evaluation of the effects from remediation of contaminated sites and to protect against additional contamination. This report describes the ground-water observation- well network, hydrogeologic, and water-quality data collected between October 1993 and April 1995. The report includes a description of the locations and construction of 28 observation wells on the Explosive Experimental Area. Hydrogeologic data include lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements of selected core intervals. Hydrologic data include synoptic and hourly measurements of ground-water levels, and observation-well slug tests to determine horizontal hydraulic conductivity. Water-quality data include analyses of major dissolved constituents in ground water and surface water.

  2. An experimental investigation on the effects of surface gravity waves on the water evaporation rate in different air flow regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jodat, Amin; Moghiman, Mohammad; Shirkhani, Golshad

    2013-12-01

    Estimating rate of evaporation from undisturbed water surfaces to moving and quiet air has been the topic a vast number of research activities. The obvious presence of various shapes of gravity waves on the water body surfaces was the motivation of this experimental investigation. In this investigation experimental measurements have been done to quantify evaporation rate from wavy water surfaces in free, mixed and forced convection regimes. The effects of a wide range of surface gravity waves from low steepness, round shaped crest with slow celerity, to steep and very slight spilling crest waves, on the water evaporation rate have been investigated. A wide range of was achieved by applying different air flow velocities on a large heated wave flume equipped with a wind tunnel. Results reveal that wave motion on the water surface increase the rate of evaporation for all air flow regimes. For free convection, due to the effect of wave motion for pumping rotational airflows at the wave troughs and the dominant effect of natural convection for the air flow advection, the maximum evaporation increment percentage from wavy water surface is about 70 %. For mixed and forced convection, water evaporation rate increment is more sensitive to the air flow velocity for the appearance of very slight spilling on the steep wave crests and the leeward air flow structures.

  3. Removal of TiO2 Nanoparticles During Primary Water Treatment: Role of Coagulant Type, Dose, and Nanoparticle Concentration.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryan J; Keene, Valerie; Daniels, Louise; Walker, Sharon L

    2014-03-01

    Nanomaterials from consumer products (i.e., paints, sunscreens, toothpastes, and food grade titanium dioxide [TiO2]) have the capacity to end up in groundwater and surface water, which is of concern because the effectiveness of removing them via traditional treatment is uncertain. Although aggregation and transport of nanomaterials have been investigated, studies on their removal from suspension are limited. Hence, this study involves the development of scaled-down jar tests to determine the mechanisms involved in the removal of a model metal oxide nanoparticle (NP), TiO2, in artificial groundwater (AGW), and artificial surface water (ASW) at the primary stages of treatment: coagulation, flocculation, and sedimentation. Total removal was quantified at the end of each treatment stage by spectroscopy. Three different coagulants-iron chloride (FeCl3), iron sulfate (FeSO4), and alum [Al2(SO4)3]-destabilized the TiO2 NPs in both source waters. Overall, greater than one-log removal was seen in groundwater for all coagulants at a constant dose of 50 mg/L and across the range of particle concentrations (10, 25, 50, and 100 mg/L). In surface water, greater than 90% removal was seen with FeSO4 and Al2(SO4)3, but less than 60% when using FeCl3. Additionally, removal was most effective at higher NP concentrations (50 and 100 mg/L) in AGW when compared with ASW. Zeta potential was measured and compared between AGW and ASW with the presence of all three coagulants at the same treatment stage times as in the removal studies. These electrokinetic trends confirm that the greatest total removal of NPs occurred when the magnitude of charge was smallest (<10 mV) and conversely, higher zeta potential values (>35 mV) measured were under conditions with poor removal (<90%). These results are anticipated to be of considerable interest to practitioners for the assessment of traditional treatment processes' capacity to remove nanomaterials prior to subsequent filtration and

  4. Removal of TiO2 Nanoparticles During Primary Water Treatment: Role of Coagulant Type, Dose, and Nanoparticle Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Ryan J.; Keene, Valerie; Daniels, Louise; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nanomaterials from consumer products (i.e., paints, sunscreens, toothpastes, and food grade titanium dioxide [TiO2]) have the capacity to end up in groundwater and surface water, which is of concern because the effectiveness of removing them via traditional treatment is uncertain. Although aggregation and transport of nanomaterials have been investigated, studies on their removal from suspension are limited. Hence, this study involves the development of scaled-down jar tests to determine the mechanisms involved in the removal of a model metal oxide nanoparticle (NP), TiO2, in artificial groundwater (AGW), and artificial surface water (ASW) at the primary stages of treatment: coagulation, flocculation, and sedimentation. Total removal was quantified at the end of each treatment stage by spectroscopy. Three different coagulants—iron chloride (FeCl3), iron sulfate (FeSO4), and alum [Al2(SO4)3]—destabilized the TiO2 NPs in both source waters. Overall, greater than one-log removal was seen in groundwater for all coagulants at a constant dose of 50 mg/L and across the range of particle concentrations (10, 25, 50, and 100 mg/L). In surface water, greater than 90% removal was seen with FeSO4 and Al2(SO4)3, but less than 60% when using FeCl3. Additionally, removal was most effective at higher NP concentrations (50 and 100 mg/L) in AGW when compared with ASW. Zeta potential was measured and compared between AGW and ASW with the presence of all three coagulants at the same treatment stage times as in the removal studies. These electrokinetic trends confirm that the greatest total removal of NPs occurred when the magnitude of charge was smallest (<10 mV) and conversely, higher zeta potential values (>35 mV) measured were under conditions with poor removal (<90%). These results are anticipated to be of considerable interest to practitioners for the assessment of traditional treatment processes' capacity to remove nanomaterials prior to subsequent

  5. [Experimental study of vibrio parahaemolyticus (biotype 2) transfer from water and sediments to benthic marine food chain organisms].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M J; Clement, R

    1979-04-01

    Transfer of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (biotype 2) from sediments to water and from water to benthic marine organisms was studied experimentally using a streptomycin-resistant strain. Transmission by trophic pathways was also studied using reconstituted marine food chains (Mytilus edulis, Nereis diversicolor, Carcinus maenas, Scorpaena porcus, Mus musculus). Water colonization by sediments could be observed only at temperatures above 16 degrees C. Sediments could well constitute a disseminating reservoir for these germs, their cycle in water being dependent of the cycle followed in the sediments. Contamination of animal organisms is essentially effected by a direct mean, either water or sediments; transfer by trophic pathways being negligible. Infection of land consumers (mice) is linked quantitatively to the nature of the last marine organism of the food chain since bacteria can flourish in the digestive tract of certain animals (Carcinus maenas). PMID:487292

  6. Experimental Investigations of Superheated and Supercooled Water (Review of Papers of the School of the Academician V. P. Skripov)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidakov, Vladimir G.

    The review presents the results of experimental investigations of nucleation in superheated light and heavy water in the range of nucleation rates from 104 to 1029 s-1m-3. A study is performed of the kinetics of crystallization of droplets of superheated water and amorphous water layers. Measurements have been made of the density, sound velocity, dielectric constant of light and heavy water in the vicinity of the phase equilibrium line with deep entry into the region of metastable (superheated) states. The local and integral characteristics of streams of boiling-up water flowing out into the atmosphere through a short channel have been investigated. One can see the determining role of a vapor phase in such a process at a temperature above 0.9T c , where T c is the temper-temperature at the critical point.

  7. Nonlinear low frequency water waves in a cylindrical shell subjected to high frequency excitations - Part I: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajun, Wang; Chunyan, Zhou; Li, Junbao; Shen, Song; Li, Min; Liu, Xijun

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on nonlinear low frequency gravity water waves in a partially filled cylindrical shell subjected to high frequency horizontal excitations. The characteristics of natural frequencies and mode shapes of the water-shell coupled system are discussed. The boundaries for onset of gravity waves are measured and plotted by curves of critical excitation force magnitude with respect to excitation frequency. For nonlinear water waves, the time history signals and their spectrums of motion on both water surface and shell are recorded. The shapes of water surface are also measured using scanning laser vibrometer. In particular, the phenomenon of transitions between different gravity wave patterns is observed and expressed by the waterfall graphs. These results exhibit pronounced nonlinear properties of shell-fluid coupled system.

  8. Interaction of vanadium oxide cluster anions with water: an experimental and theoretical study on reactivity and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Na; Xu, Bo; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui

    2012-05-14

    Vanadium oxide cluster anions (V(x)O(y)(-), x = 2-3; y = 3-7) are produced by laser ablation and reacted with water in a fast flow reactor. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to detect the cluster distribution before and after the reactions. Reaction channels of molecular hydrogen elimination (for V(2,3)O(3)(-)), water association (for V(2)O(5)(-) and V(3)O(6,7)(-)) and the coexistence of both channels (for V(2)O(4)(-) and V(3)O(4,5)(-)) are observed. V(2)O(6)(-) and V(3)O(8)(-) are nearly inert toward water. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to study the reaction mechanism of V(2)O(3)(-) in different spin states with water and the results support the experimental observation. The reaction mechanism of V(2)O(3)(+) with water is also studied, which is in agreement with the experimental report in previous literature [Eur. J. Inorg. Chem., 2008, 4961] that molecular hydrogen elimination is a minor reaction channel for V(2)O(3)(+) + H(2)O. The influence of cluster charge states and oxidation states of vanadium atoms on the cluster reactivity are presented based on the experimental and theoretical studies. PMID:22415418

  9. An experimental investigation on the surface water transport process over an airfoil by using a digital image projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wei, Tian; Hu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to characterize the transient behavior of the surface water film and rivulet flows driven by boundary layer airflows over a NACA0012 airfoil in order to elucidate underlying physics of the important micro-physical processes pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena. A digital image projection (DIP) technique was developed to quantitatively measure the film thickness distribution of the surface water film/rivulet flows over the airfoil at different test conditions. The time-resolved DIP measurements reveal that micro-sized water droplets carried by the oncoming airflow impinged onto the airfoil surface, mainly in the region near the airfoil leading edge. After impingement, the water droplets formed thin water film that runs back over the airfoil surface, driven by the boundary layer airflow. As the water film advanced downstream, the contact line was found to bugle locally and developed into isolated water rivulets further downstream. The front lobes of the rivulets quickly advanced along the airfoil and then shed from the airfoil trailing edge, resulting in isolated water transport channels over the airfoil surface. The water channels were responsible for transporting the water mass impinging at the airfoil leading edge. Additionally, the transition location of the surface water transport process from film flows to rivulet flows was found to occur further upstream with increasing velocity of the oncoming airflow. The thickness of the water film/rivulet flows was found to increase monotonically with the increasing distance away from the airfoil leading edge. The runback velocity of the water rivulets was found to increase rapidly with the increasing airflow velocity, while the rivulet width and the gap between the neighboring rivulets decreased as the airflow velocity increased.

  10. Changing forest water yields in response to climate warming: results from long-term experimental watershed sites across North America.

    PubMed

    Creed, Irena F; Spargo, Adam T; Jones, Julia A; Buttle, Jim M; Adams, Mary B; Beall, Fred D; Booth, Eric G; Campbell, John L; Clow, Dave; Elder, Kelly; Green, Mark B; Grimm, Nancy B; Miniat, Chelcy; Ramlal, Patricia; Saha, Amartya; Sebestyen, Stephen; Spittlehouse, Dave; Sterling, Shannon; Williams, Mark W; Winkler, Rita; Yao, Huaxia

    2014-10-01

    Climate warming is projected to affect forest water yields but the effects are expected to vary. We investigated how forest type and age affect water yield resilience to climate warming. To answer this question, we examined the variability in historical water yields at long-term experimental catchments across Canada and the United States over 5-year cool and warm periods. Using the theoretical framework of the Budyko curve, we calculated the effects of climate warming on the annual partitioning of precipitation (P) into evapotranspiration (ET) and water yield. Deviation (d) was defined as a catchment's change in actual ET divided by P [AET/P; evaporative index (EI)] coincident with a shift from a cool to a warm period - a positive d indicates an upward shift in EI and smaller than expected water yields, and a negative d indicates a downward shift in EI and larger than expected water yields. Elasticity was defined as the ratio of interannual variation in potential ET divided by P (PET/P; dryness index) to interannual variation in the EI - high elasticity indicates low d despite large range in drying index (i.e., resilient water yields), low elasticity indicates high d despite small range in drying index (i.e., nonresilient water yields). Although the data needed to fully evaluate ecosystems based on these metrics are limited, we were able to identify some characteristics of response among forest types. Alpine sites showed the greatest sensitivity to climate warming with any warming leading to increased water yields. Conifer forests included catchments with lowest elasticity and stable to larger water yields. Deciduous forests included catchments with intermediate elasticity and stable to smaller water yields. Mixed coniferous/deciduous forests included catchments with highest elasticity and stable water yields. Forest type appeared to influence the resilience of catchment water yields to climate warming, with conifer and deciduous catchments more susceptible to

  11. Changing forest water yields in response to climate warming: results from long-term experimental watershed sites across North America

    PubMed Central

    Creed, Irena F; Spargo, Adam T; Jones, Julia A; Buttle, Jim M; Adams, Mary B; Beall, Fred D; Booth, Eric G; Campbell, John L; Clow, Dave; Elder, Kelly; Green, Mark B; Grimm, Nancy B; Miniat, Chelcy; Ramlal, Patricia; Saha, Amartya; Sebestyen, Stephen; Spittlehouse, Dave; Sterling, Shannon; Williams, Mark W; Winkler, Rita; Yao, Huaxia

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming is projected to affect forest water yields but the effects are expected to vary. We investigated how forest type and age affect water yield resilience to climate warming. To answer this question, we examined the variability in historical water yields at long-term experimental catchments across Canada and the United States over 5-year cool and warm periods. Using the theoretical framework of the Budyko curve, we calculated the effects of climate warming on the annual partitioning of precipitation (P) into evapotranspiration (ET) and water yield. Deviation (d) was defined as a catchment's change in actual ET divided by P [AET/P; evaporative index (EI)] coincident with a shift from a cool to a warm period – a positive d indicates an upward shift in EI and smaller than expected water yields, and a negative d indicates a downward shift in EI and larger than expected water yields. Elasticity was defined as the ratio of interannual variation in potential ET divided by P (PET/P; dryness index) to interannual variation in the EI – high elasticity indicates low d despite large range in drying index (i.e., resilient water yields), low elasticity indicates high d despite small range in drying index (i.e., nonresilient water yields). Although the data needed to fully evaluate ecosystems based on these metrics are limited, we were able to identify some characteristics of response among forest types. Alpine sites showed the greatest sensitivity to climate warming with any warming leading to increased water yields. Conifer forests included catchments with lowest elasticity and stable to larger water yields. Deciduous forests included catchments with intermediate elasticity and stable to smaller water yields. Mixed coniferous/deciduous forests included catchments with highest elasticity and stable water yields. Forest type appeared to influence the resilience of catchment water yields to climate warming, with conifer and deciduous catchments more susceptible to

  12. Factors influencing fecundity in experimental crosses of water lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) cultivars

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding programs for the water lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) are hampered by an inability to account for variation in seed set associated with crosses between different cultivars. We studied seed set in two reciprocal crosses between lotus cultivars (‘Guili’ × ‘Aijiangnan’ and ‘Molingqiuse’ × ‘Qinhuaiyanzhi') to obtain insights into factors that govern fecundity in these experimental hybrids. Pollen viability, stigma receptivity and embryo development were compared for each hybrid and reciprocal cross. Results Pollen viability of the individual cultivars ranged from 4.1% to 20.2%, with the highest level (>11.9%) for all cultivars observed from the earliest collected grains (05:00–06:00 a.m.). Stigmatic pollen germination peaked at 4 h after pollination and varied from 4.8 to 60.6 grains per stigma among the crosses. Production of normal embryos ranged from 7.6% to 58.8% at 1 d after pollination and from 0 to 25% by 11 d after pollination. Seed set in crosses (0.2–23.3%) was generally lower than in open-pollinated plants (8.4–26.5%). Similar to the germination results, seed set was substantially reduced in both reciprocal crosses. Conclusions These results suggested that poor pollen fertility, low stigma receptivity, and embryo abortion were responsible for the failure of the crosses ‘Molingqiuse’ × ‘Qinhuaiyanzhi’, ‘Qinhuaiyanzhi’ × ‘Molingqiuse’, and ‘Aijiangnan’ × ‘Guili’. PMID:22676293

  13. Experimental Measurement of Frozen and Partially Melted Water Droplet Impact Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palacios, Jose; Yan, Sihong; Tan, Jason; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    High-speed video of single frozen water droplets impacting a surface was acquired. The droplets diameter ranged from 0.4 mm to 0.9 mm and impacted at velocities ranging from 140 m/sec to 309 m/sec. The techniques used to freeze the droplets and launch the particles against the surfaces is described in this paper. High-speed video was used to quantify the ice accretion area to the surface for varying impact angles (30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg), impacting velocities, and break-up angles. An oxygen /acetylene cross-flow flame used to ensure partial melting of the traveling frozen droplets is also discussed. A linear relationship between impact angle and ice accretion is identified for fully frozen particles. The slope of the relationship is affected by impact speed. Perpendicular impacts, i.e. 30 deg, exhibited small differences in ice accretion for varying velocities, while an increase of 60% in velocity from 161 m/sec to 259 m/sec, provided an increase on ice accretion area of 96% at an impact angle of 60 deg. The increase accretion area highlights the importance of impact angle and velocity on the ice accretion process of ice crystals. It was experimentally observed that partial melting was not required for ice accretion at the tested velocities when high impact angles were used (45 and 60 deg). Partially melted droplets doubled the ice accretion areas on the impacting surface when 0.0023 Joules were applied to the particle. The partially melted state of the droplets and a method to quantify the percentage increase in ice accretion area is also described in the paper.

  14. Comparative experimental investigation on the actuation mechanisms of ionic polymer–metal composites with different backbones and water contents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zicai; Chang, Longfei; Wang, Yanjie; Chen, Hualing; Asaka, Kinji; Zhao, Hongxia; Li, Dichen

    2014-03-28

    Water-based ionic polymer–metal composites (IPMCs) exhibit complex deformation properties, especially when the water content changes. To explore the general actuation mechanisms, both Nafion and Flemion membranes are used as the polymer backbones. IPMC deformation includes three stages: fast anode deformation, relaxation deformation, and slow anode deformation, which is mainly dependent on the water content and the backbone. When the water content decreases from 21 to 14 wt. %, Nafion–IPMC exhibits a large negative relaxation deformation, zero deformation, a positive relaxation deformation, and a positive steady deformation without relaxation in sequence. Despite the slow anode deformation, Flemion–IPMC also shows a slight relaxation deformation, which disappears when the water content is less than 13 wt. %. The different water states are investigated at different water contents using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The free water, which decreases rapidly at the beginning through evaporation, is proven to be critical for relaxation deformation. For the backbone, indirect evidence from the steady current response is correlated with the slow anode deformation of Flemion-IPMC. The latter is explained by the secondary dissociation of the weak acid group –COOH. Finally, we thoroughly explain not only the three deformations by swelling but also their evolvement with decreasing water content. A fitting model is also presented based on a multi-diffusion equation to reveal the deformation processes more clearly, the results from which are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. Deuterium stable isotope ratios as tracers of water resource use: an experimental test with rock doves.

    PubMed

    McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O; Martínez del Rio, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Naturally-occurring deuterium stable isotope ratios can potentially be used to trace water resource use by animals, but estimating the contribution of isotopically distinct water sources requires the accurate prediction of isotopic discrimination factors between water inputs and an animal's body water pool. We examined the feasibility of using estimates of water fluxes between a bird and its environment with a mass-balance model for the deuterium stable isotope ratio of avian body water (deltaDbody) to predict isotopic discrimination factors. Apparent fractionation and thus discrimination factors were predicted to vary with the proportion of an animal's total water losses than could be attributed to evaporative processes. To test our ability to predict isotopic discrimination, we manipulated water intake and evaporative water loss in rock doves (Columba livia) by providing them with fresh water or 0.15 M NaCl solution in thermoneutral or hot environments. After we switched the birds from drinking water with deltaD=-95 per thousand VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) to enriched drinking water with deltaD=+52 per thousand VSMOW, steady-state deltaDbody was approached asymptotically. The equilibrium deltaDbody was enriched by 10-50 per thousand relative to water inputs. After isotopic equilibrium was reached, the degree of enrichment was positively related (r2=0.34) to the fraction of total water loss that occurred by evaporation (revap/rH2O)supporting the major prediction of the model. The variation we observed in discrimination factors suggests that the apparent fractionation of deuterium will be difficult to predict accurately under natural conditions. Our results show that accurate estimates of the contribution of different water sources to a bird's body water pool require large deuterium isotopic differences between the sources. PMID:15185137

  16. Vegetation Responses to Future Climates: Global Variability in Water Use Efficiency and Primary Productivity in a CMIP5 Multimodel Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardes, S.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Zhang, Q.; Middleton, E.

    2015-12-01

    Climate projections for the 21st century predict substantial changes in temperature and in the quantity and spatiotemporal distribution of precipitation for large regions on the planet. Reductions in water availability resulting from decreased precipitation and increased water demand by the atmosphere can negatively affect plant metabolism, reduce carbon uptake, and limit services of entire ecosystems. Future increases in temperature and in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations may help offset some of these impacts on vegetation. In particular, plants may adjust their water use efficiency (WUE, plant production per water loss by evapotranspiration) in response to changing environmental conditions. We assessed an ensemble of thirteen models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) and analyzed future changes in climate variables, carbon mass in vegetation, vegetation primary productivity and WUE. The analysis considered two representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) for the period 2006-2099 and compared projections to historical values (1850-2005). Results include differences between historical and projected conditions for global, regional and latitudinal distributions of model outputs, for both RCPs. We observed significant intermodel variability when representing changes in WUE over the century, including high model sensitivity to different greenhouse concentration scenarios. Model agreement varied with RCP (higher agreement for RCP4.5), as well as regionally (higher agreement in Southeast Asia, lower agreement in arid areas, including the Sahara and Western Australia). The majority of models point to an increase in GPP and WUE for most of the planet under both concentration pathways, with changes ranging from zero to 100% of their historical values. These increases were observed to be consistently higher for RCP8.5. In addition, higher increases in GPP and WUE are predicted to occur over higher latitudes in the northern

  17. Influence of hydraulic regimes on bacterial community structure and composition in an experimental drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R L; Boxall, J B

    2013-02-01

    Microbial biofilms formed on the inner-pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can alter drinking water quality, particularly if they are mechanically detached from the pipe wall to the bulk water, such as due to changes in hydraulic conditions. Results are presented here from applying 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene to investigate the influence of different hydrological regimes on bacterial community structure and to study the potential mobilisation of material from the pipe walls to the network using a full scale, temperature-controlled experimental pipeline facility accurately representative of live DWDS. Analysis of pyrosequencing and water physico-chemical data showed that habitat type (water vs. biofilm) and hydraulic conditions influenced bacterial community structure and composition in our experimental DWDS. Bacterial community composition clearly differed between biofilms and bulk water samples. Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the most abundant phyla in biofilms while Alphaproteobacteria was predominant in bulk water samples. This suggests that bacteria inhabiting biofilms, predominantly species belonging to genera Pseudomonas, Zooglea and Janthinobacterium, have an enhanced ability to express extracellular polymeric substances to adhere to surfaces and to favour co-aggregation between cells than those found in the bulk water. Highest species richness and diversity were detected in 28 days old biofilms with this being accentuated at highly varied flow conditions. Flushing altered the pipe-wall bacterial community structure but did not completely remove bacteria from the pipe walls, particularly under highly varied flow conditions, suggesting that under these conditions more compact biofilms were generated. This research brings new knowledge regarding the influence of different hydraulic regimes on the composition and structure of bacterial communities within DWDS and the implication that this

  18. Tracing spatial variation of canopy water fluxes to the soil: An experimental approach to assessing heterogeneity with high resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Johanna Clara; Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Filipzik, Janett; Weckmüller, Josef; Schelhorn, Danny; Grauer, Christoph; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Due to the mechanisms of interception, stemflow and canopy throughfall, precipitation reaches a forest soil surface in an altered temporal and spatial distribution. The retention of water by canopies is contrasted by the formation of dynamic hotspots, which channel rain water down to the soil, e.g. canopy dripping points and stemflow. Throughfall patterns are often assumed to be the main driver for soil water content heterogeneity in forests, yet this relation has not been studied extensively and there is no prove to this theory. Because it is impossible to measure net precipitation input and soil water content in the same place at the same time, elaborate sampling is necessary for a data set allowing to address this subject. Within the last two years, in the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre AquaDiva, our group has established a new experimental site to investigate on the relationship of forest precipitation and soil water. We have developed an experimental design combining the measurement of throughfall, stemflow and soil water content on a 1 ha plot in a manner so all measurements are representative for the plot yet do not disturb each other. We adapted a statistical sampling method common for throughfall measurement to soil water content measurement comprising a high number of measurement points (throughfall: 350, soil water content: 210). To gain good insights in soil water dynamics and to capture preferential flow, soil water content was recorded in a high frequency (1* 6‑1 min‑1) in two soil depths. Stemflow was measured area-based on regular subplots (11% of the total plot area, 65 trees). Stand and soil surveys were made to investigate canopy impacts and identify soil-born patterns in soil water content. The plot is located in a mixed beech forest of the Hainich national park in Thuringia, Germany. Shallow loamy soils cover the lime- and marlstone bedrock. The forest plot is complemented by a smaller neighboring grassland plot acting as a

  19. Experimental study on improvement effect of guide wall to water flow in bend of spillway chute.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Diao, Yanfang; Zhai, Xingtao; Li, Shuning

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve water flow in a bend of a spillway chute using a guide wall, modeling experiments with or without a guide wall under conditions of three different bend axial radii, three chute bottom slopes and three flow rates were carried out in this study. Two indexes were calculated, which are the improved water surface uniformity and the reduced rate of water surface difference in concave and convex banks of the cross-section. The results show that: (1) setting a guide wall in a bend can improve water flow in the bend because it increased the water surface uniformity of the cross-section and reduced the water surface difference in the concave and convex banks; (2) the smaller the bend axial radius, the better the water surface improvement effect will be using a guide wall; (3) the steeper the bottom slope, the more cross-sections with less water surface difference; and (4) flow rates have a great influence on water surface improvement in the bend, and the guide wall can improve water flow obviously when the water depth in the starting section of the bend is lower than the height of the guide wall. This study has important implications in engineering design of guide walls. PMID:26877052

  20. Does Water Temperature Affect the Timing and Duration of Remigial Moult in Sea Ducks? An Experimental Approach

    PubMed Central

    Viain, Anouck; Guillemette, Magella

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic birds have high cost of thermoregulation, especially during the moulting period, yet the effect of water temperature on the moulting strategy of aquatic birds has rarely been studied. Our general hypothesis is that energy savings associated with lower thermoregulation costs would be allocated to moulting processes. We predicted that aquatic birds moulting in warm water would have a higher level of body reserves, a faster growth rate of feathers, and an earlier remigial moult onset compared with birds moulting in cold water. We used the common eider (Somateria mollissima dresseri), a large sea duck, as the model species. Captive individuals were experimentally exposed to warm (18°C) and cold (8°C) water treatments during a three year period with individuals swapped between treatments. We found a similar feather growth rate for the two water temperature treatments and in contrast to our predictions, eiders exposed to warm water had a lower body mass and showed a delayed onset of remigial moult of approximately 7 days compared with those exposed to cold water. Our data indicate that body mass variations influence the timing of moult in unexpected ways and we suggest that it likely controls the occurrence of wing moult through a hormonal cascade. This study emphasizes the importance of improving our knowledge of the effects of water temperature on remigial moult of aquatic birds, to better assert the potential effects of global warming on their survival. PMID:27177039

  1. Modeling of experimental treatment of acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-containing water using corona discharge technique.

    PubMed

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Sano, Noriaki; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2006-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-contaminated water were experimentally treated using corona discharge reactions and gas absorption in a single water-film column. Mathematical modeling of the combined treatment was developed in this work. Efficient removal of the gaseous acetaldehyde was achieved while the corona discharge reactions produced short-lived species such as O and O- as well as ozone. Direct contact of the radicals and ions with water was known to produce aqueous OH radical, which contributes to the decomposition of organic contaminants: phenol, absorbed acetaldehyde, and intermediate byproducts in the water. The influence of initial phenol concentration ranging from 15 to 50 mg L(-1) and that of influent acetaldehyde ranging from 0 to 200 ppm were experimentally investigated and used to build the math model. The maximum energetic efficiency of TOC, phenol, and acetaldehyde were obtained at 25.6 x 10(-9) mol carbon J(-1), 25.0 x 10(-9) mol phenol J(-1), and 2.0 x 10(-9) mol acetaldehyde J(-1), respectively. The predictions for the decomposition of acetaldehyde, phenol, and their intermediates were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:16568779

  2. Studies of air showers produced by primaries 10(16) eV using a combined scintillation and water-Cerenkov array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, G.; Perrett, J. C.; Watson, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    An array of 8 x 1.0 sq m plastic scintillation counters and 13 water-Cerenkov detectors (1 to 13.5 sq m) were operated at the center of the Haverah Park array to study some features of air showers produced by 10(16) eV primaries. Measurements of the scintillator lateral distribution function, the water-Cerenkov lateral distribution function, and of the distance dependence of the Cerenkov/scintillator ratio are described.

  3. Thermodynamic and Experimental Study of the Energetic Cost Involved in the Capture of Carbon Dioxide by Aqueous Mixtures of Commonly Used Primary and Tertiary Amines.

    PubMed

    Arcis, Hugues; Coulier, Yohann; Coxam, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The capture of carbon dioxide with chemical solvents is one solution to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources and thus tackle climate change. Recent research has been focused on optimizing new kinds of advanced absorbents including aqueous amine blends, but critical downsides such as the large energetic cost involved with the industrial process remain. To address this issue, a better understanding of the energetic interactions existing in solution is necessary. In this paper, we report direct experimental measurements of the energy cost involved in the solvation of CO2 in two aqueous amine blends at different temperatures. The chemical solvents were designed as aqueous mixtures of commonly used primary and tertiary amines to study the influence of the different chemical properties inferred by the amine class. We have also applied a thermodynamic model to represent the energetic effects that take place in solution during CO2 dissolution in these mixtures, where all parameters were taken from previous studies focused on single amine absorbents. The noteworthy agreement observed with the reported experimental heats of absorption and with literature vapor liquid equilibrium properties confirmed the relevance of the underlying molecular mechanisms considered in our model, and suggest that this model would prove useful to investigate CO2 dissolution in other amine blends. PMID:26630087

  4. The fast-spectrum transmutation experimental facility FASTEF: Main design achievements (Part 1: Core and primary system) within the FP7-CDT collaborative project of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, D.; Fernandez, R.; Mansani, L.; Woaye-Hune, A.; Sarotto, M.; Bubelis, E.

    2012-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator-driven system (ADS) in development at SCK CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. SCK CEN in association with 17 European partners from industry, research centres and academia, responded to the FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) call from the European Commission to establish a Central Design Team (CDT) for the design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) able to demonstrate efficient transmutation and associated technology through a system working in subcritical and/or critical mode. The project has started on April 01, 2009 for a period of three years. In this paper, we present the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system. The FASTEF facility has evolved quite a lot since the intermediate reporting done at the ICAPP'10 and ICAPP'11 conferences 1 2. If it remains a small-scale facility, the core power amounts now up to 100 MWth in critical mode. In a companion paper 3, we present the concept of the reactor building and the plant layout. (authors)

  5. STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE FOR ALLOY 152/52 DISSIMILAR METAL WELDS IN PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-08-15

    As part of ongoing research into primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility of alloy 690 and its welds, SCC tests have been conducted on alloy 152/52 dissimilar metal (DM) welds with cracks positioned with the goal to assess weld dilution and fusion line effects on SCC susceptibility. No increased crack growth rate was found when evaluating a 20% Cr dilution zone in alloy 152M joined to carbon steel (CS) that had not undergone a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). However, high SCC crack growth rates were observed when the crack reached the fusion line of that material where it propagated both on the fusion line and in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the carbon steel. Crack surface and crack profile examinations of the specimen revealed that cracking in the weld region was transgranular (TG) with weld grain boundaries not aligned with the geometric crack growth plane of the specimen. The application of a typical pressure vessel PWHT on a second set of alloy 152/52 – carbon steel DM weld specimens was found to eliminate the high SCC susceptibility in the fusion line and carbon steel HAZ regions. PWSCC tests were also performed on alloy 152-304SS DM weld specimens. Constant K crack growth rates did not exceed 5x10-9 mm/s in this material with post-test examinations revealing cracking primarily on the fusion line and slightly into the 304SS HAZ.

  6. Enhanced primary treatment of concentrated black water and kitchen residues within DESAR concept using two types of anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Kujawa-Roeleveld, K; Elmitwalli, T; Zeeman, G

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of concentrated domestic wastewater streams--black or brown water, and solid fraction of kitchen waste is considered as a core technology in a source separation based sanitation concept (DESAR--decentralised sanitation and reuse). A simple anaerobic digester can be implemented for an enhanced primary treatment or, in some situations, as a main treatment. Two reactor configurations were extensively studied; accumulation system (AC) and UASB septic tank at 15, 20 and 25 degrees C. Due to long retention times in an AC reactor, far stabilisation of treated medium can be accomplished with methanisation up to 60%. The AC systems are the most suitable to apply when the volume of waste to be treated is minimal and when a direct reuse of a treated medium in agriculture is possible. Digested effluent contains both liquid and solids. In a UASB septic tank, efficient separation of solids and liquid is accomplished. The total COD removal was above 80% at 25 degrees C. The effluent contains COD and nutrients, mainly in a soluble form. The frequency of excess sludge removal is low and sludge is well stabilised due to a long accumulation time. PMID:16841739

  7. OBSERVATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS OF INTERGRANULAR STRESS CORROSION CRACK GROWTH OF ALLOY 152 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Overman, Nicole R.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2013-08-15

    Significant intergranular (IG) crack growth during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) tests has been documented during tests in simulated PWR primary water on two alloy 152 specimens cut from a weldment produced by ANL. The cracking morphology was observed to change from transgranular (TG) to mixed mode (up to ~60% IG) during gentle cycling and cycle + hold loading conditions. Measured crack growth rates under these conditions often suggested a moderate degree of environmental enhancement consistent with faster growth on grain boundaries. However, overall SCC propagation rates at constant stress intensity (K) or constant load were very low in all cases. Initial SCC rates up to 6x10-9 mm/s were occasionally measured, but constant K/load growth rates dropped below ~1x10-9 mm/s with time even when significant IG engagement existed. Direct comparisons were made among loading conditions, measured crack growth response and cracking morphology during each test to assess IGSCC susceptibility of the alloy 152 specimens. These results were analyzed with respect to our previous SCC crack growth rate measurements on alloy 152/52 welds.

  8. Linking Grain Boundary Microstructure to Stress Corrosion Cracking of Cold Rolled Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2012-10-01

    Grain boundary microstructures and microchemistries are examined in cold-rolled alloy 690 tubing and plate materials and comparisons are made to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) behavior in PWR primary water. Chromium carbide precipitation is found to be a key aspect for materials in both the mill annealed and thermally treated conditions. Cold rolling to high levels of reduction was discovered to produce small IG voids and cracked carbides in alloys with a high density of grain boundary carbides. The degree of permanent grain boundary damage from cold rolling was found to depend directly on the initial IG carbide distribution. For the same degree of cold rolling, alloys with few IG precipitates exhibited much less permanent damage. Although this difference in grain boundary damage appears to correlate with measured SCC growth rates, crack tip examinations reveal that cracked carbides appeared to blunt propagation of IGSCC cracks in many cases. Preliminary results suggest that the localized grain boundary strains and stresses produced during cold rolling promote IGSCC susceptibility and not the cracked carbides and voids.

  9. Water in HD209458b's atmosphere from 3.6 -8 microns IRAC photometric observations in primary transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanella, Giammarco; Beaulieu, J. P.; Kipping, D. M.; Batista, V.; Tinetti, G.; Ribas, I.; Carey, S.; Noriega-Crespo, J. A.; Griffith, C. A.; Dong, S.; Tennyson, J.; Barber, R. J.; Deroo, P.; Fossey, S. J.; Liang, D.; Swain, M. R.; Yung, Y.; Allard, N.

    Since planets were first discovered outside our own Solar System in 1992 (around a pulsar) and in 1995 (around a main sequence star), extrasolar planet studies have become one of the most dynamic research fields in astronomy. Now that more than 400 exoplanets have been discovered, focus has moved from finding planets to characterise these alien worlds. Part of the characterisation process undoubtedly involves the detection of the atmospheres of these exoplanets. We describe the primary transit observations of the hot Jupiter HD 209458b we obtained at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 µm using the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. We detail the procedures we adopted to correct for the systematic trends present in IRAC data. The lightcurves were fitted, taking into account limb darkening effects, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo and prayer-bead Monte Carlo techniques. We obtained the following depth measurements: at 3.6 µm, 1.469±0.013 % and 1.448±0.013 %; at 4.5 µm, 1.478±0.017 %; at 5.8 µm, 1.549±0.015 % and at 8.0 µm 1.535±0.011 %. Our results indicate the presence of water in the planetary atmosphere.

  10. Experimental study of the interaction of THz radiation FEL with the atmosphere and water droplet aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, G. G.; Lisenko, A. A.; Babchenko, S. V.; Kargin, B. A.; Kablukova, E. G.; Kubarev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The interaction of radiation of the Novosibirsk Free Electron Laser (FEL) at a wavelength of 130 μm in the atmospheric transmission window with a model aerosol cloud having the known droplet size distribution function has been studied experimentally. The experimental findings are compared with theoretical calculations obtained from solution of the lidar equation for the conditions of the experiment.

  11. Water adsorption on charcoal: New approach in experimental studies and data representation

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.; Walker, R.

    1991-08-01

    The experimental apparatus was built to study the H{sub 2}O adsorption on charcoal at very low concentrations and collect the data in the form of isosteres. Experimental method is discussed and the global three-dimensional fit is constructed to predict the post-regeneration conditions of charcoal absorbers. 11 refs.

  12. An experimental study on the performance of a stainless steel-water loop heat pipe under natural cooling condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiwei; Cen, Jiwen; Jiang, Fangming; Zhu, Xiong

    2014-02-01

    Aiming to improve the thermal characteristics of modern electronics, we experimentally study the performance of a stainless steel/water loop heat pipe (LHP) under natural cooling condition. The LHP heat transfer performance, including start-up performance, temperature oscillation and total thermal resistance at different heat loads and with different incline angles have been investigated systematically. Experimental results show that at an optimal heat load (i.e. 60 W) and with the LHP being inclined 60° to the horizontal plane, the total thermal resistance is lowered to be ˜0.24 K/W, and the temperature of evaporator could be controlled steadily at around 90°C.

  13. Extraction and Capture of Water from Martian Regolith Experimental Proof-of-Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Bauman, Steven W.; Johnson, Kyle A.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept for extraction of water from the Mars soil in a real-time, open-air process was demonstrated in a Mars environment chamber. The concept breadboard uses radiative heating to bake off water from exposed soil contained in a bin. An enclosure, intended to mimic the bottom of a rover, covers the bin. A fan continuously blows the Mars atmospheric gases through the enclosure to collect the evolved water while a tiller was used to churn up moist subsurface soil. These initial tests verified concept feasibility. The sweep gas generated by commercially available muffin fans at 7 Torr was sufficient to transfer water vapor into a condenser flow loop. The radiative heating, while non-optimized, heated the soil surface to 60 C to generate water vapor. A rototiller working through the soil bin brought sufficient amounts of new moist soil to the heated surface to show an increase in rate of water extraction.

  14. Materials Reliability Program Resistance to Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloys 690, 52, and 152 in Pressurized Water Reactors (MRP-111)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.; Fyfitch, S.; Scott, P.; Foucault, M.; Kilian, R.; Winters, M.

    2004-03-01

    Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. Repairs and replacements have generally utilized wrought Alloy 690 material and its compatible weld metals (Alloy 152 and Alloy 52), which have been shown to be very highly resistant to PWSCC in laboratory experiments and have been free from cracking in operating reactors over periods already up to nearly 15 years. It is nevertheless prudent for the PWR industry to attempt to quantify the longevity of these materials with respect to aging degradation by corrosion in order to provide a sound technical basis for the development of future inspection requirements for repaired or replaced component items. This document first reviews numerous laboratory tests, conducted over the last two decades, that were performed with wrought Alloy 690 and Alloy 52 or Alloy 152 weld materials under various test conditions pertinent to corrosion resistance in PWR environments. The main focus of the present review is on PWSCC, but secondary-side conditions are also briefly considered.

  15. Experimental study of the light absorption in sea water by thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velásquez, A.; Sira, E.; Silva, S.; Cabrera, H.

    2016-01-01

    Thermal lens spectroscopy is well known as highly sensitive technique enabling measurements of low absorption and concentration determination of various compounds. The optical absorption coefficients of doubly distilled water and samples of water from different places of the open Ocean and different coastal regions have been measured at 532.8 nm wavelength using this technique. The method enables sensitive, rapid and reproducible determination of small variations of the absorption coefficient which are related with small trace contaminations in sea water.

  16. Theoretical/experimental considerations about oil displacement by water in a fractured porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Rosales, C.; Cruz-Hernandez, J.; Samaniego-V., F.

    1994-12-31

    Based upon observations made with a two-dimension porous cell, which allows direct visualization of fluid displacement processes, theoretical formulations were established for explaining oil displacement by water in a fractured porous medium. The theory rests on the idea that fluids are transported essentially through the fractures by a convective process, whereas water inflow to the matrix blocks is carried out by a dispersive process which depends on the difference between fracture and matrix water saturation. With these considerations, a derivation is presented of an expression for water saturation as a function of distance and time. Agreement between theory and experiment is reasonably good.

  17. [Experimental research on combined water and air backwashing reactor technology for biological activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Xue-Min; Zhao, Yan-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To proper control the backwashing process of biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor and improve the overall operation performance, the evaluative indexes such as backwashing wastewater turbidity, organic pollutants removal rate of pre and post-backwashing, and the variation of biomass and biological activity in carbon column are used to compare and analyze the effect of three different combined water and air backwashing methods on the operation of BAC reactor. The result shows that intermittent combined water and air backwashing method is most suitable to BAC reactor. The biological activaty obviously increases by 62.5% after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process. While, the biological activaty using the backwashing method of air plus water and the backwashing method of water and air compounded plus water washing increases by 55.6%, 38.5%, respectively. After backwashing 308h, the reactor recovered to its normal function after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process with the removal rate of UV254 reaching to 60.0%. The fulvic-like fluorescence peak of backwashing water are very weak, and are characterized by low-excitation wavelength tryptophan like (peak S) and high excitation wavelength of tryptophan (peak T), which are caused by the microbial debris washed down. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectra also show that microbial fragments are easy to be washed clean with intermittent combined water and air backwashing. PMID:22452199

  18. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Effects of water on the primary and secondary relaxation of xylitol and sorbitol: Implication on the origin of the Johari-Goldstein relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psurek, T.; Maslanka, S.; Paluch, M.; Nozaki, R.; Ngai, K. L.

    2004-07-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy was employed to study the effects of water on the primary α -relaxation and the secondary β -relaxation of xylitol. The measurements were made on anhydrous xylitol and mixtures of xylitol with water with three different water concentrations over a temperature range from 173K to 293K . The α -relaxation speeds up with increasing concentration of water in xylitol, whereas the rate of the β -relaxation is essentially unchanged. Some systematic differences in the behavior of α -relaxation for anhydrous xylitol and the mixtures were observed. Our findings confirm all the observations of Nozaki [R. Nozaki, H. Zenitani, A. Minoguchi, and K. Kitai, J. Non-Cryst. Solids 307, 349 (2002)] in sorbitol/water mixtures. Effects of water on both the α - and β -relaxation dynamics in xylitol and sorbitol are explained by using the coupling model.

  20. GENE EXPRESSION ALTERATIONS OBSERVED IN PRIMARY CULTURED RAT HEPATOCYTES AFTER TREATMENT WITH CHLORINATED OR CHLORINATED AND OZONATED DRINKING WATER FROM EAST FORK LAKE, OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water from East Fork Lake was spiked with iodide and bromide, disinfected with chlorine or ozone + chlorine, concentrated ~100-fold using reverse osmosis, and volatile disinfection by-products (DBPs) added back. Primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to full-strength, 1:10...

  1. Inorganic ground-water chemistry at an experimental New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in situ gasification site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Branam, T.D.; Comer, J.B.; Shaffer, N.R.; Ennis, M.V.; Carpenter, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental in situ gasification of New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) has been conducted in Clark County. Analyses of ground water sampled from a production well and nine nearby monitoring wells 3 months after a brief in situ gasification period revealed changes in water chemistry associated with the gasification procedure. Dissolved iron, calcium and sulphate in ground water from the production well and wells as much as 2 m away were significantly higher than in ground water from wells over 9 m away. Dissolved components in the more distant wells are in the range of those in regional ground water. Thermal decomposition of pyrite during the gasification process generated the elevated levels of iron and sulphate in solution. High concentrations of calcium indicate buffering by dissolution of carbonate minerals. While iron quickly precipitates, calcium and sulphate remain in the ground water. Trends in the concentration of sulphate show that altered ground water migrated mostly in a south-westerly direction from the production well along natural joints in the New Albany Shale. ?? 1991.

  2. An experimental study on isotope fractionation in a mesoporous silica-water system with implications for vadose-zone hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying; Horita, Juske

    2016-07-01

    Soil water dynamics within a thick vadose (unsaturated) zone is a key component in the hydrologic cycle in arid regions. In isotopic studies of soil water, the isotopic composition of adsorbed/pore-condensed water within soils has been assumed to be identical to that of bulk liquid water. To test this critical assumption, we have conducted laboratory experiments on equilibrium isotope fractionation between adsorbed/condensed water in mesoporous silica (average pore diameter 15 nm) and the vapor at relative pressures p/po = 0.3-1.0 along the adsorption-desorption isotherm at 30 °C. The isotope fractionation factors between condensed water in the silica pores and the vapor, α(2H) and α(18O), are smaller than those between liquid and vapor of bulk water (1.074 and 1.0088, respectively, at 30 °C). The α(2H) and α(18O) values progressively decrease from 1.064 and 1.0083 at p/po = 1 to 1.024 and 1.0044 at p/po = 0.27 for hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, respectively, establishing trends very similar to the isotherm curves. Empirical formulas relating α(2H) and α(18O) to the proportions of filled pores (f) are developed. Our experimental results challenge the long-held assumption that the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors for the soil water-vapor are identical to those of liquid water-vapor system with potential implications for arid-zone and global water cycles, including paleoclimate proxies in arid regions.

  3. Impact of the Provision of Safe Drinking Water on School Absence Rates in Cambodia: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Paul R.; Risebro, Helen; Yen, Marie; Lefebvre, Hélène; Lo, Chay; Hartemann, Philippe; Longuet, Christophe; Jaquenoud, François

    2014-01-01

    Background Education is one of the most important drivers behind helping people in developing countries lift themselves out of poverty. However, even when schooling is available absenteeism rates can be high. Recently interest has focussed on whether or not WASH interventions can help reduce absenteeism in developing countries. However, none has focused exclusively on the role of drinking water provision. We report a study of the association between absenteeism and provision of treated water in containers into schools. Methods and Findings We undertook a quasi-experimental longitudinal study of absenteeism rates in 8 schools, 4 of which received one 20 L container of treated drinking water per day. The water had been treated by filtration and ultraviolet disinfection. Weekly absenteeism rates were compared across all schools using negative binomial model in generalized estimating equations. There was a strong association with provision of free water and reduced absenteeism (Incidence rate ratio = 0.39 (95% Confidence Intervals 0.27–0.56)). However there was also a strong association with season (wet versus dry) and a significant interaction between receiving free water and season. In one of the intervention schools it was discovered that the water supplier was not fulfilling his contract and was not delivering sufficient water each week. In this school we showed a significant association between the number of water containers delivered each week and absenteeism (IRR = 0.98 95%CI 0.96–1.00). Conclusion There appears to be a strong association between providing free safe drinking water and reduced absenteeism, though only in the dry season. The mechanism for this association is not clear but may in part be due to improved hydration leading to improved school experience for the children. PMID:24632573

  4. Changing forest water yields in response to climate warming: Results from long-term experimental watershed sites across North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. A.; Creed, I. F.; Spargo, A.; Buttle, J. M.; Adams, M.; Beall, F. D.; Booth, E.; Campbell, J. L.; Clow, D. W.; Elder, K.; Ford, C. R.; Grimm, N. B.; Ramlal, P.; Saha, A.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Spittlehouse, D.; Sterling, S. M.; Williams, M. W.; Winkler, R. D.; Yao, H.

    2013-12-01

    Climate warming is projected to affect forest catchment water yields, but effects may vary among biomes. We hypothesized that catchments where water yields have varied relatively little in response to climate warming would be more resilient to warming effects than other types of catchments are. To test this hypothesis, we examined the variability in historical catchment water yields at long-term experimental watershed sites across Canada and the United States. Using the theoretical framework of the Budyko curve, which estimates catchment evaporation as a function of catchment dryness, we calculated the effects of climate warming on the annual partitioning of precipitation (P) into evapotranspiration (ET) and water yield. Deviation was defined as a catchment's change in actual ET divided by P (AET/P) coincident with a shift from a cool to warm period. Elasticity was defined as the ratio of inter-annual variation in potential ET divided by P (PET/P, the dryness index) to inter-annual variation in actual ET divided by P (AET/P, the evaporative index). Deviation in water yields was related to elasticity. Alpine sites showed greatest sensitivity to climate warming with any warming leading to increased water yields. Conifer sites included catchments with lowest elasticity and had stable to higher water yields, deciduous sites included catchments with intermediate elasticity and had stable to lower water yields, and mixed forests included catchments with highest elasticity and had stable water yields. For all forest types, there was a tendency for elasticity to converge to 1.0 with forest age. Both forest type and age were determinants of elasticity, which leads to resilience of catchment water yields to climate warming.

  5. Experimental evaluation of four infiltration models for calcareous soil irrigated with treated untreated grey water and fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, M. A.; Eltaif, N. I.; Alrababah, M. A.; Alhamad, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    Infiltration is vital for both irrigated and rainfed agriculture. The knowledge of infiltration characteristics of a soil is the basic information required for designing an efficient irrigation system. The objective of the present study was to model soil infiltration using four models: Green and Ampt, Horton, Kostaikov and modified Kostiakov. Infiltration tests were conducted on field plot irrigated with treated, untreated greywater and fresh water. The field water infiltration data used in these models were based on double ring infiltrometer tests conducted for 4 h. The algebraic parameters of the infiltration models and nonlinear least squares regression were fitted using measured infiltration time [I (t)] data. Among process-based infiltration models, the Horton model performed best and matched the measured I (t) data with lower sum of squares (SS).

  6. Experimental verification of the four-sensor probe model for flow diagnosis in air water flow in vertical pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S.; Mishra, R.

    2012-05-01

    Measuring the volumetric flow rate of each of the flowing components is required to be monitored in production logging applications. Hence it is necessary to measure the flow rates of gas, oil and water in vertical and inclined oil wells. An increasing level of interest has been shown by the researchers in developing system for the flow rate measurement in multiphase flows. This paper describes the experimental methodology using a miniature, local four-sensor probe for the measurement of dispersed flow parameters in bubbly two-phase flow for spherical bubbles. To establish interdependent among different parameters corresponding to dispersed flow, the available model has been used to experimentally obtain different parameters such as volume fraction, velocity and bubble shape of the dispersed phase in the bubbly air-water flow.

  7. Energy Balance Concept in the Evaluation of Water Table Management Effects on Corn Growth: Experimental Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Prasanta K.; Kanwar, Rameshwar S.

    1992-10-01

    The effects of water table management practices (WTMP) on corn growth in 1989 and 1990 at two field sites, Ames and Ankeny, Iowa, were evaluated by calculating crop water stress index (CWSI) and monitoring plant physiological parameters during the growing seasons. Experiments were conducted on field lysimeters at the Ames site by maintaining water tables at 0.3-, 0.6-, and 0.9-m depths and in a subirrigation field at the Ankeny site with 0.2-, 0.3-, 0.6-, 0.9-, and 1.1-m water table depths, and periodically measuring leaf and air temperature, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) using leaf chamber techniques. Net radiation of canopy was estimated using the leaf energy balance equation and leaf chamber measurements and then correlated with PAR. Analysis of data revealed that net radiation, leaf air temperature differential, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, and CWSI were strongly related to WTMP during vegetative and flowering stages of corn growth. Excess water in the root zone with a water table depth of 0.2 m caused the maximum crop water stress and ceased crop growth. Both water and oxygen could be adequately maintained for favorable crop growth by adopting the best WTMP. Results indicate that plant physiological parameters and CWSI could be used to evaluate the effectiveness of WTMP and develop the best WTMP for corn growth in the humid region.

  8. Controlling Disinfection Residual Losses in Drinking Water Distribution Systems: Results from Experimental Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has become generally accepted that water quality can deteriorate in a distribution system through reactions in the bulk phase and/or at the pipe wall. These reactions may be physical, chemical and/or microbiological in nature. Perhaps one of the most serious aspects of water...

  9. Controlling Disinfection Residual Losses in Drinking Water Distribution Systems: Results from Experimental Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is generally accepted that water quality can deteriorate in a distribution system through reactions in the bulk phase and/or at the pipe wall. These reactions may be physical, chemical and/or microbiological in nature. Perhaps one of the most serious aspects of water quality...

  10. EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION OF THE CALCIUM CARBONATE SATURATION STATES OF WATER SYSTEMS (TECHNICAL NOTE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emphasis is given to the fact that saturation indexes only indicate the tendency of a water to dissolve or precipitate calcium carbonate (CaCo3). The rate at which a given water attains equilibrium cannot be derived from the saturation index value.

  11. Approximate water and chemical budgets for an experimental in-pond raceway system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing interest in intensive production of Ictalurid catfish in the United States and a better understanding of water quality dynamics in intensive culture is needed. Budgets for water, nitrogen, phosphorus, organic carbon (OC), and dissolved oxygen (DO) were estimated over a productio...

  12. Evaluation of an ultra low-flow water delivery system for small experimental tanks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ultra low-flow water delivery system was developed and tested for use in research studies requiring low-flow in small water volumes. Small test systems save on the amount of fish, chemicals, and biologics needed in disease challenge and treatment experiments. The ultra low-flow system, comprise...

  13. Plasticity in leaf-level water relations of tropical rainforest trees in response to experimental drought.

    PubMed

    Binks, Oliver; Meir, Patrick; Rowland, Lucy; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Vasconcelos, Steel Silva; de Oliveira, Alex Antonio Ribeiro; Ferreira, Leandro; Christoffersen, Bradley; Nardini, Andrea; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The tropics are predicted to become warmer and drier, and understanding the sensitivity of tree species to drought is important for characterizing the risk to forests of climate change. This study makes use of a long-term drought experiment in the Amazon rainforest to evaluate the role of leaf-level water relations, leaf anatomy and their plasticity in response to drought in six tree genera. The variables (osmotic potential at full turgor, turgor loss point, capacitance, elastic modulus, relative water content and saturated water content) were compared between seasons and between plots (control and through-fall exclusion) enabling a comparison between short- and long-term plasticity in traits. Leaf anatomical traits were correlated with water relation parameters to determine whether water relations differed among tissues. The key findings were: osmotic adjustment occurred in response to the long-term drought treatment; species resistant to drought stress showed less osmotic adjustment than drought-sensitive species; and water relation traits were correlated with tissue properties, especially the thickness of the abaxial epidermis and the spongy mesophyll. These findings demonstrate that cell-level water relation traits can acclimate to long-term water stress, and highlight the limitations of extrapolating the results of short-term studies to temporal scales associated with climate change. PMID:27001030

  14. Experimental investigation on the slip between oil and water in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jing-yu; Wu, Ying-xiang; Feng, Fei-fei; Chang, Ying; Li, Dong-hui

    2008-10-15

    This work is devoted to study of the slip phenomenon between phases in water-oil two-phase flow in horizontal pipes. The emphasis is placed on the effects of input fluids flow rates, pipe diameter and viscosities of oil phase on the slip. Experiments were conducted to measure the holdup in two horizontal pipes with 0.05 m diameter and 0.025 m diameter, respectively, using two different viscosities of white oil and tap water as liquid phases. Results showed that the ratios of in situ oil to water velocity at the pipe of small diameter are higher than those at the pipe of big diameter when having same input flow rates. At low input water flow rate, there is a large deviation on the holdup between two flow systems with different oil viscosities and the deviation becomes gradually smaller with further increased input water flow rate. (author)

  15. Water/rock interactions in experimentally simulated dirty snowball and dirty iceball cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Allton, Judith H.

    1991-01-01

    In the dirty snowball model for cometary nuclei, comet-nucleus materials are regarded as mixtures of volatile ices and relatively non-volatile minerals or chemical compounds. Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are regarded as useful analogs for the rocky component. To help elucidate the possible physical geochemistry of cometary nuclei, preliminary results are reported of calorimetric experiments with two-component systems involving carbonaceous chondrites and water ice. Based on collective knowledge of the physics of water ice, three general types of interactions can be expected between water and minerals at sub-freezing temperatures: (1) heterogeneous nucleation of ice by insoluble minerals; (2) adsorption of water vapor by hygroscopic phases; and (3) freezing- and melting-point depression of liquid water sustained by soluble minerals. The relative and absolute magnitude of all three effects are expected to vary with mineral composition.

  16. Computer simulation of the water and hydrogen distillation and CECE process and its experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.; Uborski, V.V.

    1995-10-01

    Mathematical simulation procedures have been developed for three processes of hydrogen isotopes separation: (1) a non steady-state water distillation; (2) a cryogenic distillation; and (3) a combined electrolysis and multistage water/hydrogen catalytic exchange (CECE) process. The simulation procedures possess some special features. Thus, the comparatively large step of integration and as a result of this high fast-acting is the peculiarity of the model for the dynamic behaviour of water distillation column operating at total reflux. The simulation procedure for CECE process considers six components and three phases (liquid water, water vapour, and hydrogen gas) and allows one to carry out computations for any mole fraction stock. This procedure, as the one for cryogenic distillation process, is not based on the Newton-Raphson method, and, in spite of this, convergence is reached by a small number of iterations (4 - 11). 8 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. High-Resolution Characterization of Intergranular Attack and Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 in High-Temperature Primary Water

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Larry E.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2000-06-01

    Intergranular (IG) attack regions and stress-corrosion cracks in alloy 600 U-bend samples tested in 330C, pressurized-water-reactor water have been characterized by analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM). Observations of cross-sectional samples revealed short oxidized zones preceding crack tips and narrow (10-nm wide), deeply penetrated, oxidized zones along grain boundaries exposed along open cracks. High-resolution TEM imaging and fine-probe analysis were used to determine the local chemistries and structures in these corrosion-affected zones. Matrix areas surrounding the crack tips appeared highly strained, whereas the IG penetrations generally did not. The predominant oxide structure found along crack walls and just ahead of crack tips was NiO with metal-atom ratios similar to the alloy. The attacked grain boundaries off open cracks contained similar fine-grained NiO-structure oxide together with local areas of Cr-rich oxide and Ni-rich metal. In contrast, Cr-rich oxide identified as Cr2O3 predominated at the leading edges of the IG attack. Stereoscopic imaging of these tip structures revealed nm-scale porosity and tunnels within the oxide and pores along the grain-boundary plane ahead of the oxide. The general interpretation of these results is that IG attack and cracking follows local dissolution or oxidation and the formation of pores at grain boundaries. This degradation occurs at the nanometer scale and therefore requires high-resolution ATEM methods to reveal detailed characteristics. Experimental support for several possible IG degradation mechanisms is considered.

  18. An experimental study of the isotopic enrichment in Ar, Kr, and Xe when trapped in water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notesco, G.; Laufer, D.; Bar-Nun, A.; Owen, T.

    1999-01-01

    The isotopic enrichment of argon, krypton, and xenon, when trapped in water ice, was studied experimentally. The isotopes were found to be enriched according to their (m1/m2)1/2 ratio. These enrichment factors could be useful for comparison among the uncertain cosmic or solar isotopic ratios, the hopeful in situ cometary ratio, and those in Earth's atmosphere, in the context of cometary delivery of volatiles to Earth.

  19. Ionized alkaline water: new strategy for management of metabolic acidosis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Abol-Enein, Hassan; Gheith, Osama A; Barakat, Nashwa; Nour, Eman; Sharaf, Abd-Elhameed

    2009-06-01

    Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney, which represent common causes of metabolic acidosis. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis has been very controversial. Ionized alkaline water was not evaluated in such groups of patients in spite of its safety and reported benefits. So, we aimed to assess its efficacy in the management of metabolic acidosis in animal models. Two models of metabolic acidosis were created in dogs and rats. The first model of renal failure was induced by ligation of both ureters; and the second model was induced by urinary diversion to gut (gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss model). Both models were subjected to ionized alkaline water (orally and by hemodialysis). Dogs with renal failure were assigned to two groups according to the type of dialysate utilized during hemodialysis sessions, the first was utilizing alkaline water and the second was utilizing conventional water. Another two groups of animals with urinary diversion were arranged to receive oral alkaline water and tap water. In renal failure animal models, acid-base parameters improved significantly after hemodialysis with ionized alkaline water compared with the conventional water treated with reverse osmosis (RO). Similar results were observed in urinary diversion models as there was significant improvement of both the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and serum bicarbonate (P = 0.007 and 0.001 respectively) after utilizing alkaline water orally. Alkaline ionized water can be considered as a major safe strategy in the management of metabolic acidosis secondary to renal failure or dialysis or urinary diversion. Human studies are indicated in the near future to confirm this issue in humans. PMID:19527469

  20. Investigation of swirler/dilution jet flow split on primary zone flow patterns in a water model can-type combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutmos, P.; McGuirk, J. J.

    1985-03-01

    LDA measurements of the three mean velocity components and the corresponding turbulence intensities have been made to provide qualitative and quantitative information on the flow field in a water model of a can type gas turbine combustion chamber. The combustor geometry comprised a swirl driven primary zone, annulus fed rows of primary and secondary jets and an exit contraction. The effect of variation of the flow split between the swirler and the dilution holes on the flow pattern in the primary zone has been investigated in detail. Flow visualization studies revealed that significant changes occur in this region due to the interaction between the swirling flow and the radially directed primary jets. A large toroidal recirculation was formed and high levels of turbulence energy generated in the core of the combustor at low levels of swirler flow rate. As the swirl level increases the strength of this recirculation was observed to weaken and become less stable. Beyond a critical level, the primary recirculation was pushed off center and the undesirable feature of a forward velocity on the combustor axis in the primary zone was observed. Despite the dramatic changes brought about in the primary zone the flow pattern downstream of the secondary jets was practically the same for all flow splits due to the strong mixing caused by the two rows of jets.

  1. Direct Measurements of Quantum Kinetic Energy Tensor in Stable and Metastable Water near the Triple Point: An Experimental Benchmark.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Carla; Romanelli, Giovanni; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-06-16

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurement of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point, using deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra, accurate line shapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model-independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, that is, key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establish novel insight into further expand the capacity and accuracy of DINS investigations of the nuclear quantum effects in water and represent reference experimental values for theoretical investigations. PMID:27214268

  2. Synthesis of a highly water-soluble acacetin prodrug for treating experimental atrial fibrillation in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Ya-Jing; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Sun, Hai-Ying; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that duodenal administration of the natural flavone acacetin can effectively prevent the induction of experimental atrial fibrillation (AF) in canines; however, it may not be used intravenously to terminate AF due to its poor water-solubility. The present study was to design a water-soluble prodrug of acacetin and investigate its anti-AF effect in beagle dogs. Acacetin prodrug was synthesized by a three-step procedure. Aqueous solubility, bioconversion and anti-AF efficacy of acacetin prodrug were determined with different methodologies. Our results demonstrated that the synthesized phosphate sodium salt of acacetin prodrug had a remarkable increase of aqueous solubility in H2O and clinically acceptable solution (5% glucose or 0.9% NaCl). The acacetin prodrug was effectively converted into acacetin in ex vivo rat plasma and liver microsome, and in vivo beagle dogs. Intravenous infusion of acacetin prodrug (3, 6 and 12 mg/kg) terminated experimental AF without increasing ECG QTc interval in beagle dogs. The intravenous LD50 of acacetin prodrug was 721 mg/kg in mice. Our preclinical study indicates that the synthesized acacetin prodrug is highly water-soluble and safe; it effectively terminates experimental AF in beagle dogs and therefore may be a promising drug candidate for clinical trial to treat patients with acute AF. PMID:27160397

  3. Experimental Investigation in Order to Determine Catalytic Package Performances in Case of Tritium Transfer from Water to Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bornea, Anisia; Peculea, M.; Zamfirache, M.; Varlam, Carmen

    2005-07-15

    The processes for hydrogen isotope's separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes for tritium separation, is the catalyst isotope exchange water-hydrogen.Our catalytic package consists of Romanian patented catalysts with platinum on charcoal and polytetrafluoretylene (Pt/C/PTFE) and the ordered Romanian patented package B7 type. The catalytic package was tested in an isotope exchange facility for water detritiation at the Experimental Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm.Valcea.In a column of isotope exchange tritium is transferred from liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) in gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental set-up, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst and ordered package. The catalyst consists of 95.5 wt.% of PTFE, 4.1 wt. % of carbon and 0.40 wt. % of platinum and was of Raschig rings 10 x 10 x 2 mm. The ordered package was B7 type consists of wire mesh phosphor bronze 4 x 1 wire and the mesh dimension is 0.18 x 0.48 mm.We analyzed the transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase, in this system.The mass transfer coefficient which characterized the isotopic exchange on the package, were determined as function of experimental parameters.

  4. Synthesis of a highly water-soluble acacetin prodrug for treating experimental atrial fibrillation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Ya-Jing; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Sun, Hai-Ying; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that duodenal administration of the natural flavone acacetin can effectively prevent the induction of experimental atrial fibrillation (AF) in canines; however, it may not be used intravenously to terminate AF due to its poor water-solubility. The present study was to design a water-soluble prodrug of acacetin and investigate its anti-AF effect in beagle dogs. Acacetin prodrug was synthesized by a three-step procedure. Aqueous solubility, bioconversion and anti-AF efficacy of acacetin prodrug were determined with different methodologies. Our results demonstrated that the synthesized phosphate sodium salt of acacetin prodrug had a remarkable increase of aqueous solubility in H2O and clinically acceptable solution (5% glucose or 0.9% NaCl). The acacetin prodrug was effectively converted into acacetin in ex vivo rat plasma and liver microsome, and in vivo beagle dogs. Intravenous infusion of acacetin prodrug (3, 6 and 12 mg/kg) terminated experimental AF without increasing ECG QTc interval in beagle dogs. The intravenous LD50 of acacetin prodrug was 721 mg/kg in mice. Our preclinical study indicates that the synthesized acacetin prodrug is highly water-soluble and safe; it effectively terminates experimental AF in beagle dogs and therefore may be a promising drug candidate for clinical trial to treat patients with acute AF. PMID:27160397

  5. Water table fluctuations and soil biogeochemistry: An experimental approach using an automated soil column system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Couture, R.-M.; Kovac, R.; O'Connell, D.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-02-01

    Water table fluctuations significantly affect the biological and geochemical functioning of soils. Here, we introduce an automated soil column system in which the water table regime is imposed using a computer-controlled, multi-channel pump connected to a hydrostatic equilibrium reservoir and a water storage reservoir. The potential of this new system is illustrated by comparing results from two columns filled with 45 cm of the same homogenized riparian soil. In one soil column the water table remained constant at -20 cm below the soil surface, while in the other the water table oscillated between the soil surface and the bottom of the column, at a rate of 4.8 cm d-1. The experiment ran for 75 days at room temperature (25 ± 2 °C). Micro-sensors installed at -10 and -30 cm below the soil surface in the stable water table column recorded constant redox potentials on the order of 600 and -200 mV, respectively. In the fluctuating water table column, redox potentials at the same depths oscillated between oxidizing (∼700 mV) and reducing (∼-100 mV) conditions. Pore waters collected periodically and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical differences between the two columns, especially in the time series and depth distributions of Fe, Mn, K, P and S. Soil CO2 emissions derived from headspace gas analysis exhibited periodic variations in the fluctuating water table column, with peak values during water table drawdown. Transient redox conditions caused by the water table fluctuations enhanced microbial oxidation of soil organic matter, resulting in a pronounced depletion of particulate organic carbon in the midsection of the fluctuating water table column. Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed the onset of differentiation of the bacterial communities in the upper (oxidizing) and lower (reducing) soil sections, although no systematic differences in microbial community structure

  6. Observation and analysis of time-variable gravity signal in China's Three Gorges Reservoir during the experimental water impoundment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Chen, C.; Liang, Q.; Du, J.

    2012-12-01

    The reasons of gravity field changes in the Three Gorges Reservoir of China are mainly due to the loads of huge water variations, which give rise to the crustal load deformation, the fluctuation of underground water and the secondary geological hazards. These consequences are becoming inevitable problems. On October 26, 2010, the dam front water level reached 175 m which was the highest water level of engineering design. Since then, the Three Gorges Reservoir had carried out experimental impoundment for three consecutive years. To obtain the response information of Three Gorges Reservoir and geological environment of surrounding area during fluctuation period, we conducted a series of continuous gravity observation, expecting to study the time-variable gravity field during the fluctuation and high water level period, and then to discuss the evolution of geological environment. This paper is based on the continuous gravity observation data (gPhone#101) during five months (from July 2011 to December 2011) before and after Three Gorges Project experimental impoundment on the observation points off shore of Yangtze River. The results show that it can be effectively detected the impact of impoundment on regional gravity field by using gravity observing methods. After removing the various corrections of theory tides, atmospheric pressure, polar motion, etc., analysis show that the linear changes of gravity in the stable water level period was caused by instrument zero drift. According to the linear drift rate fitting from the period, the changes in composition of the entire observation period can be obtained using segmented drift fitting. Residuals of gravity anomalies after piecewise subsection fitting drift were in high consistency with the water level. In the prophase of impoundment, direct gravitational effects caused by lower water level fluctuations were very obvious and the gravity response changed before dam front water level because of the indirect factors such

  7. Aligning Experimental and Theoretical Anisotropic B-Factors: Water Models, Normal-Mode Analysis Methods, and Metrics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The strength of X-ray crystallography in providing the information for protein dynamics has been under appreciated. The anisotropic B-factors (ADPs) from high-resolution structures are invaluable in studying the relationship among structure, dynamics, and function. Here, starting from an in-depth evaluation of the metrics used for comparing the overlap between two ellipsoids, we applied normal-mode analysis (NMA) to predict the theoretical ADPs and then align them with experimental results. Adding an extra layer of explicitly treated water on protein surface significantly improved the energy minimization results and better reproduced the anisotropy of experimental ADPs. In comparing experimental and theoretical ADPs, we focused on the overlap in shape, the alignment of dominant directions, and the similarity in magnitude. The choices of water molecules, NMA methods, and the metrics for evaluating the overlap of ADPs determined final results. This study provides useful information for exploring the physical basis and the application potential of experimental ADPs. PMID:24673391

  8. [Soil condensation water in different habitats in Horqin sandy land: an experimental study].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Ping; He, Yu-Hui; Zhao, Xue-Yong; Li, Yu-Lin; Li, Yu-Qiang; Li, Yan-Qing; Li, Shi-min

    2009-08-01

    Weighing method was adopted to study the formation time and the amount of soil condensation water in four habitats (mobile sandy land, fixed sandy land, farmland, and Mongolian pine forest land) in Horqin Sandy Land in August 2007. The soil condensation water began to form at 20:00-22:00, increased gradually at 22:00-4:00, and began to evaporate after 4:00. In the four habitats, soil condensation water was mainly formed in 0-9 cm layer, and the amount was the greatest in 0-3 cm layer, accounting for 40% of the total. The soil condensation water also formed in 9-30 cm layer, but in very small amount. There was a greater difference in the mean daily amount of soil condensation water in 0-3 cm layer in the four habitats, with the sequence of fixed sandy land > mobile sandy land > farmland > Mongolian pine forest land, which indicated that the habitat with better vegetation condition was not benefit the formation of soil condensation water. The mean daily amount of soil condensation water in 0-30 cm layer was 0.172 mm in fixed sandy land, 0.128 mm in Mongolian pine forest land, 0.120 mm in mobile sandy land, and 0.110 mm in farmland. PMID:19947212

  9. [Experimental study of the root supply system with periodic water return designed for space greenhouses].

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Iu A; Smolianina, S O; Krivobok, N M

    2000-01-01

    To improve reliability of plant's moistening and aeration control in microgravity, an original root supply system with a periodic return water flow has been designed and tested in laboratory. For 30 days crops of Pekinese cabbage (Brassica pekinesis (Lour Rupr), Khibini sort) were raised in the test bench which allowed adjustment of water potential in the root zone within a preset range. A three-step water potential control algorithm included water injection with a pump-dispenser, a pause, and water sucking back to a desired value of water potential. The following parameters of the control cycle were selected in a series of two experiments: time of water injection (2.5 hr) and return (1.5 hr), and a pause of 8 and 20 hr, respectively. Magnitude of water potential about the root module axis was controlled in the range from -1.3 kPa to -3.0 kPa in both experiments and maintained at -1.3 kPa in the control. The root modules consisted of porous metaloceramic tubes wrapped in fibrous ion exchanging cloth and a light-proof film with planting slots on top. In the first experiment, plant characteristics were comparable to the control. The developed procedure and technology can be used to provide favourable moisture-air conditions in the root zone. By and large, the system of root nutrition with a periodic water return has demonstrated high capacity during the ground-based cultivation of plants. To use this system in space greenhouse, it is necessary to specify operational parameters for the microgravity environment. PMID:10826063

  10. Mortality of experimentally descaled smolts of coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in fresh and salt water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, Gerald R.; Smith, Stanley D.

    1979-01-01

    Removal of slime from 25% of the body caused no deaths among smolts of coho salmon in fresh water or in seawater (28‰). Removal of slime and scales from the same percentage of body area caused no deaths in fresh water, but 75% mortality within 10 days in seawater. The 10-day median tolerance limit was 10% scale removal immediately before the smolts entered seawater. Mortality was highest when the scales were removed from the area of the rib cage. Recovery of smolts in fresh water from a loss of scales that would be lethal in seawater occurred rapidly; 90% of the fish regained tolerance to seawater within 1 day.

  11. Assessment of School-Based Quasi-Experimental Nutrition and Food Safety Health Education for Primary School Students in Two Poverty-Stricken Counties of West China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Minxue; Hu, Ming; Sun, Zhenqiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies on nutrition and food safety education intervention for students in remote areas of China were reported. The study aimed to assess the questionnaire used to measure the knowledge, attitude and behavior with respect to nutrition and food safety, and to evaluate the effectiveness of a quasi-experimental nutrition and food safety education intervention among primary school students in poverty-stricken counties of west China. Methods Twelve primary schools in west China were randomly selected from Zhen’an of Shaanxi province and Huize of Yunnan province. Six geographically dispersed schools were assigned to the intervention group in a nonrandom way. Knowledge, attitude and behavior questionnaire was developed, assessed, and used for outcome measurement. Students were investigated at baseline and the end of the study respectively without follow-up. Students in intervention group received targeted nutrition and food safety lectures 0.5 hour per week for two semesters. Item response theory was applied for assessment of questionnaire, and a two-level difference-in-differences model was applied to assess the effectiveness of the intervention. Results The Cronbach’s alpha of the original questionnaire was 0.84. According to item response model, 22 knowledge items, 6 attitude items and 8 behavior items showed adequate discrimination parameter and were retained. 378 and 478 valid questionnaires were collected at baseline and the end point. Differences of demographic characteristics were statistically insignificant between the two groups. Two-level difference-in-differences models showed that health education improved 2.92 (95% CI: 2.06–3.78) and 2.92 (95% CI: 1.37–4.47) in knowledge and behavior scores respectively, but had no effect on attitude. Conclusion The questionnaire met the psychometric standards and showed good internal consistence and discrimination power. The nutrition and food safety education was effective in improving the knowledge

  12. Experimental evaluation of effect on Cassie-Baxter equation of surface roughness with application to soil water repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sujung; Douglas, Peter; Doerr, Stefan; Gowenlock, Cathren; Hallin, Ingrid; Mabbett, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Manifestation of soil water repellency depends both on the surface chemistry and the physical structure of the particles making up the soil. In materials science the effect of physical structure on water repellency is often explained by the Cassie-Baxter equation. Recently, a few attempts have been made to explain water repellency of soil using the Cassie-Baxter equation for hexagonally-arrayed spheres on a flat plane. Experimental verification of this conceptual model using glass beads as model soil particles has been left somewhat incomplete, as the experimentally measured contact angles do not match well those expected from theory. This might be caused by a failure to generate a perfect arrangement of particles. Therefore, we have aimed to obtain highly precise arrangements of glass beads as model soil particles using 3D printing technology. Our aim is to generate particle frames of precise hexagonal arrangement with particles at differing separations, and to measure the water contact angles upon the particle arrays optically using a goniometer. In this contribution, we report our preliminary results in which we explore the applicability of the Cassie-Baxter equation to such regular arrays as both separation distance and surface roughness is varied. This research has been funded by Bridging the Gap in Swansea University, UK.

  13. Growth and physiological responses of tree seedlings to experimental manipulation of light and water

    SciTech Connect

    Huston, M.A.; Holmgren, M.

    1995-06-01

    Seedlings of two tree species with similar tolerance to soil water and nutrient levels, but contrasting tolerance to shade (Acer saccharum and Liriodendron tulipifera) were grown in shade houses under 5 light levels (27%, 17%, 12%, 5%, and 1%) and three soil water regimes (5-9%, 11-15%, and >20%). Soil, light, and water conditions were representative of those in the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment, where the same species are being monitored under field conditions. Treatments were maintained from mid-June through October, when all plants were harvested for determination of biomass allocation patterns. The only mortality occurred among the tulip poplars, but there was a significant interaction effect of the treatments on leaf area, total biomass, and allocation patterns. Highest growth rates in both species occurred at 17% light in the highest water treatment, with the 27% treatment showing reduced growth, perhaps due to photoinhibition. Gas exchange measurements indicated that the light compensation point increased under dry conditions.

  14. Experimental Results on Isotopic Fractionation of Dusty Deuterated Water Ice During Sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, J. E.; Smith, P. H.; Brown, R. H.; Lauretta, D. S.; Boynton, W. V.; Drake, M. J.

    2008-03-01

    Observed heavy fractionation of HDO during sublimation of water ice when mixed with or overlain by (regolith) fine particulate dust is described. Results from two sets of apparatus simulating comets and the Mars polar environment will be presented.

  15. Experimental Study of Water Exchange Between Regolith and Atmosphere Under Martian Conditions: Thermodynamics and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2008-03-01

    We have designed a facility to measure near-infrared reflectance spectra of martian regolith analogs under martian surface temperature and humidity. We present adsorption isotherm and exchange kinetics between water and JSC Mars-1 regolith simulant.

  16. Experimental study of evaporation of horizontal films of water-salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elistratov, S. L.; Morozov, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    The present studies were carried out for the horizontal films (thin layers) of water and water solutions of NaCl, CaCl2, LiCl, and LiBr with different solubility characteristics, as well as with specific features of formation and decay of water hydrates. Required volume of solution Vo of given weight concentration ξo, preliminary heated to the working surface temperature, was put in one step on the horizontal bottom of the bowl, heated to working temperature tCT, by means of volume batchers Thermo Scientific. After evaporation completion, the final mass of solution and form of their residue were registered. At the final stage of evaporation formation of NaCl crystals and water hydrates of CaCl2 · 2H2O, LiCl · H2O, and LiBr · 2H2O occurred.

  17. Experimental Evaluation of Proposed Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Water Channel Aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Esteva-Font, Cristina; Jin, Byung-Ju; Lee, Sujin; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Anderson, Marc O; Verkman, A S

    2016-06-01

    The aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channel is a potentially important drug target, as AQP1 inhibition is predicted to have therapeutic action in edema, tumor growth, glaucoma, and other conditions. Here, we measured the AQP1 inhibition efficacy of 12 putative small-molecule AQP1 inhibitors reported in six recent studies, and one AQP1 activator. Osmotic water permeability was measured by stopped-flow light scattering in human and rat erythrocytes that natively express AQP1, in hemoglobin-free membrane vesicles from rat and human erythrocytes, and in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from AQP1-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures. As a positive control, 0.3 mM HgCl2 inhibited AQP1 water permeability by >95%. We found that none of the tested compounds at 50 µM significantly inhibited or increased AQP1 water permeability in these assays. Identification of AQP1 inhibitors remains an important priority. PMID:26993802

  18. Tautomerism in 7-hydroxyquinoline: a combined experimental and theoretical study in water.

    PubMed

    Al-Lawatia, Najla; Husband, John; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Abou-Zied, Osama K

    2011-05-01

    Tautomerism in the ground and excited states of 7-hydroxyquinoline (7HQ) was studied in different solvents using stead