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Sample records for primed vesicle state

  1. Synaptobrevin N-terminally bound to syntaxin–SNAP-25 defines the primed vesicle state in regulated exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Alexander M.; Wiederhold, Katrin; Bruns, Dieter; Fasshauer, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Rapid neurotransmitter release depends on the ability to arrest the SNAP receptor (SNARE)–dependent exocytosis pathway at an intermediate “cocked” state, from which fusion can be triggered by Ca2+. It is not clear whether this state includes assembly of synaptobrevin (the vesicle membrane SNARE) to the syntaxin–SNAP-25 (target membrane SNAREs) acceptor complex or whether the reaction is arrested upstream of that step. In this study, by a combination of in vitro biophysical measurements and time-resolved exocytosis measurements in adrenal chromaffin cells, we find that mutations of the N-terminal interaction layers of the SNARE bundle inhibit assembly in vitro and vesicle priming in vivo without detectable changes in triggering speed or fusion pore properties. In contrast, mutations in the last C-terminal layer decrease triggering speed and fusion pore duration. Between the two domains, we identify a region exquisitely sensitive to mutation, possibly constituting a switch. Our data are consistent with a model in which the N terminus of the SNARE complex assembles during vesicle priming, followed by Ca2+-triggered C-terminal assembly and membrane fusion. PMID:20142423

  2. Variable priming of a docked synaptic vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hoon; Szule, Joseph A.; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2016-01-01

    The priming of a docked synaptic vesicle determines the probability of its membrane (VM) fusing with the presynaptic membrane (PM) when a nerve impulse arrives. To gain insight into the nature of priming, we searched by electron tomography for structural relationships correlated with fusion probability at active zones of axon terminals at frog neuromuscular junctions. For terminals fixed at rest, the contact area between the VM of docked vesicles and PM varied >10-fold with a normal distribution. There was no merging of the membranes. For terminals fixed during repetitive evoked synaptic transmission, the normal distribution of contact areas was shifted to the left, due in part to a decreased number of large contact areas, and there was a subpopulation of large contact areas where the membranes were hemifused, an intermediate preceding complete fusion. Thus, fusion probability of a docked vesicle is related to the extent of its VM–PM contact area. For terminals fixed 1 h after activity, the distribution of contact areas recovered to that at rest, indicating the extent of a VM–PM contact area is dynamic and in equilibrium. The extent of VM–PM contact areas in resting terminals correlated with eccentricity in vesicle shape caused by force toward the PM and with shortness of active zone material macromolecules linking vesicles to PM components, some thought to include Ca2+ channels. We propose that priming is a variable continuum of events imposing variable fusion probability on each vesicle and is regulated by force-generating shortening of active zone material macromolecules in dynamic equilibrium. PMID:26858418

  3. Resident CAPS on dense-core vesicles docks and primes vesicles for fusion.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Greg; Kielar-Grevstad, D Michelle; Zhang, Xingmin; James, Declan J; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-02-15

    The Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells requires a priming step during which SNARE protein complexes assemble. CAPS (aka CADPS) is one of several factors required for vesicle priming; however, the localization and dynamics of CAPS at sites of exocytosis in live neuroendocrine cells has not been determined. We imaged CAPS before, during, and after single-vesicle fusion events in PC12 cells by TIRF micro-scopy. In addition to being a resident on cytoplasmic dense-core vesicles, CAPS was present in clusters of approximately nine molecules near the plasma membrane that corresponded to docked/tethered vesicles. CAPS accompanied vesicles to the plasma membrane and was present at all vesicle exocytic events. The knockdown of CAPS by shRNA eliminated the VAMP-2-dependent docking and evoked exocytosis of fusion-competent vesicles. A CAPS(ΔC135) protein that does not localize to vesicles failed to rescue vesicle docking and evoked exocytosis in CAPS-depleted cells, showing that CAPS residence on vesicles is essential. Our results indicate that dense-core vesicles carry CAPS to sites of exocytosis, where CAPS promotes vesicle docking and fusion competence, probably by initiating SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26700319

  4. Resident CAPS on dense-core vesicles docks and primes vesicles for fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kabachinski, Greg; Kielar-Grevstad, D. Michelle; Zhang, Xingmin; James, Declan J.; Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells requires a priming step during which SNARE protein complexes assemble. CAPS (aka CADPS) is one of several factors required for vesicle priming; however, the localization and dynamics of CAPS at sites of exocytosis in live neuroendocrine cells has not been determined. We imaged CAPS before, during, and after single-vesicle fusion events in PC12 cells by TIRF micro­scopy. In addition to being a resident on cytoplasmic dense-core vesicles, CAPS was present in clusters of approximately nine molecules near the plasma membrane that corresponded to docked/tethered vesicles. CAPS accompanied vesicles to the plasma membrane and was present at all vesicle exocytic events. The knockdown of CAPS by shRNA eliminated the VAMP-2–dependent docking and evoked exocytosis of fusion-competent vesicles. A CAPS(ΔC135) protein that does not localize to vesicles failed to rescue vesicle docking and evoked exocytosis in CAPS-depleted cells, showing that CAPS residence on vesicles is essential. Our results indicate that dense-core vesicles carry CAPS to sites of exocytosis, where CAPS promotes vesicle docking and fusion competence, probably by initiating SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26700319

  5. SNARE and regulatory proteins induce local membrane protrusions to prime docked vesicles for fast calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Malsam, Jörg; Hagen, Wim J H; Scheutzow, Andrea; Söllner, Thomas H; Briggs, John A G

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane in response to Ca2+ influx, thereby releasing neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. The protein machinery that mediates this process, consisting of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and regulatory proteins, is well known, but the mechanisms by which these proteins prime synaptic membranes for fusion are debated. In this study, we applied large-scale, automated cryo-electron tomography to image an in vitro system that reconstitutes synaptic fusion. Our findings suggest that upon docking and priming of vesicles for fast Ca2+-triggered fusion, SNARE proteins act in concert with regulatory proteins to induce a local protrusion in the plasma membrane, directed towards the primed vesicle. The SNAREs and regulatory proteins thereby stabilize the membrane in a high-energy state from which the activation energy for fusion is profoundly reduced, allowing synchronous and instantaneous fusion upon release of the complexin clamp. PMID:24493260

  6. A Chemical Controller of SNARE-Driven Membrane Fusion That Primes Vesicles for Ca(2+)-Triggered Millisecond Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Heo, Paul; Yang, Yoosoo; Han, Kyu Young; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jong-Hyeok; Jung, Younghoon; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Shin, Jaeil; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Ha, Taekjip; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    Membrane fusion is mediated by the SNARE complex which is formed through a zippering process. Here, we developed a chemical controller for the progress of membrane fusion. A hemifusion state was arrested by a polyphenol myricetin which binds to the SNARE complex. The arrest of membrane fusion was rescued by an enzyme laccase that removes myricetin from the SNARE complex. The rescued hemifusion state was metastable and long-lived with a decay constant of 39 min. This membrane fusion controller was applied to delineate how Ca(2+) stimulates fusion-pore formation in a millisecond time scale. We found, using a single-vesicle fusion assay, that such myricetin-primed vesicles with synaptotagmin 1 respond synchronously to physiological concentrations of Ca(2+). When 10 μM Ca(2+) was added to the hemifused vesicles, the majority of vesicles rapidly advanced to fusion pores with a time constant of 16.2 ms. Thus, the results demonstrate that a minimal exocytotic membrane fusion machinery composed of SNAREs and synaptotagmin 1 is capable of driving membrane fusion in a millisecond time scale when a proper vesicle priming is established. The chemical controller of SNARE-driven membrane fusion should serve as a versatile tool for investigating the differential roles of various synaptic proteins in discrete fusion steps. PMID:26987363

  7. Synaptobrevin 1 mediates vesicle priming and evoked release in a subpopulation of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Johannes; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-09-15

    The core machinery of synaptic vesicle fusion consists of three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) proteins, the two t-SNAREs at the plasma membrane (SNAP-25, Syntaxin 1) and the vesicle-bound v-SNARE synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP2). Formation of the trans-oriented four-α-helix bundle between these SNAREs brings vesicle and plasma membrane in close proximity and prepares the vesicle for fusion. The t-SNAREs are thought to be necessary for vesicle fusion. Whether the v-SNAREs are required for fusion is still unclear, as substantial vesicle priming and spontaneous release activity remain in mammalian mass-cultured synaptobrevin/cellubrevin-deficient neurons. Using the autaptic culture system from synaptobrevin 2 knockout neurons of mouse hippocampus, we found that the majority of cells were devoid of any evoked or spontaneous release and had no measurable readily releasable pool. A small subpopulation of neurons, however, displayed release, and their release activity correlated with the presence and amount of v-SNARE synaptobrevin 1 expressed. Comparison of synaptobrevin 1 and 2 in rescue experiments demonstrates that synaptobrevin 1 can substitute for the other v-SNARE, but with a lower efficiency in neurotransmitter release probability. Release activity in synaptobrevin 2-deficient mass-cultured neurons was massively reduced by a knockdown of synaptobrevin 1, demonstrating that synaptobrevin 1 is responsible for the remaining release activity. These data support the hypothesis that both t- and v-SNAREs are absolutely required for vesicle priming and evoked release and that differential expression of SNARE paralogs can contribute to differential synaptic coding in the brain. PMID:24944211

  8. Syntaxin Opening by the MUN Domain Underlies the Function of Munc13 in Synaptic Vesicle Priming

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Shen; Sheng, Yi; Zhang, Mingshu; Zou, Wenjuan; Wu, Lijie; Kang, Lijun; Rizo, Josep; Zhang, Rongguang; Xu, Tao; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    UNC-13-Munc13s play a central function in synaptic vesicle priming through their MUN domains. However, it is unclear whether this function arises from the ability of the MUN domain to mediate the transition from the Munc18-1–closed syntaxin-1 complex to the SNARE complex in vitro. The crystal structure of rat Munc13-1 MUN domain now reveals an elongated, arch-shaped architecture formed by α-helical bundles, with a highly conserved hydrophobic pocket in the middle. Mutation of two residues (NF) in this pocket abolishes the stimulation caused by the Munc13-1 MUN domain on SNARE complex assembly and on SNARE-dependent proteoliposome fusion in vitro. Moreover, the same mutation in UNC-13 abrogates synaptic vesicle priming in C. elegans neuromuscular junctions. These results strongly support the notion that orchestration of syntaxin-1 opening and SNARE complex assembly underlies the central role of UNC-13-Munc13s in synaptic vesicle priming. PMID:26030875

  9. Munc13-1 acts as a priming factor for large dense-core vesicles in bovine chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashery, Uri; Varoqueaux, Frederique; Voets, Thomas; Betz, Andrea; Thakur, Pratima; Koch, Henriette; Neher, Erwin; Brose, Nils; Rettig, Jens

    2000-01-01

    In chromaffin cells the number of large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) which can be released by brief, intense stimuli represents only a small fraction of the ‘morphologically docked’ vesicles at the plasma membrane. Recently, it was shown that Munc13-1 is essential for a post-docking step of synaptic vesicle fusion. To investigate the role of Munc13-1 in LDCV exocytosis, we overexpressed Munc13-1 in chromaffin cells and stimulated secretion by flash photolysis of caged calcium. Both components of the exocytotic burst, which represent the fusion of release-competent vesicles, were increased by a factor of three. The sustained component, which represents vesicle maturation and subsequent fusion, was increased by the same factor. The response to a second flash, however, was greatly reduced, indicating a depletion of release-competent vesicles. Since there was no apparent change in the number of docked vesicles, we conclude that Munc13-1 acts as a priming factor by accelerating the rate constant of vesicle transfer from a pool of docked, but unprimed vesicles to a pool of release-competent, primed vesicles. PMID:10899113

  10. UNC-31/CAPS docks and primes dense core vesicles in C. elegans neurons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xian-Guang; Ming, Min; Chen, Mao-Rong; Niu, Wei-Pin; Zhang, Yong-Deng; Liu, Bei; Jiu, Ya-Ming; Yu, Jun-Wei; Xu, Tao; Wu, Zheng-Xing

    2010-07-01

    UNC-31 or its mammalian homologue, Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS), is indispensable for exocytosis of dense core vesicle (DCV) and synaptic vesicle (SV). From N- to the C-terminus, UNC-31 contains putative functional domains, including dynactin 1 binding domain (DBD), C2, PH, (M)UNC-13 homology domain (MHD) and DCV binding domain (DCVBD), the last four we examined in this study. We employed UNC-31 null mutant C. elegans worms to examine whether UNC-31 functions could be rescued by ectopic expression of full length UNC-31 vs each of these four domain-deleted mutants. Full length UNC-31 cDNA rescued the phenotypes of C. elegans null mutants in response to Ca(2+)-elevation in ALA neurons. Surprisingly, MHD deletion also rescued UNC-31 exocytotic function in part because the relatively high Ca(2+) level (pre-flash Ca(2+) was 450 nM) used in the capacitance study could bypass the MHD defect. Nonetheless, the three other domain-truncation cDNAs had almost no rescue on Ca(2+) evoked secretion. Importantly, this genetic null mutant rescue strategy enabled physiological studies at levels of whole organism to single cells, such as locomotion assay, pharmacological study of neurotransmission at neuromuscular junction, in vivo neuropeptide release measurement and analysis of vesicular docking. Our results suggest that each of these UNC-31 domains support distinct sequential molecular actions of UNC-31 in vesicular exocytosis, including steps in vesicle tethering and docking that bridge vesicle with plasma membrane, and subsequently priming vesicle by initiating the formation of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) core complex. PMID:20515653

  11. Vesicle Geometries Enabled by Dynamically Trapped States.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaye; Yao, Zhenwei; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2016-02-23

    Understanding and controlling vesicle shapes is a fundamental challenge in biophysics and materials design. In this paper, we design dynamic protocols for enlarging the shape space of both fluid and crystalline vesicles beyond the equilibrium zone. By removing water from within the vesicle at different rates, we numerically produced a series of dynamically trapped stable vesicle shapes for both fluid and crystalline vesicles in a highly controllable fashion. In crystalline vesicles that are continuously dehydrated, simulations show the initial appearance of small flat areas over the surface of the vesicles that ultimately merge to form fewer flat faces. In this way, the vesicles transform from a fullerene-like shape into various faceted polyhedrons. We perform analytical elasticity analysis to show that these salient features are attributable to the crystalline nature of the vesicle. The potential to use dynamic protocols, such as those used in this study, to engineer vesicle shape transformations is helpful for exploiting the richness of vesicle geometries for desired applications. PMID:26795199

  12. Modulation of Neurotransmission by GPCRs Is Dependent upon the Microarchitecture of the Primed Vesicle Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Edaeni; Church, Emily; Wells, Christopher A.; Zurawski, Zack; Hamm, Heidi E.

    2014-01-01

    Gi/o-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) ubiquitously inhibit neurotransmission, principally via Gβγ, which acts via a number of possible effectors. GPCR effector specificity has traditionally been attributed to Gα, based on Gα's preferential effector targeting in vitro compared with Gβγ's promiscuous targeting of various effectors. In synapses, however, Gβγ clearly targets unique effectors in a receptor-dependent way to modulate synaptic transmission. It remains unknown whether Gβγ specificity in vivo is due to specific Gβγ isoform-receptor associations or to spatial separation of distinct Gβγ pathways through macromolecular interactions. We thus sought to determine how Gβγ signaling pathways within axons remain distinct from one another. In rat hippocampal CA1 axons, GABAB receptors (GABABRs) inhibit presynaptic Ca2+ entry, and we have now demonstrated that 5-HT1B receptors (5-HT1BRs) liberate Gβγ to interact with SNARE complex C terminals with no effect on Ca2+ entry. Both GABABRs and 5-HT1BRs inhibit Ca2+-evoked neurotransmitter release, but 5-HT1BRs have no effect on Sr2+-evoked release. Sr2+, unlike Ca2+, does not cause synaptotagmin to compete with Gβγ binding to SNARE complexes. 5-HT1BRs also fail to inhibit release following cleavage of the C terminus of the SNARE complex protein SNAP-25 with botulinum A toxin. Thus, GABABRs and 5-HT1BRs both localize to presynaptic terminals, but target distinct effectors. We demonstrate that disruption of SNARE complexes and vesicle priming with botulinum C toxin eliminates this selectivity, allowing 5-HT1BR inhibition of Ca2+ entry. We conclude that receptor-effector specificity requires a microarchitecture provided by the SNARE complex during vesicle priming. PMID:24381287

  13. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  14. Munc13-1-mediated vesicle priming contributes to secretory amyloid precursor protein processing.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Steffen; Fuchsbrunner, Katrin; Lange-Dohna, Christine; Hartlage-Rübsamen, Maike; Bigl, Volker; Betz, Andrea; Reim, Kerstin; Brose, Nils

    2004-07-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) gives rise toc beta-amyloid peptides, which are the main constituents of senile plaques in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Non-amyloidogenic processing of the APP can be stimulated by phorbol esters (PEs) and by intracellular diacylglycerol (DAG) generation. This led to the hypothesis that classical and novel protein kinase Cs (PKCs), which are activated by DAG/PEs, regulate APP processing. However, in addition to PKCs, there are other DAG/PE receptors present in neurons that may participate in the modulation of APP processing. Munc13-1, a presynaptic protein with an essential role in synaptic vesicle priming, represents such an alternative target of the DAG second messenger pathway. Using Munc13-1 knock-out mice and knock-in mice expressing a Munc13-1(H567K) variant deficient in DAG/PE binding, we determined the relative contributions of PKCs and Munc13-1 to PE-stimulated secretory APP processing. We establish that, in addition to PKC, Munc13-1 significantly contributes to the regulation of secretory APP metabolism. PMID:15123597

  15. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  16. Vesicles

    MedlinePlus

    ... pox Contact dermatitis (may be caused by poison ivy) Herpes simplex (cold sores, genital herpes ) Herpes zoster ( ... for certain conditions that cause vesicles, including poison ivy and cold sores.

  17. Chlorophyll a triplet-state ESR in frozen phosphatidylcholine vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromitsu, I.; Kevan, L.

    1988-05-19

    Photoexcited chlorophyll a (Chla) triplet state in rapidly frozen egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) vesicles is investigated at 77 K by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy using light intensity modulation. The electron spin polarization (ESP) intensity is stronger for 0.2 mM Chla than for 1.0 mM Chla. The absolute values of the zero field splitting parameter, D, are 283 (+/-1) x 10/sup -4/ and 276 (+/-2) x 10/sup -4/ cm/sup -1/, and the average depopulation rates of the triplet state are 0.671 +/- 0.052 and 1.054 +/- 0.036 ms/sup -1/ for 0.2 mM Chla and 1.0 mM Chla, respectively. This difference can be consistently attributed to faster triplet-state migration between adjacent Chla's at the higher 1.0 mM Chla concentration. A characteristic migration time of 2.6 ms is obtained. The ESP pattern of the Chla triplet state in the frozen EPC vesicles resembles that in polycrystals more than that in glasses. This suggests that the local environment around Chla in the vesicles is more structured than in glasses.

  18. Vesicle dynamics in a confined Poiseuille flow: From steady state to chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aouane, Othmane; Thiébaud, Marine; Benyoussef, Abdelilah; Wagner, Christian; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are the major component of blood, and the flow of blood is dictated by that of RBCs. We employ vesicles, which consist of closed bilayer membranes enclosing a fluid, as a model system to study the behavior of RBCs under a confined Poiseuille flow. We extensively explore two main parameters: (i) the degree of confinement of vesicles within the channel and (ii) the flow strength. Rich and complex dynamics for vesicles are revealed, ranging from steady-state shapes (in the form of parachute and slipper shapes) to chaotic dynamics of shape. Chaos occurs through a cascade of multiple periodic oscillations of the vesicle shape. We summarize our results in a phase diagram in the parameter plane (degree of confinement and flow strength). This finding highlights the level of complexity of a flowing vesicle in the small Reynolds number where the flow is laminar in the absence of vesicles and can be rendered turbulent due to elasticity of vesicles.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane Vesicles Triggered by Human Mucosal Fluid and Lysozyme Can Prime Host Tissue Surfaces for Bacterial Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Metruccio, Matteo M. E.; Evans, David J.; Gabriel, Manal M.; Kadurugamuwa, Jagath L.; Fleiszig, Suzanne M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS) controls (∼100-fold). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (∼4-fold, P < 0.01). Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections. PMID:27375592

  20. Spin State As a Probe of Vesicle Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghoon; Bellouard, Christine; Eastoe, Julian; Canilho, Nadia; Rogers, Sarah E; Ihiawakrim, Dris; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pasc, Andreea

    2016-03-01

    A novel system of paramagnetic vesicles was designed using ion pairs of iron-containing surfactants. Unilamellar vesicles (diameter ≈ 200 nm) formed spontaneously and were characterized by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and light and small-angle neutron scattering. Moreover, for the first time, it is shown that magnetization measurements can be used to investigate self-assembly of such functionalized systems, giving information on the vesicle compositions and distribution of surfactants between the bilayers and the aqueous bulk. PMID:26859700

  1. Solid-state NMR evidence for inequivalent GvpA subunits in gas vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, Astrid C.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Belenky, Marina; Griffin, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Gas vesicles are organelles that provide buoyancy to the aquatic microorganisms that harbor them. The gas vesicle shell consists almost exclusively of the hydrophobic 70-residue protein GvpA, arranged in an ordered array. Solid-state NMR spectra of intact, collapsed gas vesicles from the cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae show duplication of certain GvpA resonances, indicating that specific sites experience at least two different local environments. Interpretation of these results in terms of an asymmetric dimer repeat unit can reconcile otherwise conflicting features of the primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures of the gas vesicle protein. In particular, the asymmetric dimer can explain how the hydrogen bonds in the β–sheet portion of the molecule can be oriented optimally for strength while promoting stabilizing aromatic and electrostatic side-chain interactions among highly conserved residues and creating a large hydrophobic surface suitable for preventing water condensation inside the vesicle. PMID:19232353

  2. Triplet states of oxygen vacancy defects in α-quartz: Center \\bf{\\text{E}^{\\prime\\prime}_{9}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashkovtsev, R. I.; Pan, Y.

    2014-08-01

    The paramagnetic E^{\\prime\\prime}_{9} center in triplet state occurring in electron-irradiated, synthetic α-quartz has been investigated by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The primary spin Hamiltonian parameter matrices g, D and A (hyperfine interactions for five 29Si nuclei) have now been determined. The principal values and principal directions of D and A matrices allow us to suggest the structural model for this stable triplet defect. The E^{\\prime\\prime}_{9} center involves the two unpaired electrons located in the orbitals of two silicon atoms next to one oxygen vacancy each. Firm correlations between the spin Hamiltonian matrix principal axes and crystallographic directions have been attained.

  3. Vesicle dynamics in a confined Poiseuille flow: from steady state to chaos.

    PubMed

    Aouane, Othmane; Thiébaud, Marine; Benyoussef, Abdelilah; Wagner, Christian; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are the major component of blood, and the flow of blood is dictated by that of RBCs. We employ vesicles, which consist of closed bilayer membranes enclosing a fluid, as a model system to study the behavior of RBCs under a confined Poiseuille flow. We extensively explore two main parameters: (i) the degree of confinement of vesicles within the channel and (ii) the flow strength. Rich and complex dynamics for vesicles are revealed, ranging from steady-state shapes (in the form of parachute and slipper shapes) to chaotic dynamics of shape. Chaos occurs through a cascade of multiple periodic oscillations of the vesicle shape. We summarize our results in a phase diagram in the parameter plane (degree of confinement and flow strength). This finding highlights the level of complexity of a flowing vesicle in the small Reynolds number where the flow is laminar in the absence of vesicles and can be rendered turbulent due to elasticity of vesicles. PMID:25314533

  4. Role of lipopolysaccharide in the induction of type I interferon-dependent cross-priming and IL-10 production in mice by meningococcal outer membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Mackenzie, Joanne; de Leon, Joel; Mesa, Circe; Quesniaux, Valérie; Montoya, Maria; Le Bon, Agnes; Wong, Simon Y C

    2009-03-18

    We investigated the contribution of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to adjuvant properties of native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV), a vaccine candidate for meningococcal B disease. NOMV induce the maturation of and cytokine production by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells through both toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 which are mostly dependent on the signalling adaptor MyD88. NOMV are also able to induce B cell proliferation in splenocytes from LPS-hyporesponsive mice. However, induction of IL-10 and type I interferon-dependent, antigen-specific and IFN(gamma)-secreting CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in vivo by NOMV requires LPS. The importance of LPS in the induction of IL-10 and functional cross-priming has implications for NOMV-based vaccine and adjuvant development. PMID:19368771

  5. Seed priming: state of the art and new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Paparella, S; Araújo, S S; Rossi, G; Wijayasinghe, M; Carbonera, D; Balestrazzi, Alma

    2015-08-01

    Priming applied to commercial seed lots is widely used by seed technologists to enhance seed vigour in terms of germination potential and increased stress tolerance. Priming can be also valuable to seed bank operators who need improved protocols of ex situ conservation of germplasm collections (crop and native species). Depending on plant species, seed morphology and physiology, different priming treatments can be applied, all of them triggering the so-called 'pre-germinative metabolism'. This physiological process takes place during early seed imbibition and includes the seed repair response (activation of DNA repair pathways and antioxidant mechanisms), essential to preserve genome integrity, ensuring proper germination and seedling development. The review provides an overview of priming technology, describing the range of physical-chemical and biological treatments currently available. Optimised priming protocols can be designed using the 'hydrotime concept' analysis which provides the theoretical bases for assessing the relationship between water potential and germination rate. Despite the efforts so far reported to further improve seed priming, novel ideas and cutting-edge investigations need to be brought into this technological sector of agri-seed industry. Multidisciplinary translational research combining digital, bioinformatic and molecular tools will significantly contribute to expand the range of priming applications to other relevant commercial sectors, e.g. the native seed market. PMID:25812837

  6. Adhesion energy can regulate vesicle fusion and stabilize partially fused states

    PubMed Central

    Long, Rong; Hui, Chung-Yuen; Jagota, Anand; Bykhovskaia, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Release of neurotransmitters from nerve terminals occurs by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane, and this process is highly regulated. Although major molecular components that control docking and fusion of vesicles to the synaptic membrane have been identified, the detailed mechanics of this process is not yet understood. We have developed a mathematical model that predicts how adhesion forces imposed by docking and fusion molecular machinery would affect the fusion process. We have computed the membrane stress that is produced by adhesion-driven vesicle bending and find that it is compressive. Further, our computations of the membrane curvature predict that strong adhesion can create a metastable state with a partially opened pore that would correspond to the ‘kiss and run’ release mode. Our model predicts that the larger the vesicle size, the more likely the metastable state with a transiently opened pore. These results contribute to understanding the mechanics of the fusion process, including possible clamping of the fusion by increasing molecular adhesion, and a balance between ‘kiss and run’ and full collapse fusion modes. PMID:22258550

  7. Theoretical study of the A prime 5Sigma(+)g and C double prime 5Pi u states of N2 - Implications for the N2 afterglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Schwenke, David W.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical spectroscopic constants are reported for the A prime 5Sigma(+)g and C double prime 5Pi u states of N2 based on CASSCF/MRCI calculations using large ANO Gaussian basis sets. The calculated A prime Sigma(+)g potential differs qualitatively from previous calculations in that the inner well is significantly deeper (De = 3450/cm). This deeper well provides considerable support for the suggestion of Berkowitz et al. (1956) that A prime 5Sigma(+)g is the primary precursor state involved in the yellow Lewis-Rayleigh afterglow of N2.

  8. Seeing emotions in the eyes – inverse priming effects induced by eyes expressing mental states

    PubMed Central

    Wagenbreth, Caroline; Rieger, Julia; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Zaehle, Tino

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Automatic emotional processing of faces and facial expressions gain more and more of relevance in terms of social communication. Among a variety of different primes, targets and tasks, whole face images and facial expressions have been used to affectively prime emotional responses. This study investigates whether emotional information provided solely in eye regions that display mental states can also trigger affective priming. Methods: Sixteen subjects answered a lexical decision task (LDT) coupled with an affective priming paradigm. Emotion-associated eye regions were extracted from photographs of faces and acted as primes, whereas targets were either words or pseudo-words. Participants had to decide whether the targets were real German words or generated pseudo-words. Primes and targets belonged to the emotional categories “fear,” “disgust,” “happiness,” and “neutral.” Results: A general valence effect for positive words was observed: responses in the LDT were faster for target words of the emotional category happiness when compared to other categories. Importantly, pictures of emotional eye regions preceding the target words affected their subsequent classification. While we show a classical priming effect for neutral target words – with shorter RT for congruent compared to incongruent prime-target pairs- , we observed an inverse priming effect for fearful and happy target words – with shorter RT for incongruent compared to congruent prime-target pairs. These inverse priming effects were driven exclusively by specific prime-target pairs. Conclusion: Reduced facial emotional information is sufficient to induce automatic implicit emotional processing. The emotional-associated eye regions were processed with respect to their emotional valence and affected the performance on the LDT. PMID:25278925

  9. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David R.; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP) and a slowly releasable (SRP) pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation, and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles. PMID:21423410

  10. Translation-priming effects on tip-of-the-tongue states

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Tamar H.; Ferreira, Victor S.; Cera, Cynthia; Flett, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    Bilinguals experience more tip-of-the-tongue (TOT) states than monolinguals, but it is not known if this is caused in part by access of representations from both of bilinguals’ languages, or dual-language activation. In two translation priming experiments, bilinguals were given three Spanish primes and produced either semantically (Experiment 1) or phonologically related Spanish words (Experiment 2) to each. They then named a picture in English. On critical trials, one of the primes was the Spanish translation of the English picture name. Translation primes significantly increased TOTs regardless of task, and also speeded correct retrievals but only with the semantic task. In both experiments translation-primed TOTs were significantly more likely to resolve spontaneously. These results illustrate an effect of non-dominant language activation on dominant-language retrieval, as well as imply that TOTs can arise during (not after) lexical retrieval, at a level of processing where translation equivalent lexical representations normally interact (possibly competing for selection, or mutually activating each other, or both depending on the locus of retrieval failure). PMID:24644375

  11. Synaptotagmin-7 Is Essential for Ca2+-Triggered Delayed Asynchronous Release But Not for Ca2+-Dependent Vesicle Priming in Retinal Ribbon Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bacaj, Taulant

    2015-01-01

    Most synapses release neurotransmitters in two phases: (1) a fast synchronous phase lasting a few milliseconds; and (2) a delayed “asynchronous” phase lasting hundreds of milliseconds. Ca2+ triggers fast synchronous neurotransmitter release by binding to synaptotagmin-1, synaptotagmin-2, or synaptotagmin-9, but how Ca2+ triggers delayed asynchronous release has long remained enigmatic. Recent results suggested that consistent with the Ca2+-sensor function of synaptotagmin-7 in neuroendocrine exocytosis, synaptotagmin-7 also functions as a Ca2+ sensor for synaptic vesicle exocytosis but operates during delayed asynchronous release. Puzzlingly, a subsequent study postulated that synaptotagmin-7 is not a Ca2+ sensor for release but mediates Ca2+-dependent vesicle repriming after intense stimulation. To address these issues, we here analyzed synaptic transmission at rod bipolar neuron–AII amacrine cell synapses in acute mouse retina slices as a model system. Using paired recordings, we show that knock-out of synaptotagmin-7 selectively impairs delayed asynchronous release but not fast synchronous release. Delayed asynchronous release was blocked in wild-type synapses by intracellular addition of high concentrations of the slow Ca2+-chelator EGTA, but EGTA had no effect in synaptotagmin-7 knock-out neurons because delayed asynchronous release was already impaired. Moreover, direct measurements of vesicle repriming failed to uncover an effect of the synaptotagmin-7 knock-out on vesicle repriming. Our data demonstrate that synaptotagmin-7 is selectively essential for Ca2+-dependent delayed asynchronous release in retinal rod bipolar cell synapses, that its function can be blocked by simply introducing a slow Ca2+ buffer into the cells, and that synaptotagmin-7 is not required for normal vesicle repriming. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT How Ca2+ triggers delayed asynchronous release has long remained enigmatic. Synaptotagmin-7 has been implicated recently as Ca2+ sensor in

  12. Intake of silica nanoparticles by giant lipid vesicles: influence of particle size and thermodynamic membrane state

    PubMed Central

    Strobl, Florian G; Seitz, Florian; Westerhausen, Christoph; Reller, Armin; Torrano, Adriano A; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Summary The uptake of nanoparticles into cells often involves their engulfment by the plasma membrane and a fission of the latter. Understanding the physical mechanisms underlying these uptake processes may be achieved by the investigation of simple model systems that can be compared to theoretical models. Here, we present experiments on a massive uptake of silica nanoparticles by giant unilamellar lipid vesicles (GUVs). We find that this uptake process depends on the size of the particles as well as on the thermodynamic state of the lipid membrane. Our findings are discussed in the light of several theoretical models and indicate that these models have to be extended in order to capture the interaction between nanomaterials and biological membranes correctly. PMID:25671142

  13. Prime Knowledge about Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Several proofs demonstrating that there are infinitely many primes, different types of primes, tests of primality, pseudo primes, prime number generators and open questions about primes are discussed in Section 1. Some of these notions are elaborated upon in Section 2, with discussions of the Riemann zeta function and how algorithmic complexity…

  14. The Cumulative Effects of Indiana PRIME TIME: A State Sponsored Reduced Class Size Program, on Basic Skills Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malloy, Leanne; Gilman, David

    The purpose of this paper was to analyze the initial results of statewide implementation of the PRIME TIME program in Indiana. PRIME TIME is a state-wide program to reduce class size in the primary grades. Mean scores from 65,911 third graders who had completed the Indiana Competency Test in the spring of 1987 after completing 3 years of the…

  15. Information on State versus Local Administration of CETA Prime Sponsors in Michigan. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    State administration of the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) Balance of State (BOS) programs was compared with administration of CETA programs by local (regular) prime sponsors in Michigan to gain insight on the potential impact of increased state control. BOS prime sponsors spent less than regular prime sponsors for administration…

  16. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four.

  17. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D L

    2016-01-01

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four. PMID:27272401

  18. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four. PMID:27272401

  19. What's the use of being happy? Mood states, useful objects, and repetition priming effects.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Mark C; Goetz, Paul W; Robinson, Michael D

    2007-08-01

    Two experiments involving 99 undergraduate participants sought to examine the influence of mood states on encoding speed within lexical decision and pronunciation tasks. Mood states were measured naturalistically in Experiment 1 and manipulated in Experiment 2. Stimuli consisted of nouns representing useful (e.g., food) and nonuseful (e.g., lint) objects. Mood states had no implications for initial encoding speed. However, when the same words were presented a 2nd time (i.e., repeated), happy individuals displayed a tendency to encode useful words faster than nonuseful ones. Thus, mood states influenced repetition priming on the basis of stimulus valence. The authors propose that happiness sensitizes individuals to useful or rewarding objects, which in turn creates a stronger memory trace for such stimuli in the future. PMID:17683223

  20. Mechanisms of deactivation of the low-lying electronic states of 2,2 prime -bipyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Castellucci, E.; Angeloni, L. ); Marconi, G.; Venuti, E. ); Baraldi, I. )

    1990-03-08

    The photophysical properties of 2,2{prime}-bipyridine have been investigated in different solvents by means of lifetime measurements on the picosecond scale, quantum yield temperature dependence, and CS-INDO CI calculations. Both experimental and theoretical results indicate that in inert solvents the very low fluorescence quantum yield of this molecule is due to a very effective intersystem crossing to a local triplet state. The picture emerging from these data helps to gain insight into the elusive photophysical behavior of this compound.

  1. Gas vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Walsby, A E

    1994-01-01

    The gas vesicle is a hollow structure made of protein. It usually has the form of a cylindrical tube closed by conical end caps. Gas vesicles occur in five phyla of the Bacteria and two groups of the Archaea, but they are mostly restricted to planktonic microorganisms, in which they provide buoyancy. By regulating their relative gas vesicle content aquatic microbes are able to perform vertical migrations. In slowly growing organisms such movements are made more efficiently than by swimming with flagella. The gas vesicle is impermeable to liquid water, but it is highly permeable to gases and is normally filled with air. It is a rigid structure of low compressibility, but it collapses flat under a certain critical pressure and buoyancy is then lost. Gas vesicles in different organisms vary in width, from 45 to > 200 nm; in accordance with engineering principles the narrower ones are stronger (have higher critical pressures) than wide ones, but they contain less gas space per wall volume and are therefore less efficient at providing buoyancy. A survey of gas-vacuolate cyanobacteria reveals that there has been natural selection for gas vesicles of the maximum width permitted by the pressure encountered in the natural environment, which is mainly determined by cell turgor pressure and water depth. Gas vesicle width is genetically determined, perhaps through the amino acid sequence of one of the constituent proteins. Up to 14 genes have been implicated in gas vesicle production, but so far the products of only two have been shown to be present in the gas vesicle: GvpA makes the ribs that form the structure, and GvpC binds to the outside of the ribs and stiffens the structure against collapse. The evolution of the gas vesicle is discussed in relation to the homologies of these proteins. Images PMID:8177173

  2. Ground- and excited-state tautomerism in 2-(3{prime}-hydroxy-2{prime}-pyridyl)benzimidazole

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, F.R.; Rodriguez, M.C.R.; Gonzalez, M.M.; Fernandez, M.A.R.

    1994-09-01

    Ground-state HPyBI is determined to have keto-enol equilibrium in water, and the enol form predominates in nonaqueous solutions. The keto form is the only excited form in all the solvents considered. Ultrafast intramolecular proton transfer creates the enol form from the keto form. 47 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Synaptic vesicle fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The core of the neurotransmitter release machinery is formed by SNARE complexes, which bring the vesicle and plasma membranes together and are key for fusion, and by Munc18-1, which controls SNARE-complex formation and may also have a direct role in fusion. In addition, SNARE complex assembly is likely orchestrated by Munc13s and RIMs, active-zone proteins that function in vesicle priming and diverse forms of presynaptic plasticity. Synaptotagmin-1 mediates triggering of release by Ca2+, probably through interactions with SNAREs and both membranes, as well as through a tight interplay with complexins. Elucidation of the release mechanism will require a full understanding of the network of interactions among all these proteins and the membranes. PMID:18618940

  4. Helical vesicles, segmented semivesicles, and noncircular bilayer sheets from solution-state self-assembly of ABC miktoarm star terpolymers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weixin; Li, Baohui; Jin, Qinghua; Ding, Datong; Shi, An-Chang

    2009-06-24

    Multicompartment micelles, especially nanostructured vesicles, offer tremendous potential as delivery vehicles of therapeutic agents and nanoreactors. Solution-state self-assembly of miktoarm star terpolymers provides a versatile and powerful route to obtain multicompartment micelles. Here we report simulations of solution-state self-assembly of ABC star terpolymers composed of a solvophilic A arm and two solvophobic B and C arms. A variety of multicompartment micelles are predicted from the simulations. Phase diagrams for typical star terpolymers are constructed. It is discovered that the overall micelle morphology is largely controlled by the volume fraction of the solvophilic A arms, whereas the internal compartmented and/or segregated structures depend on the ratio between the volume fractions of the two solvophobic arms. The polymer-solvent and polymer-polymer interactions can be used to tune the effective volume fraction of the A-arm and, thereby, induce morphological transitions. For terpolymers with equal or nearly equal length of B and C arms, several previously unknown structures, including vesicles with novel lateral structures (helices or stacked donuts), segmented semivesicles, and elliptic or triangular bilayer sheets, are discovered. When the lengths of B and C arms are not equal, novel micelles such as multicompartment disks and onions are observed. PMID:19476352

  5. State-to-state rates for the D + H2(v = 1, j = 1) yield HD(v-prime, j-prime) + H reaction - Predictions and measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Adelman, David E.; Shafer, Neil E.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Zare, Richard N.

    1992-01-01

    A fully quantal wavepacket approach to reactive scattering in which the best available H3 potential energy surface was used enabled a comparison with experimentally determined rates for the D + H2(v = 1, j = 1) yield HD(v-prime = 0, 1, 2; j-prime) + H reaction at significantly higher total energies (1.4 to 2.25 electron volts) than previously possible. The theoretical results are obtained over a sufficient range of conditions that a detailed simulation of the experiment was possible, thus making this a definitive comparison of experiment and theory. Good to excellent agreement is found for the vibrational branching ratios and for the rotational distributions within each product vibrational level. However, the calculated rotational distributions are slightly hotter than the experimentally measured ones.

  6. Excited states of M(II,d sup 6 )-4 prime -Phenylterpyridine complexes: Electron localization

    SciTech Connect

    Amouyal, E.; Mouallem-Bahout, M. ); Calzaferri, G. )

    1991-10-03

    The authors spectroscopic and photophysical data of para-substituted phenylterpyridine (ptpy) Ru(II) complexes and molecular orbital studies of the Fe(II), Ru(II), and Os(II) compounds (M(R-ptpy){sub 2}){sup 2+}, R=H, CH{sub 3}, OH, OCH{sub 3}, and Cl. The visible charge-transfer absorption of the (Ru(R-ptpy){sub 2}){sup 2+} is almost twice as intense as observed for the corresponding 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) complex (Ru(bpy){sub 3}){sup 2+}, and it is red shifted by about 50 nm. The luminescence in solution and in membranes (Nafion, cellophane) is very weak at room temperature, and the luminescence decay time is on the order of a few nanoseconds. In a glass at 77K, however, the luminescence quantum yield is 0.4 and the decay time 13 {mu}s. Excited-state absorption spectra measured at room temperature by laser flash spectroscopy support the interpretation that the first excited state is of the MLCT type. The similarity of the excited-state absorptions to those of the ligand radical anions strengthens the idea that the excited electron is localized on a single ligand. The low luminescence quantum yield at room temperature is though to be due to low-energy intramolecular vibrations of the nonrigid complex and not to the coupling with d states. Lowering the temperature results in freezing these intramolecular movements and hence in significantly increasing the luminescence quantum yield. The molecular orbital studies indicate that it is reasonable to describe the MLCT state as ((L)Ru{sup III}(L{sm bullet}{sup {minus}})){sup 2+} because the perpendicular conformation of the two ligands causes all {pi} orbitals to be accidentally 2-fold degenerate and therefore a small asymmetric distortion is sufficient to favor the localized situation.

  7. Disruption of the autoinhibited state primes the E3 ligase parkin for activation and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atul; Aguirre, Jacob D; Condos, Tara EC; Martinez-Torres, R Julio; Chaugule, Viduth K; Toth, Rachel; Sundaramoorthy, Ramasubramanian; Mercier, Pascal; Knebel, Axel; Spratt, Donald E; Barber, Kathryn R; Shaw, Gary S; Walden, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The PARK2 gene is mutated in 50% of autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (ARJP) cases. It encodes parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase of the RBR family. Parkin exists in an autoinhibited state that is activated by phosphorylation of its N-terminal ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain and binding of phosphoubiquitin. We describe the 1.8 Å crystal structure of human parkin in its fully inhibited state and identify the key interfaces to maintain parkin inhibition. We identify the phosphoubiquitin-binding interface, provide a model for the phosphoubiquitin–parkin complex and show how phosphorylation of the Ubl domain primes parkin for optimal phosphoubiquitin binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the addition of phosphoubiquitin leads to displacement of the Ubl domain through loss of structure, unveiling a ubiquitin-binding site used by the E2∼Ub conjugate, thus leading to active parkin. We find the role of the Ubl domain is to prevent parkin activity in the absence of the phosphorylation signals, and propose a model for parkin inhibition, optimization for phosphoubiquitin recruitment, release of inhibition by the Ubl domain and engagement with an E2∼Ub conjugate. Taken together, this model provides a mechanistic framework for activating parkin. PMID:26254304

  8. Rapid Detection of an ABT-737-Sensitive Primed for Death State in Cells Using Microplate-Based Respirometry

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Pascaline; Carey, Gregory B.; Mehrabian, Zara; Wei, Michael; Hwang, Hyehyun; Girnun, Geoffrey D.; Chen, Hegang; Martin, Stuart S.; Polster, Brian M.

    2012-01-01

    Cells that exhibit an absolute dependence on the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for survival are termed “primed for death” and are killed by the BCL-2 antagonist ABT-737. Many cancers exhibit a primed phenotype, including some that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy due to high BCL-2 expression. We show here that 1) stable BCL-2 overexpression alone can induce a primed for death state and 2) that an ABT-737-induced loss of functional cytochrome c from the electron transport chain causes a reduction in maximal respiration that is readily detectable by microplate-based respirometry. Stable BCL-2 overexpression sensitized non-tumorigenic MCF10A mammary epithelial cells to ABT-737-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mitochondria within permeabilized BCL-2 overexpressing cells were selectively vulnerable to ABT-737-induced cytochrome c release compared to those from control-transfected cells, consistent with a primed state. ABT-737 treatment caused a dose-dependent impairment of maximal O2 consumption in MCF10A BCL-2 overexpressing cells but not in control-transfected cells or in immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking both BAX and BAK. This impairment was rescued by delivering exogenous cytochrome c to mitochondria via saponin-mediated plasma membrane permeabilization. An ABT-737-induced reduction in maximal O2 consumption was also detectable in SP53, JeKo-1, and WEHI-231 B-cell lymphoma cell lines, with sensitivity correlating with BCL-2:MCL-1 ratio and with susceptibility (SP53 and JeKo-1) or resistance (WEHI-231) to ABT-737-induced apoptosis. Multiplexing respirometry assays to ELISA-based determination of cytochrome c redistribution confirmed that respiratory inhibition was associated with cytochrome c release. In summary, cell-based respiration assays were able to rapidly identify a primed for death state in cells with either artificially overexpressed or high endogenous BCL-2. Rapid detection of a primed for death state in individual cancers

  9. Fusion Competent Synaptic Vesicles Persist upon Active Zone Disruption and Loss of Vesicle Docking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan Shan H; Held, Richard G; Wong, Man Yan; Liu, Changliang; Karakhanyan, Aziz; Kaeser, Pascal S

    2016-08-17

    In a nerve terminal, synaptic vesicle docking and release are restricted to an active zone. The active zone is a protein scaffold that is attached to the presynaptic plasma membrane and opposed to postsynaptic receptors. Here, we generated conditional knockout mice removing the active zone proteins RIM and ELKS, which additionally led to loss of Munc13, Bassoon, Piccolo, and RIM-BP, indicating disassembly of the active zone. We observed a near-complete lack of synaptic vesicle docking and a strong reduction in vesicular release probability and the speed of exocytosis, but total vesicle numbers, SNARE protein levels, and postsynaptic densities remained unaffected. Despite loss of the priming proteins Munc13 and RIM and of docked vesicles, a pool of releasable vesicles remained. Thus, the active zone is necessary for synaptic vesicle docking and to enhance release probability, but releasable vesicles can be localized distant from the presynaptic plasma membrane. PMID:27537483

  10. Single-Cell Gene Expression Profiles Define Self-Renewing, Pluripotent, and Lineage Primed States of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hough, Shelley R.; Thornton, Matthew; Mason, Elizabeth; Mar, Jessica C.; Wells, Christine A.; Pera, Martin F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells display significant heterogeneity in gene expression, but whether this diversity is an inherent feature of the pluripotent state remains unknown. Single-cell gene expression analysis in cell subsets defined by surface antigen expression revealed that human embryonic stem cell cultures exist as a continuum of cell states, even under defined conditions that drive self-renewal. The majority of the population expressed canonical pluripotency transcription factors and could differentiate into derivatives of all three germ layers. A minority subpopulation of cells displayed high self-renewal capacity, consistently high transcripts for all pluripotency-related genes studied, and no lineage priming. This subpopulation was characterized by its expression of a particular set of intercellular signaling molecules whose genes shared common regulatory features. Our data support a model of an inherently metastable self-renewing population that gives rise to a continuum of intermediate pluripotent states, which ultimately become primed for lineage specification. PMID:24936473

  11. Word encoding during sleep is suggested by correlations between word-evoked up-states and post-sleep semantic priming

    PubMed Central

    Ruch, Simon; Koenig, Thomas; Mathis, Johannes; Roth, Corinne; Henke, Katharina

    2014-01-01

    To test whether humans can encode words during sleep we played everyday words to men while they were napping and assessed priming from sleep-played words following waking. Words were presented during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Priming was assessed using a semantic and a perceptual priming test. These tests measured differences in the processing of words that had been or had not been played during sleep. Synonyms to sleep-played words were the targets in the semantic priming test that tapped the meaning of sleep-played words. All men responded to sleep-played words by producing up-states in their electroencephalogram. Up-states are NREM sleep-specific phases of briefly increased neuronal excitability. The word-evoked up-states might have promoted word processing during sleep. Yet, the mean performance in the priming tests administered following sleep was at chance level, which suggests that participants as a group failed to show priming following sleep. However, performance in the two priming tests was positively correlated to each other and to the magnitude of the word-evoked up-states. Hence, the larger a participant's word-evoked up-states, the larger his perceptual and semantic priming. Those participants who scored high on all variables must have encoded words during sleep. We conclude that some humans are able to encode words during sleep, but more research is needed to pin down the factors that modulate this ability. PMID:25452740

  12. CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles to fusion competence at CA3–CA1 synapses in adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Yo; Ishii, Chiaki; Fukazawa, Yugo; Sadakata, Tetsushi; Ishii, Yuki; Sano, Yoshitake; Iwasato, Takuji; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2016-01-01

    Calcium-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) regulates exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells and of synaptic vesicles in neurons. However, the synaptic function of CAPS1 in the mature brain is unclear because Caps1 knockout (KO) results in neonatal death. Here, using forebrain-specific Caps1 conditional KO (cKO) mice, we demonstrate, for the first time, a critical role of CAPS1 in adult synapses. The amplitude of synaptic transmission at CA3–CA1 synapses was strongly reduced, and paired-pulse facilitation was significantly increased, in acute hippocampal slices from cKO mice compared with control mice, suggesting a perturbation in presynaptic function. Morphological analysis revealed an accumulation of synaptic vesicles in the presynapse without any overall morphological change. Interestingly, however, the percentage of docked vesicles was markedly decreased in the Caps1 cKO. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAPS1 stabilizes the state of readily releasable synaptic vesicles, thereby enhancing neurotransmitter release at hippocampal synapses. PMID:27545744

  13. Double resonance spectroscopy of the D {}^1 \\Pi _u^+ and B^{\\prime \\prime }\\barB^1\\Sigma ^+_u states near the third dissociation threshold of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekey, R. C.; Cordova, A. E.; Duan, W.; Chartrand, A. M.; McCormack, E. F.

    2013-12-01

    Double-resonance laser spectroscopy via the E,F {}^1 \\Sigma _g^+, v^{\\prime }=6, J^{\\prime } state was used to probe the energy region below the third dissociation limit of molecular hydrogen. Resonantly enhanced multi-photon ionization spectra were recorded by detecting ion production as a function of energy using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Energies and line widths for the v = 14-17 levels of the D{}^1 \\Pi _u^+ state of H2 are reported and compared to experimental data obtained by using VUV synchrotron light excitation (Dickenson et al 2010 J. Chem. Phys. 133 144317) and fully ab initio non-adiabatic calculations of D {}^1 \\Pi _u^+ state energies and line widths (Glass-Maujean et al 2012 Phys. Rev. A 86 052507). Several high vibrational levels of the B^{\\prime \\prime }\\bar{B}^1\\Sigma ^+_u state were also observed in this region. Term energies and rotational constants for the v = 67-69 vibrational levels are reported and compared to highly accurate ro-vibrational energy level predictions from fully ab initio non-adiabatic calculations of the first six {}^1 \\Sigma _u^+ levels of H2 (Wolniewicz et al 2006 J. Mol. Spectrosc. 238 118). While additional observed transitions can be assigned to other states, several unassigned features in the spectra highlight the need for a fully integrated theoretical treatment of dissociation and ionization to understand the complex pattern of highly vibrationally excited states expected in this region.

  14. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    PubMed Central

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias; Huson, Vincent; Mamer, Lauren; Kalogreades, Lawrence; ter Veer, Mirelle; Ruiter, Marvin; Brose, Nils; Rosenmund, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The energy required to fuse synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane (‘activation energy’) is considered a major determinant in synaptic efficacy. From reaction rate theory, we predict that a class of modulations exists, which utilize linear modulation of the energy barrier for fusion to achieve supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by hypertonic solutions. We show that complexinI/II deficiency or phorbol ester stimulation indeed affects responses to hypertonic solution in a supralinear manner. An additive vs multiplicative relationship between activation energy and fusion rate provides a novel explanation for previously observed non-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca2+-dependent release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05531.001 PMID:25871846

  15. The low-energy, charge-transfer excited states of 4-amino-4-prime-nitrodiphenyl sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Donald B.; Scott, Gary W.; Tran, Kim; Coulter, Daniel R.; Miskowski, Vincent M.; Stiegman, Albert E.; Wnek, Gary E.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption and emission spectra of 4-amino-4-prime-nitrodiphenyl sulfide in polar and nonpolar solvents were used to characterize and assign the low-energy excited states of the molecule. Fluorescence-excitation anisotropy spectra and fluorescence quantum yields were also used to characterize the photophysics of these states. The lowest-energy fluorescent singlet state was determined to be an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state involving transfer of a full electron charge from the amino to the nitro group yielding a dipole moment of about 50 D. A low-energy, intense absorption band is assigned as a transition to a different ICT state involving a partial electron charge transfer from sulfur to the nitro group.

  16. The transition from naïve to primed nociceptive state: A novel wind-up protocol in mice.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Nadav Y; Tal, Michael; Shavit, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Wind-up (WU) is a progressive, frequency-dependent facilitation of spinal cord neurons in response to repetitive nociceptive stimulation of constant intensity. We identified a new WU-associated phenomenon in naïve mice (not exposed to noxious stimulation immediately prior to WU stimulation), which were subjected to a novel experimental protocol composed of three consecutive trains of WU stimulation. The 1st train produced a typical linear 'wind-up' curve as expected following a repeating series of stimuli; in addition, this 1st train sensitized ('primed') the nociceptive system so that the responses to two subsequent trains (inter-train interval of 10 min) were significantly amplified compared with the response to the 1st train. We named this augmented response potentiation-of-windup, or "PoW". The PoW phenomenon appears to be centrally mediated, as the augmented response was suppressed by administration of an NMDA receptor antagonist (MK-801) and by cutting the spinal cord. Furthermore, the PoW protocol is accompanied by enhanced pain behavior. The 'priming' effect of the 1st train could be mimicked by exposure to natural noxious stimuli prior to the PoW protocol. Presumably, the PoW phenomenon has not been previously reported due to a procedural reason: typically, WU protocols have been executed in 'primed' rather than naïve animals, i.e., animals exposed to nociceptive stimulation prior to the actual WU recording. Our findings indicate that the PoW paradigm can distinguish between 'naïve' and 'primed' states, suggesting its use as a tool for the assessment of central sensitization. PMID:26439312

  17. Modeling of decomposition activity and priming effect in soil using the versatile index of microbial physiological state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskiy, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The implementation of microbial biomass in soil organic matter (SOM) models is still unresolved issue. The approaches using explicit description of microbial biomass (decomposer) interaction with SOM usually cannot be easily verified by means of experimental estimating of total microbial biomass dynamics. Standard experimental methods, such as fumigation extraction or direct microscopic count, does not represent microbial activity (Blagodatskaya and Kuzyakov, 2013), which is essential for the control of decomposition rate. More advanced approaches, explicitly simulating intracellular metabolic activity (Resat et al., 2012) and e.g. production and turnover of extracellular enzymes (Lawrence et al., 2009) are prohibitively complex for the field and larger scales, which are most often under demand for SOM modelling. One possible parsimonious solution is an application of index of microbial physiological state (r), which describes the adaptive variation of the cell composition and metabolic activity by one variable (Panikov, 1995). This variable (r) can reflect the microbial response to the availability of carbon and nitrogen and shift of microbial biomass between active and dormant state (Blagodatsky and Richter, 1998), but also can be used for the description of the effect of external factors, such as temperature and moisture, on microbial activity. This approach is extremely useful for the description of priming effect (Blagodatsky et al., 2010) and the influence of substrate availability and external factors on the size and dynamics of priming. Distinguishing of these two types of driving forces for priming is crucial for modelling of SOM dynamics and steady-state stocks of different SOM pools. I will present the analysis of model response on combination of limiting factors presented as functions controlling the change of microbial physiological state and size of priming effect. Alternatively, the direct effect of the same factors on decomposition rate and priming

  18. Photoexcited states of biruthenium(II) compounds bridged by 2,2 prime -bis(2-pyridyl)bibenzimidazole or 1,2-bis(2-(2-pyridyl)benzimidazolyl)ethane

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, Takeshi; Nozaki, Koichi ); Haga, Masaaki )

    1992-02-19

    Charge-transfer (CT) excited states of RuL{sub 2}(L{prime}-L{prime}){sup 2+} and RuL{sub 2}(L{prime}-L{prime}){sup 4+} have been studied by means of emission and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy at 77-300 K. The bridging ligand (L{prime}-L{prime}) is either 2,2{prime}-bis(2-pyridyl)benzimidazole (bpbimH{sub 2}) or 1,2-bis(2-(2-pyridyl)benzimidazolyl)ethane (dpbime) and L is 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy), 4,4{prime}-dimethyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine (dmbpy), or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). Transient absorption (TA) spectra of the ruthenium(II) compounds subjected to laser excitation, whose molar extinction coefficients were determined, are deconvoluted to {pi}-{pi}* bands of L and L{prime}-L{prime} coordinating to Ru(III), L (or L{prime}-L{prime})-to-Ru(III) CT bands, and a {pi}-{pi}* band of (L{prime}-L{prime}){sup {center dot}-} (or L{sup {center dot}-}) by comparison with the absorption spectra of the oxidized compounds (RuL{sub 2}(L{prime}-L{prime}){sup 3+}). The degree of electron population on the ligand decreases in the order bpbimH{sub 2} > bpy {approximately} phen > dpbime > dmbpy in the excited CT states, while there is no discernible difference in the reduction potential between bpbimH{sub 2} (or dpbime) and bpy coordinating to Ru(II). The excitation efficiency of the metal sites in (Ru(bpy){sub 2}){sub 2}(dpbime){sup 4+} is lower than 50% when the laser power was large enough to excite more than 80% of the mononuclear compounds. The low excitation efficiency of the former is ascribed to rapid intramolecular annihilation of the excited states.

  19. Medium-resolution studies of extreme ultraviolet emission from N2 by electron impact - Vibrational perturbations and cross sections of the c4-prime 1Sigma(+)u and b-prime 1Sigma(+)u states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, Joseph M.; James, Geoffrey K.; Franklin, Brian O.; Shemansky, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    In a crossed-beam experiment the electron-impact-induced fluorescence spectrum of N2 in the extreme ultraviolet is studied at a spectral resolution of up to 0.03 nm. The optically thin experiment obtained the highest-resolution electron-impact emission spectrum of the Rydberg and valence states of N2. The spectral measurements provide the emission cross sections of each of the vibrational transitions of the Carroll-Yoshino and the Birge-Hopfield-II band systems. Laboratory vibrational-excitation cross sections arising from the mutual perturbation of the c4-prime 1Sigma(+)u and b-prime 1Sigma(+)u states by homogeneous configuration interactions are measured from 10 to 400 eV, and a modified Born approximation analytic model is given for them. The analysis leads to accurate band-system oscillator strengths. The relative emission and excitation cross sections each of the vibrational levels are compared. In addition, low-resolution measurements of the cross section of the atomic dissociation fragments (NI, NII, NIII) from 40 to 102 nm are made, and medium-resolution measurements are made of the emission cross section of the c4 1Pi(u), c5-prime 1Sigma(+)u, c5 1Pi(u), and c6-prime 1Sigma(+)u to X 1Sigma(+)g (0,0) transitions.

  20. Analysis of the Source Physics Experiment SPE4 Prime Using State-Of Parallel Numerical Tools.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobiev, O.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.; Glenn, L.

    2015-12-01

    This work describes a methodology used for large scale modeling of wave propagation from underground chemical explosions conducted at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) fractured granitic rock. We show that the discrete natures of rock masses as well as the spatial variability of the fabric of rock properties are very important to understand ground motions induced by underground explosions. In order to build a credible conceptual model of the subsurface we integrated the geological, geomechanical and geophysical characterizations conducted during recent test at the NNSS as well as historical data from the characterization during the underground nuclear test conducted at the NNSS. Because detailed site characterization is limited, expensive and, in some instances, impossible we have numerically investigated the effects of the characterization gaps on the overall response of the system. We performed several computational studies to identify the key important geologic features specific to fractured media mainly the joints characterized at the NNSS. We have also explored common key features to both geological environments such as saturation and topography and assess which characteristics affect the most the ground motion in the near-field and in the far-field. Stochastic representation of these features based on the field characterizations has been implemented into LLNL's Geodyn-L hydrocode. Simulations were used to guide site characterization efforts in order to provide the essential data to the modeling community. We validate our computational results by comparing the measured and computed ground motion at various ranges for the recently executed SPE4 prime experiment. We have also conducted a comparative study between SPE4 prime and previous experiments SPE1 and SPE3 to assess similarities and differences and draw conclusions on designing SPE5.

  1. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  2. Priming states of mind can affect disclosure of threatening self-information: Effects of self-affirmation, mortality salience, and attachment orientations.

    PubMed

    Davis, Deborah; Soref, Assaf; Villalobos, J Guillermo; Mikulincer, Mario

    2016-08-01

    Interviewers often face respondents reluctant to disclose sensitive, embarrassing or potentially damaging information. We explored effects of priming 5 states of mind on willingness to disclose: including 2 expected to facilitate disclosure (self-affirmation, attachment security), and 3 expected to inhibit disclosure (self-disaffirmation, attachment insecurity, mortality salience). Israeli Jewish participants completed a survey including a manipulation of 1 of these states of mind, followed by questions concerning hostile thoughts and behaviors toward the Israeli Arab outgroup, past minor criminal behaviors, and socially undesirable traits and behaviors. Self-affirmation led to more disclosures of all undesirable behaviors than neutral priming, whereas self-disaffirmation led to less disclosures. Mortality salience led to fewer disclosures of socially undesirable and criminal behaviors compared to neutral priming, but more disclosures of hostile thoughts and behaviors toward Israeli Arabs. Security priming facilitated disclosure of hostile attitudes toward Israeli Arabs. However, neither security nor insecurity priming had any other significant effects. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26914858

  3. Theoretical description of the 2A/double prime/ and 2A/prime/ states of the peroxyformyl radical. [for air pollution and Mars atmospheric studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, N. W.; Goddard, W. A., III; Bender, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    Simple orbital ideas are used to describe the lowest two states of the peroxyformyl radical, and ab initio Hartree-Fock calculations in these states are reported. It is found that both states may be formed exothermically by association of O2 and HCO in their ground states; however, the excited state may decompose readily to OH and CO2. The possible role of such processes in oxidation of aldelydes is discussed.

  4. Engineered Asymmetric Synthetic Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Chiarot, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic vesicles are small, fluid-filled spheres that are enclosed by a bilayer of lipid molecules. They can be used as models for investigating membrane biology and as delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals. In practice, it is difficult to simultaneously control membrane asymmetry, unilamellarity, vesicle size, vesicle-to-vesicle uniformity, and luminal content. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the bilayer is composed of different lipids, is of particular importance as it is a feature of most natural membranes. In this study, we leverage microfluidic technology to build asymmetric vesicles at high-throughput. We use the precise flow control offered by microfluidic devices to make highly uniform emulsions, with controlled internal content, that serve as templates to build the synthetic vesicles. Flow focusing, dielectrophoretic steering, and interfacial lipid self-assembly are critical procedures performed on-chip to produce the vesicles. Fluorescent and confocal microscopy are used to evaluate the vesicle characteristics.

  5. Characterization of the X(tilde)1A-prime state of isocyanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    East, Allan L. L.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Allen, Wesley D.

    1993-01-01

    Eight ab initio analyses are carried out to investigate the characteristics of the ground and the excited electronic states of isocyanic acid. The particular issues include the barrier to linearity, the HN-CO and H-NCO fragmentation energies, heats of formation of HNCO and related isomers, the anharmonic force field, fundamental vibrational frequencies, the equilibrium molecular structure of isocyanic acid, the rovibrational spectrum of DNCO, and the vibration-rotation interaction.

  6. Use of BABA and INA As Activators of a Primed State in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Aguilar, Keren; Ramírez-Carrasco, Gabriela; Hernández-Chávez, José Luis; Barraza, Aarón; Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    To survive in adverse conditions, plants have evolved complex mechanisms that "prime" their defense system to respond and adapt to stresses. Their competence to respond to such stresses fundamentally depends on its capacity to modulate the transcriptome rapidly and specifically. Thus, chromatin dynamics is a mechanism linked to transcriptional regulation and enhanced defense in plants. For example, in Arabidopsis, priming of the SA-dependent defense pathway is linked to histone lysine methylation. Such modifications could create a memory of the primary infection that is associated with an amplified gene response upon exposure to a second stress-stimulus. In addition, the priming status of a plant for induced resistance can be inherited to its offspring. However, analyses on the molecular mechanisms of generational and transgenerational priming in the common bean (Phaseolus vulagris L.), an economically important crop, are absent. Here, we provide evidence that resistance to P. syringae pv. phaseolicola infection was induced in the common bean with the synthetic priming activators BABA and INA. Resistance was assessed by evaluating symptom appearance, pathogen accumulation, changes in gene expression of defense genes, as well as changes in the H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks at the promoter-exon regions of defense-associated genes. We conclude that defense priming in the common bean occurred in response to BABA and INA and that these synthetic activators primed distinct genes for enhanced disease resistance. We hope that an understanding of the molecular changes leading to defense priming and pathogen resistance will provide valuable knowledge for producing disease-resistant crop varieties by exposing parental plants to priming activators, as well as to the development of novel plant protection chemicals that stimulate the plant's inherent disease resistance mechanisms. PMID:27242854

  7. Probing Rotational Viscosity in Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Zeigler, Maxwell B.; Allen, Peter B.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle (SV) is a central organelle in neurotransmission, and previous studies have suggested that SV protein 2 (SV2) may be responsible for forming a gel-like matrix within the vesicle. Here we measured the steady-state rotational anisotropy of the fluorescent dye, Oregon Green, within individual SVs. By also measuring the fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green in SVs, we determined the mean rotational viscosity to be 16.49 ± 0.12 cP for wild-type (WT) empty mice vesicles (i.e., with no neurotransmitters), 11.21 ± 0.12 cP for empty vesicles from SV2 knock-out mice, and 11.40 ± 0.65 cP for WT mice vesicles loaded with the neurotransmitter glutamate (Glu). This measurement shows that SV2 is an important determinant of viscosity within the vesicle lumen, and that the viscosity decreases when the vesicles are filled with Glu. The viscosities of both empty SV2 knock-out vesicles and Glu-loaded WT vesicles were significantly different from that of empty WT SVs (p < 0.05). This measurement represents the smallest enclosed volume in which rotational viscosity has been measured thus far. PMID:21641331

  8. Radiative decays of the psi prime to all-photon final states

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    Results of studies of selected radiative decays of the psi' to charmonium and non-charmonium states which decay into photons are presented. These studies were performed using a sample of 1.8 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi''s collected by the Crystal Ball detector at the SPEAR electron-positron storage ring. The branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/, chi/sub 2/, and eta'/sub c/ to two photons have been measured to be (4.5 +- 2.2 +- 2.0) x 10/sup -4/, (9.5 +- 2.9 +- 4.5) x 10/sup -4/ (first errors statistical, second systematic), and <1 x 10/sup -2/ (90% C.L.). The signal from the decay chain psi' ..-->.. ..gamma..chi/sub 0/, chi/sub 0/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ has been observed with essentially no background. Using the observed line shape of the radiative photon in this reaction, the full width of the psi/sub 0/ has been found to be 8.8 +- 1.3 +- 1.5 MeV/c/sup 2/. In addition, the branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/ and chi/sub 2/ to ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ have been measured to be (3.5 +- 0.3 +- 1.2) x 10/sup -3/ and (1.2 +- 0.2 +- 0.4) x 10/sup -3/; the branching ratios of the chi/sub 0/ and chi/sub 2/ to eta eta have been measured to be (2.8 +- 0.9 +- 1.3) x 10/sup -3/ and (8.4 +- 4.2 +- 4.0) x 10/sup -4/. The decays of the psi' to four non-charmonium states have been investigated. The branching ratios and upper limits of these decays have been normalized to the branching ratios of the corresponding decays from the J/psi which have been measured using a sample of 2.2 x 10/sup 6/ produced J/psi's collected by the Crystal Ball detector. The ratios of the psi' branching ratios to the J/psi branching ratios for the final states ..gamma..eta, ..gamma..eta', ..gamma..theta, and ..gamma..f have been measured to be <1.8%, <2.6%, <10 to 15%, and 9 +- 3%. These results are compared with the theoretical expectations of lowest-order quantum chromodynamics potential models. Substantial disagreement is found between theory and experiment.

  9. Granulosa cell-oocyte interactions: the phosphorylation of specific proteins in mouse oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage is dependent upon the differentiative state of companion somatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cecconi, S.; Tatone, C.; Buccione, R.; Mangia, F.; Colonna, R. )

    1991-05-01

    The role of granulosa cells in the regulation of mouse ovarian oocyte metabolism was investigated. Fully grown antral oocytes, isolated from surrounding cumulus cells, were cultured on monolayers of preantral granulosa cells in the presence of dbcAMP to prevent the resumption of meiosis. Under these conditions metabolic cooperativity was established between the two cell types as early as 1 hr after seeding. Moreover, cocultured oocytes phosphorylated two polypeptides of 74 and 21 kDa which are normally phosphorylated in follicle-enclosed growing oocytes but not in cumulus cell-enclosed fully grown oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage. When cocultured oocytes were allowed to resume meiosis, the 74 and 21 kDa proteins were synthesized but no longer phosphorylated even though intercellular coupling between the two cell types was maintained during radiolabeling. It appears therefore: (a) that the different protein kinase activity of growing and fully grown germinal vesicle-stage mouse oocytes is related to the differentiative state of granulosa cells, and (b) that the regulation of oocyte protein phosphorylation activity by granulosa cells is dependent on the meiotic stage of the oocyte.

  10. Morphological docking of secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Calcium-dependent secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones is essential for brain function and neuroendocrine-signaling. Prior to exocytosis, neurotransmitter-containing vesicles dock to the target membrane. In electron micrographs of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, like chromaffin cells many synaptic vesicles (SVs) and large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs) are docked. For many years the molecular identity of the morphologically docked state was unknown. Recently, we resolved the minimal docking machinery in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells using embryonic mouse model systems together with electron-microscopic analyses and also found that docking is controlled by the sub-membrane filamentous (F-)actin. Currently it is unclear if the same docking machinery operates in synapses. Here, I will review our docking assay that led to the identification of the LDCV docking machinery in chromaffin cells and also discuss whether identical docking proteins are required for SV docking in synapses. PMID:20577884

  11. High salt primes a specific activation state of macrophages, M(Na).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu-Chang; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Du, Lin-Juan; Sun, Jian-Yong; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Shi, Chaoji; Sun, Shuyang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Tao, Jun; Jia, Lijun; Fan, Heng-Yu; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Ying, Hao; Hui, Lijian; Liu, Xiaolong; Yi, Xianghua; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Lanjing; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High salt is positively associated with the risk of many diseases. However, little is known about the mechanisms. Here we showed that high salt increased proinflammatory molecules, while decreased anti-inflammatory and proendocytic molecules in both human and mouse macrophages. High salt also potentiated lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophage activation and suppressed interleukin 4-induced macrophage activation. High salt induced the proinflammatory aspects by activating p38/cFos and/or Erk1/2/cFos pathways, while inhibited the anti-inflammatory and proendocytic aspects by Erk1/2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 pathway. Consistent with the in vitro results, high-salt diet increased proinflammatory gene expression of mouse alveolar macrophages. In mouse models of acute lung injury, high-salt diet aggravated lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary macrophage activation and inflammation in lungs. These results identify a novel macrophage activation state, M(Na), and high salt as a potential environmental risk factor for lung inflammation through the induction of M(Na). PMID:26206316

  12. Prime Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piele, Donald T.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a computer program to efficiently generate prime numbers is discussed. Programs for many different brands of home computers are listed, with suggestions of ways the programs can be speeded up. It is noted everyone seems to have a favorite program, but that every program can be improved. (MP)

  13. Use of BABA and INA As Activators of a Primed State in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Aguilar, Keren; Ramírez-Carrasco, Gabriela; Hernández-Chávez, José Luis; Barraza, Aarón; Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2016-01-01

    To survive in adverse conditions, plants have evolved complex mechanisms that “prime” their defense system to respond and adapt to stresses. Their competence to respond to such stresses fundamentally depends on its capacity to modulate the transcriptome rapidly and specifically. Thus, chromatin dynamics is a mechanism linked to transcriptional regulation and enhanced defense in plants. For example, in Arabidopsis, priming of the SA-dependent defense pathway is linked to histone lysine methylation. Such modifications could create a memory of the primary infection that is associated with an amplified gene response upon exposure to a second stress-stimulus. In addition, the priming status of a plant for induced resistance can be inherited to its offspring. However, analyses on the molecular mechanisms of generational and transgenerational priming in the common bean (Phaseolus vulagris L.), an economically important crop, are absent. Here, we provide evidence that resistance to P. syringae pv. phaseolicola infection was induced in the common bean with the synthetic priming activators BABA and INA. Resistance was assessed by evaluating symptom appearance, pathogen accumulation, changes in gene expression of defense genes, as well as changes in the H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks at the promoter-exon regions of defense-associated genes. We conclude that defense priming in the common bean occurred in response to BABA and INA and that these synthetic activators primed distinct genes for enhanced disease resistance. We hope that an understanding of the molecular changes leading to defense priming and pathogen resistance will provide valuable knowledge for producing disease-resistant crop varieties by exposing parental plants to priming activators, as well as to the development of novel plant protection chemicals that stimulate the plant's inherent disease resistance mechanisms. PMID:27242854

  14. The Affective Regulation of Cognitive Priming

    PubMed Central

    Storbeck, Justin; Clore, Gerald L.

    2008-01-01

    Semantic and affective priming are classic effects observed in cognitive and social psychology, respectively. We discovered that affect regulates such priming effects. In Experiment 1, positive and negative moods were induced prior to one of three priming tasks; evaluation, categorization, or lexical decision. As predicted, positive affect led to both affective priming (evaluation task) and semantic priming (category and lexical decision tasks). However, negative affect inhibited such effects. In Experiment 2, participants in their natural affective state completed the same priming tasks as in Experiment 1. As expected, affective priming (evaluation task) and category priming (categorization and lexical decision tasks) were observed in such resting affective states. Hence, we conclude that negative affect inhibits semantic and affective priming. These results support recent theoretical models, which suggest that positive affect promotes associations among strong and weak concepts, and that negative affect impairs such associations (Kuhl, 2000; Clore & Storbeck, 2006). PMID:18410195

  15. An ab initio calculation of the zero-field splitting parameters of the 3A-double prime state of formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, E. R.; Ellenbogen, J. C.; Langhoff, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    The spin dipole-dipole and spin-orbit contributions to the zero-field splitting of the 3A-double prime state of formaldehyde have been evaluated at the excited state experimental geometry. Ab initio CI wave functions were generated from a Dunning double zeta plus polarization bases set using 3A-double prime rhf orbitals. Twelve states of each symmetry were used to evaluate the second-order spin-orbit effect. The resulting values of D and E were 0.19 and 0.03 kayser with the principal magnetic axes rotated 36 deg from the CO bond. The values of alpha and beta relative to the inertial axes were calculated to be 0.03 and 0.01 kayser compared to the experimental values of 0.05 plus or minus 0.01 and 0.02 plus or minus 0.02 kayser.

  16. Preeclampsia and Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Sarwat I; Weissgerber, Tracey L; Garovic, Vesna D; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a hypertensive pregnancy disorder characterized by development of hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation that remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. While preeclampsia is believed to result from complex interactions between maternal and placental factors, the proximate pathophysiology of this syndrome remains elusive. Cell-to-cell communication is a critical signaling mechanism for feto-placental development in normal pregnancies. One mechanism of cellular communication relates to activated cell-derived sealed membrane vesicles called extracellular vesicles (EVs). The concentrations and contents of EVs in biological fluids depend upon their cells of origin and the stimuli which trigger their production. Research on EVs in preeclampsia has focused on EVs derived from the maternal vasculature (endothelium, vascular smooth muscle) and blood (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and platelets), as well as placental syncytiotrophoblasts. Changes in the concentrations and contents of these EVs may contribute to the pathophysiology of preeclampsia by accentuating the pro-inflammatory and pro-coagulatory states of pregnancy. This review focuses on possible interactions among placental- and maternal-derived EVs and their contents in the initiation and progression of the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Understanding the contributions of EVs in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia may facilitate their use as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27590522

  17. The State's Prime Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Department of Education, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This standards review is the first in a series of annual reviews of the Colorado Model Content Standards. Its purpose is to identify student performance over time on measures of exiting mathematics standards, identify ways to affirm and strengthen standards and more clearly articulate the practices used by Colorado schools to promote student…

  18. High- and Low-Mobility Stages in the Synaptic Vesicle Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kamin, Dirk; Lauterbach, Marcel A.; Westphal, Volker; Keller, Jan; Schönle, Andreas; Hell, Stefan W.; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Synaptic vesicles need to be mobile to reach their release sites during synaptic activity. We investigated vesicle mobility throughout the synaptic vesicle cycle using both conventional and subdiffraction-resolution stimulated emission depletion fluorescence microscopy. Vesicle tracking revealed that recently endocytosed synaptic vesicles are highly mobile for a substantial time period after endocytosis. They later undergo a maturation process and integrate into vesicle clusters where they exhibit little mobility. Despite the differences in mobility, both recently endocytosed and mature vesicles are exchanged between synapses. Electrical stimulation does not seem to affect the mobility of the two types of vesicles. After exocytosis, the vesicle material is mobile in the plasma membrane, although the movement appears to be somewhat limited. Increasing the proportion of fused vesicles (by stimulating exocytosis while simultaneously blocking endocytosis) leads to substantially higher mobility. We conclude that both high- and low-mobility states are characteristic of synaptic vesicle movement. PMID:20643088

  19. Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization. PMID:22763746

  20. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal ‘circuitry’ and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a ‘vesicle modification’ of the archetypal CBC ‘billiard ball model’ of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle ‘programming’ in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing. PMID:26431435

  1. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Richard; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collision-based computing (CBC) is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing. PMID:26431435

  2. Imaging Exocytosis of Single Synaptic Vesicles at a Fast CNS Presynaptic Terminal.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Mitsuharu; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    Synaptic vesicles are tethered to the active zone where they are docked/primed so that they can fuse rapidly upon Ca(2+) influx. To directly study these steps at a CNS presynaptic terminal, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy at the live isolated calyx of Held terminal and measured the movements of single synaptic vesicle just beneath the plasma membrane. Only a subset of vesicles within the TIRF field underwent exocytosis. Following exocytosis, new vesicles (newcomers) approached the membrane and refilled the release sites slowly with a time constant of several seconds. Uniform elevation of the intracellular Ca(2+) using flash photolysis elicited an exocytotic burst followed by the sustained component, representing release of the readily releasable vesicles and vesicle replenishment, respectively. Surprisingly, newcomers were not released within a second of high Ca(2+). Instead, already-tethered vesicles became release-ready and mediated the replenishment. Our results reveal an important feature of conventional synapses. PMID:26539890

  3. Temporal separation of vesicle release from vesicle fusion during exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Kevin P; Wightman, R Mark

    2002-08-01

    During exocytosis, vesicles in secretory cells fuse with the cellular membrane and release their contents in a Ca2+-dependent process. Release occurs initially through a fusion pore, and its rate is limited by the dissociation of the matrix-associated contents. To determine whether this dissociation is promoted by osmotic forces, we have examined the effects of elevated osmotic pressure on release and extrusion from vesicles at mast and chromaffin cells. The identity of the molecules released and the time course of extrusion were measured with fast scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon fiber microelectrodes. In external solutions of high osmolarity, release events following entry of divalent ions (Ba2+ or Ca2+) were less frequent. However, the vesicles appeared to be fused to the membrane without extruding their contents, since the maximal observed concentrations of events were less than 7% of those evoked in isotonic media. Such an isolated, intermediate fusion state, which we term "kiss-and-hold," was confirmed by immunohistochemistry at chromaffin cells. Transient exposure of cells in the kiss and hold state to isotonic solutions evoked massive release. These results demonstrate that an osmotic gradient across the fusion pore is an important driving force for exocytotic extrusion of granule contents from secretory cells following fusion pore formation. PMID:12034731

  4. The Pharmacology of Nociceptor Priming

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Nociceptors and neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) that receive nociceptive input show remarkable plasticity in response to injury. This plasticity is thought to underlie the development of chronic pain states. Hence, further understanding of the molecular mechanisms driving and maintaining this plasticity has the potential to lead to novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of chronic pain states. An important concept in pain plasticity is the presence and persistence of “hyperalgesic priming.” This priming arises from an initial injury and results in a remarkable susceptibility to normally subthreshold noxious inputs causing a prolonged pain state in primed animals. Here we describe our current understanding of how this priming is manifested through changes in signaling in the primary nociceptor as well as through memory like alterations at CNS synapses. Moreover, we discuss how commonly utilized analgesics, such as opioids, enhance priming therefore potentially contributing to the development of persistent pain states. Finally we highlight where these priming models draw parallels to common human chronic pain conditions. Collectively, these advances in our understanding of pain plasticity reveal a variety of targets for therapeutic intervention with the potential to reverse rather than palliate chronic pain states. PMID:25846612

  5. Electromagnetic decays of radially excited mesons {pi}{sup 0 Prime }, {rho}{sup 0 Prime }, {omega}{sup 0 Prime }, and production of {pi}{sup 0 Prime} at lepton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuzov, A. B. Kuraev, E. A.; Volkov, M. K.

    2011-05-15

    Radiative decays {pi}{sup 0}({pi}{sup 0 Prime }) {yields} {gamma} + {gamma}, {pi}{sup 0 Prime} {yields} {rho}{sup 0}({omega}) + {gamma}, {rho}{sup 0 Prime }({omega} Prime ) {yields} {pi}{sup 0} + {gamma}, {rho}{sup 0 Prime }({omega} Prime ) {yields} {pi}{sup 0 Prime} + {gamma}, and some processes of {pi}{sup 0 Prime} production at lepton colliders are considered in the framework of the nonlocal SU(2) Multiplication-Sign SU(2) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. Mixing of the radially excited and the ground meson states is taken into account. Numerical results for the decay and production processes are presented.

  6. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-07-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  7. Dynamics of a compound vesicle: numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerapaneni, Shravan; Young, Yuan-Nan; Vlahovska, Petia; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2010-11-01

    Vesicles (self-enclosing lipid membranes) in simple linear flows are known to exhibit rich dynamics such as tank-treading, tumbling, trembling (swinging), and vacillating breathing. Recently, vesicles have been used as a multi-functional platform for drug-delivery. In this work, the dynamics of simplified models for such compound vesicles is investigated numerically using a state-of-the-art boundary-integral code that has been validated with high accuracy and efficiency. Results show that for a vesicle enclosing a rigid particle in a simple shear flow, transition from tank-treading to tumbling is possible even in the absence of viscosity mismatch in the interior and exterior fluids. We will discuss the shape transformations, multiple particle interactions and the flow properties. Comparison with results from analytical modeling gives insights to the underlying physics for such novel dynamics.

  8. The transition of mouse pluripotent stem cells from the naïve to the primed state requires Fas signaling through 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate structures recognized by the HS4C3 antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Kazumi; Van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Nishihara, Shoko

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Fas transcript increases during the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► 3OST-5 transcript, the HS4C3 epitope synthesis gene, increases during the transition. ► Fas signaling regulates the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► HS4C3-binding epitope regulates the transition from the naïve to the primed state. ► Fas signaling is regulated by the HS4C3 epitope during the transition. -- Abstract: The characteristics of pluripotent embryonic stem cells of human and mouse are different. The properties of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are similar to those of mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs), which are in a later developmental pluripotency state, the so-called “primed state” compared to mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) which are in a naïve state. As a result of the properties of the primed state, hESCs proliferate slowly, cannot survive as single cells, and can only be transfected with genes at low efficiency. Generating hESCs in the naïve state is necessary to overcome these problems and allow their application in regenerative medicine. Therefore, clarifying the mechanism of the transition between the naïve and primed states in pluripotent stem cells is important for the establishment of stable methods of generating naïve state hESCs. However, the signaling pathways which contribute to the transition between the naïve and primed states are still unclear. In this study, we carried out induction from mESCs to mEpiSC-like cells (mEpiSCLCs), and observed an increase in the activation of Fas signaling during the induction. The expression of Fgf5, an epiblast marker, was diminished by inhibition of Fas signaling using the caspase-8 and -3 blocking peptides, IETD and DEVD, respectively. Furthermore, during the induction, we observed increased expression of 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate (HS) structures synthesized by HS 3-O-sulfotransferase (3OST), which are recognized by the HS4C3 antibody (HS4C3-binding epitope

  9. Problems with Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melrose, Tim; Scott, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses prime numbers, defined as integers greater than 1 that are divisible only by only themselves and the number 1. A positive integer greater than 1 that is not a prime is called composite. The number 1 itself is considered neither prime nor composite. As the name suggests, prime numbers are one of the most basic but important…

  10. Learning about Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEachran, Alec

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author relates his unhappy experience in learning about prime numbers at secondary school. To introduce primes, a teacher first told students a definition of a prime number, then students were taught how to find prime numbers. Students defined and listed them and at some later point were tested on their memory of both the…

  11. Electrohydrodynamics Of Multicomponent Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gera, Prerna; Salac, David

    2015-11-01

    The addition of cholesterol into a lipid membrane induces the formation of distinct domains. These domains try to minimize the overall energy of the system by coalescence and migration. The application of electric fields will induce flow of these membrane domains and influence the rate at which they coarsen. In this work the electrohydrodynamics of multicomponent vesicles is numerically modelled. The method uses a Cahn-Hilliard-Cook model of the lipid domains restricted to a deforming three-dimensional vesicle and will be briefly discussed. Sample results will be presented and compared to experimental observations. This work supported by NSF Grant #1253739.

  12. A Flt3 and Ras-dependent Pathway Primes B Cell Development by Inducing A State of IL7-responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Xi; Goetz, Christine A.; Katerndahl, Casey D.S.; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Farrar, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Ras plays an important role in B cell development. However, the stage at which Ras governs B cell development remains unclear. Moreover, the upstream receptors and downstream effectors of Ras that govern B cell differentiation remain undefined. Using mice that express a dominant negative form of Ras, we demonstrate that Ras-mediated signaling plays a critical role in the development of common lymphoid progenitors (CLP). This developmental block parallels that found in flt3−/− mice, suggesting that Flt3 is an important upstream activator of Ras in early B cell progenitors. Ras inhibition impaired proliferation of CLP and pre-pro-B cells but not pro-B cells. Rather, Ras promotes STAT5-dependent pro-B cell differentiation by enhancing IL7Rα levels and suppressing socs2 and socs3 expression. Our results suggest a model in which Flt3/Ras-dependent signals play a critical role in B cell development by priming early B cell progenitors for subsequent STAT5-dependent B cell differentiation. PMID:20065110

  13. Measurement of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers of consequences or cause complications of pathological states, and prognosis of both evolution and therapeutic safety/efficacy.

    PubMed

    Amiral, Jean; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2016-08-01

    Utility of EVs, as biomarkers of cause or consequence of various pathological complications, and prognosis of blood components' therapy in terms of safety/efficacy and their potential associated hazards, primed by EVs involvements in pro-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and activations of both pro/anti-coagulatory and others associated pathways, as well as various cellular cross talks, are highlighted as the fundamental. Today EVs are becoming the "buzz" words of the current diagnosis, development and research [DDR] strategies, with the aim of ensuring safer therapeutic approaches in the current clinical practices, also incorporating their potential in long term cost effectiveness in health care systems. The main focus of this manuscript is to review the current opinions in some fundamental areas of EVs involvements in health and diseases. Firstly, our goal is highlighting what are EVs/MVs/MPs and how are they generated in physiology, pathology or blood products; classification and significance of EVs generated in vivo; followed by consequences and physiological/pathological induced effects of EVs generation in vivo. Secondly, specific cell origin EVs and association with malignancy; focus on EVs carrying TF and annexin V as a protective protein for harmful effects of EVs, and associations with LA; and incidence of anti-annexin V antibodies are also discussed. Thirdly, utility of EVs is presented: as diagnostic tools of disease markers; prognosis and follow-up of clinical states; evaluation of therapy efficacy; quality and risk assessment of blood products; followed by the laboratory tools for exploring, characterizing and measuring EVs, and/or their associated activity, using our own experiences of capture based assays. Finally, in perspective, the upcoming low volume sampling, fast, reliable and reproducibility and friendly use laboratory tools and the standardization of measurement methods are highlighted with the beneficial effects that we are witnessing in both

  14. Motor Priming in Neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Stoykov, Mary Ellen; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2014-01-01

    Priming is a type of implicit learning wherein a stimulus prompts a change in behavior. Priming has been long studied in the field of psychology. More recently, rehabilitation researchers have studied motor priming as a possible way to facilitate motor learning. For example, priming of the motor cortex is associated with changes in neuroplasticity that are associated with improvements in motor performance. Of the numerous motor priming paradigms under investigation, only a few are practical for the current clinical environment, and the optimal priming modalities for specific clinical presentations are not known. Accordingly, developing an understanding of the various types of motor priming paradigms and their underlying neural mechanisms is an important step for therapists in neurorehabilitation. Most importantly, an understanding of the methods and their underlying mechanisms is essential for optimizing rehabilitation outcomes. The future of neurorehabilitation is likely to include these priming methods, which are delivered prior to or in conjunction with primary neurorehabilitation therapies. In this Special Interest article we discuss those priming paradigms that are supported by the greatest amount of evidence including: (i) stimulation-based priming, (ii) motor imagery and action observation, (iii) sensory priming, (iv) movement-based priming, and (v) pharmacological priming. PMID:25415551

  15. Elasticity of vesicles affects hairless mouse skin structure and permeability.

    PubMed

    van den Bergh, B A; Bouwstra, J A; Junginger, H E; Wertz, P W

    1999-12-01

    One of the possibilities for increasing the penetration rate of drugs through the skin is the use of vesicular systems. Currently, special attention is paid to the elastic properties of liquid-state vesicles, which are supposed to have superior properties compared to gel-state vesicles with respect to skin interactions. In this study, the effects of vesicles on hairless mouse skin, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied in relation to the composition of vesicles. The interactions of elastic vesicles containing the single chain surfactant octaoxyethylene laurate-ester (PEG-8-L) and sucrose laurate-ester (L-595) with hairless mouse skin were studied, in vivo, after non-occlusive application for 1, 3 and 6 h. The skin ultrastructure was examined by ruthenium tetroxide electron microscopy (TEM) and histology. The extent, to which vesicle constituents penetrated into the stratum corneum, was quantified by thin layer chromatography (TLC). The interactions of the elastic vesicles containing PEG-8-L and L-595 surfactants were compared with those observed after treatment with rigid vesicles containing the surfactant sucrose stearate-ester (Wasag-7). Furthermore, skin permeability experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of treatment with PEG-8-L micelles, elastic vesicles (containing PEG-8-L and L-595 surfactants) or rigid Wasag-7 vesicles on the 3H(2)O transport through hairless mouse skin, in vitro, after non-occlusive application. Treatment of hairless mouse skin with the elastic vesicles affected the ultrastructure of the stratum corneum: distinct regions with lamellar stacks derived from the vesicles were observed in intercellular spaces of the stratum corneum. These stacks disrupted the organization of skin bilayers leading to an increased skin permeability, whereas no changes in the ultrastructure of the underlying viable epidermis were observed. Treatment with rigid Wasag-7 vesicles did not affect the skin ultrastructure or skin permeability. TLC

  16. The redox state of the alarmin HMGB1 is a pivotal factor in neuroinflammatory and microglial priming: A role for the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthew G; Weber, Michael D; Fonken, Laura K; Hershman, Sarah A; Watkins, Linda R; Maier, Steven F

    2016-07-01

    The alarmin high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) has been implicated as a key factor mediating neuroinflammatory processes. Recent findings suggest that the redox state of HMGB1 is a critical molecular feature of HMGB1 such that the reduced form (fr-HMGB1) is chemotactic, while the disulfide form (ds-HMGB1) is pro-inflammatory. The present study examined the neuroinflammatory effects of these molecular forms as well as the ability of these forms to prime the neuroinflammatory and microglial response to an immune challenge. To examine the neuroinflammatory effects of these molecular forms in vivo, animals were administered intra-cisterna magna (ICM) a single dose of fr-HMGB1 (10μg), ds-HMGB1 (10μg) or vehicle and basal pro-inflammatory effects were measured 2 and 24h post-injection in hippocampus. Results of this initial experiment demonstrated that ds-HMGB1 increased hippocampal pro-inflammatory mediators at 2h (NF-κBIα mRNA, NLRP3 mRNA and IL-1β protein) and 24h (NF-κBIα mRNA, TNFα mRNA, and NLRP3 protein) after injection. fr-HMGB1 had no effect on these mediators. These neuroinflammatory effects of ds-HMGB1 suggested that ds-HMGB1 may function to prime the neuroinflammatory response to a subsequent immune challenge. To assess the neuroinflammatory priming effects of these molecular forms, animals were administered ICM a single dose of fr-HMGB1 (10μg), ds-HMGB1 (10μg) or vehicle and 24h after injection, animals were challenged with LPS (10μg/kg IP) or vehicle. Neuroinflammatory mediators and the sickness response (3, 8 and 24h after injection) were measured 2h after immune challenge. We found that ds-HMGB1 potentiated the neuroinflammatory (NF-κBIα mRNA, TNFα mRNA, IL-1β mRNA, IL-6 mRNA, NLRP3 mRNA and IL-1β protein) and sickness response (reduced social exploration) to LPS challenge. fr-HMGB1 failed to potentiate the neuroinflammatory response to LPS. To examine whether these molecular forms of HMGB1 directly induce neuroinflammatory effects in

  17. Repetition Priming in Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Sean; Palmer, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The authors explore priming effects of pitch repetition in music in 3 experiments. Musically untrained participants heard a short melody and sang the last pitch of the melody as quickly as possible. Each experiment manipulated (a) whether or not the tone to be sung (target) was heard earlier in the melody (primed) and (b) the prime-target distance…

  18. How pure are your vesicles?

    PubMed

    Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled

    2013-01-01

    We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles. PMID:24009896

  19. Repetition priming in music.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Sean; Palmer, Caroline

    2008-06-01

    The authors explore priming effects of pitch repetition in music in 3 experiments. Musically untrained participants heard a short melody and sang the last pitch of the melody as quickly as possible. Each experiment manipulated (a) whether or not the tone to be sung (target) was heard earlier in the melody (primed) and (b) the prime-target distance (measured in events). Experiment 1 used variable-length melodies, whereas Experiments 2 and 3 used fixed-length melodies. Experiment 3 changed the timbre of the target tone. In all experiments, fast-responding participants produced repeated tones faster than nonrepeated tones, and this repetition benefit decreased as prime-target distances increased. All participants produced expected tonic endings faster than less expected nontonic endings. Repetition and tonal priming effects are compared with harmonic priming effects in music and with repetition priming effects in language. PMID:18505332

  20. Poking vesicles in silico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Ben; Bertrand, Martin; Joos, Bela

    2014-03-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is used to poke cells and study their mechanical properties. Using Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the deformation and relaxation of lipid bilayer vesicles, when poked with a constant force. The relaxation time, equilibrium area expansion, and surface tension of the vesicle membrane are studied over a range of applied forces. The relaxation time exhibits a strong force-dependence. Our force-compression curves show a strong similarity with results from a recent experiment by Schafer et al. (Langmuir, 2013). They used an AFM to ``poke'' adherent giant liposomes with constant nanonewton forces and observed the resulting deformation with a Laser Scanning Confocal Microscope. Results of such experiments, whether on vesicles or cells, are often interpreted in terms of dashpots and springs. This simple approach used to describe the response of a whole cell --complete with cytoskeleton, organelles etc.-- can be problematic when trying to measure the contribution of a single cell component. Our modeling is a first step in a ``bottom-up'' approach where we investigate the viscoelastic properties of an in silico cell prototype with constituents added step by step. Supported by NSERC (Canada).

  1. Clinical Resting-state fMRI in the Preoperative Setting: Are We Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed

    Lee, Megan H; Miller-Thomas, Michelle M; Benzinger, Tammie L; Marcus, Daniel S; Hacker, Carl D; Leuthardt, Eric C; Shimony, Joshua S

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an introduction to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) and to review the current application of this new and powerful technique in the preoperative setting using our institute's extensive experience. RS-fMRI has provided important insights into brain physiology and is an increasingly important tool in the clinical setting. As opposed to task-based functional MRI wherein the subject performs a task while being scanned, RS-fMRI evaluates low-frequency fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal while the subject is at rest. Multiple resting state networks (RSNs) have been identified, including the somatosensory, language, and visual networks, which are of primary importance for presurgical planning. Over the past 4 years, we have performed over 300 RS-fMRI examinations in the clinical setting and these have been used to localize eloquent somatosensory and language cortices before brain tumor resection. RS-fMRI is particularly useful in this setting for patients who are unable to cooperate with the task-based paradigm, such as young children or those who are sedated, paretic, or aphasic.Although RS-fMRI is still investigational, our experience indicates that this method is ready for clinical application in the presurgical setting. PMID:26848556

  2. Priming effects on the perceived grouping of ambiguous dot patterns.

    PubMed

    Kurylo, Daniel D; Bukhari, Farhan

    2015-09-01

    For ambiguous stimuli, complex dynamics guide processes of perceptual grouping. Previous studies have suggested two opposing effects on grouping that are produced by the preliminary stimulus state: one that enhances grouping towards the existing structure, and another that opposes this structure. To examine effects of the preliminary state on grouping directly, measurements were made of perceived grouping of dot patterns that followed a visual prime. Three stimuli were presented in sequence: prime, target, and mask. Targets were composed of an evenly spaced dot grid in which grouping was established by similarity in luminance. Subjects indicated the dominant perceived grouping. The prime either corresponded to or opposed the prevailing organization of the target. Contrary to the hypothesis, solid-line primes biased grouping away from the structure of the prime, even when the prevailing organization of dot patterns strongly favored the primes' structure. This effect occurred, although to a lesser extent, when primes did not occupy the same location of targets, but were presented in a marginal area surrounding the grid. Priming effects did not occur for primes constructed of dot patterns. Effects found here may be attributed to a forward masking effect by primes, which more effectively disrupts grouping of patterns matched to the prime. Effects may also be attributed to a type of pattern contrast, in which a grouped pattern dissimilar to primes gains salience. For the pattern contrast model, the partial activation of multiple grouped configurations is compared to the pattern of the solid-line primes. PMID:25281427

  3. A Well-Defined Readily Releasable Pool with Fixed Capacity for Storing Vesicles at Calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Mahfooz, Kashif; Singh, Mahendra; Renden, Robert; Wesseling, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The readily releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles is a core concept in studies of presynaptic function. However, operating principles lack consensus definition and the utility for quantitative analysis has been questioned. Here we confirm that RRPs at calyces of Held from 14 to 21 day old mice have a fixed capacity for storing vesicles that is not modulated by Ca2+. Discrepancies with previous studies are explained by a dynamic flow-through pool, established during heavy use, containing vesicles that are released with low probability despite being immediately releasable. Quantitative analysis ruled out a posteriori explanations for the vesicles with low release probability, such as Ca2+-channel inactivation, and established unexpected boundary conditions for remaining alternatives. Vesicles in the flow-through pool could be incompletely primed, in which case the full sequence of priming steps downstream of recruitment to the RRP would have an average unitary rate of at least 9/s during heavy use. Alternatively, vesicles with low and high release probability could be recruited to distinct types of release sites; in this case the timing of recruitment would be similar at the two types, and the downstream transition from recruited to fully primed would be much faster. In either case, further analysis showed that activity accelerates the upstream step where vesicles are initially recruited to the RRP. Overall, our results show that the RRP can be well defined in the mathematical sense, and support the concept that the defining mechanism is a stable group of autonomous release sites. PMID:27035349

  4. A Well-Defined Readily Releasable Pool with Fixed Capacity for Storing Vesicles at Calyx of Held.

    PubMed

    Mahfooz, Kashif; Singh, Mahendra; Renden, Robert; Wesseling, John F

    2016-04-01

    The readily releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles is a core concept in studies of presynaptic function. However, operating principles lack consensus definition and the utility for quantitative analysis has been questioned. Here we confirm that RRPs at calyces of Held from 14 to 21 day old mice have a fixed capacity for storing vesicles that is not modulated by Ca2+. Discrepancies with previous studies are explained by a dynamic flow-through pool, established during heavy use, containing vesicles that are released with low probability despite being immediately releasable. Quantitative analysis ruled out a posteriori explanations for the vesicles with low release probability, such as Ca2+-channel inactivation, and established unexpected boundary conditions for remaining alternatives. Vesicles in the flow-through pool could be incompletely primed, in which case the full sequence of priming steps downstream of recruitment to the RRP would have an average unitary rate of at least 9/s during heavy use. Alternatively, vesicles with low and high release probability could be recruited to distinct types of release sites; in this case the timing of recruitment would be similar at the two types, and the downstream transition from recruited to fully primed would be much faster. In either case, further analysis showed that activity accelerates the upstream step where vesicles are initially recruited to the RRP. Overall, our results show that the RRP can be well defined in the mathematical sense, and support the concept that the defining mechanism is a stable group of autonomous release sites. PMID:27035349

  5. Characterization of extracellular vesicles in whole blood: Influence of pre-analytical parameters and visualization of vesicle-cell interactions using imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fendl, Birgit; Weiss, René; Fischer, Michael B; Spittler, Andreas; Weber, Viktoria

    2016-09-01

    Extracellular vesicles are central players in intercellular communication and are released from the plasma membrane under tightly regulated conditions, depending on the physiological and pathophysiological state of the producing cell. Their heterogeneity requires a spectrum of methods for isolation and characterization, where pre-analytical parameters have profound impact on vesicle analysis, particularly in blood, since sampling, addition of anticoagulants, as well as post-sampling vesicle generation may influence the outcome. Here, we characterized microvesicles directly in whole blood using a combination of flow cytometry and imaging flow cytometry. We assessed the influence of sample agitation, anticoagulation, and temperature on post-sampling vesicle generation, and show that vesicle counts remained stable over time in samples stored without agitation. Storage with gentle rolling mimicking agitation, in contrast, resulted in strong release of platelet-derived vesicles in blood anticoagulated with citrate or heparin, whereas vesicle counts remained stable upon anticoagulation with EDTA. Using imaging flow cytometry, we could visualize microvesicles adhering to blood cells and revealed an anticoagulant-dependent increase in vesicle-cell aggregates over time. We demonstrate that vesicles adhere preferentially to monocytes and granulocytes in whole blood, while no microvesicles could be visualized on lymphocytes. Our data underscore the relevance of pre-analytical parameters in vesicle analysis and demonstrate that imaging flow cytometry is a suitable tool to study the interaction of extracellular vesicles with their target cells. PMID:27444383

  6. An ERP investigation of orthographic priming with superset primes.

    PubMed

    Ktori, Maria; Midgley, Katherine; Holcomb, Phillip J; Grainger, Jonathan

    2015-01-12

    Prime stimuli formed by inserting unrelated letters in a given target word (called "superset" primes) provide a means to modify the relative positions of the letters shared by prime and target. Here we examined the time-course of superset priming effects in an ERP study using the sandwich-priming paradigm. We compared the effects of superset primes formed by the insertion of unrelated letters (e.g., maurkdet-MARKET), or by the insertion of hyphens (e.g., ma-rk-et-MARKET), with identity priming (e.g., market-MARKET), all measured relative to unrelated control primes. Behavioral data revealed significantly greater priming in the hyphen-insert condition compared with the letter-insert condition. In the ERP signal, letter-insert priming emerged later than hyphen-insert priming and produced a reversed priming effect in the N400 time-window compared with the more typical N400 priming effects seen for both hyphen-insert priming and identity priming. The different pattern of priming effects seen for letter-insert primes and hyphen-insert primes suggests that compared with identity priming, letter superset priming reflects the joint influence of: (1) a disruption in letter position information, and (2) an inhibitory influence of mismatching letters. PMID:25451126

  7. Discovery: Prime Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

  8. Priming Gestures with Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M.; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge. PMID:26544884

  9. Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional…

  10. PRIME Lab Radiocarbon Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillegonds, D. J.; Mueller, K. A.; Ma, X.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is one of three NSF national facilities for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), and is the only one capable of determining six cosmogenic radionuclides: 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca, and 129I. This abstract describes the current status of the radiocarbon analysis program at PRIME Lab.

  11. Building Numbers from Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  12. Identification of a Munc13-sensitive step in chromaffin cell large dense-core vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Man, Kwun Nok M; Imig, Cordelia; Walter, Alexander M; Pinheiro, Paulo S; Stevens, David R; Rettig, Jens; Sørensen, Jakob B; Cooper, Benjamin H; Brose, Nils; Wojcik, Sonja M

    2015-01-01

    It is currently unknown whether the molecular steps of large dense-core vesicle (LDCV) docking and priming are identical to the corresponding reactions in synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis. Munc13s are essential for SV docking and priming, and we systematically analyzed their role in LDCV exocytosis using chromaffin cells lacking individual isoforms. We show that particularly Munc13-2 plays a fundamental role in LDCV exocytosis, but in contrast to synapses lacking Munc13s, the corresponding chromaffin cells do not exhibit a vesicle docking defect. We further demonstrate that ubMunc13-2 and Munc13-1 confer Ca2+-dependent LDCV priming with similar affinities, but distinct kinetics. Using a mathematical model, we identify an early LDCV priming step that is strongly dependent upon Munc13s. Our data demonstrate that the molecular steps of SV and LDCV priming are very similar while SV and LDCV docking mechanisms are distinct. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10635.001 PMID:26575293

  13. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Steven M.; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  14. Microfluidic isolation of cancer-cell-derived microvesicles from hetergeneous extracellular shed vesicle populations.

    PubMed

    Santana, Steven M; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A; Kirby, Brian J

    2014-12-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles, including exosomes and microvesicles, are disseminated throughout the body and represent an important conduit of cell communication. Cancer-cell-derived microvesicles have potential as a cancer biomarker as they help shape the tumor microenvironment to promote the growth of the primary tumor and prime the metastatic niche. It is likely that, in cancer cell cultures, the two constituent extracellular shed vesicle subpopulations, observed in dynamic light scattering, represent an exosome population and a cancer-cell-specific microvesicle population and that extracellular shed vesicle size provides information about provenance and cargo. We have designed and implemented a novel microfluidic technology that separates microvesicles, as a function of diameter, from heterogeneous populations of cancer-cell-derived extracellular shed vesicles. We measured cargo carried by the microvesicle subpopulation processed through this microfluidic platform. Such analyses could enable future investigations to more accurately and reliably determine provenance, functional activity, and mechanisms of transformation in cancer. PMID:25342569

  15. Nanotube-Enabled Vesicle-Vesicle Communication: A Computational Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-07-01

    Cell-to-cell communications via the tunneling nanotubes or gap junction channels are vital for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Instead of these intrinsic communication pathways, how to design artificial communication channels between cells remains a challenging but interesting problem. Here, we perform dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to analyze the interaction between rotational nanotubes (RNTs) and vesicles so as to provide a novel design mechanism for cell-to-cell communication. Simulation results have demonstrated that the RNTs are capable of generating local disturbance and promote vesicle translocation toward the RNTs. Through ligand pattern designing on the RNTs, we can find a suitable nanotube candidate with a specific ligand coating pattern for forming the RNT-vesicle network. The results also show that a RNT can act as a bridged channel between vesicles, which facilitates substance transfer. Our findings provide useful guidelines for the molecular design of patterned RNTs for creating a synthetic channel between cells. PMID:26266730

  16. Conscious contributions to subliminal priming.

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr

    2008-03-01

    Choice reaction times to visual stimuli (targets) may be influenced by preceding subliminal stimuli (primes). Some authors reported a straight priming effect i.e., responses were faster when primes and targets called for the same response than when they called for different responses. Others found the reversed pattern of results. Eimer and Schlaghecken [Eimer, M. & Schlaghecken, F. (2002). Links between conscious awareness and response inhibition: evidence from masked priming. Psychonomic Bulletin &Review, 9, 514-520.] showed recently that straight priming occurs whenever a prime is not efficiently masked thereby the information provided by the prime is accessible for consciousness. In the present study, a hypothesis is tested that straight priming is due to mediation of consciousness. To test this hypothesis, prime validity was manipulated. We showed that even when no mask was used so that participants could fully and consciously perceive the prime and participants were informed that primes were mostly invalid, for the short prime-target ISI interval (100 ms) straight priming occurred. The priming was inverse when the ISI was 800 ms. This indicates that participants were able to use the information provided by the prime to prepare the response opposite to that cued by the prime but only if the time between the prime and the target was long enough. PMID:17126565

  17. Largest known twin primes and Sophie Germain primes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indlekofer, Karl-Heinz; Járai, Antal

    The numbers 242206083* 2^38880+-1 are twin primes. The number p=2375063906985* 2^19380-1 is a Sophie Germain prime, i.e. p and 2p+1 are both primes. For p=4610194180515* 2^ 5056-1, the numbers p, p+2 and 2p+1 are all primes.

  18. Phospholipase Cη2 Activation Redirects Vesicle Trafficking by Regulating F-actin*

    PubMed Central

    Yamaga, Masaki; Kielar-Grevstad, D. Michelle; Martin, Thomas F. J.

    2015-01-01

    PI(4,5)P2 localizes to sites of dense core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells and is required for Ca2+-triggered vesicle exocytosis, but the impact of local PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis on exocytosis is poorly understood. Previously, we reported that Ca2+-dependent activation of phospholipase Cη2 (PLCη2) catalyzes PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis, which affected vesicle exocytosis by regulating the activities of the lipid-dependent priming factors CAPS (also known as CADPS) and ubiquitous Munc13-2 in PC12 cells. Here we describe an additional role for PLCη2 in vesicle exocytosis as a Ca2+-dependent regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Depolarization of neuroendocrine PC12 cells with 56 or 95 mm KCl buffers increased peak Ca2+ levels to ∼400 or ∼800 nm, respectively, but elicited similar numbers of vesicle exocytic events. However, 56 mm K+ preferentially elicited the exocytosis of plasma membrane-resident vesicles, whereas 95 mm K+ preferentially elicited the exocytosis of cytoplasmic vesicles arriving during stimulation. Depolarization with 95 mm K+ but not with 56 mm K+ activated PLCη2 to catalyze PI(4,5)P2 hydrolysis. The decrease in PI(4,5)P2 promoted F-actin disassembly, which increased exocytosis of newly arriving vesicles. Consistent with its role as a Ca2+-dependent regulator of the cortical actin cytoskeleton, PLCη2 localized with F-actin filaments. The results highlight the importance of PI(4,5)P2 for coordinating cytoskeletal dynamics with vesicle exocytosis and reveal a new role for PLCη2 as a Ca2+-dependent regulator of F-actin dynamics and vesicle trafficking. PMID:26432644

  19. How important is a prime's gestalt for subliminal priming?

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Slósarek, Maciej

    2007-06-01

    Masked stimuli (primes) can affect the preparation of a motor response to subsequently presented target stimuli. Under some conditions, reactions to the main stimulus can be facilitated (straight priming) or inhibited (inverse priming) when preceded by a compatible prime (calling for the same response). In the majority of studies in which inverse priming was demonstrated arrows pointing left or right were used as prime and targets. There is, however, evidence that arrows are special overlearned stimuli which are processed in a favorable way. Here we report three experiments designated to test whether the "arrowness" of primes/targets is a sufficient condition for inverse priming. The results clearly show that although inverse priming appeared when non-arrow shapes were used, the magnitude of the priming effect was larger with arrows. The possible reasons for this effect are discussed. PMID:16919477

  20. Benzaldehyde-functionalized Polymer Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guorong; Fang, Huafeng; Cheng, Chong; Lu, Peng; Zhang, Ke; Walker, Amy V.; Taylor, John-Stephen A.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer vesicles with diameters of ca. 100-600 nm and bearing benzaldehyde functionalities within the vesicular walls were constructed through self assembly of an amphiphilic block copolymer PEO45-b-PVBA26 in water. The reactivity of the benzaldehyde functionalities was verified by crosslinking the polymersomes, and also by a one-pot crosslinking and functionalization approach to further render the vesicles fluorescent, each via reductive amination. In vitro studies found these labelled nanostructures to undergo cell association. PMID:19309173

  1. Synaptic vesicle pools: an update.

    PubMed

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or "pools". We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are "fixed". Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  2. Synaptic Vesicle Pools: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or “pools”. We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are “fixed”. Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  3. Microcomputer-Assisted Discoveries: Primes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimberling, Clark

    1983-01-01

    Four computer programs (Applesoft Basic) on prime numbers are described, including programs for factoring a positive integer as a product of primes, listing all divisors of a given A, and for exploring primes representable as prescribed sums/differences involving squares, cubes, Fibonnaci numbers, or other primes. Program listings are included.…

  4. Adaptive and maladaptive mechanisms of cellular priming.

    PubMed Central

    Meldrum, D R; Cleveland, J C; Moore, E E; Partrick, D A; Banerjee, A; Harken, A H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The mechanisms of cellular priming resulting in both adaptive and maladaptive responses to subsequent injury and strategies for manipulating this priming to constructive therapeutic advantage are explored. BACKGROUND DATA: A cell is prepared or educated by an initial insult (priming stimulus). Investigations in both laboratory animals and humans indicate that cells, organs, and perhaps even whole patients respond differently to a proximal second insult ("second hit") by virtue of this prior environmental history. The opportunity to achieve the primed state appears to be conserved across almost all cell types. The initial stimulus transmits a message to the cellular machinery that influences the cell's response to a subsequent challenge. This response may result in an exaggerated inflammatory response in the case of the neutrophil (an often maladaptive process) or an improved tolerance to injury by the myocyte (adaptive response). Our global hypothesis is that cellular priming is a conserved, receptor-dependent process that invokes common intracellular targets across multiple cell types. We further postulate that these targets create a language based on the transient phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of intracellular enzymes that is therapeutically accessible. CONCLUSIONS: Priming is a conserved, receptor-dependent process transduced by means of intracellular targets across multiple cell types. The potential therapeutic strategies outlined involve the receptor-mediated manipulation of cellular events. These events are transmitted through an intracellular language that instructs the cell regarding its behavior in response to subsequent stimulation. Understanding these intracellular events represents a realistic goal of priming and preconditioning biology and will likely lead to clinical control of the primed state. PMID:9389392

  5. Actin- and Myosin-Dependent Vesicle Loading of Presynaptic Docking Sites Prior to Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takafumi; Malagon, Gerardo; Pulido, Camila; Llano, Isabel; Neher, Erwin; Marty, Alain

    2016-08-17

    Variance analysis of postsynaptic current amplitudes suggests the presence of distinct docking sites (also called release sites) where vesicles pause before exocytosis. Docked vesicles participate in the readily releasable pool (RRP), but the relation between docking site number and RRP size remains unclear. It is also unclear whether all vesicles of the RRP are equally release competent, and what cellular mechanisms underlie RRP renewal. We address here these questions at single glutamatergic synapses, counting released vesicles using deconvolution. We find a remarkably low variance of cumulative vesicle counts during action potential trains. This, combined with Monte Carlo simulations, indicates that vesicles transit through two successive states before exocytosis, so that the RRP is up to 2-fold higher than the docking site number. The transition to the second state has a very rapid rate constant, and is specifically inhibited by latrunculin B and blebbistatin, suggesting the involvement of actin and myosin. PMID:27537485

  6. Construction of monomers and chains assembled by 3d/4f metals and 4 Prime -(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2 Prime :6 Prime ,2 Double-Prime -terpyridine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Juan; Hu, Rui-Xiang; Zhang, Man-Bo

    2012-12-15

    A series of transition metal and lanthanide complexes of 4 Prime -(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2 Prime :6 Prime ,2 Double-Prime -terpyridine (HL, 1), namely [M(L){sub 2}]{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O (M=Ni, 2; Co, 3), [Zn(L){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}0.5nH{sub 2}O (4) and [Ln(L){sub 3}]{sub n} (Ln=Nd, 5; Gd, 6; Er, 7) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Isomorphic compounds 2 and 3 are mononuclear molecules with two ligand chelating to the metal centers via tridentate terpyridyl, while compound 4 adopts 1D chain-like structure, in which five-coordinate zinc centers are surrounded by three ligands. Compounds 5-7 also display 1D chain-like structure, but the nine-coordinate lanthanide centers bonded by four ligands. Luminescent property indicates that compound 4 exhibits photoluminescence in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Six complexes of 4 Prime -(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2 Prime :6 Prime ,2 Double-Prime -terpyridine were synthesized via assembly with transition metal and lanthanide ions, respectively. Among them, [Ni(L){sub 2}]{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O and [Co(L){sub 2}]{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O are monomers, while [Zn(L){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}0.5nH{sub 2}O and [Ln(L){sub 3}]{sub n} display chain-like structures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds of 4 Prime -(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2 Prime :6 Prime ,2 Double-Prime -terpyridine were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Ni(L){sub 2}]{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O and [Co(L){sub 2}]{center_dot}5H{sub 2}O are monomers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Zn(L){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}0.5nH{sub 2}O and [Ln(L){sub 3}]{sub n} display chain-like structures.

  7. Asymmetric Vesicle Instability in Extensional Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Andrew; Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Previous researchers have chronicled the breakup of drops in an extensional flow as they stretch into a dumbbell shape with a long thin neck. Motivated by recent experimental observations, we study an apparently similar problem with vesicles, which are deformable but incompressible membranes that conserve area and volume. First, we simulate vesicles in an unbounded uniaxial extensional flow which are given general radial perturbations from an initially stable symmetric equilibrium state. For sufficiently low reduced volume (< 0.74 at matched inner/outer viscosity) there exists a capillary number at which an asymmetric perturbation mode will grow, resulting in the formation of an asymmetric dumbbell shape with a thin connecting cylindrical bridge analogous to the shapes associated with drop breakup. Our simulations help elucidate a mechanism for this instability based on a competition between internal pressure differentials in the vesicle resulting from the membrane bending force and ambient flow. We compare and contrast this transition to the ``standard'' drop breakup transition. Funded by NSF GRFP and Stanford Graduate Fellowship.

  8. Neurotransmitter Release: The Last Millisecond in the Life of a Synaptic Vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    During an action potential, Ca2+ entering a presynaptic terminal triggers synaptic vesicle exocytosis and neurotransmitter release in less than a millisecond. How does Ca2+ stimulate release so rapidly and precisely? Work over the last decades revealed that Ca2+-binding to synaptotagmin triggers release by stimulating synaptotagmin-binding to a core machinery composed of SNARE and SM proteins that mediates membrane fusion during exocytosis. Complexin adaptor proteins assist synaptotagmin by activating and clamping this core fusion machinery. Synaptic vesicles containing synaptotagmin are positioned at the active zone, the site of vesicle fusion, by a protein complex containing RIM proteins. RIM proteins simultaneously activate docking and priming of synaptic vesicles and recruit Ca2+-channels to active zones, thereby connecting in a single complex primed synaptic vesicles to Ca2+-channels. This architecture allows direct flow of Ca2+-ions from Ca2+-channels to synaptotagmin, which then triggers fusion, thus mediating tight millisecond coupling of an action potential to neurotransmitter release. PMID:24183019

  9. Overall energy conversion efficiency of a photosynthetic vesicle

    PubMed Central

    Sener, Melih; Strumpfer, Johan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The chromatophore of purple bacteria is an intracellular spherical vesicle that exists in numerous copies in the cell and that efficiently converts sunlight into ATP synthesis, operating typically under low light conditions. Building on an atomic-level structural model of a low-light-adapted chromatophore vesicle from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we investigate the cooperation between more than a hundred protein complexes in the vesicle. The steady-state ATP production rate as a function of incident light intensity is determined after identifying quinol turnover at the cytochrome bc1 complex (cytb⁢c1) as rate limiting and assuming that the quinone/quinol pool of about 900 molecules acts in a quasi-stationary state. For an illumination condition equivalent to 1% of full sunlight, the vesicle exhibits an ATP production rate of 82 ATP molecules/s. The energy conversion efficiency of ATP synthesis at illuminations corresponding to 1%–5% of full sunlight is calculated to be 0.12–0.04, respectively. The vesicle stoichiometry, evolutionarily adapted to the low light intensities in the habitat of purple bacteria, is suboptimal for steady-state ATP turnover for the benefit of protection against over-illumination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09541.001 PMID:27564854

  10. Overall energy conversion efficiency of a photosynthetic vesicle.

    PubMed

    Sener, Melih; Strumpfer, Johan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Hunter, C Neil; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The chromatophore of purple bacteria is an intracellular spherical vesicle that exists in numerous copies in the cell and that efficiently converts sunlight into ATP synthesis, operating typically under low light conditions. Building on an atomic-level structural model of a low-light-adapted chromatophore vesicle from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, we investigate the cooperation between more than a hundred protein complexes in the vesicle. The steady-state ATP production rate as a function of incident light intensity is determined after identifying quinol turnover at the cytochrome bc1 complex (cytb⁢c1) as rate limiting and assuming that the quinone/quinol pool of about 900 molecules acts in a quasi-stationary state. For an illumination condition equivalent to 1% of full sunlight, the vesicle exhibits an ATP production rate of 82 ATP molecules/s. The energy conversion efficiency of ATP synthesis at illuminations corresponding to 1%-5% of full sunlight is calculated to be 0.12-0.04, respectively. The vesicle stoichiometry, evolutionarily adapted to the low light intensities in the habitat of purple bacteria, is suboptimal for steady-state ATP turnover for the benefit of protection against over-illumination. PMID:27564854

  11. Clathrin regenerates synaptic vesicles from endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Camacho-Pérez, Marcial; Rost, Benjamin R.; Brokowski, Bettina; Söhl-Kielczynski, Berit; Felies, Annegret; Davis, M. Wayne; Rosenmund, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ultrafast endocytosis can retrieve a single large endocytic vesicle as fast as 50-100 ms after synaptic vesicle fusion. However, the fate of the large endocytic vesicles is not known. Here we demonstrate that these vesicles transition to a synaptic endosome about one second after stimulation. The endosome is resolved into coated vesicles after 3 seconds, which in turn become small-diameter synaptic vesicles 5-6 seconds after stimulation. We disrupted clathrin function using RNAi and found that clathrin is not required for ultrafast endocytosis but is required to generate synaptic vesicles from the endosome. Ultrafast endocytosis fails when actin polymerization is disrupted, or when neurons are stimulated at room temperature instead of physiological temperature. In the absence of ultrafast endocytosis, synaptic vesicles are retrieved directly from the plasma membrane by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results explain in large part discrepancies among published experiments concerning the role of clathrin in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. PMID:25296249

  12. Extracellular vesicles during Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 infection: an inquire.

    PubMed

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Deschamps, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are defined as a heterogeneous group of vesicles that are released by prokaryotic to higher eukaryotic cells and by plant cells in an evolutionary conserved manner. The significance of these vesicles lies in their capacity to transfer selected cargo composed of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids to both recipient and parent cells and to influence various physiological and pathological functions. Microorganisms such as parasites, fungi and protozoa and even single cell organisms such as bacteria generate extracellular vesicles. In addition, several viruses have evolved strategies to hijack the extracellular vesicles for egress or to alter the surrounding environment. The thesis of this article is that: a) during HSV-1 infection vesicles are delivered from infected to uninfected cells that influence the infection; b) the cargo of these vesicles consists of viral and host transcripts (mRNAs, miRNAs and non-coding RNAs) and proteins including innate immune components, such as STING; and c) the viral vesicles carry the tetraspanins CD9, CD63 and CD81, which are considered as markers of exosomes. Therefore, we assume that the STING-carrying vesicles, produced during HSV-1 infection, are reminiscent to exosomes. The presumed functions of the exosomes released from HSV-1 infected cells include priming the recipient cells and accelerating antiviral responses to control the dissemination of the virus. This may be one strategy used by the virus to prevent the elimination by the host and establish persistent infection. In conclusion, the modification of the cargo of exosomes appears to be part of the strategy that HSV-1 has evolved to establish lifelong persistent infections into the human body to ensure successful dissemination between individuals. PMID:27048572

  13. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  14. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of 1,2-(1{prime},1{prime},2{prime},2{prime}-tetramethyldisilane-1{prime},2{prime})carborane

    SciTech Connect

    Rege, F.M. de; Kassebaum, J.D.; Scott, B.L.; Abney, K.D.; Balaich, G.J.

    1999-02-08

    The novel strained compound 1,2-(1{prime},1{prime},2{prime},2{prime}-tetramethyldisilane-1{prime},2{prime})carborane (1) was synthesized by the reaction of 1,2-dilithiocarborane and dichlorotetramethyldisilane. Compound 1 was characterized by solution methods and its structure determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In contrast to its organic analogue o-(disilanyl)-phenylene, the reaction of 1 with ethanol leads to cleavage of a Si-C bond rather than a Si-Si bond. Similarly to other cyclic disilanes, exposure of a solution of 1 to oxygen leads to the insertion of an oxygen atom into the Si-Si bond. The structure of the oxygen inserted product was also determined by X-ray crystallography. The general chemistry and attempts at polymerizing 1 are briefly discussed.

  15. Some "Prime" Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stephen I.

    Topics that deal with prime numbers are presented with the intent of allowing the student to re-create the excitement of the original investigation. Suitable for advanced high school students as an introduction to number theory at the college level or as a text for courses in teacher education, the book covers the following topics: (1) the number…

  16. "Fell" Primes "Fall", but Does "Bell" Prime "Ball"? Masked Priming with Irregularly-Inflected Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crepaldi, Davide; Rastle, Kathleen; Coltheart, Max; Nickels, Lyndsey

    2010-01-01

    Recent masked priming experiments have brought to light a morphological level of analysis that is exclusively based on the orthographic appearance of words, so that it breaks down corner into corn- and -er, as well as dealer into deal- and -er (Rastle, Davis, & New, 2004). Being insensitive to semantic factors, this morpho-orthographic…

  17. Prime Retrieval of Motor Responses in Negative Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Susanne; Buchner, Axel; Dentale, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Three auditory identification experiments were designed to specify the prime-response retrieval model of negative priming (S. Mayr & A. Buchner, 2006), which assumes that the prime response is retrieved in ignored repetition trials and interferes with probe responding. In Experiment 1, shortly before (in Experiment 1A) or after (in Experiment 1B)…

  18. Functional Nanoscale Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Cycling with Superfast Fixation.

    PubMed

    Schikorski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging is the measurement of structural changes during an ongoing physiological process over time. In many cases, functional imaging has been implemented by tracking a fluorescent signal in live imaging sessions. Electron microscopy, however, excludes live imaging which has hampered functional imaging approaches on the ultrastructural level. This barrier was broken with the introduction of superfast fixation. Superfast fixation is capable of stopping and fixing membrane traffic at sufficient speed to capture a physiological process at a distinct functional state. Applying superfast fixation at sequential time points allows tracking of membrane traffic in a step-by-step fashion.This technique has been applied to track labeled endocytic vesicles at central synapses as they pass through the synaptic vesicle cycle. At synapses, neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles (SVs) via fast activity-dependent exocytosis. Exocytosis is coupled to fast endocytosis that retrieves SVs components from the plasma membrane shortly after release. Fluorescent FM dyes that bind to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane enter the endocytic vesicle during membrane retrieval and remain trapped in endocytic vesicles have been widely used to study SV exo-endocytic cycling in live imaging sessions. FM dyes can also be photoconverted into an electron-dense diaminobenzidine polymer which allows the investigation of SV cycling in the electron microscope. The combination of FM labeling with superfast fixation made it possible to track the fine structure of endocytic vesicles at 1 s intervals. Because this combination is not specialized to SV cycling, many other cellular processes can be studied. Furthermore, the technique is easy to set up and cost effective.This chapter describes activity-dependent FM dye labeling of SVs in cultured hippocampal neurons, superfast microwave-assisted fixation, photoconversion of the fluorescent endocytic vesicles, and the analysis of

  19. Ellipsoidal relaxation of electrodeformed vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lin, Hao; Lira, Rafael; Dimova, Rumiana; Riske, Karin

    2015-11-01

    Electrodeformation has been extensively applied to investigate the mechanical behavior of vesicles and cells. While the deformation process often exhibits complex behavior and reveals interesting physics, the relaxation process post-pulsation is equally intriguing yet less frequently studied. In this work theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented, which reveal the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula, which is derived only for equilibrated shapes, is shown to be applicable to dynamic situations such as in relaxation. A closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a timescale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the ``entropic'' and the ``constant-tension'' regime. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data/model analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  20. Rhizosphere priming: a nutrient perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizosphere priming is the change in decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) caused by root activity. Rhizosphere priming plays a crucial role in soil carbon (C) dynamics and their response to global climate change. Rhizosphere priming may be affected by soil nutrient availability, but rhizospher...

  1. Masked Repetition Priming Using Magnetoencephalography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Philip J.; Fiorentino, Robert; Poeppel, David

    2008-01-01

    Masked priming is used in psycholinguistic studies to assess questions about lexical access and representation. We present two masked priming experiments using MEG. If the MEG signal elicited by words reflects specific aspects of lexical retrieval, then one expects to identify specific neural correlates of retrieval that are sensitive to priming.…

  2. Priming Ditransitive Structures in Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arai, Manabu; van Gompel, Roger P. G.; Scheepers, Cristoph

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have shown evidence for syntactic priming during language production (e.g., Bock, 1986). It is often assumed that comprehension and production share similar mechanisms and that priming also occurs during comprehension (e.g., Pickering & Garrod, 2004). Research investigating priming during comprehension (e.g., Branigan et al., 2005 and…

  3. Physicochemical characterization and cytotoxic studies of nonionic surfactant vesicles using sucrose esters as oral delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Karina; Morilla, María José; Romero, Eder; Chávez, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    Several nanotechnological solutions for mucosal immunization have been proposed, such as nanoparticles, liposomes, solid lipidic particles, micelles, and surfactant vesicles. In recent years, surfactant vesicles have gained increasing scientific attention as an alternative potential drug delivery system to the conventional liposome. This type of vesicle known as niosomes or nonionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs) has a structure and properties similar to those of liposomes. Both of them can transport hydrophilic drugs by encapsulation in the aqueous inner pool or hydrophobic drugs by intercalation into hydrophobic domains. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize vesicles formed by sucrose esters as protective systems of bioactive molecules for oral administration. Vesicles were prepared using two commercial products formed by mixtures of mono and diesters S-570 and S-770, respectively. Determined parameters were size and zeta potential; the stability of formulations was tested in presence of increasing concentrations of a surfactant, and at several pH values observed in the gastrointestinal tract. Solubilization experiences showed an initial decrease in size for vesicles of both ester mixtures, samples showed detergent resistance at higher Triton X-100 concentrations. Vesicles showed stability at pH 5-7.4 up to 90 min; however, both formulations showed colloidal instability at pH=2, which corresponds to the isoelectric point of these vesicles. To evaluate the cytotoxicity of both vesicle formulations and separately each pure ester, Caco-2 cells were used. Cytotoxic evaluation indicated that both types of vesicles and free sucrose distearate were safe for Caco-2 viability; however, free sucrose monostearate was toxic for the cells. As a conclusion of these preliminary studies, it can be stated that vesicles formed with mixtures of sucrose esters showed a size in the range of 200 nm maintaining their size when exposed to the action of a surfactant, but

  4. Ultrasound-responsive ultrathin multiblock copolyamide vesicles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Chunyang; Huang, Tong; Xu, Shuting; Bai, Yongping; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation. PMID:26878351

  5. Aggregation, lipid exchange, and metastable phases of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine vesicles.

    PubMed

    Pryor, C; Bridge, M; Loew, L M

    1985-04-23

    A new fluorescent lipid analogue, bimanephosphatidylcholine, has been synthesized for use in lipid bilayers. This probe is well suited as an energy-transfer donor with N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)phosphatidylethanolamine as the acceptor. Dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine vesicles are prepared by sonication at pH 9 and characterized by electron microscopy and other methods. Resonance energy transfer between separately labeled donor and acceptor vesicles is monitored during HCl-induced aggregation to determine the kinetics of lipid randomization. Light scattering is also monitored to measure the kinetics of aggregation. The light scattering shows a marked reversal with NaOH while the energy transfer does not, indicating lipid exchange during a reversibly aggregated state; the extent of energy transfer suggests that only lipids in the outer monolayers exchange. The gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition temperature in HCl-treated vesicles is found to be 47 degrees C with diphenylhexatriene. The initial sonicated dispersion does not show a sharp phase transition. In vesicles labeled with both donor and acceptor probes, a small, irreversible increase in energy transfer is obtained upon lowering and then restoring the pH. These results suggest a metastable phase in the sonicated vesicles containing a randomized distribution of lipid and probes within the bilayers; the thermodynamically favored phase, whose formation is triggered by the pH shock, contains domains within which the probe lipids are more highly concentrated. PMID:3995010

  6. Extracellular Vesicles as Biomarkers of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Hernandez, Javier; Cortes, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease that predominantly affects women and typically manifests in multiple organs. The damage caused by this disorder is characterized by a chronic inflammatory state. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including microvesicles (also known as microparticles), apoptotic bodies, and exosomes, are recognized vehicles of intercellular communication, carrying autoantigens, cytokines, and surface receptors. Therefore, the evidence of EVs and their cargo as biomarkers of autoimmune disease is rapidly expanding. This review will focus on biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, their pathophysiological roles, and their potential as biomarkers and therapeutics in inflammatory disease, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26435565

  7. Congruent numbers with many prime factors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Mohammed Ben Alhocain, in an Arab manuscript of the 10th century, stated that the principal object of the theory of rational right triangles is to find a square that when increased or diminished by a certain number, m becomes a square [Dickson LE (1971) History of the Theory of Numbers (Chelsea, New York), Vol 2, Chap 16]. In modern language, this object is to find a rational point of infinite order on the elliptic curve . Heegner constructed such rational points in the case that m are primes congruent to 5,7 modulo 8 or twice primes congruent to 3 modulo 8 [Monsky P (1990) Math Z 204:45–68]. We extend Heegner's result to integers m with many prime divisors and give a sketch in this report. The full details of all the proofs will be given in ref. 1 [Tian Y (2012) Congruent Numbers and Heegner Points, arXiv:1210.8231]. PMID:23213259

  8. Stronger suboptimal than optimal affective priming?

    PubMed

    Rotteveel, M; de Groot, P; Geutskens, A; Phaf, R H

    2001-12-01

    The finding of stronger affective priming in less conscious (suboptimal) conditions than in fully conscious (optimal) conditions (S. T. Murphy & R. B. Zajonc, 1993) is theoretically important because it contradicts notions that emotions are primarily reflected by conscious states. In 2 experiments, this pattern of results was obtained. Happy and angry faces were presented both optimally and suboptimally and were masked by unknown ideographs. In Experiment 1, instructions for the conscious and less conscious affective priming conditions were matched, and affective ratings of ideographs were determined. In Experiment 2, a more implicit affective measure (facial electromyography of musculus zygomaticus major and musculus corrugator supercilii) served as the dependent variable. Stronger suboptimal than optimal affective priming was found in both experiments. It is concluded that stronger suboptimal than optimal processing is characteristic for affective processing and that it can also be found when instructions are matched and when a more implicit measure is assessed. PMID:12901397

  9. Generation of large prime numbers from a sequence of previous prime numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samir, Brahim Belhaouari; Rezk, Youssef A. Y.

    2012-09-01

    A prime number is co-prime with all the primes as well. This paper utilizes this fact by generating larger prime numbers based on a set of smaller prime numbers. The prime numbers are ordered and each two consecutive primes are coupled to generate their co-prime number formula extending this process larger prime sequence is established. Will the process help us produce larger prime numbers faster and more efficiently? This paper investigates the described process.

  10. Heterologous prime-boost vaccination.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan

    2009-06-01

    An effective vaccine usually requires more than one time immunization in the form of prime-boost. Traditionally the same vaccines are given multiple times as homologous boosts. New findings suggested that prime-boost can be done with different types of vaccines containing the same antigens. In many cases such heterologous prime-boost can be more immunogenic than homologous prime-boost. Heterologous prime-boost represents a new way of immunization and will stimulate better understanding on the immunological basis of vaccines. PMID:19500964

  11. From self-assembled vesicles to protocells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Irene A; Walde, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the biophysics of protocells, as well as conceptual questions in information transmission and self-replication. PMID:20519344

  12. From Self-Assembled Vesicles to Protocells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Irene A.; Walde, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the biophysics of protocells, as well as conceptual questions in information transmission and self-replication. PMID:20519344

  13. FUSION-COMPETENT STATE INDUCED BY A C-TERMINAL HIV-1 FUSION PEPTIDE IN CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Nieva, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The replicative cycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 begins after fusion of the viral and target-cell membranes. The envelope glycoprotein gp41 transmembrane subunit contains conserved hydrophobic domains that engage and perturb the merging lipid bilayers. In this work, we have characterized the fusion-committed state generated in vesicles by CpreTM, a synthetic peptide derived from the sequence connecting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41. Pre-loading cholesterol-rich vesicles with CpreTM rendered them competent for subsequent lipid-mixing with fluorescently-labeled target vesicles. Highlighting the physiological relevance of the lasting fusion-competent state, the broadly neutralizing antibody 4E10 bound to the CpreTM-primed vesicles and inhibited lipid-mixing. Heterotypic fusion assays disclosed dependence on the lipid composition of the vesicles that acted either as virus or cell membrane surrogates. Lipid-mixing exhibited above all a critical dependence on the cholesterol content in those experiments. We infer that the fusion-competent state described herein resembles bona-fide perturbations generated by the pre-hairpin MPER-TMD connection within the viral membrane. PMID:25617671

  14. Impaired production priming and intact identification priming in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, D A; Monti, L A; Dwornik, L M; Moro, T T; Bennett, D A; Gabrieli, J D

    2001-11-01

    This study examined the distinction between identification and production processes in repetition priming for 16 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 16 healthy old control participants (NC). Words were read in three study phases. In three test phases, participants (1) reread studied words, along with unstudied words, in a word-naming task (identification priming); (2) completed 3-letter stems of studied and unstudied words into words in a word-stem completion task (production priming); and (3) answered yes or no to having read studied and unstudied words in a recognition task (explicit memory). Explicit memory and word-stem completion priming were impaired in the AD group compared to the NC group. After correcting for baseline slowing, word-naming priming magnitude did not differ between the groups. The results suggest that the distinction between production and identification processes has promise for explaining the pattern of preservation and failure of repetition priming in AD. PMID:11771621

  15. Vesicle Motion during Sustained Exocytosis in Chromaffin Cells: Numerical Model Based on Amperometric Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Jarukanont, Daungruthai; Bonifas Arredondo, Imelda; Femat, Ricardo; Garcia, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Chromaffin cells release catecholamines by exocytosis, a process that includes vesicle docking, priming and fusion. Although all these steps have been intensively studied, some aspects of their mechanisms, particularly those regarding vesicle transport to the active sites situated at the membrane, are still unclear. In this work, we show that it is possible to extract information on vesicle motion in Chromaffin cells from the combination of Langevin simulations and amperometric measurements. We developed a numerical model based on Langevin simulations of vesicle motion towards the cell membrane and on the statistical analysis of vesicle arrival times. We also performed amperometric experiments in bovine-adrenal Chromaffin cells under Ba2+ stimulation to capture neurotransmitter releases during sustained exocytosis. In the sustained phase, each amperometric peak can be related to a single release from a new vesicle arriving at the active site. The amperometric signal can then be mapped into a spike-series of release events. We normalized the spike-series resulting from the current peaks using a time-rescaling transformation, thus making signals coming from different cells comparable. We discuss why the obtained spike-series may contain information about the motion of all vesicles leading to release of catecholamines. We show that the release statistics in our experiments considerably deviate from Poisson processes. Moreover, the interspike-time probability is reasonably well described by two-parameter gamma distributions. In order to interpret this result we computed the vesicles’ arrival statistics from our Langevin simulations. As expected, assuming purely diffusive vesicle motion we obtain Poisson statistics. However, if we assume that all vesicles are guided toward the membrane by an attractive harmonic potential, simulations also lead to gamma distributions of the interspike-time probability, in remarkably good agreement with experiment. We also show that

  16. Hydrothermal syntheses, crystal structures and luminescence properties of zinc(II) and cadmium(II) coordination polymers based on bifunctional 3,2 Prime :6 Prime ,3 Prime Prime -terpyridine-4 Prime -carboxylic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Na; Guo, Hui-Lin; Hu, Huai-Ming; Song, Juan; Xu, Bing; Yang, Meng-Lin; Dong, Fa-Xin; Xue, Gang-Lin

    2013-02-15

    Five new coordination polymers, [Zn{sub 2}(ctpy){sub 2}Cl{sub 2}]{sub n} (1), [Zn{sub 2}(ctpy){sub 2}(ox)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} (2), [Zn{sub 2}(ctpy)(3-btc)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n}{center_dot}0.5nH{sub 2}O (3), [Cd(ctpy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (4), [Cd{sub 4}(ctpy){sub 2}(2-btc){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n}{center_dot}2nH{sub 2}O (5), (Hctpy=3,2 Prime :6 Prime ,3 Prime Prime -terpyridine-4 Prime -carboxylic acid, H{sub 2}ox=oxalic acid, H{sub 3}(3-btc)=1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, H{sub 3}(2-btc)=1,2,4-benzenetricarboxylic acid) have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds 1-2 are a one-dimensional chain with weak interactions to form 3D supramolecular structures. Compound 3 is a 4-nodal 3D topology framework comprised of binuclear zinc units and (ctpy){sup -} anions. Compound 4 shows two dimensional net. Compound 5 is a (4,5,6)-connected framework with {l_brace}4{sup 4}{center_dot}6{sup 2}{r_brace}{l_brace}4{sup 6}{center_dot}6{sup 4}{r_brace}{sub 2}{l_brace}4{sup 9}{center_dot}6{sup 6}{r_brace} topology. In addition, the thermal stabilities and photoluminescence properties of 1-5 were also studied in the solid state. - Graphical abstract: Five new Zn/Cd compounds with 3,2 Prime :6 Prime ,3 Prime Prime -terpyridine-4 Prime -carboxylic acid were prepared. The photoluminescence and thermal stabilities properties of 1-5 were investigated in the solid state. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five new zinc/cadmium metal-organic frameworks have been hydrothermal synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural variation is attributed to the diverse metal ions and auxiliary ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-5 exhibit 1D ring chain, 2D layer and 3D open-framework, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These compounds exhibit strong solid state luminescence emission at room temperature.

  17. 30 CFR 947.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 947.823 Section 947.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE WASHINGTON § 947.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  18. 30 CFR 922.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 922.823 Section 922.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE MICHIGAN § 922.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  19. 30 CFR 903.823 - Special performance standards-Operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 903.823 Section 903.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE ARIZONA § 903.823 Special performance standards—Operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, applies to...

  20. 30 CFR 905.823 - Special performance standards-Operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 905.823 Section 905.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.823 Special performance standards—Operations on prime farmland. Part 832 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  1. 30 CFR 905.823 - Special performance standards-Operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 905.823 Section 905.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.823 Special performance standards—Operations on prime farmland. Part 832 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  2. 30 CFR 937.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 937.823 Section 937.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE OREGON § 937.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  3. 30 CFR 941.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 941.823 Section 941.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall...

  4. 30 CFR 921.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 921.823 Section 921.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall...

  5. 30 CFR 933.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 933.823 Section 933.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE NORTH CAROLINA § 933.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall...

  6. 30 CFR 942.823 - Special performance standards-Operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 942.823 Section 942.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE TENNESSEE § 942.823 Special performance standards—Operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  7. 30 CFR 922.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 922.823 Section 922.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE MICHIGAN § 922.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  8. 30 CFR 942.823 - Special performance standards-Operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 942.823 Section 942.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE TENNESSEE § 942.823 Special performance standards—Operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  9. 30 CFR 947.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 947.823 Section 947.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE WASHINGTON § 947.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  10. 30 CFR 941.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 941.823 Section 941.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall...

  11. 30 CFR 939.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 939.823 Section 939.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall...

  12. 30 CFR 910.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 910.823 Section 910.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE GEORGIA § 910.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  13. 30 CFR 937.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 937.823 Section 937.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE OREGON § 937.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  14. 30 CFR 903.823 - Special performance standards-Operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 903.823 Section 903.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE ARIZONA § 903.823 Special performance standards—Operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, applies to...

  15. 30 CFR 910.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 910.823 Section 910.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE GEORGIA § 910.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall apply to...

  16. 30 CFR 939.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 939.823 Section 939.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall...

  17. 30 CFR 921.823 - Special performance standards-operations on prime farmland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prime farmland. 921.823 Section 921.823 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND... STATE MASSACHUSETTS § 921.823 Special performance standards—operations on prime farmland. Part 823 of this chapter, Special Permanent Program Performance Standards—Operations on Prime Farmland, shall...

  18. Spontaneous vesicle recycling in the synaptic bouton

    PubMed Central

    Truckenbrodt, Sven; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2014-01-01

    The trigger for synaptic vesicle exocytosis is Ca2+, which enters the synaptic bouton following action potential stimulation. However, spontaneous release of neurotransmitter also occurs in the absence of stimulation in virtually all synaptic boutons. It has long been thought that this represents exocytosis driven by fluctuations in local Ca2+ levels. The vesicles responding to these fluctuations are thought to be the same ones that release upon stimulation, albeit potentially triggered by different Ca2+ sensors. This view has been challenged by several recent works, which have suggested that spontaneous release is driven by a separate pool of synaptic vesicles. Numerous articles appeared during the last few years in support of each of these hypotheses, and it has been challenging to bring them into accord. We speculate here on the origins of this controversy, and propose a solution that is related to developmental effects. Constitutive membrane traffic, needed for the biogenesis of vesicles and synapses, is responsible for high levels of spontaneous membrane fusion in young neurons, probably independent of Ca2+. The vesicles releasing spontaneously in such neurons are not related to other synaptic vesicle pools and may represent constitutively releasing vesicles (CRVs) rather than bona fide synaptic vesicles. In mature neurons, constitutive traffic is much dampened, and the few remaining spontaneous release events probably represent bona fide spontaneously releasing synaptic vesicles (SRSVs) responding to Ca2+ fluctuations, along with a handful of CRVs that participate in synaptic vesicle turnover. PMID:25538561

  19. Prime time sexual harrassment.

    PubMed

    Grauerholz, E; King, A

    1997-04-01

    This study explores the explicit and implicit messages of sexual harassment that viewers receive when viewing prime-time television in the US. A content analysis of 48 hours of prime-time television reveals that sexual harassment on television is both highly visible and invisible. Sexual harassment is rendered visible simply by its prominence in these programs. Incidents involving quid-pro-quo harassment and environmental harassment occur with regularity on television. Furthermore, about 84% of the shows studied contained at least one incident of sexual harassment; yet these acts of sexual harassment remained largely invisible because none of the behaviors were labeled as sexual harassment. These incidents are presented in humorous ways, and victims are generally unharmed and very effective at ending the harassment. Although such programs may actually reflect the reality of many women's lives in terms of prevalence of sexual harassment, they perpetuate several myths about sexual harassment, such as that sexual harassment is not serious and that victims should be able to handle the situations themselves. PMID:12294811

  20. Past tense route priming.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Shikora, Emily R; Balota, David A

    2013-03-01

    The present research examined whether lexical (whole word) or more rule-based (morphological constituent) processes can be locally biased by experimental list context in past tense verb inflection. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults completed a past tense inflection task in which list context was manipulated across blocks containing regular past tense verbs (e.g. REACH-REACHED) or irregular past tense verbs (TEACH-TAUGHT). Critical targets, consisting of half regular and half irregular verbs, were embedded within blocks and participants' inflection response latency and accuracy were assessed. The results yielded a cross-over interaction in response latencies for both young and older adults. In the regular context there was a robust regularity effect: regular target verbs were conjugated faster than irregular target verbs. In contrast, in the irregular context, irregular target verbs were conjugated faster than regular target verbs. Experiment 2 used the same targets but in the context of either standard nonwords or nonwords ending in "-ED" to test the possibility of a phonological basis for the effect. The effect of context was eliminated. The results support the notion that distinct processes in past tense verb production can be locally biased by list context and, as shown in Experiment 2, this route priming effect was not due to phonological priming. PMID:23291293

  1. Extracellular vesicles including exosomes are mediators of signal transduction: Are they protective or pathogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Gangoda, Lahiru; Boukouris, Stephanie; Liem, Michael; Kalra, Hina; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are signaling organelles that are released by many cell types and is highly conserved in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Based on the mechanism of biogenesis, these membranous vesicles can be classified as exosomes, shedding microvesicles and apoptotic blebs. It is becoming clearer that these extracellular vesicles mediate signal transduction in both autocrine and paracrine fashion by the transfer of proteins and RNA. Whilst the role of extracellular vesicles including exosomes in pathogenesis is well established, very little is known about their function in normal physiological conditions. Recent evidences allude that extracellular vesicles can mediate both protective and pathogenic effects depending on the precise state. In this review, we discuss the involvement of extracellular vesicle as mediators of signal transduction in neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. In addition, the role of extracellular vesicles in mediating Wnt and PI3K signaling pathways is also discussed. Additional findings on the involvement of extracellular vesicles in homeostasis and disease progression will promote a better biological understanding, advance future therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:25307053

  2. Synaptotagmin-1 and -7 Are Redundantly Essential for Maintaining the Capacity of the Readily-Releasable Pool of Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Burré, Jacqueline; Malenka, Robert C.; Liu, Xinran; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In forebrain neurons, Ca2+ triggers exocytosis of readily releasable vesicles by binding to synaptotagmin-1 and -7, thereby inducing fast and slow vesicle exocytosis, respectively. Loss-of-function of synaptotagmin-1 or -7 selectively impairs the fast and slow phase of release, respectively, but does not change the size of the readily-releasable pool (RRP) of vesicles as measured by stimulation of release with hypertonic sucrose, or alter the rate of vesicle priming into the RRP. Here we show, however, that simultaneous loss-of-function of both synaptotagmin-1 and -7 dramatically decreased the capacity of the RRP, again without altering the rate of vesicle priming into the RRP. Either synaptotagmin-1 or -7 was sufficient to rescue the RRP size in neurons lacking both synaptotagmin-1 and -7. Although maintenance of RRP size was Ca2+-independent, mutations in Ca2+-binding sequences of synaptotagmin-1 or synaptotagmin-7—which are contained in flexible top-loop sequences of their C2 domains—blocked the ability of these synaptotagmins to maintain the RRP size. Both synaptotagmins bound to SNARE complexes; SNARE complex binding was reduced by the top-loop mutations that impaired RRP maintenance. Thus, synaptotagmin-1 and -7 perform redundant functions in maintaining the capacity of the RRP in addition to nonredundant functions in the Ca2+ triggering of different phases of release. PMID:26437117

  3. Vesicles as tools for the modulation of skin permeability.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Vaibhav; Mishra, Dinesh; Nahar, Manoj; Jain, Narendra K

    2007-11-01

    Human skin is a remarkably efficient barrier designed to keep our insides in and the outside out. The modulation of this efficient barrier's properties, including its permeability to chemicals, drugs and biologically active agents is the prime target for various dermal, transdermal, drug, antigen and gene delivery approaches. Therefore, several methods have been attempted to enhance the permeation rate of biologically active agents, temporarily and locally. One of the approaches is the application of drug-laden vesicular formulations. This review presents various mechanisms involved in increasing drug transport across the skin via different vesicular approaches, such as liposomes, elastic vesicles and ethosomes, along with compiling the research work conducted in this field. PMID:17970662

  4. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of porphyrin interactions with unilamellar lipidic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kuzelová, K; Brault, D

    1994-08-16

    The interaction of deuteroporphyrin with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles of various sizes (ranging from 38 to 222 nm) has been studied using a stopped flow with fluorescence detection. Beside the kinetics of porphyrin incorporation into vesicles, the transfer of porphyrin from vesicles to human serum albumin has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The effects of both vesicle and albumin concentrations indicate that the transfer proceeds through the aqueous phase. It is governed by the rate of incorporation of porphyrin into the outer vesicle hemileaflet (kon), by the exit to the bulk aqueous medium (koff), and by the association (kas) and dissociation (kdis) constants relative to albumin. In both systems studied, a slower transbilayer flip-flop accounts for the biphasic character of the kinetics. This model is strongly supported by the effects of vesicle size, temperature, and cholesterol. The dependence of kon on the vesicle size indicates that the incorporation is diffusion controlled. The constant koff is found to be closely coupled to the phase state of the bilayer. The transbilayer flip-flop rate constant is approximately the same in both directions (approximately 0.4 s-1 at 32 degrees C and pH 7.4). It is strongly affected by the presence of cholesterol in vesicles and by the temperature, with a sharp enhancement around the phase transition. With the exception of very small vesicles obtained by sonication, no influence of the vesicle size on the flip-flop rate was observed. An accelerating effect of tetrahydrofuran, used to improve the solubility of porphyrin, has been noted. Steady-state measurements and kinetics results were in excellent agreement. The interest of systems involving albumin as a scavenger to extract important rate constants, is emphasized. PMID:8068619

  5. Optogenetic Acidification of Synaptic Vesicles and Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Grauel, M. Katharina; Wozny, Christian; Bentz, Claudia; Blessing, Anja; Rosenmund, Tanja; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Schmitz, Dietmar; Hegemann, Peter; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Acidification is required for the function of many intracellular organelles, but methods to acutely manipulate their intraluminal pH have not been available. Here we present a targeting strategy to selectively express the light-driven proton pump Arch3 on synaptic vesicles. Our new tool, pHoenix, can functionally replace endogenous proton pumps, enabling optogenetic control of vesicular acidification and neurotransmitter accumulation. Under physiological conditions, glutamatergic vesicles are nearly full, as additional vesicle acidification with pHoenix only slightly increased the quantal size. By contrast, we found that incompletely filled vesicles exhibited a lower release probability than full vesicles, suggesting preferential exocytosis of vesicles with high transmitter content. Our subcellular targeting approach can be transferred to other organelles, as demonstrated for a pHoenix variant that allows light-activated acidification of lysosomes. PMID:26551543

  6. Ultrasound-responsive ultrathin multiblock copolyamide vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Chunyang; Huang, Tong; Xu, Shuting; Bai, Yongping; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation.This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experiments and characterization, and FT-IR, TEM, DPD, FL and micro-DSC results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08596a

  7. Deformation of vesicles flowing through capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkova, V.; Mader, M.; Podgorski, T.

    2004-11-01

    The flow of giant lipid vesicles through cylindrical capillaries is experimentally investigated. Vesicles are deflated with reduced volumes between 0.8 and 1, corresponding to prolate spheroidal equilibrium shapes. Both interior and exterior fluids are sugar solutions with viscosities close to 10-3 Pa s. Vesicles are aspirated into a capillary tube with a diameter close to the vesicle size and a constant flow rate is imposed. Significant deformation of the membrane occurs and increases when the velocity, confinement or deflation of the vesicle are increased. The mobility of vesicles, defined as the ratio of their velocity to the average velocity of the fluid is a decreasing function of confinement. Our experimental system provides a controllable and flexible tool to investigate deformability effects responsible for crucial aspects of blood rheology in capillaries.

  8. Transposed-Letter Priming Effects with Masked Subset Primes: A Re-Examination of the "Relative Position Priming Constraint"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinchcombe, Eric J.; Lupker, Stephen J.; Davis, Colin J.

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments are reported investigating the role of letter order in orthographic subset priming (e.g., "grdn"-GARDEN) using both the conventional masked priming technique as well as the sandwich priming technique in a lexical decision task. In all three experiments, subset primes produced priming with the effect being considerably larger when…

  9. Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display

    PubMed Central

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms like the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 produce gas-filled buoyant organelles, which are easily purified as protein nanoparticles (called gas vesicles or GVNPs). GVNPs are non-toxic, exceptionally stable, bioengineerable, and self-adjuvanting. A large gene cluster encoding more than a dozen proteins has been implicated in their biogenesis. One protein, GvpC, found on the exterior surface of the nanoparticles, can accommodate insertions near the C-terminal region and results in GVNPs displaying the inserted sequences on the surface of the nanoparticles. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on GVNP structure and biogenesis as well as available studies on immunogenicity of pathogenic viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins and peptides displayed on the nanoparticles. Recent improvements in genetic tools for bioengineering of GVNPs are discussed, along with future opportunities and challenges for development of vaccines and other applications. PMID:26350601

  10. Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display.

    PubMed

    DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms like the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 produce gas-filled buoyant organelles, which are easily purified as protein nanoparticles (called gas vesicles or GVNPs). GVNPs are non-toxic, exceptionally stable, bioengineerable, and self-adjuvanting. A large gene cluster encoding more than a dozen proteins has been implicated in their biogenesis. One protein, GvpC, found on the exterior surface of the nanoparticles, can accommodate insertions near the C-terminal region and results in GVNPs displaying the inserted sequences on the surface of the nanoparticles. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on GVNP structure and biogenesis as well as available studies on immunogenicity of pathogenic viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins and peptides displayed on the nanoparticles. Recent improvements in genetic tools for bioengineering of GVNPs are discussed, along with future opportunities and challenges for development of vaccines and other applications. PMID:26350601

  11. A Study of Relative-Position Priming with Superset Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Assche, Eva; Grainger, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Four lexical decision experiments are reported that use the masked priming paradigm to study the role of letter position information in orthographic processing. In Experiments 1 and 2, superset primes, formed by repetition of 1 or 2 letters of the target (e.g., jusstice-JUSTICE) or by insertion of 1 or 2 unrelated letters (e.g., juastice-JUSTICE),…

  12. Priming a new identity: self-monitoring moderates the effects of nonself primes on self-judgments and behavior.

    PubMed

    DeMarree, Kenneth G; Wheeler, S Christian; Petty, Richard E

    2005-11-01

    When a construct is primed, people often act in construct-consistent ways. Several accounts for this effect have been offered, including ideomotor theory and a social functional perspective. The authors tested an additional perspective, the Active-Self account, whereby primes can temporarily alter self-perceptions. In Study 1, non-African American participants reported feeling more aggressive on an implicit measure following an African American prime. In Study 2, participants reported feeling luckier on an implicit measure following a number 7 (vs. 13) prime. In both studies, these effects were obtained only for low self-monitors, who are more likely to change self-conceptions in response to diagnostic self-information and to use their internal states in guiding behavior. Study 3 showed that low self-monitors also show larger behavioral effects of primes. PMID:16351360

  13. 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis using 3[prime]-photoremovable protecting group

    DOEpatents

    Pirrung, M.C.; Shuey, S.W.; Bradley, J.C.

    1999-06-01

    The present invention relates, in general, to a method of synthesizing a nucleic acid, and, in particular, to a method of effecting 5[prime] to 3[prime] nucleic acid synthesis. The method can be used to prepare arrays of oligomers bound to a support via their 5[prime] end. The invention also relates to a method of effecting mutation analysis using such arrays. The invention further relates to compounds and compositions suitable for use in such methods.

  14. Endosomal vesicles as vehicles for viral genomes

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Modis, Yorgo

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is the principal cell entry pathway for large cargo and pathogens. Among the wide variety of specialized lipid structures within endosomes, the intraluminal vesicles formed in early endosomes and transferred to late endosomal compartments are emerging as critical effectors of viral infection and immune recognition. Various viruses deliver their genomes into these intraluminal vesicles, which serve as vehicles to transport the genome to the nuclear periphery for replication. When secreted as exosomes, intraluminal vesicles containing viral genomes can infect permissive cells, or activate immune responses in myeloid cells. We therefore propose that endosomal intraluminal vesicles and exosomes are key effectors of viral pathogenesis. PMID:24746011

  15. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko; Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana ; Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G.; Zorec, Robert; Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  16. Autonomous movement of a chemically powered vesicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shivam; Sreeja, K. K.; Thakur, Snigdha

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the diffusio-phoretic motion of a deformable vesicle. A vesicle is built from the linked catalytic and noncatalytic vertices that consumes fuel in the environment and utilize the resulting self-generated concentration gradient to exhibit propulsive motion. Under nonequilibrium conditions it is found that the self-propulsion velocity of the vesicle depends on its shape, which in turn is controlled by the bending rigidity of the membrane and solvent density around it. The self-propulsion velocity of the vesicle for different shapes has been calculated and the factors which affect the velocity are identified.

  17. Reversed Priming Effects May Be Driven by Misperception Rather than Subliminal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm for investigating whether a cognitive process is independent of perception was recently suggested. In the paradigm, primes are shown at an intermediate signal strength that leads to trial-to-trial and inter-individual variability in prime perception. Here, I used this paradigm and an objective measure of perception to assess the influence of prime identification responses on Stroop priming. I found that sensory states producing correct and incorrect prime identification responses were also associated with qualitatively different priming effects. Incorrect prime identification responses were associated with reversed priming effects but in contrast to previous studies, I interpret this to result from the (mis-)perception of primes rather than from a subliminal process. Furthermore, the intermediate signal strength also produced inter-individual variability in prime perception that strongly influenced priming effects: only participants who on average perceived the primes were Stroop primed. I discuss how this new paradigm, with a wide range of d′ values, is more appropriate when regression analysis on inter-individual identification performance is used to investigate perception-dependent processing. The results of this study, in line with previous results, suggest that drawing conclusions about subliminal processes based on data averaged over individuals may be unwarranted. PMID:26925016

  18. Reversed Priming Effects May Be Driven by Misperception Rather than Subliminal Processing.

    PubMed

    Sand, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A new paradigm for investigating whether a cognitive process is independent of perception was recently suggested. In the paradigm, primes are shown at an intermediate signal strength that leads to trial-to-trial and inter-individual variability in prime perception. Here, I used this paradigm and an objective measure of perception to assess the influence of prime identification responses on Stroop priming. I found that sensory states producing correct and incorrect prime identification responses were also associated with qualitatively different priming effects. Incorrect prime identification responses were associated with reversed priming effects but in contrast to previous studies, I interpret this to result from the (mis-)perception of primes rather than from a subliminal process. Furthermore, the intermediate signal strength also produced inter-individual variability in prime perception that strongly influenced priming effects: only participants who on average perceived the primes were Stroop primed. I discuss how this new paradigm, with a wide range of d' values, is more appropriate when regression analysis on inter-individual identification performance is used to investigate perception-dependent processing. The results of this study, in line with previous results, suggest that drawing conclusions about subliminal processes based on data averaged over individuals may be unwarranted. PMID:26925016

  19. Exodus: Prime Mover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Nikkol; Conwell, Pete; Johnson, Matt; Shields, Wendy; Thornton, Tim; Tokarz, Rob; Mcmanus, Rich

    1992-01-01

    The Exodus Prime Mover is an overnight package delivery aircraft designed to serve the Northern Hemisphere of Aeroworld. The preliminary design goals originated from the desire to produce a large profit. The two main driving forces throughout the design process were first to reduce the construction man-hours by simplifying the aircraft design, thereby decreasing the total production cost of the aircraft. The second influential factor affecting the design was minimizing the fuel cost during cruise. The lowest fuel consumption occurs at a cruise velocity of 30 ft/s. Overall, it was necessary to balance the economic benefits with the performance characteristics in order to create a profitable product that meets all specified requirements and objectives.

  20. Alignment of Synaptic Vesicle Macromolecules with the Macromolecules in Active Zone Material that Direct Vesicle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Jung, Jae Hoon; Marshall, Robert M.; McMahan, Uel J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock at active zones on the presynaptic plasma membrane of a neuron’s axon terminals as a precondition for fusing with the membrane and releasing their neurotransmitter to mediate synaptic impulse transmission. Typically, docked vesicles are next to aggregates of plasma membrane-bound macromolecules called active zone material (AZM). Electron tomography on tissue sections from fixed and stained axon terminals of active and resting frog neuromuscular junctions has led to the conclusion that undocked vesicles are directed to and held at the docking sites by the successive formation of stable connections between vesicle membrane proteins and proteins in different classes of AZM macromolecules. Using the same nanometer scale 3D imaging technology on appropriately stained frog neuromuscular junctions, we found that ∼10% of a vesicle’s luminal volume is occupied by a radial assembly of elongate macromolecules attached by narrow projections, nubs, to the vesicle membrane at ∼25 sites. The assembly’s chiral, bilateral shape is nearly the same vesicle to vesicle, and nubs, at their sites of connection to the vesicle membrane, are linked to macromolecules that span the membrane. For docked vesicles, the orientation of the assembly’s shape relative to the AZM and the presynaptic membrane is the same vesicle to vesicle, whereas for undocked vesicles it is not. The connection sites of most nubs on the membrane of docked vesicles are paired with the connection sites of the different classes of AZM macromolecules that regulate docking, and the membrane spanning macromolecules linked to these nubs are also attached to the AZM macromolecules. We conclude that the luminal assembly of macromolecules anchors in a particular arrangement vesicle membrane macromolecules, which contain the proteins that connect the vesicles to AZM macromolecules during docking. Undocked vesicles must move in a way that aligns this arrangement with the AZM macromolecules for

  1. Vesicles

    MedlinePlus

    ... poison ivy) Herpes simplex (cold sores, genital herpes ) Herpes zoster (shingles) Impetigo Fungal infections Burns Home Care It is ... disease on the soles Herpes simplex - close-up Herpes zoster (shingles) - close-up of lesion Poison ivy on ...

  2. Investigating Home Primes and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Marlena; Schiffman, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The process of prime factor splicing to generate home primes raises opportunity for conjecture and exploration. The notion of "home primes" is relatively new in the chronicle of mathematics. Heleen (1996-97) first described a procedure called "prime factor splicing" (PFS). The exploration of home primes is interesting and…

  3. Immediate Priming and Cognitive Aftereffects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, David E.

    2008-01-01

    Three forced-choice perceptual word identification experiments tested the claim that transitions from positive to negative priming as a function of increasing prime duration are due to cognitive aftereffects. These aftereffects are similar in nature to perceptual aftereffects that produce a negative image due to overexposure and habituation to a…

  4. Representing Numbers: Prime and Irrational

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazkis, Rina

    2005-01-01

    This article draws an analogy between prime and irrational numbers with respect to how these numbers are defined and how they are perceived by learners. Excerpts are presented from two research studies: a study on understanding prime numbers by pre-service elementary school teachers and a study on understanding irrational numbers by pre-service…

  5. Priming Macho Attitudes and Emotions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, Erik D.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated the effects of reading one of four priming stimuli stories (control, consenting sex, rape, or family) on males' evaluations of, and emotional reactions to, two videotaped date-rape scenarios. Results supported the concepts of a macho personality and revealed interactive effects for both the rape and family prime. (RJM)

  6. Rhizosphere priming: a nutrient perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Feike A.; Carrillo, Yolima; Pendall, Elise; Morgan, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    Rhizosphere priming is the change in decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) caused by root activity. Rhizosphere priming plays a crucial role in soil carbon (C) dynamics and their response to global climate change. Rhizosphere priming may be affected by soil nutrient availability, but rhizosphere priming itself can also affect nutrient supply to plants. These interactive effects may be of particular relevance in understanding the sustained increase in plant growth and nutrient supply in response to a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration. We examined how these interactions were affected by elevated CO2 in two similar semiarid grassland field studies. We found that an increase in rhizosphere priming enhanced the release of nitrogen (N) through decomposition of a larger fraction of SOM in one study, but not in the other. We postulate that rhizosphere priming may enhance N supply to plants in systems that are N limited, but that rhizosphere priming may not occur in systems that are phosphorus (P) limited. Under P limitation, rhizodeposition may be used for mobilization of P, rather than for decomposition of SOM. Therefore, with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, rhizosphere priming may play a larger role in affecting C sequestration in N poor than in P poor soils. PMID:23908649

  7. Individual Vesicle Fusion Events Mediated by Lipid-Anchored DNA

    PubMed Central

    van Lengerich, Bettina; Rawle, Robert J.; Bendix, Poul Martin; Boxer, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane fusion consists of a complex rearrangement of lipids and proteins that results in the merger of two lipid bilayers. We have developed a model system that employs synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates as a surrogate for the membrane proteins involved in the biological fusion reaction. We previously showed that complementary DNA-lipids, inserted into small unilamellar vesicles, can mediate membrane fusion in bulk. Here, we use a model membrane architecture developed in our lab to directly observe single-vesicle fusion events using fluorescence microscopy. In this system, a planar tethered membrane patch serves as the target membrane for incoming vesicles. This allows us to quantify the kinetics and characteristics of individual fusion events from the perspective of the lipids or the DNA-lipids involved in the process. We find that the fusion pathways are heterogeneous, with an arrested hemi-fusion state predominating, and we quantitate the outcome and rate of fusion events to construct a mechanistic model of DNA-mediated vesicle fusion. The waiting times between docking and fusion are distributed exponentially, suggesting that fusion occurs in a single step. Our analysis indicates that when two lipid bilayers are brought into close proximity, fusion occurs spontaneously, with little or no dependence on the number of DNA hybrids formed. PMID:23870262

  8. Cholesterol transfer between lipid vesicles. Effect of phospholipids and gangliosides.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P D; Poznansky, M J

    1988-01-01

    The effect of lipid composition on the rate of cholesterol movement between cellular membranes is investigated using lipid vesicles. The separation of donor and acceptor vesicles required for rate measurement is achieved by differential centrifugation so that the lipid effect can be quantified in the absence of a charged lipid generally used for ion-exchange-based separation. The rate of cholesterol transfer from small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) containing 50 mol% cholesterol to a common large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) acceptor containing 20 mol% cholesterol decreases with increasing mol% of sphingomyelin in the SUVs, while phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine have no appreciable effect at physiologically relevant levels. There is a large decrease in rate when phosphatidylethanolamine constitutes 50 mol% of donor phospholipids. Interestingly, gangliosides which have the same hydrocarbon moiety as sphingomyelin exert an opposite effect. The effect of spingomyelin seems to be mediated by its ability to decrease the fluidity of the lipid matrix, while that of gangliosides may arise from a weakening of phosphatidylcholine-cholesterol interactions or from a more favourable (less polar) microenvironment for the desorption of cholesterol provided by the head-group interactions involving sugar residues. If the effect of asymmetric transbilayer distribution of lipids is taken into consideration, the observed composition-dependent rate changes could partly account for the large difference in the rates of cholesterol desorption from the inner and outer layers of plasma membrane. Such rate differences may be responsible for an unequal steady-state distribution of cholesterol among various cellular membranes and lipoproteins. PMID:3390160

  9. Chaotic Nonlinear Prime Number Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, Luis A.

    2011-06-01

    Dynamical systems in nature, such as heartbeat patterns, DNA sequence pattern, prime number distribution, etc., exhibit nonlinear (chaotic) space-time fluctuations and exact quantification of the fluctuation pattern for predictability purposes has not yet been achieved [1]. In this paper a chaotic-nonlinear prime number function P(s) is developed, from which prime numbers are generated and decoded while composite numbers are encoded over time following the Euler product methodology, which works on sequences progressively culled from multiples of the preceding primes. By relating this P(s) to a virtually closed 2D number line manifold, it is possible to represent the evolving in time of nonlinear (chaotic) systems to a final value where the system becomes stable, becomes linear. This nonlinear prime number function is proposed as a chaotic model system able to describe chaotic systems.

  10. Proteomics of extracellular vesicles: Exosomes and ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Almost all bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic cells shed extracellular vesicles either constitutively or in a regulated manner. These nanosized membrane vesicles are spherical, bilayered proteolipids that harbor specific subsets of proteins, DNAs, RNAs, and lipids. Recent research has facilitated conceptual advancements in this emerging field that indicate that extracellular vesicles act as intercellular communicasomes by transferring signals to their target cell via surface ligands and delivering receptors and functional molecules. Recent progress in mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles derived from diverse cell types and body fluids has resulted in the identification of several thousand vesicular proteins that provide us with essential clues to the molecular mechanisms involved in vesicle cargo sorting and biogenesis. Furthermore, cell-type- or disease-specific vesicular proteins help us to understand the pathophysiological functions of extracellular vesicles and contribute to the discovery of diagnostic and therapeutic target proteins. This review focuses on the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles (i.e., exosomes and ectosomes), EVpedia (a free web-based integrated database of high-throughput data for systematic analyses of extracellular vesicles; http://evpedia.info), and the intravesicular protein-protein interaction network analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles. The goal of this article is to encourage further studies to construct a comprehensive proteome database for extracellular vesicles that will help us to not only decode the biogenesis and cargo-sorting mechanisms during vesicle formation but also elucidate the pathophysiological roles of these complex extracellular organelles. PMID:24421117

  11. Targeting novel chemical and constitutive primed metabolites against Plectosphaerella cucumerina.

    PubMed

    Gamir, Jordi; Pastor, Victoria; Kaever, Alexander; Cerezo, Miguel; Flors, Victor

    2014-04-01

    Priming is a physiological state for protection of plants against a broad range of pathogens, and is achieved through stimulation of the plant immune system. Various stimuli, such as beneficial microbes and chemical induction, activate defense priming. In the present study, we demonstrate that impairment of the high-affinity nitrate transporter 2.1 (encoded by NRT2.1) enables Arabidopsis to respond more quickly and strongly to Plectosphaerella cucumerina attack, leading to enhanced resistance. The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant lin1 (affected in NRT2.1) is a priming mutant that displays constitutive resistance to this necrotroph, with no associated developmental or growth costs. Chemically induced priming by β-aminobutyric acid treatment, the constitutive priming mutant ocp3 and the constitutive priming present in the lin1 mutant result in a common metabolic profile within the same plant-pathogen interactions. The defense priming significantly affects sugar metabolism, cell-wall remodeling and shikimic acid derivatives levels, and results in specific changes in the amino acid profile and three specific branches of Trp metabolism, particularly accumulation of indole acetic acid, indole-3-carboxaldehyde and camalexin, but not the indolic glucosinolates. Metabolomic analysis facilitated identification of three metabolites in the priming fingerprint: galacturonic acid, indole-3-carboxylic acid and hypoxanthine. Treatment of plants with the latter two metabolites by soil drenching induced resistance against P. cucumerina, demonstrating that these compounds are key components of defense priming against this necrotrophic fungus. Here we demonstrate that indole-3-carboxylic acid induces resistance by promoting papillae deposition and H2 O2 production, and that this is independent of PR1, VSP2 and PDF1.2 priming. PMID:24506441

  12. Phase transition in a stochastic prime-number generator.

    PubMed

    Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas; Miramontes, Octavio

    2007-07-01

    We introduce a stochastic algorithm that acts as a prime-number generator. The dynamics of this algorithm gives rise to a continuous phase transition, which separates a phase where the algorithm is able to reduce a whole set of integers into primes and a phase where the system reaches a frozen state with low prime density. We present both numerical simulations and an analytical approach in terms of an annealed approximation, by means of which the data are collapsed. A critical slowing-down phenomenon is also outlined. PMID:17677398

  13. Rheological properties of a vesicle suspension.

    PubMed

    Guedda, M; Benlahsen, M; Misbah, C

    2014-11-01

    The rheological behavior of a dilute suspension of vesicles in linear shear flow at a finite concentration is analytically examined. In the quasispherical limit, two coupled nonlinear equations that describe the vesicle orientation in the flow and its shape evolution were derived [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 028104 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.028104] and serve here as a starting point. Of special interest is to provide, for the first time, an exact analytical prediction of the time-dependent effective viscosity η_{eff} and normal stress differences N_{1} and N_{2}. Our results shed light on the effect of the viscosity ratio λ (defined as the inner over the outer fluid viscosities) as the main controlling parameter. It is shown that η_{eff},N_{1}, and N_{2} either tend to a steady state or describe a periodic time-dependent rheological response, previously reported numerically and experimentally. In particular, the shear viscosity minimum and the cusp singularities of η_{eff},N_{1}, and N_{2} at the tumbling threshold are brought to light. We also report on rheology properties for an arbitrary linear flow. We were able to obtain a constitutive law in a closed form relating the stress tensor to the strain rate tensor. It is found that the resulting constitutive markedly contrasts with classical laws known for other complex fluids, such as emulsions, capsule suspensions, and dilute polymer solutions (Oldroyd B model). We highlight the main differences between our law and classical laws. PMID:25493791

  14. Feruloyl Dioleoyglycerol Antioxidant Capacity in Phospholipid Vesicles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferulic acid and its esters are known to be effective antioxidants. Feruloyl dioleoylglycerol was assessed for its ability to serve as an antioxidant in model membrane phospholipid vesicles. The molecule was incorporated into single-lamellar vesicles of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine at ...

  15. Transport of Ions through Vesicle Bilayers

    PubMed

    Kaiser; Hoffmann

    1996-12-01

    Stopped flow measurements to determine the permeability of vesicles are presented. The kinetics of the reaction between FeSCN2+ and F- ions is used to monitor the permeability of vesicles. Samples with vesicles that have been equilibrated with the iron complex are mixed with F- solutions. The reaction is followed by UV/VIS absorption. The influence of temperature and surfactant concentration on the membrane permeability of large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles was studied. A dramatic increase of the permeability of the LUVs is observed when 30 to 40 mol% of the surfactant OP-10 (main component of Triton X-100) is added to the lipid. It is assumed that the increased permeability is due to the stabilization of transient defects in the bilayers of the vesicles as shown previously by other groups. Furthermore, a strong binding of the iron (III) thiocyanate complex to the phospholipid is observed by UV/VIS spectroscopy and zeta-potential measurements. Additional experiments with vesicles from a fluorocarbon surfactant show a much higher permeability than the phospholipid system. Models for the diffusion of either the iron (III) complex or the fluoride ions through the vesicles bilayer are discussed for LUV as well as for vesicles from a fluorocarbon surfactant. The results indicate that the rate-determining step is the diffusion of the iron complex through the membrane. PMID:8954634

  16. Functional Advantages of Porphyromonas gingivalis Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Meng-Hsuan; Chen, Chin-Ho; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Wang, Bing-Yan; Xie, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen of periodontitis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been considered as both offense and defense components of this bacterium. Previous studies indicated that like their originating cells, P. gingivalis vesicles, are able to invade oral epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts, in order to promote aggregation of some specific oral bacteria and to induce host immune responses. In the present study, we investigated the invasive efficiency of P. gingivalis OMVs and compared results with that of the originating cells. Results revealed that 70–90% of human primary oral epithelial cells, gingival fibroblasts, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells carried vesicles from P. gingivalis 33277 after being exposed to the vesicles for 1 h, while 20–50% of the host cells had internalized P. gingivalis cells. We also detected vesicle-associated DNA and RNA and a vesicle-mediated horizontal gene transfer in P. gingivalis strains, which represents a novel mechanism for gene transfer between P. gingivalis strains. Moreover, purified vesicles of P. gingivalis appear to have a negative impact on biofilm formation and the maintenance of Streptococcus gordonii. Our results suggest that vesicles are likely the best offence weapon of P. gingivalis for bacterial survival in the oral cavity and for induction of periodontitis. PMID:25897780

  17. Synaptic vesicle distribution by conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Moughamian, Armen J; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2012-03-01

    The equal distribution of synaptic vesicles among synapses along the axon is critical for robust neurotransmission. Wong et al. show that the continuous circulation of synaptic vesicles throughout the axon driven by molecular motors ultimately yields this even distribution. PMID:22385955

  18. Molecular underpinnings of synaptic vesicle pool heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Devon C; Kavalali, Ege T

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal communication relies on chemical synaptic transmission for information transfer and processing. Chemical neurotransmission is initiated by synaptic vesicle fusion with the presynaptic active zone resulting in release of neurotransmitters. Classical models have assumed that all synaptic vesicles within a synapse have the same potential to fuse under different functional contexts. In this model, functional differences among synaptic vesicle populations are ascribed to their spatial distribution in the synapse with respect to the active zone. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that synaptic vesicles are not a homogenous population of organelles, and they possess intrinsic molecular differences and differential interaction partners. Recent studies have reported a diverse array of synaptic molecules that selectively regulate synaptic vesicles' ability to fuse synchronously and asynchronously in response to action potentials or spontaneously irrespective of action potentials. Here we discuss these molecular mediators of vesicle pool heterogeneity that are found on the synaptic vesicle membrane, on the presynaptic plasma membrane, or within the cytosol and consider some of the functional consequences of this diversity. This emerging molecular framework presents novel avenues to probe synaptic function and uncover how synaptic vesicle pools impact neuronal signaling. PMID:25620674

  19. Dynamical simulations of vesicle growth and division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    Prebiotic cells constitute a beautiful and intriguing example of self-replicating vesicles. How these cells managed to grow and divide without sophisticated machinery is still an open question. The properties of these primitive vesicles can shed light on the ways modern cells have evolved by exploiting those characteristics to develop their replication mechanisms. The equilibrium configurations of elastic shells are well understood, however the dynamical behavior during growth still lacks of a deep theoretical understanding. To study vesicle growth from a general perspective, we have developed a minimal generic model where vesicles are represented by a 2D spring network and characterized by a minimum set of magnitudes: growth rate, permeability, bending stiffness, viscosity and temperature. We have performed hybrid molecuar dynamic simulations as a function of a reduced set of dimensionless parameters. Three main outcomes were observed: vesicles that grow without division, vesicles that divide symmetrically, and vesicles that act as generators of daughter vesicles. The type of outcome depends on the system parameters and specifically on its dynamics via two timescales. Furthermore, we found sets of parameters where the system shows size homeostasis. TRH was supported by Ramon Areces Foundation.

  20. Molecular Underpinnings of Synaptic Vesicle Pool Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Devon C.; Kavalali, Ege T.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal communication relies on chemical synaptic transmission for information transfer and processing. Chemical neurotransmission is initiated by synaptic vesicle fusion with the presynaptic active zone resulting in release of neurotransmitters. Classical models have assumed that all synaptic vesicles within a synapse have the same potential to fuse under different functional contexts. In this model, functional differences among synaptic vesicle populations are ascribed to their spatial distribution in the synapse with respect to the active zone. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that synaptic vesicles are not a homogenous population of organelles, and they possess intrinsic molecular differences and differential interaction partners. Recent studies have reported a diverse array of synaptic molecules that selectively regulate synaptic vesicles' ability to fuse synchronously and asynchronously in response to action potentials or spontaneously irrespective of action potentials. Here we discuss these molecular mediators of vesicle pool heterogeneity that are found on the synaptic vesicle membrane, on the presynaptic plasma membrane, or within the cytosol and consider some of the functional consequences of this diversity. This emerging molecular framework presents novel avenues to probe synaptic function and uncover how synaptic vesicle pools impact neuronal signaling. PMID:25620674

  1. Nanoplasmonic ruler to measure lipid vesicle deformation.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Špačková, Barbora; Linardy, Eric; Kim, Min Chul; Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Homola, Jiří; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    A nanoplasmonic ruler method is presented in order to measure the deformation of adsorbed, nm-scale lipid vesicles on solid supports. It is demonstrated that single adsorbed vesicles undergo greater deformation on silicon oxide over titanium oxide, offering direct experimental evidence to support membrane tension-based theoretical models of supported lipid bilayer formation. PMID:26466086

  2. Small Angle Neutron-Scattering Studies of the Core Structure of Intact Neurosecretory Vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Susan Takacs

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the state of the dense cores within intact neurosecretory vesicles. These vesicles transport the neurophysin proteins, along with their associated hormones, oxytocin or vasopressin, from the posterior pituitary gland to the bloodstream, where the entire vesicle contents are released. Knowledge of the vesicle core structure is important in developing an understanding of this release mechanism. Since the core constituents exist in a dense state at concentrations which cannot be reproduced (in solution) in the laboratory, a new method was developed to determine the core structure from SANS experiments performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. These studies were complemented by biochemical assays performed to determine the role, if any, played by phospholipids in the interactions between the core constituents. H_2O/D_2 O ratio in the solvent can be adjusted, using the method of contrast variation, such that the scattering due to the vesicle membranes is minimized, thus emphasizing the scattering originating from the cores. The applicability of this method for examining the interior of biological vesicles was tested by performing an initial study on human red blood cells, which are similar in structure to other biological vesicles. Changes in intermolecular hemoglobin interactions, occurring when the ionic strength of the solvent was varied or when the cells were deoxygenated, were examined. The results agreed with those expected for dense protein solutions, indicating that the method developed was suitable for the study of hemoglobin within the cells. Similar SANS studies were then performed on intact neurosecretory vesicles. The experimental results were inconsistent with model calculations which assumed that the cores consisted of small, densely-packed particles or large, globular aggregates. Although a unique model could not be determined, the data suggest that the core constituents form long aggregates of

  3. Mechanisms of subliminal response priming

    PubMed Central

    Kiesel, Andrea; Kunde, Wilfried; Hoffmann, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Subliminal response priming has been considered to operate on several stages, e.g. perceptual, central or motor stages might be affected. While primes’ impact on target perception has been clearly demonstrated, semantic response priming recently has been thrown into doubt (e.g. Klinger, Burton, & Pitts, 2000). Finally, LRP studies have revealed that subliminal primes evoke motor processes. Yet, the premises for such prime-evoked motor activation are not settled. A transfer of priming to stimuli that have never been presented as targets appears particularly interesting because it suggests a level of processing that goes beyond a reactivation of previously acquired S-R links. Yet, such transfer has not always withstood empirical testing. To account for these contradictory results, we proposed a two-process model (Kunde, Kiesel, & Hoffmann, 2003): First, participants build up expectations regarding imperative stimuli for the required responses according to experience and/or instructions. Second, stimuli that match these “action triggers” directly activate the corresponding motor responses irrespective of their conscious identification. In line with these assumptions, recent studies revealed that non-target primes induce priming when they fit the current task intentions and when they are expected in the experimental setting. PMID:20517516

  4. Membrane tensiometer for heavy giant vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, P.-H.; Brochard-Wyart, F.

    2004-10-01

    One key parameter of giant-vesicles adhesion is their membrane tension, σ. A theoretically simple but delicate way to impose (and measure) it is to use micropipette manipulation techniques. But usually, the vesicles are free and their tension is unknown, until an adhesion patch grows. σ can be deduced from the detailed profile of the membrane close to the substrate, but this method is limited to very low tensions. We present here a rather simple way to estimate the membrane tension of heavy vesicles, which sediment close to a surface, by observing by RIM the size of the flat region of the vesicle. As an application, we follow the slow flattening of vesicles, when the surrounding sugar solution is evaporating, and their light-induced tensioning.

  5. [Transvesical Removal of Seminal Vesicle Cystadenoma].

    PubMed

    Takayasu, Kenta; Harada, Jiro; Kawa, Gen; Ota, Syuichi; Sakurai, Takanori

    2015-07-01

    Primary tumors of the seminal vesicles are extremely rare. There have been 25 reports of this tumor from overseas and most cases are cystadenoma. We report a case of seminal vesicle cystadenoma in a 70-year-old man who presented with lower abdominal pain and urinary frequency. A digital rectal examination detected a projecting and hard mass in the right side of the prostate. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 15 cm multiple cystic mass continuous with the right seminal vesicle. A transrectal needle biopsy revealed benign tissue. The tumor was resected using an open transvesical approach that enabled full exposure of the seminal vesicle without damaging the nerves and blood supply of the bladder. Pathology was consistent with a benign seminal vesicle cystadenoma. We describe the natural history, pathology,and surgical approach in this case. PMID:26278217

  6. New links between vesicle coats and Rab-mediated vesicle targeting

    PubMed Central

    Angers, Cortney G.; Merz, Alexey J.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking is a highly regulated process that transports proteins and other cargoes through eukaryotic cells while maintaining cellular organization and compartmental identity. In order for cargo to reach the correct destination, each step of trafficking must impart specificity. During vesicle formation, this is achieved by coat proteins, which selectively incorporate cargo into the nascent vesicle. Classically, vesicle coats are thought to dissociate shortly after budding. However, recent studies suggest that coat proteins can remain on the vesicle en route to their destination, imparting targeting specificity by physically and functionally interacting with Rab-regulated tethering systems. This review focuses on how interactions among Rab GTPases, tethering factors, SNARE proteins, and vesicle coats contribute to vesicle targeting, fusion, and coat dynamics. PMID:20643221

  7. Space Place Prime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Austin J.; Novati, Alexander; Fisher, Diane K.; Leon, Nancy J.; Netting, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Space Place Prime is public engagement and education software for use on iPad. It targets a multi-generational audience with news, images, videos, and educational articles from the Space Place Web site and other NASA sources. New content is downloaded daily (or whenever the user accesses the app) via the wireless connection. In addition to the Space Place Web site, several NASA RSS feeds are tapped to provide new content. Content is retained for the previous several days, or some number of editions of each feed. All content is controlled on the server side, so features about the latest news, or changes to any content, can be made without updating the app in the Apple Store. It gathers many popular NASA features into one app. The interface is a boundless, slidable- in-any-direction grid of images, unique for each feature, and iconized as image, video, or article. A tap opens the feature. An alternate list mode presents menus of images, videos, and articles separately. Favorites can be tagged for permanent archive. Face - book, Twitter, and e-mail connections make any feature shareable.

  8. Prime focus instrument of prime focus spectrograph for Subaru telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiang-Yu; Braun, David F.; Schwochert, Mark A.; Huang, Pin-Jie; Kimura, Masahiko; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Reiley, Daniel J.; Mao, Peter; Fisher, Charles D.; Tamura, Naoyuki; Chang, Yin-Chang; Hu, Yen-Sang; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Chou, Richard C.-Y.; Takato, Naruhisa; Sugai, Hajime; Ohyama, Youichi; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Ueda, Akitoshi

    2014-07-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a new optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph design for the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope. PFS will cover 1.3 degree diameter field with 2394 fibers to complement the imaging capability of Hyper SuprimeCam (HSC). The prime focus unit of PFS called Prime Focus Instrument (PFI) provides the interface with the top structure of Subaru telescope and also accommodates the optical bench in which Cobra fiber positioners are located. In addition, the acquisition and guiding (AG) cameras, the optical fiber positioner system, the cable wrapper, the fiducial fibers, illuminator, and viewer, the field element, and the telemetry system are located inside the PFI. The mechanical structure of the PFI was designed with special care such that its deflections sufficiently match those of the HSC's Wide Field Corrector (WFC) so the fibers will stay on targets over the course of the observations within the required accuracy.

  9. Stable Kinesin and Dynein Assemblies Drive the Axonal Transport of Mammalian Prion Protein Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Encalada, Sandra E.; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Xia, Chun-hong; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Kinesin and dynein are opposite-polarity microtubule motors that drive the tightly regulated transport of a variety of cargoes. Both motors can bind to cargo but their overall composition on axonal vesicles and whether this composition directly modulates transport activity, is unknown. Here we characterize the intracellular transport and steady state motor subunit composition of mammalian prion protein (PrPC) vesicles. We identify Kinesin-1 and cytoplasmic dynein as major PrPC vesicle motor complexes, and show that their activities are tightly coupled. Regulation of normal retrograde transport by Kinesin-1 is independent of dynein-vesicle attachment, and requires the vesicle association of a complete Kinesin-1 heavy and light chain holoenzyme. Furthermore, motor subunits remain stably associated with stationary as well as with moving vesicles. Our data suggest a coordination model where PrPC vesicles maintain a stable population of associated motors whose activity is modulated by regulatory factors instead of by structural changes to motor-cargo associations. PMID:21335237

  10. Question 7: new aspects of interactions among vesicles.

    PubMed

    Stano, Pasquale

    2007-10-01

    In this short article I discuss the relevance of two aspects of vesicle reactivity that are germane to understand the role of compartments in the origin of early cells. Studies of vesicle self-reproduction indicate that simple vesicles can grow and divide, maintaining inside most of their content and giving rise to a simple autopoietic system. New aspects of vesicle reactivity are also introduced, such as selection and competition processes within vesicle populations, emphasizing the concepts of vesicle diversity, inter-vesicles and vesicles-environment interactions, intended as synthetic analogs of primitive 'ecological' processes. PMID:17610045

  11. A photophysical model for diphenylhexatriene fluorescence decay in solvents and in phospholipid vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Parasassi, T; De Stasio, G; Rusch, R M; Gratton, E

    1991-01-01

    The fluorescence decay of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in pure solvents and in phospholipid vesicles has been measured using frequency domain fluorometry. Data analysis uses a model with two energetically close excited states. The model explains the high quantum yield and the double exponential decay of DPH observed in some pure solvents and in phospholipid vesicles. This model assumes that after excitation to a first excited state, there is a rapid interconversion to a lower excited state and that most of the emission occurs from this state. The interconversion rates between the two excited states determine the average lifetime. For DPH in solvents, we find that the interconversion rates are solvent and temperature dependent. For DPH in phospholipid vesicles, we find that the back reaction rate from excited state 2 to excited state 1 (R12) is what determines the fluorescence properties. The phospholipid phase transition affects only this back reaction rate. The model was analyzed globally for a range of solvents, temperatures and vesicle composition. Of the six parameters of the model, only two, the interconversion rates between the two excited states, varied in all different samples examined. For DPH in phospholipid vesicles, there is an additional feature of the model, which is related to the apparent distribution of the rate R12. Significantly better fits were obtained using a continuous lorentzian distribution of interconversion rates. The resulting lifetime distribution was asymmetric and showed a definite narrowing above the phase transition. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:2009361

  12. Cholesterol and synaptic vesicle exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Fratangeli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    Lipids may affect synaptic function in at least two ways: by acting as ligands for effector proteins [e.g., phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate, diacylglycerol-mediated signaling] or by modifying the physicochemical properties and molecular organization of synaptic membranes. One that acts in the latter manner is cholesterol, an essential structural component of plasma membranes that is largely enriched in the membranes of synapses and synaptic vesicles, in which it may be involved in lipid-lipid and protein-lipid interactions. Cholesterol is an important constituent of the “membrane rafts” that may play a role in recruiting and organizing the specific proteins of the exocytic pathways. Furthermore, many synaptic proteins bind directly to cholesterol. The regulation of cholesterol and lipid levels may therefore influence the specific interactions and activity of synaptic proteins, and have a strong impact on synaptic functions. PMID:20798824

  13. Priming healthy eating. You can't prime all the people all of the time☆

    PubMed Central

    Forwood, Suzanna E.; Ahern, Amy L.; Hollands, Gareth J.; Ng, Yin-Lam; Marteau, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the context of a food purchasing environment filled with advertising and promotions, and an increased desire from policy makers to guide individuals toward choosing healthier foods, this study tests whether priming methods that use healthy food adverts to increase preference for healthier food generalize to a representative population. MethodsIn two studies (Study 1 n = 143; Study 2 n = 764), participants were randomly allocated to a prime condition, where they viewed fruit and vegetable advertisements, or a control condition, with no advertisements. A subsequent forced choice task assessed preference between fruits and other sweet snacks. Additional measures included current hunger and thirst, dietary restraint, age, gender, education and self-reported weight and height. ResultsIn Study 1, hunger reduced preferences for fruits (OR (95% CI) = 0.38 (0.26–0.56), p < 0.0001), an effect countered by the prime (OR (95% CI) = 2.29 (1.33–3.96), p = 0.003). In Study 2, the effect of the prime did not generalize to a representative population. More educated participants, as used in Study 1, chose more fruit when hungry and primed (OR (95% CI) = 1.42 (1.13–1.79), p = 0.003), while less educated participants' fruit choice was unaffected by hunger or the prime. ConclusionThis study provides preliminary evidence that the effects of adverts on healthy eating choices depend on key individual traits (education level) and states (hunger), do not generalize to a broader population and have the potential to increase health inequalities arising from food choice. PMID:25636234

  14. Cryo–electron tomography reveals a critical role of RIM1α in synaptic vesicle tethering

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén; Asano, Shoh; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Sakata, Eri; Doengi, Michael; Kochovski, Zdravko; Zürner, Magdalena; Stein, Valentin; Schoch, Susanne; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles are embedded in a complex filamentous network at the presynaptic terminal. Before fusion, vesicles are linked to the active zone (AZ) by short filaments (tethers). The identity of the molecules that form and regulate tethers remains unknown, but Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM) is a prominent candidate, given its central role in AZ organization. In this paper, we analyzed presynaptic architecture of RIM1α knockout (KO) mice by cryo–electron tomography. In stark contrast to previous work on dehydrated, chemically fixed samples, our data show significant alterations in vesicle distribution and AZ tethering that could provide a structural basis for the functional deficits of RIM1α KO synapses. Proteasome inhibition reversed these structural defects, suggesting a functional recovery confirmed by electrophysiological recordings. Altogether, our results not only point to the ubiquitin–proteasome system as an important regulator of presynaptic architecture and function but also show that the tethering machinery plays a critical role in exocytosis, converging into a structural model of synaptic vesicle priming by RIM1α. PMID:23712261

  15. Development and characterization of nanopore system for nano-vesicle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Gaurav

    Nano-vesicles have recently attracted a lot of attention in research and medical communities and are very promising next-generation drug delivery vehicles. This is due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability and their ability to protect drug cargo and deliver it to site-specific locations, while maintaining the desired pharmacokinetic profile. The interaction of these drug loaded vesicles with the recipient cells via adsorption, endocytosis or receptor mediated internalization involve significant bending and deformation and is governed by mechanical properties of the nano-vesicles. Currently, the mechanical characteristics of nano-vesicles are left unexplored because of the difficulties associated with vesicle analysis at sub-100 nm length scale. The need for a complete understanding of nano-vesicle interaction with each other and the recipient cells warrants development of an analytical tool capable of mechanical investigation of individual vesicles at sub-100 nm scale. This dissertation presents investigation of nano-vesicle deformability using resistive pulse sensing and solid-state nanopore devices. The dissertation is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the motivation, specific aims and presents an overview of nanoparticle characterization techniques, resistive pulse sensing background and principles, techniques for fabricating solid-state nanopores, as well the deformation behavior of giant vesicles when placed in electric field. Chapter 2 is dedicated to understanding of the scientific principles governing transport of sub-100 nm particles in dilute solutions. We investigated the translocation of rigid nanoparticles through nanopores at salt concentrations < 50 mM. When using low electrolyte strength, surface effects become predominant and resulted in unconventional current signatures in our experiments. It prompted us to explore the effects of different experimental parameters using Multiphysics simulations, in order to optimize our system

  16. Prime Diagnosticity in Short-Term Repetition Priming: Is Primed Evidence Discounted, Even when It Reliably Indicates the Correct Answer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidemann, Christoph T.; Huber, David E.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors conducted 4 repetition priming experiments that manipulated prime duration and prime diagnosticity in a visual forced-choice perceptual identification task. The strength and direction of prime diagnosticity produced marked effects on identification accuracy, but those effects were resistant to subsequent changes of diagnosticity.…

  17. Extracellular vesicles as emerging intercellular communicasomes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Oh Youn; Gho, Yong Song

    2014-01-01

    All living cells release extracellular vesicles having pleiotropic functions in intercellular communication. Mammalian extracellular vesicles, also known as exosomes and microvesicles, are spherical bilayered proteolipids composed of various bioactive molecules, including RNAs, DNAs, proteins, and lipids. Extracellular vesicles directly and indirectly control a diverse range of biological processes by transferring membrane proteins, signaling molecules, mRNAs, and miRNAs, and activating receptors of recipient cells. The active interaction of extracellular vesicles with other cells regulates various physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer, infectious diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent developments in high-throughput proteomics, transcriptomics, and lipidomics tools have provided ample data on the common and specific components of various types of extracellular vesicles. These studies may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in vesicular cargo sorting and the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles, and, further, to the identification of disease-specific biomarkers. This review focuses on the components, functions, and therapeutic and diagnostic potential of extracellular vesicles under various pathophysiological conditions. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(10): 531-539] PMID:25104400

  18. Polymeric Microgels as Potential Drug Delivery Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Ryan; Streletzky, Kiril; Bayachou, Mekki; Peiris, Pubudu

    2010-03-01

    The temperature dependent volume phase change of cross-linked amphiphilic molecules (microgels) suggests their use as drug delivery vesicles. Drug particles aggregate in the slightly hydrophobic microgel interior. They are stored in equilibrium until the critical temperature (Tv) is reached where the volume phase change limits available space, thus expelling the drugs. This loading property of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) microgels was tested using amperometric analytical techniques. Small molecules inside microgels do not approach the electrode surface, which decreases current signal. A room temperature (Troom) flow amperometric measurement comparing microgel/paracetamol solution with control paracetamol samples yielded about 20 percent concentration reduction in the microgel sample. Results from the steady-state electrochemical experiment confirm the 20 percent concentration drop in the microgel sample compared to the control sample at Troom. Using the steady-state experiment with a cyclic temperature ramp from Troom to beyond Tv showed that the paracetamol concentration change between the temperature extremes was greater for the microgels than for the controls. An evolving aspect of the study is the characterization of microgel shrinkage from in situ, temperature controlled liquid AFM images as compared to previously completed DLS characterization of the same microgel sample.

  19. Interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans Extracellular Vesicles with the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Julie M.; Espadas-Moreno, Javier; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans produces extracellular vesicles containing a variety of cargo, including virulence factors. To become extracellular, these vesicles not only must be released from the plasma membrane but also must pass through the dense matrix of the cell wall. The greatest unknown in the area of fungal vesicles is the mechanism by which these vesicles are released to the extracellular space given the presence of the fungal cell wall. Here we used electron microscopy techniques to image the interactions of vesicles with the cell wall. Our goal was to define the ultrastructural morphology of the process to gain insights into the mechanisms involved. We describe single and multiple vesicle-leaving events, which we hypothesized were due to plasma membrane and multivesicular body vesicle origins, respectively. We further utilized melanized cells to “trap” vesicles and visualize those passing through the cell wall. Vesicle size differed depending on whether vesicles left the cytoplasm in single versus multiple release events. Furthermore, we analyzed different vesicle populations for vesicle dimensions and protein composition. Proteomic analysis tripled the number of proteins known to be associated with vesicles. Despite separation of vesicles into batches differing in size, we did not identify major differences in protein composition. In summary, our results indicate that vesicles are generated by more than one mechanism, that vesicles exit the cell by traversing the cell wall, and that vesicle populations exist as a continuum with regard to size and protein composition. PMID:24906412

  20. Response Priming with More or Less Biological Movements as Primes.

    PubMed

    Eckert, David; Bermeitinger, Christina

    2016-07-01

    Response priming in general is a suitable tool in cognitive psychology to investigate motor preactivations. Typically, compatibility effects reflect faster reactions in cases in which prime and target suggest the same response (i.e., compatible trials) compared with cases in which prime and target suggest opposite responses (i.e., incompatible trials). With moving dots that were horizontally aligned, Bermeitinger (2013) found a stable pattern of results: with short SOAs, faster responses in compatible trials were found; with longer SOAs up to 250 ms, faster responses in incompatible trials were found. It is unclear whether these results are specific to the special motion used therein or whether it generalizes to other motions. We therefore used other motions realized by arrangements of dots. In four experiments, we tested point-light displays (biological coherent walkers vs. less biological scrambled/split displays) as primes. In two experiments, eye gaze motions realized by moving dots representing irises and pupils (i.e., biological) versus the same motion either without surrounding face information or integrated in an abstract line drawing (i.e., less biological) were used. We found overall large positive compatibility effects with biological motion primes and also positive-but smaller-compatibility effects with less biological motion primes. Most important, also with very long SOAs (up to 1320 ms), we did not find evidence for negative compatibility effects. Thus, the pattern of positive-followed-by-negative-compatibility effects found in Bermeitinger (2013) seems to be specific to the materials used therein, whereas response priming in general seems an applicable tool to study motion perception. PMID:27150613

  1. Subliminal primes for global or local processing influence judgments of vehicular traffic.

    PubMed

    Hüttermann, Stefanie; Bock, Otmar; Memmert, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies on semantic priming show that briefly presented words can unconsciously manipulate subjects' mental states, behaviors, and attitudes. Here we evaluated whether semantic primes can also manipulate the breadth of subjects' visual attention. We primed participants with briefly presented words that indicate either broadness or narrowness; each prime was followed by either a large or a small picture of a street intersection with vehicles, and participants had to indicate in which order the vehicles were legally allowed to pass the intersection. Participants responded to large pictures faster when primed with words denoting broadness, and to small pictures faster when primed with words denoting narrowness. From this we concluded that semantic priming can be effectively applied to manipulate the breadth of attention, which could be exploited in real-world scenarios. PMID:25286131

  2. A phase of liposomes with entangled tubular vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Chiruvolu, S.; Naranjo, E.; Warriner, H.E.; Idziak, S.H.J.; Raedler, J.O.; Zasadzinski, J.A.; Safinya, C.R.; Plano, R.J.

    1994-11-18

    An equilibrium phase belonging to the family of bilayer liposomes in ternary mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), water, and geraniol (a biological alcohol derived from oil-soluble vitamins that acts as a cosurfactant) has been identified. Electron and optical microscopy reveal the phase, labeled L{sub tv}, to be composed of highly entangled tubular vesicles. In situ x-ray diffraction confirms that the tubule walls are multilamellar with the lipids in the chain-melted state. Macroscopic observations show that the L{sub tv} phase coexists with the well-known L{sub 4} phase of spherical vesicles and a bulk L{sub {alpha}} phase. However, the defining characteristic of the L{sub tv} phase is the Weissenberg rod climbing effect under shear, which results from its polymer-like entangled microstructure. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  3. A Phase of Liposomes with Entangled Tubular Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiruvolu, Shivkumar; Warriner, Heidi E.; Naranjo, Edward; Idziak, Stefan H. J.; Radler, Joachim O.; Plano, Robert J.; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1994-11-01

    An equilibrium phase belonging to the family of bilayer liposomes in ternary mixtures of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), water, and geraniol (a biological alcohol derived from oil-soluble vitamins that acts as a cosurfactant) has been identified. Electron and optical microscopy reveal the phase, labeled Ltv, to be composed of highly entangled tubular vesicles. In situ x-ray diffraction confirms that the tubule walls are multilamellar with the lipids in the chain-melted state. Macroscopic observations show that the Ltv phase coexists with the well-known L_4 phase of spherical vesicles and a bulk L_α phase. However, the defining characteristic of the Ltv phase is the Weissenberg rod climbing effect under shear, which results from its polymer-like entangled microstructure.

  4. Illuminating the physiology of extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles play a crucial role in intercellular communication by transmitting biological materials from donor cells to recipient cells. They have pathophysiologic roles in cancer metastasis, neurodegenerative diseases, and inflammation. Extracellular vesicles also show promise as emerging therapeutics, with understanding of their physiology including targeting, distribution, and clearance therefore becoming an important issue. Here, we review recent advances in methods for tracking and imaging extracellular vesicles in vivo and critically discuss their systemic distribution, targeting, and kinetics based on up-to-date evidence in the literature. PMID:27084088

  5. Time-dependent quantum wave packet study of the Ar+H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}ArH{sup +}+H reaction on a new ab initio potential energy surface for the ground electronic state (1{sup 2}A Prime )

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Mei; Liu Xinguo; Tan Ruishan; Li Hongzheng; Xu Wenwu

    2013-05-07

    A new global potential energy surface for the ground electronic state (1{sup 2}A Prime ) of the Ar+H{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}ArH{sup +}+H reaction has been constructed by multi-reference configuration interaction method with Davidson correction and a basis set of aug-cc-pVQZ. Using 6080 ab initio single-point energies of all the regions for the dynamics, a many-body expansion function form has been used to fit these points. The quantum reactive scattering dynamics calculations taking into account the Coriolis coupling (CC) were carried out on the new potential energy surface over a range of collision energies (0.03-1.0 eV). The reaction probabilities and integral cross sections for the title reaction were calculated. The significance of including the CC quantum scattering calculation has been revealed by the comparison between the CC and the centrifugal sudden approximation calculation. The calculated cross section is in agreement with the experimental result at collision energy 1.0 eV.

  6. Test Sequence Priming in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Elizabeth E.; Mewhort, D. J. K.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined priming within the test sequence in 3 recognition memory experiments. A probe primed its successor whenever both probes shared a feature with the same studied item ("interjacent priming"), indicating that the study item like the probe is central to the decision. Interjacent priming occurred even when the 2 probes did not…

  7. Congruent numbers with many prime factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye

    2012-12-26

    Mohammed Ben Alhocain, in an Arab manuscript of the 10th century, stated that the principal object of the theory of rational right triangles is to find a square that when increased or diminished by a certain number, m becomes a square [Dickson LE (1971) History of the Theory of Numbers (Chelsea, New York), Vol 2, Chap 16]. In modern language, this object is to find a rational point of infinite order on the elliptic curve my2 = x3 - x. Heegner constructed such rational points in the case that m are primes congruent to 5,7 modulo 8 or twice primes congruent to 3 modulo 8 [Monsky P (1990) Math Z 204:45-68]. We extend Heegner's result to integers m with many prime divisors and give a sketch in this report. The full details of all the proofs will be given in ref. 1 [Tian Y (2012) Congruent Numbers and Heegner Points, arXiv:1210.8231]. PMID:23213259

  8. Lipid Bilayer Vesicle extrusion through nanopores: a coarse grained molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, Martin; Joos, Bela

    2011-03-01

    We conducted Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics simulations of the pressure extrusion of vesicles in nanopores that confirm and help explain prior experimental observations (Patty, P. and Frisken, B., Biophys. J., 85, 2003). We demonstrate that, to a first approximation, the final size of extruded vesicles can be obtained by considering an invariable inner vesicle volume enclosed by a finitely extensible lipid bilayer. Using our data, we also describe in details the mechanics of vesicle rupture in a nanopore when pushed by various pressure gradients. This is made possible by tracking local variations of the stress in the lipid membrane via changes in surface area using a triangulation algorithm. The simulations are executed using state of the art GPU accelerated software. Our findings could potentially be useful in the design of liposome based drug delivery systems and in getting a better understanding of how the cell nucleus and the cell as a whole react in similar conditions. Work supported by NSERC and FQRNT.

  9. Direct Measurement of Pore Dynamics and Leakage Induced by a Model Antimicrobial Peptide in Single Vesicles and Cells.

    PubMed

    Burton, Matthew G; Huang, Qi M; Hossain, Mohammed A; Wade, John D; Palombo, Enzo A; Gee, Michelle L; Clayton, Andrew H A

    2016-06-28

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising therapeutic alternatives to counter growing antimicrobial resistance. Their precise mechanism of action remains elusive, however, particularly with respect to live bacterial cells. We investigated the interaction of a fluorescent melittin analogue with single giant unilamellar vesicles, giant multilamellar vesicles, and bilamellar Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Time-lapse fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was employed to determine the population distribution of the fluorescent melittin analogue between pore state and membrane surface state, and simultaneously measure the leakage of entrapped fluorescent species from the vesicle (or bacterium) interior. In giant unilamellar vesicles, leakage from vesicle interior was correlated with an increase in level of pore states, consistent with a stable pore formation mechanism. In giant multilamellar vesicles, vesicle leakage occurred more gradually and did not appear to correlate with increased pore states. Instead pore levels remained at a low steady-state level, which is more in line with coupled equilibria. Finally, in single bacterial cells, significant increases in pore levels were observed over time, which were correlated with only partial loss of cytosolic contents. These observations suggested that pore formation, as opposed to complete dissolution of membrane, was responsible for the leakage of contents in these systems, and that the bacterial membrane has an adaptive capacity that resists peptide attack. We interpret the three distinct pore dynamics regimes in the context of the increasing physical and biological complexity of the membranes. PMID:27281288

  10. Serotonin levels influence patterns of repetition priming.

    PubMed

    Burgund, E Darcy; Marsolek, Chad J; Luciana, Monica

    2003-01-01

    Repetition priming in a word-stem completion task was examined in a group of control subjects and in a group of experimental subjects under conditions of acute tryptophan depletion (T-) and tryptophan augmentation (T+). Experimental subjects ingested amino acid compounds that depleted or loaded the body with tryptophan, and word-stem completion priming performance was measured. Results indicate differential effects of T- and T+ manipulations on word-stem completion priming. In the control group, both specific-visual and amodal priming were observed. Conversely, in the T+ condition, specific-visual priming, but no amodal priming, was observed, whereas in the T- condition, amodal priming, but no specific-visual priming, was observed. The authors conclude that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) plays a critical role in repetition priming by helping to modulate which neural systems contribute to priming effects. PMID:12597085