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Sample records for primate cerebellar granule

  1. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D; Bertelsen, Mads F; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R; Reep, Roger L; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C; Manger, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  2. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L.; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C.; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A.; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R.; Reep, Roger L.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Manger, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  3. Synaptic representation of locomotion in single cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Kate; Mathy, Alexandre; Duguid, Ian; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in the regulation of locomotion, but how movement is represented at the synaptic level is not known. Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells. The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement. Surprisingly, the entire step sequence can be predicted from input EPSCs and output spikes of a single granule cell, suggesting that a robust gait code is present already at the cerebellar input layer and transmitted via the granule cell pathway to downstream Purkinje cells. Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.001 PMID:26083712

  4. Multimodal sensory integration in single cerebellar granule cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Taro; Shimuta, Misa; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is a highly multimodal structure, receiving inputs from multiple sensory modalities and integrating them during complex sensorimotor coordination tasks. Previously, using cell-type-specific anatomical projection mapping, it was shown that multimodal pathways converge onto individual cerebellar granule cells (Huang et al., 2013). Here we directly measure synaptic currents using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and confirm that a subset of single granule cells receive convergent functional multimodal (somatosensory, auditory, and visual) inputs via separate mossy fibers. Furthermore, we show that the integration of multimodal signals by granule cells can enhance action potential output. These recordings directly demonstrate functional convergence of multimodal signals onto single granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12916.001 PMID:26714108

  5. Inhibition of Cerebellar Granule Cell Turning by Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Tatsuro; Komuro, Yutaro; Li, Ying; Hu, Taofang; Wang, Zhe; Littner, Yoav; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic neurons are often found in the brains of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) patients, suggesting that alcohol exposure impairs neuronal cell migration. Although it has been reported that alcohol decreases the speed of neuronal cell migration, little is known about whether alcohol also affects the turning of neurons. Here we show that ethanol exposure inhibits the turning of cerebellar granule cells in vivo and in vitro. First, in vivo studies using P10 mice demonstrated that a single i.p. injection of ethanol not only reduces the number of turning granule cells but also alters the mode of turning at the EGL-ML border of the cerebellum. Second, in vitro analysis using microexplant cultures of P0-P3 mouse cerebella revealed that ethanol directly reduces the frequency of spontaneous granule cell turning in a dose-dependent manner. Third, the action of ethanol on the frequency of granule cell turning was significantly ameliorated by stimulating Ca2+ and cGMP signaling or by inhibiting cAMP signaling. Taken together, these results indicate that ethanol affects the frequency and mode of cerebellar granule cell turning through alteration of the Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways, suggesting that the abnormal allocation of neurons found in the brains of FASD and FSA patients results, at least in part, from impaired turning of immature neurons by alcohol. PMID:20691765

  6. Extracellular potassium concentration regulates proliferation of immature cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Borodinsky, L N; Fiszman, M L

    1998-04-17

    The present study examines the effect of depolarizing potassium concentrations on the proliferation of immature rat cerebellar neurons. Cells inoculated in serum free medium and 5 mM KCl (5 K) showed a high degree of 3H-thymidine incorporation that decreased 24-48 h after plating as differentiation began. During the first 24 h after inoculation, cells grown in high potassium (25 K), showed a 34 +/- 3% increase (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 12) in 3H-thymidine incorporation as compared with the values observed in 5 K. After 24 h in vitro, cells grown in 25 K showed 23 +/- 3% (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3) less DNA synthesis than those inoculated in 5 K. The increase in DNA synthesis due to 25 K was blocked by MgCl2 and nifedipine, but not by omega-conotoxin GVIA, suggesting that it is mediated by a Ca2+ influx via voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) of the L-subtype. High potassium-induced cell proliferation was blocked by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) inhibitor (PD98059, 75 microM). The number of neurons counted after 48 h in vitro in 25 K was 35-100% above of the number obtained with 5 K and this increase also was blocked by MgCl2 and nifedipine. These data support the hypothesis that depolarizing activity during neurogenesis plays a role in the modulation of cerebellar granule cells proliferation. PMID:9602050

  7. AMPA receptors in cerebellar granule cells during development in culture.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Sluiter, A A; Balázs, R

    1995-06-27

    The survival and maturation of differentiating cerebellar granule cells in culture are known to be promoted by excitatory amino acids (EAAs) which, however, compromise the survival of mature cells. In contrast to the trophic effect, the toxic effect of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasolepropiate (AMPA) could only be elicited when the desensitisation of AMPA receptors was blocked, cyclothiazide being used in this study. Nevertheless, even under these conditions, toxicity induced by AMPA in contrast to kainate was, at 9 DIV, only half of the maximal toxicity attained by 13-16 DIV. Since cellular responses to AMPA depend so dramatically on the maturational stage of granule cells, we examined here whether this characteristic is related to developmental changes in AMPA receptor properties, which may result from changes in the subunit composition of the receptor. In contrast to toxicity, AMPA-induced 45Ca2+ influx (determined in the presence of cyclothiazide and the NMDA receptor blocker MK-801) reached a maximum already at 9 DIV. This also applied to a fraction of the 45Ca2+ uptake which persisted either after Cd2+ application or under Na(+)-free conditions and therefore presumably was mediated directly through AMPA receptor channels. Quantitative analysis of Western blots showed that the amounts of GluR4 and to a lesser extent GluR2/3/4c are substantial already at 2 DIV, remaining fairly constant until 9 DIV, followed by an increase by 16 DIV. However GluR1, which is hardly detectable in granule cells in vivo and is also low early in vitro, increased almost linearly with cultivation time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7554232

  8. Calcium transients in cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, W G; Atluri, P P

    1995-01-01

    Calcium ions act presynaptically to modulate synaptic strength and to trigger neurotransmitter release. Here we detect stimulus-evoked changes in residual free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in rat cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals. Granule cell axons, known as parallel fibers, and their associated boutons, were labeled with several calcium indicators. When parallel fibers were extracellularly activated with stimulus trains, calcium accumulated in the terminals, producing changes in the fluorescence of the indicators. During the stimulus train, the fluorescence change per pulse became progressively smaller with the high affinity indicators Fura-2 and calcium green-2 but remained constant with the low affinity dyes BTC and furaptra. In addition, fluorescence transients of high affinity dyes were slower than those of low affinity indicators, which appear to accurately report the time course of calcium transients. Simulations show that differences in the observed transients can be explained by the different affinities and off rates of the fluorophores. The return of [Ca2+]i to resting levels can be approximated by an exponential decay with a time constant of 150 ms. On the basis of the degree of saturation in the response of high affinity dyes observed during trains, we estimate that each action potential increases [Ca2+]i in the terminal by several hundred nanomolar. These findings indicate that in these terminals [Ca2+]i transients are much larger and faster than those observed in larger boutons, such as those at the neuromuscular junction. Such rapid [Ca2+]i dynamics may be found in many of the terminals in the mammalian brain that are similar in size to parallel fiber boutons. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7612860

  9. Increased amyloidogenic secretion in cerebellar granule cells undergoing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Cinzia; Piccini, Alessandra; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Castellani, Loriana; Calissano, Pietro; Zaccheo, Damiano; Tabaton, Massimo

    1998-01-01

    Some clues suggest that neuronal damage induces a secondary change of amyloid β protein (Aβ) metabolism. We investigated this possibility by analyzing the secretion of Aβ and processing of its precursor protein (amyloid precursor protein, APP) in an in vitro model of neuronal apoptosis. Primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons were metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine. Apoptosis was induced by shifting extracellular KCl concentration from 25 mM to 5 mM for 6 h. Control and apoptotic neurons were then subjected to depolarization-stimulated secretion. Constitutive and stimulated secretion media and cell lysates were immunoprecipitated with antibodies recognizing regions of Aβ, full-length APP, α- and β-APP secreted forms. Immunoprecipitated proteins were separated by SDS/PAGE and quantitated with a PhosphorImager densitometer. Although intracellular full-length APP was not significantly changed after apoptosis, the monomeric and oligomeric forms of 4-kDa Aβ were 3-fold higher in depolarization-stimulated secretion compared with control neurons. Such increments were paralleled by a corresponding increase of the β-APPs/α-APPs ratio in apoptotic secretion. Immunofluorescence studies performed with an antibody recognizing an epitope located in the Aβ sequence showed that the Aβ signal observed in the cytoplasm and in the Golgi apparatus of control neurons is uniformly redistributed in the condensed cytoplasm of apoptotic cells. These studies indicate that neuronal apoptosis is associated with a significant increase of metabolic products derived from β-secretase cleavage and suggest that an overproduction of Aβ may be the consequence of neuronal damage from various causes. PMID:9448317

  10. Neuroligin-2 accelerates GABAergic synapse maturation in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhanyan; Vicini, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Neuroligins (NLGs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are thought to function in synaptogenesis. To investigate the role of NLGs on synaptic transmission once the synapse is formed, we transfected neuroligin-2 (NLG-2) in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), and recorded GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptor mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). NLG-2 transfected cells had mIPSCs with faster decay than matching GFP expressing controls at young culture ages (days in vitro, DIV7-8). Down-regulation of NLG-2 by the isoform specific shRNA-NLG-2 resulted in an opposite effect. We and others have shown that the switch of alpha subunits of GABA(A)Rs from alpha2/3 to alpha1 underlies developmental speeding of the IPSC decay in various CNS regions, including the cerebellum. To assess whether the reduced decay time of mIPSCs by NLG-2 is due to the recruitment of more alpha1 containing GABA(A)Rs at the synapses, we examined the prolongation of current decay by the Zolpidem, which has been shown to preferentially enhance the activity of alpha1 subunit-containing GABA channel. The application of Zolpidem resulted in a significantly greater prolongation kinetics of synaptic currents in NLG-2 over-expressing cells than control cells, suggesting that NLG-2 over-expression accelerates synapse maturation by promoting incorporation of the alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs at postsynaptic sites in immature cells. In addition, the effect of NLG-2 on the speeding of decay time course of synaptic currents was abolished when we used CGC cultures from alpha1-/- mice. Lastly, to exclude the possibility that the fast decay of mIPSCs induced by NLG-2 could be also due to the impacts of NLG-2 on the GABA transient in synaptic cleft, we measured the sensitivity of mIPSCs to the fast-off competitive antagonists TPMPA. We found that TPMPA similarly inhibits mIPSCs in control and NLG-2 over-expressing CGCs both at young age (DIV8) and old age (DIV14) of

  11. Alcohol enhances GABAergic transmission to cerebellar granule cells via an increase in Golgi cell excitability.

    PubMed

    Carta, Mario; Mameli, Manuel; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2004-04-14

    Alcohol intoxication alters coordination and motor skills, and this is responsible for a significant number of traffic accident-related deaths around the world. Although the precise mechanism of action of ethanol (EtOH) is presently unknown, studies suggest that it acts, in part, by interfering with normal cerebellar functioning. An important component of cerebellar circuits is the granule cell. The excitability of these abundantly expressed neurons is controlled by the Golgi cell, a subtype of GABAergic interneuron. Granule cells receive GABAergic input in the form of phasic and tonic currents that are mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors, respectively. Using the acute cerebellar slice preparation and patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques, we found that ethanol induces a parallel increase in both the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs and the magnitude of the tonic current. EtOH (50 mm) did not produce this effect when spontaneous action potentials were blocked with tetrodotoxin. Recordings in the loose-patch cell-attached configuration demonstrated that ethanol increases the frequency of spontaneous action potentials in Golgi cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that ethanol enhances GABAergic inhibition of granule cells via a presynaptic mechanism that involves an increase in action potential-dependent GABA release from Golgi cells. This effect is likely to have an impact on the flow of information through the cerebellar cortex and may contribute to the mechanism by which acute ingestion of alcoholic beverages induces motor impairment. PMID:15084654

  12. LXR agonist rescued the deficit in the proliferation of the cerebellar granule cells induced by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xuting; Zhong, Hongyu; Li, Fen; Cai, Yulong; Li, Xin; Wang, Lian; Fan, Xiaotang

    2016-09-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) exposure during early postnatal life produces permanent neuromotor and intellectual deficits and stunts cerebellar growth. The liver X receptor (LXR) plays important roles in CNS development. However, the effects of LXR on the DEX-mediated impairment of cerebellar development remain undetermined. Thus, mice were pretreated with LXR agonist TO901317 (TO) and were later exposed to DEX to evaluate its protective effects on DEX-mediated deficit during cerebellar development. The results showed that an acute exposure of DEX on postnatal day 7 resulted in a significant impairment in cerebellar development and decreased the proliferation of granule neuron precursors in the external granule layer of cerebellum. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with TO. We further found that the decrease in the proliferation caused by DEX occurred via up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor and p27kip1, which could be partially prevented by LXR agonist pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that LXR agonist pretreatment could protect against DEX-induced deficits in cerebellar development in postnatal mice and may thus be perspective recruited to counteract such GC side effects. PMID:27369072

  13. Ex vivo imaging of postnatal cerebellar granule cell migration using confocal macroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  14. Evidence for evoked release of adenosine and glutamate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schousboe, A.; Frandsen, A.; Drejer, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Evoked release of ({sup 3}H)-D-aspartate which labels the neurotransmitter glutamate pool in cultured cerebellar granule cells was compared with evoked release of adenosine from similar cultures. It was found that both adenosine and (3H)-D-aspartate could be released from the neurons in a calcium dependent manner after depolarization of the cells with either 10-100 microM glutamate or 50 mM KCl. Cultures of cerebellar granule cells treated with 50 microM kainate to eliminate GABAergic neurons behaved in the same way. This together with the observation that cultured astrocytes did not exhibit a calcium dependent, potassium stimulated adenosine release strongly suggest that cerebellar granule cells release adenosine in a neurotransmitter-like fashion together with glutamate which is the classical neurotransmitter of these neurons. Studies of the metabolism of adenosine showed that in the granule cells adenosine is rapidly metabolized to ATP, ADP, and AMP, but in spite of this, adenosine was found to be released preferential to ATP.

  15. Ex Vivo Imaging of Postnatal Cerebellar Granule Cell Migration Using Confocal Macroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  16. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  17. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor deletion in cerebellar granule neuron precursors impairs neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dever, Daniel P; Adham, Zachariah O; Thompson, Bryan; Genestine, Matthieu; Cherry, Jonathan; Olschowka, John A; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel; Opanashuk, Lisa A

    2016-05-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated member of the basic-helix-loop-helix/PER-ARNT-SIM(PAS) transcription factor superfamily that also mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Increasing evidence suggests that AhR influences the development of many tissues, including the central nervous system. Our previous studies suggest that sustained AhR activation by TCDD and/or AhR deletion disrupts cerebellar granule neuron precursor (GNP) development. In the current study, to determine whether endogenous AhR controls GNP development in a cell-autonomous manner, we created a GNP-specific AhR deletion mouse, AhR(fx/fx) /Math1(CRE/+) (AhR CKO). Selective AhR deletion in GNPs produced abnormalities in proliferation and differentiation. Specifically, fewer GNPs were engaged in S-phase, as demonstrated by ∼25% reductions in thymidine (in vitro) and Bromodeoxyuridine (in vivo) incorporation. Furthermore, total granule neuron numbers in the internal granule layer at PND21 and PND60 were diminished in AhR conditional knockout (CKO) mice compared with controls. Conversely, differentiation was enhanced, including ∼40% increase in neurite outgrowth and 50% increase in GABARα6 receptor expression in deletion mutants. Our results suggest that AhR activity plays a role in regulating granule neuron number and differentiation, possibly by coordinating this GNP developmental transition. These studies provide novel insights for understanding the normal roles of AhR signaling during cerebellar granule cell neurogenesis and may have important implications for the effects of environmental factors in cerebellar dysgenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 533-550, 2016. PMID:26243376

  18. Synaptic action of ethanol on cerebellar auditory granule cells reveals acute tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Liu, G.; Huang, R.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The cerebellum is very sensitive to acute intoxication by ethanol. The authors have recorded electrophysiological responses of granule cells to auditory stimulation from the posterior cerebellar vermis of cats before and after a relatively low dose of ethanol. Auditory responses of granule cells were severely inhibited by ethanol at a transient, peak ethanol concentration of 15-18 mM in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thereafter, the clearance of ethanol from CSF followed an exponential time course, with 50% of the CSF ethanol being cleared with every passing hour. Auditory responses of granule cells returned to control levels within 60-90 minutes, despite the presence of a DSF ethanol concentration at 8-10mM, indicating acute tolerance. Moreover, a second, identical dose of ethanol, delivered two hours after the first dose produced an attenuated inhibition in the auditory response of cerebellar granule cells. The inhibition took a longer time to be evident but a shorter time to recover than that followed by the first dose of ethanol.

  19. PACT/RAX regulates the migration of cerebellar granule neurons in the developing cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yue; Meng, Ya; Ding, Hanqing; Fan, Zhiqin; Tang, Yifen; Zhou, Chenghua; Luo, Jia; Ke, Zun-Ji

    2015-01-01

    PACT and its murine ortholog RAX were originally identified as a protein activator for the dsRNA-dependent, interferon-inducible protein kinase PKR. Recent studies indicated that RAX played a role in embryogenesis and neuronal development. In this study, we investigated the expression of RAX during the postnatal development of the mouse cerebellum and its role in the migration of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). High expression of RAX was observed in the cerebellum from postnatal day (PD) 4 to PD9, a period when the CGNs migrate from the external granule layer (EGL) to the internal granule layer (IGL). The migration of the EGL progenitor cells in vivo was inhibited by RAX knockdown on PD4. This finding was confirmed by in vitro studies showing that RAX knockdown impaired the migration of CGNs in cerebellar microexplants. PACT/RAX-regulated migration required its third motif and was independent of PKR. PACT/RAX interacted with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and PACT/RAX knockdown disturbed the FAK phosphorylation in CGNs. These findings demonstrated a novel function of PACT/RAX in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25609658

  20. Rapid uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation accompanies glutamate toxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Minervini, G M; Marra, E; Passarella, S; Calissano, P

    1996-11-01

    A 100 microM glutamate pulse administered to rat cerebellar granule cells causes a very rapid and progressive decrease in both cell and mitochondrial oxygen consumption caused by glucose and succinate addition, respectively. The respiratory control ratio, which reflects the ability of mitochondria to produce ATP, is reduced by 50% within the first 30 min after glutamate addition. Subsequent to glutamate exposure, a progressive decrease of respiratory control ratio to almost 1 was found within the following 3-5 h. The addition of extra calcium had no effect per se on oxygen consumption by cell homogenate. PMID:8981415

  1. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  2. Characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Toms, N. J.; Jane, D. E.; Tse, H. W.; Roberts, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The pharmacology of excitatory amino acid (EAA)-stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis, monitored via [3H]-inositol monophosphate accumulation, was investigated in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. 2. EAA-stimulated PI hydrolysis peaked after 4-5 days in vitro and subsequently declined. 3. The agonist order of potency was found to be (EC50): L-quisqualic acid (Quis) (2 microM) >> L-glutamate (50 microM) > (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD) (102 microM). L-Glutamate (Emax = 873% of basal activity) elicited the largest stimulation of PI hydrolysis, whereas Quis (Emax = 603%) and (1S,3R)-ACPD (Emax = 306%) produced somewhat lower stimulations. 4. Several phenylglycine derivatives were found to be active in inhibiting 2 microM Quis-stimulated PI hydrolysis, in order of potency (IC50): (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (41 microM) > or = (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (51 microM) >> (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (243 microM). 5. Cultured cerebellar granule cells of the rat appear to have Group I mGluR pharmacology similar to that reported for cloned mGluR1 and provide an ideal system for investigating novel mGluR1 ligands in a native environment. PMID:8680712

  3. Procaspase-activating compound 1 induces a caspase-3-dependent cell death in cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Gulzeb; Akselsen, Oyvind W.; Hansen, Trond V.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2010-09-15

    Procaspase-activating compound 1, PAC-1, has been introduced as a direct activator of procaspase-3 and has been suggested as a therapeutic agent against cancer. Its activation of procaspase-3 is dependent on the chelation of zinc. We have tested PAC-1 and an analogue of PAC-1 as zinc chelators in vitro as well as their ability to activate caspase-3 and induce cell death in chicken cerebellar granule neuron cultures. These neurons are non-dividing, primary cells with normal caspase-3. The results reported herein show that PAC-1 chelates zinc, activates procaspase-3, and leads to caspase-3-dependent cell death in neurons, as the specific caspase-3-inhibitor Ac-DEVD-cmk inhibited both the caspase-3 activity and cell death. Thus, chicken cerebellar granule neurons is a suitable model to study mechanisms of interference with apoptosis of PAC-1 and similar compounds. Furthermore, the present study also raises concern about potential neurotoxicity of PAC-1 if used in cancer therapy.

  4. WNT3 Inhibits Cerebellar Granule Neuron Progenitor Proliferation and Medulloblastoma Formation via MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ayrault, Olivier; Kim, Jee Hae; Zhu, Xiaodong; Murphy, David A.; Van Aelst, Linda; Roussel, Martine F.; Hatten, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    During normal cerebellar development, the remarkable expansion of granule cell progenitors (GCPs) generates a population of granule neurons that outnumbers the total neuronal population of the cerebral cortex, and provides a model for identifying signaling pathways that may be defective in medulloblastoma. While many studies focus on identifying pathways that promote growth of GCPs, a critical unanswered question concerns the identification of signaling pathways that block mitogenic stimulation and induce early steps in differentiation. Here we identify WNT3 as a novel suppressor of GCP proliferation during cerebellar development and an inhibitor of medulloblastoma growth in mice. WNT3, produced in early postnatal cerebellum, inhibits GCP proliferation by down-regulating pro-proliferative target genes of the mitogen Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) and the bHLH transcription factor Atoh1. WNT3 suppresses GCP growth through a non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway, activating prototypic mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), the Ras-dependent extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and ERK5, instead of the classical β-catenin pathway. Inhibition of MAPK activity using a MAPK kinase (MEK) inhibitor reversed the inhibitory effect of WNT3 on GCP proliferation. Importantly, WNT3 inhibits proliferation of medulloblastoma tumor growth in mouse models by a similar mechanism. Thus, the present study suggests a novel role for WNT3 as a regulator of neurogenesis and repressor of neural tumors. PMID:24303070

  5. A Reinforcing Circuit Action of Extrasynaptic GABAA Receptor Modulators on Cerebellar Granule Cell Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Otis, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABARs) are the targets of a wide variety of modulatory drugs which enhance chloride flux through GABAR ion channels. Certain GABAR modulators appear to acutely enhance the function of δ subunit-containing GABAR subtypes responsible for tonic forms of inhibition. Here we identify a reinforcing circuit mechanism by which these drugs, in addition to directly enhancing GABAR function, also increase GABA release. Electrophysiological recordings in cerebellar slices from rats homozygous for the ethanol-hypersensitive (α6100Q) allele show that modulators and agonists selective for δ-containing GABARs such as THDOC, ethanol and THIP (gaboxadol) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in granule cells. Ethanol fails to augment granule cell sIPSC frequency in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating that circuit mechanisms involving granule cell output contribute to ethanol-enhancement of synaptic inhibition. Additionally, GABAR antagonists decrease ethanol-induced enhancement of Golgi cell firing. Consistent with a role for glutamatergic inputs, THIP-induced increases in Golgi cell firing are abolished by glutamate receptor antagonists. Moreover, THIP enhances the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in Golgi cells. Analyses of knockout mice indicate that δ subunit-containing GABARs are required for enhancing GABA release in the presence of ethanol and THIP. The limited expression of the GABAR δ subunit protein within the cerebellar cortex suggests that an indirect, circuit mechanism is responsible for stimulating Golgi cell GABA release by drugs selective for extrasynaptic isoforms of GABARs. Such circuit effects reinforce direct actions of these positive modulators on tonic GABAergic inhibition and are likely to contribute to the potent effect of these compounds as nervous system depressants. PMID:23977374

  6. A reinforcing circuit action of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor modulators on cerebellar granule cell inhibition.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Meera, Pratap; Karakossian, Movses H; Otis, Thomas S

    2013-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABARs) are the targets of a wide variety of modulatory drugs which enhance chloride flux through GABAR ion channels. Certain GABAR modulators appear to acutely enhance the function of δ subunit-containing GABAR subtypes responsible for tonic forms of inhibition. Here we identify a reinforcing circuit mechanism by which these drugs, in addition to directly enhancing GABAR function, also increase GABA release. Electrophysiological recordings in cerebellar slices from rats homozygous for the ethanol-hypersensitive (α6100Q) allele show that modulators and agonists selective for δ-containing GABARs such as THDOC, ethanol and THIP (gaboxadol) increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in granule cells. Ethanol fails to augment granule cell sIPSC frequency in the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating that circuit mechanisms involving granule cell output contribute to ethanol-enhancement of synaptic inhibition. Additionally, GABAR antagonists decrease ethanol-induced enhancement of Golgi cell firing. Consistent with a role for glutamatergic inputs, THIP-induced increases in Golgi cell firing are abolished by glutamate receptor antagonists. Moreover, THIP enhances the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in Golgi cells. Analyses of knockout mice indicate that δ subunit-containing GABARs are required for enhancing GABA release in the presence of ethanol and THIP. The limited expression of the GABAR δ subunit protein within the cerebellar cortex suggests that an indirect, circuit mechanism is responsible for stimulating Golgi cell GABA release by drugs selective for extrasynaptic isoforms of GABARs. Such circuit effects reinforce direct actions of these positive modulators on tonic GABAergic inhibition and are likely to contribute to the potent effect of these compounds as nervous system depressants. PMID:23977374

  7. Model cerebellar granule cells can faithfully transmit modulated firing rate signals

    PubMed Central

    Rössert, Christian; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio; Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2014-01-01

    A crucial assumption of many high-level system models of the cerebellum is that information in the granular layer is encoded in a linear manner. However, granule cells are known for their non-linear and resonant synaptic and intrinsic properties that could potentially impede linear signal transmission. In this modeling study we analyse how electrophysiological granule cell properties and spike sampling influence information coded by firing rate modulation, assuming no signal-related, i.e., uncorrelated inhibitory feedback (open-loop mode). A detailed one-compartment granule cell model was excited in simulation by either direct current or mossy-fiber synaptic inputs. Vestibular signals were represented as tonic inputs to the flocculus modulated at frequencies up to 20 Hz (approximate upper frequency limit of vestibular-ocular reflex, VOR). Model outputs were assessed using estimates of both the transfer function, and the fidelity of input-signal reconstruction measured as variance-accounted-for. The detailed granule cell model with realistic mossy-fiber synaptic inputs could transmit information faithfully and linearly in the frequency range of the vestibular-ocular reflex. This was achieved most simply if the model neurons had a firing rate at least twice the highest required frequency of modulation, but lower rates were also adequate provided a population of neurons was utilized, especially in combination with push-pull coding. The exact number of neurons required for faithful transmission depended on the precise values of firing rate and noise. The model neurons were also able to combine excitatory and inhibitory signals linearly, and could be replaced by a simpler (modified) integrate-and-fire neuron in the case of high tonic firing rates. These findings suggest that granule cells can in principle code modulated firing-rate inputs in a linear manner, and are thus consistent with the high-level adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit. PMID:25352777

  8. Antiphospholipid antibodies bind to rat cerebellar granule cells: the role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Riccio, A; Andreassi, C; Eboli, M L

    1998-11-27

    IgGs from sera containing antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), detected as antibodies to cardiolipin, or control sera were incubated with rat cerebellar granule cells in primary culture. Using a mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity assay (MTT test), aPL IgGs were shown to decrease MTT metabolism after 24 h incubation with the cells, and to cause non-toxic amounts of glutamate to become neurotoxic when added to the cells for 45 min. Acute and chronic aPL toxicity were prevented by MK-801. Sera containing aPL bound to intact cerebellar neurons, as revealed by an immunofluorescent technique. These results suggest that antiphospholipid antibodies interfere with excitatory pathways in glutamatergic cerebellar granule cells by a mechanism involving overactivation of the NMDA glutamate receptor. PMID:9865941

  9. Protective Effect of Edaravone in Primary Cerebellar Granule Neurons against Iodoacetic Acid-Induced Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinhua; Zhu, Longjun; Wang, Liang; Guo, Baojian; Zhang, Gaoxiao; Sun, Yewei; Zhang, Zaijun; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Yu, Pei; Wang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Edaravone (EDA) is clinically used for treatment of acute ischemic stroke in Japan and China due to its potent free radical-scavenging effect. However, it has yet to be determined whether EDA can attenuate iodoacetic acid- (IAA-) induced neuronal death in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the effect of EDA on damage of IAA-induced primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) and its possible underlying mechanisms. We found that EDA attenuated IAA-induced cell injury in CGNs. Moreover, EDA significantly reduced intracellular reactive oxidative stress production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and caspase 3 activity induced by IAA. Taken together, EDA protected CGNs against IAA-induced neuronal damage, which may be attributed to its antiapoptotic and antioxidative activities. PMID:26557222

  10. Igf1 and Pacap rescue cerebellar granule neurons from apoptosis via a common transcriptional program

    PubMed Central

    Maino, Barbara; D'Agata, Velia; Severini, Cinzia; Ciotti, Maria T.; Calissano, Pietro; Copani, Agata; Chang, Yi-Chien; DeLisi, Charles; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    A shift of the delicate balance between apoptosis and survival-inducing signals determines the fate of neurons during the development of the central nervous system and its homeostasis throughout adulthood. Both pathways, promoting or protecting from apoptosis, trigger a transcriptional program. We conducted whole-genome expression profiling to decipher the transcriptional regulatory elements controlling the apoptotic/survival switch in cerebellar granule neurons following the induction of apoptosis by serum and potassium deprivation or their rescue by either insulin-like growth factor-1 (Igf1) or pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (Pacap). Although depending on different upstream signaling pathways, the survival effects of Igf1 and Pacap converged into common transcriptional cascades, thus suggesting the existence of a general transcriptional program underlying neuronal survival. PMID:26941962

  11. Early release and subsequent caspase-mediated degradation of cytochrome c in apoptotic cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Atlante, A; Giannattasio, S; Sgaramella, G; Calissano, P; Marra, E

    1999-08-20

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) release was investigated in cerebellar granule cells used as an in vitro neuronal model of apoptosis. We have found that cyt c is released into the cytoplasm as an intact, functionally active protein, that this event occurs early, in the commitment phase of the apoptotic process, and that after accumulation, this protein is progressively degraded. Degradation, but not release, is fully blocked by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylchetone (z-VAD-fmk). On the basis of previous findings obtained in the same neuronal population undergoing excitotoxic death, it is hypothesized that release of cyt c may be part of a cellular attempt to maintain production of ATP via cytochrome oxidase, which is reduced by cytosolic NADH in a cytochrome b5-soluble cyt c-mediated fashion. PMID:10486578

  12. GABA induces functionally active low-affinity GABA receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meier, E; Drejer, J; Schousboe, A

    1984-12-01

    The effect of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and its agonists muscimol and 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5-4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the development of GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was studied by cultivation of the cells in media containing these substances. It was found that the presence of 50 microM GABA in the culture media led to the induction of low-affinity GABA receptors (KD 546 +/- 117 nM) in addition to the high-affinity receptors (KD 7 +/- 0.5 nM) which were present regardless of the presence of GABA in the culture media. The functional activity of the GABA receptors was tested by investigating the ability of GABA to modulate evoked glutamate release from the cells. It was found that GABA could inhibit evoked glutamate release (ED50 10 +/- 3 microM) only when the cells had been cultured in the presence of 50 microM GABA, 50 microM muscimol, or 150 microM THIP, i.e., under conditions where low-affinity GABA receptors were present on the cells. This inhibitory effect of GABA could be blocked by 120 microM bicuculline and mimicked by 50 microM muscimol or 150 microM THIP whereas 150 microM (-)-baclofen had no effect. It is concluded that GABA acting extracellularly induces formation of low-affinity receptors on cerebellar granule cells and that these receptors are necessary for mediating an inhibitory effect of GABA on evoked glutamate release. The pharmacological properties of these GABA receptors indicate that they belong to the so-called GABAA receptors. PMID:6149269

  13. Profilin1 activity in cerebellar granule neurons is required for radial migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kullmann, Jan A; Wickertsheim, Ines; Minnerup, Lara; Costell, Mercedes; Friauf, Eckhard; Rust, Marco B

    2015-01-01

    Neuron migration defects are an important aspect of human neuropathies. The underlying molecular mechanisms of such migration defects are largely unknown. Actin dynamics has been recognized as an important determinant of neuronal migration, and we recently found that the actin-binding protein profilin1 is relevant for radial migration of cerebellar granule neurons (CGN). As the exploited brain-specific mutants lacked profilin1 in both neurons and glial cells, it remained unknown whether profilin1 activity in CGN is relevant for CGN migration in vivo. To test this, we capitalized on a transgenic mouse line that expresses a tamoxifen-inducible Cre variant in CGN, but no other cerebellar cell type. In these profilin1 mutants, the cell density was elevated in the molecular layer, and ectopic CGN occurred. Moreover, 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine tracing experiments revealed impaired CGN radial migration. Hence, our data demonstrate the cell autonomous role of profilin1 activity in CGN for radial migration. PMID:25495756

  14. Dendritic patch-clamp recordings from cerebellar granule cells demonstrate electrotonic compactness

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Straub, Isabelle; Hallermann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells (GCs), the smallest neurons in the brain, have on average four short dendrites that receive high-frequency mossy fiber inputs conveying sensory information. The short length of the dendrites suggests that GCs are electrotonically compact allowing unfiltered integration of dendritic inputs. The small average diameter of the dendrites (~0.7 µm), however, argues for dendritic filtering. Previous studies based on somatic recordings and modeling indicated that GCs are electrotonically extremely compact. Here, we performed patch-clamp recordings from GC dendrites in acute brain slices of mice to directly analyze the electrotonic properties of GCs. Strikingly, the input resistance did not differ significantly between dendrites and somata of GCs. Furthermore, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP) were similar in amplitude at dendritic and somatic recording sites. From the dendritic and somatic input resistances we determined parameters characterizing the electrotonic compactness of GCs. These data directly demonstrate that cerebellar GCs are electrotonically compact and thus ideally suited for efficient high-frequency information transfer. PMID:25852483

  15. Generation and Characterization of an Nse-CreERT2 Transgenic Line Suitable for Inducible Gene Manipulation in Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Steller, Laura; May, Petra; Günther, Thomas; Schüle, Roland; Frotscher, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We created an Nse-CreERT2 mouse line expressing the tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of the neuron-specific enolase (Nse) promoter. By using Cre reporter lines we could show that this Nse-CreERT2 line has recombination activity in the granule cells of all cerebellar lobules as well as in postmitotic granule cell precursors in the external granular layer of the developing cerebellum. A few hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells showed Cre-mediated recombination as well. Cre activity could be induced in both the developing and adult mouse brain. The established mouse line constitutes a valuable tool to study the function of genes expressed by cerebellar granule cells in the developing and adult brain. In combination with reporter lines it is a useful model to analyze the development and maintenance of the cerebellar architecture including granule cell distribution, migration, and the extension of granule cell fibers in vivo. PMID:24950299

  16. Multiple extra-synaptic spillover mechanisms regulate prolonged activity in cerebellar Golgi cell–granule cell loops

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Tahl; Sivam, Vanessa; Zhao, Tian; Frey, Oivier; van der Wal, Peter Dow; de Rooij, Nico F; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Edgley, Steve A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Despite a wealth of in vitro and modelling studies it remains unclear how neuronal populations in the cerebellum interact in vivo. We address the issue of how the cerebellar input layer processes sensory information, with particular focus on the granule cells (input relays) and their counterpart inhibitory interneurones, Golgi cells. Based on the textbook view, granule cells excite Golgi cells via glutamate forming a negative feedback loop. However, Golgi cells express inhibitory mGluR2 receptors suggesting an inhibitory role for glutamate. We set out to test this glutamatergic paradox in Golgi cells. Here we show that granule cells and Golgi cells interact through extra-synaptic signalling mechanisms during sensory information processing, as well as synaptic mechanisms. We demonstrate that such interactions depend on granule cell-derived glutamate acting via inhibitory mGluR2 receptors leading causally to the suppression of Golgi cell activity for several hundreds of milliseconds. We further show that granule cell-derived inhibition of Golgi cell activity is regulated by GABA-dependent extra-synaptic Golgi cell inhibition of granule cells, identifying a regulatory loop in which glutamate and GABA may be critical regulators of Golgi cell–granule cell functional activity. Thus, granule cells may promote their own prolonged activity via paradoxical feed-forward inhibition of Golgi cells, thereby enabling information processing over long timescales. PMID:21669981

  17. The survival of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells is not dependent on elevated potassium-ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, H S; Hack, N; Balázs, R; Jørgensen, O S

    1994-08-01

    The effects of K(+)-induced membrane depolarization were studied on the survival and biochemical parameters in mouse and rat cerebellar granule cells grown in micro-well cultures. Cell numbers were determined by estimating DNA content using the Hoechst 33258 fluorochrome binding assay. DNA from degenerated cells was removed by prior DNAase treatment. These DNA estimates of cell numbers were comparable with values obtained by direct counting of fluorescein diacetate-stained viable cells. In agreement with previous studies, the survival of rat granule cells was promoted by increasing the concentration of K+ in the medium from 5 to 25 mM throughout a 7-day culture period. In contrast, mouse granule cells survived in culture containing 'low' K+ (5 or 10 mM), as well as in the presence of 'high' K+ (25 mM). On the other hand, several biochemical parameters in mouse granule cells were markedly increased by cultivation in 'high' as compared with 'low' K(+)-containing media, demonstrated by increased fluorescein diacetate esterase activity, enhanced rate of NADPH-dependent tetrazolium reduction, augmented 2-deoxy-D-glucose accumulation and increased N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked 45Ca2+ influx. It was concluded that although cultivation in 'high' K+ promotes biochemical differentiation in mouse cerebellar granule cells, these cells differ from their rat counterparts in that they do not develop a survival requirement for K(+)-induced membrane depolarization. PMID:7529458

  18. Proteasome inhibitors prevent cytochrome c release during apoptosis but not in excitotoxic death of cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Bobba, Antonella; Canu, Nadia; Atlante, Anna; Petragallo, Vito; Calissano, Pietro; Marra, Ersilia

    2002-03-27

    In order to find out whether and how proteasomes participate in the processes leading cerebellar granule cells to death either in necrosis, due to glutamate neurotoxicity, or in apoptosis, due to K(+) shift, we measured the three proteasome activities by using specific fluorescent probes and investigated the effect of several proteasome inhibitors, including MG132, on the cytochrome c release taking place in the early phase of both apoptosis and necrosis. We show that differently from apoptosis, the early phase of necrosis does not require proteasome activation. Inhibition of proteasome activity can prevent cytochrome c release in cerebellar granule cells undergoing apoptosis, thus improving cell survival, but not necrosis. These findings show that proteasomes play an important role in the early phase of apoptosis but not that of necrosis, and that these two types of cell death differ from each other in their mechanism of cytochrome c release. PMID:11943185

  19. Genetic Manipulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurons In Vitro and In Vivo to Study Neuronal Morphology and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Holubowska, Anna; Mukherjee, Chaitali; Vadhvani, Mayur; Stegmüller, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Developmental events in the brain including neuronal morphogenesis and migration are highly orchestrated processes. In vitro and in vivo analyses allow for an in-depth characterization to identify pathways involved in these events. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) that are derived from the developing cerebellum are an ideal model system that allows for morphological analyses. Here, we describe a method of how to genetically manipulate CGNs and how to study axono- and dendritogenesis of individual neurons. With this method the effects of RNA interference, overexpression or small molecules can be compared to control neurons. In addition, the rodent cerebellar cortex is an easily accessible in vivo system owing to its predominant postnatal development. We also present an in vivo electroporation technique to genetically manipulate the developing cerebella and describe subsequent cerebellar analyses to assess neuronal morphology and migration. PMID:24686379

  20. The Immp2l mutation causes age-dependent degeneration of cerebellar granule neurons prevented by antioxidant treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlian; Li, Xue; Lu, Baisong

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species are implicated in age-associated neurodegeneration, although direct in vivo evidence is lacking. We recently showed that mice with a mutation in the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Peptidase 2-like (Immp2l) gene had elevated levels of mitochondrial superoxide, impaired fertility and age-associated phenotypes, including kyphosis and ataxia. Here we show that ataxia and cerebellar hypoplasia occur in old mutant mice (> 16 months). Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are significantly underrepresented; Purkinje cells and cells in the molecular layer are not affected. Treating mutant mice with the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1 from 6 weeks to 21 months protected cerebellar granule neurons. Apoptotic granule neurons were observed in mutant mice but not in age-matched normal control mice or SkQ1-treated mice. Old mutant mice showed increased serum protein carbonyl content, cerebellar 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), and nitrotyrosine modification compared to old normal control mice. SOD2 expression was increased in Purkinje cells but decreased in granule neurons of old mutant mice. Mitochondrial marker protein VDAC1 also was decreased in CGNs of old mutant mice, suggesting decreased mitochondrial number. SkQ1 treatment decreased HNE and nitrotyrosine modification, and restored SOD2 and VDAC1 expression in CGNs of old mutant mice. Neuronal expression of nitric oxide synthase was increased in cerebella of young mutant mice but decreased in old mutant mice. Our work provides evidence for a causal role of oxidative stress in neurodegeneration of Immp2l mutant mice. The Immp2l mutant mouse model could be valuable in elucidating the role of oxidative stress in age-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:26616244

  1. Simulating Spinal Border Cells and Cerebellar Granule Cells under Locomotion – A Case Study of Spinocerebellar Information Processing

    PubMed Central

    Spanne, Anton; Geborek, Pontus; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Jörntell, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The spinocerebellar systems are essential for the brain in the performance of coordinated movements, but our knowledge about the spinocerebellar interactions is very limited. Recently, several crucial pieces of information have been acquired for the spinal border cell (SBC) component of the ventral spinocerebellar tract (VSCT), as well as the effects of SBC mossy fiber activation in granule cells of the cerebellar cortex. SBCs receive monosynaptic input from the reticulospinal tract (RST), which is an important driving system under locomotion, and disynaptic inhibition from Ib muscle afferents. The patterns of activity of RST neurons and Ib afferents under locomotion are known. The activity of VSCT neurons under fictive locomotion, i.e. without sensory feedback, is also known, but there is little information on how these neurons behave under actual locomotion and for cerebellar granule cells receiving SBC input this is completely unknown. But the available information makes it possible to simulate the interactions between the spinal and cerebellar neuronal circuitries with a relatively large set of biological constraints. Using a model of the various neuronal elements and the network they compose, we simulated the modulation of the SBCs and their target granule cells under locomotion and hence generated testable predictions of their general pattern of modulation under this condition. This particular system offers a unique opportunity to simulate these interactions with a limited number of assumptions, which helps making the model biologically plausible. Similar principles of information processing may be expected to apply to all spinocerebellar systems. PMID:25226298

  2. Thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system involvement in cerebellar granule cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Casalino, E; Petragallo, V A; Atlante, A

    2014-10-01

    The involvement of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), a cellular system in which neurons are induced in apoptosis by the physiological stimulus of lowering extracellular potassium. Clarifying the sequence of events that occur during apoptosis is a critical issue as it can lead to the identification of those key events that, if blocked, can slow down or reverse the death process. The results reported in this work show that TrxR is involved in the early phase of CGC apoptosis with an increase in activity that coincides with the increased expression of the TrxR1 isoform and guarantees the maintenance of adequate level of Trx in its reduced, active form. However, in late apoptosis, when about 50 % of cells are dead, partial proteolysis of TrxR1 by calpain occurs and the reduction of TrxR1 mRNA, together with the overall decrease in TrxR activity, contribute to increase the levels of the oxidized form of Trx. When the reduced form of Trx is externally added to apoptotic cultures, a significant reduction in cell death is achieved confirming that a well-functioning thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system is required for survival of CGCs. PMID:25055978

  3. Tactile responses in the granule cell layer of cerebellar folium crus IIa of freely behaving rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.; Bower, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We recorded activity from the granule cell layer (GCL) of cerebellar folium Crus IIa as freely moving rats engaged in a variety of natural behaviors, including grooming, eating, and free tactile exploration. Multiunit responses in the 1000-4500 Hz range were found to be strongly correlated with tactile stimulation of lip and whisker (perioral) regions. These responses occurred regardless of whether the stimulus was externally or self-generated and during both active and passive touch. In contrast, perioral movements that did not tactually stimulate this region of the face (e.g., chewing) produced no detectable increases in GCL activity. In addition, GCL responses were not correlated with movement extremes. When rats used their lips actively for palpation and exploration, the tactile responses in the GCL were not detectably modulated by ongoing jaw movements. However, active palpation and exploratory behaviors did result in the largest and most continuous bursts of GCL activity: responses were on average 10% larger and 50% longer during palpation and exploration than during grooming or passive stimulation. Although activity levels differed between behaviors, the position and spatial extent of the peripheral receptive field was similar over all behaviors that resulted in tactile input. Overall, our data suggest that the 1000-4500 Hz multiunit responses in the Crus IIa GCL of awake rats are correlated with tactile input rather than with movement or any movement parameter and that these responses are likely to be of particular importance during the acquisition of sensory information by perioral structures.

  4. Raising cytosolic Cl− in cerebellar granule cells affects their excitability and vestibulo-ocular learning

    PubMed Central

    Seja, Patricia; Schonewille, Martijn; Spitzmaul, Guillermo; Badura, Aleksandra; Klein, Ilse; Rudhard, York; Wisden, William; Hübner, Christian A; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical throughput involved in motor control comprises granule cells (GCs) and Purkinje cells (PCs), both of which receive inhibitory GABAergic input from interneurons. The GABAergic input to PCs is essential for learning and consolidation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, but the role of GC excitability remains unclear. We now disrupted the Kcc2 K-Cl cotransporter specifically in either cell type to manipulate their excitability and inhibition by GABAA-receptor Cl− channels. Although Kcc2 may have a morphogenic role in synapse development, Kcc2 disruption neither changed synapse density nor spine morphology. In both GCs and PCs, disruption of Kcc2, but not Kcc3, increased [Cl−]i roughly two-fold. The reduced Cl− gradient nearly abolished GABA-induced hyperpolarization in PCs, but in GCs it merely affected excitability by membrane depolarization. Ablation of Kcc2 from GCs impaired consolidation of long-term phase learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, whereas baseline performance, short-term gain-decrease learning and gain consolidation remained intact. These functions, however, were affected by disruption of Kcc2 in PCs. GC excitability plays a previously unknown, but specific role in consolidation of phase learning. PMID:22252133

  5. Detection of reactive oxygen species in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Passarella, S

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a novel procedure useful to detect the formation of two reactive oxygen species, i.e. superoxide and singlet oxygen, in neuron monolayer primary cultures, thus, making possible the investigation of the effect of certain compounds on reactive oxygen species formation. Thus, use was made of two reactive oxygen species detecting systems consisting of ferricytochrome c (Fe-cyt c) and imidazole-RNO (N, N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline) which allow for the photometric detection of superoxide anion and singlet oxygen, respectively. Both of them were used to assess the formation of reactive oxygen species in cerebellar granule cells exposed to glutamate: both superoxide anion and singlet oxygen proved to be generated in glutamate neurotoxicity in a way sensitive to glutamate NMDA-receptor inhibitor, MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a, d)cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate), to Ca(2+) complexing agent, EGTA, and to certain antioxidants. In principle, the reported protocol can be applied to any cell type in culture. PMID:10592334

  6. A sensitive method to assay the xanthine oxidase activity in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Valenti, D; Gagliardi, S; Passarella, S

    2000-11-01

    Since xanthine oxidase (XO, Xanthine:oxidoreductase, E.C.1.2.3.22) is a key enzyme in reactive oxygen specie formation which plays a major role in cell oxidative stress, the availability of a sensitive and simple assay useful to detect its activity in monolayer cell cultures is worthwhile. In order to achieve this, we developed a method in which the conversion of pterine into isoxanthopterin is monitored fluorimetrically. Temperature assay was 50 degrees C. The activity of XO was detected in cerebellar granule cells exposed to glutamate. Since XO is formed from protease-dependent xanthine dehydrogenase processing, its activity appearance was found to be prevented by the protease inhibitor, leupeptin, as well as the glutamate NMDA-receptor inhibitor, MK-801, and the Ca(++) complexing agent, EGTA. The reported novel protocol, at variance with a conventional method, is shown to be a simple, fast, sensitive and relatively cheap method to assay XO activity. In addition, the reported assay can be applied to any cell type in culture. PMID:11086257

  7. Transcriptional Analysis of Apoptotic Cerebellar Granule Neurons Following Rescue by Gastric Inhibitory Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Maino, Barbara; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Calissano, Pietro; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis triggered by exogenous or endogenous stimuli is a crucial phenomenon to determine the fate of neurons, both in physiological and in pathological conditions. Our previous study established that gastric inhibitory polypeptide (Gip) is a neurotrophic factor capable of preventing apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), during its pre-commitment phase. In the present study, we conducted whole-genome expression profiling to obtain a comprehensive view of the transcriptional program underlying the rescue effect of Gip in CGNs. By using DNA microarray technology, we identified 65 genes, we named survival related genes, whose expression is significantly de-regulated following Gip treatment. The expression levels of six transcripts were confirmed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The proteins encoded by the survival related genes are functionally grouped in the following categories: signal transduction, transcription, cell cycle, chromatin remodeling, cell death, antioxidant activity, ubiquitination, metabolism and cytoskeletal organization. Our data outline that Gip supports CGNs rescue via a molecular framework, orchestrated by a wide spectrum of gene actors, which propagate survival signals and support neuronal viability. PMID:24694544

  8. Assessment of GaN chips for culturing cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Young, Tai-Horng; Chen, Chi-Ruei

    2006-06-01

    In this work, the behaviors of cerebellar granule neurons prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rats on gallium nitride (GaN) were investigated. We believe that this is the first time that the GaN has been used as a substrate for neuron cultures to examine its effect on cell response in vitro. The GaN surface structure and its relationship with cells were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), metallography microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and Western blot analysis. GaN is a so-called III-V compound semiconductor material with a wide bandgap and a relatively high bandgap voltage. Compared with silicon used for most neural chips, neurons seeded on GaN were able to form an extensive neuritic network and expressed very high levels of GAP-43 coincident with the neurite outgrowth. Therefore, the GaN structure may spatially mediate cellular response that can promote neuronal cell attachment, differentiation and neuritic growth. The favorable biocompatibility characteristics of GaN can be used to measure electric signals from networks of neuronal cells in culture to make it a possible candidate for use in a microelectrode array. PMID:16516287

  9. Sigma-1 Receptor Enhances Neurite Elongation of Cerebellar Granule Neurons via TrkB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuriko; Fujita, Yuki; Shibata, Kumi; Mori, Megumi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2013-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an integral membrane protein predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Sig-1R demonstrates a high affinity to various synthetic compounds including well-known psychotherapeutic drugs in the central nervous system (CNS). For that, it is considered as an alternative target for psychotherapeutic drugs. On the cellular level, when Sig-1R is activated, it is known to play a role in neuroprotection and neurite elongation. These effects are suggested to be mediated by its ligand-operated molecular chaperone activity, and/or upregulation of various Ca2+ signaling. In addition, recent studies show that Sig-1R activation induces neurite outgrowth via neurotrophin signaling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite elongation through activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk), a family of neurotrophin receptors. We found that 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate (PRE-084), a selective Sig-1R agonist, significantly promoted neurite outgrowth, and K252a, a Trk inhibitor, attenuated Sig-1R-mediated neurite elongation in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Moreover, we revealed that Sig-1R interacts with TrkB, and PRE-084 treatment enhances phosphorylation of Y515, but not Y706. Thus, our results indicate that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite outgrowth in CGNs through Y515 phosphorylation of TrkB. PMID:24116072

  10. Protective effect of fangchinoline on cyanide-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soon Ok; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2002-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effect of fangchinoline, a bis- benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which exhibits the characteristics of a Ca2+ channel blocker, on cyanide-induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. NaCN produced a concentration-dependent reduction of cell viability, which was blocked by MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, verapamil, L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Pretreatment with fangchinoline over a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 microM significantly decreased the NaCN-induced neuronal cell death, glutamate release into medium, and elevation of [Ca2+]i and oxidants generation. These results suggest that fangchinoline may mitigate the harmful effects of cyanide-induced neuronal cell death by interfering with [Ca2+]i influx, due to its function as a Ca2+ channel blocker, and then by inhibiting glutamate release and oxidants generation. PMID:12135109

  11. Forward transport of proteins in the plasma membrane of migrating cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; She, Liang; Sui, Ya-nan; Yuan, Xiao-bing; Wen, Yunqing; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-12-18

    Directional flow of membrane components has been detected at the leading front of fibroblasts and the growth cone of neuronal processes, but whether there exists global directional flow of plasma membrane components over the entire migrating neuron remains largely unknown. By analyzing the trajectories of antibody-coated single quantum dots (QDs) bound to two membrane proteins, overexpressed myc-tagged synaptic vesicle-associated membrane protein VAMP2 and endogenous neurotrophin receptor TrkB, we found that these two proteins exhibited net forward transport, which is superimposed upon Brownian motion, in both leading and trailing processes of migrating cerebellar granule cells in culture. Furthermore, no net directional transport of membrane proteins was observed in nonmigrating cells with either growing or stalling leading processes. Analysis of the correlation of motion direction between two QDs on the same process in migrating neurons also showed a higher frequency of correlated forward than rearward movements. Such correlated QD movements were markedly reduced in the presence of myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin,suggesting the involvement of myosin II-dependent active transport processes. Thus, a net forward transport of plasma membrane proteins exists in the leading and trailing processes of migrating neurons, in line with the translocation of the soma. PMID:23213239

  12. Reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission of cerebellar granule cells in vivo by genetically manipulated expression of tetanus neurotoxin light chain.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Mutsuya; Wada, Norio; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Watanabe, Dai; Anzai, Masayuki; Yokoyama, Minesuke; Teranishi, Yutaka; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2003-07-30

    We developed a novel technique that allowed reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the cerebellar network. We generated two lines of transgenic mice termed Tet and TeNT mice and crossed the two transgenic lines to produce the Tet/TeNT double transgenic mice. In the Tet mice, the tetracycline-controlled reverse activator (rtTA) was expressed selectively in cerebellar granule cells by the promoter function of the GABA(A) receptor alpha6 subunit gene. In the TeNT mice, the fusion gene of tetanus neurotoxin light chain (TeNT) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was designed to be induced by the interaction of doxycycline (DOX)-activated rtTA with the tetracycline-responsive promoter. The Tet/TeNT mice grew normally even after DOX treatment and exhibited a restricted DOX-dependent expression of TeNT in cerebellar granule cells. Along with this expression, TeNT proteolytically cleaved the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP2 (also termed synaptobrevin2) and reduced glutamate release from granule cells. Both cleavage of VAMP2/synaptobrevin2 and reduction of glutamate release were reversed by removal of DOX. Among the four genotypes generated by heterozygous crossing of Tet and TeNT mice, only Tet/TeNT mice showed DOX-dependent reversible motor impairments as analyzed with fixed bar and rota-rod tests. Reversible suppression of glutamatergic neurotransmission thus can be manipulated with spatiotemporal accuracy by DOX treatment and removal. These transgenic mice will serve as an animal model to study the cerebellar function in motor coordination and learning. PMID:12890769

  13. PSD-95 regulates NMDA receptors in developing cerebellar granule neurons of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Losi, Gabriele; Prybylowski, Kate; Fu, Zhanyan; Luo, Jianhong; Wenthold, Robert J; Vicini, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    We transfected a green fluorescent protein-tagged PSD-95 (PSD-95gfp) into cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) to investigate the role of PSD-95 in excitatory synapse maturation. Cells were grown in low potassium to favour functional synapse formation in vitro. Transfected cells displayed clear clusters of PSD-95gfp, often at the extremities of the short dendritic trees. We recorded NMDA and AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (NMDA- and AMPA-mESPCs) in the presence of TTX and bicuculline. At days in vitro (DIV) 7–8 PSD-95gfp-transfected cells had NMDA-mEPSCs with faster decay and smaller amplitudes than matching controls. In contrast, AMPA-mEPSC frequencies and amplitudes were increased. Whole-cell current density and ifenprodil sensitivity were reduced in PSD-95gfp cells, indicating a reduction of NR2B subunits containing NMDA receptors. No changes were observed compared to control when cells were transfected with cDNA for PSD-95gfp with palmitoylation site mutations that prevent targeting to the synapse. Overexpression of the NMDA receptor NR2A subunit, but not the NR2B subunit, prevented NMDA-mEPSC amplitude reduction when cotransfected with PSD-95gfp. PSD-95gfp overexpression produced faster NMDA-mEPSC decay when transfected alone or with either NR2 subunit. Surface staining of the epitope-tagged NR2 subunits revealed that colocalization with PSD-95gfp was higher for flag-tagged NR2A subunit clusters than for flag-tagged NR2B subunit clusters. These data suggest that PSD-95 overexpression in CGCs favours synaptic maturation by allowing synaptic insertion of NR2A and depressing expression of NR2B subunits. PMID:12576494

  14. Pharmacological characterization of mGlu1 receptors in cerebellar granule cells reveals biased agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Hannah A.; Pshenichkin, Sergey; Grajkowska, Ewa; Gelb, Tara; Emery, Andrew C.; Wolfe, Barry B.; Wroblewski, Jarda T.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of existing research on the function of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor 1 focuses on G protein-mediated outcomes. However, similar to other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), it is becoming apparent that mGlu1 receptor signaling is multi-dimensional and does not always involve G protein activation. Previously, in transfected CHO cells, we showed that mGlu1 receptors activate a G protein-independent, β-arrestin-dependent signal transduction mechanism and that some mGlu1 receptor ligands were incapable of stimulating this response. Here we set out to investigate the physiological relevance of these findings in a native system using primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells. We tested the ability of a panel of compounds to stimulate two mGlu1 receptor-mediated outcomes: (1) protection from decreased cell viability after withdrawal of trophic support and (2) G protein-mediated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis. We report that the commonly used mGlu1 receptor ligands quisqualate, DHPG, and ACPD are completely biased towards PI hydrolysis and do not induce mGlu1 receptor-stimulated neuroprotection. On the other hand, endogenous compounds including glutamate, aspartate, cysteic acid, cysteine sulfinic acid, and homocysteic acid stimulate both responses. These results show that some commonly used mGlu1 receptor ligands are biased agonists, stimulating only a fraction of mGlu1 receptor-mediated responses in neurons. This emphasizes the importance of utilizing multiple agonists and assays when studying GPCR function. PMID:25700650

  15. NAAG fails to antagonize synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Losi, G; Vicini, S; Neale, J

    2004-03-01

    The peptide transmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) selectively activates the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors. Several reports also suggest that this peptide acts as a partial agonist at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors but its putative antagonist effects have not been directly tested. To do this, we used whole cell recordings from cerebellar granule cells (CGC) in culture that allow the highest possible resolution of NMDA channel activation. When CGC were activated with equimolar concentrations of NMDA and NAAG, the peptide failed to alter the peak current elicited by NMDA. Very high concentrations of NAAG (100-200 microM) did not significantly reduce the current elicited by 10 microM NMDA or 0.1 microM glutamate, while 400 microM NAAG produced only a very small (less than 15%) reduction in these whole cell currents. Similarly, NAAG (400 microM) failed to significantly alter the average decay time constant or the peak amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs). We conclude that high concentrations of the peptide do not exert physiologically relevant antagonist actions on synaptic NMDA receptor activation following vesicular release of glutamate. As an agonist, purified NAAG was found to be at least 10,000-fold less potent than glutamate in increasing "background" current via NMDA receptors on CGC. Inasmuch as it is difficult to confirm that NAAG preparations are completely free from contamination with glutamate at the 0.01% level, the peptide itself appears unlikely to have a direct agonist activity at the NMDA receptor subtypes found in CGC. Recent reports indicate that enhancing the activity of endogenous NAAG may be an important therapeutic approach to excitotoxicity and chronic pain perception. These effects are likely mediated by group II mGluRs, not NMDA receptors. PMID:14975672

  16. Interleukin-6 protects cerebellar granule neurons from NMDA-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Chun; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2007-04-25

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important cytokine that participates in inflammation reaction and cell growth and differentiation in the immune and nervous systems. However, the neuroprotection of IL-6 against N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced neurotoxicity and the related underlying mechanisms are still not identified. In the present study, the cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) from postnatal (8-day) infant rats were chronically exposed to IL-6 for 8 d, and then NMDA (100 micromol/L) was applied to the cultured CGNs for 30 min. Methyl-thiazole-tetrazolium (MTT) assay, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method and confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) were used to detect neuronal vitality, apoptosis and dynamic changes of intracellular Ca(2+) levels in the neurons, respectively. Anti-gp130 monoclonal antibody (75 ng/mL) was employed to the cultured CGNs with IL-6 to inhibit IL-6 activity so as to evaluate the role of gp130 (a 130 kDa glucoprotein transducing IL-6 signal) in mediating IL-6 neuroprotection. Western blot was used to measure the expressions of phospho-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phospho-extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) in the cultured CGNs. The NMDA stimulation of the cultured CGNs without IL-6 pretreatment resulted in a significant reduction of the neuronal vitality, notable enhancement of the neuronal apoptosis and intracellular Ca(2+) overload in the neurons. The NMDA stimulation of the CGNs chronically pretreated with IL-6 caused a remarkable increase in the neuronal vitality, marked suppression of neuronal apoptosis and intracellular Ca(2+) overload in the neurons, compared with that in the control neurons without IL-6 pretreatment. Furthermore, anti-gp130 antibody blocked the inhibitory effect of IL-6 on NMDA-induced intracellular Ca(2+) overload in the neurons. The levels of phospho-STAT3 and phospho-ERK1/2 were significantly higher in IL-6

  17. Cytochrome c release precedes mitochondrial membrane potential loss in cerebellar granule neuron apoptosis: lack of mitochondrial swelling.

    PubMed

    Wigdal, Susan S; Kirkland, Rebecca A; Franklin, James L; Haak-Frendscho, Mary

    2002-09-01

    It has been suggested that release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) from mitochondria during apoptotic death is through opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore followed by swelling-induced rupture of the mitochondrial outer membrane. However, this remains controversial and may vary with cell type and model system. We determined that in mouse cerebellar granule neurons, Cyt c redistribution preceded the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential during the apoptotic process, suggesting that the pore did not open prior to release. Furthermore, when mitochondria were morphologically assessed by electron microscopy, they were not obviously swollen during the period of Cyt c release. This indicates that the pore mechanism of action, if any, is not through mitochondrial outer membrane rupture. While bongkrekic acid, an inhibitor of pore opening, modestly delayed apoptotic death, it also caused a significant (p < 0.05) suppression of protein synthesis. An equivalent suppression of protein synthesis by cycloheximide had a similar delaying effect, suggesting that bongkrekic acid was acting non-specifically. These findings suggest that mitochondrial permeability transition pore is not involved in Cyt c release from mitochondria during the apoptotic death of cerebellar granule neurons. PMID:12358750

  18. Cell Division Mode Change Mediates the Regulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurogenesis Controlled by the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong; Wang, Minglei; Wang, Jia; Huang, Xingxu; Yang, Ru; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Summary Symmetric and asymmetric divisions are important for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells during neurogenesis. Although cerebellar granule neurogenesis is controlled by sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, whether and how this process is mediated by regulation of cell division modes have not been determined. Here, using time-lapse imaging and cell culture from neuronal progenitor-specific and differentiated neuron-specific reporter mouse lines (Math1-GFP and Dcx-DsRed) and Patched+/− mice in which SHH signaling is activated, we find evidence for the existence of symmetric and asymmetric divisions that are closely associated with progenitor proliferation and differentiation. While activation of the SHH pathway enhances symmetric progenitor cell divisions, blockade of the SHH pathway reverses the cell division mode change in Math1-GFP;Dcx-DsRed;Patched+/− mice by promoting asymmetric divisions or terminal neuronal symmetric divisions. Thus, cell division mode change mediates the regulation of cerebellar granule neurogenesis controlled by SHH signaling. PMID:26527387

  19. Glutamate neurotoxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells: a major role for xanthine oxidase in oxygen radical formation.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Minervini, G M; Ciotti, M T; Marra, E; Calissano, P

    1997-05-01

    To gain insight into the mechanism through which the neurotransmitter glutamate causally participates in several neurological diseases, in vitro cultured cerebellar granule cells were exposed to glutamate and oxygen radical production was investigated. To this aim, a novel procedure was developed to detect oxygen radicals; the fluorescent dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein was used to detect production of peroxides, and a specific search for the possible conversion of the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase into xanthine oxidase after the excitotoxic glutamate pulse was undertaken. A 100 microM glutamate pulse administered to 7-day-old cerebellar granule cells is accompanied by the onset of neuronal death, the appearance of xanthine oxidase, and production of oxygen radicals. Xanthine oxidase activation and superoxide (O2.-) production are completely inhibited by concomitant incubation of glutamate with MK-801, a specific NMDA receptor antagonist, or by chelation of external calcium with EGTA. Partial inhibition of both cell death and parallel production of reactive oxygen species is achieved with allopurinol, a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, leupeptin, a protease inhibitor, reducing agents such as glutathione or dithiothreitol, antioxidants such as vitamin E and vitamin C, and externally added superoxide dismutase. It is concluded that glutamate-triggered, NMDA-mediated, massive Ca2+ influx induces rapid conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into xanthine oxidase with subsequent production of reactive oxygen species that most probably have a causal involvement in the initial steps of the series of intracellular events leading to neuronal degeneration and death. PMID:9109530

  20. Methylmercury differentially affects GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous IPSCs in Purkinje and granule cells of rat cerebellar slices

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yukun; Atchison, William D

    2003-01-01

    Using whole-cell recording techniques we compared effects of the environmental cerebellar neurotoxicant methylmercury (MeHg) on spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) of both Purkinje and granule cells in cerebellar slices of the rat. In Purkinje cells, bath application of 10, 20 or 100 μM MeHg initially increased then suppressed the frequency of sIPSCs to zero. In granule cells, the initial increase in frequency was not observed in ≈50 % of cells examined, but suppression of sIPSCs by MeHg occurred in every cell tested. For both cells, time to onset of effects of MeHg was inversely related to the concentration; moreover, the pattern of changes in mIPSCs induced by MeHg in the presence of tetrodotoxin was similar to that in sIPSCs. For each concentration of MeHg, it took 2–3 times longer to block sIPSCs in Purkinje cells than it did in granule cells. MeHg also initially increased then decreased amplitudes of sIPSCs to block in both cells; again the response was more variable in granule cells. In most Purkinje and some granule cells, MeHg induced a giant, slow inward current during the late stages of exposure. Appearance of this current appeared to be MeHg concentration dependent, and the direction of current flow was reversed by changing the holding potentials. Reduction of the [Cl−] in the internal solution caused inwardly directed, but not outwardly directed giant currents to disappear, suggesting that this current is a Cl−-mediated response. However, bicuculline and picrotoxin failed to block it. MeHg apparently acts at both presynaptic and postsynaptic sites to alter GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission. GABAA receptors in granule cells appear to be more sensitive to block by MeHg than are those in Purkinje cells, although the general patterns of effects on the two cells are similar. PMID:12879869

  1. Distinct expression patterns of inwardly rectifying potassium currents in developing cerebellar granule cells of the hemispheres and the vermis.

    PubMed

    Brandalise, Federico; Lujan, Rafael; Leone, Roberta; Lodola, Francesco; Cesaroni, Valentina; Romano, Chiara; Gerber, Urs; Rossi, Paola

    2016-06-01

    G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels play a crucial role during the migration and maturation of cerebellar granule cells (GCs) in the vermis. In the cerebellar hemispheres, however, only minor effects on the development of GCs are observed in mice with GIRK channel impairment. This regional difference may reflect distinct ontogenetic expression patterns of GIRK channels. Therefore, inwardly rectifying responses in mice were characterized at different stages of development in the vermis and the hemispheres. In the vermis, GCs in the premigratory zone (PMZ) at P7-P15 exhibit GIRK current but not constitutive inwardly rectifying potassium (CIRK) current, and are relatively depolarized at rest. In contrast, premigratory GCs in the hemispheres express only CIRK channels, which accounts for their more hyperpolarized resting membrane potential. Furthermore, the pattern of voltage-dependent inward currents in the PMZ GCs of cerebellar hemispheres is consistent with a more mature stage of development than the corresponding GCs in the vermis, resulting in robust firing properties mediated by sodium channels. Later in development (P21-P22), CIRK current is then observed in the majority of vermis GCs. This developmental pattern, revealed by electrophysiological recordings, was confirmed by immunohistological experiments that showed greater reactivity for GIRK2 in the PMZ of the vermis than in the hemispheres during development (P7-P15). These findings suggest that regional differences in development are responsible for the differential expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels in the vermis and in the hemispheres. PMID:26921581

  2. The effects of neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on cerebellar granule cell movement and neurite extension in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Sekino, Y; Shirao, T

    2000-01-01

    Migration of the granule cells is a major stage of cerebellar maturation. Granule cells express neurotrophins and their receptors; however, their role in cell migration has not been defined. In this study we investigated the effects of exogenous neurotrophins on the movement and neurite extension of granule cells from glial-free cerebellar cell reaggregates in vitro. Our results provide direct evidence that neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor differentially affect the granule cells. Neurotrophin-3 significantly affected granule cell movements by decreasing the migration index (the ratio of the number of cells that moved further than half the neurite length) and the speed of cell soma movement, but did not affect neurite length or growth cone migration. In contrast, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-4 acted on growing neurites and growth cones by significantly increasing neurite length and the speed of growth cone migration, but had no effect either on the migration index or on the speed of the cell soma movement. The results suggest that neurotrophins differentially affect neurite extension and the movements of cerebellar granule cells. PMID:10842017

  3. Pharmacological properties and H+ sensitivity of excitatory amino acid receptor channels in rat cerebellar granule neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Traynelis, S F; Cull-Candy, S G

    1991-01-01

    1. N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), and kainate receptor channels have been examined in rat cerebellar granule neurones with whole-cell and single-channel patch-clamp methods. The whole-cell peak and steady-state aspartate and NMDA currents were reversibly inhibited by extracellular protons; the IC50 (concentration producing half-maximal inhibition) for the full H+ inhibition curve for NMDA receptors corresponded to pH 7.3, near to physiological pH. (S)-AMPA and kainate whole-cell currents were inhibited by protons with IC50 values that corresponded to pH 6.3 and 5.7, respectively; these receptors were, however, insensitive to H+ concentrations that inhibited NMDA receptor responses. 2. Proton inhibition of the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptor-mediated responses was voltage insensitive, and did not involve a shift in reversal potential. 3. The EC50 (concentration producing half-maximal effect) for aspartate calculated from the whole-cell dose-response curve was similar at pH 6.8 and 7.6 (mean 11.2 microM). Although the EC50 for glycine potentiation of the aspartate response was marginally increased from 273 nM at pH 7.6 to 373 nM at pH 6.8, H+ inhibition was not overcome by up to 1 mM-external glycine. Inhibiting concentrations of H+ appropriate for AMPA and kainate receptors did not markedly alter the EC50 values determined for (S)-AMPA (3.4 microM) and kainate (114 microM) at pH 7.2. 4. Treatment of neurones with N-ethylmaleimide, iodoacetic acid, dithiothretiol or diethyl pyrocarbonate did not influence proton inhibition of NMDA receptor responses. However, treatment with diethyl pyrocarbonate, which potentiated aspartate responses, appeared to reduce the effectiveness of Zn2+ inhibition of NMDA receptors. 5. Desensitization of whole-cell NMDA and (S)-AMPA currents was studied with ionophoretic application of agonist to the cell soma. Whole-cell aspartate currents desensitized rapidly, irrespective of the

  4. Balanced effect of PACAP and FasL on granule cell death during cerebellar development: a morphological, functional and behavioural characterization.

    PubMed

    Allais, Aurélie; Burel, Delphine; Roy, Vincent; Arthaud, Sébastien; Galas, Ludovic; Isaac, Emma Rachel; Desfeux, Arnaud; Parent, Bénédicte; Fournier, Alain; Chapillon, Pierre; Sherwood, Nancy McKeown; Vaudry, Hubert; Gonzalez, Bruno José

    2010-04-01

    It is now established that the development of the CNS requires equilibrium between cell survival and apoptosis. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) exerts a powerful protective effect on cerebellar granule cells by inhibiting the caspase 3. In contrast, Fas ligand (FasL) plays an essential role during ontogenesis in eliminating supernumerary neurons by apoptosis. To determine if PACAP and FasL interact during cerebellar development, we characterized the effects of these factors on cerebellar morphogenesis and caspase 3 activity in PACAP+/+ and PACAP-/- mice. First, we demonstrated in vivo that PACAP is able to reverse the diminution of internal granule cell layer thickness induced by FasL in PACAP+/+ and PACAP-/- mice. Second, ex vivo and immunohistochemical studies revealed that interaction between FasL and PACAP occurs through the caspase 3 activity. Third, behavioural study showed a significant difference for the PACAP + FasL group in the righting reflex test at P8 which does not persist at P60. Finally, a time course study revealed that the pro-apoptotic effect of FasL characterized at P8 was followed by a progressive compensatory mechanism in caspase 3 activity and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. These data suggest that PACAP and FasL interact during cerebellar development to control apoptosis of granule cells and may affect some motor cerebellar functions. PMID:20050979

  5. Control of cerebellar granule cell output by sensory-evoked Golgi cell inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duguid, Ian; Branco, Tiago; Chadderton, Paul; Arlt, Charlotte; Powell, Kate; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Classical feed-forward inhibition involves an excitation–inhibition sequence that enhances the temporal precision of neuronal responses by narrowing the window for synaptic integration. In the input layer of the cerebellum, feed-forward inhibition is thought to preserve the temporal fidelity of granule cell spikes during mossy fiber stimulation. Although this classical feed-forward inhibitory circuit has been demonstrated in vitro, the extent to which inhibition shapes granule cell sensory responses in vivo remains unresolved. Here we combined whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in vivo and dynamic clamp recordings in vitro to directly assess the impact of Golgi cell inhibition on sensory information transmission in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. We show that the majority of granule cells in Crus II of the cerebrocerebellum receive sensory-evoked phasic and spillover inhibition prior to mossy fiber excitation. This preceding inhibition reduces granule cell excitability and sensory-evoked spike precision, but enhances sensory response reproducibility across the granule cell population. Our findings suggest that neighboring granule cells and Golgi cells can receive segregated and functionally distinct mossy fiber inputs, enabling Golgi cells to regulate the size and reproducibility of sensory responses. PMID:26432880

  6. Bax inactivation in lurcher mutants rescues cerebellar granule cells but not purkinje cells or inferior olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Selimi, F; Vogel, M W; Mariani, J

    2000-07-15

    Lurcher is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor gene (Grid2) that turns the receptor into a leaky ion channel. The expression of the Lurcher gene in heterozygous (Grid2(Lc/+)) mutants induces the death of almost all Purkinje cells starting from the second postnatal week. Ninety percent of the granule cells and 60-75% of the inferior olivary neurons die because of the loss of their target neurons, the Purkinje cells. The apoptotic nature of the neurodegeneration has been demonstrated previously by the presence of activated caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family, has been shown to be involved in developmental neuronal death. To study the role of Bax in Grid2(Lc/+) neurodegeneration, double mutants with Grid2(Lc/)+ mice and Bax knock-out mice (Bax-/-) were generated. Bax deletion had no effect on the death of Purkinje cells and inferior olivary neurons, although a temporary rescue of some Purkinje cells could be detected in P15 Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/- animals. From postnatal day 15 (P15) to P60, the number of granule cells in Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/-mice did not significantly change and was significantly increased compared with the number found in Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax+/+ mice. Granule cell number in P60 Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/- mice corresponded to 70% of the number found in wild-type mice. Our results show that Bax inactivation in Grid2(Lc/+) mice does not rescue intrinsic Purkinje cell death or the target-related cell death of olivary neurons, but Bax inactivation does inhibit persistently target-related cell death in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:10884318

  7. Persistent Nav1.6 current at axon initial segments tunes spike timing of cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Nancy; Cathala, Laurence; Meisler, Miriam H; Crest, Marcel; Magistretti, Jacopo; Delmas, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar granule (CG) cells generate high-frequency action potentials that have been proposed to depend on the unique properties of their voltage-gated ion channels. To address the in vivo function of Nav1.6 channels in developing and mature CG cells, we combined the study of the developmental expression of Nav subunits with recording of acute cerebellar slices from young and adult granule-specific Scn8a KO mice. Nav1.2 accumulated rapidly at early-formed axon initial segments (AISs). In contrast, Nav1.6 was absent at early postnatal stages but accumulated at AISs of CG cells from P21 to P40. By P40–P65, both Nav1.6 and Nav1.2 co-localized at CG cell AISs. By comparing Na+ currents in mature CG cells (P66–P74) from wild-type and CG-specific Scn8a KO mice, we found that transient and resurgent Na+ currents were not modified in the absence of Nav1.6 whereas persistent Na+ current was strongly reduced. Action potentials in conditional Scn8a KO CG cells showed no alteration in threshold and overshoot, but had a faster repolarization phase and larger post-spike hyperpolarization. In addition, although Scn8a KO CG cells kept their ability to fire action potentials at very high frequency, they displayed increased interspike-interval variability and firing irregularity in response to sustained depolarization. We conclude that Nav1.6 channels at axon initial segments contribute to persistent Na+ current and ensure a high degree of temporal precision in repetitive firing of CG cells. PMID:20173079

  8. Effects on K+ currents in rat cerebellar granule neurones of a membrane-permeable analogue of the calcium chelator BAPTA.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, C. S.; Mathie, A.

    1996-01-01

    1. Whole cell recordings of voltage-activated K+ currents were made with the amphotericin B perforated patch technique from cerebellar granule (CG) neurones of 6-8 days rats that had been in culture for 1 to 16 days. By use of appropriate voltage protocols, the effects of the membrane-permeant form of BAPTA, 1,2-bis-(2-amino-phenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM), on the transient A current (IKA), the delayed rectifier current (IKV) and a standing outward current (IKSO) were investigated. 2. Bath application of 25 microM BAPTA-AM inhibited both IKV and IKSO in cultured neurones, but did not seem to affect IKA. Neither 25 microM BAPTA (free acid) nor 25 microM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (EDTA-AM) had any significant effect on the magnitude of IKSO. Similarly in short-term (1-2 days) cultured CG neurones IKV, but not IKA, was inhibited by 25 microM BAPTA-AM. 3. BAPTA-AM (2.5 microM) reduced IKV in short-term culture CG neurones, with further inhibition being seen when the perfusate was changed to one containing 25 microM BAPTA-AM. 4. Tetraethylammonium ions (TEA) (10 mM) reversibly inhibited IKV in these cells with a similar rate of block of IKV to that induced by 25 microM BAPTA-AM. 5. The degree of inhibition of IKV by 25 microM BAPTA-AM was both time- and voltage-dependent, in contrast to the inhibition of this current by TEA. 6. These data indicate that BAPTA-AM reduces K+ currents in cerebellar granule neurones and that this inhibition cannot be explained in terms of intracellular Ca2+ chelation, but is a direct effect on the underlying channels. PMID:8842443

  9. NMDA receptors amplify mossy fiber synaptic inputs at frequencies up to at least 750 Hz in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Baade, Carolin; Byczkowicz, Niklas; Hallermann, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Neuronal integration of high-frequency signals is important for rapid information processing. Cerebellar mossy fiber axons (MFs) can fire action potentials (APs) at frequencies of more than one kilohertz. However, it is unclear whether and how the postsynaptic cerebellar granule cells (GCs) are able to process these high-frequency MF inputs. Here, we measured AP firing in GCs during high-frequency MF stimulation and show that GC firing frequency increased non-linearly when MF stimulation frequency was increased from 100 to 750 Hz. To investigate the mechanisms enabling such high-frequency signaling, we analyzed the role of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), which have been implicated in synaptic signaling at lower frequencies. Application of D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV), a potent inhibitor of NMDARs, strongly impaired the GC firing frequency during high-frequency MF stimulation. APV had no significant effect on single excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) or currents (EPSCs) evoked at 1 Hz at resting membrane potentials. However, the time course of EPSCs evoked at 1 Hz at depolarized potentials or following high-frequency MF stimulation was accelerated by APV. Thus, our results show that NMDAR-mediated currents amplify high-frequency MF inputs by prolonging the time courses of synaptic inputs, thereby causing greater synaptic summation of inputs. Hence, NMDARs support the integration of MF synaptic input at frequencies up to at least 750 Hz. Synapse 70:269-276, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26887562

  10. Modulation by protein kinase C of nitric oxide and cyclic GMP poffation in cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Riccio, A; Esposito, E; Eboli, M L

    1996-04-29

    The possible modulation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) activity by protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated in primary cultures of rat cerebellar neurons. Incubation of the cells with L-arginine and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) produced detectable levels of NO, as quantified by photometric assay [0.14 +/- 0.03 nmol/h/dish (2.5 x 10(6) cells)]. The NO producing activity was paralleled by concomitant accumulation of cyclic GMP (cGMP) (0.12 +/- 0.02 pmol/dish). Downregulation of PKC by prolonged treatment with phorbol esters or inhibition of the kinase by treatment with 4taurosporine raised the basal levels of NO and cGMP five fold. When granule cells were incubated in the absence of extracellular Mg2+, N-methyl-D-aspartate and to a lesser extent, glutamate became effective in enhancing NO formation and cGMP accumulation with respect to the control. The NO and cGMP increases induced by the two agonists were almost doubled by treatment of the cells with staurosporine or depletion of PKC. Calphostin C. an inhibitor of the regulatory domain of PKC, was as effective as staurosporine in increasing the formation of NO in both resting and excited cells. These results indicate that downregulation or inhibition of PKC increase NOS activity in cerebellar neurons, and suggest that phosphorylation of NOS by PKC negatively modulates the catalytic activity of the enzyme in these cells. PMID:8773779

  11. Endothelin-1 stimulates the release of preloaded ( sup 3 H)D-aspartate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.W.; Lee, C.Y.; Chuang, D.M. )

    1990-03-16

    We have recently reported that endothelin-1 (ET) induces phosphoinositide hydrolysis in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. Here we found that ET in a dose-dependent manner (1-30 nM) stimulated the release of preloaded ({sup 3}H)D-aspartate from granule cells. The ET-induced aspartate release was completely blocked in the absence of extracellular Ca{sup 2+}, but was unaffected by 1 mM Co{sup 2+} or 1 microM dihydropyridine derivatives (nisoldipine and nimodipine). At higher concentration (10 microM) of nisoldipine and nimodipine, the release was partially inhibited. Short-term pretreatment of cells with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) potentiated the ET-induced aspartate release, while long-term pretreatment with PDBu attenuated the release. Long-term exposure of cells to pertussis toxin (PTX), on the other hand, potentiated the ET-induced effects. Our results suggest that ET has a neuromodulatory function in the central nervous system.

  12. Proneurotrophin-3 promotes cell cycle withdrawal of developing cerebellar granule cell progenitors via the p75 neurotrophin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Juan Pablo; Abercrombie, Elizabeth; Friedman, Wilma J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCP) proliferate extensively in the external granule layer (EGL) of the developing cerebellum prior to differentiating and migrating. Mechanisms that regulate the appropriate timing of cell cycle withdrawal of these neuronal progenitors during brain development are not well defined. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is highly expressed in the proliferating GCPs, but is downregulated once the cells leave the cell cycle. This receptor has primarily been characterized as a death receptor for its ability to induce neuronal apoptosis following injury. Here we demonstrate a novel function for p75NTR in regulating proper cell cycle exit of neuronal progenitors in the developing rat and mouse EGL, which is stimulated by proNT3. In the absence of p75NTR, GCPs continue to proliferate beyond their normal period, resulting in a larger cerebellum that persists into adulthood, with consequent motor deficits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16654.001 PMID:27434667

  13. Expression and traffic of cellular prolyl oligopeptidase are regulated during cerebellar granule cell differentiation, maturation, and aging.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Baylach, M J; Felipo, V; Männistö, P T; García-Horsman, J A

    2008-10-15

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is an endopeptidase which cleaves short proline-containing neuropeptides, and it is involved in memory and learning. POP also has an intercellular function mediated through the inositol pathway, and has been involved in cell death. POP has been early considered as a housekeeping enzyme, but the recent research indicates that POP expression is regulated across tissues and intracellularly. In the brain, POP is exclusively expressed in neurons and most abundantly in pyramidal neurons of cerebral cortex, in the CA1 field neurons of hippocampus and in cerebellar Purkinje's cells. Intracellularly, POP is mainly present in the cytoplasm and some in intracellular membranes, like rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In this paper, we systematically studied the levels of expression of POP along the life of cerebellar granule cells (CGC) in culture and the distribution of POP within different intracellular compartments. We used the tight-binding inhibitor JTP-4819 covalently coupled with fluorescein (FJTP) as a tool to study the changes on expression and localization of POP protein. Our results indicate that POP activity levels are regulated during the life of the neurons. POP was found mainly in cytoplasm and neuronal projections, but at an early developmental phase significant amounts were found also in nuclei. Along the life of the neurons, POP activity fluctuated in 7-day cycles. In young neurons, the cytosolic POP activity was low but increased by maturation so that the activity peak coincided with full differentiation. Over aging, cytoplasmic POP was concentrated around nucleus, but the activity decreased with time. POP was also present in vesicles across the neuron. No major changes were seen in the nuclear or membrane bound POP over aging until activity disappeared upon neuronal death. This is the first time when POP was found in the nuclei of human neuronal cells. PMID:18718510

  14. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  15. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  16. Relationship between lipophilicity of C6-10 hydrocarbon solvents and their ROS-inducing potency in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Dreiem, A; Myhre, O; Fonnum, F

    2002-12-01

    We have studied the effects of aliphatic, alicyclic, and aromatic C6-10 solvents on the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat cerebellar granule cell cultures. ROS formation was assessed by monitoring oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) to the fluorescent compound 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF). We found that aromatic solvents with C > 7, and aliphatic and alicyclic solvents with C > or = 7 induce ROS formation in rat cerebellar granule cells in vitro. The response increased with increasing solvent concentration. The potency of the compounds within each homologous group seemed to be correlated to their octanol water partition-coefficients. The aromatic solvents were generally less efficient in inducing ROS formation than the aliphatic and the alicyclic compounds. PMID:12520760

  17. Excitatory amino acid stimulation of the survival of rat cerebellar granule cells in culture is associated with an increase in SMN, the spinal muscular atrophy disease gene product.

    PubMed

    Andreassi, C; Patrizi, A L; Brahe, C; Eboli, M L

    2000-01-01

    Excitatory amino acids which promote the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture, also promote the expression of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein. Immunolocalization studies using SMN monoclonal antibody showed that SMN is decreased in cultures grown in low K+ or chemically defined medium with respect to cultures grown in high K+ medium and that an increase of SMN can be induced by treatment of low K+ cultures with glutamate or N-methyl-D-aspartate. PMID:10901626

  18. Bestrophin1 Channels are Insensitive to Ethanol and Do not Mediate Tonic GABAergic Currents in Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Marvin R.; Wadleigh, Aya; Hughes, Benjamin A.; Woodward, John J.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The granule cell layer of the cerebellum functions in spatio-temporal encoding of information. Granule cells (GCs) are tonically inhibited by spillover of GABA released from Golgi cells and this tonic inhibition is facilitated by acute ethanol. Recently, it was demonstrated that a specialized Ca2+-activated anion-channel, bestrophin1 (Best1), found on glial cells, can release GABA that contributes up to 50–75% of the tonic GABAergic current. However, it is unknown if ethanol has any actions on Best1 function. Using whole-cell electrophysiology, we found that recombinant Best1 channels expressed in HEK-293 cells were insensitive to 40 and 80 mM ethanol. We attempted to measure the Best1-mediated component of the tonic current in slices using 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB). We confirmed that this agent blocks recombinant Best1 channels. Unexpectedly, we found that NPPB significantly potentiated the tonic current and the area and decay of GABAA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in GCs in rodent slices under two different recording conditions. To better isolate the Best1-dependent tonic current component, we blocked the Golgi cell component of the tonic current with tetrodotoxin and found that NPPB similarly and significantly potentiated the tonic current amplitude and decay time of miniature IPSCs. Two other Cl−-channel blockers were also tested: 4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid disodium salt hydrate (DIDS) showed no effect on GABAergic transmission, while niflumic acid (NFA) significantly suppressed the tonic current noise, as well as the mIPSC frequency, amplitude, and area. These data suggest that acute ethanol exposure does not modulate Best1 channels and these findings serve to challenge recent data indicating that these channels participate in the generation of tonic GABAergic currents in cerebellar GCs. PMID:22275879

  19. AMPA receptors serum-dependently mediate GABAA receptor alpha1 and alpha6 subunit down-regulation in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Uusi-Oukari, Mikko; Kontturi, Leena-Stiina; Kallinen, Sampsa A; Salonen, Virpi

    2010-04-01

    Depolarization of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells with potassium or kainate results in developmentally arrested state that includes down-regulation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1, alpha6 and beta2 subunit expression. These subunits are normally strongly expressed in cerebellar granule cells from second postnatal week throughout the adulthood. In the present study we demonstrate that selective activation of AMPA subtype of glutamate receptors down-regulates alpha1 and alpha6 subunit mRNA expression. Removal of AMPA agonist from culture medium restores expression of these subunits indicating reversibility of the down-regulation. In serum-free culture medium AMPA receptor activation did not down-regulate alpha1 or alpha6 subunit expression. Furthermore, the down-regulation was strongly attenuated when the cells were cultured in the presence of dialysed fetal calf serum. The results indicate that down-regulation of GABA(A) receptor alpha1 and alpha6 subunits by AMPA receptor activation is dependent on the presence of low molecular weight compounds present in fetal calf serum. In order to study mouse cerebellar granule cell maturation and/or regulation of GABA(A) receptor subunit expression in culture, the experiments should be performed in the absence of fetal calf serum. PMID:20170697

  20. Glucose deprivation stimulates Cu(2+) toxicity in cultured cerebellar granule neurons and Cu(2+)-dependent zinc release.

    PubMed

    Isaev, Nickolay K; Genrikhs, Elisaveta E; Aleksandrova, Olga P; Zelenova, Elena A; Stelmashook, Elena V

    2016-05-27

    Copper chloride (0.01mM, 2h) did not have significant influence on the survival of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) incubated in balanced salt solution. However, CuCl2 caused severe neuronal damage by glucose deprivation (GD). The glutamate NMDA-receptors blocker MK-801 partially and antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or Zn(2+) chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) almost entirely protected CGNs from this toxic effect. Measurements of intracellular calcium ions using Fluo-4 AM, or zinc ions with FluoZin-3 AM demonstrated that 1 h-exposure to GD induced intensive increase of Fluo-4 but not FluoZin-3 fluorescence in neurons. The supplementation of solution with CuCl2 caused an increase of FluoZin-3, Fluo-4 and CellROX Green (reactive oxygen species probe) fluorescence by GD. The stimulation of Fluo-4 but not FluoZin-3 fluorescence by copper could be prevented partially by MK-801 and as well as CellROX Green fluorescence by NAC at GD. This data imply that during GD copper ions induce intense displacement zinc ions from intracellular stores, in addition free radical production, glutamate release and Ca(2+) overload of CGNs, that causes death of neurons as a result. PMID:27063646

  1. Paired-pulse facilitation of multivesicular release and intersynaptic spillover of glutamate at rat cerebellar granule cell–interneurone synapses

    PubMed Central

    Satake, Shin’Ichiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Imoto, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    A simple form of presynaptic plasticity, paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), has been explained as a transient increase in the probability of vesicular release. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to record synaptic activity in rat cerebellar slices, we found different forms of presynaptically originated short-term plasticity during glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission from granule cells (GCs) to molecular-layer interneurones (INs). Paired-pulse activation of GC axons at short intervals (30–100 ms) elicited not only a facilitation in the peak amplitude (PPFamp), but also a prolongation in the decay-time constant (PPPdecay) of the EPSCs recorded from INs. The results of pharmacological tests and kinetics analyses suggest that the mechanisms underlying the respective types of short-term plasticity were different. PPFamp was elicited by a transient increase in the number of released vesicles. On the other hand, PPPdecay was caused not only by delayed release as has been reported but also by extrasynaptic spillover of the GC transmitter and the subsequent intersynaptic pooling. Both PPFamp and PPPdecay closely rely on repetitive-activation-induced multivesicular release. Using a dynamic clamp technique, we further examined the physiological significance of different presynaptic plasticity, and found that PPFamp and PPPdecay can differentially encode and process neuronal information by influencing the total synaptic charge transferred to postsynaptic INs to reflect activation frequency of the presynaptic GCs. PMID:22930264

  2. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia are motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.

  3. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia aremore » motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.« less

  4. Glutamate neurotoxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells involves cytochrome c release from mitochondria and mitochondrial shuttle impairment.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Marra, E; Calissano, P; Passarella, S

    1999-07-01

    To gain some insight into the mechanism by which glutamate neurotoxicity takes place in cerebellar granule cells, two steps of glucose oxidation were investigated: the electron flow via respiratory chain from certain substrates to oxygen and the transfer of extramitochondrial reducing equivalents via the mitochondrial shuttles. However, cytochrome c release from intact mitochondria was found to occur in glutamate-treated cells as detected photometrically in the supernatant of the cell homogenate suspension. As a result of cytochrome c release, an increase of the oxidation of externally added NADH was found, probably occurring via the NADH-b5 oxidoreductase of the outer mitochondrial membrane. When the two mitochondrial shuttles glycerol 3-phosphate/dihydroxyacetone phosphate and malate/oxaloacetate, devoted to oxidizing externally added NADH, were reconstructed, both were found to be impaired under glutamate neurotoxicity. Consistent early activation in two NADH oxidizing mechanisms, i.e., lactate production and plasma membrane NADH oxidoreductase activity, was found in glutamate-treated cells. In spite of this, the increase in the cell NADH fluorescence was found to be time-dependent, an index of the progressive damage of the cell. PMID:10386976

  5. Relative quantification of membrane proteins in wild-type and prion protein (PrP)-knockout cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Stella, Roberto; Cifani, Paolo; Peggion, Caterina; Hansson, Karin; Lazzari, Cristian; Bendz, Maria; Levander, Fredrik; Sorgato, Maria Catia; Bertoli, Alessandro; James, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Approximately 25% of eukaryotic proteins possessing homology to at least two transmembrane domains are predicted to be embedded in biological membranes. Nevertheless, this group of proteins is not usually well represented in proteome-wide experiments due to their refractory nature. Here we present a quantitative mass spectrometry-based comparison of membrane protein expression in cerebellar granule neurons grown in primary culture that were isolated from wild-type mice and mice lacking the cellular prion protein. This protein is a cell-surface glycoprotein that is mainly expressed in the central nervous system and is involved in several neurodegenerative disorders, though its physiological role is unclear. We used a low specificity enzyme α-chymotrypsin to digest membrane proteins preparations that had been separated by SDS-PAGE. The resulting peptides were labeled with tandem mass tags and analyzed by MS. The differentially expressed proteins identified using this approach were further analyzed by multiple reaction monitoring to confirm the expression level changes. PMID:22023170

  6. Inhibitory effect of fangchinoline on excitatory amino acids-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, S D; Oh, S K; Kim, H S; Seong, Y H

    2001-04-01

    Glutamate receptors-mediated excitotoxicity is believed to play a role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was performed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of fangchinoline, a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which has a characteristic as a Ca2+ channel blocker, on excitatory amino acids (EAAs)-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule neuron. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 1 mM) and kainate (100 microM)-induced neuronal cell death which was measured by trypan blue exclusion test. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate release into medium induced by NMDA (1 mM) and kainate (100 microM), which was measured by HPLC. And fangchinoline (5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM)-induced elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. These results suggest that inhibition of Ca2+ influx by fangchinoline may contribute to the beneficial effects on neurodegenerative effect of glutamate in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11339637

  7. NF1 regulation of RAS/ERK signaling is required for appropriate granule neuron progenitor expansion and migration in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Cho, Woosung; Nazarenko, Inga; Mo, Wei; Chen, Jian; Parada, Luis F

    2014-11-01

    Cerebellar development is regulated by a coordinated spatiotemporal interplay between granule neuron progenitors (GNPs), Purkinje neurons, and glia. Abnormal development can trigger motor deficits, and more recent data indicate important roles in aspects of memory, behavior, and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Germline mutation in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene underlies Neurofibromatosis type 1, a complex disease that enhances susceptibility to certain cancers and neurological disorders, including intellectual deficits and ASD. The NF1 gene encodes for neurofibromin, a RAS GTPase-activating protein, and thus negatively regulates the RAS signaling pathway. Here, using mouse models to direct conditional NF1 ablation in either embryonic cerebellar progenitors or neonatal GNPs, we show that neurofibromin is required for appropriate development of cerebellar folia layering and structure. Remarkably, neonatal administration of inhibitors of the ERK pathway reversed the morphological defects. Thus, our findings establish a critical cell-autonomous role for the NF1-RAS-ERK pathway in the appropriate regulation of cerebellar development and provide a basis for using neonatal ERK inhibitor-based therapies to treat NF1-induced cerebellar disorders. PMID:25367036

  8. Role of glutamate receptors in tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47) neurotoxicity in mouse cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G; Tagliaferri, Sara; Roqué, Pamela J; Pellacani, Claudia

    2016-01-22

    The polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are developmental neurotoxicants, as evidenced by numerous in vitro, animal and human studies. PBDEs can alter the homeostasis of thyroid hormone and directly interact with brain cells. Induction of oxidative stress, leading to DNA damage and apoptotic cell death is a prominent mechanism of PBDE neurotoxicity, though other mechanisms have also been suggested. In the present study we investigated the potential role played by glutamate receptors in the in vitro neurotoxicity of the tetrabromodiphenyl ether BDE-47, one of the most abundant PBDE congeners. Toxicity of BDE-47 in mouse cerebellar neurons was diminished by antagonists of glutamate ionotropic receptors, but not by antagonists of glutamate metabotropic receptors. Antagonists of NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors also inhibited BDE-47-induced oxidative stress and increases in intracellular calcium. The calcium chelator BAPTA-AM also inhibited BDE-47 cytotoxicity and oxidative stress. BDE-47 caused a rapid increase of extracellular glutamate levels, which was not antagonized by any of the compounds tested. The results suggest that BDE-47, by still unknown mechanisms, increases extracellular glutamate which in turn activates ionotropic glutamate receptors leading to increased calcium levels, oxidative stress, and ultimately cell death. PMID:26640238

  9. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca2+ response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca2+]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca2+ channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca2+]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca2+]i response, whereas the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca2+]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca2+ channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  10. Activation of PAC1 Receptors in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells Stimulates Both Calcium Mobilization from Intracellular Stores and Calcium Influx through N-Type Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Basille-Dugay, Magali; Vaudry, Hubert; Fournier, Alain; Gonzalez, Bruno; Vaudry, David

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and a high density of PACAP binding sites have been detected in the developing rat cerebellum. In particular, PACAP receptors are actively expressed in immature granule cells, where they activate both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of PACAP to induce calcium mobilization in cerebellar granule neurons. Administration of PACAP-induced a transient, rapid, and monophasic rise of the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), while vasoactive intestinal peptide was devoid of effect, indicating the involvement of the PAC1 receptor in the Ca(2+) response. Preincubation of granule cells with the Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, thapsigargin, or the d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, markedly reduced the stimulatory effect of PACAP on [Ca(2+)]i. Furthermore, addition of the calcium chelator, EGTA, or exposure of cells to the non-selective Ca(2+) channel blocker, NiCl2, significantly attenuated the PACAP-evoked [Ca(2+)]i increase. Preincubation of granule neurons with the N-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA, decreased the PACAP-induced [Ca(2+)]i response, whereas the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, nifedipine, and the P- and Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, ω-conotoxin MVIIC, had no effect. Altogether, these findings indicate that PACAP, acting through PAC1 receptors, provokes an increase in [Ca(2+)]i in granule neurons, which is mediated by both mobilization of calcium from IP3-sensitive intracellular stores and activation of N-type Ca(2+) channel. Some of the activities of PACAP on proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation of cerebellar granule cells could thus be mediated, at least in part, through these intracellular and/or extracellular calcium fluxes. PMID:23675369

  11. Peroxynitrite is Involved in the Apoptotic Death of Cultured Cerebellar Granule Neurons Induced by Staurosporine, but not by Potassium Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Olguín-Albuerne, Mauricio; Ramos-Pittol, José Miguel; Coyoy, Angélica; Martínez-Briseño, Carlos Patricio; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Morán, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates numerous physiological process and is the main source of reactive nitrogen species (RNS). NO promotes cell survival, but it also induces apoptotic death having been involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. NO and superoxide anion react to form peroxynitrite, which accounts for most of the deleterious effects of NO. The mechanisms by which these molecules regulate the apoptotic process are not well understood. In this study, we evaluated the role of NO and peroxynitrite in the apoptotic death of cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGN), which are known to experience apoptosis by staurosporine (St) or potassium deprivation (K5). We found that CGN treated with the peroxynitrite catalyst, FeTTPs were completely rescued from St-induced death, but not from K5-induced death. On the other hand, the inhibition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase partially protected cell viability in CGN treated with K5, but not with St, while the inhibitor L-NAME further reduced the cell viability in St, but it did not affect K5. Finally, an inhibitor of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) diminished the cell viability in K5, but not in St. Altogether, these results shows that NO promotes cell survival in K5 through sGC-cGMP and promotes cell death by other mechanisms, while in St NO promotes cell survival independently of cGMP and peroxynitrite results critical for St-induced death. Our results suggest that RNS are differentially handled by CGN during cell death depending on the death-inducing conditions. PMID:26700430

  12. Chlorpyrifos Toxicity in Mouse Cultured Cerebellar Granule Neurons at Different Stages of Development: Additive Effect on Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Amani, Nahid; Soodi, Maliheh; Daraei, Bahram; Dashti, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a neurotoxic organophosphorus (OP) insecticide. Its mechanism of action includes oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE). The aim of the present study is to investigate CPF toxicity in mature and immature cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), as well as its effect on glutamate induced excitotoxicity. Materials and Methods This study was an in vitro experimental study performed on mice cultured CGNs. Immature and mature neurons were exposed to different concentrations of CPF (1-1000 µM) and glutamate (10-600 µM) for 48 hours after which we used the MTT assay to measure cytotoxicity. Immature neurons had exposure to CPF for 5 days in order to evaluate the cytotoxic effect on developing neurons. Mature neurons received sub-lethal concentrations of CPF (10, 100 µM) combined with different concentrations of glutamate. AChE activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed after treatments. Results Immature CGNs had increased sensitivity to CPF toxicity compared to mature neurons. We observed significantly greater ROS production in immature compared to mature neurons, however AChE activity was more inhibited in mature neurons. Although CPF toxicity was not well correlated with AChE inhibition, it correlated well with ROS production. Glutamate toxicity was potentiated by sub-lethal concentration of CPF, however glutamate induced ROS production was not affected. The results suggested that CPF potentiated glutamate toxicity by mechanisms other than oxidative stress. Conclusion CPF toxicity differed in mature and immature neurons. Potentiated glutamate toxicity by CPF implied that CPF exposure might be a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27602329

  13. Calpain plays a central role in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced neurotoxicity in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Harbison, Richard A; Ryan, Kristen R; Wilkins, Heather M; Schroeder, Emily K; Loucks, F Alexandra; Bouchard, Ron J; Linseman, Daniel A

    2011-04-01

    1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced neurotoxicity has previously been attributed to either caspase-dependent apoptosis or caspase-independent cell death. In the current study, we found that MPP(+) induces a unique, non-apoptotic nuclear morphology coupled with a caspase-independent but calpain-dependent mechanism of cell death in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay in CGNs exposed to MPP(+), we observed that these neurons are essentially devoid of caspase-dependent DNA fragments indicative of apoptosis. Moreover, proteolysis of a well recognized caspase-3 substrate, poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), was not observed in CGNs exposed to MPP(+). In contrast, calpain-dependent proteolysis of fodrin and pro-caspases-9 and -3 occurred in this model coupled with inhibition of caspase-3/-7 activities. Notably, several key members of the Bcl-2 protein family appear to be prominent calpain targets in MPP(+)-treated CGNs. Bid and Bax were proteolyzed to truncated forms thought to have greater pro-death activity at mitochondria. Moreover, the pro-survival Bcl-2 protein was degraded to a form predicted to be inactive at mitochondria. Cyclin E was also cleaved by calpain to an active low MW fragment capable of facilitating cell cycle re-entry. Finally, MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity in CGNs was significantly attenuated by a cocktail of calpain and caspase inhibitors in combination with the antioxidant glutathione. Collectively, these results demonstrate that caspases do not play a central role in CGN toxicity induced by exposure to MPP(+), whereas calpain cleavage of key protein targets, coupled with oxidative stress, plays a critical role in MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity. Our findings underscore the complexity of MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity and suggest that calpain may play a fundamental role in causing neuronal death downstream of mitochondrial oxidative stress

  14. Apoptosis induced by domoic acid in mouse cerebellar granule neurons involves activation of p38 and JNK MAP kinases

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, G.; Klintworth, H.M.; Kavanagh, T.J.; Costa, L.G.

    2008-01-01

    In mouse cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) the marine neurotoxin domoic acid (DomA) induces neuronal cell death, either by apoptosis or by necrosis, depending on its concentration, with apoptotic damage predominating in response to low concentrations (100 nM). DomA-induced apoptosis is due to selective activation of AMPA/kainate receptors, and is mediated by DomA-induced oxidative stress, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and activation of caspase-3. The p38 MAP kinase and the c-Jun NH2-terminal protein kinase (JNK) have been shown to be preferentially activated by oxidative stress. Here we report that DomA increases p38 MAP kinase and JNK phosphorylation, and that this effect is more pronounced in CGNs from Gclm (−/−) mice, which lack the modifier subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, have very low glutathione (GSH) levels, and are more sensitive to DomA-induced apoptosis than CGNs from wild-type mice. The increased phosphorylation of JNK and p38 kinase was paralleled by a decreased phosphorylation of Erk 1/2. The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX, but not the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, prevents DomA-induced activation of p38 and JNK kinases. Several antioxidants (GSH ethyl ester, catalase, phenylbutylnitrone) also prevent DomA-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAP kinases. Inhibitors of p38 (SB203580) and of JNK (SP600125) antagonize DomA-induced apoptosis. These results indicate the importance of oxidative stress-activated JNK and p38 MAP kinase pathways in DomA-induced apoptosis in CGNs. PMID:18164102

  15. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiem, Anne Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  16. Mefenamic acid bi-directionally modulates the transient outward K{sup +} current in rat cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Man; Shi Wenjie; Fei Xiaowei; Liu Yarong; Zeng Ximin; Mei Yanai

    2008-02-01

    The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on ion channels has been widely studied in several cell models, but less is known about their modulatory mechanisms. In this report, the effect of mefenamic acid on voltage-activated transient outward K{sup +} current (I{sub A}) in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was investigated. At a concentration of 5 {mu}M to 100 {mu}M, mefenamic acid reversibly inhibited I{sub A} in a dose-dependent manner. However, mefenamic acid at a concentration of 1 {mu}M significantly increased the amplitude of I{sub A} to 113 {+-} 1.5% of the control. At more than 10 {mu}M, mefenamic acid inhibited the amplitude of I{sub A} without any effect on activation or inactivation. In addition, a higher concentration of mefenamic acid induced a significant acceleration of recovery from inactivation with an increase of the peak amplitude elicited by the second test pulse. Intracellular application of mefenamic acid could significantly increase the amplitude of I{sub A}, but had no effect on the inhibition induced by extracellular mefenamic acid, implying that mefenamic acid may exert its effect from both inside and outside the ion channel. Furthermore, the activation of current induced by intracellular application of mefenamic acid was mimicked by other cyclooxygenase inhibitors and arachidonic acid. Our data demonstrate that mefenamic acid is able to bi-directionally modulate I{sub A} channels in neurons at different concentrations and by different methods of application, and two different mechanisms may be involved.

  17. DS-03SONIC HEDGEHOG ANTAGONISTS POTENTLY INDUCE APOPTOSIS IN THE CEREBELLAR EXTERNAL GRANULE LAYER: IMPLICATIONS FOR MEDULLOBLASTOMA TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Kevin; Cabrera, Omar; Swiney, Brant; Smith, Julie; Farber, Nuri

    2014-01-01

    There is a great interest in Hedgehog signaling both for its role in cerebellar development and medulloblastoma (MB) treatment. The cerebellum maintains its own proliferative layer called the external granule layer (EGL) that produces over 90% of its neurons. During development, the established dogma views Hedgehog signaling as a robust mitogenic stimulator of EGL proliferation. However, in other regions of the body, Hedgehog stimulation acts as a survival signal by potently inducing NPC apoptosis when signaling is lost. In this manner, the sonic hedgehog ligand's concentration gradient determines NPC survival or death thereby morphologically sculpting the developing nervous system. Therefore, we tested whether Hedgehog signaling also acts as a survival signal in the EGL by administering several Hedgehog antagonists (vismodegib, cyclopamine, and jervine). Remarkably, we found all Hedgehog antagonists (HAs) potently induced EGL apoptosis within a few hours of administration. This suggests a large portion of the HAs' anti-proliferative effects are due to the apoptotic loss of a large number of EGL NPCs. This research may also have important implications for MB formation and treatment. There is convincing evidence that EGL neural progenitor cells (NPCs) can be the tumor initiating cells for MBs (the most common malignant brain tumor in children). Therefore, we examined if HAs can also produce apoptosis in Patched mice which exhibit constitutive Hedgehog stimulation and are prone to MB formation. We found HA administration also potently increased apoptosis in both EGL NPCs and preneoplasms. This may have important implications for the treatment of MBs with HAs. For example, apoptosis involves signaling mechanisms distinct from proliferation that may need to be disabled for malignant transformation. In addition, the requirement for Hedgehog signaling may prevent metastasis by killing tumor cells as they spread to regions where such signaling is absent.

  18. GDF-15 enhances intracellular Ca2+ by increasing Cav1.3 expression in rat cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun-Mei; Wang, Chang-Ying; Hu, Changlong; Fang, Yan-Jia; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2016-01-01

    GDF-15 (growth/differentiation factor 15) is a novel member of the TGF (transforming growth factor)-β superfamily that has critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems. We reported previously that GDF-15 increased delayed rectifier outward K+ currents and Kv2.1 α subunit expression through TβRII (TGF-β receptor II) to activate Src kinase and Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons). In the present study, we found that treatment of CGNs with GDF-15 for 24 h increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to membrane depolarization, as determined by Ca2+ imaging. Whole-cell current recordings indicated that GDF-15 increased the inward Ca2+ current (ICa) without altering steady-state activation of Ca2+ channels. Treatment with nifedipine, an inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels, abrogated GDF-15-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and ICa. The GDF-15-induced increase in ICa was mediated via up-regulation of the Cav1.3 α subunit, which was attenuated by inhibiting Akt/mTOR and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) pathways and by pharmacological inhibition of Src-mediated TβRII phosphorylation. Given that Cav1.3 is not only a channel for Ca2+ influx, but also a transcriptional regulator, our data confirm that GDF-15 induces protein expression via TβRII and activation of a non-Smad pathway, and provide novel insight into the mechanism of GDF-15 function in neurons. PMID:27114559

  19. The natural scorpion peptide, BmK NT1 activates voltage-gated sodium channels and produces neurotoxicity in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohan; He, Yuwei; Qiao, Jinping; Zhang, Chunlei; Cao, Zhengyu

    2016-01-01

    The scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat neuronal diseases such as neuropathic pain, paralysis and epilepsy for thousands of years. Studies have demonstrated that scorpion venom is the primary active component. Although scorpion venom can effectively attenuate pain in the clinic, it also produces neurotoxic response. In this study, toxicity guided purification led to identify a mammalian toxin termed BmK NT1 comprising of 65 amino acid residues and an amidated C-terminus, a mature peptide encoded by the nucleotide sequence (GenBank No. AF464898). In contract to the recombinant product of the same nucleotide sequence, BmK AGAP, which displayed analgesic and anti-tumor effect, intravenous injection (i.v.) of BmK NT1 produced acute toxicity in mice with an LD50 value of 1.36 mg/kg. In primary cultured cerebellar granule cells, BmK NT1 produced a concentration-dependent cell death with an IC50 value of 0.65 μM (0.41-1.03 μM, 95% Confidence Intervals, 95% CI) which was abolished by TTX, a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) blocker. We also demonstrated that BmK NT1 produced modest sodium influx in cerebellar granule cell cultures with an EC50 value of 2.19 μM (0.76-6.40 μM, 95% CI), an effect similar to VGSC agonist, veratridine. The sodium influx response was abolished by TTX suggesting that BmK NT1-induced sodium influx is solely through activation of VGSC. Considered these data together, we demonstrated that BmK NT1 activated VGSC and produced neurotoxicity in cerebellar granule cell cultures. PMID:26598793

  20. Intracellular acidification by inhibition of the Na+/H+-exchanger leads to caspase-independent death of cerebellar granule neurons resembling paraptosis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, D; Gerhardt, E; Bock, J; Müller, M M; Wolburg, H; Lang, F; Schulz, J B

    2004-07-01

    Potassium withdrawal is commonly used to induce caspase-mediated apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons in vitro. However, the underlying and cell death-initiating mechanisms are unknown. We firstly investigated potassium efflux through the outward delayed rectifier K+ current (Ik) as a potential mediator. However, tetraethylammoniumchloride, an inhibitor of Ik, was ineffective to block apoptosis after potassium withdrawal. Since potassium withdrawal reduced intracellular pH (pHi) from 7.4 to 7.2, we secondly investigated the effects of intracellular acidosis. To study intracellular acidosis in cerebellar granule neurons, we inhibited the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) with 4-isopropyl-3-methylsulfonylbenzoyl-guanidine methanesulfonate (HOE 642) and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride. Both inhibitors concentration-dependently induced cell death and potentiated cell death after potassium withdrawal. Although inhibition of the NHE induced cell death with morphological criteria of apoptosis in light and electron microscopy including chromatin condensation, positive TUNEL staining and cell shrinkage, no internucleosomal DNA cleavage or activation of caspases was detected. In contrast to potassium withdrawal-induced apoptosis, cell death induced by intracellular acidification was not prevented by insulin-like growth factor-1, cyclo-adenosine-monophosphate, caspase inhibitors and transfection with an adenovirus expressing Bcl-XL. However, cycloheximide protected cerebellar granule neurons from death induced by potassium withdrawal as well as from death after treatment with HOE 642. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms leading to cell death after acidification appear to be different from the mechanisms after potassium withdrawal and resemble the biochemical but not the morphological characteristics of paraptosis. PMID:15017383

  1. The ALIAmide palmitoylethanolamide and cannabinoids, but not anandamide, are protective in a delayed postglutamate paradigm of excitotoxic death in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Skaper, S D; Buriani, A; Dal Toso, R; Petrelli, L; Romanello, S; Facci, L; Leon, A

    1996-01-01

    The amino acid L-glutamate is a neurotransmitter that mediates fast neuronal excitation in a majority of synapses in the central nervous system. Glutamate stimulates both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. While activation of NMDA receptors has been implicated in a variety of neurophysiologic processes, excessive NMDA receptor stimulation (excitotoxicity) is thought to be primarily responsible for neuronal injury in a wide variety of acute neurological disorders including hypoxia-ischemia, seizures, and trauma. Very little is known about endogenous molecules and mechanisms capable of modulating excitotoxic neuronal death. Saturated N-acylethanolamides like palmitoylethanolamide accumulate in ischemic tissues and are synthesized by neurons upon excitatory amino acid receptor activation. Here we report that palmitoylethanolamide, but not the cognate N-acylamide anandamide (the ethanolamide of arachidonic acid), protects cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells against glutamate toxicity in a delayed postagonist paradigm. Palmitoylethanolamide reduced this injury in a concentration-dependent manner and was maximally effective when added 15-min postglutamate. Cannabinoids, which like palmitoylethanolamide are functionally active at the peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2 on mast cells, also prevented neuron loss in this delayed postglutamate model. Furthermore, the neuroprotective effects of palmitoylethanolamide, as well as that of the active cannabinoids, were efficiently antagonized by the candidate central cannabinoid receptor (CB1) agonist anandamide. Analogous pharmacological behaviors have been observed for palmitoylethanolamide (ALI-Amides) in downmodulating mast cell activation. Cerebellar granule cells expressed mRNA for CB1 and CB2 by in situ hybridization, while two cannabinoid binding sites were detected in cerebellar membranes. The results suggest that (i) non-CB1 cannabinoid receptors control, upon agonist binding, the downstream

  2. The Etv1 transcription factor activity-dependently downregulates a set of genes controlling cell growth and differentiation in maturing cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Okazawa, Makoto; Abe, Haruka; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2016-05-13

    In the early postnatal period, cerebellar granule cells exhibit an activity-dependent downregulation of a set of immaturation genes involved in cell growth and migration and are shifted to establishment of a mature network formation. Through the use of a granule cell culture and both pharmacological and RNA interference (siRNA) analyses, the present investigation revealed that the downregulation of these immaturation genes is controlled by strikingly unified signaling mechanisms that operate sequentially through the stimulation of AMPA and NMDA receptors, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na(+) channels and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). This signaling cascade induces the Etv1 transcription factor, and knockdown of Etv1 by a siRNA technique prevented this activity-dependent downregulation of immaturation genes. Thus, taken into consideration the mechanism that controls the upregulation of maturation genes involved in synaptic formation, these results indicate that Etv1 orchestrates the activity-dependent regulation of both maturation and immaturation genes in developing granule cells and plays a key role in specifying the identity of mature granule cells in the cerebellum. PMID:27059140

  3. Restricted diffusion of calretinin in cerebellar granule cell dendrites implies Ca2+-dependent interactions via its EF-hand 5 domain

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Oliver; Schwaller, Beat; Brown, Edward B; Eilers, Jens; Schmidt, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs) are important regulators of neuronal Ca2+ signalling, acting either as buffers that shape Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ diffusion and/or as Ca2+ sensors. The diffusional mobility represents a crucial functional parameter of CaBPs, describing their range-of-action and possible interactions with binding partners. Calretinin (CR) is a CaBP widely expressed in the nervous system with strong expression in cerebellar granule cells. It is involved in regulating excitability and synaptic transmission of granule cells, and its absence leads to impaired motor control. We quantified the diffusional mobility of dye-labelled CR in mouse granule cells using two-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We found that movement of macromolecules in granule cell dendrites was not well described by free Brownian diffusion and that CR diffused unexpectedly slow compared to fluorescein dextrans of comparable size. During bursts of action potentials, which were associated with dendritic Ca2+ transients, the mobility of CR was further reduced. Diffusion was significantly accelerated by a peptide embracing EF-hand 5 of CR. Our results suggest long-lasting, Ca2+-dependent interactions of CR with large and/or immobile binding partners. These interactions render CR a poorly mobile Ca2+ buffer and point towards a Ca2+ sensor function of CR. PMID:23732647

  4. Changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase in cerebellar granule neurons by polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Chunyang; Besas, Jonathan

    2010-05-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as additive flame retardants and have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the effects of PBDEs are similar to the known human developmental neurotoxicants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on a molar basis. Previously, we reported that PBDE mixtures and congeners, perturbed calcium homeostasis which is critical for the development and function of the nervous system. In the present study, we tested whether environmentally relevant PBDE/PCB mixtures and congeners affected mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which are down-stream events of calcium signaling in cerebellar granule neuronal cultures. In this study, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)1/2, a widely studied MAPK cascade and known to be involved in learning and memory, levels were quantitated using western blot technique with phospho-specific antibodies. Glutamate (a positive control) increased pERK1/2 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner reaching maximum activation at 5-30 min of exposure and at doses >= 10 muM. Both Aroclor 1254 (a commercial penta PCB mixture) and DE-71 (a commercial penta PBDE mixture) elevated phospho-ERK1/2, producing maximum stimulation at 30 min and at concentrations >= 3 mug/ml; Aroclor 1254 was more efficacious than DE-71. DE-79 (an octabrominated diphenyl ether mixture) also elevated phospho-ERK1/2, but to a lesser extent than that of DE-71. PBDE congeners 47, 77, 99, and 153 also increased phospo-ERK1/2 in a concentration-dependent manner. The data indicated that PBDE congeners are more potent than the commercial mixtures. PCB 47 also increased phospho-ERK1/2 like its structural analog PBDE 47, but to a lesser extent, suggesting that these chemicals affect similar pathways. Cytotoxicity, measured as %LDH release, data showed that higher concentrations (> 30 muM) and longer exposures (> 30 min) are

  5. Neurotrophic effects of PACAP in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Botia, Béatrice; Basille, Magali; Allais, Aurélie; Raoult, Emilie; Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Galas, Ludovic; Jolivel, Valérie; Wurtz, Olivier; Komuro, Hitoshi; Fournier, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Burel, Delphine; Gonzalez, Bruno J; Vaudry, David

    2007-09-01

    In the rodent cerebellum, PACAP is expressed by Purkinje neurons and PAC1 receptors are present on granule cells during both the development period and in adulthood. Treatment of granule neurons with PACAP inhibits proliferation, slows migration, promotes survival and induces differentiation. PACAP also protects cerebellar granule cells against the deleterious effects of neurotoxic agents. Most of the neurotrophic effects of PACAP are mediated through the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and often involve the ERK MAPkinase. Caspase-3 is one of the key enzymes implicated in the neuroprotective action of PACAP but PACAP also inhibits caspase-9 activity and increases Bcl-2 expression. PACAP and functional PAC1 receptors are expressed in the monkey and human cerebellar cortex with a pattern of expression very similar to that described in rodents, suggesting that PACAP could also exert neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective functions in the cerebellum of primates including human. PMID:17544170

  6. Methylmercury disrupts the balance between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated cofilin in primary cultures of mice cerebellar granule cells A proteomic study

    SciTech Connect

    Vendrell, Iolanda; Carrascal, Montserrat; Abian, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury is an environmental contaminant that is particularly toxic to the developing central nervous system; cerebellar granule neurons are especially vulnerable. Here, primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were continuously exposed to methylmercury for up to 16 days in vitro (div). LC50 values were 508 +- 199, 345 +- 47, and 243 +- 45 nM after exposure for 6, 11, and 16 div, respectively. Proteins from cultured mouse CGCs were separated by 2DE. Seventy-one protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and MALDI-TOF/TOF sequencing. Prolonged exposure to a subcytotoxic concentration of methylmercury significantly increased non-phosphorylated cofilin both in cell protein extracts (1.4-fold; p < 0.01) and in mitochondrial-enriched fractions (1.7-fold; p < 0.01). The decrease in P-cofilin induced by methylmercury was concentration-dependent and occurred after different exposure times. The percentage of P-cofilin relative to total cofilin significantly decreased to 49 +- 13% vs. control cells after exposure to 300 nM methylmercury for 5 div. The balance between the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated form of cofilin regulates actin dynamics and facilitates actin filament turnover. Filamentous actin dynamics and reorganization are responsible of neuron shape change, migration, polarity formation, regulation of synaptic structures and function, and cell apoptosis. An alteration of the complex regulation of the cofilin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pathway could be envisaged as an underlying mechanism compatible with reported signs of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity.

  7. Regulation of Tlx3 by Pax6 is required for the restricted expression of Chrnα3 in Cerebellar Granule Neuron progenitors during development

    PubMed Central

    Divya, Thulasi Sheela; Lalitha, Soundararajan; Parvathy, Surendran; Subashini, Chandramohan; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; Rasheed, Vazhanthodi Abdul; Divya, Mundackal Sivaraman; Tole, Shubha; James, Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox gene Tlx3 is known to promote glutamatergic differentiation and is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of CNS. Contrary to this here, we discovered that Tlx3 is expressed in the proliferating progenitors of the external granule layer in the cerebellum, and examined factors that regulate this expression. Using Pax6−/−Sey mouse model and molecular interaction studies we demonstrate Pax6 is a key activator of Tlx3 specifically in cerebellum, and induces its expression starting at embryonic day (E)15. By Postnatal day (PN)7, Tlx3 is expressed in a highly restricted manner in the cerebellar granule neurons of the posterior cerebellar lobes, where it is required for the restricted expression of nicotinic cholinergic receptor-α3 subunit (Chrnα3) and other genes involved in formation of synaptic connections and neuronal migration. These results demonstrate a novel role for Tlx3 and indicate that Pax6-Tlx3 expression and interaction is part of a region specific regulatory network in cerebellum and its deregulation during development could possibly lead to Autistic spectral disorders (ASD). PMID:27452274

  8. Recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I exerts a trophic action and confers glutamate sensitivity on glutamate-resistant cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Calissano, P; Ciotti, M T; Battistini, L; Zona, C; Angelini, A; Merlo, D; Mercanti, D

    1993-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cells grown in the presence of a serum complex differentiate but are resistant to the lethal action of excitatory amino acids. When these cells are grown also in the presence of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) they become fully susceptible to the toxic, lethal action of glutamate. The glutamate-sensitizing action of IGF-I is dependent on concentration (half-maximal effect at 2-4 ng/ml) and time (half-maximal effect at 2-4 days in vitro) and is paralleled by the appearance of functionally active, glutamate-activated, Ca2+ channels and of voltage-gated Na+ and late K+ channels. IGF-I-induced glutamate sensitivity is rapidly reversible (t1/2 = 30-60 min) after removal of this somatomedin. The action of IGF-I is not mimicked by IGF-II, nerve growth factor, basic or acidic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or tumor necrosis factor alpha. We postulate that the constitutive phenotype of cerebellar granule cells is glutamate-resistant and becomes responsive to excitatory amino acids under the action of epigenetic cues among which IGF-I may be one of those operative in vivo. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8104340

  9. Mice deficient in carbonic anhydrase type 8 exhibit motor dysfunctions and abnormal calcium dynamics in the somatic region of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Matthew G; Weber, John T

    2015-06-01

    The waddles (wdl) mouse is characterized by a namesake "side-to-side" waddling gait due to a homozygous mutation of the Car8 gene. This mutation results in non-functional copies of the protein carbonic anhydrase type 8. Rota-rod testing was conducted to characterize the wdl mutations' effect on motor output. Results indicated that younger homozygotes outperformed their older cohorts, an effect not seen in previous studies. Heterozygotes, which were thought to be free of motor impairment, displayed motor learning deficiencies when compared with wild type performance. Acute cerebellar slices were then utilized for fluorescent calcium imaging experiments, which revealed significant alterations in cerebellar granule cell somatic calcium signaling when exposed to glutamate. The contribution of GABAergic signaling to these alterations was also verified using bath application of bicuculline. Changes in somatic calcium signals were found to be applicable to an in vivo scenario by comparing group responses to electrical stimulation of afferent mossy fiber projections. Finally, intracellular calcium store function was also found to be altered by the wdl mutation when slices were treated with thapsigargin. These findings, taken together with previous work on the wdl mouse, indicate a widespread disruption in cerebellar circuitry hampering proper neuronal communication. PMID:25721739

  10. Cell Signaling and Neurotoxicity: 3H-Arachidonic acid release (Phospholipase A2) in cerebellar granule neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell signaling is a complex process which controls basic cellular activities and coordinates actions to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Alterations in signaling processes have been associated with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and cerebellar ataxia, as well as, ...

  11. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with bilateral middle cerebellar peduncle lesions confirmed by repeated CSF-JC virus tests and coexistence of JC virus granule cell neuronopathy. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Takahashi, Akira

    2016-07-28

    A 65 year-old woman with small lymphocytic leukemia presented with subacute cerebellar ataxia. Six months after rituximab chemotherapy, a cranial MRI revealed lesions in the bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles. Both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) JC virus (JCV)-DNA PCR test on three occasions and brain biopsy were negative. CSF tests were repeated. The fourth test performed 6 months after the onset showed positive JCV-DNA, and a definite diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) was made. Neuroimaging of cerebellar atrophy was considered to be coexistence of granule cell neuronopathy. Medication with mirtazapine and mefloquine was temporarily effective for several months. Little are known solitary bilateral MRI lesions of the middle cerebellar peduncle in PML. JCV-PCR test of CSF may be negative at an earlier stage of PML. Repeated CSF tests should be essential to confirming the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:27356732

  12. Analysis of hedgehog signaling in cerebellar granule cell precursors in a conditional Nsdhl allele demonstrates an essential role for cholesterol in postnatal CNS development.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, David; DeBarber, Andrea E; Bir, Natalie; Binkley, Laura; Merkens, Louise S; Steiner, Robert D; Herman, Gail E

    2015-05-15

    NSDHL is a 3β-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase that is involved in the removal of two C-4 methyl groups in one of the later steps of cholesterol biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme are responsible for the X-linked, male lethal mouse mutations bare patches and striated, as well as most cases of human CHILD syndrome. Rare, hypomorphic NSDHL mutations are also associated with X-linked intellectual disability in males with CK syndrome. Since hemizygous male mice with Nsdhl mutations die by midgestation, we generated a conditional targeted Nsdhl mutation (Nsdhl(tm1.1Hrm)) to investigate the essential role of cholesterol in the early postnatal CNS. Ablation of Nsdhl in radial glia using GFAP-cre resulted in live-born, normal appearing affected male pups. However, the pups develop overt ataxia by postnatal day 8-10 and die shortly thereafter. Histological abnormalities include progressive loss of cortical and hippocampal neurons, as well as deficits in the proliferation and migration of cerebellar granule precursors and subsequent massive apoptosis of the cerebellar cortex. We replicated the granule cell precursor proliferation defect in vitro and demonstrate that it results from defective signaling by SHH. Furthermore, this defect is almost completely rescued by supplementation of the culture media with exogenous cholesterol, while methylsterol accumulation above the enzymatic block appears to be associated with increased cell death. These data support the absolute requirement for cholesterol synthesis in situ once the blood-brain-barrier forms and cholesterol transport to the fetus is abolished. They further emphasize the complex ramifications of cholesterogenic enzyme deficiency on cellular metabolism. PMID:25652406

  13. Analysis of hedgehog signaling in cerebellar granule cell precursors in a conditional Nsdhl allele demonstrates an essential role for cholesterol in postnatal CNS development

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, David; DeBarber, Andrea E.; Bir, Natalie; Binkley, Laura; Merkens, Louise S.; Steiner, Robert D.; Herman, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    NSDHL is a 3β-hydroxysterol dehydrogenase that is involved in the removal of two C-4 methyl groups in one of the later steps of cholesterol biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme are responsible for the X-linked, male lethal mouse mutations bare patches and striated, as well as most cases of human CHILD syndrome. Rare, hypomorphic NSDHL mutations are also associated with X-linked intellectual disability in males with CK syndrome. Since hemizygous male mice with Nsdhl mutations die by midgestation, we generated a conditional targeted Nsdhl mutation (Nsdhltm1.1Hrm) to investigate the essential role of cholesterol in the early postnatal CNS. Ablation of Nsdhl in radial glia using GFAP-cre resulted in live-born, normal appearing affected male pups. However, the pups develop overt ataxia by postnatal day 8–10 and die shortly thereafter. Histological abnormalities include progressive loss of cortical and hippocampal neurons, as well as deficits in the proliferation and migration of cerebellar granule precursors and subsequent massive apoptosis of the cerebellar cortex. We replicated the granule cell precursor proliferation defect in vitro and demonstrate that it results from defective signaling by SHH. Furthermore, this defect is almost completely rescued by supplementation of the culture media with exogenous cholesterol, while methylsterol accumulation above the enzymatic block appears to be associated with increased cell death. These data support the absolute requirement for cholesterol synthesis in situ once the blood-brain-barrier forms and cholesterol transport to the fetus is abolished. They further emphasize the complex ramifications of cholesterogenic enzyme deficiency on cellular metabolism. PMID:25652406

  14. Methylmercury-Dependent Increases in Fluo4 Fluorescence in Neonatal Rat Cerebellar Slices Depend on Granule Cell Migrational Stage and GABAA Receptor Modulation.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Aaron B; Mancini, Jayme D; Atchison, William D

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) disrupts cerebellar function, especially during development. Cerebellar granule cells (CGC), which are particularly susceptible to MeHg by unknown mechanisms, migrate during this process. Transient changes in intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+) i) are crucial to proper migration, and MeHg is well known to disrupt CGC Ca(2+) i regulation. Acutely prepared slices of neonatal rat cerebellum in conjunction with confocal microscopy and fluo4 epifluorescence were used to track changes induced by MeHg in CGC Ca(2+) i regulation in the external (EGL) and internal granule cell layers (IGL) as well as the molecular layer (ML). MeHg caused no cytotoxicity but did cause a time-dependent increase in fluo4 fluorescence that depended on the stage of CGC development. CGCs in the EGL were most susceptible to MeHg-induced increases in fluo4 fluorescence. MeHg increased fluorescence in CGC processes but only diffusely; Purkinje cells rarely fluoresced in these slices. Neither muscimol nor bicuculline alone altered baseline fluo4 fluorescence in any CGC layer, but each delayed the onset and reduced the magnitude of effect of MeHg on fluo4 fluorescence in the EGL and ML. In the IGL, both muscimol and bicuculline delayed the onset of MeHg-induced increases in fluo4 fluorescence but did not affect fluorescence magnitude. Thus, acute exposure to MeHg causes developmental stage-dependent increases in Ca(2+) i in CGCs. Effects are most prominent in CGCs during development or early stages of migration. GABAA receptors participate in an as yet unclear manner to MeHg-induced Ca(2+) i dysregulation of CGCs. PMID:26514794

  15. YB-1 is elevated in medulloblastoma and drives proliferation in Sonic hedgehog-dependent cerebellar granule neuron progenitor cells and medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dey, A; Robitaille, M; Remke, M; Maier, C; Malhotra, A; Gregorieff, A; Wrana, J L; Taylor, M D; Angers, S; Kenney, A M

    2016-08-11

    Postnatal proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs), proposed cells of origin for the SHH-associated subgroup of medulloblastoma, is driven by Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) in the developing cerebellum. Shh induces the oncogene Yes-associated protein (YAP), which drives IGF2 expression in CGNPs and mouse Shh-associated medulloblastomas. To determine how IGF2 expression is regulated downstream of YAP, we carried out an unbiased screen for transcriptional regulators bound to IGF2 promoters. We report that Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1), an onco-protein regulating transcription and translation, binds to IGF2 promoter P3. We observed that YB-1 is upregulated across human medulloblastoma subclasses as well as in other varieties of pediatric brain tumors. Utilizing the cerebellar progenitor model for the Shh subgroup of medulloblastoma in mice, we show for the first time that YB-1 is induced by Shh in CGNPs. Its expression is YAP-dependent and it is required for IGF2 expression in CGNPs. Finally, both gain-of function and loss-of-function experiments reveal that YB-1 activity is required for sustaining CGNP and medulloblastoma cell (MBC) proliferation. Collectively, our findings describe a novel role for YB-1 in driving proliferation in the developing cerebellum and MBCs and they identify the SHH:YAP:YB1:IGF2 axis as a powerful target for therapeutic intervention in medulloblastomas. PMID:26725322

  16. Repeated intermittent alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent increases expression of the GABAA receptor δ subunit in cerebellar granule neurons and delays motor development in rats

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Marvin R.; Vollmer, Cyndel C.; Zamudio-Bulcock, Paula A.; Vollmer, William; Blomquist, Samantha; Morton, Russell A.; Everett, Julie C.; Zurek, Agnieszka A.; Yu, Jieying; Orser, Beverley A.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) during fetal development can lead to long-lasting alterations, including deficits in fine motor skills and motor learning. Studies suggest that these are, in part, a consequence of cerebellar damage. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are the gateway of information into the cerebellar cortex. Functionally, CGNs are heavily regulated by phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition from Golgi cell interneurons; however, the effect of EtOH exposure on the development of GABAergic transmission in immature CGNs has not been investigated. To model EtOH exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy, neonatal pups were exposed intermittently to high levels of vaporized EtOH from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. This exposure gradually increased pup serum EtOH concentrations (SECs) to ~60 mM (~0.28 g/dl) during the 4 hours of exposure. EtOH levels gradually decreased to baseline 8 hrs after the end of exposure. Surprisingly, basal tonic and phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs were not significantly affected by postnatal alcohol exposure (PAE). However, PAE increased the expression of δ subunit expression at P28 as detected by immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Also, electrophysiological studies with an agonist that is highly selective for δ-containing GABAA receptors, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP), showed an increase in THIP-induced tonic current. Behavioral studies of PAE rats did not reveal any deficits in motor coordination, except for a delay in the acquisition of the mid-air righting reflex that was apparent at P15 to P18. These findings demonstrate that repeated intermittent exposure to high levels of EtOH during the equivalent of the last trimester of human pregnancy has significant but relatively subtle effects on motor coordination and GABAergic transmission in CGNs in rats. PMID:24316160

  17. Kinetic and functional analysis of transient, persistent and resurgent sodium currents in rat cerebellar granule cells in situ: an electrophysiological and modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Magistretti, Jacopo; Castelli, Loretta; Forti, Lia; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2006-01-01

    Cerebellar neurones show complex and differentiated mechanisms of action potential generation that have been proposed to depend on peculiar properties of their voltage-dependent Na+ currents. In this study we analysed voltage-dependent Na+ currents of rat cerebellar granule cells (GCs) by performing whole-cell, patch-clamp experiments in acute rat cerebellar slices. A transient Na+ current (INaT) was always present and had the properties of a typical fast-activating/inactivating Na+ current. In addition to INaT, robust persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na+ currents were observed. INaP peaked at ∼−40 mV, showed half-maximal activation at ∼−55 mV, and its maximal amplitude was about 1.5% of that of INaT. INaR was elicited by repolarizing pulses applied following step depolarizations able to activate/inactivate INaT, and showed voltage- and time-dependent activation and voltage-dependent decay kinetics. The conductance underlying INaR showed a bell-shaped voltage dependence, with peak at −35 mV. A significant correlation was found between GC INaR and INaT peak amplitudes; however, GCs expressing INaT of similar size showed marked variability in terms of INaR amplitude, and in a fraction of cells INaR was undetectable. INaT, INaP and INaR could be accounted for by a 13-state kinetic scheme comprising closed, open, inactivated and blocked states. Current-clamp experiments carried out to identify possible functional correlates of INaP and/or INaR revealed that in GCs single action potentials were followed by depolarizing afterpotentials (DAPs). In a majority of cells, DAPs showed properties consistent with INaR playing a role in their generation. Computer modelling showed that INaR promotes DAP generation and enhances high-frequency firing, whereas INaP boosts near-threshold firing activity. Our findings suggest that special properties of voltage-dependent Na+ currents provides GCs with mechanisms suitable for shaping activity patterns, with potentially

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists protect cerebellar granule cells from cytokine-induced apoptotic cell death by inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Heneka, M T; Feinstein, D L; Galea, E; Gleichmann, M; Wüllner, U; Klockgether, T

    1999-12-01

    Cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) can express the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in response to inflammatory stimuli. We demonstrate that induction of iNOS in CGCs by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and pro-inflammatory cytokines results in cell death that was potentiated by excess L-arginine and inhibited by the selective iNOS inhibitor, 2-amino-5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-4H-1,3-thiazine. The NO-mediated cell death was accompanied by increased caspase-3-like activity, DNA fragmentation and positive terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), suggesting that apoptosis mediates CGC cell death. Incubation of CGCs with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), ibuprofen or indomethacin, or with 15-deoxy-delta12,14 prostaglandin J2 (PGJ2) downregulates iNOS expression and reduces subsequent cell death. Since in other cell types, both NSAIDs and PGJ2 can activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) and downregulate cytokine levels and iNOS expression, and since CGCs express PPARgamma in vivo and in vitro, our data suggest that activation of CGC PPARgamma mediates iNOS suppression and reduced cell death. Because PPARgamma is expressed in brains of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients, in which neuronal iNOS expression and apoptotic cell death have been described, these results may help explain the basis for the beneficial effects of NSAIDs in AD. PMID:10695726

  19. Cr (VI) induced oxidative stress and toxicity in cultured cerebellar granule neurons at different stages of development and protective effect of Rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Abolfazl; Soodi, Maliheh; Amani, Nahid

    2016-03-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a widespread metal ion in the workplace, industrial effluent, and water. The toxicity of chromium (VI) on various organs including the liver, kidneys, and lung were studied, but little is known about neurotoxicity. In this study, neurotoxic effects of Cr (VI) have been investigated by cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Immature and mature neurons were exposed to different concentrations of potassium dichromate for 24 h and cytotoxicity was measured by MTT assay. In addition, immature neurons were exposed for 5 days as regards cytotoxic effect in development stages. The reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the protective effect of Rosmarinic acid on mature and immature neurons exposed to potassium dichromate, were measured. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and acetylcholinesterase activity in mature neurons were assessed following exposure to potassium dichromate. The results indicate that toxicity of Cr (VI) dependent on maturation steps. Cr (VI) was less toxic for immature neurons. Also, Cr (VI) induced MMP reduction and ROS production in both immature and mature neurons. In Cr (VI) treated neurons, increased lipid peroxidation and GPx activity but not acetylcholinesterase activity was observed. Interestingly, Rosmarinic acid, as a natural antioxidant, could protect mature but not immature neurons against Cr (VI) induced toxicity. Our findings revealed vulnerability of mature neurons to Cr (VI) induced toxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:25213303

  20. Reciprocal autoregulation by NFI occupancy and ETV1 promotes the developmental expression of dendrite-synapse genes in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Baojin; Cave, John W.; Dobner, Paul R.; Mullikin-Kilpatrick, Debra; Bartzokis, Marina; Zhu, Hong; Chow, Chi-Wing; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Kilpatrick, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Factor One (NFI) transcription factors regulate temporal gene expression required for dendritogenesis and synaptogenesis via delayed occupancy of target promoters in developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Mechanisms that promote NFI temporal occupancy have not been previously defined. We show here that the transcription factor ETV1 directly binds to and is required for expression and NFI occupancy of a cohort of NFI-dependent genes in CGNs maturing in vivo. Expression of ETV1 is low in early postnatal cerebellum and increases with maturation, mirroring NFI temporal occupancy of coregulated target genes. Precocious expression of ETV1 in mouse CGNs accelerated onset of expression and NFI temporal occupancy of late target genes and enhanced Map2(+) neurite outgrowth. ETV1 also activated expression and NFI occupancy of the Etv1 gene itself, and this autoregulatory loop preceded ETV1 binding and activation of other coregulated target genes in vivo. These findings suggest a potential model in which ETV1 activates NFI temporal binding to a subset of late-expressed genes in a stepwise manner by initial positive feedback regulation of the Etv1 gene itself followed by activation of downstream coregulated targets as ETV1 expression increases. Sequential transcription factor autoregulation and subsequent binding to downstream promoters may provide an intrinsic developmental timer for dendrite/synapse gene expression. PMID:26941328

  1. Reciprocal autoregulation by NFI occupancy and ETV1 promotes the developmental expression of dendrite-synapse genes in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Ding, Baojin; Cave, John W; Dobner, Paul R; Mullikin-Kilpatrick, Debra; Bartzokis, Marina; Zhu, Hong; Chow, Chi-Wing; Gronostajski, Richard M; Kilpatrick, Daniel L

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Factor One (NFI) transcription factors regulate temporal gene expression required for dendritogenesis and synaptogenesis via delayed occupancy of target promoters in developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Mechanisms that promote NFI temporal occupancy have not been previously defined. We show here that the transcription factor ETV1 directly binds to and is required for expression and NFI occupancy of a cohort of NFI-dependent genes in CGNs maturing in vivo. Expression of ETV1 is low in early postnatal cerebellum and increases with maturation, mirroring NFI temporal occupancy of coregulated target genes. Precocious expression of ETV1 in mouse CGNs accelerated onset of expression and NFI temporal occupancy of late target genes and enhanced Map2(+) neurite outgrowth. ETV1 also activated expression and NFI occupancy of the Etv1 gene itself, and this autoregulatory loop preceded ETV1 binding and activation of other coregulated target genes in vivo. These findings suggest a potential model in which ETV1 activates NFI temporal binding to a subset of late-expressed genes in a stepwise manner by initial positive feedback regulation of the Etv1 gene itself followed by activation of downstream coregulated targets as ETV1 expression increases. Sequential transcription factor autoregulation and subsequent binding to downstream promoters may provide an intrinsic developmental timer for dendrite/synapse gene expression. PMID:26941328

  2. Simultaneous determination of purine nucleotides, their metabolites and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in cerebellar granule cells by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Gagliardi, Sara; Samaja, Michele; Marra, Ersilia

    2003-02-01

    The method described here allows the quantitative simultaneous determination of adenosine 5'-triphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, adenosine, guanosine 5'-triphosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, uric acid, xanthine, hypoxanthine and beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by ion-pair high performance liquid chromatography. The chromatographic analysis requires 26 min per sample and allows the separation of the mentioned metabolites in a time as short as 16 min. Primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing 25 mM KCl for 1.5-48 h and their acid extracts were injected onto column. Uric acid, inosine 5'-monophosphate, inosine, beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, adenosine, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, guanosine 5'-diphosphate, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, guanosine 5'-triphosphate and adenosine 5'-triphosphate were identified and quantified, while hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanosine were below the detection limit. This method makes use of a single-step sample pre-treatment procedure which allows a greater than 91% recovery of the compounds of interest and provides the assay of the metabolites of interest in little amounts of cell extracts. Therefore, this method is suitable to evaluate the energetic state in a variety of cell types, both under normal and dismetabolic conditions, such as after the induction of apoptosis or necrosis. PMID:12565687

  3. Kruppel-Like Factor 4 Regulates Granule Cell Pax6 Expression and Cell Proliferation in Early Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peter; Ha, Thomas; Larouche, Matt; Swanson, Douglas; Goldowitz, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Kruppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is a transcription factor that regulates many important cellular processes in stem cell biology, cancer, and development. We used histological and molecular methods to study the expression of Klf4 in embryonic development of the normal and Klf4 knockout cerebellum. We find that Klf4 is expressed strongly in early granule cell progenitor development but tails-off considerably by the end of embryonic development. Klf4 is also co-expressed with Pax6 in these cells. In the Klf4-null mouse, which is perinatal lethal, Klf4 positively regulates Pax6 expression and regulates the proliferation of neuronal progenitors in the rhombic lip, external granular layer and the neuroepithelium. This paper is the first to describe a role for Klf4 in the cerebellum and provides insight into this gene’s function in neuronal development. PMID:26226504

  4. N-terminal cleavage of the mitochondrial fusion GTPase OPA1 occurs via a caspase-independent mechanism in cerebellar granule neurons exposed to oxidative or nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Josie J.; Zommer, Amelia E.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Duval, Nathan; Blackstone, Craig; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal cell death via apoptosis or necrosis underlies several devastating neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from oxidative or nitrosative stress often acts as an initiating stimulus for intrinsic apoptosis or necrosis. These events frequently occur in conjunction with imbalances in the mitochondrial fission and fusion equilibrium, although the cause and effect relationships remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) that oxidative or nitrosative stress induces an N-terminal cleavage of optic atrophy-1 (OPA1), a dynamin-like GTPase that regulates mitochondrial fusion and maintenance of cristae architecture. This cleavage event is indistinguishable from the N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 observed in CGNs undergoing caspase-mediated apoptosis (Loucks et al., 2009) and results in removal of a key lysine residue (K301) within the GTPase domain. OPA1 cleavage in CGNs occurs coincident with extensive mitochondrial fragmentation, disruption of the microtubule network, and cell death. In contrast to OPA1 cleavage induced in CGNs by removing depolarizing extracellular potassium (5K apoptotic conditions), oxidative or nitrosative stress-induced OPA1 cleavage caused by complex I inhibition or nitric oxide, respectively, is caspase-independent. N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 is also observed in vivo in aged rat and mouse midbrain and hippocampal tissues. We conclude that N-terminal cleavage and subsequent inactivation of OPA1 may be a contributing factor in the neuronal cell death processes underlying neurodegenerative diseases, particularly those associated with aging. Furthermore, these data suggest that OPA1 cleavage is a likely convergence point for mitochondrial dysfunction and imbalances in mitochondrial fission and fusion induced by oxidative or nitrosative stress. PMID:23220553

  5. N-terminal cleavage of the mitochondrial fusion GTPase OPA1 occurs via a caspase-independent mechanism in cerebellar granule neurons exposed to oxidative or nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Gray, Josie J; Zommer, Amelia E; Bouchard, Ron J; Duval, Nathan; Blackstone, Craig; Linseman, Daniel A

    2013-02-01

    Neuronal cell death via apoptosis or necrosis underlies several devastating neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. Mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from oxidative or nitrosative stress often acts as an initiating stimulus for intrinsic apoptosis or necrosis. These events frequently occur in conjunction with imbalances in the mitochondrial fission and fusion equilibrium, although the cause and effect relationships remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate in primary rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) that oxidative or nitrosative stress induces an N-terminal cleavage of optic atrophy-1 (OPA1), a dynamin-like GTPase that regulates mitochondrial fusion and maintenance of cristae architecture. This cleavage event is indistinguishable from the N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 observed in CGNs undergoing caspase-mediated apoptosis (Loucks et al., 2009) and results in removal of a key lysine residue (K301) within the GTPase domain. OPA1 cleavage in CGNs occurs coincident with extensive mitochondrial fragmentation, disruption of the microtubule network, and cell death. In contrast to OPA1 cleavage induced in CGNs by removing depolarizing extracellular potassium (5K apoptotic conditions), oxidative or nitrosative stress-induced OPA1 cleavage caused by complex I inhibition or nitric oxide, respectively, is caspase-independent. N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 is also observed in vivo in aged rat and mouse midbrain and hippocampal tissues. We conclude that N-terminal cleavage and subsequent inactivation of OPA1 may be a contributing factor in the neuronal cell death processes underlying neurodegenerative diseases, particularly those associated with aging. Furthermore, these data suggest that OPA1 cleavage is a likely convergence point for mitochondrial dysfunction and imbalances in mitochondrial fission and fusion induced by oxidative or nitrosative stress. PMID:23220553

  6. Curcumin Pretreatment Induces Nrf2 and an Antioxidant Response and Prevents Hemin-Induced Toxicity in Primary Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons of Rats

    PubMed Central

    González-Reyes, Susana; Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin is a bifunctional antioxidant derived from Curcuma longa. This study identifies curcumin as a neuroprotectant against hemin-induced damage in primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) of rats. Hemin, the oxidized form of heme, is a highly reactive compound that induces cellular injury. Pretreatment of CGNs with 5–30 μM curcumin effectively increased by 2.3–4.9 fold heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and by 5.6–14.3-fold glutathione (GSH) levels. Moreover, 15 μM curcumin attenuated by 55% the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, by 94% the reduction of GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio, and by 49% the cell death induced by hemin. The inhibition of heme oxygenase system or GSH synthesis with tin mesoporphyrin and buthionine sulfoximine, respectively, suppressed the protective effect of curcumin against hemin-induced toxicity. These data strongly suggest that HO-1 and GSH play a major role in the protective effect of curcumin. Furthermore, it was found that 24 h of incubation with curcumin increases by 1.4-, 2.3-, and 5.2-fold the activity of glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase, respectively. Additionally, it was found that curcumin was capable of inducing nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) translocation into the nucleus. These data suggest that the pretreatment with curcumin induces Nrf2 and an antioxidant response that may play an important role in the protective effect of this antioxidant against hemin-induced neuronal death. PMID:24454990

  7. Exposure to 50 Hz magnetic field modulates GABAA currents in cerebellar granule neurons through an EP receptor-mediated PKC pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guang; Ren, Zhen; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-10-01

    Previous work from both our lab and others have indicated that exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (ELF-MF) was able to modify ion channel functions. However, very few studies have investigated the effects of MF on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABA(A) Rs) channel functioning, which are fundamental to overall neuronal excitability. Here, our major goal is to reveal the potential effects of ELF-MF on GABA(A) Rs activity in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Our results indicated that exposing CGNs to 1 mT ELF-MF for 60 min. significantly increased GABA(A) R currents without modifying sensitivity to GABA. However, activation of PKA by db-cAMP failed to do so, but led to a slight decrease instead. On the other hand, PKC activation or inhibition by PMA or Bis and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) mimicked or eliminated the field-induced-increase of GABA(A) R currents. Western blot analysis indicated that the intracellular levels of phosphorylated PKC (pPKC) were significantly elevated after 60 min. of ELF-MF exposure, which was subsequently blocked by application of DHA or EP1 receptor-specific (prostaglandin E receptor 1) antagonist (SC19220), but not by EP2-EP4 receptor-specific antagonists. SC19220 also significantly inhibited the ELF-MF-induced elevation on GABA(A) R currents. Together, these data obviously demonstrated for the first time that neuronal GABA(A) currents are significantly increased by ELF-MF exposure, and also suggest that these effects are mediated via an EP1 receptor-mediated PKC pathway. Future work will focus on a more comprehensive analysis of the physiological and/or pathological consequences of these effects. PMID:26176998

  8. Exposure to 50 Hz magnetic field modulates GABAA currents in cerebellar granule neurons through an EP receptor-mediated PKC pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Ren, Zhen; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2015-01-01

    Previous work from both our lab and others have indicated that exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields (ELF-MF) was able to modify ion channel functions. However, very few studies have investigated the effects of MF on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAARs) channel functioning, which are fundamental to overall neuronal excitability. Here, our major goal is to reveal the potential effects of ELF-MF on GABAARs activity in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Our results indicated that exposing CGNs to 1 mT ELF-MF for 60 min. significantly increased GABAAR currents without modifying sensitivity to GABA. However, activation of PKA by db-cAMP failed to do so, but led to a slight decrease instead. On the other hand, PKC activation or inhibition by PMA or Bis and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) mimicked or eliminated the field-induced-increase of GABAAR currents. Western blot analysis indicated that the intracellular levels of phosphorylated PKC (pPKC) were significantly elevated after 60 min. of ELF-MF exposure, which was subsequently blocked by application of DHA or EP1 receptor-specific (prostaglandin E receptor 1) antagonist (SC19220), but not by EP2-EP4 receptor-specific antagonists. SC19220 also significantly inhibited the ELF-MF-induced elevation on GABAAR currents. Together, these data obviously demonstrated for the first time that neuronal GABAA currents are significantly increased by ELF-MF exposure, and also suggest that these effects are mediated via an EP1 receptor-mediated PKC pathway. Future work will focus on a more comprehensive analysis of the physiological and/or pathological consequences of these effects. PMID:26176998

  9. GDF15 regulates Kv2.1-mediated outward K+ current through the Akt/mTOR signalling pathway in rat cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang-Ying; Huang, An-Qi; Zhou, Meng-Hua; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2014-01-01

    GDF15 (growth/differentiation factor 15), a novel member of the TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) superfamily, plays critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, but the signal transduction pathways and receptor subtypes involved are not well understood. In the present paper, we report that GDF15 specifically increases the IK (delayed-rectifier outward K+ current) in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons) in time- and concentration-dependent manners. The GDF15-induced amplification of the IK is mediated by the increased expression and reduced lysosome-dependent degradation of the Kv2.1 protein, the main α-subunit of the IK channel. Exposure of CGNs to GDF15 markedly induced the phosphorylation of ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase), Akt and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), but the GDF15-induced IK densities and increased expression of Kv2.1 were attenuated only by Akt and mTOR, and not ERK, inhibitors. Pharmacological inhibition of the Src-mediated phosphorylation of TGFβR2 (TGFβ receptor 2), not TGFβR1, abrogated the effect of GDF15 on IK amplification and Kv2.1 induction. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that GDF15 increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of TGFβRII in the CGN lysate. The results of the present study reveal a novel regulation of Kv2.1 by GDF15 mediated through the TGFβRII-activated Akt/mTOR pathway, which is a previously uncharacterized Smad-independent mechanism of GDF15 signalling. PMID:24597762

  10. Weaker control of the electrical properties of cerebellar granule cells by tonically active GABAA receptors in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Down’s syndrome (DS) is caused by triplication of all or part of human chromosome 21 and is characterized by a decrease in the overall size of the brain. One of the brain regions most affected is the cerebellum, in which the number of granule cells (GCs) is markedly decreased. GCs process sensory information entering the cerebellum via mossy fibres and pass it on to Purkinje cells and inhibitory interneurons. How GCs transform incoming signals depends on their input–output relationship, which is adjusted by tonically active GABAA receptor channels. Results We report that in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, in which cerebellar volume and GC number are decreased as in DS, the tonic GABAA receptor current in GCs is smaller than in wild-type mice and is less effective in moderating input resistance and raising the minimum current required for action potential firing. We also find that tonically active GABAA receptors curb the height and broaden the width of action potentials in wild-type GCs but not in Ts65Dn GCs. Single-cell real-time quantitative PCR reveals that these electrical differences are accompanied by decreased expression of the gene encoding the GABAA receptor β3 subunit but not genes coding for some of the other GABAA receptor subunits expressed in GCs (α1, α6, β2 and δ). Conclusions Weaker moderation of excitability and action potential waveform in GCs of the Ts65Dn mouse by tonically active GABAA receptors is likely to contribute to atypical transfer of information through the cerebellum. Similar changes may occur in DS. PMID:23870245

  11. In vitro study of uptake and synthesis of creatine and its precursors by cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes suggests some hypotheses on the physiopathology of the inherited disorders of creatine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The discovery of the inherited disorders of creatine (Cr) synthesis and transport in the last few years disclosed the importance of blood Cr supply for the normal functioning of the brain. These putatively rare diseases share a common pathogenetic mechanism (the depletion of brain Cr) and similar phenotypes characterized by mental retardation, language disturbances, seizures and movement disorders. In the effort to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating Cr pool inside the nervous tissue, Cr transport and synthesis and related gene transcripts were explored in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes. Methods Cr uptake and synthesis were explored in vitro by incubating monotypic primary cultures of rat type I astrocytes and cerebellar granule cells with: a) D3-Creatine (D3Cr) and D3Cr plus β-guanidinopropionate (GPA, an inhibitor of Cr transporter), and b) labelled precursors of Guanidinoacetate (GAA) and Cr (Arginine, Arg; Glycine, Gly). Intracellular D3Cr and labelled GAA and Cr were assessed by ESI-MS/MS. Creatine transporter (CT1), L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT), and S-adenosylmethionine:guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT) gene expression was assessed in the same cells by real time PCR. Results D3Cr signal was extremely high in cells incubated with this isotope (labelled/unlabelled Cr ratio reached about 10 and 122, respectively in cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes) and was reduced by GPA. Labelled Arg and Gly were taken up by the cells and incorporated in GAA, whose concentration paralleled that of these precursors both in the extracellular medium and inside the cells (astrocytes). In contrast, the increase of labelled Cr was relatively much more limited since labelled Cr after precursors' supplementation did not exceed 2,7% (cerebellar granule cells) and 21% (astrocytes) of unlabelled Cr. Finally, AGAT, GAMT and SLC6A8 were expressed in both kind of cells. Conclusions Our results

  12. Differential effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls on [3H]arachidonic acid release in rat cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S; Derr-Yellin, Ethel C

    2002-08-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), which are widely used as flame-retardants, have been increasing in environmental and human tissue samples during the past 20-30 years, while other structurally related, persistent organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (on a TEQ basis), have decreased. PBDEs have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk, and developmental and long-term exposure to these contaminants may pose a human health risk, especially to children. Previously, we demonstrated that PCBs, which cause neurotoxic effects, including changes in learning and memory, stimulated the release of [(3)H]arachidonic acid ([(3)H]AA) by a cPLA(2)/iPLA(2)-dependent mechanism. PLA(2)(phospholipase A(2)) activity has been associated with learning and memory, and AA has been identified as a second messenger involved in synaptic plasticity. The objective of the present study was to test whether PBDE mixtures (DE-71 and DE-79), like other organohalogen mixtures, have a similar action on [(3)H]AA release in an in vitro neuronal culture model. Cerebellar granule cells at 7 days in culture were labeled with [(3)H]AA for 16-20 h and then exposed in vitro to PBDEs. DE-71, a mostly pentabromodiphenyl ether mixture, significantly stimulated [(3)H]AA release at concentrations as low as 10 microg/ml, while DE-79, a mostly octabromodiphenyl ether mixture, did not stimulate [(3)H]AA release, even at 50 microg/ml. The release of [(3)H]AA by DE-71 is time-dependent, and a significant increase was seen after only 5-10 min of exposure. The removal and chelation of calcium from the exposure buffer, using 0.3 mM EGTA, significantly attenuated the DE-71-stimulated [(3)H]AA release; however, only an 18% inhibition of the release was demonstrated for the calcium replete conditions at 30 microg/ml DE-71. Methyl arachidonylfluorophosphonate (5 microM), an inhibitor of cPLA(2)/iPLA(2), completely attenuated the DE-71

  13. Multisite phosphorylation of c-Jun at threonine 91/93/95 triggers the onset of c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C E; Albanito, L; De Marco, P; Aiello, D; Maggiolini, M; Napoli, A; Musti, A M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell (CGC) apoptosis by trophic/potassium (TK) deprivation is a model of election to study the interplay of pro-apoptotic and pro-survival signaling pathways in neuronal cell death. In this model, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) induces pro-apoptotic genes through the c-Jun/activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor. On the other side, a survival pathway initiated by lithium leads to repression of pro-apoptotic c-Jun/AP-1 target genes without interfering with JNK activity. Yet, the mechanism by which lithium inhibits c-Jun activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we used this model system to study the regulation and function of site-specific c-Jun phosphorylation at the S63 and T91/T93 JNK sites in neuronal cell death. We found that TK-deprivation led to c-Jun multiphosphorylation at all three JNK sites. However, immunofluorescence analysis of c-Jun phosphorylation at single cell level revealed that the S63 site was phosphorylated in all c-Jun-expressing cells, whereas the response of T91/T93 phosphorylation was more sensitive, mirroring the switch-like apoptotic response of CGCs. Conversely, lithium prevented T91T93 phosphorylation and cell death without affecting the S63 site, suggesting that T91T93 phosphorylation triggers c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity. Accordingly, a c-Jun mutant lacking the T95 priming site for T91/93 phosphorylation protected CGCs from apoptosis, whereas it was able to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Vice versa, a c-Jun mutant bearing aspartate substitution of T95 overwhelmed lithium-mediate protection of CGCs from TK-deprivation, validating that inhibition of T91/T93/T95 phosphorylation underlies the effect of lithium on cell death. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed multiphosphorylation of c-Jun at T91/T93/T95 in cells. Moreover, JNK phosphorylated recombinant c-Jun at T91/T93 in a T95-dependent manner. On the basis of our results, we propose that T91/T93/T95 multiphosphorylation of c-Jun functions as a

  14. Effects of depolarization and NMDA antagonists on the role survival of cerebellar granule cells: a pivotal role for protein kinase C isoforms.

    PubMed

    Lin, W W; Wang, C W; Chuang, D M

    1997-06-01

    Primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) grown in high-K+ (25 mM; K25) medium progressively differentiate in vitro. Differentiation is noticeable after 3-4 days in vitro (DIV) and reach a mature stage after 8 DIV. Longer cultivation of CGCs (>13 DIV) triggers the processes of spontaneous cell death. However, if cultured in normal physiological K concentration (5 mM; K5), a significant proportion of the cells dies by the end of the first week in culture. To address the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the development of CGCs, we measured the kinase activity as well as the protein level of the kinase isoforms. As the K25 CGC culture proceeded, the PKC activity time-dependently increased by 3.2-fold, reaching a steady state at 8 DIV. Western blot analysis using PKC isoform-specific antibodies revealed an increase in levels of PKC alpha, gamma, mu, lambda, and iota from 2 to 8 DIV. A slight increase or decrease at 4 DIV was observed for PKC epsilon and betaII, respectively, whereas no significant change was observed for betaI. The isoforms of delta, theta, eta, and zeta were not detected. Comparing the 14 DIV cultures with the 10 DIV cultures, the immunoreactivities of PKC iota and epsilon were decreased, those of PKC alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, and lambda were unchanged, whereas that of PKC mu was still increased. In K5 cultures, the immunoreactivity of each PKC isoform at 2-4 DIV was similar to that observed in K25 cells, although no remarkable differentiation features were observed. Coordinated with the appearance of cell death at 8 DIV in low-K+ cultures, levels of PKC alpha, mu, lambda, and iota, but not the others, were markedly decreased. The NMDA receptor antagonists MK-801 and 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid markedly prevented the age-induced apoptosis of CGCs, and the cells survived >18 DIV under these conditions. The cytoprotective effect of MK-801 was concomitant with the increases in levels of PKC gamma, lambda, iota, and mu at 10 and 14 DIV

  15. Ternary Kv4.2 channels recapitulate voltage-dependent inactivation kinetics of A-type K+ channels in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Amarillo, Yimy; De Santiago-Castillo, Jose A; Dougherty, Kevin; Maffie, Jonathon; Kwon, Elaine; Covarrubias, Manuel; Rudy, Bernardo

    2008-01-01

    Kv4 channels mediate most of the somatodendritic subthreshold operating A-type current (ISA) in neurons. This current plays essential roles in the regulation of spike timing, repetitive firing, dendritic integration and plasticity. Neuronal Kv4 channels are thought to be ternary complexes of Kv4 pore-forming subunits and two types of accessory proteins, Kv channel interacting proteins (KChIPs) and the dipeptidyl-peptidase-like proteins (DPPLs) DPPX (DPP6) and DPP10. In heterologous cells, ternary Kv4 channels exhibit inactivation that slows down with increasing depolarization. Here, we compared the voltage dependence of the inactivation rate of channels expressed in heterologous mammalian cells by Kv4.2 proteins with that of channels containing Kv4.2 and KChIP1, Kv4.2 and DPPX-S, or Kv4.2, KChIP1 and DPPX-S, and found that the relation between inactivation rate and membrane potential is distinct for these four conditions. Moreover, recordings from native neurons showed that the inactivation kinetics of the ISA in cerebellar granule neurons has voltage dependence that is remarkably similar to that of ternary Kv4 channels containing KChIP1 and DPPX-S proteins in heterologous cells. The fact that this complex and unique behaviour (among A-type K+ currents) is observed in both the native current and the current expressed in heterologous cells by the ternary complex containing Kv4, DPPX and KChIP proteins supports the hypothesis that somatically recorded native Kv4 channels in neurons include both types of accessory protein. Furthermore, quantitative global kinetic modelling showed that preferential closed-state inactivation and a weakly voltage-dependent opening step can explain the slowing of the inactivation rate with increasing depolarization. Therefore, it is likely that preferential closed-state inactivation is the physiological mechanism that regulates the activity of both ternary Kv4 channel complexes and native ISA-mediating channels. PMID:18276729

  16. Protective effects of fangchinoline and tetrandrine on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative neuronal cell damage in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Sang Bum; Ban, Ju Yeon; Lee, Bo Young; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2003-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the neuroprotective effects of fangchinoline (FAN) and tetrandrine (TET), bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, which exhibit the characteristics of Ca 2+ channel blockers, on H2O2 -induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. H2O2 produced a concentration-dependent reduction of cell viability, which was blocked by (5 R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[ a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), an N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, verapamil, an L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker, and NG-nitro- L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Pretreatment with FAN and TET over a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 microM significantly decreased the H2O2 -induced neuronal cell death as assessed by a trypan blue exclusion test, a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the number of apoptotic nuclei. In addition, FAN and TET inhibited the H2O2 -induced elevation of glutamate release into the medium, elevation of the cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+] c ), and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that FAN and TET may mitigate the harmful effects of H2O2 -induced neuronal cell death by interfering with the increase of [Ca 2+] c, and then by inhibiting glutamate release and generation of ROS. Abbreviations. AP5:D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid DMSO:dimethyl sulfoxide FAN:fangchinoline H 2 DCF-DA:2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate MK-801:(5 R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[ a,d]cyclohepten-5,20-imine MTT:3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide L-NAME: NG-Nitro- L-arginine methyl ester NMDA: N-methyl- D-aspartate TET:tetrandrine PMID:12865967

  17. Interactive effects of environmentally relevant polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins on [3H]phorbol ester binding in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kodavanti, P R; Ward, T R

    1998-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent contaminants that exist as complex mixtures in the environment. One problem faced by risk assessors is that the possible interactive effects of specific PCB congeners and related chemicals found in environmental and biological samples have not been systematically investigated. Some PCBs perturb Ca2+ homeostasis and cause protein kinase C (PKC) translocation in neuronal cell cultures and in brain homogenate preparations at concentrations where no cytotoxicity is observed, and these systems are necessary for the growth and normal functioning of neurons. The changes in second messenger systems appear to be associated with the extent of noncoplanarity of the PCB molecule. We studied the interactive effects of selected PCB congeners, a PCB metabolite, and a dioxin on PKC translocation, as determined by [3H]phorbol ester binding in cerebellar granule cells. The binary combinations included coplanar and noncoplanar PCB congeners or PCB congeners with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)/PCB metabolite. In addition, we tested the interactive effects of several PCB congeners (three or more) found in environmental samples such as human milk and blood, contaminated fish, and brain samples from PCB-treated animals. The results indicated that 1) the coplanar congener [3,3',4, 4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TeCB)] did not alter the in vitro activity of the noncoplanar (2,2',5,5'-TeCB) or coplanar [4, 4'-dichlorobiphenyl (DCB)] congeners; 2) binary mixtures of active PCB congeners (2,2',4,4'-TeCB and 2,2'-DCB; 2,2'-DCB and 3,5-DCB; 2,2',3,5',6-PeCB and 2,2',4,4',5-PeCB) interact in a dose-additive manner; 3) TCDD did not alter the activity of either coplanar (3,3', 4,4'-TeCB) or noncoplanar (2,2',5,5'-TeCB) congeners; 4) the interaction between the parent PCB congener and hydroxy metabolite of PCB is additive; 5) PCB congener mixtures at the ratios found in environmental samples are biologically active; and 6) there was no indication

  18. The compartmental restriction of cerebellar interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Consalez, G. Giacomo; Hawkes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Purkinje cells (PC's) of the cerebellar cortex are subdivided into multiple different molecular phenotypes that form an elaborate array of parasagittal stripes. This array serves as a scaffold around which afferent topography is organized. The ways in which cerebellar interneurons may be restricted by this scaffolding are less well-understood. This review begins with a brief survey of cerebellar topography. Next, it reviews the development of stripes in the cerebellum with a particular emphasis on the embryological origins of cerebellar interneurons. These data serve as a foundation to discuss the hypothesis that cerebellar compartment boundaries also restrict cerebellar interneurons, both excitatory [granule cells, unipolar brush cells (UBCs)] and inhibitory (e.g., Golgi cells, basket cells). Finally, it is proposed that the same PC scaffold that restricts afferent terminal fields to stripes may also act to organize cerebellar interneurons. PMID:23346049

  19. Calcicludine, a venom peptide of the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family, is a potent blocker of high-threshold Ca2+ channels with a high affinity for L-type channels in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Schweitz, H; Heurteaux, C; Bois, P; Moinier, D; Romey, G; Lazdunski, M

    1994-01-01

    Calcicludine (CaC) is a 60-amino acid polypeptide from the venom of Dendroaspis angusticeps. It is structurally homologous to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor, to dendrotoxins, which block K+ channels, and to the protease inhibitor domain of the amyloid beta protein that accumulates in Alzheimer disease. Voltage-clamp experiments on a variety of excitable cells have shown that CaC specifically blocks most of the high-threshold Ca2+ channels (L-, N-, or P-type) in the 10-100 nM range. Particularly high densities of specific 125I-labeled CaC binding sites were found in the olfactory bulb, in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the stratum oriens of CA3 field in the hippocampal formation, and in the granular layer of the cerebellum. 125I-labeled CaC binds with a high affinity (Kd = 15 pM) to a single class of noninteracting sites in rat olfactory bulb microsomes. The distribution of CaC binding sites in cerebella of three mutant mice (Weaver, Reeler, and Purkinje cell degeneration) clearly shows that the specific high-affinity labeling is associated with granule cells. Electrophysiological experiments on rat cerebellar granule neurons in primary culture have shown that CaC potently blocks the L-type component of the Ca2+ current (K0.5 = 0.2 nM). Then CaC, in the nanomolar range, appears to be a highly potent blocker of an L-subtype of neuronal Ca2+ channels. Images PMID:8302860

  20. Isoforms of alpha1E voltage-gated calcium channels in rat cerebellar granule cells--detection of major calcium channel alpha1-transcripts by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Schramm, M; Vajna, R; Pereverzev, A; Tottene, A; Klöckner, U; Pietrobon, D; Hescheler, J; Schneider, T

    1999-01-01

    In primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells, transcripts of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels have been amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and identified by sequencing of subcloned polymerase chain reaction products. In these neurons cultured for six to eight days in vitro, fragments of the three major transcripts alpha1C, alpha1A, and alpha1E are detected using degenerated oligonucleotide primer pairs under highly stringent conditions. Whole-cell Ca2+ current recordings from six to eight days in vitro granule cells show that most of the current is due to L-type (25%), P-type (33%) and R-type (30%) Ca2+ channels. These data support the correlation between alpha1A and P-type Ca2+ channels (G1) and between alpha1E and R-type channels (G2 and G3). By including specific primer pairs for alpha1E the complimentary DNA fragments of indicative regions of alpha1E isoforms are amplified corresponding to the three most variable regions of alpha1E, the 5'-end, the II/III-loop, and the central part of the 3'-end. Although the complementary DNA fragments of the 5'-end of rat alpha1E yield a uniform reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction product, its structure is unusual in the sense that it is longer than in the cloned rat alpha1E complementary DNA. It corresponds to the alpha1E isoform reported for mouse and human brain and is also expressed in cerebellum and cerebrum of rat brain as the major or maybe even the only variant of alpha1E. While fragments of a new rat alpha1E isoform are amplified from the 5'-end, three known fragments of the II/III-loop and two known isoforms homologue to the 3'-coding region are detected, which in the last case are discriminated by a 129 base pair insertion. The shift of the alpha1E expression from a pattern seen in cerebellum (alpha1Ee) to a pattern identified in other regions of the brain (alpha1E-3) is discussed. These data show that: (i) alpha1E is expressed in rat brain as a structural homologue to the

  1. Gene expression as a sensitive endpoint to evaluate cell differentiation and maturation of the developing central nervous system in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) exposed to pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Hogberg, Helena T.; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hartung, Thomas; Coecke, Sandra; Bal-Price, Anna K.

    2009-03-15

    The major advantage of primary neuronal cultures for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment. In our studies using primary culture of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) we have evaluated whether the gene expression relevant to the most critical developmental processes such as neuronal differentiation (NF-68 and NF-200) and functional maturation (NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors), proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes (GFAP and S100{beta}) as well as the presence of neural precursor cells (nestin and Sox10) could be used as an endpoint for in vitro DNT. The expression of these genes was assessed after exposure to various pesticides (paraquat parathion, dichlorvos, pentachlorophenol and cycloheximide) that could induce developmental neurotoxicity through different mechanisms. All studied pesticides significantly modified the expression of selected genes, related to the different stages of neuronal and/or glial cell development and maturation. The most significant changes were observed after exposure to paraquat and parathion (i.e. down-regulation of mRNA expression of NF-68 and NF-200, NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors). Similarly, dichlorvos affected mainly neurons (decreased mRNA expression of NF-68 and GABA{sub A} receptors) whereas cycloheximide had an effect on neurons and astrocytes, as significant decreases in the mRNA expression of both neurofilaments (NF-68 and NF-200) and the astrocyte marker (S100{beta}) were observed. Our results suggest that toxicity induced by pesticides that target multiple pathways of neurodevelopment can be identified by studying expression of genes that are involved in different stages of cell development and maturation, and that gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening to identify the compounds with the potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity.

  2. Iron and cell death in Parkinson's disease: a nuclear microscopic study into iron-rich granules in the parkinsonian substantia nigra of primate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong, P. S. P.; Watt, F.; Ponraj, D.; Leong, S. K.; He, Y.; Lee, T. K. Y.

    1999-10-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative brain disease characterised by a loss of cells in the substantia nigra (SN) region of the brain and accompanying biochemical changes such as inhibition of mitochondrial function, increased iron concentrations and decreased glutathione levels in the parkinsonian SN. Though the aetiology of the disease is still unknown, the observed biochemical changes point to the involvement of oxidative stress. In particular, iron is suspected to play a role by promoting free radical production, leading to oxidative stress and cell death. The increase in iron in the parkinsonian SN has been confirmed by several research groups, both in human post-mortem brains and in brain tissue from parkinsonian animal models. However, the question remains as to whether the observed increase in iron is a cause or a consequence of the SN cell death process. Our previous study using unilaterally 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-pyridine (MPTP)-lesioned monkeys in a time sequence experiment has shown that the increase in bulk iron concentrations follow rather than precede dopaminergic cell death. However, changes in the localised iron concentrations, which may play a more direct role in SN cell death, may not be reflected at the bulk level. Indeed, we have observed iron-rich granules in parkinsonian SNs. From this time sequence study into the iron content of iron-rich granules in the SNs of an untreated control and unilaterally MPTP-lesioned parkinsonian models, we present the following observations: (1) Iron-rich granules are found in both control and parkinsonian SNs and are variable in size and iron content in any one model. (2) These iron-rich granules may be associated with neuromelanin granules found in the SN and are known to accumulate transition metal ions such as iron. (3) The early onset of bulk SN cell loss (35%) was accompanied by a significant elevation of iron in granules found in the MPTP-injected SN compared to the contra-lateral SN. This

  3. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders that begin in early childhood, such as ataxia telangiectasia. In an infant or young child, symptoms of a disorder that features cerebellar hypoplasia might include floppy muscle tone, developmental or ...

  4. Cerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degeneration? Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons in the cerebellum - the area of the brain ... proteins that are necessary for the survival of neurons. Associated diseases: Diseases that are specific to the ...

  5. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma.

    PubMed

    Owler, Brian K; Makeham, John M; Shingde, Meena; Besser, Michael

    2005-04-01

    A case of cerebellar liponeurocytoma in a 34-year-old man is reported. There are only 19 other cases reporting this entity in the medical literature. The diagnostic, radiological and clinical features associated with this tumour are reviewed and discussed in relation to our case. The differences in behaviour and prognosis between medulloblastoma and cerebellar liponeurocytoma are presented with the corresponding implications for management. PMID:15851097

  6. Sonic hedgehog patterning during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Annarita; Cerrato, Valentina; Fucà, Elisa; Parmigiani, Elena; Buffo, Annalisa; Leto, Ketty

    2016-01-01

    The morphogenic factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) actively orchestrates many aspects of cerebellar development and maturation. During embryogenesis, Shh signaling is active in the ventricular germinal zone (VZ) and represents an essential signal for proliferation of VZ-derived progenitors. Later, Shh secreted by Purkinje cells sustains the amplification of postnatal neurogenic niches: the external granular layer and the prospective white matter, where excitatory granule cells and inhibitory interneurons are produced, respectively. Moreover, Shh signaling affects Bergmann glial differentiation and promotes cerebellar foliation during development. Here we review the most relevant functions of Shh during cerebellar ontogenesis, underlying its role in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26499980

  7. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... Acute cerebellar ataxia in children, especially younger than age 3, may occur several weeks after an illness caused by a virus. ...

  8. [Cerebellar stroke].

    PubMed

    Paradowski, Michał; Zimny, Anna; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke belongs to a group of rare diseases of vascular origin. Cerebellum, supplied by three pairs of arteries (AICA, PICA, SCA) with many anastomoses between them is less susceptible for a stroke, especially ischemic one. Diagnosis of the stroke in this region is harder due to lower sensibility of commonly used CT of the head in case of stroke suspicion. The authors highlight clinical symptoms distinguishing between vascular territories or topographical locations of the stroke, diagnostic procedures, classical and surgical treatment, the most common misdiagnoses are also mentioned. The authors suggest a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm development, including rtPA treatment criteria for ischemic cerebellar stroke. PMID:26181157

  9. Cerebellar abiotrophy.

    PubMed

    DeBowes, R M; Leipold, H W; Turner-Beatty, M

    1987-08-01

    Cerebellar abiotrophy is a degenerative condition of Arabian horses that produces signs of head tremors and ataxia. Affected foals demonstrate clinical signs between the time of birth and 6 months of age. The condition is untreatable, although some animals have reportedly improved to varying degrees. The disease is believed to be inherited; however, definitive evidence is lacking at this time. PMID:3497695

  10. Implications on cerebellar function from information coding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiming

    2008-01-01

    One function of the cerebellar cortex is to process information. There are at least two types of information. Temporal information is encoded in the timing pattern of action and synaptic potentials, whereas structural information is encoded in the spatial pattern of the cerebellar synaptic circuitry. Intuitively, analysis of highly complex information in the time domain would require a cerebellar cortex with structural complexity to match. Information theory offers a way to estimate quantitatively both types of information and thereby helps to test hypotheses or advance theories of cerebellar neurobiology. These estimates suggest: (i) That the mossy-fiber-granule-cell system carries far more (temporal) information than the climbing fiber system, (ii) that Purkinje cells extract only a fraction of the (temporal) information from their afferents, and (iii) that the cerebellar cortex has a large (spatial) information coding capacity. Concerning information, one can argue that the cerebellar cortex analyzes temporal information in its afferents as a search engine, in search of coincidental mossy fiber events based on timing cues provided by climbing fiber events. Results of successive searches are continuously being converted into structural information encoded in the spatial distribution pattern of granule-cell-Purkinje-cell synapses along granule cell axons, thereby providing an adaptive and indeed self-correcting dimension to the structural information code. The search engine operation involves cellular mechanisms acting on temporal events and is part of an associative learning process. The conversion and generation of structural information involves neuroplasticity mechanisms acting at the synaptic level, with electrophysiological as well as structural consequences, and may be part of the short- and long-term memory process. These and other attributes qualify the cerebellar cortex as a dynamic information processing center, contributing to memory and learning while

  11. Cerebellar Cortex Granular Layer Interneurons in the Macaque Monkey Are Functionally Driven by Mossy Fiber Pathways through Net Excitation or Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Laurens, Jean; Heiney, Shane A.; Kim, Gyutae; Blazquez, Pablo M.

    2013-01-01

    The granular layer is the input layer of the cerebellar cortex. It receives information through mossy fibers, which contact local granular layer interneurons (GLIs) and granular layer output neurons (granule cells). GLIs provide one of the first signal processing stages in the cerebellar cortex by exciting or inhibiting granule cells. Despite the importance of this early processing stage for later cerebellar computations, the responses of GLIs and the functional connections of mossy fibers with GLIs in awake animals are poorly understood. Here, we recorded GLIs and mossy fibers in the macaque ventral-paraflocculus (VPFL) during oculomotor tasks, providing the first full inventory of GLI responses in the VPFL of awake primates. We found that while mossy fiber responses are characterized by a linear monotonic relationship between firing rate and eye position, GLIs show complex response profiles characterized by “eye position fields” and single or double directional tunings. For the majority of GLIs, prominent features of their responses can be explained by assuming that a single GLI receives inputs from mossy fibers with similar or opposite directional preferences, and that these mossy fiber inputs influence GLI discharge through net excitatory or inhibitory pathways. Importantly, GLIs receiving mossy fiber inputs through these putative excitatory and inhibitory pathways show different firing properties, suggesting that they indeed correspond to two distinct classes of interneurons. We propose a new interpretation of the information flow through the cerebellar cortex granular layer, in which mossy fiber input patterns drive the responses of GLIs not only through excitatory but also through net inhibitory pathways, and that excited and inhibited GLIs can be identified based on their responses and their intrinsic properties. PMID:24376524

  12. The Primates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about primates, including definitions and examples. Includes the activities "Thumbless Relay" and "Face It," which relate attributes of primates. Includes a story about chimpanzees along with discussion questions about the story. Reproducible worksheets and a quiz are also provided. (TW)

  13. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hammer, Monia; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-06-28

    A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans. PMID:27320912

  14. Defects in the CAPN1 gene result in alterations in cerebellar development and in cerebellar ataxia in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hamad, Monia Ben; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous CAPN1 null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knock-out (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1 mediated cleavage of PH domain and Leucine rich repeat Protein Phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis, and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans. PMID:27320912

  15. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications. PMID:25578036

  16. Cerebellar and Brainstem Malformations.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-08-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of cerebellar and brainstem malformations has been shown. Familiarity with the spectrum of cerebellar and brainstem malformations and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. This article discusses cerebellar and brainstem malformations, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and recurrence. PMID:27423798

  17. Impaired motor coordination and disrupted cerebellar architecture in Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen Müller; Williamson, Theresa L.; Schwartz, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling determines the size of the cerebral cortex by regulating the amplification of radial glial stem cells, and participates in the formation of midline glial structures. We show that Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 double knockouts (FGFR DKO) generated by Cre mediated recombination driven by the human GFAP promoter (hGFAP) have reduced cerebellar size due to reduced proliferation of radial glia and other glial precursors in late embryonic and neonatal FGFR DKO mice. The proliferation of granule cell progenitors (GCPs) in the EGL was also reduced, leading to reduced granule cell numbers. Furthermore, both inward migration of granule cells into the inner granule cell layer (IGL) and outward migration of GABA interneurons into the molecular layer (ML) were arrested, disrupting layer and lobular morphology. Purkinje neurons and their dendrites, which were not targeted by Cre mediated recombination of Fgf receptors, were also misplaced in FGFR DKO mice, possibly as a consequence of altered Bergmann glia orientation or reduced granule cell number. Our findings indicate a dual role for FGFR signaling in cerebellar morphogenesis. The first role is to amplify the number of granule neuron precursors in the external granular layer and glial precursor cells throughout the cerebellum. The second is to establish the correct Bergmann glia morphology, which is crucial for granule cell migration. The disrupted cerebellar size and laminar architecture resulting from loss of FGFR signaling impairs motor learning and coordination in FGFR DKO mice. PMID:22578469

  18. Cerebellar-Motor Dysfunction in Schizophrenia and Psychosis-Risk: The Importance of Regional Cerebellar Analysis Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2014-01-01

    Motor abnormalities in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis are well documented. An accumulating body of work has also highlighted motor abnormalities related to cerebellar dysfunction in schizophrenia including eye-blink conditioning, timing, postural control, and motor learning. We have also recently found evidence for motor dysfunction in individuals at ultra high-risk for psychosis (1–3). This is particularly relevant as the cerebellum is thought to be central to the cognitive dysmetria model of schizophrenia, and these overt motor signs may point to more general cerebellar dysfunction in the etiology of psychotic disorders. While studies have provided evidence indicative of motor cerebellar dysfunction in at-risk populations and in schizophrenia, findings with respect to the cerebellum have been mixed. One factor potentially contributing to these mixed results is the whole-structure approach taken when investigating the cerebellum. In non-human primates, there are distinct closed-loop circuits between the cerebellum, thalamus, and brain with motor and non-motor cortical regions. Recent human neuroimaging has supported this finding and indicates that there is a cerebellar functional topography (4), and this information is being missed with whole-structure approaches. Here, we review cerebellar-motor dysfunction in individuals with schizophrenia and those at-risk for psychosis. We also discuss cerebellar abnormalities in psychosis, and the cerebellar functional topography. Because of the segregated functional regions of the cerebellum, we propose that it is important to look at the structure regionally in order to better understand its role in motor dysfunction in these populations. This is analogous to approaches taken with the basal ganglia, where each region is considered separately. Such an approach is necessary to better understand cerebellar pathophysiology on a macro-structural level with respect to the pathogenesis of

  19. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; ten Brinke, Michiel M.; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J.H.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  20. Cerebellar control of gait and interlimb coordination.

    PubMed

    Vinueza Veloz, María Fernanda; Zhou, Kuikui; Bosman, Laurens W J; Potters, Jan-Willem; Negrello, Mario; Seepers, Robert M; Strydis, Christos; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic and intrinsic processing in Purkinje cells, interneurons and granule cells of the cerebellar cortex have been shown to underlie various relatively simple, single-joint, reflex types of motor learning, including eyeblink conditioning and adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. However, to what extent these processes contribute to more complex, multi-joint motor behaviors, such as locomotion performance and adaptation during obstacle crossing, is not well understood. Here, we investigated these functions using the Erasmus Ladder in cell-specific mouse mutant lines that suffer from impaired Purkinje cell output (Pcd), Purkinje cell potentiation (L7-Pp2b), molecular layer interneuron output (L7-Δγ2), and granule cell output (α6-Cacna1a). We found that locomotion performance was severely impaired with small steps and long step times in Pcd and L7-Pp2b mice, whereas it was mildly altered in L7-Δγ2 and not significantly affected in α6-Cacna1a mice. Locomotion adaptation triggered by pairing obstacle appearances with preceding tones at fixed time intervals was impaired in all four mouse lines, in that they all showed inaccurate and inconsistent adaptive walking patterns. Furthermore, all mutants exhibited altered front-hind and left-right interlimb coordination during both performance and adaptation, and inconsistent walking stepping patterns while crossing obstacles. Instead, motivation and avoidance behavior were not compromised in any of the mutants during the Erasmus Ladder task. Our findings indicate that cell type-specific abnormalities in cerebellar microcircuitry can translate into pronounced impairments in locomotion performance and adaptation as well as interlimb coordination, highlighting the general role of the cerebellar cortex in spatiotemporal control of complex multi-joint movements. PMID:25139623

  1. Nav2 hypomorphic mutant mice are ataxic and exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    McNeill, Elizabeth M.; Klöckner-Bormann, Mariana; Roesler, Elizabeth C.; Talton, Lynn E.; Moechars, Dieder; Clagett-Dame, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Development of the cerebellum involves a coordinated program of neuronal process outgrowth and migration resulting in a foliated structure that plays a key role in motor function. Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) is a cytoskeletal-interacting protein that functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation. Herein we show that hypomorphic mutant mice lacking the full-length Nav2 transcript exhibit ataxia and defects in cerebellar development. At embryonic day (E)17.5, the mutant cerebellum is reduced in size and exhibits defects in vermal foliation. Reduction in cell proliferation at early times (E12.5 and E14.5) may contribute to this size reduction. The full-length Nav2 transcript is expressed in the premigratory zone of the external granule layer (EGL). Granule cells in the germinal zone of the EGL appear to proliferate normally, however, due to the reduction in cerebellar circumference there are fewer total BrdU-labeled granule cells in the mutants, and these fail to migrate normally toward the interior of the cerebellum. In Nav2 hypomorphs, fewer granule cells migrate out of cerebellar EGL explants and neurite outgrowth from both explants and isolated external granule cell cultures is reduced. This suggests the formation of parallel axon fibers and neuronal migration is disrupted in Nav2 mutants. This work supports an essential role for full-length Nav2 in cerebellar development, including axonal elongation and migration of the EGL neurons. PMID:21419114

  2. Nav2 hypomorphic mutant mice are ataxic and exhibit abnormalities in cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Elizabeth M; Klöckner-Bormann, Mariana; Roesler, Elizabeth C; Talton, Lynn E; Moechars, Dieder; Clagett-Dame, Margaret

    2011-05-15

    Development of the cerebellum involves a coordinated program of neuronal process outgrowth and migration resulting in a foliated structure that plays a key role in motor function. Neuron navigator 2 (Nav2) is a cytoskeletal-interacting protein that functions in neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation. Herein we show that hypomorphic mutant mice lacking the full-length Nav2 transcript exhibit ataxia and defects in cerebellar development. At embryonic day (E)17.5, the mutant cerebellum is reduced in size and exhibits defects in vermal foliation. Reduction in cell proliferation at early times (E12.5 and E14.5) may contribute to this size reduction. The full-length Nav2 transcript is expressed in the premigratory zone of the external granule layer (EGL). Granule cells in the germinal zone of the EGL appear to proliferate normally, however, due to the reduction in cerebellar circumference there are fewer total BrdU-labeled granule cells in the mutants, and these fail to migrate normally toward the interior of the cerebellum. In Nav2 hypomorphs, fewer granule cells migrate out of cerebellar EGL explants and neurite outgrowth from both explants and isolated external granule cell cultures is reduced. This suggests that the formation of parallel axon fibers and neuronal migration is disrupted in Nav2 mutants. This work supports an essential role for full-length Nav2 in cerebellar development, including axonal elongation and migration of the EGL neurons. PMID:21419114

  3. Cerebellar cortical degeneration in three English bulldogs: clinical and neuropathological findings.

    PubMed

    Gandini, G; Botteron, C; Brini, E; Fatzer, R; Diana, A; Jaggy, A

    2005-06-01

    This case report describes the clinical and neuropathological findings in three young English bulldogs affected by cerebellar cortical degeneration. The dogs, born from the same parents, were presented with clinical signs indicating progressive cerebellar dysfunction: a wide-based stance, severe cerebellar ataxia characterised by marked hypermetria, spasticity, and intention tremors of the head and trunk with loss of balance. On histopathological examination, lesions were confined to the cerebellum and consisted of diffuse degenerative cortical lesions, and there was a loss of Purkinje and granule cells. The history, clinical signs and neuropathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of cerebellar cortical degeneration. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of cerebellar cortical degeneration in the English bulldog. PMID:15971900

  4. Oligodendrocyte ablation affects the coordinated interaction between granule and Purkinje neurons during cerebellum development

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Ludovic; Doretto, Sandrine; Malerba, Monica; Ruat, Martial; Borrelli, Emiliana . E-mail: borrelli@uci.edu

    2007-08-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS) classically known to be devoted to the formation of myelin sheaths around most axons of the vertebrate brain. We have addressed the role of these cells during cerebellar development, by ablating OLs in vivo. Previous analyses had indicated that OL ablation during the first six postnatal days results into a striking cerebellar phenotype, whose major features are a strong reduction of granule neurons and aberrant Purkinje cells development. These two cell types are highly interconnected during cerebellar development through the production of molecules that help their proliferation, differentiation and maintenance. In this article, we present data showing that OL ablation has major effects on the physiology of Purkinje (PC) and granule cells (GC). In particular, OL ablation results into a reduction of sonic hedgehog (Shh), Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), and Reelin (Rln) expression. These results indicate that absence of OLs profoundly alters the normal cerebellar developmental program.

  5. Unilateral cerebellar aplasia.

    PubMed

    Boltshauser, E; Steinlin, M; Martin, E; Deonna, T

    1996-02-01

    We describe three children with unilateral cerebellar aplasia (UCA). Deliveries at term and neonatal periods were uneventful. Pregnancy was normal in one and complicated by mild bleeding (in second and fourth month respectively) in two instances. Presenting signs were delayed motor development with marked contralateral torticollis (n = 1), hemiplegia (n = 1) and unusual head nodding (n = 1). Neuroradiological investigations revealed complete aplasia (n = 1) and subtotal aplasia (n = 2) of one cerebellar hemisphere with only a residual wing-like structure below the tentorium. There was contralateral underdevelopment of the brainstem. The infant with hemiplegic cerebral palsy had an additional supratentorial periventricular parenchymal defect, contralateral to the cerebellar hypoplasia. In view of literature reports, describing similar neuroradiological or neuropathological findings in asymptomatic individuals, it is doubtful whether UCA is responsible for our patient's problems. In our cases UCA has presumably resulted from a prenatal destructive lesion, possibly an infarct, but the timing and exact nature are unknown. PMID:8677027

  6. Cerebellar cortex and cerebellar nuclei are concomitantly activated during eyeblink conditioning: a 7T fMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Thürling, Markus; Kahl, Fabian; Maderwald, Stefan; Stefanescu, Roxana M; Schlamann, Marc; Boele, Henk-Jan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Ladd, Mark E; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Timmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-21

    There are controversies whether learning of conditioned eyeblink responses primarily takes place within the cerebellar cortex, the interposed nuclei, or both. It has also been suggested that the cerebellar cortex may be important during early stages of learning, and that there is a shift to the cerebellar nuclei during later stages. As yet, human studies have provided little to resolve this question. In the present study, we established a setup that allows ultra-high-field 7T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the cerebellar cortex and interposed cerebellar nuclei simultaneously during delay eyeblink conditioning in humans. Event-related fMRI signals increased concomitantly in the cerebellar cortex and nuclei during early acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses in 20 healthy human subjects. ANOVAs with repeated-measures showed significant effects of time across five blocks of 20 conditioning trials in the cortex and nuclei (p < 0.05, permutation corrected). Activations were most pronounced in, but not limited to, lobules VI and interposed nuclei. Increased activations were most prominent at the first time the maximum number of conditioned responses was achieved. Our data are consistent with a simultaneous and synergistic two-site model of learning during acquisition of classically conditioned eyeblinks. Because increased MRI signal reflects synaptic activity, concomitantly increased signals in the cerebellar nuclei and cortex are consistent with findings of learning related potentiation at the mossy fiber to nuclear cell synapse and mossy fiber to granule cell synapse. Activity related to the expression of conditioned responses, however, cannot be excluded. PMID:25609637

  7. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  8. Control of a simulated arm using a novel combination of Cerebellar learning mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assad, C.; Hartmann, M.; Paulin, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    We present a model of cerebellar cortex that combines two types of learning: feedforward predicitve association based on local Hebbian-type learning between granule cell ascending branch and parallel fiber inputs, and reinforcement learning with feedback error correction based on climbing fiber activity.

  9. Sun1 deficiency leads to cerebellar ataxia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Ya; Yu, I.-Shing; Huang, Chien-Chi; Chen, Chia-Yen; Wang, Wan-Ping; Lin, Shu-Wha; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Chi, Ya-Hui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Migration and organization of the nucleus are essential for the proliferation and differentiation of cells, including neurons. However, the relationship between the positioning of the nucleus and cellular morphogenesis remains poorly understood. Inherited recessive cerebellar ataxia has been attributed to mutations in SYNE1, a component of the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex. Regardless, Syne1-mutant mice present with normal cerebellar development. The Sad1-Unc-84 homology (SUN)-domain proteins are located at the inner nuclear membrane and recruit Syne proteins through the KASH domain to the outer nuclear membrane. Here, we report an unrecognized contribution of Sun1 and Sun2 to the postnatal development of murine cerebellum. Mice depleted of Sun1 showed a marked reduction in the cerebellar volume, and this phenotype is exacerbated with additional loss of a Sun2 allele. Consistent with these histological changes, Sun1−/− and Sun1−/−Sun2+/− mice exhibited defective motor coordination. Results of immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Sun1 is highly expressed in Purkinje cells and recruits Syne2 to the periphery of the nucleus. Approximately 33% of Purkinje cells in Sun1−/− mice and 66% of Purkinje cells in Sun1−/−Sun2+/− mice were absent from the surface of the internal granule layer (IGL), whereas the proliferation and migration of granule neurons were unaffected. Furthermore, the Sun1−/−Sun2+/− Purkinje cells exhibited retarded primary dendrite specification, reduced dendritic complexity and aberrant patterning of synapses. Our findings reveal a cell-type-specific role for Sun1 and Sun2 in nucleokinesis during cerebellar development, and we propose the use of Sun-deficient mice as a model for studying cerebellar ataxia that is associated with mutation of human SYNE genes or loss of Purkinje cells. PMID:26035387

  10. Ultrastructural pathology of human peritumoural oedematous cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical biopsies of the peritumoural region of seven patients with cerebellar haemangioma, mesencephalic meningioma, cerebellopontine astrocytoma, cerebellopontine meningioma, and medulloblastoma of cerebellar vermis were examined by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy. Granule cells showed oedematous cytoplasm and mitochondria. Swollen Golgi cells exhibited lipofuscin granules and intranuclear inclusions. Both neuron cell types displayed swollen dendritic digits synapsing with afferent mossy fibre endings. Degenerated myelinated axons corresponding to afferent mossy and climbing fibres and efferent Purkinje cell axons were observed at the granular layer. Dense and clear ischaemic Purkinje cells established degenerated synapses with swollen parallel fibre synaptic varicosities. Degenerated Purkinje cell recurrent axonal collaterals were found at the molecular layer. Swollen and clear Bergmann glial cell cytoplasm was observed closely applied to the oedematous clear and dark Purkinje cell body, dendritic trunk, secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Swollen climbing fibre endings featured by numerous microtubules and neurofilaments, and a decreased number of synaptic vesicles were observed making degenerated axo-spinodendritic synapses with clear and swollen dendritic spines from Purkinje, Golgi, basket and stellate cell dendrites. Swollen stellate neurons showed oedematous mitochondria. Lipofuscin-rich astrocytes and reactive phagocytic astrocytes were observed. The latter appeared engulfing haematogenous proteinaceous oedema fluid. All cerebellar neurons showed stress endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction featured by focal dilated cisterns and detachment of associated ribosomes. Myelin sheath degeneration was related with oligodendrocyte degenerating hydropic changes. The peritumoural ischaemic cerebellar nerve and glial cell abnormalities were related with neurobehavioral changes, tremor, nystagmus, dismetry and gait disturbance

  11. A Mathematical Model of Granule Cell Generation During Mouse Cerebellum Development.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Shoshana R; Legué, Emilie; Aristizábal, Orlando; Joyner, Alexandra L; Peskin, Charles S; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2016-05-01

    Determining the cellular basis of brain growth is an important problem in developmental neurobiology. In the mammalian brain, the cerebellum is particularly amenable to studies of growth because it contains only a few cell types, including the granule cells, which are the most numerous neuronal subtype. Furthermore, in the mouse cerebellum granule cells are generated from granule cell precursors (gcps) in the external granule layer (EGL), from 1 day before birth until about 2 weeks of age. The complexity of the underlying cellular processes (multiple cell behaviors, three spatial dimensions, time-dependent changes) requires a quantitative framework to be fully understood. In this paper, a differential equation-based model is presented, which can be used to estimate temporal changes in granule cell numbers in the EGL. The model includes the proliferation of gcps and their differentiation into granule cells, as well as the process by which granule cells leave the EGL. Parameters describing these biological processes were derived from fitting the model to histological data. This mathematical model should be useful for understanding altered gcp and granule cell behaviors in mouse mutants with abnormal cerebellar development and cerebellar cancers. PMID:27125657

  12. Consensus Paper: Neuroimmune Mechanisms of Cerebellar Ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Adhikari, Keya; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Chattopadhyay, Partha; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Hampe, Christiane S; Honnorat, Jérôme; Joubert, Bastien; Kakei, Shinji; Lee, Jongho; Manto, Mario; Matsunaga, Akiko; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Nanri, Kazunori; Shanmugarajah, Priya; Yoneda, Makoto; Yuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the last few years, a lot of publications suggested that disabling cerebellar ataxias may develop through immune-mediated mechanisms. In this consensus paper, we discuss the clinical features of the main described immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias and address their presumed pathogenesis. Immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias include cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies, the cerebellar type of Hashimoto's encephalopathy, primary autoimmune cerebellar ataxia, gluten ataxia, Miller Fisher syndrome, ataxia associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Humoral mechanisms, cell-mediated immunity, inflammation, and vascular injuries contribute to the cerebellar deficits in immune-mediated cerebellar ataxias. PMID:25823827

  13. The Changeable Nervous System: Studies On Neuroplasticity In Cerebellar Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Seil, Fredrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Circuit reorganization after injury was studied in a cerebellar culture model. When cerebellar cultures derived from newborn mice were exposed at explantation to a preparation of cytosine arabinoside that destroyed granule cells and oligodendrocytes and compromised astrocytes, Purkinje cells surviving in greater than usual numbers were unensheathed by astrocytic processes and received twice the control number of inhibitory axosomatic synapses. Purkinje cell axon collaterals sprouted and many of their terminals formed heterotypical synapses with other Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The resulting circuit reorganization preserved inhibition in the cerebellar cortex. Following this reorganization, replacement of the missing granule cells and glia was followed by a restitution of the normal circuitry. Most of these developmental and reconstructive changes were not dependent on neuronal activity, the major exception being inhibitory synaptogenesis. The full complement of inhibitory synapses did not develop in the absence of neuronal activity, which could be mitigated by application of exogenous TrkB receptor ligands. Inhibitory synaptogenesis could also be promoted by activity-induced release of endogenous TrkB receptor ligands or by antibody activation of the TrkB receptor. PMID:24933693

  14. Role of Tet1/3 Genes and Chromatin Remodeling Genes in Cerebellar Circuit Formation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Girardo, David; Govek, Eve-Ellen; John, Keisha; Mellén, Marian; Tamayo, Pablo; Mesirov, Jill P; Hatten, Mary E

    2016-01-01

    Although mechanisms underlying early steps in cerebellar development are known, evidence is lacking on genetic and epigenetic changes during the establishment of the synaptic circuitry. Using metagene analysis, we report pivotal changes in multiple reactomes of epigenetic pathway genes in cerebellar granule cells (GCs) during circuit formation. During this stage, Tet genes are upregulated and vitamin C activation of Tet enzymes increases the levels of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) at exon start sites of upregulated genes, notably axon guidance genes and ion channel genes. Knockdown of Tet1 and Tet3 by RNAi in ex vivo cerebellar slice cultures inhibits dendritic arborization of developing GCs, a critical step in circuit formation. These findings demonstrate a role for Tet genes and chromatin remodeling genes in the formation of cerebellar circuitry. PMID:26711116

  15. A novel inhibitory nucleo-cortical circuit controls cerebellar Golgi cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ankri, Lea; Husson, Zoé; Pietrajtis, Katarzyna; Proville, Rémi; Léna, Clément; Yarom, Yosef; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Uusisaari, Marylka Yoe

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum, a crucial center for motor coordination, is composed of a cortex and several nuclei. The main mode of interaction between these two parts is considered to be formed by the inhibitory control of the nuclei by cortical Purkinje neurons. We now amend this view by showing that inhibitory GABA-glycinergic neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN) project profusely into the cerebellar cortex, where they make synaptic contacts on a GABAergic subpopulation of cerebellar Golgi cells. These spontaneously firing Golgi cells are inhibited by optogenetic activation of the inhibitory nucleo-cortical fibers both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the CN may contribute to the functional recruitment of the cerebellar cortex by decreasing Golgi cell inhibition onto granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06262.001 PMID:25965178

  16. Metronidazole induced cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Aditya; Srikanth, B. Akshaya; Lakshmi, G. Sriranga

    2013-01-01

    Metronidazole is a widely used antimicrobial usually prescribed by many specialist doctors for a short duration of 10-15 days. Prolonged use of metronidazole is rare. The present case is of a patient who used the drug for 4 months and developed peripheral neuropathy, convulsions, and cerebellar ataxia. He was treated with diazepam and levetiracetam. The patient recovered completely following discontinuation of metronidazole. PMID:23833378

  17. Roles of granule size in over-granulation during high shear wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Limin; Feng, Yushi; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2010-08-01

    A mechanistic understanding of the over-granulation problem during high shear wet granulation (HSWG) process can guide efficient development of robust formulation and manufacturing process. Using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) as a model compound, we demonstrate that size enlargement is an important mechanism for over-granulation in HSWG. A higher granulation water level results in larger granules and lower tabletability. With increasing water, granules enlarge sharply when water level is higher than 65%. Granule tabletability deteriorates with increasing granule size and becomes over-granulated when more than 70% water is used. For a batch of over-granulated granule that is ground and sieved, tabletability of the sieved fractions decreases with increasing granule size. The tabletability of the finest fraction (45-90 microm) is nearly four times that of the largest fraction (300-425 microm). These results show that size reduction can be an effective strategy to address the problem of over-granulation. PMID:20232456

  18. Dissociation of locomotor and cerebellar deficits in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Caroline F; Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Aronica, Eleonora M A; Judson, Matthew C; Philpot, Benjamin D; Hoebeek, Freek E; van Woerden, Geeske M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurological disorder that is associated with prominent movement and balance impairments that are widely considered to be due to defects of cerebellar origin. Here, using the cerebellar-specific vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) paradigm, we determined that cerebellar function is only mildly impaired in the Ube3am-/p+ mouse model of AS. VOR phase-reversal learning was singularly impaired in these animals and correlated with reduced tonic inhibition between Golgi cells and granule cells. Purkinje cell physiology, in contrast, was normal in AS mice as shown by synaptic plasticity and spontaneous firing properties that resembled those of controls. Accordingly, neither VOR phase-reversal learning nor locomotion was impaired following selective deletion of Ube3a in Purkinje cells. However, genetic normalization of αCaMKII inhibitory phosphorylation fully rescued locomotor deficits despite failing to improve cerebellar learning in AS mice, suggesting extracerebellar circuit involvement in locomotor learning. We confirmed this hypothesis through cerebellum-specific reinstatement of Ube3a, which ameliorated cerebellar learning deficits but did not rescue locomotor deficits. This double dissociation of locomotion and cerebellar phenotypes strongly suggests that the locomotor deficits of AS mice do not arise from impaired cerebellar cortex function. Our results provide important insights into the etiology of the motor deficits associated with AS. PMID:26485287

  19. ERBB3-mediated regulation of Bergmann glia proliferation in cerebellar lamination

    PubMed Central

    Sathyamurthy, Anupama; Yin, Dong-Min; Barik, Arnab; Shen, Chengyong; Bean, Jonathan C.; Figueiredo, Dwight; She, Jin-Xiong; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Cortical lamination is crucial for the assembly of cerebellar circuitry. In this process, granule neurons (GNs) migrate along Bergmann glia (BG), which are specialized astroglial cells, from the external granule layer to the internal granule layer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying BG development are not well understood. Here, we show that GFAP::Cre;Erbb3F/F mice, which lack Erbb3 in both radial glia and neurons, exhibit impairments in balance and motor coordination. Cerebellar lamination is aberrant, with misplaced Purkinje neurons and GN clusters. These phenotypes were not observed in Math1::CreERT2;Erbb3F/F mice, where the Erbb3 gene was deleted in GNs, suggesting involvement of non-neuronal Erbb3 in cerebellar lamination. Mechanistic studies indicate that ERBB3 is crucial for the proliferation of BG, which are required for GN migration. These observations identify a crucial role for ERBB3 in cerebellar lamination and reveal a novel mechanism that regulates BG development. PMID:25564653

  20. Understanding size enlargement and hardening of granules on tabletability of unlubricated granules prepared by dry granulation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Dahiya, Sandeepkumar; Sun, Changquan Calvin; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2011-02-01

    The mechanism of loss of "reworkability" or tabletability of dry granulated microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was investigated in relation to both granule size enlargement and granule hardness. Slugs of MCC were prepared under three pressures (12.5, 37.5, and 93.8 MPa) and tabletability (tensile strength vs. pressure) of respective granules (three different sizes) was determined. Nominal single granule fracture strength and granule friability were measured. The reduction in tabletability was profound for harder granules, which were obtained from higher slugging pressure. This is consistent with their ability to resist granule fragmentation during tableting. Variation in granule size exhibits negligible effect on tabletability for the lowest slugging pressure and only a small effect for the middle and highest slugging pressure. This observation is again related to different tendency to granule fragmentation during compaction. The results suggest that granule-hardening negatively affects tensile strength more than that of granule size enlargement for MCC. PMID:20803605

  1. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. PMID:24954915

  2. Cerebellar neurones: differentiation and modulation of sensitivity to excitotoxic treatment.

    PubMed

    Mercanti, D; Angelini, A; Ciotti, M T; Eboli, M L; Galli, C; Battistini, L; Merlo, D; Calissano, P

    1993-01-01

    The neurite outgrowth and adhesion complex (NOAC), isolated from rabbit sera has been dissociated in its major components by reverse-phase chromatography in HPLC by using a C18 column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the active fractions revealed the presence of three major bands of approximately 100, 70 and 50 kDa. Studies on the biological activity of NOAC were carried out on rat cerebellar granule cells. NOAC-cultured cells exhibit a marked resistance to excitotoxic stimuli carried by glutamate. PMID:7763737

  3. Cerebellar neurones: Differentiation and modulation of sensitivity to excitotoxic treatment.

    PubMed

    Mercanti, D; Angelini, A; Ciotti, M; Eboli, M; Galli, C; Battistini, L; Merlo, D; Calissano, P

    1993-01-01

    The neurite outgrowth and adhesion complex (NOAC), isolated from rabbit sera has been dissociated in its major components by reverse-phase chromatography in HPLC by using a C(18) column. SDS-PAGE analisys of the active fractions revealed the presence of three major bands of approximately 100, 70 and 50 kDa. Studies on the biological activity of NOAC were carried out on rat cerebellar granule cells. NOAC-cultured cells exhibit a marked resistance to excitotoxic stimuli carried by glutamate. PMID:22358672

  4. Clinical manifestations of cerebellar disease.

    PubMed

    Javalkar, Vijayakumar; Khan, Misbba; Davis, Debra E

    2014-11-01

    Clinical manifestations of cerebellar disease include ataxia and tremor, as well as nystagmus, dysarthria, and cognitive dysfunction. Recognition of the cerebellar pattern of disease can aid in the prompt and correct diagnosis and lead to appropriate treatment and rehabilitation to minimize disability. PMID:25439285

  5. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed. PMID:26535469

  6. Stereological study of the effects of maternal diabetes on cerebellar cortex development in rat.

    PubMed

    Hami, Javad; Vafaei-Nezhad, Saeed; Ghaemi, Kazem; Sadeghi, Akram; Ivar, Ghasem; Shojae, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Mehran

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes during pregnancy is associated with the deficits in balance and motor coordination and altered social behaviors in offspring. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of maternal diabetes and insulin treatment on the cerebellar volume and morphogenesis of the cerebellar cortex of rat neonates during the first two postnatal weeks. Sprague Dawley female rats were maintained diabetic from a week before pregnancy through parturition. At the end of pregnancy, the male offspring euthanized on postnatal days (P) 0, 7, and 14. Cavalieri's principle and fractionator methods were used to estimate the cerebellar volume, the thickness and the number of cells in the different layers of the cerebellar cortex. In spite of P0, there was a significant reduction in the cerebellar volume and the thickness of the external granule, molecular, and internal granule layers between the diabetic and the control animals. In diabetic group, the granular and purkinje cell densities were increased at P0. Moreover, the number of granular and purkinje cells in the cerebellum of diabetic neonates was reduced in comparison with the control group at P7 and P14. There were no significant differences in either the volume and thickness or the number of cells in the different layers of the cerebellar cortex between the insulin-treated diabetic group and controls. Our data indicate that diabetes in pregnancy disrupts the morphogenesis of cerebellar cortex. This dysmorphogenesis may be part of the cascade of events through which diabetes during pregnancy affects motor coordination and social behaviors in offspring. PMID:26842601

  7. The Small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 Regulate Cerebellar Development by Controlling Cell Morphogenesis, Migration and Foliation

    PubMed Central

    Mulherkar, Shalaka; Uddin, Mohammad Danish; Couvillon, Anthony D.; Sillitoe, Roy V.; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 are key cytoskeletal regulators that function in a mutually antagonistic manner to control the migration and morphogenesis of a broad range of cell types. However, their role in shaping the cerebellum, a unique brain structure composed of an elaborate set of folia separated by fissures of different lengths, remains largely unexplored. Here we show that dysregulation of both RhoA and Rac1 signaling results in abnormal cerebellar ontogenesis. Ablation of RhoA from neuroprogenitor cells drastically alters the timing and placement of fissure formation, the migration and positioning of granule and Purkinje cells, the alignment of Bergmann glia, and the integrity of the basement membrane, primarily in the anterior lobules. Furthermore, in the absence of RhoA, granule cell precursors located at the base of fissures fail to undergo cell shape changes required for fissure initiation. Many of these abnormalities can be recapitulated by deleting RhoA specifically from granule cell precursors but not postnatal glia, indicating that RhoA functions in granule cell precursors to control cerebellar morphogenesis. Notably, mice with elevated Rac1 activity due to loss of the Rac1 inhibitors Bcr and Abr show similar anterior cerebellar deficits, including ectopic neurons and defects in fissure formation, Bergmann glia organization and basement membrane integrity. Together, our results suggest that RhoA and Rac1 play indispensable roles in patterning cerebellar morphology. PMID:25128586

  8. Dynamics of fast and slow inhibition from cerebellar Golgi cells allow flexible control of synaptic integration

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, John J.; Fioravante, Diasynou; Regehr, Wade G.

    2011-01-01

    Throughout the brain, multiple interneuron types influence distinct aspects of synaptic processing. Interneuron diversity can thereby promote differential firing from neurons receiving common excitation. In contrast, Golgi cells are the sole interneurons regulating granule cell spiking evoked by mossy fibers, thereby gating inputs to the cerebellar cortex. Here, we examine how this single interneuron type modifies activity in its targets. We find that GABAA-mediated transmission at unitary Golgi cell → granule cell synapses consists of varying contributions of fast synaptic currents and sustained inhibition. Fast IPSCs depress and slow IPSCs gradually build during high frequency Golgi cell activity. Consequently, fast and slow inhibition differentially influence granule cell spike timing during persistent mossy fiber input. Furthermore, slow inhibition reduces the gain of the mossy fiber → granule cell input-output curve, while fast inhibition increases the threshold. Thus, a lack of interneuron diversity need not prevent flexible inhibitory control of synaptic processing. PMID:19778512

  9. Role of Pax6 in development of the cerebellar system.

    PubMed

    Engelkamp, D; Rashbass, P; Seawright, A; van Heyningen, V

    1999-08-01

    Post-mitotic neurons generated at the rhombic lip undertake long distance migration to widely dispersed destinations, giving rise to cerebellar granule cells and the precerebellar nuclei. Here we show that Pax6, a key regulator in CNS and eye development, is strongly expressed in rhombic lip and in cells migrating away from it. Development of some structures derived from these cells is severely affected in Pax6-null Small eye (Pax6(Sey)/Pax6(Sey)) embryos. Cell proliferation and initial differentiation seem unaffected, but cell migration and neurite extension are disrupted in mutant embryos. Three of the five precerebellar nuclei fail to form correctly. In the cerebellum the pre-migratory granule cell sub-layer and fissures are absent. Some granule cells are found in ectopic positions in the inferior colliculus which may result from the complete absence of Unc5h3 expression in Pax6(Sey)/Pax6(Sey) granule cells. Our results suggest that Pax6 plays a strong role during hindbrain migration processes and at least part of its activity is mediated through regulation of the netrin receptor Unc5h3. PMID:10409504

  10. Property in Nonhuman Primates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2011-01-01

    Property is rare in most nonhuman primates, most likely because their lifestyles are not conducive to it. Nonetheless, just because these species do not frequently maintain property does not mean that they lack the propensity to do so. Primates show respect for possession, as well as behaviors related to property, such as irrational decision…

  11. Cerebellar information processing in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS).

    PubMed

    Lesage, E; Apps, M A J; Hayter, A L; Beckmann, C F; Barnes, D; Langdon, D W; Ramnani, N

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has characterized the anatomical connectivity of the cortico-cerebellar system - a large and important fibre system in the primate brain. Within this system, there are reciprocal projections between the prefrontal cortex and Crus II of the cerebellar cortex, which both play important roles in the acquisition and execution of cognitive skills. Here, we propose that this system also plays a particular role in sustaining skilled cognitive performance in patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS), in whom advancing neuropathology causes increasingly inefficient information processing. We scanned RRMS patients and closely matched healthy subjects while they performed the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT), a demanding test of information processing speed, and a control task. This enabled us to localize differences between conditions that change as a function of group (group-by-condition interactions). Hemodynamic activity in some patient populations with CNS pathology are not well understood and may be atypical, so we avoided analysis strategies that rely exclusively on models of hemodynamic activity derived from the healthy brain, using instead an approach that combined a 'model-free' analysis technique (Tensor Independent Component Analysis, TICA) that was relatively free of such assumptions, with a post-hoc 'model-based' approach (General Linear Model, GLM). Our results showed group-by-condition interactions in cerebellar cortical Crus II. We suggest that this area may have in role maintaining performance in working memory tasks by compensating for inefficient data transfer associated with white matter lesions in MS. PMID:20714060

  12. Automated cerebellar lobule segmentation with application to cerebellar structural analysis in cerebellar disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Ye, Chuyang; Bogovic, John A; Carass, Aaron; Jedynak, Bruno M; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L

    2016-02-15

    The cerebellum plays an important role in both motor control and cognitive function. Cerebellar function is topographically organized and diseases that affect specific parts of the cerebellum are associated with specific patterns of symptoms. Accordingly, delineation and quantification of cerebellar sub-regions from magnetic resonance images are important in the study of cerebellar atrophy and associated functional losses. This paper describes an automated cerebellar lobule segmentation method based on a graph cut segmentation framework. Results from multi-atlas labeling and tissue classification contribute to the region terms in the graph cut energy function and boundary classification contributes to the boundary term in the energy function. A cerebellar parcellation is achieved by minimizing the energy function using the α-expansion technique. The proposed method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation on 15 subjects including both healthy controls and patients with cerebellar diseases. Based on reported Dice coefficients, the proposed method outperforms two state-of-the-art methods. The proposed method was then applied to 77 subjects to study the region-specific cerebellar structural differences in three spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) genetic subtypes. Quantitative analysis of the lobule volumes shows distinct patterns of volume changes associated with different SCA subtypes consistent with known patterns of atrophy in these genetic subtypes. PMID:26408861

  13. Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxias (ARCA) are a heterogeneous group of rare neurological disorders involving both central and peripheral nervous system, and in some case other systems and organs, and characterized by degeneration or abnormal development of cerebellum and spinal cord, autosomal recessive inheritance and, in most cases, early onset occurring before the age of 20 years. This group encompasses a large number of rare diseases, the most frequent in Caucasian population being Friedreich ataxia (estimated prevalence 2–4/100,000), ataxia-telangiectasia (1–2.5/100,000) and early onset cerebellar ataxia with retained tendon reflexes (1/100,000). Other forms ARCA are much less common. Based on clinicogenetic criteria, five main types ARCA can be distinguished: congenital ataxias (developmental disorder), ataxias associated with metabolic disorders, ataxias with a DNA repair defect, degenerative ataxias, and ataxia associated with other features. These diseases are due to mutations in specific genes, some of which have been identified, such as frataxin in Friedreich ataxia, α-tocopherol transfer protein in ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED), aprataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA1), and senataxin in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by ancillary tests such as neuroimaging (magnetic resonance imaging, scanning), electrophysiological examination, and mutation analysis when the causative gene is identified. Correct clinical and genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counseling and prognosis and, in some instances, pharmacological treatment. Due to autosomal recessive inheritance, previous familial history of affected individuals is unlikely. For most ARCA there is no specific drug treatment except for coenzyme Q10 deficiency and abetalipoproteinemia. PMID:17112370

  14. Stereotyped spatial patterns of functional synaptic connectivity in the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Valera, Antoine M; Binda, Francesca; Pawlowski, Sophie A; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Casella, Jean-François; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Poulain, Bernard; Isope, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Motor coordination is supported by an array of highly organized heterogeneous modules in the cerebellum. How incoming sensorimotor information is channeled and communicated between these anatomical modules is still poorly understood. In this study, we used transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific subsets of Purkinje cells that allowed us to target a given set of cerebellar modules. Combining in vitro recordings and photostimulation, we identified stereotyped patterns of functional synaptic organization between the granule cell layer and its main targets, the Purkinje cells, Golgi cells and molecular layer interneurons. Each type of connection displayed position-specific patterns of granule cell synaptic inputs that do not strictly match with anatomical boundaries but connect distant cortical modules. Although these patterns can be adjusted by activity-dependent processes, they were found to be consistent and predictable between animals. Our results highlight the operational rules underlying communication between modules in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:26982219

  15. Inferred properties of stellar granulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, D.F.; Toner, C.G.

    1985-06-01

    Apparent characteristics of stellar granulation in F and G main-sequence stars are inferred directly from observed spectral-line asymmetries and from comparisons of numerical simulations with the observations: (1) the apparent granulation velocity increases with effective temperature, (2) the dispersion of granule velocities about their mean velocity of rise increases with the apparent granulation velocity, (3) the mean velocity of rise of granules must be less than the total line broadening, (4) the apparent velocity difference between granules and dark lanes corresponds to the granulation velocity deduced from stellar line bisectors, (5) the dark lanes show velocities of fall approximately twice as large as the granule rise velocities, (6) the light contributed to the stellar flux by the granules is four to ten times more than the light from the dark lanes. Stellar rotation is predicted to produce distortions in the line bisectors which may give information on the absolute velocity displacements of the line bisectors. 37 references.

  16. Cerebellar Cortical Lamination and Foliation Require Cyclin A2

    PubMed Central

    Otero, José Javier; Kalaszczynska, Ilona; Michowski, Wojciech; Wong, Michael; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Griveau, Amélie; Odajima, Junko; Czeisler, Catherine; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Murnen, Alice; Schüler, Ulrich; Sicinski, Piotr; Rowitch, David

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian genome encodes two A-type cyclins, which are considered potentially redundant yet essential regulators of the cell cycle. Here, we tested requirements for cyclin A1 and cyclin A2 function in cerebellar development. Compound conditional loss of cyclin A1/A2 in neural progenitors resulted in severe cerebellar hypoplasia, decreased proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron progenitors (CGNP), and Purkinje (PC) neuron dyslamination. Deletion of cyclin A2 alone showed an identical phenotype, demonstrating that cyclin A1 does not compensate for cyclin A2 loss in neural progenitors. Cyclin A2 loss lead to increased apoptosis at early embryonic time points but not at post-natal time points. In contrast, neural progenitors of the VZ/SVZ did not undergo increased apoptosis, indicating that VZ/SVZ-derived and rhombic lip-derived progenitor cells show differential requirements to cyclin A2. Conditional knockout of cyclin A2 or the SHH proliferative target Nmyc in CGNP also resulted in PC neuron dyslamination. Although cyclin E1 has been reported to compensate for cyclin A2 function in fibroblasts and is upregulated in cyclin A2 null cerebella, cyclin E1 expression was unable to compensate for loss-of cyclin A2 function. PMID:24184637

  17. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    The present study sought an acoustic signature for the speech disturbance recognized in cerebellar degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for a radiological rating of cerebellar involvement in six cerebellar ataxic dysarthric speakers. Acoustic measures of the [pap] syllables in contrastive prosodic conditions and of normal vs. brain-damaged patients were used to further our understanding both of the speech degeneration that accompanies cerebellar pathology and of speech motor control and movement in general. Pair-wise comparisons of the prosodic conditions within the normal group showed statistically significant differences for four prosodic contrasts. For three of the four contrasts analyzed, the normal speakers showed both longer durations and higher formant and fundamental frequency values in the more prominent first condition of the contrast. The acoustic measures of the normal prosodic contrast values were then used as a model to measure the degree of speech deterioration for individual cerebellar subjects. This estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual differences between cerebellar and normal subjects' acoustic values of the four prosodic contrasts was used in correlation analyses with MRI ratings. Moderate correlations between speech deterioration and cerebellar atrophy were found in the measures of syllable duration and f0. A strong negative correlation was found for F1. Moreover, the normal model presented by these acoustic data allows for a description of the flexibility of task- oriented behavior in normal speech motor control. These data challenge spatio-temporal theory which explains movement as an artifact of time wherein longer durations predict more extreme movements and give further evidence for gestural internal dynamics of movement in which time emerges from articulatory events rather than dictating those events. This model provides a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic

  18. mRNP granules

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granules are dynamic, self-assembling structures that harbor non-translating mRNAs bound by various proteins that regulate mRNA translation, localization, and turnover. Their importance in gene expression regulation is far reaching, ranging from precise spatial-temporal control of mRNAs that drive developmental programs in oocytes and embryos, to similarly exquisite control of mRNAs in neurons that underpin synaptic plasticity, and thus, memory formation. Analysis of mRNP granules in their various contexts has revealed common themes of assembly, disassembly, and modes of mRNA regulation, yet new studies continue to reveal unexpected and important findings, such as links between aberrant mRNP granule assembly and neurodegenerative disease. Continued study of these enigmatic structures thus promises fascinating new insights into cellular function, and may also suggest novel therapeutic strategies in various disease states. PMID:25531407

  19. Rearing conditions differently affect the motor performance and cerebellar morphology of prenatally stressed juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Ulupinar, Emel; Erol, Kevser; Ay, Hakan; Yucel, Ferruh

    2015-02-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most vulnerable parts of the brain to environmental changes. In this study, the effect of diverse environmental rearing conditions on the motor performances of prenatally stressed juvenile rats and its reflection to the cerebellar morphology were investigated. Prenatally stressed Wistar rats were grouped according to different rearing conditions (Enriched=EC, Standard=SC and Isolated=IC) after weaning. Six weeks later, male and female offspring from different litters were tested behaviorally. In rotarod and string suspension tests, females gained better scores than males. Significant gender and housing effects were observed especially on the motor functions requiring fine skills with the best performance by enriched females, but the worst by enriched males. The susceptibility of cerebellar macro- and micro-neurons to environmental conditions was compared using stereological methods. In female groups, no differences were observed in the volume proportions of cerebellar layers, soma sizes and the numerical densities of granule or Purkinje cells. However, a significant interaction between housing and gender was observed in the granule to Purkinje cell ratio of males, due to the increased numerical densities of the granule cells in enriched males. These data imply that proper functioning of the cerebellum relies on its well organized and evolutionarily conserved structure and circuitry. Although early life stress leads to long term behavioral and neurobiological consequences in the offspring, diverse rearing conditions can alter the motor skills of animals and synaptic connectivity between Purkinje and granular cells in a gender dependent manner. PMID:25315128

  20. Primate molecular divergence dates.

    PubMed

    Steiper, Michael E; Young, Nathan M

    2006-11-01

    With genomic data, alignments can be assembled that greatly increase the number of informative sites for analysis of molecular divergence dates. Here, we present an estimate of the molecular divergence dates for all of the major primate groups. These date estimates are based on a Bayesian analysis of approximately 59.8 kbp of genomic data from 13 primates and 6 mammalian outgroups, using a range of paleontologically supported calibration estimates. Results support a Cretaceous last common ancestor of extant primates (approximately 77 mya), an Eocene divergence between platyrrhine and catarrhine primates (approximately 43 mya), an Oligocene origin of apes and Old World monkeys (approximately 31 mya), and an early Miocene (approximately 18 mya) divergence of Asian and African great apes. These dates are examined in the context of other molecular clock studies. PMID:16815047

  1. Migration behavior of rodent granule neurons in the presence of antibody to the 4C5 antigen.

    PubMed

    Yfanti, E; Nagata, I; Patsavoudi, E

    1998-10-01

    We have reported the production of monoclonal antibody 4C5, which recognizes a cell surface antigen, the 4C5 antigen, involved in granule cell migration processes. In the present study, we investigated in a more precise manner the role of the 4C5 antigen in the different types of granule cell migrations that take place during cerebellar development. When cerebellar explant cultures derived from 10-day-old rats were performed for 2 days in the presence of monoclonal antibody 4C5, vertical granule cell migration, occurring in the presence of glia, was not significantly inhibited. In contrast, when monoclonal antibody 4C5 was included in the medium of microexplant cultures derived from 4-day-old mice and maintained for 4 days in vitro, granule cell migrations that occurred both parallel and perpendicular to the neurite bundles that were free of glia were inhibited. Moreover, a stronger inhibitory effect of the antibody was observed on migration perpendicular to the neurite bundles compared with the parallel type of migration. Our results indicate that the 4C5 antigen differentially affects the different developmental stages and types of granule cell migration during rodent cerebellar development. PMID:9751168

  2. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Casper, Maureen A; Raphael, Lawrence J; Harris, Katherine S; Geibel, Jennifer M

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy speakers and six with ataxia. The speaking task was designed to elicit six different prosodic conditions and four contrastive prosodic events. Distinct prosodic patterns were elicited by the examiner for cerebellar patients and healthy speakers. These utterances were digitally recorded and analysed acoustically and statistically. The healthy speakers showed statistically significant differences among all four prosodic contrasts. The normal model described by the prosodic contrasts provided a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic analyses. A significant interaction between subject groups and prosodic conditions revealed a compromised prosody in cerebellar patients. Significant differences were found for durational parameters, F0 and formant frequencies. The cerebellar speakers demonstrated different patterns of syllable lengthening and syllable reduction from that of the healthy speakers. PMID:17613097

  3. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Synonym(s): ... Publications and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration? Ataxia often occurs ...

  4. Afferent-target cell interactions in the cerebellum: negative effect of granule cells on Purkinje cell development in lurcher mice.

    PubMed

    Doughty, M L; Lohof, A; Selimi, F; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N; Mariani, J

    1999-05-01

    Lurcher (Lc) is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor gene that results in a large, constitutive inward current in the cerebellar Purkinje cells of +/Lc mice. +/Lc Purkinje cells fail to differentiate fully and die during postnatal development. In normal mice, interactions with granule cells promote Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation. Partial destruction of the granule cell population in young +/Lc mice by x irradiation resulted in a significant increase in Purkinje cell dendritic growth and improved cytoplasmic structure but did not prevent Purkinje cell death. These results indicate two components to Purkinje cell abnormalities in +/Lc mice: a retardation/blockade of dendritic development that is mediated by interactions with granule cells and the death of the cell. Thus, the normal trophic effects of granule cell interaction on Purkinje cell development are absent in the +/Lc cerebellum, suggesting that granule cells are powerful regulators of Purkinje cell differentiation. PMID:10212305

  5. Primate taxonomy: species and conservation.

    PubMed

    Rylands, Anthony B; Mittermeier, Russell A

    2014-01-01

    Primatology as a discrete branch of science involving the study of primate behavior and ecology took off in the 1960s after discovery of the importance of primates as models for biomedical research and the realization that primates provide insights into the evolutionary history of humans. Osman Hill's unfortunately incomplete monograph series on the comparative anatomy and taxonomy of the primates(1) and the Napiers' 1967 A Handbook of Living Primates(2) recorded the world's view of primate diversity at this time. This taxonomy remained the baseline for nearly three decades, with the diversity of each genus being represented by some species, but extensively as subspecies. PMID:24591133

  6. The cerebellar Golgi cell and spatiotemporal organization of granular layer activity

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Egidio; Solinas, Sergio; Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; Mapelli, Lisa; Prestori, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellar granular layer has been suggested to perform a complex spatiotemporal reconfiguration of incoming mossy fiber signals. Central to this role is the inhibitory action exerted by Golgi cells over granule cells: Golgi cells inhibit granule cells through both feedforward and feedback inhibitory loops and generate a broad lateral inhibition that extends beyond the afferent synaptic field. This characteristic connectivity has recently been investigated in great detail and been correlated with specific functional properties of these neurons. These include theta-frequency pacemaking, network entrainment into coherent oscillations and phase resetting. Important advances have also been made in terms of determining the membrane and synaptic properties of the neuron, and clarifying the mechanisms of activation by input bursts. Moreover, voltage sensitive dye imaging and multi-electrode array (MEA) recordings, combined with mathematical simulations based on realistic computational models, have improved our understanding of the impact of Golgi cell activity on granular layer circuit computations. These investigations have highlighted the critical role of Golgi cells in: generating dense clusters of granule cell activity organized in center-surround structures, implementing combinatorial operations on multiple mossy fiber inputs, regulating transmission gain, and cut-off frequency, controlling spike timing and burst transmission, and determining the sign, intensity and duration of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber-granule cell relay. This review considers recent advances in the field, highlighting the functional implications of Golgi cells for granular layer network computation and indicating new challenges for cerebellar research. PMID:23730271

  7. Review: granulation and fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.

    1981-01-01

    The history of granulation techniques is very long; however, the systematic study of the granulation phenomenon began only after 1950. The first, distinguished paper treating the fundamental binding mechanism of granules was published by Rumpf in 1958. Although there are several binding forces, the discussion in this paper is confined to granulation involving the capillary energy of a liquid-particle system. This technique has been applied widely and successfully to various fields of powder technology because of its advantages of simplicity and economy (ref. 2). Granules with diameters larger than 5 mm can be prepared efficiently by rotating-type granulators, such as a pan or a trommel (ref. 3, 4, 5). On the other hand, the purpose of fluidized-bed granulators (hereafter abbreviated as FBG) is to produce small granules with diameters from 0.3 to 3 mm (ref. 6). Because it contains a small amount of liquid, a fluidized-bed granulator has a fluidization state differing significantly from that of an ordinary fluidized bed. The dispersion of liquid and powder in the bed plays an important role in the granulation mechanism. This mechanism is compared to that of pan granulators, and the differences in characteristics are discussed.

  8. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  9. Human Quadrupeds, Primate Quadrupedalism, and Uner Tan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Liza J.; Cole, Whitney G.; Young, Jesse W.; Raichlen, David A.; Robinson, Scott R.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2005, an extensive literature documents individuals from several families afflicted with “Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS),” a condition that in its most extreme form is characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia, loss of balance and coordination, impaired cognitive abilities, and habitual quadrupedal gait on hands and feet. Some researchers have interpreted habitual use of quadrupedalism by these individuals from an evolutionary perspective, suggesting that it represents an atavistic expression of our quadrupedal primate ancestry or “devolution.” In support of this idea, individuals with “UTS” are said to use diagonal sequence quadrupedalism, a type of quadrupedal gait that distinguishes primates from most other mammals. Although the use of primate-like quadrupedal gait in humans would not be sufficient to support the conclusion of evolutionary “reversal,” no quantitative gait analyses were presented to support this claim. Using standard gait analysis of 518 quadrupedal strides from video sequences of individuals with “UTS”, we found that these humans almost exclusively used lateral sequence–not diagonal sequence–quadrupedal gaits. The quadrupedal gait of these individuals has therefore been erroneously described as primate-like, further weakening the “devolution” hypothesis. In fact, the quadrupedalism exhibited by individuals with UTS resembles that of healthy adult humans asked to walk quadrupedally in an experimental setting. We conclude that quadrupedalism in healthy adults or those with a physical disability can be explained using biomechanical principles rather than evolutionary assumptions. PMID:25029457

  10. Isolation of neuromelanin granules.

    PubMed

    Tribl, Florian

    2008-12-01

    Neuromelanin granules are pigmented organelles in the human midbrain that give name to a brain area, substantia nigra pars compacta, which macroscopically appears as a dark brown region in the midbrain due to the insoluble pigment neuromelanin. The substantia nigra pars compacta massively degenerates in Parkinson's disease and gives rise to severely disabling movement symptoms. It has been suggested that neuromelanin granules play an important role in the neurodegenerative events in Parkinson's disease: redox-active iron is bound to neuromelanin and thereby retained within this compartment, but in Parkinson's disease it is thought to be increasingly released into the cytosol, promoting oxidative stress. This unit includes a methodological workflow for the isolation of neuromelanin granules from the human midbrain. This top-down approach (describes an approach that reduces the complexity of the sample stepwise from the level of tissue to cell, and from cell to organelle) encompasses the organelle isolation by sequential density gradient centrifugation and the assessment of the isolation efficacy by western blotting. PMID:19085988

  11. Hands of early primates.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Doug M; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Chester, Stephen G B; Bloch, Jonathan I; Godinot, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Questions surrounding the origin and early evolution of primates continue to be the subject of debate. Though anatomy of the skull and inferred dietary shifts are often the focus, detailed studies of postcrania and inferred locomotor capabilities can also provide crucial data that advance understanding of transitions in early primate evolution. In particular, the hand skeleton includes characteristics thought to reflect foraging, locomotion, and posture. Here we review what is known about the early evolution of primate hands from a comparative perspective that incorporates data from the fossil record. Additionally, we provide new comparative data and documentation of skeletal morphology for Paleogene plesiadapiforms, notharctines, cercamoniines, adapines, and omomyiforms. Finally, we discuss implications of these data for understanding locomotor transitions during the origin and early evolutionary history of primates. Known plesiadapiform species cannot be differentiated from extant primates based on either intrinsic hand proportions or hand-to-body size proportions. Nonetheless, the presence of claws and a different metacarpophalangeal [corrected] joint form in plesiadapiforms indicate different grasping mechanics. Notharctines and cercamoniines have intrinsic hand proportions with extremely elongated proximal phalanges and digit rays relative to metacarpals, resembling tarsiers and galagos. But their hand-to-body size proportions are typical of many extant primates (unlike those of tarsiers, and possibly Teilhardina, which have extremely large hands). Non-adapine adapiforms and omomyids exhibit additional carpal features suggesting more limited dorsiflexion, greater ulnar deviation, and a more habitually divergent pollex than observed plesiadapiforms. Together, features differentiating adapiforms and omomyiforms from plesiadapiforms indicate increased reliance on vertical prehensile-clinging and grasp-leaping, possibly in combination with predatory behaviors in

  12. [Clinical manifestations of cerebellar ataxias].

    PubMed

    Abdulkerimov, Kh T

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of clinical manifestations and focal symptoms in 18 patients with cerebellar ataxia (CA) has shown that these markers are not sufficient for making an accurate diagnosis in all CA cases. It is recommended to verify an ataxia form with objective methods, computed stabilography, in particular. PMID:12958853

  13. Orthostatic tremor: a cerebellar pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Traian; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Valabregue, Romain; Legrand, André-Pierre; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Marais, Lea; Degos, Bertrand; Hubsch, Cecile; Fernández-Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Roze, Emmanuel; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Meunier, Sabine; Vidailhet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    See Muthuraman et al. (doi:10.1093/aww164) for a scientific commentary on this article. Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by high frequency tremor affecting the legs and trunk during the standing position. Cerebellar defects were suggested in orthostatic tremor without direct evidence. We aimed to characterize the anatomo-functional defects of the cerebellar motor pathways in orthostatic tremor. We used multimodal neuroimaging to compare 17 patients with orthostatic tremor and 17 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. Nine of the patients with orthostatic tremor underwent repetitive transcranial stimulation applied over the cerebellum during five consecutive days. We quantified the duration of standing position and tremor severity through electromyographic recordings. Compared to healthy volunteers, grey matter volume in patients with orthostatic tremor was (i) increased in the cerebellar vermis and correlated positively with the duration of the standing position; and (ii) increased in the supplementary motor area and decreased in the lateral cerebellum, which both correlated with the disease duration. Functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area was abnormally increased in patients with orthostatic tremor, and correlated positively with tremor severity. After repetitive transcranial stimulation, tremor severity and functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area were reduced. We provide an explanation for orthostatic tremor pathophysiology, and demonstrate the functional relevance of cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections in tremor related to cerebellar defects. PMID:27329770

  14. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  15. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements. PMID:25124058

  16. Comparative sensitivity of rat cerebellar neurons to dysregulation of divalent cation homeostasis and cytotoxicity caused by methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Joshua R.; Marty, M. Sue; Atchison, William D. . E-mail: atchiso1@msu.edu

    2005-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the relative effectiveness of methylmercury (MeHg) to alter divalent cation homeostasis and cause cell death in MeHg-resistant cerebellar Purkinje and MeHg-sensitive granule neurons. Application of 0.5-5 {mu}M MeHg to Purkinje and granule cells grown in culture caused a concentration- and time-dependent biphasic increase in fura-2 fluorescence. At 0.5 and 1 {mu}M MeHg, the elevations of fura-2 fluorescence induced by MeHg were biphasic in both cell types, but significantly delayed in Purkinje as compared to granule cells. Application of the heavy-metal chelator, TPEN, to Purkinje cells caused a precipitous decline in a proportion of the fura-2 fluorescence signal, indicating that MeHg causes release of Ca{sup 2+} and non-Ca{sup 2+} divalent cations. Purkinje cells were also more resistant than granule cells to the neurotoxic effects of MeHg. At 24.5 h after-application of 5 {mu}M MeHg, 97.7% of Purkinje cells were viable. At 3 {mu}M MeHg there was no detectable loss of Purkinje cell viability. In contrast, only 40.6% of cerebellar granule cells were alive 24.5 h after application of 3 {mu}M MeHg. In conclusion, Purkinje neurons in primary cultures appear to be more resistant to MeHg-induced dysregulation of divalent cation homeostasis and subsequent cell death when compared to cerebellar granule cells. There is a significant component of non-Ca{sup 2+} divalent cation released by MeHg in Purkinje neurons.

  17. Late onset cerebellar cortical degeneration in a koala.

    PubMed

    Kuwamura, M; Murai, F; Nishioka, S; Aoki, M; Ohashi, F; Yamate, J; Kotani, T; Summers, B A

    2009-08-01

    A 10-year-old male koala started to fall from the tree while sleeping. Subsequently, the koala often fell down while walking and showed a gait abnormality, abnormal nystagmus and hypersalivation. At 12 years of age, the koala became ataxic and seemed blind. At 13 years of age, the koala exhibited signs of dysstasia and was euthanased. Necropsy revealed marked symmetrical atrophy of the cerebellum. Histopathologically, a severe loss of Purkinje and granule cells was evident in the cerebellum, while the molecular layer was more cellular than normal with cells resembling small neurons, which were positively stained with parvalbumin immunohistochemistry. Reactive Bergmann glial cells (astrocytes) were present adjacent to the depleted Purkinje cell zone. The very late onset and slow progression of the cerebellar cortical degeneration in this case is particularly interesting and appears to be the first report in the koala. PMID:19673852

  18. Murine cerebellar neurons express a novel gene encoding a protein related to cell cycle control and cell fate determination proteins.

    PubMed

    Taoka, M; Isobe, T; Okuyama, T; Watanabe, M; Kondo, H; Yamakawa, Y; Ozawa, F; Hishinuma, F; Kubota, M; Minegishi, A

    1994-04-01

    We cloned cDNAs of a novel protein (designated V-1) that has been identified from among the developmentally regulated proteins in the rat cerebellum. Protein sequencing analysis (Taoka, M., Yamakuni, T., Song, S.-Y., Yamakawa, Y., Seta, K., Okuyama, T., and Isobe, T. (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 207, 615-620) and cDNA sequence analysis revealed that the V-1 protein consists of 117 amino acids and contains 2.5 contiguous repeats of the cdc10/SWI6 motif, which was originally found in the products of the cell cycle control genes of yeasts and the cell fate determination genes in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that the expression of the V-1 gene is transiently increased in postmigratory granule cells during postnatal rat cerebellar development and thereafter is markedly suppressed, whereas Purkinje cells constitutively express V-1 mRNA. In contrast, cerebellar granule cells of the staggerer mutant mouse continue to express the V-1 gene even when the granule cells of the normal mouse have ceased to express the V-1 gene, suggesting that the expression of the V-1 gene in granule cells is regulated through the interaction with Purkinje cells. On the basis of these results, we postulate that the V-1 protein has a potential role in the differentiation of granule cells. PMID:8144589

  19. What Is a Primate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Describes a series of hands-on experiments that engage students in hypothesis testing and promotes active learning of the concepts of evolution and adaptation. Laboratory exercises demonstrate how features of the hands and eyes distinguish primates from other mammals. (SOE)

  20. Nonhuman Primate Ocular Biometry

    PubMed Central

    Augusteyn, Robert C.; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine ocular growth in nonhuman primates (NHPs) from measurements on ex vivo eyes. Methods We obtained NHP eyes from animals that had been killed as part of other studies or because of health-related issues. Digital calipers were used to measure the horizontal, vertical, and anteroposterior globe diameters as well as corneal horizontal and vertical diameters of excised globes from 98 hamadryas baboons, 551 cynomolgus monkeys, and 112 rhesus monkeys, at ages ranging from 23 to 360 months. Isolated lens sagittal thickness and equatorial diameter were measured by shadowphotogrammetry. Wet and fixed dry weights were obtained for lenses. Results Nonhuman primate globe growth continues throughout life, slowing toward an asymptotic maximum. The final globe size scales with negative allometry to adult body size. Corneal growth ceases at around 20 months. Lens diameter increases but thickness decreases with increasing age. Nonhuman primate lens wet and dry weight accumulation is monophasic, continuing throughout life toward asymptotic maxima. The dry/wet weight ratio reaches a maximum of 0.33. Conclusions Nonhuman primate ocular globe and lens growth differ in several respects from those in humans. Although age-related losses of lens power and accommodative amplitude are similar, lens growth and properties are different indicating care should be taken in extrapolating NHP observations to the study of human accommodation. PMID:26780314

  1. RNA Granules in Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Seydoux, Geraldine; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Nagamori, Ippei

    2011-01-01

    “Germ granules” are cytoplasmic, nonmembrane-bound organelles unique to germline. Germ granules share components with the P bodies and stress granules of somatic cells, but also contain proteins and RNAs uniquely required for germ cell development. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of germ granule assembly, dynamics, and function. One hypothesis is that germ granules operate as hubs for the posttranscriptional control of gene expression, a function at the core of the germ cell differentiation program. PMID:21768607

  2. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  3. Cerebellar Structure and Function in Male Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) rat strain may model some of the behavioral features associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have shown that, in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning, WKHA emit eyeblink CRs with shortened onset latencies. To further characterize the shortened CR onset latencies seen in WKHA rats, we examined 750-ms delay conditioning with either a tone CS or a light CS, we extended acquisition training, and we included Wistar rats as an additional, outbred control strain. Our results indicated that WKHAs learned more quickly and showed a shortened CR onset latency to a tone CS compared to both Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) and Wistars. WKHAs and Wistars show a lengthening of CR onset latency over conditioning with a tone CS and an increasing confinement of CRs to the later part of the tone CS (inhibition of delay). WKHAs learned more quickly to a light CS only in comparison to WKHTs and showed a shortened CR onset latency only in comparison to Wistars. Wistars showed an increasing confinement of CRs to the late part of the light CS over conditioning. We used unbiased stereology to estimate the number of Purkinje and granule cells in the cerebellar cortex of the three strains. Our results indicated that WKHAs have more granule cells than Wistars and WKHTs and more Purkinje cells than Wistars. Results are discussed in terms of CS processing and cerebellar cortical contributions to EBC. PMID:23398437

  4. Role of glycogen in processes of cerebellar glial cells under conditions of its damage with sodium nitrite.

    PubMed

    Samosudova, N V; Reutov, V P; Larionova, N P

    2010-12-01

    Ultrastructure of processes of glial cell, astrocytes of the molecular layer of cerebellar cortex in Rana temporaria frog, under conditions of damage to the cerebellum caused by NO-generating compound sodium nitrite was studied under an electron microscope. It was found that astrocytes have at least two types of processes: the first (fibrillar) primarily contained numerous fibrils and few glycogen granules and the second (granular) primarily containing glycogen granules. In the presence of NO-generating compound in toxic doses, fibrillar processes are damaged or completely degrade more rapidly than granular ones. The processes containing glycogen can protect both damaged synapses and individual synaptic buttons by forming a compact structure, wrapping, around them. We analyzed the possible role of glycogen of cerebellar glial cell processes in neuroglial interactions in the presence of sodium nitrite. PMID:21240384

  5. Aspm sustains postnatal cerebellar neurogenesis and medulloblastoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott E; Garcia, Idoia; Crowther, Andrew J; Li, Shiyi; Stewart, Alyssa; Liu, Hedi; Lough, Kendall J; O'Neill, Sean; Veleta, Katherine; Oyarzabal, Esteban A; Merrill, Joseph R; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Gershon, Timothy R

    2015-11-15

    Alterations in genes that regulate brain size may contribute to both microcephaly and brain tumor formation. Here, we report that Aspm, a gene that is mutated in familial microcephaly, regulates postnatal neurogenesis in the cerebellum and supports the growth of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Cerebellar granule neuron progenitors (CGNPs) express Aspm when maintained in a proliferative state by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, and Aspm is expressed in Shh-driven medulloblastoma in mice. Genetic deletion of Aspm reduces cerebellar growth, while paradoxically increasing the mitotic rate of CGNPs. Aspm-deficient CGNPs show impaired mitotic progression, altered patterns of division orientation and differentiation, and increased DNA damage, which causes progenitor attrition through apoptosis. Deletion of Aspm in mice with Smo-induced medulloblastoma reduces tumor growth and increases DNA damage. Co-deletion of Aspm and either of the apoptosis regulators Bax or Trp53 (also known as p53) rescues the survival of neural progenitors and reduces the growth restriction imposed by Aspm deletion. Our data show that Aspm functions to regulate mitosis and to mitigate DNA damage during CGNP cell division, causes microcephaly through progenitor apoptosis when mutated, and sustains tumor growth in medulloblastoma. PMID:26450969

  6. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  7. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  8. Cerebellar mature teratoma in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Zavanone, M; Alimehmeti, R; Campanella, R; Ram-Pini, P; Locatelli, M; Egidi, M; Righini, A; Bauer, D

    2002-03-01

    Mature teratoma of the posterior cranial fossa in adults is extremely rare. We report a particularly rare case of medio-lateral cerebellar mature teratoma that became symptomatic in a middle-aged man. The CT revealed the lesion of heterogeneous density with calcifications in the solid medial portion. Only the MRI could reliably define the borders of the cystic component extending into the left cerebellar lobe. Histologically the presence of fully matured representative tissues of the 3 germ layers ensured the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We suggest that the cyst formation from progressive latent hemorrhage and/or secretion from the gland cells of the tumor, may be responsible for the clinical decompensation even in adulthood. PMID:12118223

  9. Cerebellar neurocognition and Korsakoff's syndrome: an hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Wijnia, Jan W; Goossensen, Anne

    2010-08-01

    In literature, the cerebellum is given a substantial role in cognitive processes, in addition to traditional views on cerebellar function of regulating motor behaviour. The phenomenon of cerebellar damage causing impairments in memory and executive functioning was observed in various cerebellar disorders. Cerebellar cognitive dysfunction can be interpreted as a disturbance of cerebello-cerebral connections to areas of the cerebral cortex involved in cognitive processing, but the exact nature of the cognitive dysregulation is not known. Memory and executive dysfunction are important clinical features of Korsakoff's syndrome. We hypothesize that the Korsakoff syndrome might be an example of cerebellar neurocognitive dysfunctioning, caused by cerebello-cerebral pathways being disconnected in brain areas that are classically affected in Wernicke's encephalopathy. Further research is needed to support the possibility of cerebellar neurocognitive disturbances in Korsakoff's syndrome. If correct, this hypothesis may contribute to a better understanding of the clinical and neuropsychological profile of Korsakoff's syndrome. PMID:20303220

  10. Development of maize starch granules

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize kernels of self-pollinated inbred line B73 harvested on various days after pollination (DAP) were subjected for starch granule development studies. Starch in endosperms was first observed on 6 DAP. A small amount of starch granules (<2% of dry weight) was found in the endosperm on 12 DAP. S...

  11. [Research of aerobic granule characteristics with different granule age].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Man; Yang, Chang-Zhu; Pu, Wen-Hong; Luo, Ying-Dong; Gong, Jian-Yu

    2012-03-01

    In the SBR reactor, we studied the different style, physicochemical characteristic, pollutants removal and microbial activity between the short age and long age aerobic granule, respectively. The short age aerobic granule was cultivated from activated floccules sludge and the other was gotten from aerobic granular sludge which was operated stably more than one year. The results indicated that the wet density, the specific gravity and integrated coefficient (IC) of the short age aerobic granule were 1.066 g x cm(-1), 1.013 g x cm(-3) and 98.7%, respectively. And that of long age were 1.026 g x cm(-3), 1.010 g x cm(-3) and 98.4%, respectively. All of them were higher than the long age aerobic granule. The mean diameters of them were 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively. The settling velocity of short age and long age aerobic granule were 0.005-0.032 m x s(-1) and 0.003-0.028 m x s(-1), respectively, and two kinds of aerobic granule settling velocity increased with the diameter increased. SVI of the former was lower. The COD removal rates of two aerobic granules were above 90%, and the NH4(+) -N removal rates of them were about 85%. The results of the COD effluent concentration, NH4(+) -N effluent concentration and the pollutants concentration in a typical cycle indicated that the short age aerobic granule had better pollutants removal efficiency. The TP removal rates of them were between 40% -90% and 32% -85%, respectively. The TN removal rates of them were about 80%. The SOUR(H) SOUR(NH4) and SOUR(NO2) of the short age aerobic granule were 26.4, 14.8 and 11.2 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. And that of long age were 25.2, 14.4 and 8.4 mg x (h x g)(-1), respectively. In summary, the aerobic granule had significantly different physical and chemical characteristics because of different granule age, and the short age aerobic granule exhibited better pollutants removal ability, higher microbial activity and more stability than the long age aerobic granule. PMID:22624385

  12. Modeling possible effects of atypical cerebellar processing on eyeblink conditioning in autism.

    PubMed

    Radell, Milen L; Mercado, Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Autism is unique among other disorders in that acquisition of conditioned eyeblink responses is enhanced in children, occurring in a fraction of the trials required for control participants. The timing of learned responses is, however, atypical. Two animal models of autism display a similar phenotype. Researchers have hypothesized that these differences in conditioning reflect cerebellar abnormalities. The present study used computer simulations of the cerebellar cortex, including inhibition by the molecular layer interneurons, to more closely examine whether atypical cerebellar processing can account for faster conditioning in individuals with autism. In particular, the effects of inhibitory levels on delay eyeblink conditioning were simulated, as were the effects of learning-related synaptic changes at either parallel fibers or ascending branch synapses from granule cells to Purkinje cells. Results from these simulations predict that whether molecular layer inhibition results in an enhancement or an impairment of acquisition, or changes in timing, may depend on (1) the sources of inhibition, (2) the levels of inhibition, and (3) the locations of learning-related changes (parallel vs. ascending branch synapses). Overall, the simulations predict that a disruption in the balance or an overall increase of inhibition within the cerebellar cortex may contribute to atypical eyeblink conditioning in children with autism and in animal models of autism. PMID:24590391

  13. Calcium-binding proteins in the cerebellar cortex of the bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise.

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, Sergei G; Pushchin, Igor I

    2008-07-01

    Studying the distribution of Ca2+-binding proteins allows one to discover specific neuron chemotypes involved in the regulation of the activity of various neural elements. While extensive data exist on Ca2+-binding proteins in the nervous system, in particular, in the cerebellar cortex of terrestrial mammals, the localization of these proteins in the cerebellar cortex of marine mammals has not been studied. We studied the localization of calretinin, calbindin, and parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the cerebellar cortex of the bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncates and harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena. In both species, most Purkinje cells were calbindin-immunoreactive, while calretinin and parvalbumin were expressed in a small portion of Purkinje cells. In addition, calretinin-immunoreactive unipolar brush and granule cells and calbindin- and parvalbumin-immunoreactive basket, stellate, and Golgi cells were observed. Calretinin-immunoreactive corticopetal (mossy and climbing) fibers were found. Based on the length of the primary dendrite, short-, middle-, and long-dendrite unipolar brush cells could be distinguished. The validity of this classification was supported using cluster analysis suggesting the presence of several natural types of these cells. The distribution of Ca2+-binding proteins in the cerebellar cortex of the cetaceans studied was generally similar to that reported for terrestrial mammals, suggesting that this trait is evolutionarily conservative in mammals. PMID:18455363

  14. Cerebellar associative sensory learning defects in five mouse autism models

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Alexander D; Badura, Aleksandra; Li, Amy; Cherskov, Adriana; Connolly, Sara G; Giovannucci, Andrea; Bangash, M Ali; Grasselli, Giorgio; Peñagarikano, Olga; Piochon, Claire; Tsai, Peter T; Geschwind, Daniel H; Hansel, Christian; Sahin, Mustafa; Takumi, Toru; Worley, Paul F; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2015-01-01

    Sensory integration difficulties have been reported in autism, but their underlying brain-circuit mechanisms are underexplored. Using five autism-related mouse models, Shank3+/ΔC, Mecp2R308/Y, Cntnap2−/−, L7-Tsc1 (L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+), and patDp(15q11-13)/+, we report specific perturbations in delay eyeblink conditioning, a form of associative sensory learning requiring cerebellar plasticity. By distinguishing perturbations in the probability and characteristics of learned responses, we found that probability was reduced in Cntnap2−/−, patDp(15q11-13)/+, and L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+, which are associated with Purkinje-cell/deep-nuclear gene expression, along with Shank3+/ΔC. Amplitudes were smaller in L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+ as well as Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y, which are associated with granule cell pathway expression. Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y also showed aberrant response timing and reduced Purkinje-cell dendritic spine density. Overall, our observations are potentially accounted for by defects in instructed learning in the olivocerebellar loop and response representation in the granule cell pathway. Our findings indicate that defects in associative temporal binding of sensory events are widespread in autism mouse models. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06085.001 PMID:26158416

  15. Impaired Eye-Blink Conditioning in waggler, a Mutant Mouse With Cerebellar BDNF Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Shaowen; Chen, Lu; Qiao, Xiaoxi; Knusel, Beat; Thompson, Richard F.

    1998-01-01

    In addition to their trophic functions, neurotrophins are also implicated in synaptic modulation and learning and memory. Although gene knockout techniques have been used widely in studying the roles of neurotrophins at molecular and cellular levels, behavioral studies using neurotrophin knockouts are limited by the early-onset lethality and various sensory deficits associated with the gene knockout mice. In the present study, we found that in a spontaneous mutant mouse, waggler, the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was selectively absent in the cerebellar granule cells. The cytoarchitecture of the waggler cerebellum appeared to be normal at the light microscope level. The mutant mice exhibited no sensory deficits to auditory stimuli or heat-induced pain. However, they were massively impaired in classic eye-blink conditioning. These results suggest that BDNF may have a role in normal cerebellar neuronal function, which, in turn, is essential for classic eye-blink conditioning. PMID:10454360

  16. Network Structure within the Cerebellar Input Layer Enables Lossless Sparse Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Guy; Piasini, Eugenio; Lőrincz, Andrea; Nusser, Zoltan; Silver, R. Angus

    2014-01-01

    Summary The synaptic connectivity within neuronal networks is thought to determine the information processing they perform, yet network structure-function relationships remain poorly understood. By combining quantitative anatomy of the cerebellar input layer and information theoretic analysis of network models, we investigated how synaptic connectivity affects information transmission and processing. Simplified binary models revealed that the synaptic connectivity within feedforward networks determines the trade-off between information transmission and sparse encoding. Networks with few synaptic connections per neuron and network-activity-dependent threshold were optimal for lossless sparse encoding over the widest range of input activities. Biologically detailed spiking network models with experimentally constrained synaptic conductances and inhibition confirmed our analytical predictions. Our results establish that the synaptic connectivity within the cerebellar input layer enables efficient lossless sparse encoding. Moreover, they provide a functional explanation for why granule cells have approximately four dendrites, a feature that has been evolutionarily conserved since the appearance of fish. PMID:25123311

  17. Synaptic Multivesicular Release in the Cerebellar Cortex: Its Mechanism and Role in Neural Encoding and Processing.

    PubMed

    Satake, Shin'Ichiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Imoto, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    The number of synaptic vesicles released during fast release plays a major role in determining the strength of postsynaptic response. However, it remains unresolved how the number of vesicles released in response to action potentials is controlled at a single synapse. Recent findings suggest that the Cav2.1 subtype (P/Q-type) of voltage-gated calcium channels is responsible for inducing presynaptic multivesicular release (MVR) at rat cerebellar glutamatergic synapses from granule cells to molecular layer interneurons. The topographical distance from Cav2.1 channels to exocytotic Ca(2+) sensors is a critical determinant of MVR. In physiological trains of presynaptic neurons, MVR significantly impacts the excitability of postsynaptic neurons, not only by increasing peak amplitude but also by prolonging decay time of the postsynaptic currents. Therefore, MVR contributes additional complexity to neural encoding and processing in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25971904

  18. The primate seahorse rhythm.

    PubMed

    Campos, L M G; Cruz-Rizzolo, Roelf J; Pinato, L

    2015-07-10

    The main Zeitgeber, the day-night cycle, synchronizes the central oscillator which determines behaviors rhythms as sleep-wake behavior, body temperature, the regulation of hormone secretion, and the acquisition and processing of memory. Thus, actions such as acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval performed in the hippocampus are modulated by the circadian system and show a varied dependence on light and dark. To investigate changes in the hippocampus' cellular mechanism invoked by the day and night in a diurnal primate, this study analyzed the expression of PER2 and the calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in the hippocampus of Sapajus apella, a diurnal primate, at two different time points, one during the day and one during the dark phase. The PER2 protein expression peaked at night in the antiphase described for the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the same primate, indicating that hippocampal cells can present independent rhythmicity. This hippocampal rhythm was similar to that presented by diurnal but not nocturnal rodents. The CaBPs immunoreactivity also showed day/night variations in the cell number and in the cell morphology. Our findings provide evidence for the claim that the circadian regulation in the hippocampus may involve rhythms of PER2 and CaBPs expression that may contribute to the adaptation of this species in events and activities relevant to the respective periods. PMID:25862571

  19. Processing of Multi-dimensional Sensorimotor Information in the Spinal and Cerebellar Neuronal Circuitry: A New Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Spanne, Anton; Jörntell, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Why are sensory signals and motor command signals combined in the neurons of origin of the spinocerebellar pathways and why are the granule cells that receive this input thresholded with respect to their spike output? In this paper, we synthesize a number of findings into a new hypothesis for how the spinocerebellar systems and the cerebellar cortex can interact to support coordination of our multi-segmented limbs and bodies. A central idea is that recombination of the signals available to the spinocerebellar neurons can be used to approximate a wide array of functions including the spatial and temporal dependencies between limb segments, i.e. information that is necessary in order to achieve coordination. We find that random recombination of sensory and motor signals is not a good strategy since, surprisingly, the number of granule cells severely limits the number of recombinations that can be represented within the cerebellum. Instead, we propose that the spinal circuitry provides useful recombinations, which can be described as linear projections through aspects of the multi-dimensional sensorimotor input space. Granule cells, potentially with the aid of differentiated thresholding from Golgi cells, enhance the utility of these projections by allowing the Purkinje cell to establish piecewise-linear approximations of non-linear functions. Our hypothesis provides a novel view on the function of the spinal circuitry and cerebellar granule layer, illustrating how the coordinating functions of the cerebellum can be crucially supported by the recombinations performed by the neurons of the spinocerebellar systems. PMID:23516353

  20. Processing of multi-dimensional sensorimotor information in the spinal and cerebellar neuronal circuitry: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Spanne, Anton; Jörntell, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Why are sensory signals and motor command signals combined in the neurons of origin of the spinocerebellar pathways and why are the granule cells that receive this input thresholded with respect to their spike output? In this paper, we synthesize a number of findings into a new hypothesis for how the spinocerebellar systems and the cerebellar cortex can interact to support coordination of our multi-segmented limbs and bodies. A central idea is that recombination of the signals available to the spinocerebellar neurons can be used to approximate a wide array of functions including the spatial and temporal dependencies between limb segments, i.e. information that is necessary in order to achieve coordination. We find that random recombination of sensory and motor signals is not a good strategy since, surprisingly, the number of granule cells severely limits the number of recombinations that can be represented within the cerebellum. Instead, we propose that the spinal circuitry provides useful recombinations, which can be described as linear projections through aspects of the multi-dimensional sensorimotor input space. Granule cells, potentially with the aid of differentiated thresholding from Golgi cells, enhance the utility of these projections by allowing the Purkinje cell to establish piecewise-linear approximations of non-linear functions. Our hypothesis provides a novel view on the function of the spinal circuitry and cerebellar granule layer, illustrating how the coordinating functions of the cerebellum can be crucially supported by the recombinations performed by the neurons of the spinocerebellar systems. PMID:23516353

  1. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  2. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  3. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  4. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania.

    PubMed

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-07-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  5. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania

    PubMed Central

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R.; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-01-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  6. Cellular and molecular basis of cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Salvador; Andreu, Abraham; Mecklenburg, Nora; Echevarria, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of cerebellar development were investigated through structural descriptions and studying spontaneous mutations in animal models and humans. Advances in experimental embryology, genetic engineering, and neuroimaging techniques render today the possibility to approach the analysis of molecular mechanisms underlying histogenesis and morphogenesis of the cerebellum by experimental designs. Several genes and molecules were identified to be involved in the cerebellar plate regionalization, specification, and differentiation of cerebellar neurons, as well as the establishment of cellular migratory routes and the subsequent neuronal connectivity. Indeed, pattern formation of the cerebellum requires the adequate orchestration of both key morphogenetic signals, arising from distinct brain regions, and local expression of specific transcription factors. Thus, the present review wants to revisit and discuss these morphogenetic and molecular mechanisms taking place during cerebellar development in order to understand causal processes regulating cerebellar cytoarchitecture, its highly topographically ordered circuitry and its role in brain function. PMID:23805080

  7. Asymptomatic cerebellar atrophy after acute enteroviral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Vitaszil, Edina; Kamondi, Anita; Csillik, Anita; Velkey, Imre; Szirmai, Imre

    2005-07-01

    We report on a 13-year-old male who had acute enteroviral encephalitis causing cerebellar symptoms at the age of 10 years. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no abnormalities. Clinically he appeared to be recovered completely after 6 months. Twenty-three months after the recovery, MRI was performed because he presented with slight lower-limb and truncal ataxia experienced as lack of foot coordination while playing football or riding a bicycle. MRI demonstrated severe cerebellar atrophy. Clinically he recovered completely in 10 days. Only sophisticated electrophysiological methods revealed cerebellar dysfunction. The case provides evidence for the plasticity of cerebellar regulatory structures involved in the coordination of fine movements. It seems that in childhood the slow, isolated disintegration of cerebellar systems can be compensated for by upper thalamic or telencephalic connections, in a similar way to a congenital deficit of the cerebellum. PMID:15991870

  8. Granule consolidation during compaction.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, M H

    1976-03-01

    The deformation of small cylindrical aggregates of dibasic calcium phosphate was measured during compaction. An analogy between these aggregates and cylindrical granules was proposed. No change in the original shape of the aggregates occurred; the cylindrical shape was maintained even at high compaction pressures. Relaxation of the aggregates occurred at pressures higher than 420 MNm-2 (60.9 x 10(3) lb in.-2) when removed from the compacts, but no relaxation took place at pressures below this value. In addition, the aggregates relaxed by an increase in thickness only; there was no corresponding change in diameter. Up to a pressure of 200 MNm-2 (29.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), an increase in aggregate diameter occurred, which was accompanied by a reduction in thickness. This change produced only a small reduction in volume, which was attributable to interparticulate slippage resulting in a closer packed arrangement. At a pressure of 200 MNm-2, the aggregate diameter no longer increased because solid bridges were formed between the particles and the die wall, preventing further spreading. From 200 to 420 MNm-2, failure of the material occurred by plastic deformation, which produced only a decrease in aggregate thickness. From 420 to 800 MNm-2 (116.0 x 10(3) lb in.-2), a structure was formed that could support the applied load without further reduction of thickness, and this structure was shown to behave elastically. PMID:1263085

  9. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules and how degranulation of granule subsets is regulated. PMID:27558325

  10. Alcohol Excites Cerebellar Golgi Cells by Inhibiting the Na+/K+ ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Paolo; de Souza, Fabio M Simões; Sangrey, Thomas; De Schutter, Erik; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-induced alterations of cerebellar function cause motor coordination impairments that are responsible for millions of injuries and deaths worldwide. Cognitive deficits associated with alcoholism are also a consequence of cerebellar dysfunction. The mechanisms responsible for these effects of ethanol are poorly understood. Recent studies have identified neurons in the input layer of the cerebellar cortex as important ethanol targets. In this layer, granule cells (GrCs) receive the majority of sensory inputs to the cerebellum through the mossy fibers. Information flow at these neurons is gated by a specialized pacemaker interneuron known as the Golgi cell, which provides divergent GABAergic input to thousands of GrCs. In vivo electrophysiological experiments have previously shown that acute ethanol exposure abolishes GrC responsiveness to sensory inputs carried by mossy fibers. Slice electrophysiological studies suggest that ethanol causes this effect by potentiating GABAergic transmission at Golgi cell-to-GrC synapses through an increase in Golgi cell excitability. Using patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques in cerebellar slices and computer modeling, we show here that ethanol excites Golgi cells by inhibiting the Na+/K+ ATPase. Voltage-clamp recordings of Na+/K+ ATPase currents indicated that ethanol partially inhibits this pump and this effect could be mimicked by low concentrations of ouabain. Partial inhibition of Na+/K+ ATPase function in a computer model of the Golgi cell reproduced these experimental findings. These results establish a novel mechanism of action of ethanol on neuronal excitability, which likely has a role in ethanol-induced cerebellar dysfunction and may also contribute to neuronal functional alterations in other brain regions. PMID:20520600

  11. Cell death and neurodegeneration in the postnatal development of cerebellar vermis in normal and Reeler mice.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Claudia; Merighi, Adalberto; Lossi, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) was demonstrated in neurons and glia in normal brain development, plasticity, and aging, but also in neurodegeneration. (Macro)autophagy, characterized by cytoplasmic vacuolization and activation of lysosomal hydrolases, and apoptosis, typically entailing cell shrinkage, chromatin and nuclear condensation, are the two more common forms of PCD. Their underlying intracellular pathways are partly shared and neurons can die following both modalities, according to the type of death-triggering stimulus. Reelin is an extracellular protein necessary for proper neuronal migration and brain lamination. In the mutant Reeler mouse, its absence causes neuronal mispositioning, with a notable degree of cerebellar hypoplasia that was tentatively related to an increase in PCD. We have carried out an ultrastructural analysis on the occurrence and type of postnatal PCD affecting the cerebellar neurons in normal and Reeler mice. In the forming cerebellar cortex, PCD took the form of apoptosis or autophagy and mainly affected the cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). Densities of apoptotic CGCs were comparable in both mouse strains at P0-P10, while, in mutants, they increased to become significantly higher at P15. In WT mice the density of autophagic neurons did not display statistically significant differences in the time interval examined in this study, whereas it was reduced in Reeler in the P0-P10 interval, but increased at P15. Besides CGCs, the Purkinje neurons also displayed autophagic features in both WT and Reeler mice. Therefore, cerebellar neurons undergo different types of PCD and a Reelin deficiency affects the type and degree of neuronal death during postnatal development of the cerebellum. PMID:26931496

  12. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  13. Rapid Signaling Actions of Environmental Estrogens in Developing Granule Cell Neurons Are Mediated by Estrogen Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hoa H.; Belcher, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) constitute a diverse group of man-made chemicals and natural compounds derived from plants and microbial metabolism. Estrogen-like actions are mediated via the nuclear hormone receptor activity of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ and rapid regulation of intracellular signaling cascades. Previous study defined cerebellar granule cell neurons as estrogen responsive and that granule cell precursor viability was developmentally sensitive to estrogens. In this study experiments using Western blot analysis and pharmacological approaches have characterized the receptor and signaling modes of action of selective and nonselective estrogen ligands in developing cerebellar granule cells. Estrogen treatments were found to briefly increase ERK1/2-phosphorylation and then cause prolonged depression of ERK1/2 activity. The sensitivity of granule cell precursors to estrogen-induced cell death was found to require the integrated activation of membrane and intracellular ER signaling pathways. The sensitivity of granule cells to selective and nonselective ER agonists and a variety of estrogenic and nonestrogenic EDCs was also examined. The ERβ selective agonist DPN, but not the ERα selective agonist 4,4′,4′-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl) trisphenol or other ERα-specific ligands, stimulated cell death. Only EDCs with selective or nonselective ERβ activities like daidzein, equol, diethylstilbestrol, and bisphenol A were observed to induce E2-like neurotoxicity supporting the conclusion that estrogen sensitivity in granule cells is mediated via ERβ. The presented results also demonstrate the utility of estrogen sensitive developing granule cells as an in vitro assay for elucidating rapid estrogen-signaling mechanisms and to detect EDCs that act at ERβ to rapidly regulate intracellular signaling. PMID:20926581

  14. Developmental Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome in Ex-preterm Survivors Following Cerebellar Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brossard-Racine, Marie; du Plessis, Adre J.; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar injury is increasingly recognized as an important complication of very preterm birth. However, the neurodevelopmental consequences of early life cerebellar injury in prematurely born infants have not been well elucidated. We performed a literature search of studies published between 1997 and 2014 describing neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants following direct cerebellar injury or indirect cerebellar injury/underdevelopment. Available data suggests that both direct and indirect mechanisms of cerebellar injury appear to stunt cerebellar growth and adversely affect neurodevelopment. This review also provides important insights into the highly integrated cerebral-cerebellar structural and functional correlates. Finally, this review highlights that early life impairment of cerebellar growth extends far beyond motor impairments and plays a critical, previously underrecognized role in the long-term cognitive, behavioral, and social deficits associated with brain injury among premature infants. These data point to a developmental form of the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome previously described in adults. Longitudinal prospective studies using serial advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques are needed to better delineate the full extent of the role of prematurity-related cerebellar injury and topography in the genesis of cognitive, social-behavioral dysfunction. PMID:25241880

  15. Widespread State-Dependent Shifts in Cerebellar Activity in Locomoting Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ozden, Ilker; Dombeck, Daniel A.; Hoogland, Tycho M.; Tank, David W.; Wang, Samuel S.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Excitatory drive enters the cerebellum via mossy fibers, which activate granule cells, and climbing fibers, which activate Purkinje cell dendrites. Until now, the coordinated regulation of these pathways has gone unmonitored in spatially resolved neuronal ensembles, especially in awake animals. We imaged cerebellar activity using functional two-photon microscopy and extracellular recording in awake mice locomoting on an air-cushioned spherical treadmill. We recorded from putative granule cells, molecular layer interneurons, and Purkinje cell dendrites in zone A of lobule IV/V, representing sensation and movement from trunk and limbs. Locomotion was associated with widespread increased activity in granule cells and interneurons, consistent with an increase in mossy fiber drive. At the same time, dendrites of different Purkinje cells showed increased co-activation, reflecting increased synchrony of climbing fiber activity. In resting animals, aversive stimuli triggered increased activity in granule cells and interneurons, as well as increased Purkinje cell co-activation that was strongest for neighboring dendrites and decreased smoothly as a function of mediolateral distance. In contrast with anesthetized recordings, no 1–10 Hz oscillations in climbing fiber activity were evident. Once locomotion began, responses to external stimuli in all three cell types were strongly suppressed. Thus climbing and mossy fiber representations can shift together within a fraction of a second, reflecting in turn either movement-associated activity or external stimuli. PMID:22880068

  16. The cerebellum and its contribution to complex tasks in higher primates: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Cantalupo, Claudio; Hopkins, William

    2010-01-01

    Many aspects of the involvement of the cerebellum in motor control and cognition are still quite unclear or relatively unexplored. In particular, very little is known about the evolution of cerebellar contribution to complex behavior in higher primate species. In this paper, we provide an overview of existing and ongoing comparative studies of the role of the cerebellum in primate behavior. In particular, we discuss evidence that great apes show greater cerebellar relative size than monkeys and that such interspecific difference is mainly explained by growth of the lateral neocerebellum in evolution with converse changes in the vermis. Furthermore, we present evidence that volumetric differences as well as lateral asymmetry of the cerebellum are related to both performance and hand preference for skilled tasks like tool use and aimed throwing. Finally we suggest future directions for this comparative research area that may offer further valuable clues into the involvement of the cerebellum in complex behavior and its evolutionary origin in primate species. PMID:19926082

  17. Cerebellar Motor Function in Spina Bifida Meningomyelocele

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Maureen; Salman, Michael S.; Juranek, Jenifer; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2010-01-01

    Spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM), a congenital neurodevelopmental disorder, involves dysmorphology of the cerebellum, and its most obvious manifestations are motor deficits. This paper reviews cerebellar neuropathology and motor function across several motor systems well studied in SBM in relation to current models of cerebellar motor and timing function. Children and adults with SBM have widespread motor deficits in trunk, upper limbs, eyes, and speech articulators that are broadly congruent with those observed in adults with cerebellar lesions. The structure and function of the cerebellum are correlated with a range of motor functions. While motor learning is generally preserved in SBM, those motor functions requiring predictive signals and precise calibration of the temporal features of movement are impaired, resulting in deficits in smooth movement coordination as well as in the classical cerebellar triad of dysmetria, ataxia, and dysarthria. That motor function in individuals with SBM is disordered in a manner phenotypically similar to that in adult cerebellar lesions, and appears to involve similar deficits in predictive cerebellar motor control, suggests that age-based cerebellar motor plasticity is limited in individuals with this neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:20652468

  18. X-linked disorders with cerebellar dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    X-linked disorders with cerebellar dysgenesis (XLCD) are a genetically heterogeneous and clinically variable group of disorders in which the hallmark is a cerebellar defect (hypoplasia, atrophy or dysplasia) visible on brain imaging, caused by gene mutations or genomic imbalances on the X-chromosome. The neurological features of XLCD include hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, ataxia and/or other cerebellar signs. Normal cognitive development has also been reported. Cerebellar dysgenesis may be isolated or associated with other brain malformations or multiorgan involvement. There are at least 15 genes on the X-chromosome that have been constantly or occasionally associated with a pathological cerebellar phenotype. 8 XLCD loci have been mapped and several families with X-linked inheritance have been reported. Recently, two recurrent duplication syndromes in Xq28 have been associated with cerebellar hypoplasia. Given the report of several forms of XLCD and the excess of males with ataxia, this group of conditions is probably underestimated and families of patients with neuroradiological and clinical evidence of a cerebellar disorder should be counseled for high risk of X-linked inheritance. PMID:21569638

  19. Pediatric Neurocutaneous Syndromes with Cerebellar Involvement.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes encompasses a broad group of genetic disorders with different clinical, genetic, and pathologic features that share developmental lesions of the skin as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Cerebellar involvement has been shown in numerous types of neurocutaneous syndrome. It may help or be needed for the diagnosis and to explain the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of affected children. This article describes various types of neurocutaneous syndrome with cerebellar involvement. For each neurocutaneous disease or syndrome, clinical features, genetic, neuroimaging findings, and the potential role of the cerebellar involvement is discussed. PMID:27423801

  20. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections). PMID:25983678

  1. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections). PMID:25983678

  2. Brains, Genes and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Callaway, Edward M.; Churchland, Patricia; Caddick, Sarah J.; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E.; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A.; Miller, Cory T.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R.; Movshon, J. Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H.; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Silva, Afonso C.; Strick, Peter L.; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  3. Ethics of primate use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the ethical issues raised by the use of non-human primates (NHPs) in research involving scientific procedures which may cause pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm. It is not an exhaustive review of the literature and views on this subject, and it does not present any conclusions about the moral acceptability or otherwise of NHP research. Rather the aim has been to identify the ethical issues involved and to provide guidance on how these might be addressed, in particular by carefully examining the scientific rationale for NHP use, implementing fully the 3Rs principle of Russell and Burch (1959) and applying a robust "harm-benefit assessment" to research proposals involving NHPs.

  4. Stereotyped spatial patterns of functional synaptic connectivity in the cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Antoine M; Binda, Francesca; Pawlowski, Sophie A; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Casella, Jean-François; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Poulain, Bernard; Isope, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Motor coordination is supported by an array of highly organized heterogeneous modules in the cerebellum. How incoming sensorimotor information is channeled and communicated between these anatomical modules is still poorly understood. In this study, we used transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific subsets of Purkinje cells that allowed us to target a given set of cerebellar modules. Combining in vitro recordings and photostimulation, we identified stereotyped patterns of functional synaptic organization between the granule cell layer and its main targets, the Purkinje cells, Golgi cells and molecular layer interneurons. Each type of connection displayed position-specific patterns of granule cell synaptic inputs that do not strictly match with anatomical boundaries but connect distant cortical modules. Although these patterns can be adjusted by activity-dependent processes, they were found to be consistent and predictable between animals. Our results highlight the operational rules underlying communication between modules in the cerebellar cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09862.001 PMID:26982219

  5. A nuclear factor containing the leucine-rich repeats expressed in murine cerebellar neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, K; Taoka, M; Satozawa, N; Nakayama, H; Ichimura, T; Takahashi, N; Yamakuni, T; Song, S Y; Isobe, T

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear protein, termed leucine-rich acidic nuclear protein (LANP), has been isolated from among rat cerebellar proteins whose expression was transiently increased during an early stage of postnatal development. The amino acid sequence, deduced from its cDNA, showed that LANP contains 247 amino acids consisting of two distinct structural domains: the N-terminal domain characterized by "leucine-rich repeat," which is found in many eukaryotic proteins and which potentially functions in mediating protein-protein interactions, and the C-terminal domain characterized by a cluster of acidic amino acids with a putative nuclear localization signal. Immunohistochemical study using an antibody against LANP revealed that the protein is localized mainly in nuclei of Purkinje cells. In the rat cerebellum on postnatal day 7, LANP mRNA was expressed moderately in the external granule and Purkinje cells and weakly in the internal granule cells. The expression in these cells, especially in Purkinje cells, increased in the second postnatal week and thereafter decreased to an adult level. The structural characteristics, localization, and the stage- and cell type-specific expression suggest a potential role of LANP in a signal transduction pathway that directs differentiation of cerebellar neurons. Images PMID:7937870

  6. Insights From Cerebellar Transcriptomic Analysis Into the Pathogenesis of Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Ryten, Mina; Forabosco, Paola; Schorge, Stephanie; Hersheson, Joshua; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The core clinical and neuropathological feature of the autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) is cerebellar degeneration. Mutations in the known genes explain only 50% to 60% of SCA cases. To date, no effective treatments exist, and the knowledge of drug-treatable molecular pathways is limited. The examination of overlapping mechanisms and the interpretation of how ataxia genes interact will be important in the discovery of potential disease-modifying agents. OBJECTIVES To address the possible relationships among known SCA genes, predict their functions, identify overlapping pathways, and provide a framework for candidate gene discovery using whole-transcriptome expression data. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We have used a systems biology approach based on whole-transcriptome gene expression analysis. As part of the United Kingdom Brain Expression Consortium, we analyzed the expression profile of 788 brain samples obtained from 101 neuropathologically healthy individuals (10 distinct brain regions each). Weighted gene coexpression network analysis was used to cluster 24 SCA genes into gene coexpression modules in an unsupervised manner. The overrepresentation of SCA transcripts in modules identified in the cerebellum was assessed. Enrichment analysis was performed to infer the functions and molecular pathways of genes in biologically relevant modules. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Molecular functions and mechanisms implicating SCA genes, as well as lists of relevant coexpressed genes as potential candidates for novel SCA causative or modifier genes. RESULTS Two cerebellar gene coexpression modules were statistically enriched in SCA transcripts (P = .021 for the tan module and P = 2.87 × 10−5 for the light yellow module) and contained established granule and Purkinje cell markers, respectively. One module includes genes involved in the ubiquitin-proteasome system and contains SCA genes usually associated with a complex phenotype, while the

  7. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase antisense oligodeoxynucleotides protect against cytosine arabinonucleoside-induced apoptosis in cultured cerebellar neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ishitani, R; Chuang, D M

    1996-01-01

    Cytosine arabinonucleoside (AraC) is a pyrimidine antimetabolite that kills proliferating cells by inhibiting DNA synthesis and, importantly, is also an inducer of apoptosis. We recently reported that age-induced apoptotic cell death of cultured cerebellar neurons is directly associated with an over-expression of a particulate 38-kDa protein, identified by us as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; EC 1.2.1.12). We now show that the AraC-induced neuronal death of immature cerebellar granule cells in culture is effectively delayed by actinomycin-D, cycloheximide, or aurintricarboxylic acid (a DNase inhibitor). Furthermore, two GAPDH antisense, but not their corresponding sense, oligodeoxyribonucleotides markedly arrested AraC-induced apoptosis. This protection was more effective than that induced by the above-mentioned classical inhibitors of apoptosis. Prior to AraC-induced neuronal death, GAPDH mRNA levels increased by approximately 2.5-fold, and this mRNA accumulation was blocked by actinomycin-D and the GAPDH antisense (but not sense) oligonucleotide. Like actinomycin-D, a GAPDH antisense oligonucleotide also suppressed the AraC-induced over-expression of the 38-kDa particulate protein (i.e., GAPDH), while the corresponding sense oligonucleotide was totally ineffective. Thus, the present results show that GAPDH over-expression is involved in AraC-induced apoptosis of cultured cerebellar granule cells. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8790435

  8. Acquisition of granule neuron precursor identity is a critical determinant of progenitor cell competence to form Hedgehog-induced medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, Ulrich; Heine, Vivi M.; Mao, Junhao; Kho, Alvin T.; Dillon, Allison K.; Han, Young-Goo; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Sun, Tao; Ligon, Azra H.; Qian, Ying; Ma, Qiufu; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; McMahon, Andrew P.; Rowitch, David H.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2008-01-01

    Origins of the brain tumor, medulloblastoma, from stem cells or restricted progenitor cells are unclear. To investigate this, we activated oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in multipotent and lineage-restricted CNS progenitors. We observed that normal unipotent cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNP) derive from hGFAP+ and Olig2+ RL progenitors. Hh activation in a spectrum of early and late stage CNS progenitors generated similar medulloblastomas, but not other brain cancers, indicating that acquisition of CGNP identity is essential for tumorigenesis. We show in human and mouse medulloblastoma that cells expressing the glia-associated markers Gfap and Olig2 are neoplastic and that they retain features of embryonic-type granule lineage progenitors. Thus, oncogenic Hh signaling promotes medulloblastoma from lineage-restricted granule cell progenitors. PMID:18691547

  9. Robustness effect of gap junctions between Golgi cells on cerebellar cortex oscillations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous one-dimensional network modeling of the cerebellar granular layer has been successfully linked with a range of cerebellar cortex oscillations observed in vivo. However, the recent discovery of gap junctions between Golgi cells (GoCs), which may cause oscillations by themselves, has raised the question of how gap-junction coupling affects GoC and granular-layer oscillations. To investigate this question, we developed a novel two-dimensional computational model of the GoC-granule cell (GC) circuit with and without gap junctions between GoCs. Results Isolated GoCs coupled by gap junctions had a strong tendency to generate spontaneous oscillations without affecting their mean firing frequencies in response to distributed mossy fiber input. Conversely, when GoCs were synaptically connected in the granular layer, gap junctions increased the power of the oscillations, but the oscillations were primarily driven by the synaptic feedback loop between GoCs and GCs, and the gap junctions did not change oscillation frequency or the mean firing rate of either GoCs or GCs. Conclusion Our modeling results suggest that gap junctions between GoCs increase the robustness of cerebellar cortex oscillations that are primarily driven by the feedback loop between GoCs and GCs. The robustness effect of gap junctions on synaptically driven oscillations observed in our model may be a general mechanism, also present in other regions of the brain. PMID:22330240

  10. Bax-deficiency prolongs cerebellar neurogenesis, accelerates medulloblastoma formation and paradoxically increases both malignancy and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Idoia; Crowther, Andrew J.; Gama, Vivian; Miller, C. Ryan; Deshmukh, Mohanish; Gershon, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Neurogenesis requires negative regulation through differentiation of progenitors or their programmed cell death (PCD). Growth regulation is particularly important in the postnatal cerebellum, where excessive progenitor proliferation promotes medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. We present evidence that PCD operates alongside differentiation to regulate cerebellar granule neuron progenitors (CGNPs) and to prevent medulloblastoma. Here we show that genetic deletion of pro-apoptotic Bax disrupts regulation of cerebellar neurogenesis and promotes medulloblastoma formation. In Bax−/− mice, the period of neurogenesis was extended into the third week of postnatal life, and ectopic neurons and progenitors collected in the molecular layer of the cerebellum and adjacent tectum. Importantly, genetic deletion of Bax in medulloblastoma-prone ND2:SmoA1 transgenic mice greatly accelerated tumorigenesis. Bax-deficient medulloblastomas exhibited strikingly distinct pathology, with reduced apoptosis, increased neural differentiation and tectal migration. Comparing Bax+/+ and Bax−/− medulloblastomas, we were able to identify up-regulation of Bcl-2 and nuclear exclusion of p27 as tumorigenic changes that are required to mitigate the tumor suppressive effect of Bax. Studies on human tumors confirmed the importance of modulating Bax in medulloblastoma pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that Bax-dependent apoptosis regulates postnatal cerebellar neurogenesis, suppresses medulloblastoma formation, and imposes selective pressure on tumors that form. Functional resistance to Bax-mediated apoptosis, required for medulloblastoma tumorigenesis, may be a tumor-specific vulnerability to be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:22710714

  11. The p75 Neurotrophin Receptor Can Induce Autophagy and Death of Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Florez-McClure, Maria L.; Linseman, Daniel A.; Chu, Charleen T.; Barker, Phil A.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Le, Shoshona S.; Laessig, Tracey A.; Heidenreich, Kim A.

    2007-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms underlying Purkinje neuron death in various neurodegenerative disorders of the cerebellum are poorly understood. Here we investigate an in vitro model of cerebellar neuronal death. We report that cerebellar Purkinje neurons, deprived of trophic factors, die by a form of programmed cell death distinct from the apoptotic death of neighboring granule neurons. Purkinje neuron death was characterized by excessive autophagic–lysosomal vacuolation. Autophagy and death of Purkinje neurons were inhibited by nerve growth factor (NGF) and were activated by NGF-neutralizing antibodies. Although treatment with antisense oligonucleotides to the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75ntr) decreased basal survival of cultured cerebellar neurons, p75ntr-antisense decreased autophagy and completely inhibited death of Purkinje neurons induced by trophic factor withdrawal. Moreover, adenoviral expression of a p75ntr mutant lacking the ligand-binding domain induced vacuolation and death of Purkinje neurons. These results suggest that p75ntr is required for Purkinje neuron survival in the presence of trophic support; however, during trophic factor withdrawal, p75ntr contributes to Purkinje neuron autophagy and death. The autophagic morphology resembles that found in neurodegenerative disorders, suggesting a potential role for this pathway in neurological disease. PMID:15140920

  12. Primate models in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas J; Kirk, Allan D

    2013-09-01

    Large animal models have long served as the proving grounds for advances in transplantation, bridging the gap between inbred mouse experimentation and human clinical trials. Although a variety of species have been and continue to be used, the emergence of highly targeted biologic- and antibody-based therapies has required models to have a high degree of homology with humans. Thus, the nonhuman primate has become the model of choice in many settings. This article will provide an overview of nonhuman primate models of transplantation. Issues of primate genetics and care will be introduced, and a brief overview of technical aspects for various transplant models will be discussed. Finally, several prominent immunosuppressive and tolerance strategies used in primates will be reviewed. PMID:24003248

  13. Consensus Paper: Radiological Biomarkers of Cerebellar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baldarçara, Leonardo; Currie, Stuart; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Hoggard, Nigel; Jack, Allison; Jackowski, Andrea P.; Mascalchi, Mario; Parazzini, Cecilia; Reetz, Kathrin; Righini, Andrea; Schulz, Jörg B.; Vella, Alessandra; Webb, Sara Jane; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic cerebellar ataxias represent a vast and still growing group of diseases whose diagnosis and differentiation cannot only rely on clinical evaluation. Brain imaging including magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine techniques allows for characterization of structural and functional abnormalities underlying symptomatic ataxias. These methods thus constitute a potential source of radiological biomarkers, which could be used to identify these diseases and differentiate subgroups of them, and to assess their severity and their evolution. Such biomarkers mainly comprise qualitative and quantitative data obtained from MR including proton spectroscopy, diffusion imaging, tractography, voxel-based morphometry, functional imaging during task execution or in a resting state, and from SPETC and PET with several radiotracers. In the current article, we aim to illustrate briefly some applications of these neuroimaging tools to evaluation of cerebellar disorders such as inherited cerebellar ataxia, fetal developmental malformations, and immune-mediated cerebellar diseases and of neurodegenerative or early-developing diseases, such as dementia and autism in which cerebellar involvement is an emerging feature. Although these radiological biomarkers appear promising and helpful to better understand ataxia-related anatomical and physiological impairments, to date, very few of them have turned out to be specific for a given ataxia with atrophy of the cerebellar system being the main and the most usual alteration being observed. Consequently, much remains to be done to establish sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of available MR and nuclear medicine features as diagnostic, progression and surrogate biomarkers in clinical routine. PMID:25382714

  14. Leopard predation and primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Zuberbühler, Klaus; Jenny, David

    2002-12-01

    Although predation is an important driving force of natural selection its effects on primate evolution are still not well understood, mainly because little is known about the hunting behaviour of the primates' various predators. Here, we present data on the hunting behaviour of the leopard (Panthera pardus), a major primate predator in the Tai; forest of Ivory Coast and elsewhere. Radio-tracking data showed that forest leopards primarily hunt for monkeys on the ground during the day. Faecal analyses confirmed that primates accounted for a large proportion of the leopards' diet and revealed in detail the predation pressure exerted on the eight different monkey and one chimpanzee species. We related the species-specific predation rates to various morphological, behavioural and demographic traits that are usually considered adaptations to predation (body size, group size, group composition, reproductive behaviour, and use of forest strata). Leopard predation was most reliably associated with density, suggesting that leopards hunt primates according to abundance. Contrary to predictions, leopard predation rates were not negatively, but positively, related to body size, group size and the number of males per group, suggesting that predation by leopards did not drive the evolution of these traits in the predicted way. We discuss these findings in light of some recent experimental data and suggest that the principal effect of leopard predation has been on primates' cognitive evolution. PMID:12473487

  15. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Jonathan B; Vangay, Pajau; Huang, Hu; Ward, Tonya; Hillmann, Benjamin M; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel A; Travis, Dominic A; Long, Ha Thang; Tuan, Bui Van; Minh, Vo Van; Cabana, Francis; Nadler, Tilo; Toddes, Barbara; Murphy, Tami; Glander, Kenneth E; Johnson, Timothy J; Knights, Dan

    2016-09-13

    The primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome. PMID:27573830

  16. Effects of Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 in Cerebellar Development: Role in Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ana P. B.; Diniz, Luan P.; Eller, Cristiane M.; de Matos, Beatriz G.; Martinez, Rodrigo; Gomes, Flávia C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Granule cells (GC) are the most numerous glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellar cortex and represent almost half of the neurons of the central nervous system. Despite recent advances, the mechanisms of how the glutamatergic synapses are formed in the cerebellum remain unclear. Among the TGF-β family, TGF-beta 1 (TGF-β1) has been described as a synaptogenic molecule in invertebrates and in the vertebrate peripheral nervous system. A recent paper from our group demonstrated that TGF-β1 increases the excitatory synapse formation in cortical neurons. Here, we investigated the role of TGF-β1 in glutamatergic cerebellar neurons. We showed that the expression profile of TGF-β1 and its receptor, TβRII, in the cerebellum is consistent with a role in synapse formation in vitro and in vivo. It is low in the early postnatal days (P1–P9), increases after postnatal day 12 (P12), and remains high until adulthood (P30). We also found that granule neurons express the TGF-β receptor mRNA and protein, suggesting that they may be responsive to the synaptogenic effect of TGF-β1. Treatment of granular cell cultures with TGF-β1 increased the number of glutamatergic excitatory synapses by 100%, as shown by immunocytochemistry assays for presynaptic (synaptophysin) and post-synaptic (PSD-95) proteins. This effect was dependent on TβRI activation because addition of a pharmacological inhibitor of TGF-β, SB-431542, impaired the formation of synapses between granular neurons. Together, these findings suggest that TGF-β1 has a specific key function in the cerebellum through regulation of excitatory synapse formation between granule neurons. PMID:27199658

  17. Role of granule-cell transmission in memory trace of cerebellum-dependent optokinetic motor learning.

    PubMed

    Wada, Norio; Funabiki, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2014-04-01

    Adaptation of the optokinetic response (OKR) is an eye movement enhanced by repeated motion of a surrounding visual field and represents a prototype of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. Purkinje cells and vestibular nuclei (VN) receive optokinetic and retinal slip signals via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway and climbing-fiber projections, respectively. To explore the neural circuits and mechanisms responsible for OKR adaptation, we adopted the reversible neurotransmission-blocking (RNB) technique, in which granule-cell transmission to Purkinje cells was selectively and reversibly blocked by doxycycline-dependent expression of transmission-blocking tetanus toxin in granule cells. Blockade of granule-cell inputs abolished both short-term and long-term OKR adaptation induced by repeated OKR training, but normal levels of both responses were immediately evoked in the pretrained RNB mice by OKR retraining once granule-cell transmission had recovered. Importantly, eye movement elicited by electrical stimulation of the cerebellar focculus was elevated by long-term but not by short-term OKR training in adaptive OKR-negative RNB mice. Furthermore, when the flocculus of adaptive OKR-negative RNB mice was electrically excited in-phase with OKR stimulation, these mice exhibited long-term adaptive OKR. These results indicate that convergent information to the VN was critical for acquisition and storage of long-term OKR adaptation with conjunctive action of Purkinje cells for OKR expression. Interestingly, in contrast to conditioned eyeblink memory, the expression of once acquired adaptive long-term OKR was not abrogated by blockade of granule-cell transmission, suggesting that distinct forms of neural plasticity would operate in different forms of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. PMID:24706878

  18. Smad2 protein disruption in the central nervous system leads to aberrant cerebellar development and early postnatal ataxia in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lixiang; Nomura, Masatoshi; Goto, Yutaka; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Abe, Ichiro; Sakamoto, Shohei; Shibata, Atsushi; Enciso, Patricio L M; Adachi, Masahiro; Ohnaka, Keizo; Kawate, Hisaya; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2011-05-27

    Smad2 is a critical mediator of TGF-β signals that are known to play an important role in a wide range of biological processes in various cell types. Its role in the development of the CNS, however, is largely unknown. Mice lacking Smad2 in the CNS (Smad2-CNS-KO) were generated by a Cre-loxP approach. These mice exhibited behavioral abnormalities in motor coordination from an early postnatal stage and mortality at approximately 3 weeks of age, suggestive of severe cerebellar dysfunction. Gross observation of Smad2-CNS-KO cerebella demonstrated aberrant foliations in lobule IX and X. Further analyses revealed increased apoptotic cell death, delayed migration and maturation of granule cells, and retardation of dendritic arborization of Purkinje cells. These findings indicate that Smad2 plays a key role in cerebellar development and motor function control. PMID:21464123

  19. STIMULATION OF [3H] ARACHIDONIC ACID RELEASE IN RAT CEREBELLAR GRANULE NEURONS BY POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants in electronic equipment, plastics, textiles, and building materials. While the presence of other persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin...

  20. CHANGES IN MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE IN CEREBELLAR GRANULE NEURONAL CULTURES BY POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as additive flame-retardants and have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk; clarifying the nature of the risks posed is important for clean-up and remediation. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown t...

  1. COMPARATIVE EFFECTS OF TWO POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL CONGENERS ON CALCIUM HOMEOSTASIS IN RAT CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been reported to alter locomotor activity and decrease brain dopamine function in laboratory animals. CBs with orth- and/or para-chlorine substitutions are reportedly most potent in decreasing cell dopamine content in vitro and were dete...

  2. ONTOGENY OF PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH NEURITE GROWTH AND SYNAPTOGENESIS IN CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS IN VITRO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro techniques may be useful in screening for effects of developmental neurotoxicants. Previously, we characterized changes in biochemical markers associated with neuronal development in a PC12 cell model of differentiation and growth. The current research extended these stu...

  3. EFFECTS OF ORGANOTINS ON RACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM IN CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS IN CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of organotins has increased drastically in the past decade, including their use as stabilizers in polyvinylchloride pipes. Monomethyl- (MMT), dimethyl- (DMT), monobutyl- (MBT), and dibutyltin (DBT) have been found in home water samples and in human blood at concentrations up...

  4. Cytochrome c is released from mitochondria in a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent fashion and can operate as a ROS scavenger and as a respiratory substrate in cerebellar neurons undergoing excitotoxic death.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Calissano, P; Bobba, A; Azzariti, A; Marra, E; Passarella, S

    2000-11-24

    In rat cerebellar granule cells both reactive oxygen species production and release of cytochrome c take place during glutamate toxicity. This investigation was aimed (i) to ascertain whether and how these two processes are related and (ii) to gain insight into the role played by the released cytochrome c in the onset of neurotoxicity. Cytochrome c release takes place owing to the generation of reactive oxygen species both in glutamate-treated cerebellar granule cells and in sister control cultures incubated in the presence of the reactive oxygen species-generating system consisting of xanthine plus xanthine oxidase. In the early phase of neurotoxicity (30-min glutamate exposure) about 40% of the maximum (as measured at 3 h of glutamate exposure) cytochrome c release was found to occur in cerebellar granule cells from mitochondria that were essentially coupled and intact and that had a negligible production of oxygen free radicals. Contrarily, mitochondria from cells treated with glutamate for 3 h were mostly uncoupled and produced reactive oxygen species at a high rate. The cytosolic fraction containing the released cytochrome c was able to transfer electrons from superoxide anion to molecular oxygen via the respiratory chain and was found to partially prevent glutamate toxicity when added externally to cerebellar neurons undergoing necrosis. In the light of these findings, we propose that in the early phase of neurotoxicity, cytochrome c release can be part of a cellular and mitochondrial defense mechanism against oxidative stress. PMID:10980192

  5. A theory of cerebellar cortex and adaptive motor control based on two types of universal function approximation capability.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    Lesions of the cerebellum result in large errors in movements. The cerebellum adaptively controls the strength and timing of motor command signals depending on the internal and external environments of movements. The present theory describes how the cerebellar cortex can control signals for accurate and timed movements. A model network of the cerebellar Golgi and granule cells is shown to be equivalent to a multiple-input (from mossy fibers) hierarchical neural network with a single hidden layer of threshold units (granule cells) that receive a common recurrent inhibition (from a Golgi cell). The weighted sum of the hidden unit signals (Purkinje cell output) is theoretically analyzed regarding the capability of the network to perform two types of universal function approximation. The hidden units begin firing as the excitatory inputs exceed the recurrent inhibition. This simple threshold feature leads to the first approximation theory, and the network final output can be any continuous function of the multiple inputs. When the input is constant, this output becomes stationary. However, when the recurrent unit activity is triggered to decrease or the recurrent inhibition is triggered to increase through a certain mechanism (metabotropic modulation or extrasynaptic spillover), the network can generate any continuous signals for a prolonged period of change in the activity of recurrent signals, as the second approximation theory shows. By incorporating the cerebellar capability of two such types of approximations to a motor system, in which learning proceeds through repeated movement trials with accompanying corrections, accurate and timed responses for reaching the target can be adaptively acquired. Simple models of motor control can solve the motor error vs. sensory error problem, as well as the structural aspects of credit (or error) assignment problem. Two physiological experiments are proposed for examining the delay and trace conditioning of eyelid responses, as

  6. Oculomotor studies of cerebellar function in autism.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Caralynn V; Minshew, Nancy J; Luna, Beatriz; Takarae, Yukari; Sweeney, John A

    2005-11-15

    Histopathological, neuroimaging and genetic findings indicate cerebellar abnormalities in autism, but the extent of neurophysiological dysfunction associated with those findings has not been systematically examined. Suppression of intrusive saccades (square wave jerks) and the ability to sustain eccentric gaze, two phenomena requiring intact cerebellar function, were examined in 52 high-functioning individuals with autism and 52 age- and IQ-matched healthy subjects during visual fixation of static central and peripheral targets. Rates of intrusive saccades were not increased in autism during visual fixation, and foveopetal ocular drift was also not increased when subjects held an eccentric gaze. The absence of gross disturbances of visual fixation associated with cerebellar disease in individuals with autism, such as increased square wave jerk rates and foveopetal drift when holding eccentric gaze, indicates that the functional integrity of cerebellar--brainstem networks devoted to oculomotor control is preserved in autism despite reported anatomic variations. However, increased amplitude of intrusive saccades and reduced latency of target refixation after intrusive saccades were observed in individuals with autism, especially when subjects maintained fixation of remembered target locations without sensory guidance. The atypical metrics of intrusive saccades that were observed may be attributable to faulty functional connectivity in cortico-cerebellar networks. PMID:16214219

  7. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  8. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by progressive problems ...

  10. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  11. Process optimization for continuous extrusion wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Carella, Anthony J; Ren, Yukun; Lo, Julian B

    2011-08-01

    Three granulating binders in high drug-load acetaminophen blends were evaluated using high shear granulation and extrusion granulation. A polymethacrylate binder enhanced tablet tensile strength with rapid disintegration in simulated gastric fluid, whereas polyvinylpyrrolidone and hydroxypropyl cellulose binders produced less desirable tablets. Using the polymethacrylate binder, the extrusion granulation process was studied regarding the effects of granulating liquid, injection rate and screw speed on granule properties. A full factorial experimental design was conducted to allow the statistical analysis of interactions between extrusion process parameters. Response variables considered in the study included extruder power consumption (screw loading), granule bulk/tapped density, particle size distribution, tablet hardness, friability, disintegration time and dissolution. PMID:20367553

  12. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  13. Selective sorting of alpha-granule proteins

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, J.E.; Battinelli, E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary One of the main functions of blood platelets is to secrete a variety of substances that can modify a developing thrombus, regulate the growth of the vasculature, promote wound repair, and contribute to cell-adhesive events. The majority of this vast array of secreted proteins is stored in alpha-granules. Until recently, it was assumed that platelets contained one homogeneous population of alpha-granules that undergo complete de-granulation during platelet activation. This review focuses on the mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis and secretion, with a particular emphasis on recent findings that clearly demonstrate that platelets contain distinct subpopulations of alpha-granules that undergo differential release during activation. We consider the implications of this new paradigm of platelet secretion, discuss mechanisms of alpha-granule biogenesis, and review the molecular basis of transport and delivery of alpha-granules to assembling platelets. PMID:19630794

  14. A Molecular Phylogeny of Living Primates

    PubMed Central

    Perelman, Polina; Johnson, Warren E.; Roos, Christian; Seuánez, Hector N.; Horvath, Julie E.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Kessing, Bailey; Pontius, Joan; Roelke, Melody; Rumpler, Yves; Schneider, Maria Paula C.; Silva, Artur; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of primates offer considerable potential to define and understand the processes that mold, shape, and transform the human genome. However, primate taxonomy is both complex and controversial, with marginal unifying consensus of the evolutionary hierarchy of extant primate species. Here we provide new genomic sequence (∼8 Mb) from 186 primates representing 61 (∼90%) of the described genera, and we include outgroup species from Dermoptera, Scandentia, and Lagomorpha. The resultant phylogeny is exceptionally robust and illuminates events in primate evolution from ancient to recent, clarifying numerous taxonomic controversies and providing new data on human evolution. Ongoing speciation, reticulate evolution, ancient relic lineages, unequal rates of evolution, and disparate distributions of insertions/deletions among the reconstructed primate lineages are uncovered. Our resolution of the primate phylogeny provides an essential evolutionary framework with far-reaching applications including: human selection and adaptation, global emergence of zoonotic diseases, mammalian comparative genomics, primate taxonomy, and conservation of endangered species. PMID:21436896

  15. Landmark Based Shape Analysis for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Cerebellar Atrophy Pattern Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules. PMID:27303111

  16. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  17. [Hemocompatibility of various synthetic granulates].

    PubMed

    Jung, F; Mrowietz, C; Seyfert, U T; Franke, R P

    1997-06-01

    The adherence of platelets to different polymer granulates was examined in a perfusion chamber filled with platelet-rich plasma. The surface area of each of the granulates was of a standardised size. The results were compared with those found for a non-thrombogenic and a highly thrombogenic foreign-body surface. The three polymers examined-Cryolite, Styrolux and Zylar-must be considered non-thrombogenic. Platelet adherence to these substances is significantly less (3%) than that to a highly thrombogenic surface such as glass (95%). The three materials did not differ in terms of platelet adherence, and would appear to be suitable potential materials for use in cell separators. PMID:9312306

  18. Retinal connectivity and primate vision

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Martin, Paul R.; Grünert, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  19. Retinal connectivity and primate vision.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2010-11-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  20. Iron granules in plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, M K; Madden, M

    1982-01-01

    The curious and unusual finding of coarse iron granules in marrow plasma cells is reported in 13 patients, in whom the finding was incidental. In 10 of these patients there was known alcohol abuse and serious medical complications of that abuse. Previous reports of the finding are reviewed. Haematological data of the 13 patients are presented. A hypothesis is outlined which may account for the finding. Images PMID:7068907

  1. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing—the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized—has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed. PMID:25009490

  2. [Residual cerebellar ataxia following acute phenytoin intoxication].

    PubMed

    Awada, A; Amene, P; al Jumah, M; al Beladi, K

    1999-04-01

    A 30-year-old man was given high doses of phenytoin together with 4 antituberculous drugs for a seizure associated with a probable brain tuberculoma. He developed hepatic toxicity and his serum phenytoin reached the high level of 298 mumol/l (therapeutic range 40-79 mumol/l). All drugs were stopped and the biological parameters returned progressively to normal over the next 15 days. However, he remained with a cerebellar axial syndrome and was still severely ataxic 2 months later. Brain CT and MRI showed mild cerebellar atrophy. This case and the few other published ones, together with some recent experimental data, show that high doses of phenytoin can be toxic to the cerebellar cortical cells. The rarity of similar cases, while millions of epileptics are under phenytoin treatment, would however suggest that individual susceptibility may play a role in this toxicity. PMID:10367328

  3. Cerebellar Glioblastoma Multiforme in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hyuk; Jung, Tae-Young; Kim, In-Young

    2008-01-01

    Primary cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rare tumor in adults that accounts for just 1% of all cases of GBM. Due to their rarity, cerebellar GBMs are not yet completely understood about the pathogenesis and the prognosis. Here, we present a case of GBM in a 69-year-old man. Neurologic examination revealed the presence of cerebellar signs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 4.5 × 3.6 cm-sized, ill-defined, heterogeneously enhancing mass in the left cerebellum and two patchy hyperintense lesions in the right cerebellum with minimal enhancement. After operation, glioblastoma was histologically confirmed. Postoperative radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy was subsequently followed. Here, a case of unusual GBM in the cerebellum is reported with review of literature regarding the pathogenesis, the differential diagnosis and prognosis. There was no evidence of recurrence during postoperative one year. This patient showed a good prognosis in spite of the multiple lesions. PMID:19096643

  4. Cerebellar contribution to feedforward control of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Pisotta, Iolanda; Molinari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellum is an important contributor to feedforward control mechanisms of the central nervous system, and sequencing-the process that allows spatial and temporal relationships between events to be recognized-has been implicated as the fundamental cerebellar mode of operation. By adopting such a mode and because cerebellar activity patterns are sensitive to a variety of sensorimotor-related tasks, the cerebellum is believed to support motor and cognitive functions that are encoded in the frontal and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. In this model, the cerebellum is hypothesized to make predictions about the consequences of a motor or cognitive command that originates from the cortex to prepare the entire system to cope with ongoing changes. In this framework, cerebellar predictive mechanisms for locomotion are addressed, focusing on sensorial and motoric sequencing. The hypothesis that sequence recognition is the mechanism by which the cerebellum functions in gait control is presented and discussed. PMID:25009490

  5. A proposed aerobic granules size development scheme for aerobic granulation process.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Olsson, Gustaf; Salmiati; Hamdzah, Myzairah; Din, Mohd Fadhil Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Anuar, Aznah Nor; Noor, Zainura Zainon; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granulation is increasingly used in wastewater treatment due to its unique physical properties and microbial functionalities. Granule size defines the physical properties of granules based on biomass accumulation. This study aims to determine the profile of size development under two physicochemical conditions. Two identical bioreactors namely Rnp and Rp were operated under non-phototrophic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. An illustrative scheme was developed to comprehend the mechanism of size development that delineates the granular size throughout the granulation. Observations on granules' size variation have shown that activated sludge revolutionised into the form of aerobic granules through the increase of biomass concentration in bioreactors which also determined the changes of granule size. Both reactors demonstrated that size transformed in a similar trend when tested with and without illumination. Thus, different types of aerobic granules may increase in size in the same way as recommended in the aerobic granule size development scheme. PMID:25661308

  6. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5820 - Implanted cerebellar stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted cerebellar stimulator. 882.5820 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5820 Implanted cerebellar stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted cerebellar stimulator is a device used to...

  9. Protein mobility within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  10. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  11. Oligodeoxynucleotide studies in primates: antisense and immune stimulatory indications.

    PubMed

    Farman, Cindy A; Kornbrust, Doug J

    2003-01-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide compounds (AS ODN) are being developed as therapeutics for various disease indications. Their safety and pharmacokinetics are most commonly evaluated in rodents and nonhuman primates. Traditional AS ODN are short, single strands of DNA, and they target specific mRNA sequences. Plasma clearance of AS ODN is rapid, broad tissue distribution occurs, and elimination is by nuclease metabolism. Structural modifications to AS ODN have been made to enhance their efficacy and improve their safety. A number of class effects are observed with AS ODN that are unrelated to the specific targeted mRNA sequence. Acute effects include activation of the alternative complement pathway and inhibition of the intrinsic coagulation pathway. In monkeys, rodents, and dogs given repeated doses of AS ODN, accumulation of AS ODN and/or metabolites occurs in the form of basophilic granules in various tissues, including the kidney, lymph nodes and liver. A new potential therapeutic application of ODN is that of immune stimulation. Immunostimulatory ODN (IS ODN) are being investigated for use in treating cancer, infectious disease, and allergy. For the development of both AS and IS ODN, primates will continue to be important for safety assessment. PMID:12597439

  12. [Research proceedings on primate comparative genomics].

    PubMed

    Liao, Cheng-Hong; Su, Bing

    2012-02-01

    With the accomplishment of genome sequencing of human, chimpanzee and other primates, there has been a great amount of primate genome information accumulated. Primate comparative genomics has become a new research field at current genome era. In this article, we reviewed recent progress in phylogeny, genome structure and gene expression of human and nonhuman primates, and we elaborated the major biological differences among human, chimpanzee and other non-human primate species, which is informative in revealing the mechanism of human evolution. PMID:22345018

  13. Pathogenesis of Varicelloviruses in primates

    PubMed Central

    Ouwendijk, Werner J.D.; Verjans, Georges M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation. PMID:25255989

  14. Neuroethology of primate social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Steve W. C.; Brent, Lauren J. N.; Adams, Geoffrey K.; Klein, Jeffrey T.; Pearson, John M.; Watson, Karli K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    A neuroethological approach to human and nonhuman primate behavior and cognition predicts biological specializations for social life. Evidence reviewed here indicates that ancestral mechanisms are often duplicated, repurposed, and differentially regulated to support social behavior. Focusing on recent research from nonhuman primates, we describe how the primate brain might implement social functions by coopting and extending preexisting mechanisms that previously supported nonsocial functions. This approach reveals that highly specialized mechanisms have evolved to decipher the immediate social context, and parallel circuits have evolved to translate social perceptual signals and nonsocial perceptual signals into partially integrated social and nonsocial motivational signals, which together inform general-purpose mechanisms that command behavior. Differences in social behavior between species, as well as between individuals within a species, result in part from neuromodulatory regulation of these neural circuits, which itself appears to be under partial genetic control. Ultimately, intraspecific variation in social behavior has differential fitness consequences, providing fundamental building blocks of natural selection. Our review suggests that the neuroethological approach to primate behavior may provide unique insights into human psychopathology. PMID:23754410

  15. Developmental features of rat cerebellar neural cells cultured in a chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, V.; Ciotti, M.T.; Aloisi, F.; Levi, G.

    1986-01-01

    We studied some aspects of the differentiation of rat cerebellar neural cells obtained from 8-day postnatal animals and cultured in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The ability of the cells to take up radioactive transmitter amino acids was analyzed autoradiographically. The L-glutamate analogue /sup 3/H-D-aspartate was taken up by astroglial cells, but not by granule neurons, even in late cultures (20 days in vitro). This is in agreement with the lack of depolarization-induced release of /sup 3/H-D-aspartate previously observed in this type of culture. In contrast, /sup 3/H-(GABA) was scarcely accumulated by glial-fibrillary-acidic-protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes, but taken up by glutamate-decarboxylase-positive inhibitory interneurons and was released in a Ca2+-dependent way upon depolarization: /sup 3/H-GABA evoked release progressively increased with time in culture. Interestingly, the expression of the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I was much reduced in granule cells cultured in CDM as compared to those maintained in the presence of serum. These data would indicate that in CDM the differentiation of granule neurons is not complete, while that of GABAergic neurons is not greatly affected. Whether the diminished differentiation of granule cells must be attributed only to serum deprivation or also to other differences in the composition of the culture medium remains to be established. /sup 3/H-GABA was avidly taken up also by a population of cells which were not recognized by antibodies raised against GFAP, glutamate decarboxylase, and microtubule-associated protein 2. These cells have been characterized as bipotential precursors of oligodendrocytes and of a subpopulation of astrocytes bearing a stellate shape and capable of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake.

  16. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-07-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation.

  17. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  18. Improving Cerebellar Segmentation with Statistical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multi-atlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non-Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution. PMID:27127334

  19. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence…

  20. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  1. Cerebellar Disease in an Adult Cow

    PubMed Central

    Oz, H. H.; Nicholson, S. S.; Al-Bagdadi, F. K.; Zeman, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    This is the report of clinical signs and lesions of a cerebellar disorder in an adult four year old Limousin cow grazing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). The most striking histopathological lesion was a marked paucity of Purkinje cells throughout the cerebellum. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17422607

  2. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.

    PubMed

    Buchin, Anatoly; Rieubland, Sarah; Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S; Roth, Arnd

    2016-08-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  3. Balloon-borne imagery of the solar granulation. II - The lifetime of solar granulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehltretter, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Phenomenological aspects of the temporal evolution of photospheric granulation are reported as derived from time series of granulation photographs obtained during a flight of a balloon-borne telescope. The distribution of granule lifetime probabilities is determined, and it is found that the data can be represented by an exponential decrease with a 'decay constant' of 5.9 min. The general properties of granular evolution are described along with the way individual granules evolve with time. The most common type of granule is shown to be a medium-sized or small fragment, and it is suggested that all granules are produced by fragmentation of preexisting granules. The relative frequencies of granule destruction by fragmentation, fading, and merging are determined to be 51%, 21%, and 28%, respectively. An average radial velocity of 0.8 km/s is computed for conglomerates with an average diameter of 2.25 arcsec.

  4. Calcium spatial distribution in aerobic granules and its effects on granule structure, strength and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ting-Ting; Liu, Li; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Zhang, Ming-Chuan; Zhu, Jian-Rong

    2008-07-01

    Calcium-rich aerobic granules were cultivated after 3-month operation. The chemical form and spatial distribution of calcium in the granules and their physicochemical characteristics were explored. Examination with a scanning electron microscope combined energy dispersive X-ray detector (SEM-EDX) shows that Ca was mainly accumulated in the core of the granules. CaCO(3) was found to be the main calcium precipitate in the granules. The fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis shows that the cells were crowded in the outer layer and gathered in clusters. Compared with the granules without Ca accumulation, the Ca-rich granules had more rigid structure and a higher strength. However, their specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) reduced after the Ca accumulation inside them. Comparison between the SOUR values of the granules with and without Ca accumulation suggests that Ca accumulated in the aerobic granules might have a negative effect on their bioactivity. PMID:18514253

  5. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-02-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  6. Improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Priya Lakshmi; Boonazier, Natalie; Warton, Christopher; Molteno, Christopher D; Joseph, Jesuchristopher; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Zöllei, Lilla; Meintjes, Ernesta M

    2016-01-01

    Background Consistent localization of cerebellar cortex in a standard coordinate system is important for functional studies and detection of anatomical alterations in studies of morphometry. To date, no pediatric cerebellar atlas is available. New method The probabilistic Cape Town Pediatric Cerebellar Atlas (CAPCA18) was constructed in the age-appropriate National Institute of Health Pediatric Database asymmetric template space using manual tracings of 16 cerebellar compartments in 18 healthy children (9–13 years) from Cape Town, South Africa. The individual atlases of the training subjects were also used to implement multi atlas label fusion using multi atlas majority voting (MAMV) and multi atlas generative model (MAGM) approaches. Segmentation accuracy in 14 test subjects was compared for each method to ‘gold standard’ manual tracings. Results Spatial overlap between manual tracings and CAPCA18 automated segmentation was 73% or higher for all lobules in both hemispheres, except VIIb and X. Automated segmentation using MAGM yielded the best segmentation accuracy over all lobules (mean Dice Similarity Coefficient 0.76; range 0.55–0.91). Comparison with existing methods In all lobules, spatial overlap of CAPCA18 segmentations with manual tracings was similar or higher than those obtained with SUIT (spatially unbiased infra-tentorial template), providing additional evidence of the benefits of an age appropriate atlas. MAGM segmentation accuracy was comparable to values reported recently by Park et al. (2014) in adults (across all lobules mean DSC = 0.73, range 0.40–0.89). Conclusions CAPCA18 and the associated multi atlases of the training subjects yield improved segmentation of cerebellar structures in children. PMID:26743973

  7. Orthostatic hypotension in acute cerebellar infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the frequency and pattern of orthostatic hypotension (OH) associated with acute isolated cerebellar infarction, and to identify the cerebellar structure(s) potentially responsible for OH, 29 patients (mean age 60.0) with acute isolated cerebellar infarction performed a standard battery of autonomic function tests including the head up tilt test using Finapres for recording of the beat-to-beat BP response during the acute period. Cerebellar infarction related OH was defined as fall in BP (>20 mmHg systolic BP) on tilting in patients without any disease(s) that could potentially cause autonomic dysfunction, or in patients who had a potential cause of autonomic dysfunction, but showed the absence of OH during a follow-up test. The severity and distribution of autonomic dysfunction were measured by the composite autonomic severity score (CASS). Nine patients (31 %) had OH (range 24-53 mmHg) on tilting during the acute period. Most patients (7/9) had a remarkable decrement in systolic BP immediately upon tilting, but OH rapidly normalized. Mean of maximal decrease in systolic BP during head up tilt test was 37.0 mmHg. The OH group showed mild autonomic dysfunctions (CASS, 3.7) with adrenergic sympathetic dysfunction appearing as the most common abnormality. Lesion subtraction analyses revealed that damage to the medial part of the superior semilunar lobule (Crus I) and tonsil was more frequent in OH group compared to non-OH group. Cerebellar infarction may cause a brief episode of OH. The medial part of the superior semilunar lobule and tonsil may participate in regulating the early BP response during orthostasis. PMID:26530504

  8. Ultra-rapid axon-axon ephaptic inhibition of cerebellar Purkinje cells by the pinceau.

    PubMed

    Blot, Antonin; Barbour, Boris

    2014-02-01

    Excitatory synaptic activity in the brain is shaped and balanced by inhibition. Because inhibition cannot propagate, it is often recruited with a synaptic delay by incoming excitation. Cerebellar Purkinje cells are driven by long-range excitatory parallel fiber inputs, which also recruit local inhibitory basket cells. The axon initial segment of each Purkinje cell is ensheathed by basket cell axons in a structure called the pinceau, which is largely devoid of chemical synapses. In mice, we found at the single-cell level that the pinceau mediates ephaptic inhibition of Purkinje cell firing at the site of spike initiation. The reduction of firing rate was synchronous with the presynaptic action potential, eliminating a synaptic delay and allowing granule cells to inhibit Purkinje cells without a preceding phase of excitation. Axon-axon ephaptic intercellular signaling can therefore mediate near-instantaneous feedforward and lateral inhibition. PMID:24413696

  9. Cellular viability effects of fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibition on cerebellar neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide (ANA) participates in the control of cell death inducing the formation of apoptotic bodies and DNA fragmentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the ANA degrading enzyme, the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), would induce cellular death. Experiments were performed in cerebellar granule neurons cultured with the FAAH inhibitor, URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) as well as endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) or palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and cellular viability was determined by MTT test. Neurons cultured with URB597 (25, 50 or 100 nM) displayed a decrease in cellular viability. In addition, if cultured with OEA (25 nM) or PEA (100 nM), cellular death was found. These results further suggest that URB597, OEA or PEA promote cellular death. PMID:21854612

  10. Counting primates for conservation: primate surveys in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Plumptre, Andrew J; Cox, Debby

    2006-01-01

    Primate census techniques have been developed over the past 35-40 years yet there is still some confusion and great variation in the methods used. This precludes comparisons between sites where different techniques have been used. This paper discusses the variations between the methods that seem to be practiced currently and then describes a census of primates in the forests of western Uganda. Primate density and biomass varied greatly between forests as well as within forests and this is probably related to food availability. Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) density was strongly correlated with nest encounter rates from reconnaissance walks in the forest. This result can be used to estimate chimpanzee density in forests where it is difficult to survey this species (e.g., due to security reasons). A total of 4,980 chimpanzee was estimated for Uganda which is higher than previously guessed, but still of conservation concern. Only four forests had more than 500 individuals which gives concern for long-term population viability. PMID:16132166

  11. Anatomy and approaches along the cerebellar-brainstem fissures.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Ken; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Kohno, Michihiro; Rhoton, Albert L

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Fissure dissection is routinely used in the supratentorial region to access deeply situated pathology while minimizing division of neural tissue. Use of fissure dissection is also practical in the posterior fossa. In this study, the microsurgical anatomy of the 3 cerebellar-brainstem fissures (cerebellomesencephalic, cerebellopontine, and cerebellomedullary) and the various procedures exposing these fissures in brainstem surgery were examined. METHODS Seven cadaveric heads were examined with a microsurgical technique and 3 with fiber dissection to clarify the anatomy of the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures, in which the major vessels and neural structures are located. Several approaches directed along the cerebellar surfaces and fissures, including the supracerebellar infratentorial, occipital transtentorial, retrosigmoid, and midline suboccipital approaches, were examined. The 3 heads examined using fiber dissection defined the anatomy of the cerebellar peduncles coursing in the depths of these fissures. RESULTS Dissections directed along the cerebellar-brainstem and cerebellar fissures provided access to the posterior and posterolateral midbrain and upper pons, lateral pons, floor and lateral wall of the fourth ventricle, and dorsal and lateral medulla. CONCLUSIONS Opening the cerebellar-brainstem and adjacent cerebellar fissures provided access to the brainstem surface hidden by the cerebellum, while minimizing division of neural tissue. Most of the major cerebellar arteries, veins, and vital neural structures are located in or near these fissures and can be accessed through them. PMID:26274986

  12. Temporal Sequence of Autolysis in the Cerebellar Cortex of the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Finnie, J W; Blumbergs, P C; Manavis, J

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the temporal sequence of post-mortem changes in the cerebellar cortical granular and Purkinje cell layers of mice kept at a constant ambient temperature for up to 4 weeks. Nuclei of granule cell microneurons became pyknotic early after death, increasing progressively until, by 7 days, widespread nuclear lysis resulted in marked cellular depletion of the granular layer. Purkinje cells were relatively unaltered until about 96 h post mortem, at which time there was shrinkage and multivacuolation of the amphophilic cytoplasm, nuclear hyperchromasia and, sometimes, a perinuclear clear space. By 7 days, Purkinje cells had hypereosinophilic cytoplasm and frequent nuclear pyknosis. By 2 weeks after death, Purkinje cells showed homogenization, the cytoplasm being uniformly eosinophilic, progressing to a 'ghost-like' appearance in which the cytoplasm had pale eosinophilic staining with indistinct cell boundaries, and nuclei often absent. The results of this study could assist in differentiating post-mortem autolysis from ante-mortem lesions in the cerebellar cortex and determining the post-mortem interval. Moreover, this information could be useful when interpreting brain lesions in valuable mice found dead unexpectedly during the course of biomedical experiments. PMID:27156898

  13. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Visavadiya, Nishant P; Springer, Joe E

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  14. Efficient differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into functional cerebellar-like cells.

    PubMed

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Zipancic, Ivan; Lainez, Sergio; Roselló, Mireia Gárcia; Xiong, Chen; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Fernando Javier; Planells, Rosa; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Bhattacharya, Shom Shanker; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2010-11-01

    The cerebellum has critical roles in motor and sensory learning and motor coordination. Many cerebellum-related disorders indicate cell therapy as a possible treatment of neural loss. Here we show that application of inductive signals involved in early patterning of the cerebellar region followed by application of different factors directs human embryonic stem cell differentiation into cerebellar-like cells such as granule neurons, Purkinje cells, interneuron, and glial cells. Neurons derived using our protocol showed a T-shaped polarity phenotype and express similar markers to the developed human cerebellum. Electrophysiological measurements confirmed functional electrical properties compatible with these cells. In vivo implantation of differentiated human embryonic stem cells transfected with MATH1-GFP construct into neonatal mice resulted in cell migration across the molecular and the Purkinje cell layers and settlement in the internal molecular layers. Our findings demonstrate that the universal mechanisms involved in the development of cerebellum can be efficiently recapitulated in vitro, which enables the design of new strategies for cell replacement therapy, to study early human development and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20521974

  15. [EXPRESSION OF DOUBLECORTIN AND NeuN IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLAR NEURONS IN RAT].

    PubMed

    Zimatkin, S M; Karniushko, O A

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed on the offspring of 5 outbred female albino rats to give a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of doublecortin (DCX) and NeuN expression in the neurons of the cerebellar cortex and nucleus interpositus in the early postnatal ontogenesis (postnatal days 2-15). DCX expression was detected in postmitotic neurons of the external granular layer and migrating neurons of the cerebellar cortex. At postnatal days 2 and 7 DCX expression in neocerebellum was higher than in paleocerebellum. NeuN expression was found to appear in migrating granule neurons, and reach the maximum in mature neurons of internal granular layer. DCX expression was not detected in Purkinje cells and in the nucleus interpositus of the cerebellum. In neurons of the nucleus interpositus the expression of NeuN progressively increased from postnatal days 2 to 15. Thus, a comparative immunohistochemical study of the dynamics of the expression of the pair of molecular markers studied proved to be an effective way of the assessment of the development of granular neurons of the cerebellum in early postnatal ontogenesis. PMID:27487661

  16. Optogenetic Modulation and Multi-Electrode Analysis of Cerebellar Networks In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Wolfgang; Krause, Martin; Aarse, Janna; Mark, Melanie D.; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Herlitze, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The firing patterns of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs), as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, determine and tune motor behavior. PC firing is modulated by various inputs from different brain regions and by cell-types including granule cells (GCs), climbing fibers and inhibitory interneurons. To understand how signal integration in PCs occurs and how subtle changes in the modulation of PC firing lead to adjustment of motor behaviors, it is important to precisely record PC firing in vivo and to control modulatory pathways in a spatio-temporal manner. Combining optogenetic and multi-electrode approaches, we established a new method to integrate light-guides into a multi-electrode system. With this method we are able to variably position the light-guide in defined regions relative to the recording electrode with micrometer precision. We show that PC firing can be precisely monitored and modulated by light-activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressed in PCs, GCs and interneurons. Thus, this method is ideally suited to investigate the spatio/temporal modulation of PCs in anesthetized and in behaving mice. PMID:25144735

  17. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  18. Reevaluation of the Beam and Radial Hypotheses of Parallel Fiber Action in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Samuel W.; Gao, Wangcai; Chen, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The role of parallel fibers (PFs) in cerebellar physiology remains controversial. Early studies inspired the “beam” hypothesis whereby granule cell (GC) activation results in PF-driven, postsynaptic excitation of beams of Purkinje cells (PCs). However, the “radial” hypothesis postulates that the ascending limb of the GC axon provides the dominant input to PCs and generates patch-like responses. Using optical imaging and single-cell recordings in the mouse cerebellar cortex in vivo, this study reexamines the beam versus radial controversy. Electrical stimulation of mossy fibers (MFs) as well as microinjection of NMDA in the granular layer generates beam-like responses with a centrally located patch-like response. Remarkably, ipsilateral forepaw stimulation evokes a beam-like response in Crus I. Discrete molecular layer lesions demonstrate that PFs contribute to the peripherally generated responses in Crus I. In contrast, vibrissal stimulation induces patch-like activation of Crus II and GABAA antagonists fail to convert this patch-like activity into a beam-like response, implying that molecular layer inhibition does not prevent beam-like responses. However, blocking excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) generates beam-like responses in Crus II. These beam-like responses are suppressed by focal inhibition of MF-GC synaptic transmission. Using EAAT4 reporter transgenic mice, we show that peripherally evoked patch-like responses in Crus II are aligned between parasagittal bands of EAAT4. This is the first study to demonstrate beam-like responses in the cerebellar cortex to peripheral, MF, and GC stimulation in vivo. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of the responses depends on extracellular glutamate and its local regulation by EAATs. PMID:23843513

  19. Cytarabine induced cerebellar neuronal damage in juvenile rat: correlating neurobehavioral performance with cellular and genetic alterations.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ronak S; Rachamalla, Mahesh; Chary, Namoju R; Shera, Firdos Y; Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2012-03-11

    Cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a pyrimidine analogue induces cerebellar dysfunction and behavioral abnormalities. Although many in vitro experiments have been conducted in the past demonstrating the lethal potential of Ara-C to cerebellar neurons, there is a paucity of literature available regarding the effects of Ara-C on the cellular and genetic material of cerebellum and its subsequent influence on the neurobehavioral performance in vivo. Rats were treated with Ara-C at the dose levels 50, 100 and 200mg/kg/day for 5 and 14 days by intraperitoneal (i.p.) route. Endpoints of the evaluation included food and water intake, body and organ weight, behavioral parameters, histopathology, oxidative stress, DNA damage, apoptosis, expression of p53, caspase-3 and calbindin D-28K (calbindin) as well as histone acetylation and methylation. Ara-C treatment for 14 days significantly decreased the food and water intake, body weight gain and brain weight in rat as compared to the control. Alterations in various behavioral parameters were observed, indicating the impaired cerebellar function. Further, cellular abnormalities in the cerebellum such as Purkinje cell misalignment and granule cell cytotoxicity were observed. Positive correlation was observed between Ara-C induced disturbance in the motor performance and the Purkinje cell loss in rat cerebellum. Moreover, Ara-C treatment significantly increased the oxidative stress, DNA damage, TUNEL positive cells, p53 and caspase-3 positive cells in the rat cerebellum. Unlike short-term treatment, long-term Ara-C treatment significantly reduced calbindin expression in the cerebellum. Apart from this, 14 days Ara-C treatment led to significant alterations in the histone acetylation and methylation in the cerebellum, while in 5 days treatment no such alterations were observed. Present results indicated that Ara-C, by inducing oxidative stress mediated DNA damage, executes neuronal apoptosis which is accompanied by an increase in the p53

  20. Optogenetics in the nonhuman primate

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    The nonhuman primate brain, the model system closest to the human brain, plays a critical role in our understanding of neural computation, cognition, and behavior. The continued quest to crack the neural codes in the monkey brain would be greatly enhanced with new tools and technologies that can rapidly and reversibly control the activities of desired cells at precise times during specific behavioral states. Recent advances in adapting optogenetic technologies to monkeys have enabled precise control of specific cells or brain regions at the millisecond timescale, allowing for the investigation of the causal role of these neural circuits in this model system. Validation of optogenetic technologies in monkeys also represents a critical preclinical step on the translational path of new generation cell-type-specific neural modulation therapies. Here, I discuss the current state of the application of optogenetics in the nonhuman primate model system, highlighting the available genetic, optical and electrical technologies, and their limitations and potentials. PMID:22341328

  1. 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase is expressed in dissociated rat cerebellar cells and included in the postsynaptic density fraction.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sun-Jung; Jung, Jae Seob; Jin, IngNyol; Moon, Il Soo

    2003-08-31

    We have shown by protein sequencing that the phosphotyrosine-containing 48 kDa protein band of the rat cerebellar postsynaptic density fraction (CBL-PSD) is 2', 3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase 2 (CNP2). Immunoblot analysis indicated that both CNP1 and CNP2 isoforms are present in the CBL-PSD fraction, whereas there is little CNP2 in the forebrain (FB)-PSD fraction. Both isoforms in the CBL-PSD fraction were tyrosine-phosphorylated to a basal extent. They were efficiently dissociated from the complexes in the PSD fraction by salt, but not by non-ionic detergents such as n-octyl glucoside (OG) and Triton X-100. Immunocytochemistry of dissociated cerebellar cultures revealed patchy CNP staining in oligodendrocytes (OLs), Purkinje cells (PCs), and unidentified PSD95-positive cells, but no staining in granule cells (GCs). Our results indicate that both CNP1 and CNP2 are expressed in cerian populations of cerebellar cells in addition to OL, and that they are associated with complexes that are co-isolated with the PSD. PMID:14503857

  2. Ectopic cerebellar cell migration causes maldevelopment of Purkinje cells and abnormal motor behaviour in Cxcr4 null mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Jen; Edwards, Andrew; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Yi-Shin; Peng, Lei; Era, Takumi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Chen, Shu-Jen; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice. PMID:24516532

  3. The spatiotemporal organization of cerebellar network activity resolved by two-photon imaging of multiple single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Daniela; Pozzi, Paolo; Tognolina, Marialuisa; Chirico, Giuseppe; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the spatiotemporal organization of neuronal activity in local microcircuits, techniques allowing the simultaneous recording from multiple single neurons are required. To this end, we implemented an advanced spatial-light modulator two-photon microscope (SLM-2PM). A critical issue for cerebellar theory is the organization of granular layer activity in the cerebellum, which has been predicted by single-cell recordings and computational models. With SLM-2PM, calcium signals could be recorded from different network elements in acute cerebellar slices including granule cells (GrCs), Purkinje cells (PCs) and molecular layer interneurons. By combining WCRs with SLM-2PM, the spike/calcium relationship in GrCs and PCs could be extrapolated toward the detection of single spikes. The SLM-2PM technique made it possible to monitor activity of over tens to hundreds neurons simultaneously. GrC activity depended on the number of spikes in the input mossy fiber bursts. PC and molecular layer interneuron activity paralleled that in the underlying GrC population revealing the spread of activity through the cerebellar cortical network. Moreover, circuit activity was increased by the GABA-A receptor blocker, gabazine, and reduced by the AMPA and NMDA receptor blockers, NBQX and APV. The SLM-2PM analysis of spatiotemporal patterns lent experimental support to the time-window and center-surround organizing principles of the granular layer. PMID:24782707

  4. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. PMID:25869451

  5. Ceramic granule strength variability and compaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Readey, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    Diametral compression strength distributions and the compaction behavior and of irregular shape 150--200 {mu}m ceramic granules and uniform-size 210 {mu}m glass spheres were measured to determine how granule strength variability relates to compaction behavior of granular assemblies. High variability in strength, represented by low Weibull modulus values (m<3) was observed for ceramic granules having a distribution of sizes and shapes, and for uniform-size glass spheres. Compaction pressure data were also analyzed using a Weibull distribution function, and the results were very similar to those obtained from the diametral compression strength tests for the same material. This similarity suggests that it may be possible to model granule compaction using a weakest link theory, whereby an assemblage of granules is viewed as the links of a chain, and failure of the weakest granule (i.e., the weakest link) leads to rearrangement and compaction. Additionally, with the use of Weibull statistics, it appears to be possible to infer the variability in strength of individual granules from a simple pressure compaction test, circumventing the tedious task of testing individual granules.

  6. Primate Experiments on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aochi, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments to study how certain body systems are affected by the space environment are described. These experiments are to be conducted on space shuttle flights. How weightlessness affects two body systems of primates are the prime concern. Thermoregulation and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis are the two systems concerned. The thermoregulation project will provide data on how body temperature and circadian rhythms are affected in a weightlessness environment and the homeostasis in fluids and electrolyte levels will address the problem of body fluid shifts.

  7. Continuous twin screw granulation: influence of process variables on granule and tablet quality.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Córdoba Díaz, D; Peeters, E; Fonteyne, M; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to screen theophylline (125 mg) tablets manufactured via twin screw granulation in order to improve process understanding and knowledge of process variables that determine granule and tablet quality. A premix of theophylline anhydrate, α-lactose monohydrate and PVP (ratio: 30/67.5/2.5,w/w) was granulated with demineralized water. Experiments were done using the high-shear wet granulation module (based on twin screw granulation) of the ConsiGma™-25 unit (a continuous tablet manufacturing system) for particle size enlargement. After drying, granules were compressed using a MODUL™ P tablet press (compression force: 10 kN, tablet diameter: 12 mm). Using a D-optimal experimental design, the effect of several process variables (throughput (10-25 kg/h), screw speed (600-950 rpm), screw configuration (number (2, 4, 6 and 12) and angle (30°, 60° and 90°) of kneading elements), barrel temperature (25-40°C) and method of binder addition (dry versus wet)) on the granulation process (torque and temperature increase in barrel wall), granule (particle size distribution, friability and flowability) and tablet (tensile strength, porosity, friability, disintegration time and dissolution) quality was evaluated. The results showed that the quality of granules and tablets can be optimized by adjusting specific process variables (number of kneading elements, barrel temperature and binder addition method) during a granulation process using a continuous twin screw granulator. PMID:22687571

  8. Soils, time, and primate paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Soils are the skin of the earth. From both poles to the equator, wherever rocks or sediment are exposed at the surface, soils are forming through the physical and chemical action of climate and living organisms. The physical attributes (color, texture, thickness) and chemical makeup of soils vary considerably, depending on the composition of the parent material and other variables: temperature, rainfall and soil moisture, vegetation, soil fauna, and the length of time that soil-forming processes have been at work. United States soil scientists1 have classified modern soils into ten major groups and numerous subgroups, each reflecting the composition and architecture of the soils and, to some extent, the processes that led to their formation. The physical and chemical processes of soil formation have been active throughout geologic time; the organic processes have been active at least since the Ordovician.2 Consequently, nearly all sedimentary rocks that were deposited in nonmarine settings and exposed to the elements contain a record of ancient, buried soils or paleosols. A sequence of these rocks, such as most ancient fluvial (stream) deposits, provides a record of soil paleoenvironments through time. Paleosols are also repositories of the fossils of organisms (body fossils) and the traces of those organisms burrowing, food-seeking, and dwelling activities (ichnofossils). Indeed, most fossil primates are found in paleosols. Careful study of ancient soils gives new, valuable insights into the correct temporal reconstruction of the primate fossil record and the nature of primate paleoenvironments. ?? 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Assessing Anxiety in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kristine; Pierre, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety can be broadly described as a psychological state in which normally innocuous environmental stimuli trigger negative emotional expectations. Human anxiety disorders are multidimensional and may be organic or acquired, situational or pervasive. The broad ranging nature of the anxiety phenotype speaks to the need for models that identify its various components and root causes to develop effective clinical treatments. The cross-species comparative approach to modeling anxiety disorders in animals aims to understand mechanisms that both contribute to and modulate anxiety. Nonhuman primate models provide an important bridge from nonprimate model systems because of the complexity of nonhuman primates’ biobehavioral capacities and their commonalities with human emotion. The broad goal of this review is to provide an overview of various procedures available to study anxiety in the nonhuman primate, with a focus on the behavioral aspects of anxiety. Commonly used methods covered in this review include assessing animals in their home environment or in response to an ethologically relevant threat, associative conditioning and startle response tests, and cognitive bias tests. We also discuss how these procedures can help veterinarians and researchers care for captive nonhuman primates. PMID:25225310

  10. Electrochemical performance of granulated titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, O.; Pratsinis, S. E.; de Chambrier, E.; Crouzet, M.; Exnar, I.

    The electrochemical performance of Li-ion insertion into electrodes made of various sizes of anatase titania nanoparticles embedded in larger granulated entities (1-10 μm) is investigated. The granules are formed by spray drying of a suspension containing titania nanoparticles made by hydrolyzing titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). Depending on the three process steps, i.e. hydrolysis-condensation, hydrothermal processing and spray drying, different properties for the electrode made from these granules can be achieved in terms of phase composition, specific surface area (SSA) and specific charge capacity. Hydrothermally processed (HP) particles are more resistant to calcination than sol-gel precipitated (SGP) ones and have a higher SSA which leads to a better performance with respect to specific charge capacity. Electrodes made from granulated nanoparticles have superior specific charge capacity than from non-granulated ones as the former have more inter-particle contacts.

  11. Mast cell secretory granules: armed for battle.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Sara; Pejler, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells of the immune system and recent studies show that they have immunomodulatory roles in diverse processes in both health and disease. Mast cells are distinguished by their high content of electron-dense secretory granules, which are filled with large amounts of preformed and pre-activated immunomodulatory compounds. When appropriately activated, mast cells undergo degranulation, a process by which these preformed granule compounds are rapidly released into the surroundings. In many cases, the effects that mast cells have on an immune response are closely associated with the biological actions of the granule compounds that they release, as exemplified by the recent studies showing that mast cell granule proteases account for many of the protective and detrimental effects of mast cells in various inflammatory settings. In this Review, we discuss the current knowledge of mast cell secretory granules. PMID:24903914

  12. [Reasons for not using primates in research].

    PubMed

    Sauer, U G

    2000-01-01

    In terms of physiological development, non-human primates are our next of kin in the animal kingdom. Scientists who oppose the use of primates for experimental purposes argue that due to the high degree of similarity between primates and humans, experiments that may not be performed on humans due to ethical reasons also should not be performed on primates. Taking neurophysiological experiments with primates as an example, it is discussed which consequences it would have for medical progress if the use of primates in research were abandoned altogether. Taking into account the alternatives available and the results gained with the animal tests, it is concluded that medical progress would be unimpeded, even though in some instances the exact same questions that currently are evaluated with the animal tests might no longer be pursued with the alternatives. PMID:11178554

  13. [Correlation of dry granulation process parameters and granule quality based on multiple regression analysis].

    PubMed

    Cao, Han-Han; Du, Ruo-Fei; Yang, Jia-Ning; Feng, Yi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, microcrystalline cellulose WJ101 was used as a model material to investigate the effect of various process parameters on granule yield and friability after dry granulation with a single factor and the effect of comprehensive inspection process parameters on the effect of granule yield and friability, then the correlation between process parameters and granule quality was established. The regress equation was established between process parameters and granule yield and friability by multiple regression analysis, the affecting the order of the size of the order of the process parameters on granule yield and friability was: rollers speed > rollers pressure > speed of horizontal feed. Granule yield was positively correlated with pressure and speed of horizontal feed and negatively correlated rollers speed, while friability was on the contrary. By comparison, fitted value and real value, fitted and real value are basically the same of no significant differences (P > 0.05) and with high precision and reliability. PMID:24961115

  14. Influence of metronidazole particle properties on granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Censi, Roberta; Malaj, Ledjan; Martelli, Sante; Joiris, Etienne; Barthélémy, Christine

    2007-02-01

    Metronidazole is a good example of high-dose drug substance with poor granulating and tableting properties. Tablets are generally produced by liquid granulation; however, the technological process failure is quite frequent. In order to verify how the metronidazole particle characteristics can influence granule properties, three metronidazole batches differing for crystal habit, mean particle size, BET surface area and wettability were selected, primarily designed according to their different elongation ratio: needle-shaped, stick-shaped, and isodimensional. In the presence of lactose monohydrate and pregelatinized maize starch, respectively as diluent and binder, they were included in a formula for wet granulation in a high-shear mixer-granulator. In order to render the process comparable as far as possible, all parameters and experimental conditions were maintained constant. Four granule batches were obtained: granules from placebo (G-placebo), granules from needle-shaped crystals (G-needle-shaped), granules from stick-shaped crystals (G-stick-shaped), and granules from isodimensional crystals (G-isodimensional). Different granule properties were considered, in particular concerning porosity, friability, loss on drying (LOD), and flowability. In order to study their tabletability and compressibility, the different granules obtained were then compressed in a rotary press. The best tabletability was obtained with the isodimensional batch, while the poorest was exhibited by the stick-shaped one. Differences in tabletability are in good accordance with compressibility results: to a better tabletability corresponds an important granule ability to undergo a volume reduction as a result of an applied pressure. In particular, it was proposed that the greatest compressibility of the G-isodimensional must be related to the greatest granule porosity percentage. PMID:17454043

  15. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  16. An update on Spino-cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Banashree; Paul, Pritikanta; Paul, Madhuparna; Kumar, Hrishikesh

    2013-01-01

    The dominantly inherited ataxias, also known as Spino-cerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are rapidly expanding entities. New mutations are being identified at remarkable regularity. Recent awareness of molecular abnormalities in SCAs has addressed some of the long sought questions, but gaps in knowledge still exist. Three major categories of SCAs, according to molecular mechanisms, have evolved over recent few years: Polyglutamate expansion ataxia, non-coding zone repeat ataxia, and ataxia due to conventional mutation. Using the fulcrum of these mechanisms, the article provides an update of SCAs. Shared and specific clinical features, genetic abnormalities, and possible links between molecular abnormalities and cerebellar degeneration have been discussed. Emphasis has been placed on the mechanisms of polyglutamate toxicity. PMID:24101804

  17. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly. PMID:27381497

  18. [Diagnostic and treatment of hypertensive cerebellar hematomas].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Dash'ian, V G; Murashko, A A; Burov, S A

    2009-01-01

    Authors analyzed the results of treatment of 56 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhages (volume 0,5-41 cm3). Brain stem symptoms were found in 45 (80%) of patients. The dislocation of brain stem was observed in 38 (68%) cases, occlusive hydrocephaly - in 22 (39%), intraventricular hemorrhage - in 26 (46%). Severity of state depended on character of disease course, presence of stem symptoms, awakening level, volume and localization of cerebellar hematoma, development of intraventricular hemorrhage, occlusive hydrocephaly and dislocation of brain stem. Thirty-six patients were operated. After the neurosurgical intervention, 22 (61%) patients were discharged without or with the minimal neurological deficit, 1 (3%) with marked disability and 13 (36%) patients died. In conclusion, the removal of hematoma is recommended in dislocation of brain stem and disturbance of consiousnes: the ventricular drainage - in occlusive hydrocephaly developed as a consequence of hemotamponade of IV ventricular. The surgical treatment is not recommended to patients with cerebellar hematomas with the volume less than 7 cm3. PMID:19491806

  19. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    PubMed Central

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for age, sex, handedness, musicality, and level of education were tested. Auditory and visual sensory sequences were presented out of different sensory pattern categories (tones with different acoustic frequencies and durations, visual stimuli with different spatial locations and colors, sequential vision of irregular shapes) and different ranges of inter-cue time intervals (fast and slow). Motor requirements were small, with vocal responses and no time restrictions. Perception of visual and acoustic stimuli was generally preserved in patients and controls. The number of errors was significantly higher in the faster tempo of sequence presentation in learning of sequences of tones of different frequencies and in learning of sequences of visual stimuli of different spatial locations and different colors. No difference in tempo between the groups was shown. The total number of errors between the two groups was identical in the sequence conditions. No major disturbances in acquisition or discrimination of various sensory sequences were observed in the group of cerebellar patients. Sequence learning may be impaired only in tasks with significant motor demands. PMID:15169865

  20. From cerebellar texture to movement optimization.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Fahad

    2014-10-01

    The cerebellum is a major site for supervised procedural learning and appears to be crucial for optimizing sensorimotor performance. However, the site and origin of the supervising signal are still elusive. Furthermore, its relationship with the prominent neuronal circuitry remains puzzling. In this paper, I will review the relevant information and seek to synthesize a working hypothesis that explains the unique cerebellar structure. The aim of this review was to link the distinctive functions of the cerebellum, as derived from cerebellar lesion studies, with potential elementary computations, as observed by a bottom-up approach from the cerebellar microcircuitry. The parallel fiber geometry is ideal for performing millisecond computations that extract instructive signals. In this scenario, the higher time derivatives of kinematics such as acceleration and/or jerk that occur during motor performance are detected via a tidal wave mechanism and are used (with appropriate gating) as the instructive signal to guide motor smoothing. The advantage of such a mechanism is that movements are optimized by reducing "jerkiness" which, in turn, lowers their energy requirements. PMID:25037239

  1. Cavernous angioma with olivary hypertrophy and contralateral cerebellar diaschisis.

    PubMed

    Komaba, Y; Nomoto, T; Kitamura, S; Terashi, A

    1997-07-01

    We describe a 66-year-old man with a 20-year history of ataxic gait who suddenly developed diplopia on rightward gaze. Neurologic examination revealed right hemi-ataxia and hemi-hypesthesia, and left internuclear ophthalmoplegia. MRI showed a cavernous angioma in the left tectum, mild right cerebellar atrophy, and left interior olivary hypertrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging demonstrated contralateral cerebellar diaschisis. We discuss the findings and review the literature concerning contralateral cerebellar diaschisis. PMID:9240502

  2. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  3. Different Degrees of Iodine Deficiency Inhibit Differentiation of Cerebellar Granular Cells in Rat Offspring, via BMP-Smad1/5/8 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jing; Lei, Xibing; Wang, Yi; Wang, Yuan; Song, Heling; Li, Min; Min, Hui; Yu, Ye; Xi, Qi; Teng, Weiping; Chen, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Iodine deficiency (ID) during development results in dysfunction of the central nervous system (CNS) and affects psychomotor and motor function. It is worth noting that maternal mild and marginal ID tends to be the most common reason of preventable neurodevelopmental impairment, via a mechanism that has not been elucidated. Therefore, our aim was to study the effects of developmental mild and marginal ID on the differentiation of cerebellar granule cells (GCs) and investigate the activation of BMP-Smad1/5/8 signaling, which is crucial for the development and differentiation of cerebellum. Three developmental rat models were created by feeding dam rats with a diet deficient in iodine and deionized water supplemented with potassium iodide. Our results showed that different degrees of ID inhibited and delayed the differentiation of cerebellar GCs on postnatal day (PN) 7, PN14, and PN21. Moreover, mild and severe ID reduced the expression of BMP2 and p-Smad1/5/8, and increased the levels of Id2 on PN7, PN14, and PN21. However, marginal ID rarely altered expression of these proteins in the offspring. Our study supports the hypothesis that mild and severe ID during development inhibits the differentiation of cerebellar GCs, which may be ascribed to the down-regulation of BMP-Smad1/5/8 signaling and the overexpression of Id2. Furthermore, it was speculated that maternal marginal ID rarely affected the differentiation of cerebellar GCs in the offspring. PMID:26307610

  4. A VARIANT OF NESPRIN1 GIANT DEVOID OF KASH DOMAIN UNDERLIES THE MOLECULAR ETIOLOGY OF AUTOSOMAL RECESSIVE CEREBELLAR ATAXIA TYPE I

    PubMed Central

    Razafsky, David; Hodzic, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Nonsense mutations across the whole coding sequence of Syne1/ Nesprin1 have been linked to Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia Type I (ARCA1). However, nothing is known about the molecular etiology of this late-onset debilitating pathology. In this work, we report that Nesprin1 giant is specifically expressed in CNS tissues. We also identified a CNS-specific splicing event that leads to the abundant expression of a KASH-LESS variant of Nesprin1giant (KLNes1g) in the cerebellum. KLNes1g displayed a noncanonical localization at glomeruli of cerebellar mossy fibers whereas Nesprin2 exclusively decorated the nuclear envelope of all cerebellar neurons. In immunogold electron microscopy, KLNes1g colocalized both with synaptic vesicles within mossy fibers and with dendritic membranes of cerebellar granule neurons. We further identified vesicle- and membrane-associated proteins in KLNes1g immunoprecipitates. Together, our results suggest that the loss of function of KLNes1g resulting from Nesprin1 nonsense mutations underlie the molecular etiology of ARCA1. PMID:25843669

  5. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Hauger, R.L.; Catt, K.J.; Aguilera, G.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution and properties of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) were analyzed in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys. Binding of (/sup 125/I)tyrosine-labeled ovine CRF to frontal cortex and amygdala membrane-rich fractions was saturable, specific, and time- and temperature-dependent, reaching equilibrium in 30 min at 23/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated one class of high-affinity sites with a K/sub d/ of 1 nM and a concentration of 125 fmol/mg. As in the rat pituitary and brain, CRF receptors in monkey cerebral cortex and amygdala were coupled to adenylate cyclase. Autoradiographic analysis of specific CRF binding in brain sections revealed that the receptors were widely distributed in the cerebral cortex and limbic system. Receptor density was highest in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary and throughout the cerebral cortex, specifically in the prefrontal, frontal, orbital, cingulate, insular, and temporal areas, and in the cerebellar cortex. A low binding density was present in the superior colliculus, locus coeruleus, substantia gelatinosa, preoptic area, septal area, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These data demonstrate that receptors for CRF are present within the primate brain at areas related to the central control of visceral function and behavior, suggesting that brain CRF may serve as a neurotransmitter in the coordination of endocrine and neural mechanisms involved in the response to stress.

  6. Distinct Roles for Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Cerebellar Development and Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Emmenegger, Brian A.; Hwang, Eugene I.; Moore, Colin; Markant, Shirley L.; Brun, Sonja N.; Dutton, John W.; Read, Tracy-Ann; Fogarty, Marie P.; Singh, Alok R.; Durden, Donald L.; Yang, Chaofeng; McKeehan, Wallace L.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule neurons are the most abundant neurons in the brain, and a critical element of the circuitry that controls motor coordination and learning. In addition, granule neuron precursors (GNPs) are thought to represent cells of origin for medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Thus, understanding the signals that control the growth and differentiation of these cells has important implications for neurobiology and neuro-oncology. Our previous studies have shown that proliferation of GNPs is regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh), and that aberrant activation of the Shh pathway can lead to medulloblastoma. Moreover, we have demonstrated that Shh-dependent proliferation of GNPs and medulloblastoma cells can be blocked by basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). But while the mitogenic effects of Shh signaling have been confirmed in vivo, the inhibitory effects of bFGF have primarily been studied in culture. Here we demonstrate that mice lacking FGF signaling in GNPs exhibit no discernable changes in GNP proliferation or differentiation. In contrast, activation of FGF signaling has a potent effect on tumor growth: treatment of medulloblastoma cells with bFGF prevents them from forming tumors following transplantation, and inoculation of tumor-bearing mice with bFGF markedly inhibits tumor growth in vivo. These results suggest that activators of FGF signaling may be useful for targeting medulloblastoma and other Shh-dependent tumors. PMID:23045271

  7. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma in two siblings suggests a possible familial predisposition.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Fellig, Yakov; Margolin, Emil

    2016-10-01

    There is limited data on the genetic origin and natural history of cerebellar liponeurocytoma. To the best of our knowledge there has been only one report of a familial presentation of this rare entity. We report a 72-year-old female with a posterior fossa tumor presenting with progressive cerebellar signs and symptoms. The patient underwent total tumor resection via an uncomplicated sub-occipital craniotomy. Histopathologic examination was diagnostic for cerebellar liponeurocytoma. Her sister was previously treated for a similar tumor. Our report provides further evidence for the possible existence of a hereditary abnormality predisposing afflicted families to cerebellar liponeurocytoma development. PMID:27349466

  8. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. PMID:25562758

  9. Reduced tabletability of roller compacted granules as a result of granule size enlargement.

    PubMed

    Sun, Changquan Calvin; Himmelspach, Micah W

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism for the frequently observed "loss of reworkability or tabletability" of dry-granulated (DG) powders was investigated in detail using microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). It was hypothesized that granule size enlargement is the primary mechanism to the phenomenon. Detrimental effects of size enlargement on tabletability of plastic materials are predictable based on the physical model of interparticulate bonding within a tablet. In absence of extensive fracture of particles/granules, larger particles/granules exhibit lower surface area available for bonding thus lower tensile strength when compressed under identical conditions. Size effects were first demonstrated using different grades of MCC powders, both whole and sieved, of different particle size distributions. Regardless grade and sieve fraction, larger particles always resulted in lower tabletability, that is, lower tensile strength at the same compaction pressure. It was subsequently shown that enlargement of granules also reduced powder tabletability regardless grade of MCC. Tabletability of sieved granules after roller compacted for one, two, and four times decreased monotonically with increasing granule size but independent of the total number of roller compaction. Moreover, tabletability of fine granules (44-106 microm) was higher than that of coarse MCC powder (Avicel PH-200). These results suggest that the primary mechanism for reduced tabletabilty of DG granules of MCC is granule size enlargement rather than "work-hardening." PMID:16315244

  10. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  11. Asymmetric distribution in twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Chan Seem, Tim; Rowson, Neil A; Gabbott, Ian; de Matas, Marcel; Reynolds, Gavin K; Ingram, Andy

    2016-09-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) was successfully employed to validate measured transverse asymmetry in material distribution in the conveying zones of a Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). Flow asymmetry was established to be a property of the granulator geometry and dependent on fill level. The liquid distribution of granules as a function of fill level was determined. High flow asymmetry at low fill level negatively affects granule nucleation leading to high variance in final uniformity. Wetting of material during nucleation was identified as a critical parameter in determining final granule uniformity and fill level is highlighted as a crucial control factor in achieving this. Flow asymmetry of dry material in conveying zones upstream of binder fluid injection leads to poor non-uniform wetting at nucleation and results in heterogeneous final product. The granule formation mechanism of 60°F kneading blocks is suggested to be primarily breakage of agglomerates formed during nucleation. Optimisation of screw configuration would be required to provide secondary growth. This work shows how fill dependent flow regimes affect granulation mechanisms. PMID:26820919

  12. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  13. Analysis of the release process of phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride from ethylcellulose matrix granules V. Release properties of ethylcellulose layered matrix granules.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Atsuko; Fujii, Ryuta; Yonezawa, Yorinobu; Sunada, Hisakazu

    2008-04-01

    In the pharmaceutical preparation of a controlled release drug, it is very important and necessary to understand the release properties. In previous papers, a combination of the square-root time law and cube-root law equations was confirmed to be a useful equation for qualitative treatment. It was also confirmed that the combination equation could analyze the release properties of layered granules as well as matrix granules. The drug release property from layered granules is different from that of matrix granules. A time lag occurs before release, and the entire release property of layered granules was analyzed using the combination of the square-root time law and cube-root law equations. It is considered that the analysis method is very useful and efficient for both matrix and layered granules. Comparing the granulation methods, it is easier to control the manufacturing process by tumbling granulation (method B) than by tumbling-fluidized bed granulation (method C). Ethylcellulose (EC) layered granulation by a fluidized bed granulator might be convenient for the preparation of controlled release dosage forms as compared with a tumbling granulator, because the layered granules prepared by the fluidized bed granulator can granulate and dry at the same time. The time required for drying by the fluidized bed granulator is shorter than that by the tumbling granulator, so the fluidized bed granulator is convenient for preparation of granules in handling and shorter processing time than the tumbling granulator. It was also suggested that the EC layered granules prepared by the fluidized bed granulator were suitable for a controlled release system as well as the EC matrix granules. PMID:18379102

  14. Primate communities: past, present, and possible future.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kaye E; Bidner, Laura R

    2004-01-01

    An understanding of the fundamental causes of the structure of primate communities is important for studies of primate evolutionary history, primate behavioral ecology, and development of conservation strategies. Research into these structuring factors has benefited from new perspectives such as consideration of primate phylogenetic history, metacommunities, and interactions with predators and nonprimate competitors. This review presents the underlying factors of primate community structure within the biogeographic regions of Madagascar, the Neotropics, Africa, and Asia. One of the major differences among these locations likely resulted from the initial primate taxa that colonized each region (a single colonization event in the case of Madagascar and South America, and multiple radiations of higher-level taxa in Africa and Asia). As most primates live in forests, the differences among the forests in these locations, caused by various climatic influences, further influenced speciation and the development of primate communities. Within these habitats, species interactions with different groups of organisms were also instrumental in developing community dynamics. Through an investigation of these fundamental factors, we identify some of the most important effects on primate communities in each region. These findings suggest that low primate richness in Asia may be caused by either the abundance of dipterocarp trees or high levels of monsoon rains. High numbers of frugivores and a lack of folivores in neotropical communities may be associated with competition with sloths that were already present at the time of initial radiation. Climatic patterns which affect forest structure and productivity in Madagascar may be responsible for high numbers of folivorous lemurs. The identification of these factors are important for the conservation of existing primate communities, and indicate directions for future studies. PMID:15605389

  15. Mitigation of cerebellar neuropathy in globoid cell leukodystrophy mice by AAV-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dar-Shong; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Lee, Allan Yueh-Luen; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Wang, Tuen-Jen; Jian, Yuan-Ren; Hsu, Jui-Cheng; Huang, Zon-Darr; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chiang, Ming-Fu

    2015-10-15

    Globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of the enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The absence of GALC activity leads to the accumulation of the toxic substance psychosine and the preferential loss of myelinating cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Profound demyelination, astrogliosis and axonopathy are the hallmarks of the pathogenesis of GLD, and cerebellar ataxia is one of the dominant manifestations in adolescents and adults affected with GLD. To date, studies regarding cerebellar degeneration in GLD are limited. In this study, the efficacy of cerebellum-targeted gene therapy on the cerebellar neuropathology in twitcher mice (a murine model of GLD) has been validated. We observed degeneration of Purkinje cells, Bergmann glia, and granule cells in addition to astrocytosis and demyelination in the cerebellum of the twitcher mice. Ultrastructural analysis revealed dark cell degeneration and disintegration of the cellular composition of Purkinje cells in untreated twitcher mice. In addition, the expressions of neurotrophic factors CNTF, GDNF and IGF-I were up-regulated and the expression of BDNF was down-regulated. Intracerebellar-mediated gene therapy efficiently corrected enzymatic deficiency by direct transduction to Purkinje cells and cross-correction in other cell types in the cerebellum, leading to the amelioration of both neuroinflammation and demyelination. The population, dendritic territory, and axonal processes of Purkinje cells remained normal in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, where radial fibers of Bergmann glia spanned the molecular layer and collateral branches ensheathed the dendritic processes of Purkinje cells. Moreover, the aberrant expressions of neurotrophic factors were mitigated in the cerebellum of treated twitcher mice, indicating the preservation of cellular function in addition to maintaining the neuronal architecture. The life span of the

  16. Chronic In Vivo Imaging of Ponto-Cerebellar Mossy Fibers Reveals Morphological Stability during Whisker Sensory Manipulation in the Adult Rat123

    PubMed Central

    Rylkova, Daria; Crank, Aidan R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The cerebellum receives extensive disynaptic input from the neocortex via the basal pontine nuclei, the neurons of which send mossy fiber (MF) axons to the granule cell layer of the contralateral cerebellar hemisphere. Although this cortico-cerebellar circuit has been implicated in tasks such as sensory discrimination and motor learning, little is known about the potential role of MF morphological plasticity in the function of the cerebellar granule cell layer. To address this issue, we labeled MFs with EGFP via viral infection of the basal pons in adult rats and performed in vivo two-photon imaging of MFs in Crus I/II of the cerebellar hemisphere over a period of several weeks. Following the acquisition of baseline images, animals were housed in control, enriched, or deprived sensory environments. Morphological dynamics were assessed by tracing MF axons and their terminals, and by tracking the stability of filopodia arising from MF terminal rosettes. MF axons and terminals were found to be remarkably stable. Parameters derived neither from measurements of axonal arbor geometry nor from the morphology of individual rosettes and their filopodial extensions significantly changed under control conditions over 4 weeks of imaging. Increasing whisker stimulation by manipulating the sensory environment or decreasing such stimulation by whisker trimming also failed to alter MF structure. Our studies indicate that pontine MF axons projecting to Crus I/II in adult rats do not undergo significant structural rearrangements over the course of weeks, and that this stability is not altered by the sustained manipulation of whisker sensorimotor experience. PMID:26693178

  17. Bion 11 mission: primate experiments.

    PubMed

    Ilyin, E A; Korolkov, V I; Skidmore, M G; Viso, M; Kozlovskaya, I B; Grindeland, R E; Lapin, B A; Gordeev, Y V; Krotov, V P; Fanton, J W; Bielitzki, J T; Golov, V K; Magedov, V S; Hines, J W

    2000-01-01

    A summary is provided of the major operations required to conduct the wide range of primate experiments on the Bion 11 mission, which flew for 14 days beginning December 24, 1996. Information is given on preflight preparations, including flight candidate selection and training; attachment and implantation of bioinstrumentation; flight and ground experiment designs; onboard life support and test systems; ground and flight health monitoring; flight monkey selection and transport to the launch site; inflight procedures and data collection; postflight examinations and experiments; and assessment of results. PMID:11543472

  18. [Optimization of dry granulating technique of Qibai Pingfei granule through response surface methodology].

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-feng; Li, Yun-xiao; Xu, Zhen-qiu; Meng, Jin; Yan, Ming; Jin, Rui-ting; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    To determine the optimum process conditions for dry granulating technique of Qibai Pingfei granule, granule excipient type, rolling wheel speed and pressure and feeding speed were studied. Taking shaping rate at a time, moisture absorption and dissolubility as index, the type and amount of granule excipient were determined. In addition, taking shaping rate at a time as index, parameters of rolling wheel speed and pressure and feeding speed were researched through single factor test and response surface methodology. The optimum parameters were as follows: lactose as excipient, dry extract powder to excipient at 1:2, rolling wheel speed and pressure at 10.9 Hz and 6.4 MPa and feeding speed at 7.2 Hz. After validation of three batches pilot-scale production, the optimum processing parameters for dry granulating technique of Qibai Pingfei granule is reasonable and feasible, which can provide reliable basis for production. PMID:26677695

  19. Noninvasive Test for Tuberculosis Detection among Primates

    PubMed Central

    Mugisha, Lawrence; Shoyama, Fernanda Miyagaki; O’Malley, Melanie J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Asiimwe, Benon; Travis, Dominic A.; Singer, Randall S.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Traditional testing methods have limited epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis among free-living primates. PCR amplification of insertion element IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fecal samples was evaluated as a noninvasive screening test for tuberculosis in primates. Active tuberculosis was detected among inoculated macaques and naturally exposed chimpanzees, demonstrating the utility of this test. PMID:25695329

  20. Nonhuman Primate Infections after Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Haustein, Silke V.; Kolterman, Amanda J.; Sundblad, Jeffrey J.; Fechner, John H.; Knechtle, Stuart J.

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, primarily rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), and baboons (Papio spp.), have been used extensively in research models of solid organ transplantation, mainly because the nonhuman primate (NHP) immune system closely resembles that of the human. Nonhuman primates are also frequently the model of choice for preclinical testing of new immunosuppressive strategies. But the management of post-transplant nonhuman primates is complex, because it often involves multiple immunosuppressive agents, many of which are new and have unknown effects. Additionally, the resulting immunosuppression carries a risk of infectious complications, which are challenging to diagnose. Last, because of the natural tendency of animals to hide signs of weakness, infectious complications may not be obvious until the animal becomes severely ill. For these reasons the diagnosis of infectious complications is difficult among post-transplant NHPs. Because most nonhuman primate studies in organ transplantation are quite small, there are only a few published reports concerning infections after transplantation in nonhuman primates. Based on our survey of these reports, the incidence of infection in NHP transplant models is 14%. The majority of reports suggest that many of these infections are due to reactivation of viruses endemic to the primate species, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), polyomavirus, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–related infections. In this review, we address the epidemiology, pathogenesis, role of prophylaxis, clinical presentation, and treatment of infectious complications after solid organ transplantation in nonhuman primates. PMID:18323582

  1. Modeling Olfactory Bulb Evolution through Primate Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Heritage, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive characterizations of primates have usually included a reduction in olfactory sensitivity. However, this inference of derivation and directionality assumes an ancestral state of olfaction, usually by comparison to a group of extant non-primate mammals. Thus, the accuracy of the inference depends on the assumed ancestral state. Here I present a phylogenetic model of continuous trait evolution that reconstructs olfactory bulb volumes for ancestral nodes of primates and mammal outgroups. Parent-daughter comparisons suggest that, relative to the ancestral euarchontan, the crown-primate node is plesiomorphic and that derived reduction in olfactory sensitivity is an attribute of the haplorhine lineage. The model also suggests a derived increase in olfactory sensitivity at the strepsirrhine node. This oppositional diversification of the strepsirrhine and haplorhine lineages from an intermediate and non-derived ancestor is inconsistent with a characterization of graded reduction through primate evolution. PMID:25426851

  2. [Cerebellar Control of Ocular Movements: Application to the Topographical Diagnosis of Cerebellar Lesions].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, substantial information on cerebellar oculomotor control has been provided by the use of sophisticated neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and imaging techniques. We now know that an intact cerebellum is a prerequisite for normal oculomotor performance. This review clarifies the current knowledge on structure-function correlations of the cerebellum in relation to ocular movements and allows them to be applied to topographical diagnosis of cerebellar lesions. The cerebellar regions most closely related to oculomotor function are: (1) the flocculus/paraflocculus for VOR suppression, cancellation, smooth pursuit eye movement and gaze-holding, (2) the nodulus/ventral uvula for velocity storage and low frequency prolonged vestibular response, and (3) the dorsal oculomotor vermis (declive VI, folium VII) and the posterior portion of the fastigial nucleus (fastigial oculomotor region) for saccades and smooth pursuit initiation. Symptomatically, defects in the flocculus/parflocculus cause saccadic pursuit, downbeat nystagmus, and impairments to visual suppression of the VOR. Lesions of the nodulus/uvula reveal as periodic alternating nystagmus. Lesions of the oculomotor vermis and the fastigial nucleus can induce saccadic dysmetria, while fastigial nucleus lesions may also cause ocular flutter/opsoclonus. A detailed knowledge of cerebellar anatomy and the physiology of eye movements enables localization of lesions to specific areas of the cerebellum. PMID:27001776

  3. Insulin Granule Biogenesis, Trafficking and Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, June Chunqiu; Min, Le; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that beta cell dysfunction resulting in abnormal insulin secretion is the essential element in the progression of patients from a state of impaired glucose tolerance to frank type 2 diabetes (Del Prato, 2003; Del Prato and Tiengo, 2001). Although extensive studies have examined the molecular, cellular and physiologic mechanisms of insulin granule biogenesis, sorting, and exocytosis the precise mechanisms controlling these processes and their dysregulation in the developed of diabetes remains an area of important investigation. We now know that insulin biogenesis initiates with the synthesis of preproinsulin in rough endoplastic reticulum and conversion of preproinsulin to proinsulin. Proinsulin begins to be packaged in the Trans-Golgi Network and is sorting into immature secretory granules. These immature granules become acidic via ATP-dependent proton pump and proinsulin undergoes proteolytic cleavage resulting the formation of insulin and C-peptide. During the granule maturation process, insulin is crystallized with zinc and calcium in the form of dense-core granules and unwanted cargo and membrane proteins undergo selective retrograde trafficking to either the constitutive trafficking pathway for secretion or to degradative pathways. The newly formed mature dense-core insulin granules populate two different intracellular pools, the readily releasable pools (RRP) and the reserved pool. These two distinct populations are thought to be responsible for the biphasic nature of insulin release in which the RRP granules are associated with the plasma membrane and undergo an acute calcium-dependent release accounting for first phase insulin secretion. In contrast, second phase insulin secretion requires the trafficking of the reserved granule pool to the plasma membrane. The initial trigger for insulin granule fusion with the plasma membrane is a rise in intracellular calcium and in the case of glucose stimulation results from

  4. Heart xenotransplantation in primate models.

    PubMed

    Postrach, Johannes; Bauer, Andreas; Schmoeckel, Michael; Reichart, Bruno; Brenner, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is a potential solution for the worldwide persisting donor organ shortage. However, immunological and physiological barriers need to be overcome before the first clinical trials can be started. Nonhuman primates are considered the most suitable recipients in preclinical xenotransplantation models. Heterotopic abdominal cardiac xenotransplantation is a well-established nonworking heart model for immunological and biological studies on acute and delayed xenograft rejection and xenograft survival. Nevertheless, orthotopic life-supporting pig-to-baboon heart transplantation is the only accepted model for future cardiac xenotransplantation in humans so far. Survival times of 3 months in at least 60% of consecutive experiments have to be achieved and a minimum number of ten nonhuman primates have to survive for this period of time before clinical transplantation may be started. We recently introduced the heterotopic thoracic technique of pig-to-baboon heart transplantation. We believe that this technique combines the advantages of a working heart model with the safety of heterotopic transplantation. We describe the technical procedure of the three different pig-to-baboon models and give detailed information on perioperative care of the recipients. PMID:22565995

  5. Foxc1 dependent mesenchymal signalling drives embryonic cerebellar growth

    PubMed Central

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Gillies, Gwendolyn S; Janson, Olivia K; Chizhikov, Victor V; Mithal, Divakar S; Miller, Richard J; Millen, Kathleen J

    2014-01-01

    Loss of Foxc1 is associated with Dandy-Walker malformation, the most common human cerebellar malformation characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and an enlarged posterior fossa and fourth ventricle. Although expressed in the mouse posterior fossa mesenchyme, loss of Foxc1 non-autonomously induces a rapid and devastating decrease in embryonic cerebellar ventricular zone radial glial proliferation and concurrent increase in cerebellar neuronal differentiation. Subsequent migration of cerebellar neurons is disrupted, associated with disordered radial glial morphology. In vitro, SDF1α, a direct Foxc1 target also expressed in the head mesenchyme, acts as a cerebellar radial glial mitogen and a chemoattractant for nascent Purkinje cells. Its receptor, Cxcr4, is expressed in cerebellar radial glial cells and conditional Cxcr4 ablation with Nes-Cre mimics the Foxc1−/− cerebellar phenotype. SDF1α also rescues the Foxc1−/− phenotype. Our data emphasizes that the head mesenchyme exerts a considerable influence on early embryonic brain development and its disruption contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03962.001 PMID:25513817

  6. Cerebellar atrophy and prognosis after temporal lobe resection.

    PubMed Central

    Specht, U; May, T; Schulz, R; Rohde, M; Ebner, A; Schmidt, R C; Schütz, M; Wolf, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Experimental data indicate inhibitory effects of the cerebellum on seizure activity. Structural damage such as cerebellar atrophy, which is a common finding in patients with chronic epilepsy, may reduce these effects. METHODS: Outcome after temporal lobectomy was studied in 78 consecutive patients, with or without cerebellar atrophy diagnosed by MRI. RESULTS: Thirty five patients (45%) showed cerebellar atrophy. At a mean follow up of 14.6 (range, 6-40) months, 50 patients (64%) had no postoperative seizures. In these patients, the frequency of cerebellar atrophy was significantly lower (34%) than in patients who relapsed (64%, p < 0.01). Occurrence of generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) within two years before surgery, occurrence of GTCS at any time preoperatively, long duration of epilepsy, and older age at surgery were also associated with recurrence of seizures. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested occurrence of GTCS within two years before surgery and cerebellar atrophy as the main predictive indicators. When both factors were present, the percentage of patients remaining seizure free since surgery fell to 30%, compared with 60% when only GTCS were present, 78.6% when only cerebellar atrophy was present, and 87.5% when both factors were absent. CONCLUSIONS: Cerebellar atrophy shown by MRI was a frequent finding in surgically treated patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The presence of cerebellar atrophy seems to worsen the prognosis after temporal lobe resection. Images PMID:9153610

  7. Pre- and Postnatal Neuroimaging of Congenital Cerebellar Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-02-01

    The human cerebellum has a protracted development that makes it vulnerable to a broad spectrum of developmental disorders including malformations and disruptions. Starting from 19 to 20 weeks of gestation, prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reliably study the developing cerebellum. Pre- and postnatal neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnostic work-up of congenital cerebellar abnormalities. Diagnostic criteria for cerebellar malformations and disruptions are based mostly on neuroimaging findings. The diagnosis of a Dandy-Walker malformation is based on the presence of hypoplasia, elevation, and counterclockwise upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, which extends posteriorly filling out the posterior fossa. For the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome, the presence of the molar tooth sign (thickened, elongated, and horizontally orientated superior cerebellar peduncles and an abnormally deep interpeduncular fossa) is needed. The diagnostic criteria of rhombencephalosynapsis include a complete or partial absence of the cerebellar vermis and continuity of the cerebellar hemispheres across the midline. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia is defined by the complete aplasia or hypoplasia of one cerebellar hemisphere. Familiarity with these diagnostic criteria as well as the broad spectrum of additional neuroimaging findings is important for a correct pre- and postnatal diagnosis. A correct diagnosis is essential for management, prognosis, and counseling of the affected children and their family. PMID:26166429

  8. De novo cerebellar malignant glioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gliomas of the cerebellum are rare in adults, and their natural history and clinical behavior are not well known. Because cerebellar glioma is not usually diagnosed until clinical symptoms have appeared, no reports have described the developmental process of new cerebellar gliomas. We describe a case of de novo cerebellar anaplastic astrocytoma in which the developmental process was detected on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Presentation of case A 78-year-old man with a history of cerebral infarction was undergoing follow-up MRI every 6 months. This follow-up revealed a small abnormality in the left cerebellar hemisphere without clinical symptoms. Subsequent MRI showed lesion growth accompanying clinical symptoms. As cerebellar tumor was suspected, the lesion was extirpated. The histological diagnosis was anaplastic astrocytoma. Local recurrence developed and the patient died 20 months postoperatively. Discussion Cerebellar gliomas sometimes do not exhibit the common MRI findings of supratentorial gliomas, leading to difficulty with preoperative diagnosis. In this case, we initially diagnosed asymptomatic cerebellar infarction because the lesion was small and asymptomatic. The abnormal lesion gradually grew and clinical symptoms appeared. Cerebellar glioma may show few signs characteristic of tumor on MRI in the initial stages. Conclusion When MRI detects a new, faint abnormality in the cerebellum, close follow-up of clinical symptoms and MRI on suspicion of glioma is warranted PMID:27017277

  9. Increased cerebellar volume and BDNF level following quadrato motor training.

    PubMed

    Ben-Soussan, Tal Dotan; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Venditti, Sabrina; Verdone, Loredana; Caserta, Micaela; Carducci, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Using whole-brain structural measures coupled to analysis of salivary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), we demonstrate sensory motor training-induced plasticity, including cerebellar gray matter volume increment and increased BDNF level. The increase of cerebellar volume was positively correlated with the increase of BDNF level. PMID:25311848

  10. Dystonia and Cerebellar Degeneration in the Leaner Mouse Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Raike, Robert S.; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar degeneration is traditionally associated with ataxia. Yet, there are examples of both ataxia and dystonia occurring in individuals with cerebellar degeneration. There is also substantial evidence suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction alone may cause dystonia. The types of cerebellar defects that may cause ataxia, dystonia, or both have not been delineated. In the current study, we explored the relationship between cerebellar degeneration and dystonia using the leaner mouse mutant. Leaner mice have severe dystonia that is associated with dysfunctional and degenerating cerebellar Purkinje cells. Whereas the density of Purkinje cells was not significantly reduced in 4 week-old leaner mice, approximately 50% of the neurons were lost by 34 weeks of age. On the other hand, the dystonia and associated functional disability became significantly less severe during this same interval. In other words, dystonia improved as Purkinje cells were lost, suggesting that dysfunctional Purkinje cells, rather than Purkinje cell loss, contribute to the dystonia. These results provide evidence that distorted cerebellar function may cause dystonia and support the concept that different types of cerebellar defects can have different functional consequences. PMID:25791619

  11. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation. PMID:22012411

  12. Distinct Critical Cerebellar Subregions for Components of Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between…

  13. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique. PMID:25402966

  14. Process analysis of fluidized bed granulation.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, J; Jørgensen, A; Räsänen, E; Luukkonen, P; Airaksinen, S; Raiman, J; Hänninen, K; Antikainen, O; Yliruusi, J

    2001-01-01

    This study assesses the fluidized bed granulation process for the optimization of a model formulation using in-line near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for moisture determination. The granulation process was analyzed using an automated granulator and optimization of the verapamil hydrochloride formulation was performed using a mixture design. The NIR setup with a fixed wavelength detector was applied for moisture measurement. Information from other process measurements, temperature difference between process inlet air and granules (T(diff)), and water content of process air (AH), was also analyzed. The application of in-line NIR provided information related to the amount of water throughout the whole granulation process. This information combined with trend charts of T(diff) and AH enabled the analysis of the different process phases. By this means, we can obtain in-line documentation from all the steps of the processing. The choice of the excipient affected the nature of the solid-water interactions; this resulted in varying process times. NIR moisture measurement combined with temperature and humidity measurements provides a tool for the control of water during fluid bed granulation. PMID:14727858

  15. Role of Microtubules in Stress Granule Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Konstantin G.; Barbet, Aurélie; Hamon, Loic; Ovchinnikov, Lev P.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Pastré, David

    2009-01-01

    Following exposure to various stresses (arsenite, UV, hyperthermia, and hypoxia), mRNAs are assembled into large cytoplasmic bodies known as “stress granules,” in which mRNAs and associated proteins may be processed by specific enzymes for different purposes like transient storing, sorting, silencing, or other still unknown processes. To limit mRNA damage during stress, the assembly of micrometric granules has to be rapid, and, indeed, it takes only ∼10–20 min in living cells. However, such a rapid assembly breaks the rules of hindered diffusion in the cytoplasm, which states that large cytoplasmic bodies are almost immobile. In the present work, using HeLa cells and YB-1 protein as a stress granule marker, we studied three hypotheses to understand how cells overcome the limitation of hindered diffusion: shuttling of small messenger ribonucleoprotein particles from small to large stress granules, sliding of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles along microtubules, microtubule-mediated stirring of large stress granules. Our data favor the two last hypotheses and underline that microtubule dynamic instability favors the formation of micrometric stress granules. PMID:19843517

  16. Otogenic cerebellar abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Richter, Gresham T; Smith, Jason A; Dornhoffer, John L

    2009-04-01

    This case report describes the gradual deterioration of a healthy, highly functioning man who initially presented with a draining right ear. The patient's indolent neurologic decline and referral to an otologist ultimately led to the diagnosis and treatment of an otogenic cerebellar abscess, an increasingly rare intracranial complication of otitis media. We report this case to illustrate that severe complications of chronic otitis media still occur in the United States, to stress the importance of clinical suspicion in the postantibiotic era, and to review the literature regarding the most appropriate time to perform the otologic portion of the surgery. PMID:19358116

  17. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-09-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of 'restorable stage'. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  18. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    PubMed Central

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18–59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty. PMID:24106465

  19. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of ‘restorable stage’. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  20. [Familial cerebellar ataxia: clinical, radiological and electrophysiological findings].

    PubMed

    Gajkowski, K; Rysz, A; Walecki, J; Bojakowski, J

    1988-01-01

    A family with cerebellar ataxia of late onset occurring in four generations was observed. Neurological abnormalities included signs of cerebellar ataxia, pyramidal tract damage and damage to the peripheral motor neuron. Computerized tomography demonstrated in five out of six studied patients an image suggesting olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebellar structures, brainstem and cerebral hemispheres evidence of atrophy was detected. No correlation was demonstrated between the intensity of the clinical signs and the progression of changes in CT image. Electrophysiological investigations demonstrated changes compatible with damage to the motor and sensory fibres in the peripheral nerves and signs suggesting damage to the spinal motor neurons and pyramidal tract. These observations confirm the multilevel development of the process. The use of similar diagnostic methods will permit a more accurate classification of cerebellar ataxia and obtaining of better information for prognostication of individual cases. PMID:3164096

  1. [Modeling formation of aerobic granule and influence of hydrodynamic shear forces on granule diameter].

    PubMed

    Dong, Feng; Zhang, Han-Min; Yang, Feng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimension aerobic granule mathematical model was established, basing on mathematical biofilm model and activated sludge model. The model was used to simulate simple aerobic granule process such as nutrients removal, granule diameter evolution, cycle performance as well as depth profiles of DO and biomass. The effluent NH4(+) -N concentration decreased as the modeling processed. The simulation effluent NO3(-)-N concentration decreased to 3 mg x L(-1) as the granules grew. While the granule diameter increased from 1.1 mm on day 30 to 2.5 mm on day 100, the TN removal efficiency increased from less than 10% to 91%. The denitrification capacity was believed to enhance because the anoxic zone would be enlarged with the increasing granule diameter. The simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred inside the big aerobic granules. The oxygen permeating depth increased with the consumption of substrate. It was about 100-200 microm at the beginning of the aeration phase, and it turned to near 800 microm at the end of reaction. The autotrophs (AOB and NOB) were mostly located at the out layer where the DO concentration was high. The heterotrophic bacteria were distributed through the whole granule. As hydrodynamic shear coefficient k(de) increased from 0.25 (m x d)(-1) to 5 (m x d)(-1), the granule diameter under steady state decreased form 3.5 mm to 1.8 mm. The granule size under the dynamic steady-state decreased with the increasing hydrodynamic shear force. The granule size could be controlled by adjusting aeration intensity. PMID:22452208

  2. The evolution of the vertebrate cerebellum: absence of a proliferative external granule layer in a non-teleost ray-finned fish.

    PubMed

    Butts, Thomas; Modrell, Melinda S; Baker, Clare V H; Wingate, Richard J T

    2014-03-01

    The cerebellum represents one of the most morphologically variable structures in the vertebrate brain. To shed light on its evolutionary history, we have examined the molecular anatomy and proliferation of the developing cerebellum of the North American paddlefish, Polyodon spathula. Absence of an external proliferative cerebellar layer and the restriction of Atonal1 expression to the rhombic lip and valvular primordium demonstrate that transit amplification in a cerebellar external germinal layer, a prominent feature of amniote cerebellum development, is absent in paddlefish. Furthermore, expression of Sonic hedgehog, which drives secondary proliferation in the mouse cerebellum, is absent from the paddlefish cerebellum. These data are consistent with what has been observed in zebrafish and suggest that the transit amplification seen in the amniote cerebellum was either lost very early in the ray-finned fish lineage or evolved in the lobe-finned fish lineage. We also suggest that the Atoh1-positive proliferative valvular primordium may represent a synapomorphy (shared derived character) of ray-finned fishes. The topology of valvular primordium development in paddlefish differs significantly from that of zebrafish and correlates with the adult cerebellar form. The distribution of proliferative granule cell precursors in different vertebrate taxa is thus the likely determining factor in cerebellar morphological diversity. PMID:24617988

  3. Association of Primate Veterinarians 2014 Nonhuman Primate Housing Survey.

    PubMed

    Bennett, B Taylor

    2016-01-01

    The Board of Directors of the Association of Primate Veterinarians supported conducting a survey to determine how NHP were housed in USDA-registered research facilities. The data generated were to be used to refute allegations in a petition filed with the USDA by the New England Antivivisectionist Society, which alleged that the proportion of NHP housed singly had not improved since the implementation of the standards contained in §3.81 of the Animal Welfare Regulations. The survey gathered housing information on approximately 90% of the NHP housed in research facilities in FY2014. That information documented that the number of NHP housed in groups or pairs has increased by 20 percentage points to 84% since the USDA's survey conducted in 2000 and 2001. This article describes the methodology and approach used to conduct the survey, summarizes the data obtained, and discusses the meaning of those data. PMID:27025809

  4. Survival of interneurons and parallel fiber synapses in a cerebellar cortex deprived of Purkinje cells: studies in the double mutant mouse Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-).

    PubMed

    Zanjani, S Hadi; Selimi, Fekrije; Vogel, Michael W; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Boeuf, Julien; Mariani, Jean; Bailly, Yannick J

    2006-08-01

    The Lurcher mutation in the Grid2 gene causes the cell autonomous death of virtually all cerebellar Purkinje cells and the target-related death of 90% of the granule cells and 60-75% of the olivary neurons. Inactivation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family, in heterozygous Lurcher mutants (Grid2Lc/+) rescues approximately 60% of the granule cells, but does not rescue Purkinje or olivary neurons. Given the larger size of the cerebellar molecular layer in Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) double mutants compared to Grid2Lc/+ mutants, we analyzed the survival of the stellate and basket interneurons as well as the synaptic connectivity of parallel fibers originating from the surviving granule cells in the absence of their Purkinje cell targets in the Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) cerebellum. Quantification showed a significantly higher density of interneurons ( approximately 60%) in the molecular layer of the Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) mice compared to Grid2Lc/+, suggesting that interneurons are subject to a BAX-dependent target-related death in the Lurcher mutants. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed the normal ultrastructural aspect of a number of parallel fibers in the molecular layer of the Grid2Lc/+; Bax(-/-) double mutant mice and preserved their numerous synaptic contacts on interneurons, suggesting that interneurons could play a trophic role for axon terminals of surviving granule cells. Finally, parallel fibers varicosities in the double mutant established "pseudo-synapses" on glia as well as displayed autophagic profiles, suggesting that the connections established by the parallel fibers in the absence of their Purkinje cell targets were subject to a high turnover involving autophagy. PMID:16739195

  5. Special issue: Comparative biogeography of Neotropical primates.

    PubMed

    Lynch Alfaro, Jessica W; Cortés-Ortiz, Liliana; Di Fiore, Anthony; Boubli, Jean P

    2015-01-01

    New research presented in this special issue of Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution on the "Phylogeny and Biogeography of Neotropical Primates" greatly improves our understanding of the evolutionary history of the New World monkeys and provides insights into the multiple platyrrhine radiations, diversifications, extinctions, and recolonizations that have taken place over time and over space in the Neotropics. Here, we synthesize genetic and biogeographic research from the past several years to construct an overarching hypothesis for platyrrhine evolution. We also highlight continuing controversies in Neotropical primate biogeography, such as whether the location of origin of platyrrhines was Africa or Asia; whether Patagonian fossil primates are stem or crown platyrrhines; and whether cis- and trans-Andean Neotropical primates were subject to vicariance through Andes mountain building, or instead diversified through isolation in mountain valleys after skirting around the Andes on the northwestern coast of South America. We also consider the role of the Amazon River and its major tributaries in shaping platyrrhine biodiversity, and how and when primates from the Amazon reached the Atlantic Forest. A key focus is on primate colonizations and extirpations in Central America, the Andes, and the seasonally dry tropical forests and savannas (such as the Llanos, Caatinga, and Cerrado habitats), all ecosystems that have been understudied up until now for primates. We suggest that most primates currently inhabiting drier open habitats are relatively recent arrivals, having expanded from rainforest habitats in the Pleistocene. We point to the Pitheciidae as the taxonomic group most in need of further phylogenetic and biogeographic research. Additionally, genomic studies on the Platyrrhini are deeply needed and are expected to bring new surprises and insights to the field of Neotropical primate biogeography. PMID:25451803

  6. Insights into cerebellar development and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar development is an extensive process that begins during early embryonic stages and persists more than one year after birth in human. Therefore, the cerebellum is susceptible to acquire various developmental abnormalities leading to numerous diseases such as medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor. One third of the patients with medulloblastoma are incurable and survivors have a poor quality of life due to the aggressiveness of the broad-spectrum treatments. Within the past few years, it has been highlighted that medulloblastoma is a heterogeneous disease that is divided in four molecular subgroups. This recent advance in the field, combined with the development of associated preclinical models for each subgroup, should enable, in the future, the discovery and use of targeted therapy in clinical treatments for each subtype of medulloblastoma. In this review, we first aim to show how deregulation of cerebellar development can lead to medulloblastoma formation and then to present the advances in the molecular subgrouping of medulloblastoma and the associated preclinical models. PMID:26688373

  7. Oligocene primates from China reveal divergence between African and Asian primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xijun; Li, Qiang; Li, Lüzhou; Beard, K Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Profound environmental and faunal changes are associated with climatic deterioration during the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) roughly 34 million years ago. Reconstructing how Asian primates responded to the EOT has been hindered by a sparse record of Oligocene primates on that continent. Here, we report the discovery of a diverse primate fauna from the early Oligocene of southern China. In marked contrast to Afro-Arabian Oligocene primate faunas, this Asian fauna is dominated by strepsirhines. There appears to be a strong break between Paleogene and Neogene Asian anthropoid assemblages. Asian and Afro-Arabian primate faunas responded differently to EOT climatic deterioration, indicating that the EOT functioned as a critical evolutionary filter constraining the subsequent course of primate evolution across the Old World. PMID:27151861

  8. Primates in 21st century ecosystems: does primate conservation promote ecosystem conservation?

    PubMed

    Norconk, Marilyn A; Boinski, Sue; Forget, Pierre-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the American Journal of Primatology were among the participants in an invited symposium at the 2008 Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation meeting in Paramaribo, Suriname. They were asked to assess how essential primates are to tropical ecosystems and, given their research interests, discuss how primate research contributes to the broader understanding about how ecosystems function. This introduction to the issue is divided into three parts: a review of the roles that nonhuman primates play in tropical ecosystems; the implementation of large-scale landscape methods used to identify primate densities; and concerns about the increasingly porous boundaries between humans, nonhuman primates, and pathogens. Although 20th century primate research created a rich database on individual species, including both theoretical and descriptive approaches, the dual effects of high human population densities and widespread habitat destruction should warn us that creative, interdisciplinary and human-related research is needed to solve 21st century problems. PMID:20677224

  9. The Automated Primate Research Laboratory (APRL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a self-contained automated primate research laboratory to study the effects of weightlessness on subhuman primates. Physiological parameters such as hemodynamics, respiration, blood constituents, waste, and diet and nutrition are analyzed for abnormalities in the simulated space environment. The Southeast Asian pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemistrina) was selected for the experiments owing to its relative intelligence and learning capacity. The objective of the program is to demonstrate the feasibility of a man-tended primate space flight experiment.

  10. Properties of cerebellar fastigial neurons during translation, rotation, and eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Ghasia, Fatema F.; Dickman, J. David; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2005-01-01

    The most medial of the deep cerebellar nuclei, the fastigial nucleus (FN), receives sensory vestibular information and direct inhibition from the cerebellar vermis. We investigated the signal processing in the primate FN by recording single-unit activities during translational motion, rotational motion, and eye movements. Firing rate modulation during horizontal plane translation in the absence of eye movements was observed in all non-eye-movement-sensitive cells and 26% of the pursuit eye-movement-sensitive neurons in the caudal FN. Many non-eye-movement-sensitive cells recorded in the rostral FN of three fascicularis monkeys exhibited convergence of signals from both the otolith organs and the semicircular canals. At low frequencies of translation, the majority of these rostral FN cells changed their firing rates in phase with head velocity rather than linear acceleration. As frequency increased, FN vestibular neurons exhibited a wide range of response dynamics with most cells being characterized by increasing phase leads as a function of frequency. Unlike cells in the vestibular nuclei, none of the rostral FN cells responded to rotational motion alone, without simultaneously exhibiting sensitivity to translational motion. Modulation during earth-horizontal axis rotation was observed in more than half (77%) of the neurons, although with smaller gains than during translation. In contrast, only 47% of the cells changed their firing rates during earth-vertical axis rotations in the absence of a dynamic linear acceleration stimulus. These response properties suggest that the rostral FN represents a main processing center of otolith-driven information for inertial motion detection and spatial orientation.

  11. An internal model architecture for novelty detection: implications for cerebellar and collicular roles in sensory processing.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sean R; Porrill, John; Pearson, Martin J; Pipe, Anthony G; Prescott, Tony J; Dean, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is thought to implement internal models for sensory prediction, but details of the underlying circuitry are currently obscure. We therefore investigated a specific example of internal-model based sensory prediction, namely detection of whisker contacts during whisking. Inputs from the vibrissae in rats can be affected by signals generated by whisker movement, a phenomenon also observable in whisking robots. Robot novelty-detection can be improved by adaptive noise-cancellation, in which an adaptive filter learns a forward model of the whisker plant that allows the sensory effects of whisking to be predicted and thus subtracted from the noisy sensory input. However, the forward model only uses information from an efference copy of the whisking commands. Here we show that the addition of sensory information from the whiskers allows the adaptive filter to learn a more complex internal model that performs more robustly than the forward model, particularly when the whisking-induced interference has a periodic structure. We then propose a neural equivalent of the circuitry required for adaptive novelty-detection in the robot, in which the role of the adaptive filter is carried out by the cerebellum, with the comparison of its output (an estimate of the self-induced interference) and the original vibrissal signal occurring in the superior colliculus, a structure noted for its central role in novelty detection. This proposal makes a specific prediction concerning the whisker-related functions of a region in cerebellar cortical zone A(2) that in rats receives climbing fibre input from the superior colliculus (via the inferior olive). This region has not been observed in non-whisking animals such as cats and primates, and its functional role in vibrissal processing has hitherto remained mysterious. Further investigation of this system may throw light on how cerebellar-based internal models could be used in broader sensory, motor and cognitive contexts. PMID

  12. Septo-temporal distribution and lineage progression of hippocampal neurogenesis in a primate (Callithrix jacchus) in comparison to mice

    PubMed Central

    Amrein, Irmgard; Nosswitz, Michael; Slomianka, Lutz; van Dijk, R. Maarten; Engler, Stefanie; Klaus, Fabienne; Raineteau, Olivier; Azim, Kasum

    2015-01-01

    Adult born neurons in the hippocampus show species-specific differences in their numbers, the pace of their maturation and their spatial distribution. Here, we present quantitative data on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in a New World primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) that demonstrate parts of the lineage progression and age-related changes. Proliferation was largely (∼70%) restricted to stem cells or early progenitor cells, whilst the remainder of the cycling pool could be assigned almost exclusively to Tbr2+ intermediate precursor cells in both neonate and adult animals (20–122 months). Proliferating DCX+ neuroblasts were virtually absent in adults, although rare MCM2+/DCX+ co-expression revealed a small, persisting proliferative potential. Co-expression of DCX with calretinin was very limited in marmosets, suggesting that these markers label distinct maturational stages. In adult marmosets, numbers of MCM2+, Ki67+, and significantly Tbr2+, DCX+, and CR+ cells declined with age. The distributions of granule cells, proliferating cells and DCX+ young neurons along the hippocampal longitudinal axis were equal in marmosets and mice. In both species, a gradient along the hippocampal septo-temporal axis was apparent for DCX+ and resident granule cells. Both cell numbers are higher septally than temporally, whilst proliferating cells were evenly distributed along this axis. Relative to resident granule cells, however, the ratio of proliferating cells and DCX+ neurons remained constant in the septal, middle, and temporal hippocampus. In marmosets, the extended phase of the maturation of young neurons that characterizes primate hippocampal neurogenesis was due to the extension in a large CR+/DCX- cell population. This clear dissociation between DCX+ and CR+ young neurons has not been reported for other species and may therefore represent a key primate-specific feature of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26175670

  13. Prenatal Cerebellar Disruptions: Neuroimaging Spectrum of Findings in Correlation with Likely Mechanisms and Etiologies of Injury.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cerebellum is susceptible to prenatal infections and hemorrhages and that congenital morphologic anomalies of the cerebellum may be caused by disruptive (acquired) causes. Starting from the neuroimaging pattern, this report describes a spectrum of prenatal cerebellar disruptions including cerebellar agenesis, unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia, cerebellar cleft, global cerebellar hypoplasia, and vanishing cerebellum in Chiari type II malformation. The neuroimaging findings, possible causative disruptive events, and clinical features of each disruption are discussed. Recognition of cerebellar disruptions and their differentiation from cerebellar malformations is important in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, and genetic counselling. PMID:27423799

  14. Strengthening aerobic granule by salt precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-You; Pan, Xiangliang; Li, Jun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Structural stability of aerobic granules is generally poor during long-term operation. This study precipitated seven salts inside aerobic granules using supersaturated solutions of (NH4)3PO4, CaCO3, CaSO4, MgCO3, Mg3(PO4)2, Ca3(PO4)2 or SiO2 to enhance their structural stability. All precipitated granules have higher interior strength at ultrasonic field and reveal minimal loss in organic matter degradation capability at 160-d sequential batch reactor tests. The strength enhancement followed: Mg3(PO4)2=CaSO4>SiO2>(NH4)3PO4>MgCO3>CaCO3=Ca3(PO4)2>original. Also, the intra-granular solution environment can be buffered by the precipitate MgCO3 to make the aerobic granules capable of degradation of organic matters at pH 3. Salt precipitation is confirmed a simple and cost-effective modification method to extend the applicability of aerobic granules for wastewater treatments. PMID:27377228

  15. Formation of volutin granules in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Pallerla, Srinivas Reddy; Knebel, Sandra; Polen, Tino; Klauth, Peter; Hollender, Juliane; Wendisch, Volker F; Schoberth, Siegfried M

    2005-02-01

    Volutin granules are intracellular storages of complexed inorganic polyphosphate (poly P). Histochemical staining procedures differentiate between pathogenic corynebacteria such as Corynebacterum diphtheriae (containing volutin) and non-pathogenic species, such as C. glutamicum. Here we report that strains ATCC13032 and MH20-22B of the non-pathogenic C. glutamicum also formed subcellular entities (18-37% of the total cell volume) that had the typical characteristics of volutin granules: (i) volutin staining, (ii) green UV fluorescence when stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, (iii) electron-dense and rich in phosphorus when determined with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis, and (iv) 31P NMR poly P resonances of isolated granules dissolved in EDTA. MgCl2 addition to the growth medium stimulated granule formation but did not effect expression of genes involved in poly P metabolism. Granular volutin fractions from lysed cells contained polyphosphate glucokinase as detected by SDS-PAGE/MALDI-TOF, indicating that this poly P metabolizing enzyme is present also in intact poly P granules. The results suggest that formation of volutin is a more widespread phenomenon than generally accepted. PMID:15668011

  16. Granulation in saturnian rings and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    The third theorem of the wave planetary tectonics [1-3 & others] states: "Celestial bodies are granular". It means that inertia-gravity waves appearing in bodies due to their movements in non-circular keplerian orbits and propagating in them in four interfering orthogonal and diagonal directions produce tectonic granules. They are of three kinds: uprising (+), subsiding (-) and neutral (0). Their sizes are inversely proportional to bodies orbital frequencies. Higher frequency - smaller granule, lower frequency - larger granule. The inertia-gravity waves warp all spheres of celestial bodies: solid, liquid, gaseous, and act in stars, planets, asteroids, comets and satellites. The Cassini data provide numerous excellent images of saturnian rings and show that wave processes are ordinary also in them - in disperse solid environment. To illustrate dependence between orbital frequencies and granule sizes we provide the following geometrical representation of the planetary row starting from the solar photosphere also having a certain orbital frequency about the center of the Solar system (Fig. 1). This row can be extended in domain of the outer planets by the same algorithm: Jupiter 3πR, Saturn 7.5πR, Uranus 21πR, Neptune 41πR, Pluto 62πR. One cannot directly observe these huge waves in the planets but they are needed for wave modulation procedures very important for satellites and rings having two orbital frequencies: around the star and planets. A recent support for the wave structurization in the Solar system came from Saturn where 22 year long ground-based temperature observations discovered a wave-like oscillation: hotcold pattern switches every Saturn half-year = 15 Earth's years [4]. Like in the radio-wave physics the lower orbiting frequency of the Saturn's system around Sun modulates the higher orbiting frequencies of the system satellites, rings and the planet's upper atmosphere about the Saturn `s system center. . The higher frequency is multiplied and

  17. Denitrification in USB reactor with granulated biomass.

    PubMed

    Pagácová, P; Galbová, K; Drtil, M; Jonatová, I

    2010-01-01

    Denitrification of low concentrations of NO(3)-N (20 mg L(-1)), with methanol as an organic carbon source (COD:NO(3)-N=6) in laboratory upflow sludge bed reactor (USB), was tested as a possibility for wastewater post-treatment. By gradual increase of volumetric loading (Bv) and hydraulic loading (gamma), anoxic biomass spontaneously granulated out even from flocculate activated sludge and from anaerobic granulated sludge as well. Anaerobic granulated biomass derived from high-rate anaerobic IC reactor was a far better inoculum for anoxic granulation and for denitrification in the USB reactor. The maximum level of Bv and gamma was remarkably higher with the use of anaerobic granulated inoculum, (19-22 kg COD m(-3)d(-1); 3.2-3.7 kg NO(3)-Nm(-3)d(-1); 2.8-3.2m(3)m(-2)h(-1); SVI=15 mL g(-1)) in comparison to inoculum from flocculate activated sludge (4.2-8.1 kg CO Dm(-3)d(-1); 0.7-1.4 kg NO(3)-Nm(-3)d(-1); 0.7-1.15m(3)m(-2)h(-1); SVI=40-95 mL g(-1)). PMID:19716692

  18. The evolution of granule fracture strength as a function of impeller tip speed and granule size for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Wade, J B; Martin, G P; Long, D F

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process has been established previously and several potential advantages over the conventional process have been highlighted (Wade et al., 2014a,b,b). Due to fundamental differences in the growth mechanism and granule consolidation behaviour between the two processes the reverse-phase approach generally formed granules with a greater mass mean diameter and a lower intragranular porosity than those formed by the conventional granulation process under the same liquid saturation and impeller tip speed conditions. The lower intragranular porosity was hypothesised to result in an increase in the granule strength and subsequent decrease in tablet tensile strength. Consequently, the aim of this study was to compare the effect of impeller tip speed and granule size on the strength and compaction properties of granules prepared using both the reverse-phase and conventional granulation processes. For the conventional granulation process an increase in the impeller tip speed from 1.57 to 4.71 ms(-1) (200-600 RPM) resulted in an increase in the mean granule strength (p<0.05) for all granule size fractions and as the granule size fraction increased from 425-600 to 2000-3350 μm the mean fracture strength decreased (p<0.05). For the reverse-phase process an increase in impeller tip speed had no effect (p>0.05) on mean granule strength whereas, like the conventional process, an increase in granule size fraction from 425-600 to 2000-3350 μm resulted in a decrease (p<0.05) in the mean fracture strength. No correlation was found between mean granule fracture strength and the tablet tensile strength (p>0.05) for either granulation approach. These data support the rejection of the original hypothesis which stated that an increase in granule strength may result in a decrease in the tablet tensile strength. The similar tablet tensile strength observed between the conventional and reverse-phase granulation processes indicated that

  19. Contribution of Cerebellar Sensorimotor Adaptation to Hippocampal Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Jean-Baptiste; Sheynikhovich, Denis; Duvelle, Éléonore; Arleo, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation. PMID:22485133

  20. Neural correlates of impaired emotional face recognition in cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Adamaszek, Michael; Kirkby, Kenneth C; D'Agata, Fedrico; Olbrich, Sebastian; Langner, Sönke; Steele, Christopher; Sehm, Bernhard; Busse, Stefan; Kessler, Christof; Hamm, Alfons

    2015-07-10

    Clinical and neuroimaging data indicate a cerebellar contribution to emotional processing, which may account for affective-behavioral disturbances in patients with cerebellar lesions. We studied the neurophysiology of cerebellar involvement in recognition of emotional facial expression. Participants comprised eight patients with discrete ischemic cerebellar lesions and eight control patients without any cerebrovascular stroke. Event-related potentials (ERP) were used to measure responses to faces from the Karolinska Directed Emotional Faces Database (KDEF), interspersed in a stream of images with salient contents. Images of faces augmented N170 in both groups, but increased late positive potential (LPP) only in control patients without brain lesions. Dipole analysis revealed altered activation patterns for negative emotions in patients with cerebellar lesions, including activation of the left inferior prefrontal area to images of faces showing fear, contralateral to controls. Correlation analysis indicated that lesions of cerebellar area Crus I contribute to ERP deviations. Overall, our results implicate the cerebellum in integrating emotional information at different higher order stages, suggesting distinct cerebellar contributions to the proposed large-scale cerebral network of emotional face recognition. PMID:25912431

  1. Cerebellar Processing of Sensory Inputs Primes Motor Cortex Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, B.; Hubsch, C.; Pradeep, S.; Roze, E.; Vidailhet, M.; Meunier, S.; Kishore, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity of the human primary motor cortex (M1) has a critical role in motor control and learning. The cerebellum facilitates these functions using sensory feedback. We investigated whether cerebellar processing of sensory afferent information influences the plasticity of the primary motor cortex (M1). Theta-burst stimulation protocols (TBS), both excitatory and inhibitory, were used to modulate the excitability of the posterior cerebellar cortex and to condition an ongoing M1 plasticity. M1 plasticity was subsequently induced in 2 different ways: by paired associative stimulation (PAS) involving sensory processing and TBS that exclusively involves intracortical circuits of M1. Cerebellar excitation attenuated the PAS-induced M1 plasticity, whereas cerebellar inhibition enhanced and prolonged it. Furthermore, cerebellar inhibition abolished the topography-specific response of PAS-induced M1 plasticity, with the effects spreading to adjacent motor maps. Conversely, cerebellar excitation had no effect on the TBS-induced M1 plasticity. This demonstrates the key role of the cerebellum in priming M1 plasticity, and we propose that it is likely to occur at the thalamic or olivo-dentate nuclear level by influencing the sensory processing. We suggest that such a cerebellar priming of M1 plasticity could shape the impending motor command by favoring or inhibiting the recruitment of several muscle representations. PMID:22351647

  2. Developmental dyslexia and widespread activation across the cerebellar hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Baillieux, Hanne; Vandervliet, Everhard J M; Manto, Mario; Parizel, Paul M; De Deyn, Peter P; Mariën, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Developmental dyslexia is the most common learning disability in school-aged children with an estimated incidence of five to ten percent. The cause and pathophysiological substrate of this developmental disorder is unclear. Recently, a possible involvement of the cerebellum in the pathogenesis of dyslexia has been postulated. In this study, 15 dyslexic children and 7 age-matched control subjects were investigated by means of functional neuroimaging (fMRI) using a noun-verb association paradigm. Comparison of activation patterns between dyslexic and control subjects revealed distinct and significant differences in cerebral and cerebellar activation. Control subjects showed bilaterally well-defined and focal activation patterns in the frontal and parietal lobes and the posterior regions of the cerebellar hemispheres. The dyslexic children, however, presented widespread and diffuse activations on the cerebral and cerebellar level. Cerebral activations were found in frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions. Activations in the cerebellum were found predominantly in the cerebellar cortex, including Crus I, Crus II, hemispheric lobule VI, VII and vermal lobules I, II, III, IV and VII. This preliminary study is the first to reveal a significant difference in cerebellar functioning between dyslexic children and controls during a semantic association task. As a result, we propose a new hypothesis regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms of developmental dyslexia. Given the sites of activation in the cerebellum in the dyslexic group, a defect of the intra-cerebellar distribution of activity is suspected, suggesting a disorder of the processing or transfer of information within the cerebellar cortex. PMID:18986695

  3. Update on the pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and central vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Roger; Teufel, Julian; Feil, Katharina; Muth, Caroline; Strupp, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An overview of the current pharmacotherapy of central vestibular syndromes and the most common forms of central nystagmus as well as cerebellar disorders is given. 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) is recommended for the treatment of downbeat nystagmus, a frequent form of acquired persisting fixation nystagmus, and upbeat nystagmus. Animal studies showed that this non-selective blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels increases Purkinje cell excitability and normalizes the irregular firing rate, so that the inhibitory influence of the cerebellar cortex on vestibular and deep cerebellar nuclei is restored. The efficacy of 4-AP in episodic ataxia type 2, which is most often caused by mutations of the PQ-calcium channel, was demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial. It was also shown in an animal model (the tottering mouse) of episodic ataxia type 2. In a case series, chlorzoxazone, a non-selective activator of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, was shown to reduce the DBN. The efficacy of acetyl-DL-leucine as a potential new symptomatic treatment for cerebellar diseases has been demonstrated in three case series. The ongoing randomized controlled trials on episodic ataxia type 2 (sustained-release form of 4-aminopyridine vs. acetazolamide vs. placebo; EAT2TREAT), vestibular migraine with metoprolol (PROVEMIG-trial), cerebellar gait disorders (sustained-release form of 4-aminopyridine vs. placebo; FACEG) and cerebellar ataxia (acetyl-DL-leucine vs. placebo; ALCAT) will provide new insights into the pharmacotherapy of cerebellar and central vestibular disorders. PMID:27083881

  4. Biokinetics of Plutonium in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Deepesh; Guilmette, Raymond A; Gesell, Thomas F; Harris, Jason T; Brey, Richard R

    2016-10-01

    A major source of data on metabolism, excretion and retention of plutonium comes from experimental animal studies. Although old world monkeys are one of the closest living relatives to humans, certain physiological differences do exist between these nonhuman primates and humans. The objective of this paper was to describe the metabolism of plutonium in nonhuman primates using the bioassay and retention data obtained from macaque monkeys injected with plutonium citrate. A biokinetic model for nonhuman primates was developed by adapting the basic model structure and adapting the transfer rates described for metabolism of plutonium in adult humans. Significant changes to the parameters were necessary to explain the shorter retention of plutonium in liver and skeleton of the nonhuman primates, differences in liver to bone partitioning ratio, and significantly higher excretion of plutonium in feces compared to that in humans. PMID:27575347

  5. The use of nonhuman primates in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, R. C. (Editor); Bourne, G. H. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Space related biomedical research involving nonhuman primates is reviewed. The scientific assets of various species and the instruments used for monitoring physiological processes during long duration experimentations are described.

  6. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  7. Variant PTA Terminating in Cerebellar Artery, Associated with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Yeong Uk

    2016-01-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is one of the remnant fetal anastomoses between the carotid artery and basilar artery. PTAs are classified according to angiographic appearance and various connection. Among them, those directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries are rare subtype. In addition, aneurysms of the PTA are unusual in the literature and have not previously accompanied this subtype of PTA connecting cerebellar artery. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA which is directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries and combined with multiple aneurysms. PMID:27446623

  8. Variant PTA Terminating in Cerebellar Artery, Associated with Multiple Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yeong Uk; Kim, Jin Woo

    2016-01-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is one of the remnant fetal anastomoses between the carotid artery and basilar artery. PTAs are classified according to angiographic appearance and various connection. Among them, those directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries are rare subtype. In addition, aneurysms of the PTA are unusual in the literature and have not previously accompanied this subtype of PTA connecting cerebellar artery. We present the first case of an aneurysm of the PTA which is directly terminating in the cerebellar arteries and combined with multiple aneurysms. PMID:27446623

  9. The combined effect of wet granulation process parameters and dried granule moisture content on tablet quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Gabbott, Ian P; Al Husban, Farhan; Reynolds, Gavin K

    2016-09-01

    A pharmaceutical compound was used to study the effect of batch wet granulation process parameters in combination with the residual moisture content remaining after drying on granule and tablet quality attributes. The effect of three batch wet granulation process parameters was evaluated using a multivariate experimental design, with a novel constrained design space. Batches were characterised for moisture content, granule density, crushing strength, porosity, disintegration time and dissolution. Mechanisms of the effect of the process parameters on the granule and tablet quality attributes are proposed. Water quantity added during granulation showed a significant effect on granule density and tablet dissolution rate. Mixing time showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength, and mixing speed showed a significant effect on the distribution of tablet crushing strengths obtained. The residual moisture content remaining after granule drying showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength. The effect of moisture on tablet tensile strength has been reported before, but not in combination with granulation parameters and granule properties, and the impact on tablet dissolution was not assessed. Correlations between the energy input during granulation, the density of granules produced, and the quality attributes of the final tablets were also identified. Understanding the impact of the granulation and drying process parameters on granule and tablet properties provides a basis for process optimisation and scaling. PMID:27016211

  10. A Mitogenomic Phylogeny of Living Primates

    PubMed Central

    Finstermeier, Knut; Zinner, Dietmar; Brameier, Markus; Meyer, Matthias; Kreuz, Eva; Hofreiter, Michael; Roos, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Primates, the mammalian order including our own species, comprise 480 species in 78 genera. Thus, they represent the third largest of the 18 orders of eutherian mammals. Although recent phylogenetic studies on primates are increasingly built on molecular datasets, most of these studies have focused on taxonomic subgroups within the order. Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes have proven to be extremely useful in deciphering within-order relationships even up to deep nodes. Using 454 sequencing, we sequenced 32 new complete mt genomes adding 20 previously not represented genera to the phylogenetic reconstruction of the primate tree. With 13 new sequences, the number of complete mt genomes within the parvorder Platyrrhini was widely extended, resulting in a largely resolved branching pattern among New World monkey families. We added 10 new Strepsirrhini mt genomes to the 15 previously available ones, thus almost doubling the number of mt genomes within this clade. Our data allow precise date estimates of all nodes and offer new insights into primate evolution. One major result is a relatively young date for the most recent common ancestor of all living primates which was estimated to 66-69 million years ago, suggesting that the divergence of extant primates started close to the K/T-boundary. Although some relationships remain unclear, the large number of mt genomes used allowed us to reconstruct a robust primate phylogeny which is largely in agreement with previous publications. Finally, we show that mt genomes are a useful tool for resolving primate phylogenetic relationships on various taxonomic levels. PMID:23874967

  11. Antimicrobial-Coated Granules for Disinfecting Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.; Kliestik, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Methods of preparing antimicrobialcoated granules for disinfecting flowing potable water have been developed. Like the methods reported in the immediately preceding article, these methods involve chemical preparation of substrate surfaces (in this case, the surfaces of granules) to enable attachment of antimicrobial molecules to the surfaces via covalent bonds. A variety of granular materials have been coated with a variety of antimicrobial agents that include antibiotics, bacteriocins, enzymes, bactericides, and fungicides. When employed in packed beds in flowing water, these antimicrobial-coated granules have been proven effective against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Composite beds, consisting of multiple layers containing different granular antimicrobial media, have proven particularly effective against a broad spectrum of microorganisms. These media have also proven effective in enhancing or potentiating the biocidal effects of in-line iodinated resins and of very low levels of dissolved elemental iodine.

  12. Differential involvement of protein kinase C in transmitter release and response to excitatory amino acids in cultured cerebellar neurons.

    PubMed

    Eboli, M L; Ciotti, M T; Mercanti, D; Calissano, P

    1993-02-01

    Cerebellar granule cells cultured in the presence of a differentiating factor isolated from rabbit serum exhibit, at variance with those cultured in fetal calf serum, an almost complete resistance to excitatory aminoacid (EAA)-induced cytotoxicity. We investigated the behaviour of protein kinase C (PKC), strongly implicated in EAA cytotoxicity, in the two types of culture. Phorbol esters, used to monitor the enzyme, enhanced the depolarization-evoked release of D-[3H]aspartate, but less effectively in factor-conditioned cells. EAAs increased phorbol esters binding in both cultures, but the effect was briefly lasting in factor-conditioned cells. The different behaviour of PKC is postulated to be causally related to different response to EAA of the cultures. PMID:8097287

  13. Contextualising primate origins--an ecomorphological framework.

    PubMed

    Soligo, Christophe; Smaers, Jeroen B

    2016-04-01

    Ecomorphology - the characterisation of the adaptive relationship between an organism's morphology and its ecological role - has long been central to theories of the origin and early evolution of the primate order. This is exemplified by two of the most influential theories of primate origins: Matt Cartmill's Visual Predation Hypothesis, and Bob Sussman's Angiosperm Co-Evolution Hypothesis. However, the study of primate origins is constrained by the absence of data directly documenting the events under investigation, and has to rely instead on a fragmentary fossil record and the methodological assumptions inherent in phylogenetic comparative analyses of extant species. These constraints introduce particular challenges for inferring the ecomorphology of primate origins, as morphology and environmental context must first be inferred before the relationship between the two can be considered. Fossils can be integrated in comparative analyses and observations of extant model species and laboratory experiments of form-function relationships are critical for the functional interpretation of the morphology of extinct species. Recent developments have led to important advancements, including phylogenetic comparative methods based on more realistic models of evolution, and improved methods for the inference of clade divergence times, as well as an improved fossil record. This contribution will review current perspectives on the origin and early evolution of primates, paying particular attention to their phylogenetic (including cladistic relationships and character evolution) and environmental (including chronology, geography, and physical environments) contextualisation, before attempting an up-to-date ecomorphological synthesis of primate origins. PMID:26830706

  14. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sun; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes. PMID:26090078

  15. Toxoplasma secretory granules: one population or more?

    PubMed

    Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, dense granules are known as the storage secretory organelles of the so-called GRA proteins (for dense granule proteins), which are destined to the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and the PV-derived cyst wall. Recently, newly annotated GRA proteins targeted to the host cell nucleus have enlarged this view. Here we provide an update on the latest developments on the Toxoplasma secreted proteins, which to date have been mainly studied at both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages, and we point out that recent discoveries could open the issue of a possible, yet uncharacterized, distinct secretory pathway in Toxoplasma. PMID:25599584

  16. Formulation of custom sized LX-15 granules

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, T.W.

    1980-04-01

    LX-15 is a booster explosive formulation consisting of 95% HNS I and 5% Kel F-800 developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The purpose of this effort was to develop formulation techniques for the production of custom size granules that are amenable for processing in automatic weighing equipment. This report details processes whereby 0.4 and 1.5 kg size batches are produced, meeting those requirements. Efforts to date have found that granule size is dependent on batch/vessel size, water-to-solvent ratio and the degree of vessel agitation.

  17. Process for producing zirconium based granules

    SciTech Connect

    Jade, S.S.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production f amorphous zirconium based granules. It comprises: adding about 2--15 wt % of a suitable phase stabilizer to an aqueous solutio, based upon the total weight of ZrO{sub 2} in solution, to produce an aqueous solution having a pH in the range of about 4 to 7 comprising a zirconium based complex and phase stabilizer and thereafter; drying the aqueous solution comprising the zirconium based complex and the phase stabilizer at a temperature below about 180{degrees} C. for a time sufficient to evaporate the aqueous solution thereby forming amorphous zirconium based granules containing the phase stabilizer.

  18. Gene expression signature of cerebellar hypoplasia in a mouse model of Down syndrome during postnatal development

    PubMed Central

    Laffaire, Julien; Rivals, Isabelle; Dauphinot, Luce; Pasteau, Fabien; Wehrle, Rosine; Larrat, Benoit; Vitalis, Tania; Moldrich, Randal X; Rossier, Jean; Sinkus, Ralph; Herault, Yann; Dusart, Isabelle; Potier, Marie-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Background Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21. The mechanisms by which this aneuploidy produces the complex and variable phenotype observed in people with Down syndrome are still under discussion. Recent studies have demonstrated an increased transcript level of the three-copy genes with some dosage compensation or amplification for a subset of them. The impact of this gene dosage effect on the whole transcriptome is still debated and longitudinal studies assessing the variability among samples, tissues and developmental stages are needed. Results We thus designed a large scale gene expression study in mice (the Ts1Cje Down syndrome mouse model) in which we could measure the effects of trisomy 21 on a large number of samples (74 in total) in a tissue that is affected in Down syndrome (the cerebellum) and where we could quantify the defect during postnatal development in order to correlate gene expression changes to the phenotype observed. Statistical analysis of microarray data revealed a major gene dosage effect: for the three-copy genes as well as for a 2 Mb segment from mouse chromosome 12 that we show for the first time as being deleted in the Ts1Cje mice. This gene dosage effect impacts moderately on the expression of euploid genes (2.4 to 7.5% differentially expressed). Only 13 genes were significantly dysregulated in Ts1Cje mice at all four postnatal development stages studied from birth to 10 days after birth, and among them are 6 three-copy genes. The decrease in granule cell proliferation demonstrated in newborn Ts1Cje cerebellum was correlated with a major gene dosage effect on the transcriptome in dissected cerebellar external granule cell layer. Conclusion High throughput gene expression analysis in the cerebellum of a large number of samples of Ts1Cje and euploid mice has revealed a prevailing gene dosage effect on triplicated genes. Moreover using an enriched cell population that is thought

  19. Granule size distributions after twin-screw granulation - Do not forget the feeding systems.

    PubMed

    Meier, R; Thommes, M; Rasenack, N; Moll, K-P; Krumme, M; Kleinebudde, P

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of qualitatively different powder feeder performances on resulting granule size distributions after twin-screw granulation of a highly drug loaded, hydrophobic mixture and a mannitol powder. It was shown that powder feeder related problems usually cannot be identified by trusting in the values given by the feeder. Therefore, a newly developed model for the evaluation of the performance of powder feeders was introduced and it was tried to connect this model to residence time distributions in twin-screw granulation processes. The influence of feeder performances on resulting granule size distributions varied, depending on the applied screw configuration and the used powder. Regarding the hydrophobic and highly drug loaded formulation, which was granulated at an L/S-ratio of 0.5, a pure conveying screw and a medium kneading configuration, consisting of 60° kneading blocks were negatively influenced by poor feeder settings. For optimal settings more narrow distributions could be obtained. For an extensive kneading configuration good and poor settings resulted in mono-modal granule size distributions but were differing in the overall size. Mannitol, a model substance for a liquid sensitive formulation was granulated at an L/S-ratio of 0.075. It was even more important to maintain optimal feeding as mannitol was highly affected by poor feeder performances. Even an extensive kneading configuration could not level the errors in powder feeder performance, resulting in qualitatively different granule size distributions. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of detailed knowledge about applied feeding systems to gain optimal performance in twin-screw granulation. PMID:27224854

  20. Continuous melt granulation: Influence of process and formulation parameters upon granule and tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Vancoillie, Jochem; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has a growing interest in alternative manufacturing models allowing automation and continuous production in order to improve process efficiency and reduce costs. Implementing a switch from batch to continuous processing requires fundamental process understanding and the implementation of quality-by-design (QbD) principles. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between formulation-parameters (type binder, binder concentration, drug-binder miscibility), process-parameters (screw speed, powder feed rate and granulation temperature), granule properties (size, size distribution, shape, friability, true density, flowability) and tablet properties (tensile strength, friability, dissolution rate) of four different drug-binder formulations using Design of experiments (DOE). Two binders (polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Soluplus®) with a different solid state, semi-crystalline vs amorphous respectively, were combined with two model-drugs, metoprolol tartrate (MPT) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF), both having a contrasting miscibility with the binders. This research revealed that the granule properties of miscible drug-binder systems depended on the powder feed rate and barrel filling degree of the granulator whereas the granule properties of immiscible systems were mainly influenced by binder concentration. Using an amorphous binder, the tablet tensile strength depended on the granule size. In contrast, granule friability was more important for tablet quality using a brittle binder. However, this was not the case for caffeine-containing blends, since these phenomena were dominated by the enhanced compression properties of caffeine Form I, which was formed during granulation. Hence, it is important to gain knowledge about formulation behavior during processing since this influences the effect of process parameters onto the granule and tablet properties. PMID:27449628

  1. Perceptions of nonhuman primates in human-wildlife conflict scenarios.

    PubMed

    Hill, Catherine M; Webber, Amanda D

    2010-09-01

    Nonhuman primates (referred to as primates in this study) are sometimes revered as gods, abhorred as evil spirits, killed for food because they damage crops, or butchered for sport. Primates' perceived similarity to humans places them in an anomalous position. While some human groups accept the idea that primates "straddle" the human-nonhuman boundary, for others this resemblance is a violation of the human-animal divide. In this study we use two case studies to explore how people's perceptions of primates are often influenced by these animals' apparent similarity to humans, creating expectations, founded within a "human morality" about how primates should interact with people. When animals transgress these social rules, they are measured against the same moral framework as humans. This has implications for how people view and respond to certain kinds of primate behaviors, their willingness to tolerate co-existence with primates and their likely support for primate conservation initiatives. PMID:20806339

  2. Unusual morphological damage of Purkinje cells following postnatal BrdU administration in the cerebellar cortex of mouse.

    PubMed

    Takács, T

    2012-01-01

    Postnatal development of the cerebellum lasts for weeks in rodents and can be disturbed by systemic 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) administration. This thymidine analogue incorporates into the DNA of proliferating cells, and result in more or less serious damage or death granule cells, the most actively dividing neuronal population in the developing cerebellar cortex. Further consequences of postnatal BrdU administration are the interrupted postnatal migration and integrations as well as partial loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. In the present study, C57B16 mice were administered with 50 μg/g body weight BrdU, one sc. injection daily, between P0 and P11 postnatal days, respectively.Large "cavities" appeared in the cytoplasm of a subpopulation of Purkinje cells by P7 in about one-third of administered animals, their number are size of the cavities (and PCs exhibiting unusual morphology) decreased. EM studies revealed that the unusual Purkinje cells received numerous axonal inputs of unknown origin, first of all on their somatic and dendritic spines. The transitory appearance of a subpopulation of Purkinje cells possessing unusual morphology refers to the influence of other (neuronal, glial, or both) cells on their regular differentiation. PMID:22514871

  3. Developmental delay in motor skill acquisition in Niemann-Pick C1 mice reveals abnormal cerebellar morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Paola; Bruno, Francesco; Palladino, Giampiero; Dragotto, Jessica; Petrosini, Laura; Mangia, Franco; Erickson, Robert P; Canterini, Sonia; Fiorenza, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by defective intracellular trafficking of exogenous cholesterol. Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration is the main sign of cerebellar dysfunction in both NPC1 patients and animal models. It has been recently shown that a significant decrease in Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression reduces the proliferative potential of granule neuron precursors in the developing cerebellum of Npc1 (-/-) mice. Pursuing the hypothesis that this developmental defect translates into functional impairments, we have assayed Npc1-deficient pups belonging to the milder mutant mouse strain Npc1 (nmf164) for sensorimotor development from postnatal day (PN) 3 to PN21. Npc1 (nmf164) / Npc1 (nmf164) pups displayed a 2.5-day delay in the acquisition of complex motor abilities compared to wild-type (wt) littermates, in agreement with the significant disorganization of cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture observed between PN11 and PN15. Compared to wt, Npc1 (nmf164) homozygous mice exhibited a poorer morphological differentiation of Bergmann glia (BG), as indicated by thicker radial shafts and less elaborate reticular pattern of lateral processes. Also BG functional development was defective, as indicated by the significant reduction in GLAST and Glutamine synthetase expression. A reduced VGluT2 and GAD65 expression also indicated an overall derangement of the glutamatergic/GABAergic stimulation that PCs receive by climbing/parallel fibers and basket/stellate cells, respectively. Lastly, Npc1-deficiency also affected oligodendrocyte differentiation as indicated by the strong reduction of myelin basic protein. Two sequential 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin administrations at PN4 and PN7 counteract these defects, partially preventing functional impairment of BG and fully restoring the normal patterns of glutamatergic/GABAergic stimulation to PCs.These findings indicate that in Npc1 (nmf164) homozygous mice the derangement of synaptic

  4. Ephrin/Eph receptor expression in brain of adult nonhuman primates: implications for neuroadaptation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Danqing; Miller, Gregory M; Jassen, Amy; Westmoreland, Susan V; Pauley, Douglas; Madras, Bertha K

    2006-01-01

    In developing brain, Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands (Ephs/ephrins) are implicated in facilitating topographic guidance of a number of pathways, including the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathways. In adult rodent brain, these molecules are implicated in neuronal plasticity associated with learning and memory. Cocaine significantly alters the expression of select members of this family of axonal guidance molecules, implicating Ephs, ephrins in drug-induced neuroadaptation. The potential contribution of Ephs, ephrins to cocaine-induced reorganization of striatal circuitry brain in primates [Saka, E., Goodrich, C., Harlan, P., Madras, B.K., Graybiel, A.M., 2004. Repetitive behaviors in monkeys are linked to specific striatal activation patterns. J. Neurosci. 24, 7557-7565] is unknown because there are no documented reports of Eph/ephrin expression or function in adult primate brain. We now report that brains of adult old and new world monkeys express mRNA encoding EphA4 receptor and ephrin-B2 ligand, implicated in topographic guidance of dopamine and striatal neurons during development. Their encoded proteins distributed highly selectively in regions of adult monkey brain. EphA4 mRNA levels were prominent in the DA-rich caudate/putamen, nucleus accumbens and globus pallidus, as well as the medial and orbitofrontal cortices, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus and cerebellum. Immunocytochemical localization of EphA4 protein revealed discrete expression in caudate/putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, cerebellar Purkinje cells, pyramidal cells of frontal cortices (layers II, III and V) and the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. Evidence for EphA4 expression in dopamine neurons emerged from colocalization with tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive terminals in striatum and substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area cell bodies. The association of axonal guidance molecules with drug-induced reorganization of adult primate brain circuitry warrants

  5. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  6. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Bocci, Tommaso; Cortese, Francesca; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with neurological diseases, including dementia, epilepsy, post-stroke dysfunctions, movement disorders, and other pathological conditions. Because of this technique's ability to modify cerebellar excitability without significant side effects, cerebellar tDCS is a new, interesting, and powerful tool to induce plastic modifications in the cerebellum. In this report, we review a number of interesting studies on the application of cerebellar tDCS for various neurological conditions (ataxia, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, essential tremor) and the possible mechanism by which the stimulation acts on the cerebellum. Study findings indicate that cerebellar tDCS is a promising therapeutic tool in treating several neurological disorders; however, this method's efficacy appears to be limited, given the current data. PMID:27595007

  7. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  8. Novel Approaches to Studying the Genetic Basis of Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Sajan, Samin A.; Waimey, Kathryn E.

    2010-01-01

    The list of genes that when mutated cause disruptions in cerebellar development is rapidly increasing. The study of both spontaneous and engineered mouse mutants has been essential to this progress, as it has revealed much of our current understanding of the developmental processes required to construct the mature cerebellum. Improvements in brain imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the emergence of better classification schemes for human cerebellar malformations, have recently led to the identification of a number of genes which cause human cerebellar disorders. In this review we argue that synergistic approaches combining classical molecular techniques, genomics, and mouse models of human malformations will be essential to fuel additional discoveries of cerebellar developmental genes and mechanisms. PMID:20387026

  9. Malignant cerebellar peduncle lesions - rapid progression and poor outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Kapoor, Ankur; Savardekar, Amey; Radotra, B. D.; Chatterjee, Debjyoti; Gupta, Sunil K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumors arising from cerebellar peduncle are extremely rare and behave aggressively. The inclusion of these into either cerebellar or brainstem gliomas is contentious. Case Description: We performed clinicopathological review of three patients treated at our institute and surveyed the literature for previous such reported cases. Mean duration of symptoms in our patients was 2 weeks. Subtotal tumor resection was performed in two patients while the third underwent stereotactic biopsy followed by chemoradiotherapy. Histopathology revealed glioblastoma in initial two patients and medulloblastoma Grade IV in the third. The two patients who underwent surgical excision succumbed to the illness within 2 days and a month, respectively. Conclusion: Malignant cerebellar peduncular lesions have poor overall survival despite surgical debulking. It is not confirmed whether these tumors should be considered as cerebellar lesions or brainstem gliomas due to aggressive clinical behavior, and so the ideal line of management is not yet known. PMID:27057396

  10. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  11. Esophoria or esotropia in adulthood: a sign of cerebellar dysfunction?

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Katharina; Frenzel, Claudia; Kremmyda, Olympia; Adrion, Christine; Bardins, Stanislavs; Glasauer, Stefan; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Convergent strabismus is a common diagnosis in early childhood, when it is mostly considered benign. If it develops later in life, strabismus can, however, be a sign of neurological disease. In these cases the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are largely unknown. In this retrospective case-control study we analyzed the neuro-ophthalmological examination reports of 400 adult patients who presented at the German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders to determine an association between ocular misalignment and cerebellar dysfunction. Patients with cerebellar signs (i.e., cerebellar ataxia and/or cerebellar ocular motor signs) had a 4.49 (95 % CI [1.60; 13.78]) times higher frequency of ocular misalignment and specifically a 13.3 (95 % CI [3.80; 55.73]) times increased frequency of esophoria/esotropia (ESO) during distant gaze than patients without cerebellar dysfunction. ESO when looking into the distance was associated with saccadic smooth pursuit, dysmetria of saccades, and downbeat nystagmus (DBN) (χ (2) test, p < 0.0001 for all associations). Patients with cerebellar dysfunction also showed mildly impaired eye abduction (χ (2) test, left eye and right eye: p < 0.0001), associated with horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus (χ (2) test, p < 0.0001). The association of ESO and DBN implicates a pathophysiological involvement of the cerebellar flocculus, while the association with dysmetric saccades suggests involvement of the oculomotor vermis. This is compatible with animal studies showing that the pathways of the flocculus/posterior interposed nucleus and vermis/nucleus fastigii are both involved in vergence movements and static binocular alignment. From a clinical point of view, a newly diagnosed esophoria/esotropia only during distant gaze may be a sign of a cerebellar disease. PMID:25522697

  12. Cerebellar contributions to neurological soft signs in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Kubera, Katharina M; Stieltjes, Bram; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are frequently found in psychiatric disorders of significant neurodevelopmental origin, e.g., in patients with schizophrenia and autism. Yet NSS are also present in healthy individuals suggesting a neurodevelopmental signature of motor function, probably as a continuum between health and disease. So far, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying these motor phenomena in healthy persons, and it is even less known whether the cerebellum contributes to NSS expression. Thirty-seven healthy young adults (mean age = 23 years) were studied using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and "resting-state" functional MRI at three Tesla. NSS levels were measured using the "Heidelberg Scale." Cerebellar gray matter volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Cerebellar function was assessed using regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of local network strength. The relationship between cerebellar structure and function and NSS was analyzed using regression models. There was no significant relationship between cerebellar volume and NSS (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). Positive associations with cerebellar lobule VI activity were found for the "motor coordination" and "hard signs" NSS domains. A negative relationship was found between lobule VI activity and "complex motor task" domain (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). The data indicate that in healthy young adults, distinct NSS domains are related to cerebellar activity, specifically with activity of cerebellar subregions with known cortical somatomotor projections. In contrast, cerebellar volume is not predictive of NSS in healthy persons. PMID:25708455

  13. Primary cerebellar agenesis presenting as isolated cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Obaid; Jabeen, Shumyla; Khan, Azhar; Shaheen, Feroze

    2016-01-01

    Primary cerebellar agenesis is a rare entity. To the best of our knowledge, eleven living cases have been reported till date. Most of these were associated with some degree of motor impairment. We present a case of cerebellar agenesis in a child who presented with cognitive abnormalities leading to poor performance at school. No motor impairment was seen. Among the eleven cases reported earlier, only one case showed lack of motor impairment.

  14. Voice discrimination in four primates.

    PubMed

    Candiotti, Agnès; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lemasson, Alban

    2013-10-01

    One accepted function of vocalisations is to convey information about the signaller, such as its age-sex class, motivation, or relationship with the recipient. Yet, in natural habitats individuals not only interact with conspecifics but also with members of other species. This is well documented for African forest monkeys, which form semi-permanent mixed-species groups that can persist for decades. Although members of such groups interact with each other on a daily basis, both physically and vocally, it is currently unknown whether they can discriminate familiar and unfamiliar voices of heterospecific group members. We addressed this question with playbacks on monkey species known to form polyspecific associations in the wild: red-capped mangabeys, Campbell's monkeys and Guereza colobus monkeys. We tested subjects' discrimination abilities of contact calls of familiar and unfamiliar female De Brazza monkeys. When pooling all species, subjects looked more often towards the speaker when hearing contact calls of unfamiliar than familiar callers. When testing De Brazza monkeys with their own calls, we found the same effect with the longest gaze durations after hearing unfamiliar voices. This suggests that primates can discriminate, not only between familiar and unfamiliar voices of conspecifics, but also between familiar and unfamiliar voices of heterospecifics living within a close proximity. PMID:23800631

  15. Globin gene switching in primates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert M; Gumucio, Deborah; Goodman, Morris

    2002-11-01

    Evolutionary approaches to the identification of DNA sequences required for transcription of the genes of the beta-globin cluster are reviewed. Sequence alignments of non-coding regions from widely divergent species revealed many conserved motifs (phylogenetic footprints) that were putative transcription factor binding sites and candidate binding proteins were identified. The differential timing of the prosimian and simian gamma-globin genes was analyzed by identifying base changes in the vicinity of the phylogenetic footprints. These differential phylogenetic footprints were shown to bind different nuclear factors, and the behavior of constructs with human or galago gamma-promoters in transgenic mice indicated that DNA motifs near the gamma-globin genes are sufficient to determine the developmental stage of expression. Locus control region alignments have identified many conserved sequence differences outside of the hypersensitive sites. Globin protein and mRNA expression profiles during embryological development in a series of catarrhine (Old World monkeys and apes) and platyrrhine (New World monkeys) primates have been determined. While all catarrhines examined to date have globin expression patterns that are highly similar to the well-established human switching behavior, platyrrhines have inactivated their gamma 1 genes by a variety of mechanisms, and have an earlier gamma-beta switch. PMID:12443943

  16. Commentary on "The Cerebellar System and What it Signifies from a Biological Perspective: A Communication by Christofredo Jakob (1866-1956) Before the Society of Neurology and Psychiatry of Buenos Aires, December 1938".

    PubMed

    Tzouma, Anny; Margulies, Daniel S; Triarhou, Lazaros C

    2016-08-01

    This commentary highlights a "cerebellar classic" by a pioneer of neurobiology, Christfried Jakob. Jakob discussed the connectivity between the cerebellum and mesencephalic, diencephalic, and telencephalic structures in an evolutionary, developmental, and histophysiological perspective. He proposed three evolutionary morphofunctional stages, the archicerebellar, paleocerebellar, and neocerebellar; he attributed the reduced cerebellospinal connections in humans, compared to other primates, to the perfection of the rubrolenticular and thalamocortical systems and the intense ascending pathways to the red nucleus in exchange for the more elementary descending efferent pathways. Jakob hypothesized the convergence of cerebellar pathways in associative cortical regions, insisting on the intimate collaboration of the cerebellum with the frontal lobe. The extensive lines of communication between regions throughout the association cortex substantiate Jakob's intuition and begin to outline the mechanisms for substantial cerebellar involvement in functions beyond the purely motor domain. Atop a foundation of anatomical and phylogenetic mastery, Jakob conceived ideas that were noteworthy, timely, and have much relevance to our current thinking on cerebellar structure and function. PMID:27230900

  17. α-granules: a story in the making.

    PubMed

    Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2012-12-13

    α-granules are by far the most abundant platelet granules. Yet little is known about how they are formed. In this issue of Blood, Urban et al now characterize platelets from patients with an inheritable α-granule defect, demonstrating a role for VPS16B in α-granule biogenesis and taking us one step closer to understanding how these elusive organelles are formed. PMID:23243155

  18. Starch Granule Variability in Wild Solanum Species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because most of the dry matter of potato tubers is starch, an understanding of starch properties is important in potato improvement programs. Starch granule size is considered to influence tuber processing quality parameters such as gelatinization temperature, viscosity, and water holding capacity. ...

  19. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Alexis A; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey; Martinou, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-14

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized "mitochondrial RNA granules," mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  20. Next generation fluidized bed granulator automation.

    PubMed

    Rantanen, J; Känsäkoski, M; Suhonen, J; Tenhunen, J; Lehtonen, S; Rajalahti, T; Mannermaa, J P; Yliruusi, J

    2000-01-01

    A system for fluidized bed granulator automation with in-line multichannel near infrared (NIR) moisture measurement and a unique air flow rate measurement design was assembled, and the information gained was investigated. The multivariate process data collected was analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). The test materials (theophylline and microcrystalline cellulose) were granulated and the calibration behavior of the multichannel NIR set-up was evaluated against full Fourier Transform (FT) NIR spectra. Accurate and reliable process air flow rate measurement proved critical in controlling the granulation process. The process data describing the state of the process was projected in two dimensions, and the information from various trend charts was outlined simultaneously. The absorbence of test material at correction wavelengths (NIR region) and the nature of material-water interactions affected the detected in-line NIR water signal. This resulted in different calibration models for the test materials. Development of process analytical methods together with new data visualization algorithms creates new tools for in-process control of the fluidized bed granulation. PMID:14727843

  1. Microbial degradation of polyacrylamide by aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Wang, Zhiping; Lin, Kuangfei; Cai, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    To deal with polyacrylamide (PAM) wastewater, granular sludge formed in glucose-fed sequencing batch reactors (SBR) was employed to cultivate PAM-degrading granules. Three replicated SBRs were operated with increasing PAM concentration in the influent from 67 to 670 mg L(-1), and the hydraulic retention time was increased at the same time from 1 d to 6 d during the six-phase of the 43 d acclimation period. The well-acclimated PAM-degrading granules were different from the seeding granules in colour, mean diameter, biomass density and settle ability, and could use PAM as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. In the batch experiments, PAM degradation rate by granules was determined as 2.23 mg PAM g(-1) MLSS h(-1). According to the analysis of the intermediates of PAM biodegradation, PAM was degraded initially through hydrolysis of the amide group, and no acrylamide monomer was detected. With the help of LC/MS, the main intermediate was identified as polyacrylic acid with a low molecular weight. Therefore, the PAM-degrading granular sludge may be employed for removing PAM in the wastewater produced from tertiary oil recovery that uses polymeric flooding technology. PMID:22720433

  2. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration. PMID:26155762

  3. Emotions and their cognitive control in children with cerebellar tumors.

    PubMed

    Hopyan, Talar; Laughlin, Suzanne; Dennis, Maureen

    2010-11-01

    A constellation of deficits, termed the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS), has been reported following acquired cerebellar lesions. We studied emotion identification and the cognitive control of emotion in children treated for acquired tumors of the cerebellum. Participants were 37 children (7-16 years) treated for cerebellar tumors (19 benign astrocytomas (AST), 18 malignant medulloblastomas (MB), and 37 matched controls (CON). The Emotion Identification Task investigated recognition of happy and sad emotions in music. In two cognitive control tasks, we investigated whether children could identify emotion in situations in which the emotion in the music and the emotion in the lyrics was either congruent or incongruent. Children with cerebellar tumors identified emotion as accurately and quickly as controls (p > .05), although there was a significant interaction of emotions and group (p < .01), with the MB group performing less accurately identifying sad emotions, and both cerebellar tumor groups were impaired in the cognitive control of emotions (p < .01). The fact that childhood acquired cerebellar tumors disrupt cognitive control of emotion rather than emotion identification provides some support for a model of the CCAS as a disorder, not so much of emotion as of the regulation of emotion by cognition. PMID:20887648

  4. Disrupted cortico-cerebellar connectivity in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Peltier, Scott J.; Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Jaeggi, Susanne M.; Buschkuehl, Martin; Fling, Brett W.; Kwak, Youngbin; Jonides, John; Monk, Christopher S.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2013-01-01

    Healthy aging is marked by declines in a variety of cognitive and motor abilities. A better understanding of the aging brain may aid in elucidating the neural substrates of these behavioral effects. Investigations of resting state functional brain connectivity have provided insights into pathology, and to some degree, healthy aging. Given the role of the cerebellum in both motor and cognitive behaviors, as well as its known volumetric declines with age, investigating cerebellar networks may shed light on the neural bases of age-related functional declines. We mapped the resting state networks of the lobules of the right hemisphere and the vermis of the cerebellum in a group of healthy older adults and compared them to those of young adults. We report disrupted cortico-cerebellar resting state network connectivity in older adults. These results remain even when controlling for cerebellar volume, signal-to-noise ratio, and signal-to-fluctuation noise ratio. Specifically, there was consistent disruption of cerebellar connectivity with both the striatum and the medial temporal lobe. Associations between connectivity strength and both sensorimotor and cognitive task performance indicate that cerebellar engagement with the default mode network and striatal pathways is associated with better performance for older adults. These results extend our understanding of the resting state networks of the aging brain to include cortico-cerebellar networks, and indicate that age differences in network connectivity strength are important for behavior. PMID:23792980

  5. Verbal memory impairments in children after cerebellar tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Davis-Ratner, Mathew S.; Milner, Marnee W.; Annabel Chen, S.H.; Schraedley-Desmond, Pam; Fisher, Paul G.; Desmond, John E.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate cerebellar lobular contributions to specific cognitive deficits observed after cerebellar tumor resection. Verbal working memory (VWM) tasks were administered to children following surgical resection of cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and age-matched controls. Anatomical MRI scans were used to quantify the extent of cerebellar lobular damage from each patient’s resection. Patients exhibited significantly reduced digit span for auditory but not visual stimuli, relative to controls, and damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII was significantly correlated with this deficit. Patients also showed reduced effects of articulatory suppression and this was correlated with damage to the vermis and hemispheral lobule IV/V bilaterally. Phonological similarity and recency effects did not differ overall between patients and controls, but outlier patients with abnormal phonological similarity effects to either auditory or visual stimuli were found to have damage to hemispheral lobule VIII/VIIB on the left and right, respectively. We postulate that damage to left hemispheral lobule VIII may interfere with encoding of auditory stimuli into the phonological store. These data corroborate neuroimaging studies showing focal cerebellar activation during VWM paradigms, and thereby allow us to predict with greater accuracy which specific neurocognitive processes will be affected by a cerebellar tumor resection. PMID:19491473

  6. Oxidative injury in multiple sclerosis cerebellar grey matter.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Kevin; Redondo, Juliana; Hares, Kelly; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction is a significant contributor to disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Both white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) injury occurs within MS cerebellum and, within GM, demyelination, inflammatory cell infiltration and neuronal injury contribute to on-going pathology. The precise nature of cerebellar GM injury is, however, unknown. Oxidative stress pathways with ultimate lipid peroxidation and cell membrane injury occur extensively in MS and the purpose of this study was to investigate these processes in MS cerebellar GM. Post-mortem human cerebellar GM from MS and control subjects was analysed immunohistochemically, followed by semi-quantitative analysis of markers of cellular injury, lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant enzyme expression. We have shown evidence for reduction in myelin and neuronal markers in MS GM, coupled to an increase in expression of a microglial marker. We also show that the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal co-localises with myelin and its levels negatively correlate to myelin basic protein levels. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase (SOD1 and 2) enzymes, localised within cerebellar neurons, are up-regulated, yet the activation of subsequent enzymes responsible for the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, catalase and glutathione peroxidase are relatively deficient. These studies provide evidence for oxidative injury in MS cerebellar GM and further help define disease mechanisms within the MS brain. PMID:27086975

  7. Voltage-gated calcium channel autoimmune cerebellar degeneration

    PubMed Central

    McKasson, Marilyn; Clawson, Susan A.; Hill, Kenneth E.; Wood, Blair; Carlson, Noel; Bromberg, Mark; Greenlee, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe response to treatment in a patient with autoantibodies against voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) who presented with autoimmune cerebellar degeneration and subsequently developed Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), and to study the effect of the patient's autoantibodies on Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures. Methods: Case report and study of rat cerebellar slice cultures incubated with patient VGCC autoantibodies. Results: A 53-year-old man developed progressive incoordination with ataxic speech. Laboratory evaluation revealed VGCC autoantibodies without other antineuronal autoantibodies. Whole-body PET scans 6 and 12 months after presentation detected no malignancy. The patient improved significantly with IV immunoglobulin G (IgG), prednisone, and mycophenolate mofetil, but worsened after IV IgG was halted secondary to aseptic meningitis. He subsequently developed weakness with electrodiagnostic evidence of LEMS. The patient's IgG bound to Purkinje cells in rat cerebellar slice cultures, followed by neuronal death. Reactivity of the patient's autoantibodies with VGCCs was confirmed by blocking studies with defined VGCC antibodies. Conclusions: Autoimmune cerebellar degeneration associated with VGCC autoantibodies may precede onset of LEMS and may improve with immunosuppressive treatment. Binding of anti-VGCC antibodies to Purkinje cells in cerebellar slice cultures may be followed by cell death. Patients with anti-VGCC autoantibodies may be at risk of irreversible neurologic injury over time, and treatment should be initiated early. PMID:27088118

  8. Imaging of zymogen granules in fully wet cells: evidence for restricted mechanism of granule growth.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Anaby, Debbie

    2007-09-01

    The introduction of wet SEM imaging technology permits electron microscopy of wet samples. Samples are placed in sealed specimen capsules and are insulated from the vacuum in the SEM chamber by an impermeable, electron-transparent membrane. The complete insulation of the sample from the vacuum allows direct imaging of fully hydrated, whole-mount tissue. In the current work, we demonstrate direct inspection of thick pancreatic tissue slices (above 400 mum). In the case of scanning of the pancreatic surface, the boundaries of intracellular features are seen directly. Thus no unfolding is required to ascertain the actual particle size distribution based on the sizes of the sections. This method enabled us to investigate the true granule size distribution and confirm early studies of improved conformity to a Poisson-like distribution, suggesting that the homotypic granule growth results from a mechanism, which favors the addition of a single unit granule to mature granules. PMID:17557275

  9. Altered cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients ON and OFF L-DOPA medication

    PubMed Central

    Festini, Sara B.; Bernard, Jessica A.; Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2015-01-01

    Although nigrostriatal changes are most commonly affiliated with Parkinson's disease, the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's has become increasingly apparent. The present study used lobule-based cerebellar resting state functional connectivity to (1) compare cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients both ON and OFF L-DOPA medication and controls, and to (2) relate variations in cerebellar connectivity to behavioral performance. Results indicated that, when contrasted to the control group, Parkinson's patients OFF medication had increased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity, whereas Parkinson's patients ON medication had decreased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity. Moreover, analyses relating levels of cerebellar connectivity to behavioral measures demonstrated that, within each group, increased levels of connectivity were most often associated with improved cognitive and motor performance, but there were several instances where increased connectivity was related to poorer performance. Overall, the present study found medication-variant cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients, further demonstrating cerebellar changes associated with Parkinson's disease and the moderating effects of medication. PMID:25954184

  10. Post-Plasmodium vivax malaria cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis: A new form of delayed cerebellar ataxia or cerebellar variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kasundra, Gaurav M.; Bhargava, Amita Narendra; Bhushan, Bharat; Shubhakaran, Khichar; Sood, Isha

    2015-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is commonly seen after viral and bacterial infections, immunization, and Plasmodium falciparum (PF) malaria. Plasmodium vivax (PV) rarely causes ADEM. We report a 14-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset bilateral cerebellar ataxia and optic neuritis, 2 weeks after recovery from PV. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral cerebellar hyperintensities suggestive of ADEM. No specific viral etiology was found on cerebrospinal fluid examination. Patient responded well to treatment without any sequelae. Thus, PV too is an important cause of ADEM along with PF. Two of the previously reported cases had co-infection with falciparum malaria. The only other two reported cases, as also this patient, are from Asia. A geographical or racial predisposition needs to be evaluated. Also, a possibility of post-PV delayed cerebellar ataxia, which is classically described post-PF infection, may be considered as it may be clinically, radiologically, and prognostically indistinguishable from a milder presentation of ADEM. PMID:25878748

  11. Proteoglycan modifications by granulation tissue in culture.

    PubMed

    Quintner, M I; Kollar, E J; Rossomando, E F

    1982-01-01

    To study the process of tissue remodeling that occurs during wound healing, radioactive proteoglycan ([35S]-PGS) was used to assay for enzymatic activities present in the extracellular fluid of healing tissue. Mice, wounded by removal of a 2 x 1.5 cm patch of skin from the dorsal surface, were sacrificed after 3 days of healing. Granulation tissue (1 cm2) was removed, spread onto a sterile wire mesh support and placed in the center well of an organ culture dish. To each well was added 1 ml MCDB medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and antibiotics and 5-20 microliters of [35S]-PGS (100,000 cpm/10 microliters). Medium, removed from the well by aspiration after 24 and 48 h of culture, was boiled 5 min at 100 degrees C and stored frozen at -20 degrees C. Alterations of the PGS were assayed with a Sepharose 4B column (1 x 50 cm) which had an excluded and included volume of 17 and 46 ml, respectively. PGS, incubated without cells or with tissues from unwounded animals, eluted at 26 ml. PGS, incubated with granulation tissue and cultured for either 24 or 48 h, eluted from the Sepharose 4B at 29 ml, a 10% increase in elution volume, suggesting that the size or shape of the PGS has been altered by enzymes secreted by the cells of the granulation tissue. In contrast, PGS incubated with tissues from unwounded animals or without granulation tissue showed no changes. These data suggest that enzymatic activities secreted by cells of granulation tissue may be involved in remodeling during healing. PMID:6749574

  12. Experimental investigation of granule size and shape dynamics in twin-screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Bellandi, Giacomo; Gernaey, Krist V; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2014-11-20

    A twin-screw granulator (TSG), a promising equipment for continuous high shear wet granulation (HSWG), achieves the desired level of mixing by a combination of the appropriate screw configuration and a suitable set of process settings (e.g. feed rate, screw speed, etc.), thus producing a certain granule size and shape distribution (GSSD). However, the primary sizing and shaping mechanism behind the resulting distribution is not well understood due to the opacity of the multiphase system in the granulator. This study experimentally characterised the GSSD dynamics along the TSG barrel length in order to understand the function of individual screw modules and process settings, as well as their interaction. Particle size analysis of granules collected at the outlet of the TSG suggested significant interaction between the process and screw configuration parameters influencing the heterogeneity in the GSSD. By characterising the samples collected along the screw length, a variable influence of the screw modules at different process conditions was observed. At low liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S), the first kneading module seemed to play a significant role in mixing, whereas the second kneading module was found to be more involved in reshaping the granules. At high L/S and high throughput, aggregation mainly took place in the second kneading module changing the GSSD. The results obtained from this study will be further used for the calibration and validation of a mechanistic model and, hence, support future development of a more detailed understanding of the HSWG process in a TSG. PMID:25234863

  13. Aerobic granulation of protein-rich granules from nitrogen-lean wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-You; Ju, Sheau-Pyng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Proteins (PN)-rich granules are stable in structure in long-term reactor operations. This study proposed to cultivate PN-rich granules with PN/polysaccharides (PS) >20 from nitrogen lean wastewater, with ammonia-nitrogen as sole nitrogen source at chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N of 153.8. The yielded granules can sustain their structural stability in sequencing batch reactor mode for sufficient treatment of wastewaters up to 7000mg/L COD and with COD/N<500 and in continuous-flow reactor for successful 216-d treatment of wastewaters up to organic loading rate (OLR) of 39kg/m(3)-d. The produced granules were enriched with Firmicutes and β-proteobacteria as dominating strains. More than 58% of the nitrogen fed in the nitrogen-lean wastewater is converted to the PN in the granules. The replacement of ammonia by nitrate as sole nitrogen source led to granules enriched with γ-proteobacteria which are easily deteriorated at low OLR. PMID:27394992

  14. Amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules affected by granule surface area.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kong, B W; Kim, M J; Lee, S H

    2008-11-01

    Initial stage of hydrolysis of native starch granules with various amylolytic enzymes, alpha-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, glucoamylase I (GA-I) and II (GA-II) from Aspergillus niger, and beta-amylase from sweet potato showed that the reaction was apparently affected by a specific surface area of the starch granules. The ratios of the reciprocal of initial velocity of each amylolytic hydrolysis for native potato and maize starch to that for rice with the amylolytic enzymes were nearly equivalent to the ratio of surface area per mass of the 2 starch granules to that of rice, that is, 6.94 and 2.25, respectively. Thus, the reciprocal of initial velocity of each enzymatic hydrolysis as expressed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot was a linear function of the reciprocal of surface area for each starch granule. As a result, it is concluded that amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules is governed by the specific surface area, not by the mass concentration, of each granule. PMID:19021791

  15. Wave granulation in the Venus' atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    In unique venusian planetary system the solid body rotates very slowly and the detached massive atmosphere very rapidly. However both together orbit Sun and their characteristic orbital frequency -1/ 0.62 year - places them in the regular row of planets assigning them characteristic only for Venus wave produced granulation with a granule size πR/6 [1& others]. Remind other bodies in the row with their granule sizes inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: solar photosphere πR/60, Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1 (R-a body radius). Three planets have atmospheres with wave granulations having sizes equal to their lithospheric granules. But Venus, unlike Earth and Mars, has the detached atmosphere that can be considered as a separate body with its own orbital frequency around the center of the Venus' system. According to the correlation between an orbital frequency and a wave granule size the venusian wave granule will be πR/338 (a scale can be Earth: orbital frequency 1/ 1year, granule size πR/4 or Sun: frequency 1/1month, granule size πR/60). So, πR/338 = 57 km. This theoretical size is rather close to that observed by Galileo SC through a violet filter "the filamentary dark features. . . are here revealed to be composed of several dark nodules, like beads on a string, each about 60 miles across" (PIA00072). Actually all Venus' disc seen from a distance ~1.7mln.miles is peppered with these fine features seen on a limit of resolution. So, the Venus' atmosphere has two main frequencies in the solar system with corresponding wave granulations: around Sun 1/225 days (granule πR/6) and around Venus 1/ 4 days (granule πR/338). As was done for the Moon, Phobos, Titan and other icy satellites of Saturn [2, 3, 4 & others] one can apply the wave modulation technique also for the atmosphere of Venus. The lower frequency modulates the higher one by dividing and multiplying it thus getting two side frequencies and

  16. Wave granulation in the Venus' atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    In unique venusian planetary system the solid body rotates very slowly and the detached massive atmosphere very rapidly. However both together orbit Sun and their characteristic orbital frequency -1/ 0.62 year - places them in the regular row of planets assigning them characteristic only for Venus wave produced granulation with a granule size πR/6 [1& others]. Remind other bodies in the row with their granule sizes inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: solar photosphere πR/60, Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1 (R-a body radius). Three planets have atmospheres with wave granulations having sizes equal to their lithospheric granules. But Venus, unlike Earth and Mars, has the detached atmosphere that can be considered as a separate body with its own orbital frequency around the center of the Venus' system. According to the correlation between an orbital frequency and a wave granule size the venusian wave granule will be πR/338 (a scale can be Earth: orbital frequency 1/ 1year, granule size πR/4 or Sun: frequency 1/1month, granule size πR/60). So, πR/338 = 57 km. This theoretical size is rather close to that observed by Galileo SC through a violet filter "the filamentary dark features. . . are here revealed to be composed of several dark nodules, like beads on a string, each about 60 miles across" (PIA00072). Actually all Venus' disc seen from a distance π1.7mln.miles is peppered with these fine features seen on a limit of resolution. So, the Venus' atmosphere has two main frequencies in the solar system with corresponding wave granulations: around Sun 1/225 days (granule πR/6) and around Venus 1/ 4 days (granule πR/338). As was done for the Moon, Phobos, Titan and other icy satellites of Saturn [2, 3, 4 & others] one can apply the wave modulation technique also for the atmosphere of Venus. The lower frequency modulates the higher one by dividing and multiplying it thus getting two side frequencies and

  17. Sperm Morphology Assessment in Captive Neotropical Primates.

    PubMed

    Swanson, W F; Valle, R R; Carvalho, F M; Arakaki, P R; Rodas-Martínez, A Z; Muniz, Japc; García-Herreros, M

    2016-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate sperm morphology in four neotropical primate species to compare the sperm morphological traits and the sperm morphometric parameters as a basis for establishing normative sperm standards for each species. Data from 80 ejaculates collected from four primate species, Callithrix jacchus, Callimico goeldii, Alouatta caraya and Ateles geoffroyi, were analysed for detection of sperm morphological alterations using subjective World Health Organization (WHO-2010) standards and Sperm Deformity Index (SDI) criteria, objective computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA) and subpopulation sperm determination (SSD) methods. There were multiple differences (p < 0.01) observed among primate species in values obtained from WHO-2010, SDI, CASMA and SSD sperm analysis methods. In addition, multiple significant positive and negative correlations were observed between the sperm morphological traits (SDI, Sperm Deformity Index Head Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Midpiece Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Tail Defects, Normal Sperm, Head Defects, Midpiece Defects and Tail Defects) and the sperm morphometric parameters (SSD, Area (A), Perimeter (P), Length (L), Width (W), Ellipticity, Elongation and Rugosity) (p ≤ 0.046). In conclusion, our findings using different evaluation methods indicate that pronounced sperm morphological variation exists among these four neotropical primate species. Because of the strong relationship observed among morphological and morphometric parameters, these results suggest that application of objective analysis methods could substantially improve the reliability of comparative studies and help to establish valid normative sperm values for neotropical primates. PMID:27260333

  18. Ancient single origin for Malagasy primates.

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, A D; Cartmill, M; Ruvolo, M; Smith, K; Vilgalys, R

    1996-01-01

    We report new evidence that bears decisively on a long-standing controversy in primate systematics. DNA sequence data for the complete cytochrome b gene, combined with an expanded morphological data set, confirm the results of a previous study and again indicate that all extant Malagasy lemurs originated from a single common ancestor. These results, as well as those from other genetic studies, call for a revision of primate classifications in which the dwarf and mouse lemurs are placed within the Afro-Asian lorisiforms. The phylogenetic results, in agreement with paleocontinental data, indicate an African origin for the common ancestor of lemurs and lorises (the Strepsirrhini). The molecular data further suggest the surprising conclusion that lemurs began evolving independently by the early Eocene at the latest. This indicates that the Malagasy primate lineage is more ancient than generally thought and places the split between the two strepsirrhine lineages well before the appearance of known Eocene fossil primates. We conclude that primate origins were marked by rapid speciation and diversification sometime before the late Paleocene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8643538

  19. Neocortex size predicts deception rate in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Richard W.; Corp, Nadia

    2004-01-01

    Human brain organization is built upon a more ancient adaptation, the large brain of simian primates: on average, monkeys and apes have brains twice as large as expected for mammals of their size, principally as a result of neocortical enlargement. Testing the adaptive benefit of this evolutionary specialization depends on finding an association between brain size and function in primates. However, most cognitive capacities have been assessed in only a restricted range of species under laboratory conditions. Deception of conspecifics in social circumstances is an exception, because a corpus of field data is available that encompasses all major lines of the primate radiation. We show that the use of deception within the primates is well predicted by the neocortical volume, when observer effort is controlled for; by contrast, neither the size of the rest of the brain nor the group size exert significant effects. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that neocortical expansion has been driven by social challenges among the primates. Complex social manipulations such as deception are thought to be based upon rapid learning and extensive social knowledge; thus, learning in social contexts may be constrained by neocortical size. PMID:15306289

  20. Role of cerebellar adrenomedullin in blood pressure regulation.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Leticia; Israel, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) and their receptor components, calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP1, RMP2 and RAMP3) are widely expressed in the central nervous system, including cerebellum. We have shown that AM binding sites are altered in cerebellum during hypertension, suggesting a role for cerebellar adrenomedullinergic system in blood pressure regulation. To further evaluate the role of AM in cerebellum, we assessed the expression of AM, RAMP1, RAMP2, RAMP3 and CRLR in the cerebellar vermis of 8 and 16week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. In addition, the effect of microinjection of AM into rat cerebellar vermis on arterial blood pressure (BP) was determined. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation and cerebellar vermis was dissected for quantification of AM, CRLR, RAMP1, RAMP2 and RAMP3 expression using western blot analysis. Another group of male, 16week old SHR and WKY rats was anesthetized, and a cannula was implanted in the cerebellar vermis. Following recovery AM (0.02 to 200pmol/5μL) or vehicle was injected into cerebellar vermis. BP was determined, before and after treatments, by non-invasive plethysmography. In addition, to establish the receptor subtype involved in AM action in vivo, animals received microinjections of AM22-52 (200pmol/5μL), an AM1 receptor antagonist, or the CGRP1 receptor antagonist, CGRP8-37 (200pmol/5μL) into the cerebellar vermis, administered simultaneously with AM or vehicle microinjection. Cannulation was verified post mortem with the in situ injection of a dye solution. Our findings demonstrated that the expression of CRLR, RAMP1 and RAMP3 was higher in cerebellum of SHR rats, while AM and RAMP2 expression was lower than those of WKY rats, both in 8 and 16week old rats. In vivo microinjection of AM into the cerebellar vermis caused a profound, dose dependent, hypotensive effect in SHR but not in normotensive WKY rats. Coinjections of a

  1. Cerebellar control of postural scaling and central set in stance.

    PubMed

    Horak, F B; Diener, H C

    1994-08-01

    1. The effects of cerebellar deficits in humans on scaling the magnitude of automatic postural responses based on sensory feedback and on predictive central set was investigated. Electromyographic (EMG) and surface reactive torques were compared in patients with anterior lobe cerebellar disorders and in normal healthy adults exposed to blocks of four velocities and five amplitudes of surface translations during stance. Correlations between the earliest postural responses (integrated EMG and initial rate of change of torque) and translation velocity provided a measure of postural magnitude scaling using sensory information from the current displacement. Correlations of responses with translation amplitude provided a measure of scaling dependent on predictive central set based on sequential experience with previous like displacements because the earliest postural responses occurred before completion of the displacements and because scaling to displacement amplitude disappeared when amplitudes were randomized in normal subjects. 2. Responses of cerebellar patients to forward body sway induced by backward surface displacements were hypermetric, that is, surface-reactive torque responses were two to three times larger than normal with longer muscle bursts resulting in overshooting of initial posture. Despite this postural hypermetria, the absolute and relative latencies of agonist muscle bursts at the ankle, knee, and hip were normal in cerebellar patients. 3. Although they were hypermetric, the earliest postural responses of cerebellar patients were scaled normally to platform displacement velocities using somatosensory feedback. Cerebellar patients, however, were unable to scale initial postural response magnitude to expected displacement amplitudes based on prior experience using central set. Randomization of displacement amplitudes eliminated the set effect of amplitude on initial responses in normal subjects, but responses to randomized and blocked trials were not

  2. Distribution and phenotypes of unipolar brush cells in relation to the granule cell system of the rat cochlear nuclear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Diño, Maria. R.; Mugnaini, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    In most mammals the cochlear nuclear complex (CN) contains a distributed system of granule cells (GCS), whose parallel fiber axons innervate the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN). Like their counterpart in cerebellum, CN granules are innervated by mossy fibers of various origins. The GCS is complemented by unipolar brush (UBCs) and Golgi cells, and by stellate and cartwheel cells of the DCN. This cerebellum-like microcircuit modulates the activity of the DCN’s main projection neurons, the pyramidal, giant and tuberculoventral neurons, and is thought to improve auditory performance by integrating acoustic and proprioceptive information. In this paper, we focus on the UBCs, a chemically heterogeneous neuronal population, using antibodies to calretinin, mGluR1α epidermal growth factor substrate 8 (Eps8) and the transcription factor Tbr2. Eps8 and Tbr2 labeled most of the CN’s UBCs, if not the entire population, while calretinin and mGluR1α distinguished two largely separate subsets with overlapping distributions. By double labeling with antibodies to Tbr2 and the α6 GABAA-receptor subunit, we found that UBCs populate all regions of the GCS and occur at remarkably high densities in the DCN and subpeduncular corner, but rarely in the lamina. Although GCS subregions likely share the same microcircuitry, their dissimilar UBC densities suggest they may be functionally distinct. UBCs and granules are also present in regions previously not included in the GCS, namely the rostrodorsal magnocellular portions of VCN, vestibular nerve root, trapezoid body, spinal tract and sensory and principal nuclei of the trigeminal nerve, and cerebellar peduncles. The UBC’s dendritic brush receives AMPA- and NMDA-mediated input from an individual mossy fiber, favoring singularity of input, and its axon most likely forms several mossy fiber-like endings that target numerous granule cells and other UBCs, as in the cerebellum. The UBCs therefore, may amplify afferent signals temporally and

  3. Operant Nociception in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kangas, Brian D.; Bergman, Jack

    2014-01-01

    The effective management of pain is a longstanding public health concern. Morphine-like opioids have long been front-line analgesics, but produce undesirable side effects that can limit their application. Slow progress in the introduction of novel improved medications for pain management over the last 5 decades has prompted a call for innovative translational research, including new preclinical assays. Most current in vivo procedures (e.g., tail flick, hot plate, warm water tail withdrawal) assay the effects of nociceptive stimuli on simple spinal reflexes or unconditioned behavioral reactions. However, clinical treatment goals may include the restoration of previous behavioral activities, which can be limited by medication-related side-effects that are not measured in such procedures. The present studies describe an apparatus and procedure to study the disruptive effects of nociceptive stimuli on voluntary behavior in nonhuman primates, and the ability of drugs to restore such behavior through their analgesic actions. Squirrel monkeys were trained to pull a cylindrical thermode for access to a highly palatable food. Next, sessions were conducted in which the temperature of the thermode was increased stepwise until responding stopped, permitting the determination of stable nociceptive thresholds. Tests revealed that several opioid analgesics, but not d-amphetamine or Δ9-THC, produced dose-related increases in threshold that were antagonist-sensitive and efficacy-dependent, consistent with their effects using traditional measures of antinociception. Unlike traditional reflex-based measures, however, the results also permitted the concurrent evaluation of response disruption, providing an index with which to characterize the behavioral selectivity of antinociceptive drugs. PMID:24968803

  4. Effect of suspension property on granule morphology and compaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hae-Weon Lee, Guesup Song, In-Sik Suk

    1995-12-31

    Granule morphology is an important factor during dry pressing, since it has great influences on die flowability, compaction ratio, and resulting green microstructure. Granule morphology and packing structure of ultrafine Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} particles in the granule were optimized during spray drying by adjusting the suspension structure. The particle packing structure of spray-dried granule was investigated with suspension structure. The effects of granule morphology and its particle packing structure on compaction and resultant sintering behavior were evaluated.

  5. In vivo Atoh1 targetome reveals how a proneural transcription factor regulates cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Klisch, Tiemo J; Xi, Yuanxin; Flora, Adriano; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2011-02-22

    The proneural, basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Atoh1 governs the development of numerous key neuronal subtypes, such as cerebellar granule and brainstem neurons, inner ear hair cells, and several neurons of the proprioceptive system, as well as diverse nonneuronal cell types, such as Merkel cells and intestinal secretory lineages. However, the mere handful of targets that have been identified barely begin to account for Atoh1's astonishing range of functions, which also encompasses seemingly paradoxical activities, such as promoting cell proliferation and medulloblastoma formation in the cerebellum and inducing cell cycle exit and suppressing tumorigenesis in the intestine. We used a multipronged approach to create a comprehensive, unbiased list of over 600 direct Atoh1 target genes in the postnatal cerebellum. We found that Atoh1 binds to a 10 nucleotide motif (AtEAM) to directly regulate genes involved in migration, cell adhesion, metabolism, and other previously unsuspected functions. This study expands current thinking about the transcriptional activities driving neuronal differentiation and provides a framework for further neurodevelopmental studies. PMID:21300888

  6. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  7. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this c