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Sample records for primary water experimental

  1. Imaging of primary and secondary radiation-Modelling and experimental results of a radioactive source and a water phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, K. A. A.; Taylor, G. C.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper the contribution of primary and secondary radiation from a water phantom to a pinhole volume, as a result of three neutron sources (Cf, AmBe and 5 MeV mono-energetic) and two gamma sources (Cs and Co), is separately estimated using the PTRAC particle tracking option available in MCNP. Also in this paper imaging of the mixed radiation field produced by a Van de Graaf accelerator (when a water phantom is present) is described. In the model, a spherical tally volume, 2 cm in diameter, was placed equidistantly from a radioactive source and 30×30×15 cm3 water phantom. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to investigate the level of primary and secondary radiation contributing to the pinhole volume directly from the source and from interactions in the phantom respectively. The spatial distribution of counts clearly discriminated the source and the phantom. The results have shown that the percentage of neutrons reflected from the phantom with energies above 1 MeV increases with mean energy of the source. This method has significant potential to characterise secondary radiation in proton therapy, where it would help to verify the location and the energy delivered during the treatment.

  2. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of primary paper sludge using a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst: Experimental vs thermodynamic equilibrium results.

    PubMed

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-02-01

    H2, CH4, CO and CO2 yields were measured during supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of primary paper waste sludge (PWS) at 450°C. Comparing these yields with calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values offer an improved understanding of conditions required to produce near-equilibrium yields. Experiments were conducted at different catalyst loads (0-1g/gPWS) and different reaction times (15-120min) in a batch reactor, using either K2CO3 or Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 as catalyst. K2CO3 up to 1g/gPWS increased the H2 yield significantly to 7.5mol/kgPWS. However, these yields and composition were far from equilibrium values, with carbon efficiency (CE) and energy recovery (ER) of only 29% and 20%, respectively. Addition of 0.5-1g/gPWS Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 resulted in high H2 and CH4 yields (6.8 and 14.8mol/kgPWS), CE of 84-90%, ER of 83% and a gas composition relatively close to the equilibrium values (at hold times of 60-120min). PMID:26638140

  3. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1964-04-01

    A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

  4. Primary production in Southern Ocean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, Kevin R.; Worthen, Denise; Schnell, Anthony; Lizotte, Michael P.

    1998-07-01

    The Southern Ocean forms a link between major ocean basins, is the site of deep and intermediate water ventilation, and is one of the few areas where macronutrients are underutilized by phytoplankton. Paradoxically, prior estimates of annual primary production are insufficient to support the Antarctic food web. Here we present results from a primary production algorithm based upon monthly climatological phytoplankton pigment concentrations from the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS). Phytoplankton production was forced using monthly temperature profiles and a radiative transfer model that computed changes in photosynthetically usable radiation at each CZCS pixel location. Average daily productivity (g C m-2 d-1) and total monthly production (Tg C month-1) were calculated for each of five geographic sectors (defined by longitude) and three ecological provinces (defined by sea ice coverage and bathymetry as the pelagic province, the marginal ice zone, and the shelf). Annual primary production in the Southern Ocean (south of 50°S) was calculated to be 4414 Tg C yr-1, 4-5 times higher than previous estimates made from in situ data. Primary production was greatest in the month of December (816 Tg C month-1) and in the pelagic province (contributing 88.6% of the annual primary production). Because of their small size the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and the shelf contributed only 9.5% and 1.8%, respectively, despite exhibiting higher daily production rates. The Ross Sea was the most productive region, accounting for 28% of annual production. The fourfold increase in the estimate of primary production for the Southern Ocean likely makes the notion of an "Antarctic paradox" (primary production insufficient to support the populations of Southern Ocean grazers, including krill, copepods, microzooplankton, etc.) obsolete.

  5. The water dimer I: Experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Anamika; Cole, William T. S.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    As the archetype of water hydrogen bonding, the water dimer has been studied extensively by both theory and experiment for nearly seven decades. In this article, we present a detailed chronological review of the experimental dimer studies and the insights into the complex nature of water and hydrogen bonding gained from them. A subsequent letter will review the corresponding theoretical advances.

  6. Children's Understanding of Experimental Contrast and Experimental Control: An Inventory for Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterhaus, Christopher; Koerber, Susanne; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Experimentation skills are a central component of scientific thinking, and many studies have investigated whether and when primary-school children develop adequate experimentation strategies. However, the answers to these questions vary substantially depending on the type of task that is used: while discovery tasks, which require children to…

  7. On the experimental investigation on primary atomization of liquid streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumouchel, Christophe

    2008-09-01

    The production of a liquid spray can be summarized as the succession of the following three steps; the liquid flow ejection, the primary breakup mechanism and the secondary breakup mechanism. The intermediate step—the primary breakup mechanism—covers the early liquid flow deformation down to the production of the first isolated liquid fragments. This step is very important and requires to be fully understood since it constitutes the link between the flow issuing from the atomizer and the final spray. This paper reviews the experimental investigations dedicated to this early atomization step. Several situations are considered: cylindrical liquid jets, flat liquid sheets, air-assisted cylindrical liquid jets and air-assisted flat liquid sheets. Each fluid stream adopts several atomization regimes according to the operating conditions. These regimes as well as the significant parameters they depend on are listed. The main instability mechanisms, which control primary breakup processes, are rather well described. This review points out the internal geometrical nozzle characteristics and internal flow details that influence the atomization mechanisms. The contributions of these characteristics, which require further investigations to be fully identified and quantified, are believed to be the main reason of experimental discrepancies and explain a lack of universal primary breakup regime categorizations.

  8. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  9. Unlocking water markets: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Rabotyagov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Water markets are frequently referred to as a promising approach to alleviate stress on water systems, especially as future hydrologic assessments suggest increasing demand and less reliable supply. Yet, despite decades of advocacy by water resource economists, water markets (leases and sales of water rights between willing buyers and sellers) have largely failed to develop in the western US. Although there are a number of explanations for this failure, we explore one potential reason that has received less attention : farmers as sellers may have preferences for different elements of a water market transaction that are not captured in the relative comparison of their profits from farming and their profits from agreeing to a deal. We test this explanation by recruiting irrigators with senior water rights in the upper Yakima River Basin in Washington state to participate in a series of experimental auctions. In concept, the Yakima Basin is well situated for water market transactions as it has significant water shortages for junior water users ~15% of years and projections show these are likely to increase in the future. Participants were asked a series of questions about the operation of a hypothetical 100-acre timothy hay farm including the type of buyer, how the water bank is managed, the lease type, and the offer price. Results from 7 sessions with irrigators (n=49) and a comparison group of undergraduates (n=38) show that irrigators are more likely to accept split-season than full-season leases (controlling for differences in farm profits) and are more likely to accept a lease from an irrigation district and less likely to accept an offer from a Developer. Most notably, we find farmers were far more likely than students to reject offers from buyers even though it would increase their winnings from the experiment. These results could be used in ongoing water supply policy debates in the Yakima Basin to simulate the amount of water that could be freed by water

  10. THF water hydrate crystallization: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Surya; Groysman, Alexander; Myerson, Allan S.

    1999-08-01

    Supersaturated solutions of THF-water hydrate system were experimentally studied before and during crystallization, to examine the system's behavior in the metastable zone and observe any anomalies suggesting cluster formation. Nucleation induction time measurements, with and without additives, were performed to screen potential growth inhibitors. Shifts in the onset points of crystallization for water and THF-water mixtures with additives were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Aspartame was among one of the few successfully screened inhibitors. Preliminary on-line crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements were performed on this system to monitor the crystal size during crystallization. The CSD data was also used to compute the hydrate crystal growth rates, which were found to be in the order of 145 μm/h.

  11. Environment, Teacher Manual, Primary, Idea 3, Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Project, Grafton, IL.

    The Environmental Education Project Center has developed these guidelines for teaching a unit in environmental studies. It is their intention that the teacher and student cooperatively plan the approach and content to be used during the course of study. In this unit about water, teacher resource information and student material are combined to…

  12. Primary acoustic signal structure during free falling drop collision with a water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-04-01

    Consistent optical and acoustic techniques have been used to study the structure of hydrodynamic disturbances and acoustic signals generated as a free falling drop penetrates water. The relationship between the structures of hydrodynamic and acoustic perturbations arising as a result of a falling drop contacting with the water surface and subsequent immersion into water is traced. The primary acoustic signal is characterized, in addition to stably reproduced features (steep leading edge followed by long decay with local pressure maxima), by irregular high-frequency packets, which are studied for the first time. Reproducible experimental data are used to recognize constant and variable components of the primary acoustic signal.

  13. Experimental demonstration of water based tunable metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odit, Mikhail; Kapitanova, Polina; Andryieuski, Andrei; Belov, Pavel; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2016-07-01

    A simple dynamically tunable metasurface (two-dimensional metamaterial) operating at microwave frequencies is developed and experimentally investigated. Conceptually, the simplicity of the approach is granted by reconfigurable properties of unit cells partially filled with distilled water. The transmission spectra of the metasurface for linear and circular polarizations of the incident wave were experimentally measured under the metasurface rotation around a horizontal axis. The changes in the transmission coefficient magnitude up to 8 dB at 1.25 GHz are reported while rotating the metasurface by the 90° angle. The proposed approach manifests the cheap and accessible route for the electromagnetic wave control in the microwave region with the help of metasurfaces.

  14. Environmental Science. An Experimental Programme for Primary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linke, R. D.

    An experimental course covering some of the fundamental principles and terminology associated with environmental science and the application of these principles to various contemporary problems is summarized in this report. The course involved a series of lectures together with a program of specific seminar and discussion topics presented by the…

  15. Response of plant community structure and primary productivity to experimental drought and flooding in an Alaskan fen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchill, A.C.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, Anthony; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.

    2014-01-01

    Northern peatlands represent a long-term net sink for atmospheric CO2, but these ecosystems can shift from net carbon (C) sinks to sources based on changing climate and environmental conditions. In particular, changes in water availability associated with climate control peatland vegetation and carbon uptake processes. We examined the influence of changing hydrology on plant species abundance and ecosystem primary production in an Alaskan fen by manipulating the water table in field treatments to mimic either sustained flooding (raised water table) or drought (lowered water table) conditions for 6 years. We found that water table treatments altered plant species abundance by increasing sedge and grass cover in the raised water table treatment and reducing moss cover while increasing vascular green area in the lowered water table treatment. Gross primary productivity was lower in the lowered treatment than in the other plots, although there were no differences in total biomass or vascular net primary productivity among the treatments. Overall, our results indicate that vegetation abundance was more sensitive to variation in water table than total biomass and vascular biomass accrual. Finally, in our experimental peatland, drought had stronger consequences for change in vegetation abundance and ecosystem function than sustained flooding.

  16. Primary simulation and experimental results of a coaxial plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Huang, J.; Han, J.; Zhang, Z.; Quan, R.; Wang, L.; Yang, X.; Feng, C.

    A coaxial plasma accelerator with a compressing coil is developed to simulate the impacting and erosion effect of space debris on exposed materials of spacecrafts During its adjustment operation some measurements are conducted including discharging current by Rogowski coil average plasma speed in the coaxial gun by magnetic coils and ejected particle speed by piezoelectric sensor etc In concert with the experiment a primary physical model is constructed in which only the coaxial gun is taken into account with the compressor coil not considered for its unimportant contribution to the plasma ejection speed The calculation results by the model agree well with the diagnostic results considering some assumptions for simplification Based on the simulation result some important suggestions for optimum design and adjustment of the accelerator are obtained for its later operation

  17. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  18. Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a National Primary School HIV Intervention in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a primary-school HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper primary-school pupils in Kenya. A quasi-experimental mixed qualitative-quantitative pre- and 18-month post-design using 40 intervention and 40 matched control schools demonstrated significant…

  19. Water movement through an experimental soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (???1 x 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 x 15 x 0.9m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20,037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water break through at the base of the liner occurs. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.5 x 10-9, 4.0 x 10-8, and 5.0 x 10-8 cm s-1 based on measurements of water infiltration into the liner by large- and small-ring infiltrometers and a water balance analysis, respectively. Also investigated in this research was the variability of the liner's hydraulic properties and estimates of the transit times for water and tracers. Small variances exhibited by small-ring flux data suggested that the liner was homogeneous with respect to infiltration fluxes. The predictions of water and tracer breakthrough at the base of the liner ranged from 2.4-12.6 y, depending on the method of calculation and assumptions made. The liner appeared to be saturated to a depth between 18 and 33 cm at the end of the first year of monitoring. Transit time calculations cannot be verified yet, since breakthrough has not occurred. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement established by the U.S. EPA.A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (??? 1 ?? 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20.037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water

  20. Experimental Activities in Primary School to Learn about Microbes in an Oral Health Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mafra, Paulo; Lima, Nelson; Carvalho, Graça S.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental science activities in primary school enable important cross-curricular learning. In this study, experimental activities on microbiology were carried out by 16 pupils in a Portuguese grade-4 classroom (9-10?years old) and were focused on two problem-questions related to microbiology and health: (1) do your teeth carry microbes? (2) why…

  1. Water safety education among primary school children in Grenada.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Rachele; Giganti, Mark J; Weiner, Allison; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a common cause of death among children. Successful prevention interventions currently used in developed countries are often not transferable into developing countries due to differences in both environment and resources. In this study, we adapted a water safety education programme developed by the American Red Cross for primary school students in Grenada. Water safety knowledge before and after the training session was assessed using a nine-question evaluation tool. Following the training, a survey was administered to all teachers to assess the adaptability and effectiveness of the WHALE Tales training. Fifty-six students (30% males) completed the training. The age range was between 5 and 12 years old. Participants' water safety knowledge increased 15% (p < 0.01). Mean scores of correct answers increased for every grade level, ranging from a 5% increase for first graders to 33% increase for second graders. The findings from this study suggested that implementation of such a programme is effective. With cultural modifications and outsourcing, we believe this adapted programme would be successful in Grenada and other similar settings. PMID:22950942

  2. Discriminating secondary from primary water in volcanic glass using thermogravimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachetti, T.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Gardner, J. E.; Shea, T.; Daniller-Varghese, M.

    2013-12-01

    Matrix-glass water in pyroclasts can include both primary (magmatic) and secondary (meteoric) water. Quantitative discrimination between magmatic and meteoric water is essential to interpret magma degassing processes, but remains challenging. Analyses of D/H isotopic ratios or water speciation help assess whether a texturally intact glass has been rehydrated, but we yet to correct for the extent of rehydration quantitatively, largely because the diffusivity of water at low temperatures (<400°C) is poorly understood. We present new results on the rehydration of rhyolitic pumices using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA quantifies precisely the mass lost from volatile exsolution (almost exclusively water in our case, as determined by both mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy) from a given sample heated to a specified temperature at specified rate. TGA has been used previously to discriminate between magmatic and meteoric water in silicic glasses, under the assumption that exsolution of meteoric water only occurs at T<550°C. Analyzed samples include crystal-free rhyolitic Plinian pumices from Glass Mountain (1.1 ka), Valles Caldera (50-60 ka) and Long Valley caldera (760 ka). All samples were crushed to <125 μm grains, and analyzed by TGA for temperatures up to 1000°C, using a heating rate of 20°C/min. The total weight loss attributed to water ranges from 1.3 wt% in pumice from Glass Mountain to >4.5 wt% in pumice from Valles Caldera. For all samples, >80% of the total water is lost far below 550°C, the first derivative of the mass loss always showing a major degassing peak between 210-320°C, followed by a smaller peak between 430-670°C. Moreover, the TGA curve of an obsidian from Glass Mountain, first dehydrated by heating the sample to 1000°C, and then experimentally hydrated to 3.9 wt% at high temperature and pressure (i.e., containing only ';magmatic' water), also shows that ~85% of the water is lost below 550°C, with a major peak around 380

  3. Experimental Study of Sudden Solidification of Supercooled Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The two independent methods of measurement of the mass of ice created at sudden solidification of supercooled water are described. One is based on the calorimetric measurement of heat that is necessary for melting the ice and the second interprets the volume change that accompanies the water freezing. Experimental results are compared with the…

  4. Upper Washita River Experimental Watersheds: Nutrient Water Quality Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality datasets were acquired by the USDA-ARS in three large research watersheds in Oklahoma: the Southern Great Plains Research Watershed (SGPRW), and the Little Washita River and Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental Watersheds (LWREW and FCREW, respectively). Water quality data in the SGPRW we...

  5. Does surface roughness influence the primary stability of acetabular cups? A numerical and experimental biomechanical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Le Cann, Sophie; Galland, Alexandre; Rosa, Benoît; Le Corroller, Thomas; Pithioux, Martine; Argenson, Jean-Noël; Chabrand, Patrick; Parratte, Sébastien

    2014-09-01

    Most acetabular cups implanted today are press-fit impacted cementless. Anchorage begins with the primary stability given by insertion of a slightly oversized cup. This primary stability is key to obtaining bone ingrowth and secondary stability. We tested the hypothesis that primary stability of the cup is related to surface roughness of the implant, using both an experimental and a numerical models to analyze how three levels of surface roughness (micro, macro and combined) affect the primary stability of the cup. We also investigated the effect of differences in diameter between the cup and its substrate, and of insertion force, on the cups' primary stability. The results of our study show that primary stability depends on the surface roughness of the cup. The presence of macro-roughness on the peripheral ring is found to decrease primary stability; there was excessive abrasion of the substrate, damaging it and leading to poor primary stability. Numerical modeling indicates that oversizing the cup compared to its substrate has an impact on primary stability, as has insertion force. PMID:25080896

  6. An experimental study on recovering heat from domestic drain water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Mohamad; Al Shaer, Ali; Haddad, Ahmad; Khaled, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    This paper concerns an experimental study on a system of heat recovery applied to domestic drain water pipes. The concept suggested consists of using the heat still present in the drain water as a preheating/heating source to the cold water supply of the building. To proceed, an appropriate experimental setup is developed and a coil heat exchanger is used as heat transfer device in the recovery system. Several scenarios are simulated and corresponding parameters are recorded and analyzed. It was shown that the suggested recovery concept can considerably preheat the cold water supply and then decrease the energy consumption. Particularly, up to 8.6 kW of heat were recovered when the cold water supply is initially at 3 °C.

  7. An Experimental Project on Energy Education for Rural Women, Primary School Children and Teachers Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pathak, Yogini; Mankodi, Hina

    One of the University of Baroda's (India) Rural/Tribal Block Placement Program's major aims during the year 1988-89 was to develop energy consciousness in women, primary school children and teachers. An experimental project was designed for a rural Indian village. The objectives were to obtain information on rural energy resources; assess the role…

  8. Experimental Observation of Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinhua; Yang, Jiong; Zi, Jian; Chan, C. T.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array of resonators composing of bottom-mounted split tubes, resulting in the prohibition of water wave propagation. It is found that when negative gravity occurs, the averaged displacement of water surface in a unit cell of the array has a phase difference of π to that along the boundary of the unit cell, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide a mechanism to block water waves and may find applications in wave energy conversion and coastal protection. PMID:23715132

  9. Experimental studies toward the characterization of Inmetro's circulating water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. M.; Alho, A. T. P.; Garcia, D. A.; Farias, M. H.; Massari, P. L.; Silva, V. V. S.

    2016-07-01

    Circulating water channels are facilities which can be used for conducting environmental, metrological and engineering studies. The Brazilian National Institute of Metrology-INMETRO has a water channel of innovative design, and the present work deals with the prior experimental investigation of its hydrodynamics performance. By using the optical technique PIV - Particle Image Velocimetry, under certain conditions, the velocity profile behavior in a region inside the channel was analyzed in order to evaluate the scope of applicability of such bench.

  10. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  11. Experimental study of the constituents of space wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.; Colombo, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    This report presents experimental data, obtained under controlled conditions, which quantify the various constituents of human origin that may be expected in space wash water. The experiments were conducted with a simulated crew of two male and two female subjects. The data show that the expected wash water contaminants originating from human secretions are substantially lower than theoretical projections indicated. The data presented are immediately useful and may have considerable impact on the tradeoff comparisons among various unit processes and systems under consideration by NASA for recycling space wash water.

  12. No evidence of complementary water use along a plant species richness gradient in temperate experimental grasslands.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Dörte; Gockele, Annette; Ravenek, Janneke M; Roscher, Christiane; Strecker, Tanja; Weigelt, Alexandra; Buchmann, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Niche complementarity in resource use has been proposed as a key mechanism to explain the positive effects of increasing plant species richness on ecosystem processes, in particular on primary productivity. Since hardly any information is available for niche complementarity in water use, we tested the effects of plant diversity on spatial and temporal complementarity in water uptake in experimental grasslands by using stable water isotopes. We hypothesized that water uptake from deeper soil depths increases in more diverse compared to low diverse plant species mixtures. We labeled soil water in 8 cm (with 18O) and 28 cm depth (with ²H) three times during the 2011 growing season in 40 temperate grassland communities of varying species richness (2, 4, 8 and 16 species) and functional group number and composition (legumes, grasses, tall herbs, small herbs). Stable isotope analyses of xylem and soil water allowed identifying the preferential depth of water uptake. Higher enrichment in 18O of xylem water than in ²H suggested that the main water uptake was in the upper soil layer. Furthermore, our results revealed no differences in root water uptake among communities with different species richness, different number of functional groups or with time. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis of increased complementarity in water use in more diverse than in less diverse communities of temperate grassland species. PMID:25587998

  13. Treatment Technology to Meet the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations for Inorganics: Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorg, Thomas J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This article is the third in a series summarizing existing treatment technology to meet the inorganic National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations. This report deals specifically with treatment methods for removing cadmium, lead, and silver from drinking water. (CS)

  14. The Strategy to Survive Primary Malaria Infection: An Experimental Study on Behavioural Changes in Parasitized Birds

    PubMed Central

    Mukhin, Andrey; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Platonova, Elena; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Vakoliuk, Irina; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Haemosporida, Plasmodium) are of cosmopolitan distribution, and they have a significant impact on vertebrate host fitness. Experimental studies show that high parasitemia often develops during primary malaria infections. However, field studies only occasionally reveal high parasitemia in free-living birds sampled using the traditional methods of mist-netting or trapping, and light chronic infections predominate. The reason for this discrepancy between field observation and experimental data remains insufficiently understood. Since mist-netting is a passive capture method, two main parameters determine its success in sampling infected birds in wildlife, i. e. the presence of parasitized birds at a study site and their mobility. In other words, the trapping probability depends on the survival rate of birds and their locomotor activity during infection. Here we test (1) the mortality rate of wild birds infected with Plasmodium relictum (the lineage pSGS1), (2) the changes in their behaviour during presence of an aerial predator, and (3) the changes in their locomotor activity at the stage of high primary parasitemia.We show that some behavioural features which might affect a bird's survival during a predator attack (time of reaction, speed of flush flight and take off angle) did not change significantly during primary infection. However, the locomotor activity of infected birds was almost halved compared to control (non-infected) birds during the peak of parasitemia. We report (1) the markedly reduced mobility and (2) the 20% mortality rate caused by P. relictum and conclude that these factors are responsible for the underrepresentation of birds in mist nets and traps during the stage of high primary parasitemia in wildlife. This study indicates that the widespread parasite, P. relictum (pSGS1) influences the behaviour of birds during primary parasitemia. Experimental studies combined with field observations are needed to better understand the

  15. The Strategy to Survive Primary Malaria Infection: An Experimental Study on Behavioural Changes in Parasitized Birds.

    PubMed

    Mukhin, Andrey; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Platonova, Elena; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Vakoliuk, Irina; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Haemosporida, Plasmodium) are of cosmopolitan distribution, and they have a significant impact on vertebrate host fitness. Experimental studies show that high parasitemia often develops during primary malaria infections. However, field studies only occasionally reveal high parasitemia in free-living birds sampled using the traditional methods of mist-netting or trapping, and light chronic infections predominate. The reason for this discrepancy between field observation and experimental data remains insufficiently understood. Since mist-netting is a passive capture method, two main parameters determine its success in sampling infected birds in wildlife, i. e. the presence of parasitized birds at a study site and their mobility. In other words, the trapping probability depends on the survival rate of birds and their locomotor activity during infection. Here we test (1) the mortality rate of wild birds infected with Plasmodium relictum (the lineage pSGS1), (2) the changes in their behaviour during presence of an aerial predator, and (3) the changes in their locomotor activity at the stage of high primary parasitemia.We show that some behavioural features which might affect a bird's survival during a predator attack (time of reaction, speed of flush flight and take off angle) did not change significantly during primary infection. However, the locomotor activity of infected birds was almost halved compared to control (non-infected) birds during the peak of parasitemia. We report (1) the markedly reduced mobility and (2) the 20% mortality rate caused by P. relictum and conclude that these factors are responsible for the underrepresentation of birds in mist nets and traps during the stage of high primary parasitemia in wildlife. This study indicates that the widespread parasite, P. relictum (pSGS1) influences the behaviour of birds during primary parasitemia. Experimental studies combined with field observations are needed to better understand the

  16. Impact of environmental traders on water markets: An experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tisdell, John G.

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports the results of a series of economic experiments in which an environmental agency with a stochastic demand function enters an existing water market to buy or sell water for instream use. Previous experimental studies have examined the use of tenders to reduce water extractions and social suasion to maintain aggregate flow levels and compared imposing minimum flow restrictions with subsidizing downstream water use and the allocation of tradeable minimum flow rights. The important contribution of this paper is that it explores the consequence of having an environmental agency enter an existing water market. In this paper we explore the consequences of (1) formally allocating tradeable water rights to the environmental agency, (2) allocating funding to purchase water as required, and (3) having the trading actions of the environmental agency a matter of public record. The research, while contextualized to water markets in this paper, addresses an important and timely issue that could have implication beyond water markets. In pollution permit markets, for example, there is the question of what the impact on the market would be if a government agency were to begin buying back permits, particularly if this represented a relatively large volume of trades and entered into such purchases on a needs basis.

  17. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  18. Modeling primary dendrite arm spacings in resistance spot welds; Part 2: Experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, J.E. )

    1994-05-01

    Hold time sensitivity is a potential concern when cold-rolled high-strength low-alloy sheet steels are used in resistance spot welded applications. Hold time sensitivity is defined by cracking, which occurs along the faying surface of the weld on peel testing when conventional hold times are used, and does not occur when reduces hold times are used. Hold time sensitivity is related to solidification cracking in the steel; however, it is believed that steel hardenability may also play a role. As an aid to understanding of solidification cracking in resistance spot welds, it is necessary to have an understanding of how the solidification structure develops. In this work, solidification structures in resistance spot welds have been characterized by the primary dendrite spacing. In Part 1 of this work, primary dendrite spacings were modeled by using a combination of numerical thermal modeling and closed-form primary dendrite spacings modeling. Numerical thermal modeling was used to predict solidification conditions in these welds. These solidification conditions were then used in the primary dendrite spacings model to predict the local spacings. In this paper, experimental studies were conducted to examine the validity of the modeling described in the previous paper. Experimentally, primary dendrite spacings were characterized for three grades of cold-rolled HSLA steel with nominal compositions of 0.05C-0.3Mn, 0.1C-1Mn and 0.15C-1.5Mn. For each steel, three separate thicknesses (nominally 0.8, 1.25 and 2.0 mm) were investigated. Primary dendrite spacings were determined at nominally the weld faying surface from deep-etched micrographs using an area-averaging technique.

  19. Availability of primary or juvenile water for ordinary uses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuinness, C.L.; Poland, J.F.

    1954-01-01

    Progressive depletion of the water supplies of many of the desert valleys of the Southwest, both because of recurrent droughts and because of overdevelopment, has focused increasing attention on the possibilities of developing supplementary water supplies from sources that are immune to drought, or at least whose development will not interfere with an existing supply now being utilized. Among the possibilities that are the subject of research by scientific organizations and other agencies are conversion of sea water and other saline water, salvage of water now used by phreatophytes (water-loving plants) of low economic value, and induced precipitation (rain-making).

  20. Primary School Pupils' Perceptions of Water in the Context of STS Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havu-Nuutinen, Sari; Karkkainen, Sirpa; Keinonen, Tuula

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on pupils' perceptions of water issues. The instructional situations take place in a Finnish primary school and aim at introducing the Science-Technology-Society (STS) study approach. The primary aim of this study is, in the context of STS instruction, to describe issues that pupils associate with water. This paper involves…

  1. Numerical and Experimental Quantification of coupled water and water vapor fluxes in very dry soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions with deep groundwater and very dry soils, vapor movement in the vadose zone may be a major component in the total water flux. Therefore, the coupled movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat transport in the unsaturated zone should be explicitly considered to quantify subsurface water fluxes in such regions. Only few studies focused on the importance of vapor water diffusion in dry soils and in many water flow studies in soil it was neglected. We are interested in the importance of water vapor diffusion and condensation in very dry sand. A version of Hydrus-1D capable of solving the coupled water vapor and heat transport equations will be used to do the numerical modeling. The soil hydraulic properties will be experimentally determined. A soil column experiment was developed with negligible liquid flow in order to isolate vapor flux for testing. We have used different values of initial water contents trying to generate different scenarios to assess the role of the water vapor transport in arid and semi-arid soils and how it changes the soil water content using different soil hydraulic parametrization functions. In the session a preliminary experimental and modelling results of vapor and water fluxes will be presented.

  2. The impact of educational videotapes on water contact behaviour of primary school students in the Dongting Lakes region, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, L; Manderson, L; Tempongko, M S; Wei, W; Aiguo, P

    2000-08-01

    Multimedia has become increasingly important in educational programmes in schools in all societies, and has potential value for health education. We developed a video and a comic book on the transmission and prevention of schistosomiasis for use in primary schools in endemic areas of China. The material was designed to increase children's knowledge of schistosomiasis as an environmental disease and to encourage them to reduce their contact with unsafe water sources. To test the effectiveness of the video and booklet, a quasi-experimental study was conducted among 1,739 children in 50 primary schools in the Dongting Lake region. A self-administered questionnaire pre- and post-intervention showed a significant increase in knowledge about schistosomiasis in the intervention schools. Significantly, this change was associated with a decrease in contact with unsafe water sources, as established from water contact observations. This behavioural change suggests the value of short, targeted educational interventions to decrease risk of infection. PMID:10995095

  3. Optimization of the water chemistry of the primary coolant at nuclear power plants with VVER

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, L. F.; Kruglova, T. K.; Sinitsyn, V. P.

    2005-01-15

    Results of the use of automatic hydrogen-content meter for controlling the parameter of 'hydrogen' in the primary coolant circuit of the Kola nuclear power plant are presented. It is shown that the correlation between the 'hydrogen' parameter in the coolant and the 'hydrazine' parameter in the makeup water can be used for controlling the water chemistry of the primary coolant system, which should make it possible to optimize the water chemistry at different power levels.

  4. Experimental nanocalorimetry of protonated and deprotonated water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Boulon, Julien; Braud, Isabelle; Zamith, Sébastien; Labastie, Pierre; L’Hermite, Jean-Marc; CNRS, UMR 5589, F-31062 Toulouse

    2014-04-28

    An experimental nanocalorimetric study of mass selected protonated (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +} and deprotonated (H{sub 2}O){sub n−1}OH{sup −} water clusters is reported in the size range n = 20–118. Water cluster's heat capacities exhibit a change of slope at size dependent temperatures varying from 90 to 140 K, which is ascribed to phase or structural transition. For both anionic and cationic species, these transition temperatures strongly vary at small sizes, with higher amplitude for protonated than for deprotonated clusters, and change more smoothly above roughly n ≈ 35. There is a correlation between bonding energies and transition temperatures, which is split in two components for protonated clusters while only one component is observed for deprotonated clusters. These features are tentatively interpreted in terms of structural properties of water clusters.

  5. Experimental long term evolution of breathers in water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Oceanic rogue waves may occur, due to the modulation instability, also referred to as the Benjamin-Feir instability. This instability can be also discussed within the framework of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS), which describes the dynamics of unstable packets in deep-water. In particular, through exact breather solutions of the NLS. Breathers are currently under intensive study, since their recent experimental observation in optics, water waves and in plasma proved the validity of the NLS to describe strong localizations in nonlinear dispersive media. We present evolution characteristics of breather, propagating over a long propagation distance in deep-water. In addition, we present several analytical and promising techniques, based on the theory of nonlinear wave theory, how an early stage of breather dynamics may be detected, before the occurrence of strong wave focusing.

  6. Primary Datasets for Case Studies of River-Water Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulder, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Level 6 (final-year BSc) students undertook case studies on between-site and temporal variation in river-water quality. They used professionally-collected datasets supplied by the Environment Agency. The exercise gave students the experience of working with large, real-world datasets and led to their understanding how the quality of river water is…

  7. Calculation of water-bearing primary basalt and estimation of source mantle conditions beneath arcs: PRIMACALC2 model for WINDOWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Ariskin, Alexey A.

    2014-04-01

    present a new method for estimating the composition of water-bearing primary arc basalt and its source mantle conditions. The PRIMACALC2 model uses a thermodynamic fractional crystallization model COMAGMAT3.72 and runs with an Excel macro to examine the mantle equilibrium and trace element calculations of a primary basalt. COMAGMAT3.72 calculates magma fractionation in 0-10 kb at various compositions, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and water content, but is only applicable for forward calculations. PRIMACALC2 first calculates the provisional composition of a primary basalt from an observed magma. The basalt composition is then calculated by COMAGMAT3.72 for crystallization. Differences in elemental concentrations between observed and the closest-match calculated magmas are then adjusted in the primary basalt. Further iteration continues until the calculated magma composition converges with the observed magma, resulting in the primary basalt composition. Once the fitting is satisfied, back calculations of trace elements are made using stepwise addition of fractionated minerals. Mantle equilibrium of the primary basalt is tested using the Fo-NiO relationship of olivine in equilibrium with the primary basalt, and thus with the source mantle. Source mantle pressure, temperature, and degree of melting are estimated using petrogenetic grids based on experimental data obtained in anhydrous systems. Mantle melting temperature in a hydrous system is computed by adjusting T with a parameterization for a water-bearing system. PRIMACALC2 can be used either in dry or water-bearing arc magmas and is also applicable to mid-ocean ridge basalts and nonalkalic ocean island basalts.

  8. Primary cell cultures from sea urchin ovaries: a new experimental tool.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Silvia; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Sugni, Michela; Candia Carnevali, M Daniela

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, primary cell cultures from ovaries of the edible sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus were developed in order to provide a simple and versatile experimental tool for researches in echinoderm reproductive biology. Ovary cell phenotypes were identified and characterized by different microscopic techniques. Although cell cultures could be produced from ovaries at all stages of maturation, the cells appeared healthier and viable, displaying a higher survival rate, when ovaries at early stages of gametogenesis were used. In terms of culture medium, ovarian cells were successfully cultured in modified Leibovitz-15 medium, whereas poor results were obtained in minimum essential medium Eagle and medium 199. Different substrates were tested, but ovarian cells completely adhered only on poly-L-lysine. To improve in vitro conditions and stimulate cell proliferation, different serum-supplements were tested. Fetal calf serum and an originally developed pluteus extract were detrimental to cell survival, apparently accelerating processes of cell death. In contrast, cells cultured with sea urchin egg extract appeared larger and healthier, displaying an increased longevity that allowed maintaining them for up to 1 month. Overall, our study provides new experimental bases and procedures for producing successfully long-term primary cell cultures from sea urchin ovaries offering a good potential to study echinoid oogenesis in a controlled system and to investigate different aspects of echinoderm endocrinology and reproductive biology. PMID:24002666

  9. Quasi-experimental evaluation of a national primary school HIV intervention in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary

    2007-05-01

    This study examined the impact of a primary-school HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper primary-school pupils in Kenya. A quasi-experimental mixed qualitative-quantitative pre- and 18-month post-design using 40 intervention and 40 matched control schools demonstrated significant program impact on targeted objectives of (1) adequate program delivery and, for standard 6 and 7 pupils (ages 11-16 years), (2) increased HIV-related knowledge; (3) increased communication with parents and teachers about HIV and sexuality; (4) increased assistance to fellow pupils to avoid sexual activity; (5) increased self-efficacy related to abstinence and condom use; (6) decreased exposure to HIV through delayed first intercourse, decreased sexual activity and increased condom. Results support the conclusions that the existing infrastructure is adequate for national roll-out of the program; that the program has its most beneficial effect on sexually inexperienced youth and should therefore be implemented with the youngest age groups possible; and that gains are gender specific, with boys reporting increased condom use while girls are more likely to decrease or delay sexual activity. Based on these results, the program began national roll-out to all primary schools in 2005. By June 2006, the program was operating in 11,000 of the country's nearly 19,000 schools. PMID:17689323

  10. Experimentally determined water storage capacity in the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferot, A.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.

    2010-12-01

    Trace amounts of hydrogen dissolved as defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) in the mantle are believed to play a key role in physical and chemical processes in the Earth’s upper mantle. Hence, the estimation of water storage in mantle phases and solubility mechanisms are important in order to better understand the effect of water. Experimental data on water solubility in NAMs are available for upper mantle minerals such as olivine, pyroxenes and garnet. However, the majority of studies are based on the study of single phases, and at temperatures or pressures that are too low for the Earth’s upper mantle. The aim of this study is to constrain the combined effects of pressure, temperature and composition on water solubility in olivine and orthopyroxene under upper mantle conditions. The solubility of water in coexisting orthopyroxene and olivine was investigated by simultaneously synthesizing the two phases at high pressure and high temperature in a multi-anvil press. Experiments were performed under water-saturated conditions in the MSH systems with Fe and Al at 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 9 GPa and temperatures between 1175 and 1400°C. Integrated OH absorbances were determined using polarized infrared spectroscopy on doubly polished thin sections of randomly oriented crystals. Water solubility in olivine increases with pressure and decreases with temperature as has been described previously (Bali et al., 2008). The aluminum content strongly decreases in olivine with pressure from 0.09 wt% at 2.5 GPa and 1250°C to 0.04 wt% at 9 GPa and 1175°C. The incorporation of this trivalent cation in the system enhances water solubility in olivine even if present in trace amounts, however this behavior appears to reverse at high pressure. The effect of temperature on water solubility follows a bell-shaped curve with a maximum solubility in olivine and orthopyroxene at 1250°C. Aluminum is incorporated in orthopyroxene following the Tschermak substitution and strongly

  11. Water cluster-deuterium oxide collisions: An experimental glimpse

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The wealth of cluster research now found in the literature is just beginning to bridge the gap between the study of molecule, surface, and condensed matter physics. Recent advances in experimental technology have opened up new windows into the world of cluster-molecule collision dynamics. This thesis is an attempt to present a glimpse into the collision dynamics of the water cluster-deuterium oxide system. An analysis of the potential reaction channels is presented and the cluster size dependence of the reaction cross section is detailed. An interpretation of this cluster size dependence is proposed.

  12. Transit time of mixed high pressure injection water and primary loop water in pressurized water reactor cold legs

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, B.H.; Oh, S.; Rothe, P.H.

    1984-03-01

    During an overcooling transient in a pressurized water reactor, cold water from the high pressure injection (HPI) mixes with the hot primary coolant in the cold leg. The transit time is a gauge for the assessment of the time and the velocity of the mixed flow that passes through the cold leg to the downcomer. Existing data from mixing tests at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/CREARE and EPRI/SAI facilities are analyzed. By means of models for HPI jet entrainment as well as the propagation of a gravity current, dimensionless correlations have been developed for the transit time and cold water front velocity at stagnant loop flow conditions. Based on this transit time correlation for stagnant loop flow and the limiting condition for large loop flow, a general correlation has been developed to account for the loop flow effect on transit time. These correlations unify a wide range of data obtained from five geometrically different test sections with two fluids (pure water and saline solution). In addition to the geometric factors, the governing dimensionless parameters for the transit time are the HPI jet Froude number, the Froude number for the cold-leg channel, and the ratio of loop flow to HPI flow.

  13. Primary infection protects pigs against re-infection with Lawsonia intracellularis in experimental challenge studies.

    PubMed

    Riber, Ulla; Cordes, Henriette; Boutrup, Torsten S; Jensen, Tim K; Heegaard, Peter M H; Jungersen, Gregers

    2011-05-01

    In two separate trials pigs were experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis at 5-6 weeks of age followed by antibiotic treatment and resolution of the primary infection and then re-inoculated at 12-13 weeks of age. A treatment-control group of pigs received the primary infection and antibiotic treatment only, and served as control for the antibiotic treatment of the primary infection. A challenge-control group of pigs received the second inoculation dose only at 12-13 weeks of age to control infectivity of the challenge-dose and susceptibility of pigs to L. intracellularis at this age. Pigs were monitored for shedding of L. intracellularis in faeces by PCR, and for the development of antibodies and responses of acute phase proteins in serum. The presence of L. intracellularis antigen in the intestinal mucosa was examined in post mortem samples by immunohistochemistry. In both trials primary infected pigs were protected from infection after challenge inoculation as evidenced by absence of faecal shedding of L. intracellularis, lack of changes in acute phase protein concentrations after challenge and with low levels of bacterial antigen in the intestinal mucosa of re-inoculated pigs comparable to that of the treatment-control pigs. In contrast, challenge-control pigs shed L. intracellularis in faeces, had L. intracellularis antigen extensively present within all layers of the intestinal mucosa and developed a significant acute phase protein response in serum after the experimental infection. The acute phase protein response to L. intracellularis infection was detected as an increased rise in the serum concentrations of C-reactive protein and haptoglobin from day-6 post infection, and increased serum concentrations of haptoglobin were generally seen 2-3 weeks after inoculation both at 5-6 and 12-13 weeks of age. In conclusion substantial protection against L. intracellularis infection was found in the re-inoculated pigs in contrast to the development of

  14. Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Morphology and Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2004-12-01

    A research program on primary stress corrosion crack (PWSCC) is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this program, the material degradation problem in Alloys 600, 182, and 82 is being investigated with objectives that include compling a knowledge base on all cracking in nickel based materials at all degradation sites in nuclear power plants, assessing NDE methods using mockups to quantify the detection, sizing, and using mockups to quantify the detection sizing and characterization of tight cracks, and determining the role of welding processes in degradation. In this paper, the resuts of the initial literature searchs are presented. The relevant data on crack properties such as shape and orientation are presented and their impace on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability is discussed.

  15. Hypoglycemic and antioxidant potential of coconut water in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Preetha, P P; Devi, V Girija; Rajamohan, T

    2012-07-01

    Coconut water is a natural nutritious beverage that contains several biologically active compounds. The present study aims to evaluate the hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects of mature coconut water (MCW) on alloxan-induced diabetes in experimental rats. The experimental animals were divided into four groups - normal control, normal rats treated with MCW, diabetic control and diabetic rats treated with MCW. The blood glucose, plasma insulin, hemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, activities of the various antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) and lipid peroxidation markers (malondialdehyde, hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes) were evaluated in all the groups. The results indicate that the diabetic animals treated with MCW had decreased blood glucose levels and reduced oxidative stress induced by alloxan, which was evident from the increased activities of the antioxidant enzymes and the decreased levels of the lipid peroxidation products. The overall results indicate that MCW significantly attenuated hyperglycemia and oxidative stress in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, indicating the therapeutic potential of MCW. PMID:22576019

  16. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  17. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  18. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  19. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  20. 40 CFR 142.19 - EPA review of State implementation of national primary drinking water regulations for lead and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... national primary drinking water regulations for lead and copper. 142.19 Section 142.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION Primary Enforcement Responsibility § 142.19 EPA review of...

  1. Automatic quantitative analysis of experimental primary and secondary retinal neurodegeneration: implications for optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B M; Guo, L; Brenton, J; Langley, L; Normando, E M; Cordeiro, M F

    2016-01-01

    Secondary neurodegeneration is thought to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, which potential therapies may target. However, the quantitative assessment of the degree of secondary neurodegeneration is difficult. The present study describes a novel algorithm from which estimates of primary and secondary degeneration are computed using well-established rodent models of partial optic nerve transection (pONT) and ocular hypertension (OHT). Brn3-labelled retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified in whole-retinal mounts from which RGC density, nearest neighbour distances and regularity indices were determined. The spatial distribution and rate of RGC loss were assessed and the percentage of primary and secondary degeneration in each non-overlapping segment was calculated. Mean RGC number (82 592±681) and RGC density (1695±23.3 RGC/mm2) in naïve eyes were comparable with previous studies, with an average decline in RGC density of 71±17 and 23±5% over the time course of pONT and OHT models, respectively. Spatial analysis revealed greatest RGC loss in the superior and central retina in pONT, but significant RGC loss in the inferior retina from 3 days post model induction. In comparison, there was no significant difference between superior and inferior retina after OHT induction, and RGC loss occurred mainly along the superior/inferior axis (~30%) versus the nasal–temporal axis (~15%). Intriguingly, a significant loss of RGCs was also observed in contralateral eyes in experimental OHT. In conclusion, a novel algorithm to automatically segment Brn3a-labelled retinal whole-mounts into non-overlapping segments is described, which enables automated spatial and temporal segmentation of RGCs, revealing heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of primary and secondary degenerative processes. This method provides an attractive means to rapidly determine the efficacy of neuroprotective therapies with implications for any

  2. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (< 1 g) facilitates determining the solute transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  4. MANUAL OF TREATMENT TECHNIQUES FOR MEETING THE INTERIM PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Following the passage on December 16, 1974, of Public Law 93-523, The Safe Drinking Water Act, the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations were promulgated on December 24, 1975, to take effect June 24, 1977. These regulations set Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) for ten inorga...

  5. Perceptions of the Water Cycle among Primary School Children in Botswana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taiwo, A. A.; Motswiri, M. J.; Masene, R.

    1999-01-01

    Describes qualitative and quantitative methods used to elucidate the nature of the perception of the water cycle held by Botswana primary-grade pupils in three different geographic areas. Concludes that the students' perception of the water cycle was positively influenced by schooling but negatively impacted upon, to some extent, by the untutored…

  6. Experimental Sarcocystis hominis infection in a water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Chen, X W; Zuo, Y X; Hu, J J

    2003-04-01

    A water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) was fed 5.0 x 10(5) Sarcocystis hominis sporocysts from a human volunteer who had ingested S. hominis cysts from naturally infected cattle. A necropsy was performed on the buffalo 119 days after inoculation, and a large number of microscopic sarcocysts (approximately 5,000/g) were found in skeletal muscles. Ultrastructurally, the sarcocyst wall from buffalo muscles has upright villar protrusions measuring about 5.6 x 0.8 microm with numerous microtubules that run from the base to the apex. Sarcocysts from this buffalo were infective to 2 human volunteers, confirming their identity as S. hominis. Therefore, we believe that buffaloes can act experimentally as the intermediate host for S. hominis. PMID:12760663

  7. Modeling the electrochemistry of the primary circuits of light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertuch, A.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Kriksunov, L.; Arioka, K.

    1994-12-31

    To model the corrosion behaviors of the heat transport circuits of light water reactors, a mixed potential model (NTM) has been developed and applied to both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Using the data generated by the GE/UKEA-Harwell radiolysis model, electrochemical potentials (ECPs) have been calculated for the heat transport circuits of eight BWRs operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). By modeling the corrosion behaviors of these reactors, the effectiveness of HWC at limiting IGSCC and IASCC can be determined. For simulating PWR primary circuits, a chemical-radiolysis model (developed by the authors) was used to generate input parameters for the MPM. Corrosion potentials of Type 304 and 316 SSs in PWR primary environments were calculated using the NTM and were found to be in good agreement with the corrosion potentials measured in the laboratory for simulated PWR primary environments.

  8. Experimental Study of Water Transport through Hydrophilic Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Xie, Quan; Li, Yinxiao; Duan, Chuanhua

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate one of the fundamental aspects of Nanofluidics, which is the experimental study of water transport through nanoscale hydrophilic conduits. A new method based on spontaneous filling and a novel hybrid nanochannel design is developed to measure the pure mass flow resistance of single nanofluidic channels/tubes. This method does not require any pressure and flow sensors and also does not rely on any theoretical estimations, holding the potential to be standards for nanofluidic flow characterization. We have used this method to measure the pure mass flow resistance of single 2-D hydrophilic silica nanochannels with heights down to 7 nm. Our experimental results quantify the increased mass flow resistance as a function of nanochannel height, showing a 45% increase for a 7nm channel compared with classical hydrodynamics, and suggest that the increased resistance is possibly due to formation of a 7-angstrom-thick stagnant hydration layer on the hydrophilic surfaces. It has been further shown that this method can reliably measure a wide range of pure mass flow resistances of nanoscale conduits, and thus is promising for advancing studies of liquid transport in hydrophobic graphene nanochannels, CNTs, as well as nanoporous media. The work is supported by the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (ACS PRF # 54118-DNI7) and the Faculty Startup Fund (Boston University, USA).

  9. Microbial Biodiversity: Approaches to Experimental Design and Hypothesis Testing in Primary Scientific Literature from 1975 to 1999

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Cindy E.; Bardin, Marc; Berge, Odile; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Fromin, Nathalie; Girardin, Hélène; Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Lebaron, Philippe; Thiéry, Jean M.; Troussellier, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Research interest in microbial biodiversity over the past 25 years has increased markedly as microbiologists have become interested in the significance of biodiversity for ecological processes and as the industrial, medical, and agricultural applications of this diversity have evolved. One major challenge for studies of microbial habitats is how to account for the diversity of extremely large and heterogeneous populations with samples that represent only a very small fraction of these populations. This review presents an analysis of the way in which the field of microbial biodiversity has exploited sampling, experimental design, and the process of hypothesis testing to meet this challenge. This review is based on a systematic analysis of 753 publications randomly sampled from the primary scientific literature from 1975 to 1999 concerning the microbial biodiversity of eight habitats related to water, soil, plants, and food. These publications illustrate a dominant and growing interest in questions concerning the effect of specific environmental factors on microbial biodiversity, the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of this biodiversity, and quantitative measures of population structure for most of the habitats covered here. Nevertheless, our analysis reveals that descriptions of sampling strategies or other information concerning the representativeness of the sample are often missing from publications, that there is very limited use of statistical tests of hypotheses, and that only a very few publications report the results of multiple independent tests of hypotheses. Examples are cited of different approaches and constraints to experimental design and hypothesis testing in studies of microbial biodiversity. To prompt a more rigorous approach to unambiguous evaluation of the impact of microbial biodiversity on ecological processes, we present guidelines for reporting information about experimental design, sampling strategies, and analyses of results in

  10. Water-Free Shale Stimulation: Experimental Studies of Electrofracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.; Geilikman, M. B.; Gardner, W. P.; Broome, S. T.; Glover, S.; Williamson, K.; Su, J.

    2015-12-01

    Electrofracturing is a water-free stimulation method that might be applicable to hydrocarbon reservoirs. This method of dynamic fragmentation uses high-voltage pulses applied to rock via a pair of electrodes. Fragmentation occurs through two general processes (Cho et al, 2006): 1) electrohydraulic shock and 2) internal breakdown inside bulk solid dielectrics. In the first process, electrical current passing through brackish or salty water found naturally in the formation generates a shock wave of sufficient magnitude to crush/fail the rock as the wave travels through it. In the second process, the electric current flows through the rock preferentially along mineral interfaces; tensile and branching cracks are induced at the boundary interfaces either by heating and differential expansion, or by a shock wave induced by the electrical impulse itself. Both processes have been examined experimentally on rocks and on concrete starting in the late 1980's.In light of the "shale revolution" that has reinvigorated the North American petroleum resource base over the last decade, we developed a laboratory based experimental system to study coupled deformation and gas flow during high-voltage pulse application at elevated confining pressure (to 70 MPa). We deformed twelve samples using 6.5 μs full width at half maximum exponential voltage pulses from 80 to 200 kV. Exponential decay loading was shown to fracture shale at pressure, producing a 5-8 order-of-magnitude increase in permeability (initiating in the nD range) with significant fracturing. Fractures were documented using CT and SEM. The preponderance of fractures are parallel to bedding with fractures often extending from end to end in the samples, which were up to 9 cm in length. The bedding-parallel fractures are adjacent to, or off centered to, the input pulse location. Fractures oblique to bedding planes are present as well, but are fewer in number. The test system, and experimental and observational methods and

  11. Procedures for the reconstruction, primary culture and experimental use of rainbow trout gill epithelia.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Sabine; Stott, Lucy C; Hogstrand, Christer; Wood, Chris M; Kelly, Scott P; Pärt, Peter; Owen, Stewart F; Bury, Nic R

    2016-03-01

    This protocol describes how to reconstruct and culture the freshwater rainbow trout gill epithelium on flat permeable membrane supports within cell culture inserts. The protocol describes gill cell isolation, cultured gill epithelium formation, maintenance, monitoring and preparation for use in experimental procedures. To produce a heterogeneous gill epithelium, as seen in vivo, seeding of isolated gill cells twice over a 2-d period is required. As a consequence, this is termed the double-seeded insert technique. Approximately 5-12 d after cell isolation and seeding, preparations develop electrically tight gill epithelia that can withstand freshwater on the apical cell surface. The system can be used to study freshwater gill physiology, and it is a humane alternative for toxicity testing, bioaccumulation studies and environmental water quality monitoring. PMID:26866792

  12. Experimental study of choking flow of water at supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, Altan

    Future nuclear reactors will operate at a coolant pressure close to 25 MPa and at outlet temperatures ranging from 500°C to 625°C. As a result, the outlet flow enthalpy in future Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWR) will be much higher than those of actual ones which can increase overall nuclear plant efficiencies up to 48%. However, under such flow conditions, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water is not fully known, e.g., pressure drop, forced convection and heat transfer deterioration, critical and blowdown flow rate, etc. Up to now, only a very limited number of studies have been performed under supercritical conditions. Moreover, these studies are conducted at conditions that are not representative of future SCWRs. In addition, existing choked flow data have been collected from experiments at atmospheric discharge pressure conditions and in most cases by using working fluids different than water which constrain researchers to analyze the data correctly. In particular, the knowledge of critical (choked) discharge of supercritical fluids is mandatory to perform nuclear reactor safety analyses and to design key mechanical components (e.g., control and safety relief valves, etc.). Hence, an experimental supercritical water facility has been built at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal which allows researchers to perform choking flow experiments under supercritical conditions. The facility can also be used to carry out heat transfer and pressure drop experiments under supercritical conditions. In this thesis, we present the results obtained at this facility using a test section that contains a 1 mm inside diameter, 3.17 mm long orifice plate with sharp edges. Thus, 545 choking flow of water data points are obtained under supercritical conditions for flow pressures ranging from 22.1 MPa to 32.1 MPa, flow temperatures ranging from 50°C to 502°C and for discharge pressures from 0.1 MPa to 3.6 MPa. Obtained data are compared with the data given in

  13. Aquaporin 4-specific T cells and NMO-IgG cause primary retinal damage in experimental NMO/SD.

    PubMed

    Zeka, Bleranda; Hastermann, Maria; Kaufmann, Nathalie; Schanda, Kathrin; Pende, Marko; Misu, Tatsuro; Rommer, Paulus; Fujihara, Kazuo; Nakashima, Ichiro; Dahle, Charlotte; Leutmezer, Fritz; Reindl, Markus; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica/spectrum disorder (NMO/SD) is a severe, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In the majority of patients, it is associated with the presence of pathogenic serum autoantibodies (the so-called NMO-IgGs) directed against the water channel aquaporin 4 (AQP4), and with the formation of large, astrocyte-destructive lesions in spinal cord and optic nerves. A large number of recent studies using optical coherence tomography (OCT) demonstrated that damage to optic nerves in NMO/SD is also associated with retinal injury, as evidenced by retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning and microcystic inner nuclear layer abnormalities. These studies concluded that retinal injury in NMO/SD patients results from secondary neurodegeneration triggered by optic neuritis.However, the eye also contains cells expressing AQP4, i.e., Müller cells and astrocytes in the retina, epithelial cells of the ciliary body, and epithelial cells of the iris, which raised the question whether the eye can also be a primary target in NMO/SD. Here, we addressed this point in experimental NMO/SD (ENMO) induced in Lewis rat by transfer of AQP4268-285-specific T cells and NMO-IgG.We show that these animals show retinitis and subsequent dysfunction/damage of retinal axons and neurons, and that this pathology occurs independently of the action of NMO-IgG. We further show that in the retinae of ENMO animals Müller cell side branches lose AQP4 reactivity, while retinal astrocytes and Müller cell processes in the RNFL/ganglionic cell layers are spared. These changes only occur in the presence of both AQP4268-285-specific T cells and NMO-IgG.Cumulatively, our data show that damage to retinal cells can be a primary event in NMO/SD. PMID:27503347

  14. Response of millet and sorghum to a varying water supply around the primary and nodal roots

    PubMed Central

    Rostamza, M.; Richards, R. A.; Watt, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Cereals have two root systems. The primary system originates from the embryo when the seed germinates and can support the plant until it produces grain. The nodal system can emerge from stem nodes throughout the plant's life; its value for yield is unclear and depends on the environment. The aim of this study was to test the role of nodal roots of sorghum and millet in plant growth in response to variation in soil moisture. Sorghum and millet were chosen as both are adapted to dry conditions. Methods Sorghum and millet were grown in a split-pot system that allowed the primary and nodal roots to be watered separately. Key Results When primary and nodal roots were watered (12 % soil water content; SWC), millet nodal roots were seven times longer than those of sorghum and six times longer than millet plants in dry treatments, mainly from an 8-fold increase in branch root length. When soil was allowed to dry in both compartments, millet nodal roots responded and grew 20 % longer branch roots than in the well-watered control. Sorghum nodal roots were unchanged. When only primary roots received water, nodal roots of both species emerged and elongated into extremely dry soil (0·6–1·5 % SWC), possibly with phloem-delivered water from the primary roots in the moist inner pot. Nodal roots were thick, short, branchless and vertical, indicating a tropism that was more pronounced in millet. Total nodal root length increased in both species when the dry soil was covered with plastic, suggesting that stubble retention or leaf mulching could facilitate nodal roots reaching deeper moist layers in dry climates. Greater nodal root length in millet than in sorghum was associated with increased shoot biomass, water uptake and water use efficiency (shoot mass per water). Millet had a more plastic response than sorghum to moisture around the nodal roots due to (1) faster growth and progression through ontogeny for earlier nodal root branch length and (2

  15. Does Improved Water Access Increase Child School Attendance? A Quasi-Experimental Approach From Rural Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Y.; Cook, J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of improved water access on child school attendance using two years of primary panel data from a quasi-experimental study in Oromiya, Ethiopia. A predominant form of child labor in rural poor households in least developed countries is water collection. Girls are often the primary water collectors for households, and because of the time intensive nature of water collection improved water access may allow for time to be reallocated to schooling (Rosen and Vincent 1999; Nankhuni and Findeis 2004). Understanding how improved water access may increase schooling for girls has important development policy implications. Indeed, abundant research on returns to education suggests increased schooling for girls is tied to improved future child and maternal health, economic opportunities, and lower fertility rates (Handa 1996; Schultz 1998; Michaelowa 2000). The literature to date finds that improved water access leads to increased schooling; however, there still exists a clear gap in the literature for understanding this relationship for two reasons. First, only four studies have directly examined the relationship between improved water access and schooling in sub-Saharan Africa, and analyses have been limited due to the use of cross-sectional data and research designs (Nankhuni and Findeis 2004; Koolwal and Van de Walle 2010; Ndiritu and Nyangan 2011; Nauges and Strand 2011). Indeed, only two studies have attempted to control for the endogenous nature of water access. Second, all studies use a binary school enrollment indicator from household surveys, which may suffer from response bias and may be an imperfect measure for actual schooling. Respondents may feel pressured to report that their children are enrolled in school if, like in Ethiopia, there are compulsory education laws. This may result in an overestimation of school enrollment. In addition, most children from rural poor households combine work and school, and a binary indicator does

  16. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ˜10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132-300 tungsten wires with 5-10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (˜50 TW) and total radiated energy (˜500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  17. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  18. Glass polymorphism in glycerol–water mixtures: II. Experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A.; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol–water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0–1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol–water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s–1–10 K h–1) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ g. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χ g ≥ 0.20), ice (χ g ≤ 0.32), and/or “distorted ice” (0 < χ g ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ g ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol–water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ g ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ g < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ g ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ g < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ g ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ g ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ g ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol–water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex

  19. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: II. Experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-04-20

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol-water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0-1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol-water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s(-1)-10 K h(-1)) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χg. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χg ≥ 0.20), ice (χg ≤ 0.32), and/or "distorted ice" (0 < χg ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χg ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol-water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χg ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χg < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χg ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χg < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χg ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χg ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χg ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol-water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex "phase" behavior of glassy binary

  20. Experimental constraints on CO2 and H2O in the Martian mantle and primary magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, John R.; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Cocheo, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    We present new data on the stability of hornblende in a Martian mantle composition, on CO2 solubility in iron-rich basaltic magmas, and on the solubility of H2O in an alkalic basaltic magma. These new data are combined with a summary of data from the literature to present a summary of the current state of our estimates of solubilities of H2O and CO2 in probable Martian magmas and the stability of hornblende in a slightly hydrous mantle. The new results suggest that hornblende stability is not sensitive to the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio (mg#) of the mantle, that is the results for terrestrial mantle compositions are similar to the more iron-rich Martian composition. Likewise, CO2 solubility in iron-rich tholeiitic basaltic magmas is similar to iron-poor terrestrial compositions. The solubility of H2O has been measured in an alkalic basaltic (basanite) composition for the first time, and it is significantly lower than predicted for models of water solubility in magmas. The lack of mg# dependence observed in hornblende stability and on CO2 solubility that in many cases terrestrial results can be applied to Martian compositions. This conclusion does not apply to other phenomena such as primary magma compositions and major mantle mineral mineralogy.

  1. Experimental infrared measurements for hydrocarbon pollutant determination in subterranean waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay-Ekuakille, A.; Palamara, I.; Caratelli, D.; Morabito, F. C.

    2013-01-01

    Subterranean waters are often polluted by industrial and anthropic effluents that are drained in subsoil. To prevent and control pollution, legislations of different developed countries require an online monitoring measurement, especially for detecting organic solvents (chlorinated and unchlorinated ones). Online measurements include both real-time and no real-time measurements. In general, it is difficult to implement real-time measurements in stricto sensu for online acquisitions on aqueous effluents since they need to be processed by a modeling. This research presents an experimental measurement system based on infrared (IR) spectroscopy for aqueous effluents containing hydrocarbons and capable of displaying excellent values of pollutant concentrations even in instable conditions; the system is able to detect pollutants either in laminar or turbulent flow. The results show the possibility of avoiding the use of "Pitot tube" that is employed to create a stagnation point in order to convert kinetic energy into potential one. This conversion allows the transformation of a turbulent flow in a laminar flow making easy measurement of pollutants included in an aqueous effluent. Obviously, "Pitot tube" is also used for other fluid effluents. The obtained results have been compared with those produced by means of sophisticated IR instrumentation for laboratory applications.

  2. Experimental Studies of Nanobubbles at Solid-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua

    2013-11-01

    When a hydrophobic substrate is in contact with water, gas bubbles thinner than 100 nm can form at the interface and stay for long time under ambient conditions. These nanobubbles have significant influence on a range of interfacial processes. For example, they give rise to hydrodynamic slip on the boundary, initiate the rupture of thin liquid films, facilitate the long-ranged interactions between hydrophobic surfaces, and enhance the attachment of a macroscopic bubble to the substrate. Experimentally, it is nontrivial to characterize such small fragile bubbles and unravel their fundamental physical properties. Based on our established procedure for the nanobubble formation, we have systematically studied the formation, stability and response of nanobubbles to external fields (e.g. sonication, pressure drop and temperature rise). By following the bubble morphology by atomic force microscopy, we show that the loss or gain of the nanobubble volume is achieved mainly by the change in the bubble height. The pinning on the three-phase boundary has significant implication on the properties of nanobubbles under various conditions. This talk will cover the effects of the substrate structures on the nanobubble formation, and the response of nanobubbles to the gas dissolution, the temperature increase, the extended gentle ultrasound or the substantial pressure drop in the environment. We acknowledge the support from Australian Research Council (FFT120100473).

  3. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium 0.05 Fluoride 1.4-2.4 Lead 0.05 Mercury 0.002 Nitrate (as N) 10 Selenium 0.01 Silver 0.05 Endrin 0.0002...

  4. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  5. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    This dissertation summarizes results of an experimental exploration of heat transfer during vaporization of a water droplet deposited on a nanostructured surface at a temperature approaching and exceeding the Leidenfrost point for the surface and at lower surface temperatures 10-40 degrees C above the saturated temperature of the water droplet at approximately 101 kPa. The results of these experiments were compared to those performed on bare smooth copper and aluminum surfaces in this and other studies. The nanostructured surfaces were composed of a vast array of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals grown by hydrothermal synthesis on a smooth copper substrate having an average surface roughness of approximately 0.06 micrometer. Various nanostructured surface array geometries were produced on the copper substrate by performing the hydrothermal synthesis for 4, 10 and 24 hours. The individual nanostructures were randomly-oriented and, depending on hydrothermal synthesis time, had a mean diameter of about 500-700 nm, a mean length of 1.7-3.3 micrometers,and porosities of approximately 0.04-0.58. Surface wetting was characterized by macroscopic measurements of contact angle based on the droplet profile and calculations based on measurements of liquid film spread area. Scanning electron microscope imaging was used to document the nanoscale features of the surface before and after the experiments. The nanostructured surfaces grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 4 and 24 hours exhibited contact angles of approximately 10, whereas the surfaces grown for 10 hours were superhydrophilic, exhibiting contact angles typically less than 3 degrees. In single droplet deposition experiments at 101 kPa, a high-speed video camera was used to document the droplet-surface interaction. Distilled and degassed water droplets ranging in size from 2.5-4.0 mm were deposited onto the surface from heights ranging from approximately 0.2-8.1 cm, such that Weber numbers spanned a range of approximately 0

  6. Primary events regulating stem growth at low water potentials. [Glycine max (L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Boyer, J.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Cell enlargement is inhibited by inadequate water. As a first step toward understanding the mechanism, all the physical parameters affecting enlargement were monitored to identify those that changed first, particularly in coincidence with the inhibition. The osmotic potential, turgor, yield threshold turgor, growth-induced water potential, wall extensibility, and conductance to water were measured in the elongating region, and the water potential was measured in the xylem of stems of dark-grown soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedlings. The results indicate that the primary event during the growth inhibition was the change in the growth-induced water potential. Because the growth limitation subsequently shifted to the low wall extensibility and tissue conductance for water, the initial change in potential may have set in motion subsequent metabolic changes that altered the characteristics of the wall and cell membranes.

  7. Proceedings: 1987 EPRI Workshop on Mechanisms of Primary Water Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    1988-09-01

    Representatives from utilities, vendors, universities, government agencies, and EPRI reviewed recent research on stress corrosion cracking of steam generator tubing in primary water. Participants agreed that, although the mechanism involved in cracking is uncertain, identifying the rate-limiting step is more important than understanding the complete mechanism.

  8. Young Scientists Explore Air, Land, and Water Life. Book 3 Primary Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Linda

    Designed to present interesting facts about science and to heighten the curiosity of primary age students, this book contains activities about the natural world and numerous black and white illustrations. The activities focus on familiar animals that are found in the air, on land, and in the water. A duckling named Little Mac Mallard introduces…

  9. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES...

  10. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:23864952

  11. Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of the Physics of Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Fernandez-Francos, J.; Galdo-Vega, M.

    2010-01-01

    A simple rocket can be made using a plastic bottle filled with a volume of water and pressurized air. When opened, the air pressure pushes the water out of the bottle. This causes an increase in the bottle momentum so that it can be propelled to fairly long distances or heights. Water rockets are widely used as an educational activity, and several…

  12. Experimental research of "microcable in a microconduct" system stability to effect of freezing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vladimir A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Gavryushin, Sergey A.; Nikulin, Aleksey G.; Praporshchikov, Denis E.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental researches of "optical microcable in a microduct" system stability to effect of freezing water are presented. It is shown this system is steadier to water freezing in comparison to lighten optical cable in protective polymer tube.

  13. Learning to Teach Geography for Primary Education: Results of an Experimental Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankman, Marian; Schoonenboom, Judith; van der Schee, Joop; Boogaard, Marianne; Volman, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Students training to become primary school teachers appear to have little awareness of the core concepts of geography (teaching). To ensure that future primary school teachers are able to develop their pupils' geographical awareness, a six weeks programme was developed. The characteristics of this programme -- named Consciously Teaching Geography…

  14. National primary drinking water regulations: Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2002-01-14

    In this document, EPA is finalizing the Long Term 1 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT1ESWTR). The purposes of the LT1ESWTR are to improve control of microbial pathogens, specifically the protozoan Cryptosporidium, in drinking water and address risk trade- offs with disinfection byproducts. The rule will require systems to meet strengthened filtration requirements as well as to calculate levels of microbial inactivation to ensure that microbial protection is not jeopardized if systems make changes to comply with disinfection requirements of the Stage 1 Disinfection and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The LT1ESWTR applies to public water systems that use surface water or ground water under the direct influence of surface water and serve fewer than 10,000 persons. The LT1ESWTR builds upon the framework established for systems serving a population of 10,000 or more in the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (IESWTR). This rule was proposed in combination with the Filter Backwash Recycling Rule (FBRR) in April 2000. PMID:11800007

  15. An experimental investigation on diffusion of water in haplogranitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.; Behrens, Harald

    1997-02-01

    The diffusivity of water has been investigated for a haplogranitic melt of anhydrous composition Qz28Ab38Or34 (in wt %) at temperatures of 800-1200°C and at pressures of 0.5-5.0 kbar using the diffusion couple technique. Water contents of the starting glass pairs varied between 0 and 9 wt %. Concentration-distance profiles for the different water species (molecular water and hydroxyl groups) were determined by near-infrared microspectroscopy. Because the water speciation of the melt is not quenchable (Nowak 1995; Nowak and Behrens 1995; Shen and Keppler 1995), the diffusivities of the individual species can not be evaluated directly from these profiles. Therefore, apparent chemical diffusion coefficients of water ( D water) were determined from the total water profiles using a modified Boltzmann-Matano analysis. The diffusivity of water increases linearly with water content <3 wt % but exponentially at higher water contents. The activation energy decreases from 64 ± 10 kJ/mole for 0.5 wt % water to 46 ± 5 kJ/mole for 4 wt % water but remains constant at higher water contents. A small but systematic decrease of D water with pressure indicates an average activation volume of about 9 cm3/mole. The diffusivity (in cm2/s) can be calculated for given water content (in wt %), T (in K) and P (in kbar) by in the ranges 1073 K ≤ T ≤ 1473 K; 0.5 kbar ≤ P≤ 5␣kbar; 0.5 wt % ≤ C water ≤ 6 wt %. The absence of alkali concentration gradients in the glasses after the experiments shows that interdiffusion of alkali and H+ or H3O+ gives no contribution to the transport of water in aluminosilicate melts. The H/D interdiffusion coefficients obtained at 800°C and 5 kbar using glass pieces with almost the same molar content of either water or deuterium oxide are almost identical to the chemical diffusivities of water. This indicates that protons are transported by the neutral component H2O under these conditions.

  16. Improving the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water by electropolishing treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangdong; Lu, Zhanpeng; Ru, Xiangkun; Chen, Junjie; Xiao, Qian; Tian, Yongwu

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of 316L stainless steel specimens after emery paper grounding, mechanical polishing, and electropolishing were investigated in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water at 310 °C for 120 and 500 h. Electropolishing afforded improved oxidation resistance especially during the early immersion stages. Duplex oxide films comprising a coarse Fe-rich outer layer and a fine Cr-rich inner layer formed on all specimens after 500 h of immersion. Only a compact layer was observed on the electropolished specimen after 120 h of immersion. The enrichment of chromium in the electropolished layer contributed to the passivity and protectiveness of the specimen.

  17. Experimental determination of the absorbed dose to water in a scanned proton beam using a water calorimeter and an ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnebin, Solange; Twerenbold, Damian; Pedroni, Eros; Meer, David; Zenklusen, Silvan; Bula, Christian

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose to water is the reference physical quantity for the energy absorbed in tissue when exposed to beams of ionizing radiation in radiotherapy. The SI unit of absorbed dose to water is the gray (Gy = 1 J/kg). Ionization chambers are used as the dosimeters of choice in the clinical environment because they show a high reproducibility and are easy to use. However, ionization chambers have to be calibrated in order to convert the measured electrical charge into absorbed dose to water. In addition, protocols require these conversion factors to be SI traceable to a primary standard of absorbed dose to water. We present experimental results where the ionization chamber used for the dosimetry for the scanned proton beam facility at PSI is compared with the direct determination of absorbed dose to water from the METAS primary standard water calorimeter. The agreement of 3.2% of the dose values measured by the two techniques are within their respective statistical uncertainties.

  18. Upwelling-Induced Primary Productivity in Coastal Waters of the Black Sea: Impact on Algorithms for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Joel C.; Brink, Kenneth K.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen; Sosik, Heidi M.

    1997-01-01

    This research program was a collaborative effort to investigate the impact of rapid changes in the water column during coastal upwelling, on biological and optical properties. These properties are important for constructing region or event-specific algorithms for remote sensing of pigment concentration and primary productivity and for comparing these algorithms with those used for the development of large scale maps from ocean color. We successfully achieved the primary objective of this research project which was to study in situ the dynamics of rapid spatial and temporal changes in properties of the water column during, coastal upwelling off the Crimean Coast in the Black Sea. The work was a collaborative effort between a group of biological and physical oceanographers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and from two oceanographic research institutions in the Crimea, Ukraine, located near the study site, the Marine Hydrophysical Institute (MHI) and the Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas (IBSS). The site was an ideal experimental model, both from a technical and economic standpoint, because of the predictable summer upwelling that occurs in the region and because of the availability of both a ship on call and laboratory and remote sensing facilities at the nearby marine institutes. We used a combination of shipboard measurements and remote sensing to investigate the physical evolution of rapid upwelling events and their impact on photoplankton and water column optical properties. The field work involved a two day cruise for mooring, deployment and a three day baseline survey cruise, followed by an eleven day primary cruise during, a summer upwelling event (anticipated by monitoring local winds and tracked by remote sensing imaging). An MHI ship was outfitted and used for these purposes.

  19. Is litter decomposition 'primed' by primary producer-release of labile carbon in terrestrial and aquatic experimental systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, A. Margarida P. M.; Kritzberg, Emma S.; Rousk, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    It is possible that recalcitrant organic matter (ROM) can be 'activated' by inputs of labile organic matter (LOM) through the priming effect (PE). Investigating the PE is of major importance to fully understand the microbial use of ROM and its role on carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In aquatic ecosystems it is thought that the PE is triggered by periphytic algae release of LOM. Analogously, in terrestrial systems it is hypothesized that the LOM released in plant rhizospheres, or from the green crusts on the surface of agricultural soils, stimulate the activity and growth of ROM decomposers. Most previous studies on PE have utilised pulse additions of single substrates at high concentrations. However, to achieve an assessment of the true importance of the PE, it is important to simulate a realistic delivery of LOM. We investigated, in a series of 2-week laboratory experiments, how primary producer (PP)-release of LOM influence litter degradation in terrestrial and aquatic experimental systems. We used soil (terrestrial) and pond water (aquatic) microbial communities to which litter was added under light and dark conditions. In addition, glucose was added at PP delivery rates in dark treatments to test if the putative PE in light systems could be reproduced. We observed an initial peak of bacterial growth rate followed by an overall decrease over time with no treatment differences. In light treatments, periphytic algae growth and increased fungal production was stimulated when bacterial growth declined. In contrast, both fungal growth and algal production were negligible in dark treatments. This reveals a direct positive influence of photosynthesis on fungal growth. To investigate if PP LOM supplements, and the associated fungal growth, translate into a modulated litter decomposition, we are using stable isotopes to track the use of litter and algal-derived carbon by determining the δ13C in produced CO2. Fungi and bacteria

  20. An experimental investigation of the interaction of primary and secondary stresses in fuel plates

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Yahr, G.T.

    1996-02-01

    If the load is not relieved as a structure starts to yield, the induced stress is defined as primary stress. If the load relaxes, as a structure begins yield the induced stress is defined as secondary stress. In design it is not uncommon to give more weight to primary stresses than to secondary stresses. However, knowing when this is good design practice and when it is not good design practice represents a problem. In particular, the fuel plates in operating reactors contain both primary stresses and secondary stresses and to properly assess a design there is a need to assign design weights to the stresses. Tests were conducted on reactor fuel plates intended for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) to determine the potential of giving different design weights to the primary and secondary stresses. The results of these tests and the conclusion that the stresses should be weighted the same are given in this paper.

  1. Experimental study of water adsorption on activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-01-19

    Two carbons of different origins (wood and coal) were oxidized with nitric acid. The materials were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. Boehm titration, and potentiometric titration. The water adsorption isotherms were measured at various temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From these isotherms heats of adsorption were calculated using virial equation. The results showed that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by surface chemical heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. The shapes of heats obtained indicate strong water-water interactions as a result of adsorption on secondary sites and cluster formation. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol) was obtained.

  2. Water erosion monitoring and experimentation for global change studies

    SciTech Connect

    Poesen, J.W.; Boardman, J.; Wilcox, B.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the need for monitoring the effects of climatic change on soil erosion. The importance of monitoring not only runoff, but monitoring and experimental studies at the larger scale of hillslope and catchments is stressed.

  3. Extensive tissue-specific transcriptomic plasticity in maize primary roots upon water deficit

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Lithio, Andrew; Brandt, Ronny; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is the most important environmental constraint severely limiting global crop growth and productivity. This study investigated early transcriptome changes in maize (Zea mays L.) primary root tissues in response to moderate water deficit conditions by RNA-Sequencing. Differential gene expression analyses revealed a high degree of plasticity of the water deficit response. The activity status of genes (active/inactive) was determined by a Bayesian hierarchical model. In total, 70% of expressed genes were constitutively active in all tissues. In contrast, <3% (50 genes) of water deficit-responsive genes (1915) were consistently regulated in all tissues, while >75% (1501 genes) were specifically regulated in a single root tissue. Water deficit-responsive genes were most numerous in the cortex of the mature root zone and in the elongation zone. The most prominent functional categories among differentially expressed genes in all tissues were ‘transcriptional regulation’ and ‘hormone metabolism’, indicating global reprogramming of cellular metabolism as an adaptation to water deficit. Additionally, the most significant transcriptomic changes in the root tip were associated with cell wall reorganization, leading to continued root growth despite water deficit conditions. This study provides insight into tissue-specific water deficit responses and will be a resource for future genetic analyses and breeding strategies to develop more drought-tolerant maize cultivars. PMID:26463995

  4. Extensive tissue-specific transcriptomic plasticity in maize primary roots upon water deficit.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Lithio, Andrew; Brandt, Ronny; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Water deficit is the most important environmental constraint severely limiting global crop growth and productivity. This study investigated early transcriptome changes in maize (Zea mays L.) primary root tissues in response to moderate water deficit conditions by RNA-Sequencing. Differential gene expression analyses revealed a high degree of plasticity of the water deficit response. The activity status of genes (active/inactive) was determined by a Bayesian hierarchical model. In total, 70% of expressed genes were constitutively active in all tissues. In contrast, <3% (50 genes) of water deficit-responsive genes (1915) were consistently regulated in all tissues, while >75% (1501 genes) were specifically regulated in a single root tissue. Water deficit-responsive genes were most numerous in the cortex of the mature root zone and in the elongation zone. The most prominent functional categories among differentially expressed genes in all tissues were 'transcriptional regulation' and 'hormone metabolism', indicating global reprogramming of cellular metabolism as an adaptation to water deficit. Additionally, the most significant transcriptomic changes in the root tip were associated with cell wall reorganization, leading to continued root growth despite water deficit conditions. This study provides insight into tissue-specific water deficit responses and will be a resource for future genetic analyses and breeding strategies to develop more drought-tolerant maize cultivars. PMID:26463995

  5. Experimental reconstruction of excitation energies of primary hot isotopes in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Lin, W.; Liu, X.; Huang, M.; Zhang, S.; Chen, Z.; Wang, J.; Wada, R.; Kowalski, S.; Keutgen, T.; Hagel, K.; Barbui, M.; Bottosso, C.; Bonasera, A.; Natowitz, J. B.; Materna, T.; Qin, L.; Sahu, P. K.; Schmidt, K. J.

    2013-09-01

    The excitation energies of the primary hot isotopes in multifragmentation events are experimentally reconstructed in the reaction system 64Zn + 112Sn at 40 MeV/nucleon. A kinematical focusing method is employed to evaluate the multiplicities of the evaporated light particles associated with isotopically identified fragments with 3≤Z≤14. Angular distributions of the velocity spectra of light charged particles and neutrons associated with trigger isotopes are examined. A moving source fit is used to separate the kinematically correlated particles, evaporated from the parents of the detected isotopes, from the uncorrelated particles originating from other sources. The latter are evaluated experimentally relative to those in coincidence with the Li isotopes. A parameter, k, is used to adjust the yield of the uncorrelated particles for different trigger isotopes. For each experimentally detected isotope, the multiplicities, apparent temperatures, and k values for n, p, d, t, and α particles are extracted. Using the extracted values, the excitation energies of the primary hot isotopes are reconstructed employing a Monte Carlo method. The extracted excitation energies are in the range of 1 to 4 MeV/nucleon but show a significant decreasing trend as a function of A for a given Z of the isotopes. The results are compared with those of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) and statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) simulations. While some of the experimental characteristics are predicted partially by each model, neither simulation reproduces the overall characteristics of the experimental results.

  6. Biodiversity effects on the water balance of an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimer, Sophia; Kreutziger, Yvonne; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Beßler, Holger; Engels, Christof; Oelmann, Yvonne; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wirth, Christian; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Plant species richness increases aboveground biomass production in biodiversity experiments. Biomass production depends on and feeds back to the water balance, but it remains unclear how plant species richness influences soil water contents and water fluxes (actual evapotranspiration (ETa), downward flux (DF), and upward flux (UF)). Our objective was to determine the effects of plant species and functional richness and functional identity on soil water contents and water fluxes for two soil depths (0-0.3 and 0.3.-0.7 m). To achieve this, we used a water balance model in connection with Bayesian hierarchical modeling. We monitored soil water contents on 86 plots of a grassland plant diversity experiment in Jena, Germany between July 2002 and January 2006. In the field experiment, plant species richness (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) and functional group composition (0-4 functional groups: legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall herbs, non-leguminous small herbs) were manipulated in a factorial design. Climate data (air temperature, precipitation, wind velocity, relative humidity, global radiation, soil moisture) was measured at a central climate station between July 2002 and December 2007. Root biomass data from July 2006 was available per plot. Missing water contents per plot and depth were estimated in weekly resolution for the years 2003-2007 with a Bayesian hierarchical model using measured water contents per plot and centrally measured soil moisture. To obtain ETa, DF, and UF of the two different soil depths, we modified a soil water balance model which had been developed for our study site. The model is based on changes in soil water content between subsequent observation dates and modeled potential evapotranspiration which was partitioned between soil layers according to percentage of root biomass. The presence of specific functional groups significantly changed water contents and fluxes with partly opposing effects in the two soil depths. Presence of grasses

  7. Water weakening during semibrittle flow and faulting of experimentally deformed quartz sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanaya, T.; Hirth, G.

    2015-12-01

    Triaxial compression experiments were conducted on Fontainebleau sandstone at temperatures to 900°C and effective pressures to 175 MPa with varying water contents. Both yield and peak strengths associated with semibrittle faulting decrease linearly with an increase in intragranular water concentration (COH); COH is determined from infrared spectroscopy. Microstructural observations and the influence of strain rate, temperature, and COH on peak strength suggest that transient semibrittle flow is accommodated through cataclasis assisted by stress-corrosion microcracking. The roles of the experimental variables on the constitutive behavior are similar to those reported for subcritical cracking of quartz single crystals. At high COH, microstructural observations indicate an increase in the relative contribution of mm-scale distributed shear fractures (bands) to axial strain, reflecting a reduction in grain-scale fracture toughness. This is consistent with the inference that highly dissipative shear fractures lead to the observed reduction in strength at high COH. Stress vs. strain rate data for transient semibrittle flow show temperature-dependent rate behavior, and are well fit by an exponential law with an activation enthalpy of 185 to 250 kJ/mol and Peierls stress of 2.5 to 7.5 GPa. Using these constraints, we infer that stress-corrosion cracking is rate-limited by the dislocation activity at crack tips. Correlation of microscale COH maps to microstructures suggests that intragranular water in the undeformed sandstone is associated mainly with clusters of fluid inclusions, resulting in a highly nonuniform distribution of COH both within and between grains. Axially deformed samples show a reduction in the median and variability of COH over a range of length scales. We observe that a local reduction in COH correlates with fluid inclusions that are decrepitated and crosscut by intragranular fractures. We conclude that intragranular fracture is the primary mechanism of

  8. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  9. Experimental research on water-jet guided laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Wang, Yang; Yang, Lijun; Chu, Jiecheng

    2007-01-01

    The water-jet guided laser processing is a new compound micro-machining process in which the laser beam passes through the water-jet by full reflection onto the workpiece. In this paper, a new key component:the coupling unit was designed and which would form a long, slim, high-pressure and stable water-jet. The couple unit made the fluid field in the chamber symmetry; the coupling quality of the laser beam and the water-jet could be easily detected by CCD camera. For its excellent surface quality, the nozzle with a \\fgr 0.18mm hole got better machining effect than other nozzles. Aiming at finding optimum machining parameters, experiments were carried out. The results showed the attenuation of laser energy bore relation to water-jet stability. The energy intensity distributed over the water-jet cross section nearly homogeneous and the laser energy nearly did not decrease in long working distance. When water-jet pressure was high, efficient cooling of the workpiece prevented burrs, cracks and heat affected zone from forming. During cutting Si wafer process, nearly no cracking was found; Adjusting reasonable laser parameters grooving 65Mn, the machining accuracy would combine with the speed.

  10. Water supply and not nitrate concentration determines primary root growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Nick; Whalley, W Richard; Lindsey, Keith; Miller, Anthony J

    2011-10-01

    Understanding how root system architecture (RSA) adapts to changing nitrogen and water availability is important for improving acquisition. A sand rhizotron system was developed to study RSA in a porous substrate under tightly regulated nutrient supply. The RSA of Arabidopsis seedlings under differing nitrate (NO₃⁻) and water supplies in agar and sand was described. The hydraulic conductivity of the root environment was manipulated by using altered sand particle size and matric potentials. Ion-selective microelectrodes were used to quantify NO₃⁻ at the surface of growing primary roots in sands of different particle sizes. Differences in RSA were observed between seedlings grown on agar and sand, and the influence of NO₃⁻ (0.1-10.0 mm) and water on RSA was determined. Primary root length (PRL) was a function of water flux and independent of NO₃⁻. The percentage of roots with laterals correlated with water flux, whereas NO₃⁻ supply was important for basal root (BR) growth. In agar and sand, the NO₃⁻ activities at the root surface were higher than those supplied in the nutrient solution. The sand rhizotron system is a useful tool for the study of RSA, providing a porous growth environment that can be used to simulate the effects of hydraulic conductivity on growth. PMID:21707650

  11. Experimental remote sensing of subsurface temperature in natural ocean water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.; Caputo, B.; Johnson, R. L.; Hoge, F. E.

    1977-01-01

    The first successful depth-resolved remote sensing measurements of subsurface ocean water temperature were obtained by spectral analysis of the 3400 per cm O-H stretching Raman band of liquid water. Raman spectral data were obtained from a research vessel at various depths from the surface to 10 meters below the surface in a tidal estuary. The temperature inferred from the spectra was consistent with ground truth temperature to within the shot noise limited accuracy of plus or minus 2 C. The performance of a future fully developed airborne laser Raman water temperature measurement system is estimated on the basis of these first tests.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Thermodynamics of the Reaction of Titania and Water at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quynhgiao N.; Myers, Dwight L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The transpiration method was used to determine the volatility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in water vapor-containing environments at temperatures between 1473 and 1673 K. Water contents ranged from 0 to 76 mole % in oxygen or argon carrier gases for 20 to 250 hr exposure times. Results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor to volatilization and the primary reaction for volatilization in this temperature range is: TiO2(s) + H2O(g) = TiO(OH)2(g). Data were analyzed with both the second and third law methods to extract an enthalpy and entropy of formation. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of TiO(OH)2(g) were computed using B3LYP density functional theory, and the enthalpy of formation was computed using the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with a perturbative correction for connected triple substitutions [CCSD(T)]. Thermal functions are calculated using both a structure with bent and linear hydroxyl groups. Calculated second and third heats show closer agreement with the linear hydroxyl group, suggesting more experimental and computational spectroscopic and structural work is needed on this system.

  13. Experimental Analysis of the Mechanism of Hearing under Water

    PubMed Central

    Chordekar, Shai; Kishon-Rabin, Liat; Kriksunov, Leonid; Adelman, Cahtia; Sohmer, Haim

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of human hearing under water is debated. Some suggest it is by air conduction (AC), others by bone conduction (BC), and others by a combination of AC and BC. A clinical bone vibrator applied to soft tissue sites on the head, neck, and thorax also elicits hearing by a mechanism called soft tissue conduction (STC) or nonosseous BC. The present study was designed to test whether underwater hearing at low intensities is by AC or by osseous BC based on bone vibrations or by nonosseous BC (STC). Thresholds of normal hearing participants to bone vibrator stimulation with their forehead in air were recorded and again when forehead and bone vibrator were under water. A vibrometer detected vibrations of a dry human skull in all similar conditions (in air and under water) but not when water was the intermediary between the sound source and the skull forehead. Therefore, the intensities required to induce vibrations of the dry skull in water were significantly higher than the underwater hearing thresholds of the participants, under conditions when hearing by AC and osseous BC is not likely. The results support the hypothesis that hearing under water at low sound intensities may be attributed to nonosseous BC (STC). PMID:26770975

  14. Carbon dioxide flux and net primary production of a boreal treed bog: responses to warming and water table manipulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, T. M.; Perkins, M.; Kaing, E.; Strack, M.

    2014-09-01

    Mid-latitude treed bogs are significant carbon (C) stocks and are highly sensitive to global climate change. In a dry continental treed bog, we compared three sites; control, recent (1-3 years; experimental) and older drained (10-13 years; drained) with water levels at 38, 74 and 120 cm below the surface, respectively. At each site we measured carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and tree root respiration (Rr) (across hummock-hollow microtopography of the forest floor) and net primary production (NPP) of trees during the growing seasons (May to October) of 2011-2013. The carbon (C) balance was calculated by adding net CO2 exchange of the forest floor (NEff-Rr) to the NPP of the trees. From cooler and wetter 2011 to driest and warmest 2013, The control site was a~C sink of 92, 70 and 76 g m-2, experimental site was a C source of 14, 57 and 135 g m-2, and drained site was a progressively smaller source of 26, 23 and 13 g m-2, respectively. Although all microforms at the experimental site had large net CO2 emissions, the longer-term drainage and deeper water level at the drained site resulted in the replacement of mosses with vascular plants (shrubs) at the hummocks and lichens at the hollows leading to the highest CO2 uptake at drained hummocks and significant losses at hollows. The tree NPP was highest at the drained site. We also quantified the impact of climatic warming at all water table treatments by equipping additional plots with open-top chambers (OTCs) that caused a passive warming on average of ∼1 °C and differential air warming of ∼6 °C (at mid-day full sun) across the study years. Warming significantly enhanced the shrub growth and CO2 sink function of the drained hummocks (exceeding the cumulative respiration losses at hollows induced by the lowered water level × warming). There was an interaction of water level with warming across hummocks that resulted in largest net CO2 uptake at warmed drained hummocks. Thus in 2013, the warming treatment enhanced

  15. Primary and Secondary Aerosol Investigation from Different Sea-Waters in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'anna, B.; Marchand, N.; Sellegri, K.; Sempéré, R.; Mas, S.; George, C.; Meme, A.; Frihi, A.; Pey, J.; Schwier, A.; Delmont, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminate the contribution of Primary and Secondary Aerosol formed at the sea-air interface from background level of the aerosol. We therefore decided to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment provided by a 2m3simulation chamber, using freshly collected sea-water samples from the SEMEX site (43°15'64 N, 05°20'01 E) near Marseille bay. Two types of experiments were conducted for 4 weeks testing 3 different sea-waters. Primary sea-aerosol was generated by bubble-bursting method, then introduced in the simulation chamber and exposed to atmospheric oxidants (O3, OH) and light to simulated primary aerosol aging. A second set of experiments focused on secondary particle formation upon illumination and/or ozone exposure of the sea-water surface (15l of sea-water were deposited in a pyrex container located inside the simulation chamber). New particle formation was only observed for relatively high DOC level of the sea-water sample. Particles detection and analysis was followed by a PSM (1nm size), a CPC (2.5nm size), a SMPS (granulometry), a CCN chamber for hygroscopicity studies, a TOF-AMS (Aerodyne) for chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction. Off-line analysis included TEM-EDX samples for morphology and size distribution studies and a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer) for the molecular identification of the organic fraction. VOCs were measured on-line by PTR-HR-MS. The seawater samples were filtered at 60μm before use and were daily analyzed for chemical (colored dissolved organic matter, particulate matter and related polar compounds, transparent polysaccharides and nutrients concentration) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton) analyses.

  16. Antimicrobial effect of ozonated water, sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine gluconate in primary molar root canals

    PubMed Central

    Goztas, Zeynep; Onat, Halenur; Tosun, Gul; Sener, Yagmur; Hadimli, Hasan Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the antimicrobial effect of ozonated water, ozonated water with ultrasonication, sodium hypochloride and chlorhexidine (CHX) in human primary root canals contaminated by Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis). Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight extracted human primary molar teeth were used. Crowns were cut off using a diamond saw under water-cooling. One hundred roots were obtained and mechanically prepared. The roots were then sterilized by autoclaving in water for 15 min at 121°C. All samples were contaminated with E. faecalis for 24 h and the root canals were randomly divided into five groups (n = 20). Group I: 25 mg/L of Ozonated water (O3aq), Group II: 25 mg/L of O3aq with ultrasonication, Group III: 2.5% Sodium hypochloride (NaOCl), Group IV: 2% CHX and Group V: Positive control. The canal of each specimen was irrigated for 4 min and positive control was untreated. All root canals were agitated with sterile saline solution. The saline solution was collected from canals with sterile paper points. For each specimen, the paper points were transposed to eppendorf vials containing 2 ml of brain heart infusion. According to bacterial proliferation, the mean values of optical density were achieved by ELİSA (Biotek EL ×800, Absorbance Microplate Reader, ABD) and the data were analyzed. Results: NaOCI, CHX and two types of O3aq were found statistically different than positive control group. NaOCI irrigation was found significantly most effective. Conclusions: NaOCl, CHX and O3aq applications provide antibacterial effect in vitro conditions in primary root canals. PMID:25512726

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Study of the Primary Current Distribution in Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez Aranda, Armando I.; Henquin, Eduardo R.; Torres, Israel Rodriguez; Bisang, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described to determine the primary current distribution in parallel-plate electrochemical reactors. The electrolyte is simulated by conductive paper and the electrodes are segmented to measure the current distribution. Experiments are reported with the electrolyte confined to the interelectrode gap, where the current…

  18. Desert Life, Experimental Edition Prepared for Testing in the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelby, Betty; And Others

    This unit and teacher's guide were prepared for use with primary grade children. The activities include the construction of a desert terrarium, the study of cacti, and the use of animal sort cards. A special section is devoted to the way parents can help with the unit. A detailed list of needed materials is provided in the guide. This work was…

  19. Experimental shock lithification of water-bearing rock powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Keil, K.; See, T.

    1982-01-01

    The geology and morphology of the terrestrial planets and their moons have been profoundly affected by impact cratering. Some of these bodies contain substantial quantities of water or ice in their regoliths. It is pointed out that the effects of impacts into water-bearing target rocks are not well understood, and may be significantly different from those produced by identical impacts on a desiccated surface. The present investigation has the objective to determine the effects of water on targets of powdered rock and to seek evidence of impact-induced hydration or clay formation. Samples of andesitic basalt were crushed and sieved, and experiments were conducted on the material smaller than 150 micrometers. These experiments show that the water content of a powdered rock target can strongly affect its physical condition following an impact. A relatively small component (5-15 wt %) of water or ice in planetary surface material could inhibit or prevent lithification throughout much of the shocked volume at an impact site.

  20. Primary production of coral ecosystems in the Vietnamese coastal and adjacent marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tac-An, Nguyen; Minh-Thu, Phan; Cherbadji, I. I.; Propp, M. V.; Odintsov, V. S.; Propp, L. H.

    2013-11-01

    Coral reef ecosystems in coastal waters and islands of Vietnam have high primary production. Average gross primary production (GPP) in coral reef waters was 0.39 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of corals ranged from 3.12 to 4.37 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of benthic microalgae in coral reefs ranged from 2 to 10 g C m-2 day-1. GPP of macro-algae was 2.34 g C m-2 day-1. Therefore, the total of GPP of whole coral reef ecosystems could reach 7.85 to 17.10 g C m-2 day-1. Almost all values of the ratio of photosynthesis to respiration in the water bodies are higher than 1, which means these regions are autotrophic systems. Wire variation of GPP in coral reefs was contributed by species abundance of coral and organisms, nutrient supports and environmental characteristics of coral ecosystems. Coral reefs play an important ecological role of biogeochemical cycling of nutrients in waters around the reefs. These results contribute valuable information for the protection, conservation and sustainable exploitation of the natural resources in coral reef ecosystems in Vietnam.

  1. Development of Alternative Reductant Application in Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domae, Masafumi; Kawamura, Hirotaka; Ohira, Taku

    In primary coolant of pressurized water reactors, high concentration dissolved hydrogen (DH) has been added, to prevent generation of oxidizing species through radiolysis of the coolant. Recently, number of ageing plants is increasing and utilities are concerned about primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Some researchers consider that occurrence of PWSCC and crack propagation rate are affected by the DH concentration. The authors consider that one of possible mitigation methods toward PWSCC is use of alternative reductant in place of hydrogen. Because from the radiation chemical aspect aliphatic alcohols are typical scavengers of the oxidizing radical generated through the radiolysis of water, they are promising candidates of the alternative reductant. In the present work, possible alternatives of hydrogen were screened, and methanol was selected as the best candidate. Corrosion tests of type 304 stainless steels were carried out in high temperature water at 320°C without irradiation under two conditions: (1) DH 1.5 ppm (part per million) and (2) methanol 2.9 ppm. Electrochemical corrosion potential of the stainless steel specimens was measured during the immersion tests. After the immersion tests for 1500 h, surface morphology of the stainless steel specimens was observed by scanning probe microscope. Major component of the oxide film formed on the stainless steel specimens was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. From comparison of the test results, it is concluded that addition of 2.9 ppm methanol has almost the same effect on corrosion environment as DH 1.5 ppm addition.

  2. Phenotypic responses of wild barley to experimentally imposed water stress.

    PubMed

    Ivandic, V; Hackett, C A; Zhang, Z J; Staub, J E; Nevo, E; Thomas, W T; Forster, B P

    2000-12-01

    Responses to water stress within a population of wild barley from Tabigha, Israel, were examined. The population's distribution spans two soil types: Terra Rossa (TR) and Basalt (B). Seeds were collected from plants along a 100 m transect; 24 genotypes were sampled from TR and 28 from B. Due to different soil water-holding capacities, plants growing on TR naturally experience more intense drought than plants growing on B. In a glasshouse experiment, water was withheld from plants for two periods (10 d and 14 d) after flag leaf emergence. A total of 15 agronomic, morphological, developmental, and fertility related traits were examined by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Ten of these traits were significantly affected by the treatment. A high degree of phenotypic variation was found in the population with significant genotypextreatment and soil typextreatment interactions. Principal component analysis (PCA) was performed using combined control and stress treatment data sets. The first three principal components (pc) explained 88.8% of the variation existing in the population with pc1 (47.9%) comprising yield-related and morphological traits, pc2 (22.9%) developmental characteristics and pc3 (18.0%) fertility-related traits. The relative performance of individual genotypes was determined and water stress tolerant genotypes identified. TR genotypes were significantly less affected by the imposed water stress than B genotypes. Moreover, TR genotypes showed accelerated development under water deficit conditions. Data indicate that specific genotypes demonstrating differential responses may be useful for comparative physiological studies, and that TR genotypes exhibiting yield stability may have value for breeding barley better adapted to drought. PMID:11141176

  3. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Primary Roots of Alhagi sparsifolia in Response to Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xinwu; Zhang, Chao; Jia, Shirong; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Background Alhagi sparsifolia is a typical desert phreatophyte and has evolved to withstand extreme dry, cold and hot weather. While A. sparsifolia represents an ideal model to study the molecular mechanism of plant adaption to abiotic stress, no research has been done in this aspect to date. Here we took advantage of Illumina platform to survey transcriptome in primary roots of A. sparsifolia under water stress conditions in aim to facilitate the exploration of its genetic basis for drought tolerance. Methodology and Principal Findings We sequenced four primary roots samples individually collected at 0, 6, 24 and 30h from the A. sparsifolia seedlings in the course of 24h of water stress following 6h of rehydration. The resulting 38,763,230, 67,511,150, 49,259,804 and 54,744,906 clean reads were pooled and assembled into 33,255 unigenes with an average length of 1,057 bp. All-unigenes were subjected to functional annotation by searching against the public databases. Based on the established transcriptome database, we further evaluated the gene expression profiles in the four different primary roots samples, and identified numbers of differently expressed genes (DEGs) reflecting the early response to water stress (6h vs. 0h), the late response to water stress (24h vs. 0h) and the response to post water stress rehydration (30h vs. 24h). Moreover, the DEGs specifically regulated at 6, 24 and 30h were captured in order to depict the dynamic changes of gene expression during water stress and subsequent rehydration. Functional categorization of the DEGs indicated the activation of oxidoreductase system, and particularly emphasized the significance of the ‘Glutathione metabolism pathway’ in response to water stress. Conclusions This is the first description of the genetic makeup of A. sparsifolia, thus providing a substantial contribution to the sequence resources for this species. The identified DEGs offer a deep insight into the molecular mechanism of A. sparsifolia

  4. Upper Washita River experimental watersheds: Multiyear stability of soil water content profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scaling in situ soil water content time series data to a large spatial domain is a key element of watershed environmental monitoring and modeling. The primary method of estimating and monitoring large-scale soil water content distributions is via in situ networks. It is critical to establish the s...

  5. WATER TEMPERATURE DYNAMICS IN EXPERIMENTAL FIELD CHANNELS: ANALYSIS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is on water temperature dynamics in the shallow field channels of the USEPA Monticello Ecological Research Station (MERS). The hydraulic and temperature environment in the MERS channels was measured and simulated to provide some background for several biological studie...

  6. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the physics of water rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Fernández-Francos, J.; Galdo-Vega, M.

    2010-09-01

    A simple rocket can be made using a plastic bottle filled with a volume of water and pressurized air. When opened, the air pressure pushes the water out of the bottle. This causes an increase in the bottle momentum so that it can be propelled to fairly long distances or heights. Water rockets are widely used as an educational activity, and several mathematical models have been proposed to investigate and predict their physics. However, the real equations that describe the physics of the rockets are so complicated that certain assumptions are usually made to obtain models that are easier to use. These models provide relatively good predictions but fail in describing the complex physics of the flow. This paper presents a detailed theoretical analysis of the physics of water rockets that concludes with the proposal of a physical model. The validity of the model is checked by a series of field tests. The tests showed maximum differences with predictions of about 6%. The proposed model is finally used to investigate the temporal evolution of some significant variables during the propulsion and flight of the rocket. The experience and procedure described in this paper can be proposed to graduate students and also at undergraduate level if certain simplifications are assumed in the general equations.

  7. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  8. Growth of the Maize Primary Root at Low Water Potentials 1

    PubMed Central

    Voetberg, Gary S.; Sharp, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    Seedlings of maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 × Mo 17) growing at low water potentials in vermiculite contained greatly increased proline concentrations in the primary root growth zone. Proline levels were particularly high toward the apex, where elongation rates have been shown to be completely maintained over a wide range of water potentials. Proline concentration increased even in quite mild treatments and reached 120 millimolal in the apical millimeter of roots growing at a water potential of −1.6 megapascal. This accounted for almost half of the osmotic adjustment in this region. Increases in concentration of other amino acids and glycinebetaine were comparatively small. We have assessed the relative contributions of increased rates of proline deposition and decreased tissue volume expansion to the increases in proline concentration. Proline content profiles were combined with published growth velocity distributions to calculate net proline deposition rate profiles using the continuity equation. At low water potential, proline deposition per unit length increased by up to 10-fold in the apical region of the growth zone compared to roots at high water potential. This response accounted for most of the increase in proline concentration in this region. The results suggest that osmotic adjustment due to increased proline deposition plays an important role in the maintenance of root elongation at low water potentials. PMID:16668308

  9. Use of TV in space science activities - Some considerations. [onboard primary experimental data recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, T. C.

    1977-01-01

    Advantages in the use of TV on board satellites as the primary data-recording system in a manned space laboratory when certain types of experiments are flown are indicated. Real-time or near-real-time validation, elimination of film weight, improved depth of field and low-light sensitivity, and better adaptability to computer and electronic processing of data are spelled out as advantages of TV over photographic techniques, say, in fluid dynamics experiments, and weightlessness studies.

  10. MICROBIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS RECEIVING GROUNDWATER AND SURFACE WATER AS THE PRIMARY SOURCES OF WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Earlier descriptions of water distribution systems (WDS) microbial communities have relied on culturing techniques. These techniques are known to be highly selective in nature, but more importantly, they tend to grossly underestimate the microbial diversity of most environments. ...

  11. Experimental study of hydrogen production by direct decomposition of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgen, E.; Galindo, J.; Baykara, S. Z.

    The hydrogen production by direct decomposition of water in a solar furnace is studied. The set-up is a horizontal axis system consisting of two 1.0 kW parabolic concentrators, both powered by a single heliostat. A temperature of 3000 K is possible. The water is fed to the reactor installed at the focal space of the concentrator, and the steam is decomposed at about 2500 K. The reactor consisted of a cylindrical cavity type refractory receiver covered with a silica cupola. The steam was introduced at a known rate into the cavity and the product gases were quenched. After the condensation of steam, hydrogen and oxygen were collected in a reservoir. Results indicate that with an optimized system, it is possible to produce hydrogen at about 70 percent rate of the theoretical value at the temperature level studied.

  12. Combustion of oil on water: an experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    1982-02-01

    This study determined how well crude and fuel oils burn on water. Objectives were: (1) to measure the burning rates for several oils; (2) to determine whether adding heat improves the oils' combustibility; (3) to identify the conditions necessary to ignite fuels known to be difficult to ignite on ocean waters (e.g., diesel and Bunker C fuel oils); and (4) to evaluate the accuracy of an oil-burning model proposed by Thompson, Dawson, and Goodier (1979). Observations were made about how weathering and the thickness of the oil layer affect the combustion of crude and fuel oils. Nine oils commonly transported on the world's major waterways were tested. Burns were first conducted in Oklahoma under warm-weather conditions (approx. 30/sup 0/C) and later in Ohio under cold-weather conditions (approx. 0/sup 0/C to 10/sup 0/C).

  13. Experimental Values of the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, P. T.

    1951-01-01

    The results of surface-tension measurements for supercooled water are presented. A total of 702 individual measurements of surface tension of triple-distilled water were made in the temperature range, 27 to -22.2 C, with 404 of these measurements at temperatures below 0 C. The increase in magnitude of surface tension with decreasing temperature, as indicated by measurements above 0 C, continues to -22.2 C. The inflection point in the surface-tension - temperature relation in the vicinity of 0 C, as indicated by the International Critical Table values for temperatures down to -8 C, is substantiated by the measurements in the temperature range, 0 to -22.2 C. The surface tension increases at approximately a linear rate from a value of 76.96+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -8 C to 79.67+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -22.2 C.

  14. Advanced TEM characterization of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennour, M.; Laghoutaris, P.; Guerre, C.; Molins, R.

    2009-09-01

    Advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques were carried out in order to investigate stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 600 U-bend samples exposed in simulated PWR primary water at 330 °C. Using high-resolution imaging and fine-probe chemical analysis methods, ultrafine size oxides present inside cracks and intergranular attacks were nanoscale characterized. Results revealed predominance of Cr 2O 3 oxide and Ni-rich metal zones at the majority of encountered crack tip areas and at leading edge of intergranular attacks. However, NiO-structure oxide was predominant far from crack tip zones and within cracks propagating along twin boundaries and inside grains. These observations permit to suggest a mechanism for intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water. Indeed, the results suggest that stress corrosion cracking is depending on chromium oxide growth in the grain boundary. Oxide growth seems to be dependent on oxygen diffusion in porous oxide and chromium diffusion in strained alloy and in grain boundary beyond crack tip. Strain could promote transport kinetic and oxide formation by increasing defaults rate like dislocations.

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.

    1945-01-01

    The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed.

  16. Microstructural characterization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2013-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracks in Alloy 600 compact tension specimens tested at 325 °C in a simulated primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor were analyzed using microscopic equipment. Oxygen diffused into the grain boundaries just ahead of the crack tips from the external primary water. As a result of oxygen penetration, Cr oxides were precipitated on the crack tips and the attacked grain boundaries. The oxide layer in the crack interior was revealed to consist of double (inner and outer) layers. Cr oxides were found in the inner layer, with NiO and (Ni,Cr) spinels in the outer layer. Cr depletion (or Ni enrichment) zones were created in the attacked grain boundary, the crack tip, and the interface between the crack and matrix, which means that the formation of Cr oxides was due to the Cr diffusion from the surrounding matrix. The oxygen penetration and resultant metallurgical changes around the crack tip are believed to be significant factors affecting the PWSCC initiation and growth behaviors of Alloy 600. For interpretation of color in Fig. 4, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.

  17. Major element chemistry of surface- and ground waters in basaltic terrain, N-Iceland.: I. primary mineral saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnórsson, Stefán; Gunnarsson, Ingvi; Stefánsson, Andri; Andrésdóttir, Audur; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Árny E.

    2002-12-01

    This contribution describes primary basalt mineral saturation in surface- and up to 90°C ground waters in a tholeiite flood basalt region in northern Iceland. It is based on data on 253 water samples and the mineralogical composition of the associated basalts. Surface waters are significantly under-saturated with plagioclase and olivine of the compositions occurring in the study area, saturation index (SI) values ranging from -1 to -10 and -5 to -20, respectively. With few exceptions these waters are also significantly under-saturated with pigeonite and augite of all compositions (SI = -1 to -7) and with ilmenite (SI = -0.5 to -6). The surface waters are generally over-saturated with respect to the titano-magnetite of the compositions occurring in the basalts of the study area, the range in SI being from -2 to +10. For crystalline OH-apatite, SI values in surface waters range from strong under-saturation (-10) to strong over-saturation (+5) but for crystalline F-apatite they lie in the range 0 to 15. Systematic under-saturation is, on the other hand, observed for "amorphous apatite," i.e. an apatite of the kind Clark (1955) prepared by mixing Ca(OH) 2 and H 3PO 4 solutions. Like surface waters, ground waters are under-saturated with plagioclase and olivine, its degree increasing with increasing Ca content of the plagioclase and increasing Fe content of the olivine, the SI values being -2 to -7 and 0 to -4 for the Ca-richest and Ca-poorest plagioclase, respectively, and about -3 to -18 and 0 to -15 for forsterite and fayalite, respectively. Ground waters are generally close to saturation with pigeonite and augite of all compositions. However, some non-thermal ground waters in highland areas are strongly under-saturated. Above 25°C the ground waters are ilmenite under-saturated but generally over-saturated at lower temperatures. These waters are titano-magnetite over-saturated at temperatures below 70°C, the SI values decreasing with increasing temperature from

  18. Experimental study on the behavior of primary human osteoblasts on laser-cused pure titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Jutta; Friedrichs, Jens; Werner, Carsten; Davids, Andreas; Weise, Hartmut; Lesche, Raoul; Weber, Anke; Range, Ursula; Meißner, Heike; Lauer, Günther; Reitemeier, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Mandibular tumor resection can lead to a mandibular segmental defect. LaserCUSING® is used to produce a mandibular implant, designed to be identical to the shape of the mandibular defect. Novel microrough surfaces result from this generative technology. In the current study, the behavior of human osteoblasts on untreated laser-cused titanium specimens or on specimens conditioned with different blasting agents was analyzed. The conditioning of these specimens resulted in surfaces with graded roughness. White light confocal microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface of the specimens and to quantify the initial adhesion of primary human osteoblasts to the specimens, respectively. Furthermore, cell growth, viability, apoptosis as well as mineralization of the specimens were analyzed over a time-period of 2 months. Compared to specimens that were treated with blasting agents, untreated specimens had the highest surface roughness. Quantitative SCFS measurements demonstrated that the adhesion of human primary osteoblasts was the highest on these specimens. Additionally, the untreated specimens allowed the highest number of osteoblasts to colonize. Mineralization studies showed increasing calcium and phosphor elemental composition for all specimen series. It can be concluded that untreated laser-cused titanium specimens are superior to promote the initial adhesion and subsequent colonization by osteoblast cells. PMID:23775939

  19. Primary experimental results of wire-array Z-pinches on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Ren, X. D. Dan, J. K. Wang, K. L. Zhang, S. Q. Li, J. Xu, Q. Cai, H. C. Duan, S. C. Ouyang, K. Chen, G. H. Ji, C. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a multiterawatt pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. In this paper, primary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 14.4-26.4 mm, and consisting of 132∼276 tungsten wires with 5∼10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to determine the characteristics of x-ray radiations and to obtain self-emitting images of imploding plasmas. X-ray power up to 80 TW with ∼3 ns FWMH is achieved by using nested wire arrays. The total x-ray energy exceeds 500 kJ and the peak radiation temperature is about 150 eV. Typical velocity of imploding plasmas goes around 3∼5×10{sup 7} cm/s and the radial convergence ratio is between 10 and 20.

  20. Experimental study on mixing efficiency in water supply rectangular tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; Medina, V.; Mujal, A.

    2009-04-01

    Phenomenon of mixing in drinking water storage tanks and reservoirs has a direct effect on the quality of water. Creation of poor mixing zones and volume stratification can have negative effects in public health. The design of a storage tank must consider the conditions of the inlet and outlets, and also their orientation (vertical or horizontal) to prevent the formation of these zones. Experiments done in a reduced scaled-model with a rectangular base and three different inlets (two waterfalls and a pipe inlet) had the objective to decide which of these inlets achieved the best mixing efficiency. Four situations were considered while three entrances, two unsteady: filling and drawing, and two steady with different outlets. Moreover the effects of columns that support the roof of the tank were studied by running the three entrances with and without columns in the four situations. Neglecting the viscous scale effects, the time taken to mix the volume stored depends on the distance between the inlet and the opposite wall as though as its orientation. Taking into account the whole tank columns have a negative effect on mixing efficiency although they divide the flux and create local zones of turbulence around them, increasing local mixing. Using a digital treating image technique the results are found in a quantitative way.

  1. CRACK GROWTH RESPONSE OF ALLOY 152 AND 52 WELD METALS IN SIMULATED PWR PRIMARY WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2009-12-01

    The crack growth response of alloy 152 and 52 weld metals has been measured in simulated PWR primary water at both high (325-350 C) and low (50 C) temperatures. Tests were performed on samples machined from alloy 152 or 52 mockup welds. Propagation rates under cycle + hold and constant K conditions at high temperatures show stable, but extremely low SCC growth rates. The most significant intergranular cracking occurred during cycling at 50 C, particularly for the alloy 152 weld metal at high stress intensity.

  2. Proceedings: Primary water stress corrosion cracking: 1989 EPRI remedial measures workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, J.A. )

    1990-04-01

    A meeting on PWSCC Remedial Measures'' was organized to give those working in this area an opportunity to share their results, ideas and plans with regard to development and application of remedial measures directed against the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) phenomenon affecting alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Topics discussed included: utility experience and strategies; nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for PWSCC; technical topics ranging from predictive methods for occurrence of PWSCC to results of corrosion tests; and services provided by vendors that can help prevent the occurrence of PWSCC or can help address problems caused by PWSCC once it occurs.

  3. Laminar burning velocities at high pressure for primary reference fuels and gasoline: Experimental and numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzembeck, S.; Peters, N.; Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H.

    2009-02-15

    Spherical flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, PRF 87 and gasoline/air mixtures are experimentally investigated to determine laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths under engine-relevant conditions by using the constant volume bomb method. Data are obtained for an initial temperature of 373 K, equivalence ratios varying from {phi}=0.7 to {phi}=1.2, and initial pressures from 10 to 25 bar. To track the flame front in the vessel a dark field He-Ne laser Schlieren measurement technique and digital image processing were used. The propagating speed with respect to the burned gases and the stretch rate are determined from the rate of change of the flame radius. The laminar burning velocities are obtained through a linear extrapolation to zero stretch. The experimentally determined Markstein numbers are compared to theoretical predictions. A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for n-heptane and iso-octane was derived from the Lawrence Livermore comprehensive mechanisms. This mechanism was validated for ignition delay times and flame propagation at low and high pressures. In summary an overall good agreement with the various experimental data sets used in the validation was obtained. (author)

  4. Simulation of Water Balance and Forest Treatment Effects at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wemple, Beverley C.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2005-10-30

    The watershed model DHSVM was applied to the small watersheds WS1,2,3 in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest (HJA), Oregon and tested for skill in simulating observed forest treatment effects on streamflow. These watersheds in the rain-snow transition zone underwent road and clearcut treatments during 1959-66 and subsequent natural regeneration. DHSVM was applied with 10 m and 1 hr resolution to 1958-98, most of the period of record. Water balance for old-growth WS2 indicated that evapotranspiration and streamflow were unlikely to be the only loss terms, and groundwater recharge was included to account for about 12% of precipitation; this term was assumed zero in previous studies. After limited calibration, overall efficiency in simulating hourly streamflow exceeded 0.7, and mean annual error was less than 10%. Model skill decreased at the margins, with overprediction of low flows and underprediction of high flows. However, statistical analyses of simulated and observed peakflows yielded similar characterizations of treatment effects. Primary simulation weaknesses were snowpack accumulation, snowmelt under rain-on-snow conditions, and production of quickflow. This challenging test of DHSVM moved the model closer to a practical tool for forest management.

  5. Experimental observation of rainbow scattering by a coated cylinder: twin primary rainbows and thin-film interference.

    PubMed

    Adler, C L; Lock, J A; Nash, J K; Saunders, K W

    2001-03-20

    We experimentally examine the primary rainbow created by the illumination of a coated cylinder. We present a simple technique for varying the coating thickness over a wide range of values, and we see evidence for two different scattering regimes. In one, where the coating thickness is large, twin rainbows are produced. In the second, where the coating is thin enough to act as a thin film, a single rainbow is produced whose intensity varies periodically as the coating thickness varies. We find good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. PMID:18357147

  6. Numerical and experimental study on the flow distribution in a water manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gwansik; Jong Lee, Pil; Kang, Jong Hoon

    2016-03-01

    This study presents water distribution analysis of the device for spraying cooling water through specific nozzles numerically and experimentally. Numerical analysis was performed using the 3-D incompressible, multi-phase flow model, for different Reynolds numbers of 4 × 105, 8 × 105. Experimental analysis was performed at real-size, under the same conditions. The calculated results and the measured results for the distribution of flow were matched relatively well. The distribution of the nozzle flow depends on the Reynolds number.

  7. Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, Michael; Anderson, Mark; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2013-01-16

    This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Primary and Secondary Features in High-Mach-Number Shock-Bubble Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Devesh; Niederhaus, John; Motl, Bradley; Anderson, Mark; Oakley, Jason; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Experiments to study the compression and unstable evolution of an isolated soap-film bubble containing helium, subjected to a strong planar shock wave (M=2.95) in ambient nitrogen, have been performed in a vertical shock tube of square internal cross section using planar laser diagnostics. The early phase of the interaction process is dominated by the formation of a primary vortex ring due to the baroclinic source of vorticity deposited during the shock-bubble interaction, and the mass transfer from the body of the bubble to the vortex ring. The late time (long after shock interaction) study reveals the presence of a secondary baroclinic source of vorticity at high Mach number which is responsible for the formation of counterrotating secondary and tertiary vortex rings and the subsequent larger rate of elongation of the bubble.

  9. Improvement of PNPI experimental industrial plant based on CECE process for heavy water detritiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S. D.; Alekseev, I. A.; Fedorchenko, O. A.; Vasyanina, T. V.; Konoplev, K. A.; Arkhipov, E. A.; Uborsky, V. V.

    2008-07-15

    An updated experimental industrial plant of PNPI for the development of CECE technology is described. Experimental results for heavy water detritiation in different operating modes are shown. The effect of pressure, temperatures and gas flow rate on the detritiation factor for the CECE process is presented. (authors)

  10. Experimental studies on the impact properties of water ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, F. G.; Lin, D. N. C.; Hatzes, A. P.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies on the impact of ice particles at very low velocity were continued. These measurements have applications in the dynamics of Saturn's rings. Initially data were obtained on the coefficient of restitution for ice spheres of one radius of curvature. The type of measurements were expanded to include restitution data for balls with a variety of surfaces as well as sticking forces between ice particles. Significant improvements were made to this experiment, the most important being the construction of a new apparatus. The new apparatus consists of a smaller version of the disk pendulum and a stainless steel, double-walled cryostat. The apparatus has proved to be a significant improvement over the old one. Measurements can now be made at temperatures near 90 K, comparable to the temperature of the environment of Saturn's rings, and with much greater temperature stability. It was found that a roughened contact surface or the presence of frost can cause a much larger change in the restitution measure than the geometrical effect of the radius of curvature.

  11. Mechanism for the primary transformation of acetaminophen in a soil/water system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuanzhou; Lan, Zhonghui; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Yingbao

    2016-07-01

    The transformation of acetaminophen (APAP) in a soil/water system was systematically investigated by a combination of kinetic studies and a quantitative analysis of the reaction intermediates. Biotransformation was the predominant pathway for the elimination of APAP, whereas hydrolysis or other chemical transformation, and adsorption processes made almost no contribution to the transformation under a dark incubation. Bacillus aryabhattai strain 1-Sj-5-2-5-M, Klebsiella pneumoniae strain S001, and Bacillus subtilis strain HJ5 were the main bacteria identified in the biotransformation of APAP. The soil-to-water ratio and soil preincubation were able to alter the transformation kinetic pattern. Light irradiation promoted the overall transformation kinetics through enhanced biotransformation and extra photosensitized chemical reactions. The transformation pathways were strongly dependent on the initial concentration of APAP. The main primary transformation products were APAP oligomers and p-aminophenol, with the initial addition of 26.5 and 530 μM APAP, respectively. APAP oligomers accounted for more than 95% of transformed APAP, indicating that almost no bound residues were generated through the transformation of APAP in the soil/water system. The potential environmental risks of APAP could increase following the transformation of APAP in the soil/water system because of the higher toxicity of the transformation intermediates. PMID:27107139

  12. Estimation of water quality and plant primary production in Arctic wetlands using ground based spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andresen, C.; Lougheed, V.; Tweedie, C.

    2010-12-01

    Wetlands represent a significant portion of the Arctic tundra landscape, which is experiencing warming at an unprecedented rate. Understanding of primary production in these ecosystems is essential for assessing carbon fluxes and climate change effects. Remote sensing techniques are known to be accurate and cost effective to monitor aquatic vegetation and water quality parameters; however, their utility in mapping these ecosystems is unknown. We used a handheld hyperspectral radiometer (Unispec, PP Systems) to measure reflectance across the visible and near-infrared spectrum (400-1100nm) of two predominant aquatic graminoid species (Carex aquatilis and Arctophila fulva) along an anthropogenic disturbance gradient in tundra ponds of Barrow, Alaska. Spectral measurements were validated with in situ biomass harvest and water quality monitoring (e.g DOC, nutrients, algal chlorophyll). Reflectance of the two plant species exhibited spectral differences in the near-infrared portion of the spectrum. These reflectance measurements were also associated with water quality and plant biomass. Future efforts will involve the extrapolation of these ground based observations to a regional level using airborne and satellite imagery. This study advances large scale quantification and monitoring of water quality and aquatic plant production in the Arctic tundra and aids understanding of anthropogenic and climate effects in this rapidly changing ecosystem.

  13. Experimental critical parameters of plutonium metal cylinders flooded with water

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Forty-nine critical configurations are reported for experiments involving arrays of 3 kg plutonium metal cylinders moderated and reflected by water. Thirty-four of these describe systems assembled in the laboratory, while 15 others are derived critical parameters inferred from 46 subcritical cases. The arrays included 2x2xN, N = 2, 3, 4, and 5, in one program and 3x3x3 configurations in a later study. All were three-dimensional, nearly square arrays with equal horizontal lattice spacings but a different vertical lattice spacing. Horizontal spacings ranged from units in contact to 180 mm center-to-center; and vertical spacings ranged from about 80 mm to almost 400 mm center-to-center. Several nearly-equilateral 3x3x3 arrays exhibit an extremely sensitive dependence upon horizontal separation for identical vertical spacings. A line array of unreflected and essentially unmoderated canned plutonium metal units appeared to be well subcritical based on measurements made to assure safety during the manual assembly operations. All experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the mid-1970s and early 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant`s Critical Mass Laboratory.

  14. Influence of the Orinoco River on the primary production of eastern Caribbean surface waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Ramón; López, José M.; Morell, Julio; Corredor, Jorge E.; Castillo, Carlos E.

    2013-09-01

    The influence of the Orinoco River on the primary production in eastern Caribbean waters was investigated using fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF) and ocean color remote sensing. FRRF-based carbon fixation rates significantly correlated with independent estimates based on the 14C uptake method (r = 0.92, n = 9). Satellite-derived estimates of primary production, using the Carbon Based Productivity Method (CbPM), moderately correlated with in situ FRRF-based measurements. These estimates varied with river plume dilution gradients, with the highest rates associated with waters under river plume influence (CbPM 631 mg C m-2 d-1 and FRRF 570 mg C m-2 d-1). A time series of satellite-derived estimates (2002-2011) revealed seasonal variations associated with river discharge and climate driven fluctuations. Regional integrated productivity of about 2.80 Tg C yr-1 was calculated based on the average spatial coverage of the Orinoco River plume over the last decade.

  15. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, D. J.; Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2015-09-01

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year (WY) 2014. It is the sixth report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011), a report released June 2012 examined water year 2011 (Poch et al. 2012), a report released April 2013 examined water year 2012 (Poch et al. 2013), and a report released June 2014 examined water year 2013 (Graziano et al. 2014).

  16. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J.

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  17. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ponist, S.; Drafi, F.; Kuncirova, V.; Mihalova, D.; Rackova, L.; Danisovic, L.; Ondrejickova, O.; Tumova, I.; Trunova, O.; Fedorova, T.; Bauerova, K.

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  18. Effect of Carnosine in Experimental Arthritis and on Primary Culture Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ponist, S; Drafi, F; Kuncirova, V; Mihalova, D; Rackova, L; Danisovic, L; Ondrejickova, O; Tumova, I; Trunova, O; Fedorova, T; Bauerova, K

    2016-01-01

    Carnosine's (CARN) anti-inflammatory potential in autoimmune diseases has been but scarcely investigated as yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of CARN in rat adjuvant arthritis, in the model of carrageenan induced hind paw edema (CARA), and also in primary culture of chondrocytes under H2O2 injury. The experiments were done on healthy animals, arthritic animals, and arthritic animals with oral administration of CARN in a daily dose of 150 mg/kg b.w. during 28 days as well as animals with CARA treated by a single administration of CARN in the same dose. CARN beneficially affected hind paw volume and changes in body weight on day 14 and reduced hind paw swelling in CARA. Markers of oxidative stress in plasma and brain (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal, protein carbonyls, and lag time of lipid peroxidation) and also activity of gamma-glutamyltransferase were significantly corrected by CARN. CARN also reduced IL-1alpha in plasma. Suppression of intracellular oxidant levels was also observed in chondrocytes pretreated with CARN. Our results obtained on two animal models showed that CARN has systemic anti-inflammatory activity and protected rat brain and chondrocytes from oxidative stress. This finding suggests that CARN might be beneficial for treatment of arthritic diseases. PMID:26885252

  19. FEM Analysis and Experimental Verification of the Integral Forging Process for AP1000 Primary Coolant Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun

    2016-08-01

    AP1000 primary coolant pipes must be manufactured by integral forging technology according to the designer—Westinghouse Electric Co. The characteristics of these large, special-shaped pipes create nonuniform temperatures, effective stress, and effective strain during shaping of the pipes. This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element simulation (3D FEM) of the integral forging process, and qualitatively evaluates the likelihood of forging defects. By analyzing the evolution histories of the three field variables, we concluded that the initial forging temperature should be strictly controlled within the interval 1123 K to 1423 K (850 °C to 1150 °C) to avoid second-phase precipitation. In the hard deformation zones, small strains do not contribute to recrystallization resulting in coarse grains. Conversely, in the free deformation zone, the large strains can contribute to the dynamic recrystallization, favoring grain refinement and closure of voids. Cracks are likely to appear, however, on the workpiece surface when forging leads to large deformations. Based on the simulation results, an eligible workpiece with good mechanical properties, few macroscopic defects, and favorable grain size has been successfully forged by experiments at an industrial scale, which validates the FEM simulation.

  20. The exchange of water between the Faroe Shelf and the surrounding waters and its effect on the primary production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasen, Sólvá Karadóttir; Hansen, Bogi; Larsen, Karin Margretha Húsgarð; Hátún, Hjálmar

    2016-01-01

    The interannual variation of the spring bloom and its effect on the marine ecosystem on the Faroe Shelf has been observed for a couple of decades. However, the mechanism controlling the spring bloom has so far not been known and attempts to explain the mechanism have mostly ruled out possibilities. The Faroe Shelf is to a variable degree isolated from the surrounding waters by a tidal front. It has previously been suggested that variations in the density difference across the front and how water masses are transferred across it affect the spring primary production, which is thought to be a driver of the shelf ecosystem. Using air-sea heat flux data and sea temperature observations on the shelf and off the shelf, we estimate the cross-frontal volume exchange in January-April and find that it increases with the tidal current speed and decreases with the cross-frontal temperature difference. Using the observed exchange rates, we show that the phytoplankton growth rate may be reduced by more than 0.05 day- 1 when the exchange is intense and off-shelf production is still low. Based on frontal dynamics theory, we suggest that the cross-frontal exchange rate in the above mentioned period is determined by the rate of vertical turbulent diffusion through the front. A simple theoretical model is found to support this hypothesis qualitatively as well as quantitatively. This supports that variations in horizontal exchange are an important controlling factor of the initial spring bloom and that the horizontal exchange during the winter can be determined by vertical turbulent diffusion. Our results will be relevant for the primary production in other similar systems of small geographical extent and also for other problems involving cross-shelf exchange, such as oil spill dispersal.

  1. Water weakening in experimentally deformed milky quartz single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunitz, H.; Thust, A.; Kilian, R.; Heilbronner, R.; Behrens, H.; Tarantola, A.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural single crystals of quartz have been experimentally deformed in two orientations: (1) normal to one prism-plane, (2) In O+ orientation at temperatures of 900 and 1000°C, pressures of 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, and strain rates of ~1 x 10-6s-1. The starting material is milky quartz, consisting of dry quartz (H2O contents of <150 H/106Si) with fluid inclusions (FI). During pressurization many FI´s decrepitate. Cracks heal and small neonate FI´s form, increasing the number of FI´s drastically. During subsequent deformation, the size of FI´s is further reduced (down to ~10 nm). Sample deformation occurs by dominant dislocation glide on selected slip systems, accompanied by some dynamic recovery. Strongly deformed regions show FTIR spectra with a pointed broad absorption band in the ~3400 cm-1 region as a superposition of molecular H2O bands and three discrete absorption bands (at 3367, 3400, and 3434 cm-1). In addition, there is a discrete absorption band at 3585 cm-1, which only occurs in deformed regions. The 3585 cm-1 band is reduced or even disappears after annealing. This band is polarized and represents structurally bound H, its H-content is estimated to be 1-3% of the total H2O-content and appears to be associated with dislocations. The H2O weakening effect in our FI-bearing natural quartz crystals is assigned to the processes of dislocation generation and multiplication at small FI´s. The deformation processes in these crystals represent a recycling of H2O between FI´s, dislocation generation at very small fluid inclusions, incorporation of structurally bound H into dislocation cores, and release of H2O from dislocations back into FI´s during recovery. Cracking and crack healing play an important role in the recycling process and imply a close interrelationship between brittle and crystal plastic deformation. The H2O weakening by this process is of a disequilibrium nature and thus depends on the amount of H2O available.

  2. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2012-07-16

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and

  3. Effects of experimental water table and temperature manipulations on ecosystem CO2 fluxes in an Alaskan rich fen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Waddington, J.M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Peatlands store 30% of the world's terrestrial soil carbon (C) and those located at northern latitudes are expected to experience rapid climate warming. We monitored growing season carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes across a factorial design of in situ water table (control, drought, and flooded plots) and soil warming (control vs. warming via open top chambers) treatments for 2 years in a rich fen located just outside the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest in interior Alaska. The drought (lowered water table position) treatment was a weak sink or small source of atmospheric CO2 compared to the moderate atmospheric CO2 sink at our control. This change in net ecosystem exchange was due to lower gross primary production and light-saturated photosynthesis rather than increased ecosystem respiration. The flooded (raised water table position) treatment was a greater CO2 sink in 2006 due largely to increased early season gross primary production and higher light-saturated photosynthesis. Although flooding did not have substantial effects on rates of ecosystem respiration, this water table treatment had lower maximum respiration rates and a higher temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration than the control plot. Surface soil warming increased both ecosystem respiration and gross primary production by approximately 16% compared to control (ambient temperature) plots, with no net effect on net ecosystem exchange. Results from this rich fen manipulation suggest that fast responses to drought will include reduced ecosystem C storage driven by plant stress, whereas inundation will increase ecosystem C storage by stimulating plant growth. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  4. Understanding flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide for organic dyes from water: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Peng; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Yayun; Shi, Xiaoyang; Lü, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xi

    2015-11-01

    Flocculation treatment processes play an important role in water and wastewater pretreatment. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the possibility of using graphene oxide (GO) as a flocculant to remove methylene blue (MB) from water. Experimental results show that GO can remove almost all MB from aqueous solutions at its optimal dosages and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that MB cations quickly congregate around GO in water. Furthermore, PIXEL energy contribution analysis reveals that most of the strong interactions between GO and MB are of a van der Waals (London dispersion) character. These results offer new insights for shedding light on the molecular mechanism of interaction between GO and organic pollutants.

  5. Experimental study of iron and multivitamin drops on enamel microhardness of primary tooth

    PubMed Central

    Pasdar, Nilgoon; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Mottaghi, Fattane; Tavassoli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Iron and multivitamin drops are being frequently prescribed in children less than 2 years of age. Due to their low pH levels, these drops may lead to the softening of enamel and accelerate the destructive process. The aim of the present study was to investigate the enamel microhardness of primary teeth after exposing them to iron and multivitamin drops. Materials and Methods: Forty healthy anterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 10 samples each. Samples were exposed to two iron drops of Kharazmi (Iran) and Ironorm (UK) and two multivitamin drops of Shahdarou (Iran) and Eurovit (Germany) for 5 min. The surface microhardness was measured before and after exposure and data processing was done using statistical paired t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. The surface structure of the teeth was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: In all groups, microhardness was decreased, but it was not significant in Eurovit multivitamin group (P = 0.088). The reduction rate in Kharazmi iron group was significant compared to that in other groups (P < 0.005). Hardness reduction percent for Kharazmi iron drop was 28/12 ± 47/43. In SEM analysis, irregular granular appearance was observed in the enamel exposed to Kharazmi iron drop. Conclusion: The results showed that all the studied drugs have the potential to cause erosion; this potential is the most in Kharazmi iron drop and the least in Eurovit multivitamin drops. Therefore, after using these kinds of drops, preventive measures should be used in children. PMID:26759808

  6. Swashplateless Helicopter Experimental Investigation: Primary Control with Trailing Edge Flaps Actuated with Piezobenders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copp, Peter

    Helicopter rotor primary control is conventionally carried out using a swashplate with pitch links. Eliminating the swashplate promises to reduce the helicopter's parasitic power in high speed forward flight, as well as may lead to a hydraulic-less vehicle. A Mach-scale swashplateless rotor is designed with integrated piezobender-actuated trailing edge flaps and systematically tested on the benchtop, in the vacuum chamber and on the hoverstand. The blade is nominally based on the UH-60 rotor with a hover tip Mach number of 0.64. The blade diameter is 66 inches requiring 2400 RPM for Mach scale simulation. The rotor hub is modified to reduce the blade fundamental torsional frequency to less than 2.0/rev by replacing the rigid pitch links with linear springs, which results in an increase of the blade pitching response to the trailing edge flaps. Piezoelectric multilayer benders provide the necessary bandwidth, stroke and stiffness to drive the flaps for primary control while fitting inside the blade profile and withstanding the high centrifugal forces. This work focuses on several key issues. A piezobender designed from a soft piezoelectric material, PZT-5K4, is constructed. The new material is used to construct multi-layer benders with increased stroke for the same stiffness relative to hard materials such as PZT-5H2. Each layer has a thickness of 10 mils. The soft material with gold electrodes requires a different bonding method than hard material with nickel electrodes. With this new bonding method, the measured stiffness matches precisely the predicted stiffness for a 12 layer bender with 1.26 inch length and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 1.04 lb/mil. The final in-blade bender has a length of 1.38 inches and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 0.325 lb/mil and stroke of 20.2 mils for an energy output of 66.3 lb-mil. The behavior of piezobenders under very high electric fields is investigated. High field means +18.9 kV/cm (limited by arcing in air) and -3.54k

  7. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces. PMID:27339861

  8. Addressing the sexual problems of Iranian women in a primary health care setting: A quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Rostamkhani, Fatemeh; Jafari, Fatemeh; Ozgoli, Giti; Shakeri, Masomeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization emphasizes on integration of sexual health into primary health care services, educating people and health care workers about sexuality, and promoting optimal sexual health. Despite the high prevalence of sexual problems, these problems are poorly managed in primary health care services. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of the first two steps of PLISSIT (Permission, Limited Information, Specific Suggestions, Intensive Treatment) model for handling of women sexual problems in a primary health care setting. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study that was carried out in Zanjan, northwest of Iran. Eighty women who had got married in the past 5 years and had sexual problem were randomly assigned to control and intervention groups. The intervention group received consultation based on PLISSIT model by a trained midwife and the control group received routine services. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire was used for assessing and tracking any changes in sexual function. Data were collected at three points: Before consultation and 2 and 4 weeks after consultation. Paired t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for comparison of scores within groups. Results: Significant improvement was found in FSFI sub-domain scores, including sexual desire (P < 0.0001), arousal (P < 0.0001), lubrication (P < 0.0001), orgasm (P = 0.005), satisfaction (P = 0.005), pain (P < 0.0001), and FSFI total score (P < 0.0001) in the intervention group compared to the control group. Conclusions: This study showed that PLISSIT model can meet the sexual health needs of clients in a primary health care setting and it can be used easily by health workers in this setting for addressing sexual complaints and dysfunctions. PMID:25709703

  9. Vitamins and nutrients as primary treatments in experimental brain injury: Clinical implications for nutraceutical therapies.

    PubMed

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Peterson, Todd C; Martens, Kris M; Hoane, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    With the numerous failures of pharmaceuticals to treat traumatic brain injury in humans, more researchers have become interested in combination therapies. This is largely due to the multimodal nature of damage from injury, which causes excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, edema, neuroinflammation and cell death. Polydrug treatments have the potential to target multiple aspects of the secondary injury cascade, while many previous therapies focused on one particular aspect. Of specific note are vitamins, minerals and nutrients that can be utilized to supplement other therapies. Many of these have low toxicity, are already FDA approved and have minimal interactions with other drugs, making them attractive targets for therapeutics. Over the past 20 years, interest in supplementation and supraphysiologic dosing of nutrients for brain injury has increased and indeed many vitamins and nutrients now have a considerable body of the literature backing their use. Here, we review several of the prominent therapies in the category of nutraceutical treatment for brain injury in experimental models, including vitamins (B2, B3, B6, B9, C, D, E), herbs and traditional medicines (ginseng, Gingko biloba), flavonoids, and other nutrients (magnesium, zinc, carnitine, omega-3 fatty acids). While there is still much work to be done, several of these have strong potential for clinical therapies, particularly with regard to polydrug regimens. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery. PMID:26723564

  10. Antibody and inflammatory responses in laying hens with experimental primary infections of Ascaridia galli.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Atxutegi, C; Gandolfi, B; Arangüena, T; Sepúlveda, R; Arévalo, M; Simón, F

    2009-04-01

    Ascaridia galli, an intestinal nematode that affects hens and other domestic and wild birds, causes economic losses in avian exploitations. The present work shows that A. galli stimulates a strong antibody response as well as an intense inflammatory reaction, in the intestinal mucous of experimentally infected Lohmann Brown laying hens. IgG antibodies against soluble extracts of A. galli embrionated eggs and adult worms, were detected in both blood and yolks eggs from infected hens during a period of 105 days after the infection. This indicates that hens transfer to their offspring a part of the IgG antibodies produced when they become infected. The antigens responsible for the stimulation of specific IgG were molecules of 30-34, 44-54 and 58-90 kDa, while in the yolk eggs of infected hens a reactivity directed against antigens of molecular weight (M(w)) lower than 50 kDa was detected. Histology revealed traumatic lesions with leukocyte infiltration, and inflammation of the intestinal wall of the infected hens after 105 days of initial infection. The possible influence of the immune and inflammatory response on the population dynamics of the parasite is discussed. PMID:19167166

  11. The role of intergranular chromium carbides on intergranular oxidation of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaslain, F. O. M.; Le, H. T.; Duhamel, C.; Guerre, C.; Laghoutaris, P.

    2016-02-01

    Alloy 600 is used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) but is susceptible to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Intergranular chromium carbides have been found beneficial to reduce PWSCC. Focussed ion beam coupled with scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM) 3D tomography has been used to reconstruct the morphology of grain boundary oxide penetrations and their interaction with intergranular Cr carbides in Alloy 600 subjected to a PWR environment. In presence of intergranular Cr carbides, the intergranular oxide penetrations are less deep but larger than without carbide. However, the intergranular oxide volumes normalized by the grain boundary length for both samples are similar, which suggest that intergranular oxidation growth rate is not affected by carbides. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows that the intergranular oxide consists mainly in a spinel-type oxide containing nickel and chromium, except in the vicinity of Cr carbides where Cr2O3 was evidenced. The formation of chromium oxide may explain the lower intergranular oxide depth observed in grain boundaries containing Cr carbides.

  12. Experimental treatment of Epstein-Barr virus-associated primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Sameek; Peng, Ruoqi; Baiocchi, Robert A; Bhatt, Darshna; Vourganti, Srinivas; Grecula, John; Gupta, Nilendu; Eisenbeis, Charles F; Nuovo, Gerard J; Yang, Weilian; Schmalbrock, Petra; Ferketich, Amy; Moeschberger, Melvin; Porcu, Pierluigi; Barth, Rolf F; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2003-03-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) that arises in immune-deficient patients is an aggressive B-cell neoplasm that is universally associated with the EBV. Patients with EBV(+) PCNSL face a particularly poor prognosis with median survival times of 2-12 months despite aggressive management with radiation therapy. We have developed a preclinical model of EBV(+) PCNSL to explore strategies that specifically target EBV-infected B lymphoblasts in vivo. Stereotactic implantation of EBV-transformed human lymphoblastoid B-cell lines into the caudate nucleus of the nude rat resulted in lethal CNS tumor burden manifested by the onset of focal neurological symptoms within 21 days. Histological evaluation at autopsy revealed a multifocal, perivascular human EBV(+) lymphoblastic B-cell infiltrate that displayed a latency type III EBV gene expression profile similar to PCNSL that develops in some immune-deficient patients. Radiation (1600 cGy) of lymphoblastoid B-cell lines resulted in up-regulation of the EBV thymidine kinase (EBV-TK) transcript and sensitization of these cells to drug-induced apoptosis using nucleoside analogs. Enhanced expression of EBV-TK mRNA in EBV(+) PCNSL tumors by radiation therapy occurred in a dose-dependent fashion. In vivo trials using the nude rat PCNSL model demonstrated significantly improved mean survival time (MST) with single fraction whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and antiviral therapy consisting of zidovudine (AZT) and ganciclovir (GCV; MST 41.3 +/- 3.3 days; P = 0.05), compared with either antiviral therapy (MST 32.1 +/- 1.1 days) or WBRT alone (MST 22 +/- 0.8 days). We found constitutive and abundant EBV-TK mRNA expression in a stereotactic core biopsy specimen from a solid organ transplant patient with EBV(+) PCNSL. Withdrawal of immunosuppression did not result in disease regression. This patient achieved a complete response after therapy with high-dose AZT and GCV in the absence of WBRT, and remains in remission on oral

  13. Design-development and operation of the Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) facility, 1955--1967

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Wimunc, E.A.; Whittington, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    The Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) was designed, built, and operated to provide experience and engineering data that would demonstrate the feasibility of the direct-cycle, boiling-water reactor and be applicable to improved, larger nuclear power stations; and was based on information obtained in the first test boiling-water reactors, the BORAX series. EBWR initially produced 20 MW(t), 5 MW(e); later modified and upgraded, as described and illustrated, it was operated at up to 100 MW(t). The facility fulfilled its primary mission -- demonstrating the practicality of the direct-boiling concept -- and, in fact, was the prototype of some of the first commercial plants and of reactor programs in some other countries. After successful completion of the Water-Cooled Reactor Program, EBWR was utilized in the joint Argonne-Hanford Plutonium Recycle Program to develop data for the utilization of plutonium as a fuel in light- water thermal systems. Final shutdown of the EBWR facility followed the termination of the latter program. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  14. Carbon and oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf: role of water column primary production and respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a multi-year study of the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) to better understand the linkages between water column net metabolism and the formation of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen <2 ml O2 L-1) in the region. Rates of water column community respiration (R) and primary p...

  15. Parameterizing ecosystem light use efficiency and water use efficiency to estimate maize gross primary production and evapotranspiration using MODIS EVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying global carbon and water balances requires accurate estimation of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET), respectively, across space and time. Models that are based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE) and water use efficiency (WUE) have emerged as efficient met...

  16. 76 FR 33756 - Notice of Approval of the Primacy Application for National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ... Regulations: (1) Stage 2 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (January 4, 2006, 71 FR 388) and (2) Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (January 5, 2006, 71 FR 654). During the review of... AGENCY Notice of Approval of the Primacy Application for National Primary Drinking Water Regulations...

  17. Incorporating Social and Human Capital into an Experimental Approach to Urban Water Resources Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    To test the benefits of decentralized Green Infrastructure (GI) in an urban setting, we aimed to install GI in the Shepherd Creek Watershed of Cincinnati. The primary stressor in Shepherd Creek is stormwater runoff. An assessment of the total impervious surface area in the waters...

  18. Primary production export flux in Marguerite Bay (Antarctic Peninsula): Linking upper water-column production to sediment trap flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, Keith; Jickells, Timothy D.; Carson, Damien S.; Clarke, Andrew; Meredith, Michael P.; Brandon, Mark A.; Wallace, Margaret I.; Ussher, Simon J.; Hendry, Katharine R.

    2013-05-01

    A study was carried out to assess primary production and associated export flux in the coastal waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula at an oceanographic time-series site. New, i.e., exportable, primary production in the upper water-column was estimated in two ways; by nutrient deficit measurements, and by primary production rate measurements using separate 14C-labelled radioisotope and 15N-labelled stable isotope uptake incubations. The resulting average annual exportable primary production estimates at the time-series site from nutrient deficit and primary production rates were 13 and 16 mol C m-2, respectively. Regenerated primary production was measured using 15N-labelled ammonium and urea uptake, and was low throughout the sampling period. The exportable primary production measurements were compared with sediment trap flux measurements from 2 locations; the time-series site and at a site 40 km away in deeper water. Results showed ˜1% of the upper mixed layer exportable primary production was exported to traps at 200 m depth at the time-series site (total water column depth 520 m). The maximum particle flux rate to sediment traps at the deeper offshore site (total water column depth 820 m) was lower than the flux at the coastal time-series site. Flux of particulate organic carbon was similar throughout the spring-summer high flux period for both sites. Remineralisation of particulate organic matter predominantly occurred in the upper water-column (<200 m depth), with minimal remineralisation below 200 m, at both sites. This highly productive region on the Western Antarctic Peninsula is therefore best characterised as 'high recycling, low export'.

  19. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays. An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength. Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%. Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%. The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water

  20. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at

  1. SWAP Modeling Results of Monitored Soil Water Moisture Data of Irrigation Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Garsia-Orenes, F.; van den Elsen, E.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    In arid and semiarid zones of the Mediterranean regions a shortage of fresh water resources constitutes some time dramatic problem. In these regions with growing population and the scarce of rainfall irregularity in time during growing season an efficient use of water irrigation became a main challenge for future extensive agriculture development. In the frame of FP6 Water-Reuse project 516731 project a special field experimentation has been carried out in Alicante Region of Spain (Location UTM X: 693.809, Y: 4.279.922, Z: 626) on a Sandy Typic Xerofkuvent (Soil Survey Staff, 1999), Calcaric Fluvisol (WRB, FAO, 1989). with aim to investigate water regime in water repellent soils under irrigation of vine Vitus Labrusca. During field experimentation from 2006 till 2008 on 9 plots, there the same regime of irrigation water application was maintained, a monitoring of weather parameters was done by automatic meteorological station as well as a monitoring of soil water moisture was done by set of data-loggers and TDR-soil moisture sensors ECO-2 installed at different depts. SWAP model was used to simulate water regime of irrigated plots. Empirical coefficients of van Genuchten-Mualem's equations were calculated by pedotransfer functions derived from HYPRES data base using measured values of bulk density, organic matter content and soil texture. Testing of validity of the use of estimated curves was done by comparison with unsaturated soil hydraulic parameters of water retention and hydraulic conductivity measured in vitro by Wind's method on soil samples. Calibration of SWAP model for each plot was done on measured soil moisture data of irrigation events by adjusting a value of saturated hydraulic coefficient. Verification of the SWAP model was done by full range of experimental data. Similarity and non-similarity of the water regime at experimental plots as well as results of verification of SWAP model were analyzed

  2. Influence of localized plasticity on oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels under primary water reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cissé, Sarata; Laffont, Lydia; Lafont, Marie-Christine; Tanguy, Benoit; Andrieu, Eric

    2013-02-01

    The sensitivity of precipitation-strengthened A286 austenitic stainless steel to stress corrosion cracking was studied by means of slow-strain-rate tests. First, alloy cold working by low cycle fatigue (LCF) was investigated. Fatigue tests under plastic strain control were performed at different strain levels (Δɛp/2 = 0.2%, 0.5%, 0.8% and 2%) to establish correlations between stress softening and the deformation microstructure resulting from the LCF tests. Deformed microstructures were identified through TEM investigations. The interaction between oxidation and localized deformation bands was also studied and it resulted that localized deformation bands are not preferential oxide growth channels. The pre-cycling of the alloy did not modify its oxidation behaviour. However, intergranular oxidation in the subsurface under the oxide layer formed after exposure to PWR primary water was shown.

  3. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Corwin Lee; Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Galyean, William Jospeh

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  4. Experimental study of natural convection enhancement using a Fe3O4-water based magnetic nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Stoian, Floriana D; Holotescu, Sorin

    2012-10-01

    The effect of nanoparticles dispersed in a carrier fluid on the natural convection heat transfer is still raising controversies. While the reported experimental results show no improvement or even worsening of the heat transfer performance of nanofluids, the numerical simulations show an increase of the heat transfer coefficient, at least for certain ranges of Ra number. We report an experimental investigation regarding the natural convection heat transfer performance of a Fe3O4-water based nanofluid, in a cylindrical enclosure. The fluid was heated linearly from the bottom wall using an electric heater and cooled from the upper wall by a constant flow of water, such that a constant temperature difference between the upper and bottom walls was obtained at steady-state. The experiment was also carried out using water, in order to observe the effect of the addition of Fe3O4 nanoparticles on the heat transfer coefficient. Several regimes were tested, both for water and nanofluid. The experimental results showed that values obtained for the heat transfer coefficient for Fe3O4-water nanofluid were higher than those for water, at the same temperature difference. The present experimental results are also compared with our previous work and the reference literature. PMID:23421199

  5. Materials Reliability Program: Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MRP-137)

    SciTech Connect

    R.Kilian

    2004-12-01

    Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In recent comprehensive review of laboratory, component and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program, flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not considered in laboratory studies but applicable in plant operating environments. Available data for carbon/low-alloy steel piping components suggest that high flow is beneficial regarding the effects of a reactor water environment. Similar information is lacking for stainless steel piping materials. This report documents progress made to date in an extensive testing program underway to evaluate the effects of flow rate on the corrosion fatigue of 304L stainless steel under simulated PWR primary water environmental conditions.

  6. Water balance of rice plots under three different water treatments: monitoring activity and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaradia, Enrico Antonio; Romani, Marco; Facchi, Arianna; Gharsallah, Olfa; Cesari de Maria, Sandra; Ferrari, Daniele; Masseroni, Daniele; Rienzner, Michele; Battista Bischetti, Gian; Gandolfi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    In the agricultural seasons 2012 and 2013, a broad monitoring activity was carried out at the Rice Research Centre of Ente Nazionale Risi (CRR-ENR) located in Castello d'Agogna (PV, Italy) with the purpose of comparing the water balance components of paddy rice (Gladio cv.) under different water regimes and assessing the possibility of reducing the high water inputs related to the conventional practice of continuous submergence. The experiments were laid out in six plots of about 20 m x 80 m each, with two replicates for each of the following water regimes: i) continuous flooding with wet-seeded rice (FLD), ii) continuous flooding from around the 3-leaf stage with dry-seeded rice (3L-FLD), and iii) surface irrigation every 7-10 days with dry-seeded rice (IRR). One out of the two replicates of each treatment was instrumented with: water inflow and outflow meters, set of piezometers, set of tensiometers and multi-sensor moisture probes. Moreover, an eddy covariance station was installed on the bund between the treatments FLD and IRR. Data were automatically recorded and sent by a wireless connection to a PC, so as to be remotely controlled thanks to the development of a Java interface. Furthermore, periodic measurements of crop biometric parameters (LAI, crop height and rooting depth) were performed in both 2012 and 2013 (11 and 14 campaigns respectively). Cumulative water balance components from dry-seeding (3L-FLD and IRR), or flooding (FLD), to harvest were calculated for each plot by either measurements (i.e. rainfall, irrigation and surface drainage) or estimations (i.e. difference in the field water storage, evaporation from both the soil and the water surface and transpiration), whereas the sum of percolation and capillary rise (i.e. the 'net percolation') was obtained as the residual term of the water balance. Incidentally, indices of water application efficiency (evapotranspiration over net water input) and water productivity (grain production over net water

  7. Experimental Study on the Effect of the Ultrasonic Wave on the Freezing of the Supercooled Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozumi, Tsutomu; Saito, Akio; Okawa, Seiji; Matsui, Tatsuyuki

    In order to confirm the effect of ultrasonic wave on the freezing of supercooled water, various level of ultrasonic waves were applied to the supercooled water. The frequencies of the waves applied were 28kHz, 40kHz, 45kHz, 50kHz, and 1MHz. In order to clarify the mechanism of the effect of the ultrasonic wave, several factors were examined changing the experimental conditions and the results were compared each other; the factors were the existence of a free surface or oil -water interface, the volume of water, the purity of water and the existence of metal bar inserted. Each test section was cooled at a constant cooling rate and the ultrasonic waves were applied to each test section continuously, varying the frequency and the intensity. The experiments were carried out until the water in the test section solidified. The degree of supercooling at the freezing is determined by measuring the temperature just before a rapid increment of temperature due to freezing. It was found that the existence of a free surface and insertion of a metal bar with an addition to the ultrasonic wave have effects on the freezing of supercooled water. On the other hand, if oil-water interface or no metal bar insertion was selected as the experimental condition, there was no influence of the ultrasonic wave on the freezing of the supercooled water even the frequency and the intensity were varied.

  8. Uncertainty analysis of primary water pollutant control in China's pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zong-guo; Di, Jing-han; Zhang, Xue-ying

    2016-03-15

    The total emission control target of water pollutants (e.g., COD and NH4-N) for a certain industrial sector can be predicted and analysed using the popular technology-based bottom-up modelling. However, this methodology has obvious uncertainty regarding the attainment of mitigation targets. The primary uncertainty comes from macro-production, pollutant reduction roadmap, and technical parameters. This research takes the paper and pulp industry in China as an example, and builds 5 mitigation scenarios via different combinations of raw material structure, scale structure, procedure mitigation technology, and end-of-pipe treatment technology. Using the methodology of uncertainty analysis via Monte Carlo, random sampling was conducted over a hundred thousand times. According to key parameters, sensitive parameters that impact total emission control targets such as industrial output, technique structure, cleaner production technology, and end-of-pipe treatment technology are discussed in this article. It appears that scenario uncertainty has a larger influence on COD emission than NH4-N, hence it is recommended that a looser total emission control target for COD is necessary to increase its feasibility and availability while maintaining the status quo of NH4-N. Consequently, from uncertainty analysis, this research recognizes the sensitive products, techniques, and technologies affecting industrial water pollution. PMID:26722715

  9. Experimental Confirmation of Water Column Natural Resonance Migration in a BBDB Device.

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L; Gunawan, Budi; Holmes, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Experiments were conducted with a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) oscillating water column wave energy conversion device with a scaling factor of 50 at HMRC at University College Cork, Ireland. Results were compared to numerical performance models. This work experimentally verified the migration of the natural resonance location of the water column due to hydrodynamic coupling for a floating non- axisymmetric device without a power conversion chain PCC present. In addition, the experimental results verified the performance model with a PCC of the same non- axisymmetric device when both floating and grounded.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of the Cooling Performance of Water Spraying Systems during a Fire

    PubMed Central

    Chen, YaoHan; Su, ChungHwei; Tseng, JoMing; Li, WunJie

    2015-01-01

    The water spray systems are effective protection systems in the confined or unconfined spaces to avoid the damage to building structures since the high temperature when fires occur. NFPA 15 and 502 have suggested respectively that the factories or vehicle tunnels install water spray systems to protect the machinery and structures. This study discussed the cooling effect of water spray systems in experimental and numerical analyses. The actual combustion of woods were compared with the numerical simulations. The results showed that although the flame continued, the cooling effects by water spraying process within 120 seconds were obvious. The results also indicated that the simulation results of the fifth version Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) overestimated the space temperature before water spraying in the case of the same water spray system. PMID:25723519

  11. Experimental and numerical analysis of the cooling performance of water spraying systems during a fire.

    PubMed

    Chen, YaoHan; Su, ChungHwei; Tseng, JoMing; Li, WunJie

    2015-01-01

    The water spray systems are effective protection systems in the confined or unconfined spaces to avoid the damage to building structures since the high temperature when fires occur. NFPA 15 and 502 have suggested respectively that the factories or vehicle tunnels install water spray systems to protect the machinery and structures. This study discussed the cooling effect of water spray systems in experimental and numerical analyses. The actual combustion of woods were compared with the numerical simulations. The results showed that although the flame continued, the cooling effects by water spraying process within 120 seconds were obvious. The results also indicated that the simulation results of the fifth version Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) overestimated the space temperature before water spraying in the case of the same water spray system. PMID:25723519

  12. Experimental determination of the transport number of water in Nafion 117 membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, T.F.; Newman, J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-05-01

    The transport number of water in Nafion 117 membrane over a wide range of water contents is determined experimentally using a concentration cell. The transport number of water, the ratio f[sup m][sub o]/Z[sub o], is about 1.4 for a membrane equilibrated with saturated water vapor at 25[degrees]C, decreases slowly as the membrane is dehydrated, and falls sharply toward zero as the concentration of water approaches zero. In this paper, the relationship between the transference number, the transport number, and the electro-osmotic drag coefficient is presented, and their relevance to water management is solid-polymer-electrolyte fuel cells is discussed. Results are compared with other data available in the literature and with the theoretical maximum.

  13. An experimental test of voluntary strategies to promote urban water demand management.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Kelly S; Spinks, Anneliese; Russell, Sally; McCrea, Rod; Stewart, Rodney; Gardner, John

    2013-01-15

    In light of the current and future threats to global water security the current research focuses on trialing interventions to promote urban water conservation. We report an experimental study designed to test the long-term impact of three different interventions on household water consumption in South East Queensland. Participants from 221 households were recruited and completed an initial survey, and their houses were fitted with smart water meters which measured total water usage at 5 s intervals. Households were allocated into one of four conditions: a control group and three interventions groups (water saving information alone, information plus a descriptive norm manipulation, and information plus tailored end-user feedback). The study is the first to use smart water metering technology as a tool for behaviour change as well as a way to test the effectiveness of demand management interventions. Growth curve modelling revealed that compared to the control, the three intervention groups all showed reduced levels of household consumption (an average reduction of 11.3 L per person per day) over the course of the interventions, and for some months afterwards. All interventions led to significant water savings, but long-term household usage data showed that in all cases, the reduction in water use resulting from the interventions eventually dissipated, with water consumption returning to pre-intervention levels after approximately 12 months. Implications for water demand management programs are discussed. PMID:23168251

  14. Radiological sampling and analytical methods for National Primary Drinking Water Regulations.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R L; Hahne, R M; Kahn, B; McCurdy, D; Mellor, R A; Moore, W S; Sedlet, J; Whittaker, E

    1985-05-01

    Radiological sampling and analysis performed under the National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations were evaluated for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Drinking Water to consider whether any changes should be recommended. The authors reviewed the analytical screening scheme; sample collection, storage and analysis procedures; selection of analytical methods; reliability of results; and possible future needs. The main problem in the program has been dependence on a screening scheme of gross alpha-particle activity measurement and 226Ra analysis for predicting elevated 228Ra levels to determine compliance with the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for Ra. In some aquifers, 228Ra levels have been found to be unrelated to 226Ra levels. Several alternatives are discussed to eliminate this problem. A secondary problem is that the measurement for assuring compliance with the MCL for gross alpha-particle activity minus Ra, Rn and U uses chemical U analysis and assumes equilibrium of 238U and 234U. Because some ground waters are known to be at disequilibrium, radiometric U analysis is needed for those gross alpha-particle activities and chemical U values that could result in an erroneous conclusion relative to the MCL. In addition, studies were recommended for determining analytical uncertainties and assuring reliable sampling and sample maintenance; improvements in the system for accepting methods were suggested; and methods were identified for several radionuclides not currently in the analytical program that may be needed to assure absence of elevated radiation doses and could be useful for identifying trace contaminants. PMID:3988523

  15. A vegetation sensitivity approximation for gross primary production in water limited conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claesson, Jonas; Nycander, Jonas

    2013-04-01

    The most severe impact of climate change on vegetation growth and agriculture is likely to occur under water-limited conditions. Under such conditions the plants optimize the inward flux of CO2 and the outward flux of water vapor (the transpiration) by regulating the size of the stomata openings. Higher temperature increases water loss through transpiration, forcing the plants to diminish the stomata openings, which decreases photosynthesis. This is counteracted by higher CO2 concentration, which allows plants to maintain the inward flux of CO2 through the smaller openings. These two counteracting effects, combined with the change in precipitation, determine the net change of biological productivity in a changed climate. Here, a vegetation sensitivity approximation (VSA) is introduced, in order to understand and estimate the combined effect of changed temperature, CO2-concentration and precipitation on gross primary production (GPP) to first order. According to the VSA, we have: ( ) ?CO2atm ν GP P = ?0 P Here ?CO2atm is the atmospheric CO2 concentration, ?0 is the baseline for atmospheric CO2 concentration, P is precipitation and ν is defined by: -s- ν = 1 - 11°C where s is the climate sensitivity i.e. the increase in temperature when atmospheric CO2 is doubled. The VSA is based on the physical laws of gas flux through the stomata openings, and is only valid under water-limited conditions. It assumes that the temperature depends logarithmically on the CO2 concentration with a given climate sensitivity. Transpiration is assumed to be a constant fraction of precipitation, which is reasonable under water-limited conditions. The VSA is compared to simulations with the dynamic vegetation model LPJ. The agreement is reasonable, and the deviations can be understood by comparison with Köppen's definition of arid climate: in an arid climate growth increases more according to LPJ than according to the VSA, and in non-arid conditions the reverse is true. Both the VSA and

  16. Experimental research of fluorescence spectra of watercress stressed by lack or excess of watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullo, O. A.; Fedotov, Yu. V.; Belov, M. L.; Gorodnichev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental laboratory investigations of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of watercress were conducted. The fluorescence spectra were excited by a YAG:Nd laser emitting at 532 nm. The laboratory setup was described and fluorescence spectra of watercress in stressed states caused by lack and excess of water were presented. It was established that the influence of stress caused by lack and excess of watering is manifested in changes of fluorescence spectra.

  17. Experimental Analysis of the Feasibility of Polydisperse Droplet Water Flow Using at Fire Extinguishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitkov, Ivan S.; Zabelin, Maxim V.; Zhdanova, Alena O.

    2016-02-01

    With use of modern diagnostic methods the experimental researches of the process of the sprayed water evaporation at its movement through a flame of the fixed height was conducted. The change ranges of the main integrated evaporation characteristics of the sprayed water droplets (rates, sizes, concentration in a flow) are established. It is shown that at the extinguishing of fires the most expedient decision is the use of polydisperse droplet flows.

  18. Cattle-derived microbial input to source water catchments: An experimental assessment of stream crossing modification.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Andrew; Rolls, Robert J; Ryder, Darren; Watkinson, Andrew; Mackenzie, Mark

    2015-06-01

    The provision of safe drinking water is a global issue, and animal production is recognized as a significant potential origin of human infectious pathogenic microorganisms within source water catchments. On-farm management can be used to mitigate livestock-derived microbial pollution in source water catchments to reduce the risk of contamination to potable water supplies. We applied a modified Before-After Control Impact (BACI) design to test if restricting the access of livestock to direct contact with streams prevented longitudinal increases in the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria and suspended solids. Significant longitudinal increases in pollutant concentrations were detected between upstream and downstream reaches of the control crossing, whereas such increases were not detected at the treatment crossing. Therefore, while the crossing upgrade was effective in preventing cattle-derived point source pollution by between 112 and 158%, diffuse source pollution to water supplies from livestock is not ameliorated by this intervention alone. Our findings indicate that stream crossings that prevent direct contact between livestock and waterways provide a simple method for reducing pollutant loads in source water catchments, which ultimately minimises the likelihood of pathogenic microorganisms passing through source water catchments and the drinking water supply system. The efficacy of the catchment as a primary barrier to pathogenic risks to drinking water supplies would be improved with the integration of management interventions that minimise direct contact between livestock and waterways, combined with the mitigation of diffuse sources of livestock-derived faecal matter from farmland runoff to the aquatic environment. PMID:25841195

  19. Cenozoic magmatism of north Victoria Land, Antarctica: an experimental study on the mantle source of a primary basanite from the McMurdo Volcanic Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Freda, C.; Misiti, V.; Perinelli, C.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes of the McMurdo Vocanic Group (MMVG) (Antarctica) dot the eastern shoulder of Ross Sea Rift System giving rise to alkaline transitional volcanic suites which in north Victoria Land are emplaced since Early Cenozoic. Geochemical geological, geophysical and geochronological data on Cenozoic volcanic activity in NVL suggest that the region is a site of passive astenospheric rise, rather than affected by a thermally active mantle plume. Furthermore the comparison of geochemical and isotopical data of basic lavas with those provided by mantle xenoliths they carry to the surface, document the compositional heterogeneity of sublithospheric mantle caused by the coupled action of partial melting and metasomatism. In particular the metasomatic episode is probably linked to the amagmatic extensional event that affected the West Antarctic Rift System in the Late Cretaceous. The astenospheric melts generated during this event, moving through the upper mantle, can have crystallized as veins or may have led to the formation of metasomatic minerals such as amphibole or phlogopite. In this scenario the mineralogical and chemical composition of sources responsible for Cenozoic magmatism, amphibole-bearing spinel-peridotite versus pyroxenite in the garnet stability field, it is still a matter of debate. To shed light on this argument a previous experimental study on a basanite of MMVG, representative of primary magma (Orlando et al., 2000) has been integrated with new experimental investigation on the same basanitic composition. The preliminary experiments were conducted to pressures of 1.0 - 2.0GPa in the presence of 0-1% of added water and indicate olivine on the liquidus at 1.0 GPa that is substitute by clinopyroxene at 2.0GPa. The addition of 1% of water induces a decrease of liquidus temperature of about 40°C shifting its value in the T range (1280-1310°C) the same that was inferred by melt inclusions hosted in the olivine phenocrysts of the studied basanite.

  20. Experimental Evaluation the Effectiveness of Water Mist Fire Extinguishing Systems at Oil and Gas Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyashina, G. S.; Medvedev, V. V.; Shevyrev, S. A.; Vysokomornaya, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    Currently mist water is one of the most promising areas of fire protection. We performed an experimental study of phase transformations drops of water mist (range 50 - 500 microns) in motion in a high-temperature (500 - 2000 K) typical products of combustion of petroleum products (gasoline, kerosene, acetone, alcohol). We used high speed (the speed of shooting at least 105 frames per second) and optical methods of recording streams of liquid and gas medium. We determined the effect of the parameters of the test process (the initial temperature and the initial droplet size) at the rate of evaporation of atomized water under these conditions.

  1. A Combined Experimental and Molecular Dynamics Study of Iodide-Based Ionic Liquid and Water Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Stella D; Nofen, Elizabeth M; Chen, Haobo; Ngan, Miranda; Shindel, Benjamin; Yu, Hongyu; Dai, Lenore L

    2015-07-16

    Iodide-based ionic liquids have been widely employed as iodide sources in electrolytes for applications utilizing the triiodide/iodide redox couple. While adding a low-viscosity solvent such as water to ionic liquids can greatly enhance their usefulness, mixtures of highly viscous iodide-containing ILs with water have never been studied. This paper investigates, for the first time, mixtures of water and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide ([BMIM][I]) through a combined experimental and molecular dynamics study. The density, melting point, viscosity, and conductivity of these mixtures were measured by experiment. The composition region below 50% water by mole was found to differ dramatically from the region above 50% water, with trends in density and melting point differing before and after that point. Water was found to have a profound effect on viscosity and conductivity of the IL, and the effect of hydrogen bonding was discussed. Molecular dynamics simulations representing the same mixture compositions were performed. Molecular ordering was observed, as were changes in this ordering corresponding to water content. Molecular ordering was related to the experimentally measured mixture properties, providing a possible explanation for the two distinct composition regions identified by experiment. PMID:26090562

  2. Water, energy and carbon flux observations from ARS watersheds and agro-ecosystem experimental sites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several ARS watershed locations and long term experimental/monitoring sites have been measuring water, energy and carbon fluxes using the eddy covariance technique. Several sites have been collecting flux data for 5 to 10 years, while other locations have recently started a monitoring program. The...

  3. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a representative lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated at various power levels in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to anchor a CFD model. Performance of a water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted by CFD models anchored to test data. The accompanying viewgraph presentation includes the following topics: 1) Testbed Configuration; 2) Core Heater Placement and Instrumentation; 3) Thermocouple Placement; 4) Core Thermocouple Placement; 5) Outer Tank Thermocouple Placement; 6) Integrated Testbed; 7) Methodology; 8) Experimental Results: Core Temperatures; 9) Experimental Results; Outer Tank Temperatures; 10) CFD Modeling; 11) CFD Model: Anchored to Experimental Results (1-g); 12) CFD MOdel: Prediction for 1/6-g; and 13) CFD Model: Comparison of 1-g to 1/6-g.

  4. Experimental Evaluation of the Drag Coefficient of Water Rockets by a Simple Free-Fall Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E. Arguelles-Diaz, K.; Fernandez-Oro, J.

    2009-01-01

    The flight trajectory of a water rocket can be reasonably calculated if the magnitude of the drag coefficient is known. The experimental determination of this coefficient with enough precision is usually quite difficult, but in this paper we propose a simple free-fall experiment for undergraduate students to reasonably estimate the drag…

  5. Long-term carbon dioxide and water flux database, Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, Arizona, USA 1850

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present the carbon dioxide and water flux data along with associated meteorological data collected by USDA Agricultural Research Service, Southwest Watershed Research Center, on the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) from 1997 through 2006. Measurements were collected from a shrub and gr...

  6. Water-polysaccharide interactions in the primary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana from polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water (1)H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide (13)C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water-pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water-cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water-polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water-pectin spin diffusion precedes water-cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins. PMID:24984197

  7. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR WATER FORMATION VIA OZONE HYDROGENATION ON DUST GRAINS AT 10 K

    SciTech Connect

    Mokrane, H.; Chaabouni, H.; Accolla, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.; Chehrouri, M.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2009-11-10

    The formation of water molecules from the reaction between ozone (O{sub 3}) and D-atoms is studied experimentally for the first time. Ozone is deposited on non-porous amorphous solid water ice (H{sub 2}O), and D-atoms are then sent onto the sample held at 10 K. HDO molecules are detected during the desorption of the whole substrate where isotope mixing takes place, indicating that water synthesis has occurred. The efficiency of water formation via hydrogenation of ozone is of the same order of magnitude as that found for reactions involving O-atoms or O{sub 2} molecules and exhibits no apparent activation barrier. These experiments validate the assumption made by models using ozone as one of the precursors of water formation via solid-state chemistry on interstellar dust grains.

  8. Seasonal Shifts in Primary Water Source Type: A Comparison of Largely Pastoral Communities in Uganda and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Amber L; Zwickle, Adam; Namanya, Judith; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Mwita, Emiliana

    2016-02-01

    Many water-related illnesses show an increase during the wet season. This is often due to fecal contamination from runoff, yet, it is unknown whether seasonal changes in water availability may also play a role in increased illness via changes in the type of primary water source used by households. Very little is known about the dynamic aspects of access to water and changes in source type across seasons, particularly in semi-arid regions with annual water scarcity. The research questions in this study were: (1) To what degree do households in Uganda (UG) and Tanzania (TZ) change primary water source type between wet and dry seasons?; and (2) How might seasonal changes relate to water quality and health? Using spatial survey data from 92 households each in UG and TZ this study found that, from wet to dry season, 26% (UG) and 9% (TZ) of households switched from a source with higher risk of contamination to a source with lower risk. By comparison, only 20% (UG) and 0% (TZ) of households switched from a source with lower risk of contamination to a source with higher risk of contamination. This research suggests that one pathway through which water-related disease prevalence may differ across seasons is the use of water sources with higher risk contamination, and that households with access to sources with lower risks of contamination sometimes choose to use more contaminated sources. PMID:26828507

  9. Seasonal Shifts in Primary Water Source Type: A Comparison of Largely Pastoral Communities in Uganda and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Amber L.; Zwickle, Adam; Namanya, Judith; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Mwita, Emiliana

    2016-01-01

    Many water-related illnesses show an increase during the wet season. This is often due to fecal contamination from runoff, yet, it is unknown whether seasonal changes in water availability may also play a role in increased illness via changes in the type of primary water source used by households. Very little is known about the dynamic aspects of access to water and changes in source type across seasons, particularly in semi-arid regions with annual water scarcity. The research questions in this study were: (1) To what degree do households in Uganda (UG) and Tanzania (TZ) change primary water source type between wet and dry seasons?; and (2) How might seasonal changes relate to water quality and health? Using spatial survey data from 92 households each in UG and TZ this study found that, from wet to dry season, 26% (UG) and 9% (TZ) of households switched from a source with higher risk of contamination to a source with lower risk. By comparison, only 20% (UG) and 0% (TZ) of households switched from a source with lower risk of contamination to a source with higher risk of contamination. This research suggests that one pathway through which water-related disease prevalence may differ across seasons is the use of water sources with higher risk contamination, and that households with access to sources with lower risks of contamination sometimes choose to use more contaminated sources. PMID:26828507

  10. Experimental simulation of the water cooling of corium spread over the floor of a BWR containment

    SciTech Connect

    Morage, F.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with an experimental investigation of the cooling effect of water collected on the surface of corium released onto the floor of a BWR drywell. In the present experiments, the actual reactor materials were replaced by simulant materials. Specifically, the results are shown for Freon-11 film boiling over liquid Wood`s metal spread above a solid porous surface through which argon gas was injected. An analysis of the obtained experimental data revealed that the actual film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and the water above the pool should be more efficient than predicted by using standard correlations for boiling over solid surfaces. This effect will be further augmented by the gas released due to the ablation of concrete floor beneath the corium and percolating towards its upper surface and into through the water layer above.

  11. Primary portal vein hypoplasia and SLC2A9 mutation associated with urate urolithiasis in a Spanish water dog

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Laura; Hammond, Gawain; Mclauchlan, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a Spanish water dog with an ammonium urate urethrolith which was diagnosed with primary portal vein hypoplasia and was found to be homozygous for the mutated SLC2A9 gene. This is the first Spanish water dog described with the SLC2A9 mutation and the first case of concurrent portal vascular abnormalities and SLC2A9 mutation. PMID:26538670

  12. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, M

    1987-01-01

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated.

  13. The Life-Cycle Costs of School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan Primary Schools.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kelly T; Mwaki, Alex; Adhiambo, Dorothy; Cheney-Coker, Malaika; Muga, Richard; Freeman, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programs in schools can increase the health, dignity and comfort of students and teachers. Understanding the costs of WASH facilities and services in schools is one essential piece for policy makers to utilize when budgeting for schools and helping to make WASH programs more sustainable. In this study we collected data from NGO and government offices, local hardware shops and 89 rural primary schools across three Kenyan counties. Current expenditures on WASH, from school and external (NGO, government, parent) sources, averaged 1.83 USD per student per year. After reviewing current expenditures, estimated costs of operations and maintenance for bringing schools up to basic WASH standards, were calculated to be 3.03 USD per student per year. This includes recurrent costs, but not the cost of installing or setting up WASH infrastructure, which was 18,916 USD per school, for a school of 400 students (4.92 USD per student, per year). These findings demonstrate the need for increases in allocations to schools in Kenya, and stricter guidance on how money should be spent on WASH inputs to enable all schools to provide basic WASH for all students. PMID:27355962

  14. Assessing Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Morphology and Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2005-12-01

    A research program on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this program, the material degradation problem in Alloys 600, 182 and 82 is being investigated, with objectives that include compiling a knowledge base on all cracking in nickel-base materials at all degradation sites in nuclear power plants, assessing nondestructive evaluation methods using mockups to quantify the detection, sizing, and characterization of tight cracks, determining the role of material parameters, such as welding processes, in the degradation. This work is being conducted as a part of an international cooperative research project that has been set up to leverage efforts in several countries to address a significant and common problem. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is leading this cooperative project to address this generic problem in a systematic manner over the next four years. In this paper, published information on the failure history of Alloys 600, 182, and 82 is compiled and presented. The configurations of the welded assemblies that contain these alloys are shown to be important considerations for NDE reliability measurements. The product forms and the welding processes represented in the degraded components are described. The relevant data on crack morphology parameters such as shape and orientation are presented, and their impact on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability is discussed.

  15. The Life-Cycle Costs of School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan Primary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kelly T.; Mwaki, Alex; Adhiambo, Dorothy; Cheney-Coker, Malaika; Muga, Richard; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programs in schools can increase the health, dignity and comfort of students and teachers. Understanding the costs of WASH facilities and services in schools is one essential piece for policy makers to utilize when budgeting for schools and helping to make WASH programs more sustainable. In this study we collected data from NGO and government offices, local hardware shops and 89 rural primary schools across three Kenyan counties. Current expenditures on WASH, from school and external (NGO, government, parent) sources, averaged 1.83 USD per student per year. After reviewing current expenditures, estimated costs of operations and maintenance for bringing schools up to basic WASH standards, were calculated to be 3.03 USD per student per year. This includes recurrent costs, but not the cost of installing or setting up WASH infrastructure, which was 18,916 USD per school, for a school of 400 students (4.92 USD per student, per year). These findings demonstrate the need for increases in allocations to schools in Kenya, and stricter guidance on how money should be spent on WASH inputs to enable all schools to provide basic WASH for all students. PMID:27355962

  16. Water use efficiency of net primary production in global terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lei; Wang, Fei; Mu, Xingmin; Jin, Kai; Sun, Wenyi; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Guangju

    2015-07-01

    The carbon and water cycles of terrestrial ecosystems, which are strongly coupled via water use efficiency (WUE), are influenced by global climate change. To explore the relationship between the carbon and water cycles and predict the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to study the WUE in global terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, the 13-year WUE (i.e., net primary production (NPP)/evapotranspiration (ET)) of global terrestrial ecosystems was calculated based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) NPP (MOD17A3) and ET (MOD16A3) products from 2000 to 2012. The results indicate that the annual average WUE decreased but not significantly, and the 13-year mean value was 868.88 mg C m -2 mm -1. The variation trend of WUE value for each pixel differed greatly across the terrestrial ecosystems. A significant variation ( P<0.05) occurred in about 18.50% of the land surface. WUE was spatially distributed from 0 to 2541 mg C m -2 mm -1, and 58.78% of the WUE values were concentrated in the interval of 600-1200 mg C m -2 mm -1. The WUE increased from north to south in Africa and Oceania and from east to west in Europe and South America. Both latitudinal and longitudinal gradients existed in Asia and North America. The following trends in the WUE of different continents and Köppen-Geiger climates were observed: Europe (1129.71 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Oceania (1084.46 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Africa (893.51 mg C m -2 mm -1)> South America (893.07 mg C m -2 mm -1)> North America (870.79 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Asia (738.98 mg C m -2 mm -1) and warm temperate climates (1094 mg C m -2 mm -1)> snowy climates (862 mg C m -2 mm -1)> arid climates (785 mg C m -2 mm -1)> equatorial climates (732 mg C m -2 mm -1)> polar climates (435 mg C m -2 mm -1). Based on the WUE value and the present or future rainfall, the maximum carbon that fixed in one region may be theoretically calculated. Also, under the background of global climatic change, WUE may

  17. Experimental and Numerical Simulation of Water Vapor Adsorption and Diffusion in Shale Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Cihan, A.; Wan, J.; Zheng, L.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in deep horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have lead to large increases in production from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. Despite the success of this technology, uncertainties associated with basic transport processes require understanding in order to improve efficiency and minimize environmental impacts. The hydraulic fracturing process introduces large volumes of water into shale gas reservoirs. Most of the fracturing water remains in reservoirs to interfere with gas production. The quantification of the amount of water retained in shale gas reservoirs is crucial for predicting gas shale formation productivity and for optimizing extraction conditions. In this study, water vapor adsorption isotherms were gravimetrically measured on granular fractions of Woodford formation shales sieved after crushing. The isotherms were obtained at 30℃ and 50℃, for relative humidities from 11.1% to 97.0%. Water adsorption in these shale grains conformed to the typeⅡisotherm, and were nearly identical for the two experimental temperatures. In order to better understand the isotherms, a computational model based on the Maxwell-Stefan Diffusion equations (MSDM) was constructed to analyze the water adsorption and gas diffusion in shale grains. Based on the experimental results, the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) isotherm model for gas adsorption was included in the model.

  18. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: The experimental and data analysis perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taschin, A.; Bartolini, P.; Eramo, R.; Righini, R.; Torre, R.

    2014-08-01

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information.

  19. Optical Kerr effect of liquid and supercooled water: the experimental and data analysis perspective.

    PubMed

    Taschin, A; Bartolini, P; Eramo, R; Righini, R; Torre, R

    2014-08-28

    The time-resolved optical Kerr effect spectroscopy (OKE) is a powerful experimental tool enabling accurate investigations of the dynamic phenomena in molecular liquids. We introduced innovative experimental and fitting procedures, that enable a safe deconvolution of sample response function from the instrumental function. This is a critical issue in order to measure the dynamics of liquid water. We report OKE data on water measuring intermolecular vibrations and the structural relaxation processes in an extended temperature range, inclusive of the supercooled states. The unpreceded data quality makes possible a solid comparison with few theoretical models: the multi-mode Brownian oscillator model, the Kubo's discrete random jump model, and the schematic mode-coupling model. All these models produce reasonable good fits of the OKE data of stable liquid water, i.e., over the freezing point. The features of water dynamics in the OKE data becomes unambiguous only at lower temperatures, i.e., for water in the metastable supercooled phase. We found that the schematic mode-coupling model provides the more rigorous and complete model for water dynamics, even if its intrinsic hydrodynamic approach does not give a direct access to the molecular information. PMID:25173021

  20. Comparison of GEANT4 very low energy cross section models with experimental data in water

    SciTech Connect

    Incerti, S.; Ivanchenko, A.; Karamitros, M.; Mantero, A.; Moretto, P.; Tran, H. N.; Mascialino, B.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Bernal, M. A.; Francis, Z.; Villagrasa, C.; Baldacchino, G.; Gueye, P.; Capra, R.; Nieminen, P.; Zacharatou, C.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The GEANT4 general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is able to simulate physical interaction processes of electrons, hydrogen and helium atoms with charge states (H{sup 0}, H{sup +}) and (He{sup 0}, He{sup +}, He{sup 2+}), respectively, in liquid water, the main component of biological systems, down to the electron volt regime and the submicrometer scale, providing GEANT4 users with the so-called ''GEANT4-DNA'' physics models suitable for microdosimetry simulation applications. The corresponding software has been recently re-engineered in order to provide GEANT4 users with a coherent and unique approach to the simulation of electromagnetic interactions within the GEANT4 toolkit framework (since GEANT4 version 9.3 beta). This work presents a quantitative comparison of these physics models with a collection of experimental data in water collected from the literature. Methods: An evaluation of the closeness between the total and differential cross section models available in the GEANT4 toolkit for microdosimetry and experimental reference data is performed using a dedicated statistical toolkit that includes the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. The authors used experimental data acquired in water vapor as direct measurements in the liquid phase are not yet available in the literature. Comparisons with several recommendations are also presented. Results: The authors have assessed the compatibility of experimental data with GEANT4 microdosimetry models by means of quantitative methods. The results show that microdosimetric measurements in liquid water are necessary to assess quantitatively the validity of the software implementation for the liquid water phase. Nevertheless, a comparison with existing experimental data in water vapor provides a qualitative appreciation of the plausibility of the simulation models. The existing reference data themselves should undergo a critical interpretation and selection, as some of the series exhibit significant

  1. Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy of carbonaceous chondrites: Implications for water quantification and primary composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garenne, A.; Beck, P.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Brissaud, O.; Schmitt, B.; Quirico, E.; Bonal, L.; Beck, C.; Howard, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we measured bidirectional reflectance spectra (0.5-4.0 μm) of 24 CMs, five CRs, one CI, one CV, and one C2 carbonaceous chondrites. These meteorites are known to have experienced an important variability in their relative degrees of aqueous alteration degree (Rubin et al. [2007]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 71, 2361-2382; Howard et al. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard et al. [2011]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 75, 2735-2751; Alexander et al. [2013]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 123, 244-260). These measurements were performed on meteorite powders inside an environmental cell under a primary vacuum and heated at 60 °C in order to minimize adsorbed terrestrial water. This protocol allows controlling of atmospheric conditions (i.e. humidity) in order to avoid contamination by terrestrial water. We discuss various spectral metrics (e.g. reflectance, band depth, single-scattering albedo, …) in the light of recent bulk composition characterization (Howard et al. [2009]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 73, 4576-4589; Howard et al. [2015]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 149, 206-222; Alexander et al. [2012]. Science 337, 721; Beck et al. [2014]. Icarus 229, 263-277; Garenne et al. [2014]. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 137, 93-112). This study reveals variability of reflectance among meteorite groups. The reflectance is not correlated with carbon or hydrogen abundance neither with measured grain size distribution. We suggest that it is rather controlled by the nature of accreted components, in particular the initial matrix/chondrule proportion. Band depth, integrated band depth, mean optical path length, normalized optical path length, effective single-particle absorption thickness were calculated on the so called 3-μm band for reflectance spectra and for single scattering albedo spectra. They were compared with hydrated phase proportions from previous study on the same meteorites by thermogravimetric analyses and infrared spectroscopy in transmission. We find

  2. Experimental manipulation of water levels in two French riverine grassland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oorschot, Mark; van Gaalen, Nils; Maltby, Ed; Mockler, Natalie; Spink, Andrew; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.

    2000-01-01

    In this experimental study, we simulated the effects of different river flooding regimes on soil nutrient availability, decomposition and plant production in floodplain grasslands. This was done to investigate the influences of soil water contents on nutrient cycling. Water levels were manipulated in mesocosms with intact soil turfs from two French floodplain grasslands. Three water levels were established: a `wet' (water level at the soil surface), an `intermediate' (water level at -20 cm) and a `dry' treatment (water level at -120 cm). With increasing soil moisture, soil pH became more neutral, while redox-potential and oxygen concentration decreased. The `dry' treatment showed much lower values for process rates in soil and vegetation than the `intermediate' and `wet' treatments. Regressions showed that soil C-evolution and N-mineralization were positively related to soil moisture content. Not all mineralized N was available for plant uptake in the wet treatment, as a considerable part was denitrified here. Denitrification was especially high as soil water contents increased to levels above field capacity, where redox-potentials sharply dropped. Further, soil P availability was higher under wet conditions. In the `dry' treatment, soil water content was close to the wilting point and plant production was low. In the `intermediate' treatment, plant production was most likely limited by nitrogen. The `wet' treatment did not result in a further increase in plant production. Dam construction and river bed degradation can result in lower river levels and summer drought on floodplains. This experimental study suggests that summer drought on floodplain soils reduces decomposition of soil organic matter, nutrient availability, denitrification, plant production and nutrient uptake. This can affect the capacity of floodplains to remove or retain nutrients from river water in a negative way.

  3. Plasma membrane proteomics in the maize primary root growth zone: novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress.

    PubMed

    Voothuluru, Priyamvada; Anderson, Jeffrey C; Sharp, Robert E; Peck, Scott C

    2016-09-01

    Previous work on maize (Zea mays L.) primary root growth under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. These responses involve spatially differential and coordinated regulation of osmotic adjustment, modification of cell wall extensibility, and other cellular growth processes that are required for root growth under water-stressed conditions. As the interface between the cytoplasm and the apoplast (including the cell wall), the plasma membrane likely plays critical roles in these responses. Using a simplified method for enrichment of plasma membrane proteins, the developmental distribution of plasma membrane proteins was analysed in the growth zone of well-watered and water-stressed maize primary roots. The results identified 432 proteins with differential abundances in well-watered and water-stressed roots. The majority of changes involved region-specific patterns of response, and the identities of the water stress-responsive proteins suggest involvement in diverse biological processes including modification of sugar and nutrient transport, ion homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and cell wall composition. Integration of the distinct, region-specific plasma membrane protein abundance patterns with results from previous physiological, transcriptomic and cell wall proteomic studies reveals novel insights into root growth adaptation to water stress. PMID:27341663

  4. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  5. Genetic variability of oxalate oxidase activity and elongation in water-stressed primary roots of diverse maize and rice lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work on maize primary roots under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. In association with these responses, several proteins related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, part...

  6. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  10. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and feedwater piping and other systems which penetrate containment of direct-cycle boiling water power... CFR 50.12, are still applicable to Option B of this appendix if necessary, unless specifically revoked... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for...

  11. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    REID, ROBERT S.; PEARSON, J. BOSIE; STEWART, ERIC T.

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  12. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-30

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  13. Theoretical and experimental investigation of a novel built-in-storage solar water heater

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptan, I.N.; Kilic, A.

    1996-11-01

    In this work, a novel built-in-storage type solar water heater of about 871 capacity has been investigated theoretically and experimentally for the case of no draw-off. The solar water heater which performs the dual function of absorbing and storing hot water is made of 5 pipes, each of length 1.8 m and diameter 12 cm. A baffle plate is placed inside each pipe. The experiments have been performed inside the laboratory using an artificial Sun consisting of 27 lamps. The water temperatures have been measured at various locations in the system. In the theoretical study, transient performance of the system is predicted by solving the mathematical model consisting of energy balance equations written for each control volume comprising one length of pipe. These equations are converted to finite difference form and then solved by a personal computer. The experimental results have been compared with the numerical model and a good agreement has been found between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions. 24 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. An experimental study of freezing of supercooled water droplet on solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, S. V.; Mendig, C.; Schulz, M.; Sinapius, M.; Prykhodko, O. A.

    2016-05-01

    Results of experimental investigations of the freezing of immobile water droplet on an aluminum plate are presented. The process was studied with the aid of a high-speed photo camera. The freezing of supercooled water contained in the surface droplet proceeds in a few stages: (i) preliminary heating of water and nucleation of ice microcrystals, (ii) relatively fast formation of the ice-liquid system with a transition to the state of thermodynamic equilibrium near the freezing temperature, and (iii) slow process of complete freezing. The rate and duration of each stage and the time of delay between the moment of action upon the supercooled droplet and the onset of freezing are estimated. Processes of supercooled and nonsupercooled water solidification are compared.

  15. Experimental study of the water jet induced by underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koita, T.; Zhu, Y.; Sun, M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation on the effects of explosion depth and tube width on the water jet induced by an underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube. The water jet formation and bubble structure were evaluated from the images recorded by a high-speed video camera. Two typical patterns of jet formation and four general patterns of bubble implosion were observed, depending on the explosion depth and tube width. The velocity of the water jet was calculated from the recorded images. The jet velocity was observed to depend on not only the explosion depth and energy, but also on the tube width. We proposed an empirical formula defining the water jet velocity in the tube as a function of the tube width and explosion depth and energy.

  16. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. B.; Reid, R.; Sadasivan, P.; Stewart, E.

    2007-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. A representative lunar surface reactor design is evaluated at various power levels in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The evaluation compares the experimental data from the WST to CFD models. Performance of a water shield on the lunar surface is predicted by CFD models anchored to test data, and by matching relevant dimensionless parameters.

  17. Experimental investigation of over-expanded supersonic steam jet submerged in quiescent water

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xin-Zhuang; Yan, Jun-Jie; Li, Wen-Jun; Pan, Dong-Dong; Liu, Guang-Yao

    2010-01-15

    This study was designed to determine the behaviour of an over-expanded supersonic steam jet in quiescent water. Only two shapes of steam plume were observed and an analytical model was constructed. The axial and radial temperature distributions were measured in the steam plume and in the surrounding water. The flow pattern and temperature distributions were influenced mainly by steam mass flux and water temperature. The results confirmed the occurrence of compression and expansion waves in the steam plume, and indicated that the temperature distributions reflected the steam plume shapes. The axial temperature distributions in the forepart of the steam plume were independent of water temperature. Empirical correlations were found that predicted the dimensionless axial and radial temperatures of the turbulent jet region. Moreover, prediction of the steam plume length by the dimensionless axial temperature showed good agreement with the experimental results. (author)

  18. Biofilm formation in an experimental water distribution system: the contamination of non-touch sensor taps and the implication for healthcare.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ginny; Stevenson, David; Thompson, Katy-Anne; Parks, Simon; Ngabo, Didier; Bennett, Allan M; Walker, Jimmy T

    2015-01-01

    Hospital tap water is a recognised source of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. U.K. guidance documents recommend measures to control/minimise the risk of P. aeruginosa in augmented care units but these are based on limited scientific evidence. An experimental water distribution system was designed to investigate colonisation of hospital tap components. P. aeruginosa was injected into 27 individual tap 'assemblies'. Taps were subsequently flushed twice daily and contamination levels monitored over two years. Tap assemblies were systematically dismantled and assessed microbiologically and the effect of removing potentially contaminated components was determined. P. aeruginosa was repeatedly recovered from the tap water at levels above the augmented care alert level. The organism was recovered from all dismantled solenoid valves with colonisation of the ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) diaphragm confirmed by microscopy. Removing the solenoid valves reduced P. aeruginosa counts in the water to below detectable levels. This effect was immediate and sustained, implicating the solenoid diaphragm as the primary contamination source. PMID:26652665

  19. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  20. Water age and stream solute dynamics at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (US)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, Gianluca; Benettin, Paolo; McGuire, Kevin; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The contribution discusses experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA) to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is used to model both conservative and weathering-derived solutes. Based on the available information about the hydrology of the site, an integrated transport model was developed and used to estimate the relevant hydrochemical fluxes. The model was designed to reproduce the deuterium content of streamflow and allowed for the estimate of catchment water storage and dynamic travel time distributions (TTDs). Within this framework, dissolved silicon and sodium concentration in streamflow were simulated by implementing first-order chemical kinetics based explicitly on dynamic TTD, thus upscaling local geochemical processes to catchment scale. Our results highlight the key role of water stored within the subsoil glacial material in both the short-term and long-term solute circulation at Hubbard Brook. The analysis of the results provided by the calibrated model allowed a robust estimate of the emerging concentration-discharge relationship, streamflow age distributions (including the fraction of event water) and storage size, and their evolution in time due to hydrologic variability.

  1. On the growth of homogeneously nucleated water droplets in nitrogen: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, M. A. L. J.; Sachteleben, E.; Hrubý, J.; Smeulders, D. M. J.

    2014-07-01

    A pulse-expansion wave tube method to determine homogeneous nucleation rates of water droplets has been improved. In particular, by accounting for background scattering, the experimental light scattering can be fitted extremely well with the Mie scattering theory. This results in an accurate determination of the droplet growth curve, which is well defined owing to the sharp monodispersity of the droplet cloud generated by the nucleation pulse method. With this method, water condensation is effectively decoupled in birth (nucleation) and growth of droplets. Droplet growth curves yield information on the diffusion coefficient, which only depends on pressure and temperature and on the supersaturation of the individual experiments. Here, we propose to use this information in the interpretation of nucleation rate data. Experimental results are given for homogeneous nucleation rates of supercooled water droplets at nucleation temperature 240 K and pressure 1.0 MPa and for growth of supercooled water droplets at temperature 247 K and pressure 1.1 MPa. The supersaturation was varied between 10 and 14, resulting in nucleation rates varying between 10 m s and 10 m s. For the diffusion coefficient, a value of 1.51 0.03 mm s was found (247 K, 1.1 MPa) in agreement with previously reported results. It is discussed how the information from droplet growth data can be used to assess the quality of the individual water nucleation experiments.

  2. Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

    2007-04-18

    Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate controlling sub

  3. Experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of water mist automated fire extinguishing systems for oil transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, D. O.; Nyashina, G. S.; Strizhak, P. A.; Volkov, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental investigation of regularities of carryover of water mist droplets (radius of 50 - 500 μm) by high temperature (500 - 1800 K) products of combustion of typical petroleum products (oil, gasoline, kerosene, etc.) was carried out. The panoramic optical methods and high-speed hardware and software systems were used. Speeds of droplets after mixing with oncoming high temperature gases were determined. Conditions of continuation of droplets movement through combustion products with preservation of initial trajectory in spite of intensive evaporation and braking were found. The predictive evaluation of effectiveness of water mist use for extinguishing of fires involving oil and typical petroleum products.

  4. An experimental investigation of the burning characteristics of water-oil emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.H.; Chen, J.T.

    1996-10-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on the combustion characteristics of droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-hexadecane and iso-octane emulsified with various amount of water and freely falling in a furnace of controlled temperature. Results demonstrate the intricate influences of water emulsification on the ignition, extinction and micro-explosion of the droplet response, and that the droplet burning time can be significantly reduced through judicious fuel blending so as to minimize the ignition delay and advance the onset of micro-explosion.

  5. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Bull, R; Holdsworth, G

    1986-03-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increases in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. For example, after 3 months of exposure to deionized water or water containing 15 ppm monochloramine, plasma cholesterol was 1266 +/- 172 and 2049 +/- 212 mg/dl, respectively, a difference of 783 mg/dl. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. We suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3456597

  6. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies.

    PubMed Central

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Bull, R; Holdsworth, G

    1986-01-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increases in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. For example, after 3 months of exposure to deionized water or water containing 15 ppm monochloramine, plasma cholesterol was 1266 +/- 172 and 2049 +/- 212 mg/dl, respectively, a difference of 783 mg/dl. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. We suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3456597

  7. Structural properties of geminal dicationic ionic liquid/water mixtures: a theoretical and experimental insight.

    PubMed

    Serva, Alessandra; Migliorati, Valentina; Lapi, Andrea; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Arcovito, Alessandro; D'Angelo, Paola

    2016-06-28

    The structural behavior of geminal dicationic ionic liquid 1,n-bis[3-methylimidazolium-1-yl] alkane bromide ([Cn(mim)2]Br2)/water mixtures has been studied using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The properties of the mixtures are investigated as a function of both water concentration and alkyl-bridge chain length. The very good agreement between the EXAFS experimental data and the theoretical curves calculated from the MD structural results has proven the validity of the theoretical framework used for all of the investigated systems. In all the solutions the water molecules are preferentially coordinated with the Br(-) ion, even if a complex network of interactions among dications, anions and water molecules takes place. The local molecular arrangement around the bromide ion is found to change with increasing water content, as more and more water molecules are accomodated in the Br(-) first coordination shell. Moreover, with the decrease of the alkyl-bridge chain length, the interactions between dications and anions increase, with Br(-) forming a bridge between the two imidazolium rings of the same dication. On the other hand, in [Cn(mim)2]Br2/water mixtures with long alkyl-bridge chains peculiar internal arrangements of the dications are found, leading to different structural features of geminal dicationic ionic liquids as compared to their monocationic counterparts. PMID:27272477

  8. Screening and Quantification of Aliphatic Primary Alkyl Corrosion Inhibitor Amines in Water Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Damon, Deidre E; Barrett, Richard M; Syed, S U; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-01-19

    Direct analysis and identification of long chain aliphatic primary diamine Duomeen O (n-oleyl-1,3-diaminopropane), corrosion inhibitor in raw water samples taken from a large medium pressure water tube boiler plant water samples at low LODs (<0.1 pg) has been demonstrated for the first time, without any sample preparation using paper spray mass spectrometry (PS-MS). The presence of Duomeen O in water samples was confirmed via tandem mass spectrometry using collision-induced dissociation and supported by exact mass measurement and reactive paper spray experiments using an LTQ Orbitrap Exactive instrument. Data shown herein indicate that paper spray ambient ionization can be readily used as a rapid and robust method for in situ direct analysis of polymanine corrosion inhibitors in an industrial water boiler plant and other related samples in the water treatment industry. This approach was applied for the analysis of three complex water samples including feedwater, condensate water, and boiler water, all collected from large medium pressure (MP) water tube boiler plants, known to be dosed with varying amounts of polyamine and amine corrosion inhibitor components. Polyamine chemistry is widely used for example in large high pressure (HP) boilers operating in municipal waste and recycling facilities to prevent corrosion of metals. The samples used in this study are from such a facility in Coventry waste treatment facility, U.K., which has 3 × 40 tonne/hour boilers operating at 17.5 bar. PMID:26727190

  9. The First Association of a Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Death with Culturable Naegleria fowleri in Tap Water from a U.S. Treated Public Drinking Water System

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Jennifer R.; Ratard, Raoult C.; Hill, Vincent R.; Sokol, Theresa; Causey, Jonathan Jake; Yoder, Jonathan S.; Mirani, Gayatri; Mull, Bonnie; Mukerjee, Kimberly A.; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Doucet, Meggie; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Poole, Charla N.; Akingbola, Olugbenga A.; Ritter, Jana; Xiong, Zhenggang; da Silva, Alexandre; Roellig, Dawn; Van Dyke, Russell; Stern, Harlan; Xiao, Lihua; Beach, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Naegleria fowleri is a climate-sensitive, thermophilic ameba found in warm, freshwater lakes and rivers. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is almost universally fatal, occurs when N. fowleri–containing water enters the nose, typically during swimming, and N. fowleri migrates to the brain via the olfactory nerve. In August 2013, a 4-year-old child died of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology in a Louisiana hospital. Methods Clinical and environmental testing and a case investigation were initiated to determine the cause of death and to identify potential exposures. Results Based on testing of CSF and brain specimens, the child was diagnosed with PAM. His only reported water exposure was tap water; in particular, tap water that was used to supply water to a lawn water slide on which the child had played extensively prior to becoming ill. Water samples were collected from both the home and the water distribution system that supplied the home and tested; N. fowleri were identified in water samples from both the home and the water distribution system. Conclusions This case is the first reported PAM death associated with culturable N. fowleri in tap water from a U.S. treated drinking water system. This case occurred in the context of an expanding geographic range for PAM beyond southern tier states with recent case reports from Minnesota, Kansas, and Indiana. This case also highlights the role of adequate disinfection throughout drinking water distribution systems and the importance of maintaining vigilance when operating drinking water systems using source waters with elevated temperatures. PMID:25595746

  10. LBE water interaction in sub-critical reactors: First experimental and modelling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampichetti, A.; Agostini, P.; Benamati, G.; Bandini, G.; Pellini, D.; Forgione, N.; Oriolo, F.; Ambrosini, W.

    2008-06-01

    This paper concerns the study of the phenomena involved in the interaction between LBE and pressurised water which could occur in some hypothetical accidents in accelerator driven system type reactors. The LIFUS 5 facility was designed and built at ENEA-Brasimone to reproduce this kind of interaction in a wide range of conditions. The first test of the experimental program was carried out injecting water at 70 bar and 235 °C in a reaction vessel containing LBE at 1 bar and 350 °C. A pressurisation up to 80 bar was observed in the test section during the considered transient. The SIMMER III code was used to simulate the performed test. The calculated data agree in a satisfactory way with the experimental results giving confidence in the possibility to use this code for safety analyses of heavy liquid metal cooled reactors.