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Sample records for printed high-frequency phased-array

  1. Fully Printed High-Frequency Phased-Array Antenna on Flexible Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yihong; Lu, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    To address the issues of flexible electronics needed for surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back-to-Earth communications necessary for manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, a room-temperature printing process has been developed to create active, phased-array antennas (PAAs) on a flexible Kapton substrate. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proven feasible for phased-array antenna systems. The carrier mobility of an individual CNT is estimated to be at least 100,000 sq cm/V(dot)s. The CNT network in solution has carrier mobility as high as 46,770 sq cm/V(dot)s, and has a large current-density carrying capacity of approx. 1,000 mA/sq cm , which corresponds to a high carrying power of over 2,000 mW/ sq cm. Such high carrier mobility, and large current carrying capacity, allows the achievement of high-speed (>100 GHz), high-power, flexible electronic circuits that can be monolithically integrated on NASA s active phasedarray antennas for various applications, such as pressurized rovers, pressurized habitats, and spacesuits, as well as for locating beacon towers for lunar surface navigation, which will likely be performed at S-band and attached to a mobile astronaut. A fully printed 2-bit 2-element phasedarray antenna (PAA) working at 5.6 GHz, incorporating the CNT FETs as phase shifters, is demonstrated. The PAA is printed out at room temperature on 100-mm thick Kapton substrate. Four CNT FETs are printed together with microstrip time delay lines to function as a 2-bit phase shifter. The FET switch exhibits a switching speed of 0.2 ns, and works well for a 5.6-GHz RF signal. The operating frequency is measured to be 5.6 GHz, versus the state-of-the-art flexible FET operating frequency of 52 MHz. The source-drain current density is measured to be over 1,000 mA/sq cm, while the conventional organic FETs, and single carbon nanotube-based FETs, are typically in the m

  2. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-11-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  3. Fully Printed, Flexible, Phased Array Antenna for Lunar Surface Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Hen, Ray T.; Lu, Xuejun; Chen, Maggie Yihong

    2013-01-01

    NASAs future exploration missions focus on the manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, which will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back to Earth. Flexible antennas are highly desired in many scenarios. Active phased array antennas (active PAAs) with distributed control and processing electronics at the surface of an antenna aperture offer numerous advantages for radar communications. Large-area active PAAs on flexible substrates are of particular interest in NASA s space radars due to their efficient inflatable package that can be rolled up during transportation and deployed in space. Such an inflatable package significantly reduces stowage volume and mass. Because of these performance and packaging advantages, large-area inflatable active PAAs are highly desired in NASA s surface-to-orbit and surface-to-relay communications. To address the issues of flexible electronics, a room-temperature printing process of active phased-array antennas on a flexible Kapton substrate was developed. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proved feasible for the PAA system. This innovation is a new type of fully inkjet-printable, two-dimensional, high-frequency PAA on a flexible substrate at room temperature. The designed electronic circuit components, such as the FET switches in the phase shifter, metal interconnection lines, microstrip transmission lines, etc., are all printed using a special inkjet printer. Using the developed technology, entire 1x4, 2x2, and 4x4 PAA systems were developed, packaged, and demonstrated at 5.3 GHz. Several key solutions are addressed in this work to solve the fabrication issues. The source/drain contact is developed using droplets of silver ink printed on the source/drain areas prior to applying CNT thin-film. The wet silver ink droplets allow the silver to

  4. Application of adaptive optics to scintillation correction in phased array high-frequency radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theurer, Timothy E.; Bristow, William A.

    2015-06-01

    At high frequency, diffraction during ionospheric propagation can yield wavefronts whose amplitude and phase fluctuate over the physical dimensions of phased array radars such as those of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN). Distortion in the wavefront introduces amplitude and phase scintillation into the geometric beamformed signal while reducing radar performance in terms of angular resolution and achieved array gain. A scintillation correction algorithm based on adaptive optics techniques is presented. An experiment conducted using two SuperDARN radars is presented that quantifies the effect of wavefront distortion and demonstrates a reduction in observed scintillation and improvement in radar performance post scintillation correction.

  5. PMN-PT single-crystal high-frequency kerfless phased array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruimin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor E; Lam, Kwok Ho; Hsu, Hsiu-sheng; Zheng, Fan; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of a miniature high-frequency kerfless phased array prepared from a PMN-PT single crystal for forward-looking intravascular or endoscopic imaging applications. After lapping down to around 40 μm, the PMN-PT material was utilized to fabricate 32-element kerfless phased arrays using micromachining techniques. The aperture size of the active area was only 1.0 × 1.0 mm. The measured results showed that the array had a center frequency of 40 MHz, a bandwidth of 34% at -6 dB with a polymer matching layer, and an insertion loss of 20 dB at the center frequency. Phantom images were acquired and compared with simulated images. The results suggest that the feasibility of developing a phased array mounted at the tip of a forward-looking intravascular catheter or endoscope. The fabricated array exhibits much higher sensitivity than PZT ceramic-based arrays and demonstrates that PMN-PT is well suited for this application. PMID:24859667

  6. PMN-PT Single-Crystal High-Frequency Kerfless Phased Array

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruimin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor E.; Lam, Kwok Ho; Hsu, Hsiu-sheng; Zheng, Fan; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of a miniature high-frequency kerfless phased array prepared from a PMN-PT single crystal for forward-looking intravascular or endoscopic imaging applications. After lapping down to around 40 μm, the PMN-PT material was utilized to fabricate 32-element kerfless phased arrays using micromachining techniques. The aperture size of the active area was only 1.0 × 1.0 mm. The measured results showed that the array had a center frequency of 40 MHz, a bandwidth of 34% at −6 dB with a polymer matching layer, and an insertion loss of 20 dB at the center frequency. Phantom images were acquired and compared with simulated images. The results suggest that the feasibility of developing a phased array mounted at the tip of a forward-looking intravascular catheter or endoscope. The fabricated array exhibits much higher sensitivity than PZT ceramic-based arrays and demonstrates that PMN-PT is well suited for this application. PMID:24859667

  7. Scan blindness in infinite phased arrays of printed dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozar, D. M.; Schaubert, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive study of infinite phased arrays of printed dipole antennas is presented, with emphasis on the scan blindness phenomenon. A rigorous and efficient moment method procedure is used to calculate the array impedance versus scan angle. Data are presented for the input reflection coefficient for various element spacings and substrate parameters. A simple theory, based on coupling from Floquet modes to surface wave modes on the substrate, is shown to predict the occurrence of scan blindness. Measurements from a waveguide simulator of a blindness condition confirm the theory.

  8. Fabrication and performance of a miniaturized 64-element high-frequency endoscopic phased array.

    PubMed

    Bezanson, Andre; Adamson, Rob; Brown, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a 40-MHz, 64-element phased-array transducer packaged in a 2.5 x 3.1 mm endoscopic form factor. The array is a forward-looking semi-kerfed design based on a 0.68Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3) - 0.32PbTiO3 (PMN-32%PT) single-crystal wafer with an element-to-element pitch of 38 µm. To achieve a miniaturized form factor, a novel technique of wire bonding the array elements to a polyimide flexible circuit board oriented parallel to the forward looking ultrasound beam and perpendicular to the array was developed. A technique of partially dicing into the back of the array was also implemented to improve the directivity of the array elements. The array was fabricated with a single-layer P(VDF-TrFE)-copolymer matching layer and a polymethylpentene (TPX) lens for passive elevation focusing to a depth of 7 mm. The two-way -6-dB pulse bandwidth was measured to be 55% and the average electromechanical coupling (k(eff)) for the individual elements was measured to be 0.62. The one-way -6-dB directivities from several array elements were measured to be ±20°, which was shown to be an improvement over an identical kerfless array. The -3-dB elevation focus resulting from the TPX lens was measured to be 152 µm at the focal depth, and the focused lateral resolution was measured to be 80 µm at a steering angle of 0°. To generate beam profiles and images, the probe was connected to a commercial ultrasound imaging platform which was reprogrammed to allow for phased array transmit beamforming and receive data collection. The collected RF data were then processed offline using a numerical computing script to generate sector images. The radiation pattern for the beamformed transmit pulse was collected along with images of wire phantoms in water and tissue-equivalent medium with a dynamic range of 60 dB. Finally, ex vivo tissue images were generated of porcine brain tissue. PMID:24402894

  9. Print protection using high-frequency fractal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Khaled W.; Blackledge, Jonathon M.; Datta, Sekharjit; Flint, James A.

    2004-06-01

    All digital images are band-limited to a degree that is determined by a spatial extent of the point spread function; the bandwidth of the image being determined by the optical transfer function. In the printing industry, the limit is determined by the resolution of the printed material. By band limiting the digital image in such away that the printed document maintains its fidelity, it is possible to use the out-of-band frequency space to introduce low amplitude coded data that remains hidden in the image. In this way, a covert signature can be embedded into an image to provide a digital watermark, which is sensitive to reproduction. In this paper a high frequency fractal noise is used as a low amplitude signal. A statistically robust solution to the authentication of printed material using high-fractal noise is proposed here which is based on cross-entropy metrics to provide a statistical confidence test. The fractal watermark is based on application of self-affine fields, which is suitable for documents containing high degree of texture. In principle, this new approach will allow batch tracking to be performed using coded data that has been embedded into the high frequency components of the image whose statistical characteristics are dependent on the printer/scanner technology. The details of this method as well as experimental results are presented.

  10. Cobalt Nanoparticle Inks for Printed High Frequency Applications on Polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelo, Mikko; Myllymäki, Sami; Juuti, Jari; Uusimäki, Antti; Jantunen, Heli

    2015-12-01

    In this work the high frequency properties of low curing temperature cobalt nanoparticle inks printed on polycarbonate substrates were investigated. The inks consisted of 30-70 vol.% metallic cobalt nanoparticles and poly (methylene methacrylate) polymer, having excellent adhesion on polycarbonate and a curing temperature of 110°C. The influence of binder material content on the electromagnetic properties of the ink was investigated using the shorted microstrip transmission-line perturbation method. Changes in mechanical properties were evaluated with adhesion tests using the pull-out strength test and the ASTM D 3359-B cross-hatch tape peel test. The microstructure of the printed patterns was investigated with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The inks remained mechanically durable with metal contents up to 60 vol.%, achieving pull-off strength of up to 5.2 MPa and the highest marks in adhesion of the tape peel test. The inks obtained a relative permeability of 1.5-3 in the 45 MHz-10 GHz band with a magnetic loss tangent of 0.01-0.06. The developed inks can be utilized in various printed electronics applications such as antenna miniaturization, antenna substrates and magnetic sensors or sensing.

  11. X-band printed phased array antennas using high-performance CNT/ion gel/Ag transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubb, Peter M.; Bidoky, Fazel; Mahajan, Ankit; Subbaraman, Harish; Li, Wentao; Frisbie, Daniel; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a fully printed phased array antenna developed on a 125 micron thick flexible Kapton substrate. Switching for the phase delay lines is accomplished using printed carbon nanotube transistors with ion gel dielectric layers. Design of each element of the phased array antenna is reported, including a low loss constant impedance power divider, a phase shifter network, and patch antenna design. Steering of an X-band PAA operating at 10GHz from 0 degrees to 22.15 degrees is experimentally demonstrated. In order to completely package the array with electrical interconnects, a single substrate interconnect scheme is also investigated.

  12. Printed silver nanowire antennas with low signal loss at high-frequency radio.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Natsuki; Nogi, Masaya; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Kohno, Kazuo; Akiyama, Yutaka; Otsuka, Kanji

    2012-05-21

    Silver nanowires are printable and conductive, and are believed to be promising materials in the field of printed electronics. However, the resistivity of silver nanowire printed lines is higher than that of metallic particles or flakes even when sintered at high temperatures of 100-400 °C. Therefore, their applications have been limited to the replacement of transparent electrodes made from high-resistivity materials, such as doped metallic oxides, conductive polymers, carbon nanotubes, or graphenes. Here we report that using printed silver nanowire lines, signal losses obtained in the high-frequency radio were lower than those obtained using etched copper foil antennas, because their surfaces were much smoother than those of etched copper foil antennas. This was the case even though the resistivity of silver nanowire lines was 43-71 μΩ cm, which is much higher than that of etched copper foil (2 μΩ cm). When printed silver nanowire antennas were heated at 100 °C, they achieved signal losses that were much lower than those of silver paste antennas comprising microparticles, nanoparticles, and flakes. Furthermore, using a low temperature process, we succeeded in remotely controlling a commercialized radio-controlled car by transmitting a 2.45 GHz signal via a silver nanowire antenna printed on a polyethylene terephthalate film. PMID:22522460

  13. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  14. Inkjet-printing- and electroless-plating- based fabrication of RF circuit structures on high-frequency substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, A.; Reiding, J.; Adelaar, H.; Achterhoek, F.; van Dijk, D. J.; Akkerman, R.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, a method to fabricate radio frequency (RF) circuit structures is described. This method involves inkjet printing of a silver nanoparticle-based ink on a functional substrate material to create the seed track (i.e., the seed layer), onto which copper is subsequently deposited by an electroless plating method, to obtain the desired thickness and conductivity of the RF structures. This process combination was validated by fabricating an S-band filter on a high-frequency substrate and comparing the RF performance of this filter with that of a filter fabricated using the conventional lithography-based method. The adhesion of the circuit structures to the substrate was qualitatively ascertained by the scotch tape test method. The performance of the inkjet-printed-electroless-plated filter was comparable to that of the conventional filter, thus proving the suitability of this novel method for practical RF applications.

  15. Non-Planar Pad-Printed Thick-Film Focused High-Frequency Ultrasonic Transducers for Imaging and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lethiecq, Marc; Lou-Moeller, Rasmus; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Levassort, Franck; Tran-Huu-Hue, Louis Pascal; Filoux, Erwan; Silverman, Ronald H.; Wolny, Wanda W.

    2013-01-01

    Pad-printed thick-film transducers have been shown to be an interesting alternative to lapped bulk piezoceramics, because the film is deposited with the required thickness, size, and geometry, thus avoiding any subsequent machining to achieve geometrical focusing. Their electromechanical properties are close to those of bulk ceramics with similar composition despite having a higher porosity. In this paper, pad-printed high-frequency transducers based on a low-loss piezoceramic composition are designed and fabricated. High-porosity ceramic cylinders with a spherical top surface are used as the backing substrate. The transducers are characterized in view of imaging applications and their imaging capabilities are evaluated with phantoms containing spherical inclusions and in different biological tissues. In addition, the transducers are evaluated for their capability to produce high-acoustic intensities at frequencies around 20 MHz. High-intensity measurements, obtained with a calibrated hydrophone, show that transducer performance is promising for applications that would require the same device to be used for imaging and for therapy. Nevertheless, the transducer design can be improved, and simulation studies are performed to find a better compromise between low-power and high-power performance. The size, geometry, and constitutive materials of optimized configurations are proposed and their feasibility is discussed. PMID:23007770

  16. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  17. Coplanar waveguide fed phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Ponchak, George E.; Lee, R. Q.; Fernandez, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    A K-band four element linear phased array was designed and tested. Coplanar waveguide (CPW) is used for the microwave distribution system. A CPW to twin strip transition is used to interface with the printed dipole antennas. MMIC phased shifters are used for phase control.

  18. Semiconductor Laser Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Oscillations synchronized and modulated individually for beam steering. Phased array of GaAs infrared lasers put out powerful electronically-steerable coherent beam. Fabricated as integrated circuit on GaAs chip, new device particularly suited to optical communications, optical data processing and optical detection and ranging systems.

  19. FEL phased array configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellan, Jeffrey B.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of various phased array and shared aperture concepts for FEL configurations are discussed. Consideration is given to the characteristics of intra- and inter-micropulse phasing; intra-macropulse phasing; an internal coupled resonator configuration; and an injection locked oscillator array. The use of a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration with multiple or single master oscillators for FELs is examined. The venetian blind, rotating plate, single grating, and grating rhomb shared aperture concepts are analyzed. It is noted that the shared aperture approach using a grating rhomb and the MOPA concept with a single master oscillator and a coupled resonator are useful for FEL phased array configurations; and the MOPA concept is most applicable.

  20. Phased array antenna control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doland, G. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Several new and useful improvements in steering and control of phased array antennas having a small number of elements, typically on the order of 5 to 17 elements are provided. Among the improvements are increasing the number of beam steering positions, reducing the possibility of phase transients in signals received or transmitted with the antennas, and increasing control and testing capacity with respect to the antennas.

  1. Phased array ghost elimination.

    PubMed

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2006-05-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  2. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  3. Large phased-array radars

    SciTech Connect

    Brookner, D.E.

    1988-12-15

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  4. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  5. Trends in phased array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, A. C.

    1986-03-01

    In the past 15 years, several outstanding phased arrays have been taken into service for functions involving defense applications. It is pointed out, however, that the impact of phased array technology on radar and communications antennas has been minor in comparison to the impact of solid-state technology on the other major subsystem, the signal processor. This situation is mainly related to cost considerations, and the scale of the commercial market involved. Attention is given to details regarding the economics of phased arrays, a possible key to improved solutions to phased array construction and operation, the employment of the techniques of photolithography in the fabrication of a transversely-developed array, the need for manufacturing techniques to incorporate magnetic or electroacoustic control devices into the array, problems of heat generation, small mm-wave arrays, questions of reliability, and integrated antennas.

  6. Phased arrays 1985 symposium: Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyskal, H. P.

    1985-08-01

    The Phased Arrays '85 Symposium, sponsored by the Rome Air Development Center, the MITRE Corporation, and the University of Massachusetts, was held at the MITRE Corporation 15 to 18 October and reviewed the state-of-the-art of phased array antenna systems and of the technology for next generation systems. This report contains the full papers which were presented with clearance for unlimited distribution.

  7. Grounded Coplanar Waveguide Feeds Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, G.E.; Lee, R. Q.; Simons, R. N.; Fernandez, N.S.

    1993-01-01

    Prototype electronically steerable K-band end-fire antenna includes phased array of four printed-circuit linear dipole elements fed by grounded coplanar waveguide (GCPW). Distribution-and-phasing network of antenna fed through single entering antenna split equally by three GCPW T junctions onto four GCPW transmission lines.

  8. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  9. Cabling design for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, I. D.; Turkiewicz, L.

    1972-01-01

    The ribbon-cabling system used for the AEGIS phased array which provides minimum cable bulk, complete EMI shielding, rugged mechanical design, repeatable electrical characteristics, and ease of assembly and maintenance is described. The ribbon cables are 0.040-inch thick, and in widths up to 2 1/2 inches. Their terminations are molded connectors that can be grouped in a three-tier arrangement, with cable branching accomplished by a matrix-welding technique.

  10. Airborne electronically steerable phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the second stage of a program for the design and development of a phased array capable of simultaneous and separate transmission and reception of radio frequency signals at S-band frequencies. The design goals of this stage were the development of three major areas of interest required for the final prototype model. These areas are the construction and testing of the low-weight, full-scale 128-element array of antenna elements, the development of the RF manifold feed system, and the construction and testing of a working module containing diplexer and transmit and receive circuits.

  11. Infrared phased-array sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovick, Brian A.; Bean, Jeffrey A.; Florence, Lou A.; Boreman, Glenn D.

    2011-06-01

    Metal-oxide-metal (MOM) tunnel diode detectors when integrated with phased-array antennas provide determination of the angle of arrival and degree of coherence of received infrared radiation. Angle-of-arrival measurements are made with a pair of dipole antennas coupled to a MOM diode through a coplanar strip transmission line. The direction of maximum angular response is altered by varying the position of the MOM diode along the transmission line connecting the antenna elements. Phased-array antennas can also be used to measure the degree of coherence of a partially coherent infrared field. With a two-element array, the degree of coherence is a measure of the correlation of electric fields received by the antennas as a function of the element separation. Antenna-coupled MOM diode devices are fabricated using electron beam lithography and thin-film deposition through a resist shadow mask. Measurements at 10.6 μm are substantiated by electromagnetic simulations and compared to analytic results.

  12. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  13. Phased array radars - Present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pell, Christopher

    1989-12-01

    The characteristics of tactical defense phased-array radars mainly employing two-dimensional electronic beam alignment are reviewed. Technology issues connected with the phased-array architecture and array control are examined. Technical summaries are then given for a representative selection of projected future operational systems, i.e, EMPAR, Multifire, and MESAR.

  14. Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2001-11-01

    The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

  15. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  16. Analysis of phased-array diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, A.; Streifer, W.

    1985-07-01

    An improved, more accurate analysis of phased-array diode lasers is presented, which yields results that differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from those previously employed. A numerical example indicating decreased splitting in array mode gains is included.

  17. A phased array tracking antenna for vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Mano, Kazukiko; Tanaka, Kenji; Matsunaga, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Makio

    1990-01-01

    An antenna system including antenna elements and a satellite tracking method is considered a key technology in implementing land mobile satellite communications. In the early stage of land mobile satellite communications, a mechanical tracking antenna system is considered the best candidate for vehicles, however, a phased array antenna will replace it in the near future, because it has many attractive advantages such as a low and compact profile, high speed tracking, and potential low cost. Communications Research Laboratory is now developing a new phased array antenna system for land vehicles based on research experiences of the airborne phased array antenna, which was developed and evaluated in satellite communication experiments using the ETS-V satellite. The basic characteristics of the phased array antenna for land vehicles are described.

  18. Phased array antenna analysis using hybrid finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Daniel T.

    1993-06-01

    This research in computational electromagnetics developed a new method for predicting the near-field mutual coupling effects in phased array antennas, using the finite element method (FEM) in combination with integral equations. Accurate feed modeling is accomplished by enforcing continuity between the FEM solution and an arbitrary number of wave guide models across a ground plane aperture. A periodic integral equation is imposed above the antenna's physical structure in order to enforce the radiation condition and to confine the analysis to an array unit cell. The electric field is expanded in terms of vector finite elements, and Galerkin's method is used to write the problem as a matrix equation. A general-purpose computer code was developed and validated by comparing its results to published data for several array types. Its versatility was demonstrated with predictions of the scanning properties of arrays of printed dipoles and printed flared notches.

  19. Intracavitary ultrasound phased arrays for thermal therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Erin

    Currently, the success of hyperthermia and thermal surgery treatments is limited by the technology used in the design and fabrication of clinical heating devices and the completeness of the thermometry systems used for guidance. For both hyperthermia and thermal surgery, electrically focused ultrasound generated by phased arrays provides a means of controlling localized energy deposition in body tissues. Intracavitary applicators can be used to bring the energy source close to a target volume, such as the prostate, thereby minimizing normal tissue damage. The work performed in this study was aimed at improving noninvasive prostate thermal therapies and utilized three research approaches: (1) Acoustic, thermal and optimization simulations, (2) Design and fabrication of multiple phased arrays, (3) Ex vivo and in vivo experimental testing of the heating capabilities of the phased arrays. As part of this study, a novel aperiodic phased array design was developed which resulted in a 30- 45% reduction in grating lobe levels when compared to conventional phased arrays. Measured acoustic fields generated by the constructed aperiodic arrays agreed closely with the fields predicted by the theoretical simulations and covered anatomically appropriate ranges. The power capabilities of these arrays were demonstrated to be sufficient for the purposes of hyperthermia and thermal surgery. The advantage of using phased arrays in place of fixed focus transducers was shown by demonstrating the ability of electronic scanning to increase the size of the necrosed tissue volume while providing a more uniform thermal dose, which can ultimately reduce patient treatment times. A theoretical study on the feasibility of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) thermometry for noninvasive temperature feedback control was investigated as a means to improve transient and steady state temperature distributions achieved in hyperthermia treatments. MRI guided ex vivo and in vivo experiments demonstrated

  20. Optically controlled phased-array antenna technology for space communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1988-01-01

    Using MMICs in phased-array applications above 20 GHz requires complex RF and control signal distribution systems. Conventional waveguide, coaxial cable, and microstrip methods are undesirable due to their high weight, high loss, limited mechanical flexibility and large volume. An attractive alternative to these transmission media, for RF and control signal distribution in MMIC phased-array antennas, is optical fiber. Presented are potential system architectures and their associated characteristics. The status of high frequency opto-electronic components needed to realize the potential system architectures is also discussed. It is concluded that an optical fiber network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but may require higher power.

  1. Improved Phased Array Imaging of a Model Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    An advanced phased array system, OptiNav Array 48, and a new deconvolution algorithm, TIDY, have been used to make octave band images of supersonic and subsonic jet noise produced by the NASA Glenn Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig (SHJAR). The results are much more detailed than previous jet noise images. Shock cell structures and the production of screech in an underexpanded supersonic jet are observed directly. Some trends are similar to observations using spherical and elliptic mirrors that partially informed the two-source model of jet noise, but the radial distribution of high frequency noise near the nozzle appears to differ from expectations of this model. The beamforming approach has been validated by agreement between the integrated image results and the conventional microphone data.

  2. Control of phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilenko, V. I.; Shishov, Iu. A.

    Principles and algorithms for the control of phased arrays are described. Particular consideration is given to algorithms for the control of phase distribution, adaptive arrays, beam-steerable arrays, the design of phase shifters, the compensation of beam-pointing errors, and the calibration of high-gain antenna pointing.

  3. Plane wave imaging using phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Arno

    2014-02-01

    Phased arrays are often used for rapid inspections. Phased arrays can be used to synthesize different wave fronts. For imaging, focused wave fronts are frequently used. In order to build an image, the phased array has to be fired multiple times at the same location. Alternatively, different data acquisition configurations can be designed in combination with an imaging algorithm. The objective of this paper is to use the minimal amount of data required to construct an image. If a plane wave is synthesized, the region of interest is illuminated completely. For plane wave synthesis, all elements in the phase array are fired. This ensures a good signal to noise ratio. Imaging can be performed efficiently with a mapping algorithm in the wavenumber domain. The algorithm involves only two Fourier transforms and can therefore be extremely fast. The obtained resolution is comparable to conventional imaging algorithms. This work investigates the potential and limitations of this mapping algorithm on simulated data. With this approach, frame rates of more than 1 kHz can be achieved.

  4. MSAT-X electronically steered phased array antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. H.; Foy, W.; Schaffner, G.; Pagels, W.; Vayner, M.; Nelson, J.; Peng, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A low profile electronically steered phased array was successfully developed for the Mobile Satellite Experiment Program (MSAT-X). The newly invented cavity-backed printed crossed-slot was used as the radiating element. The choice of this element was based on its low elevation angle gain coverage and low profile. A nineteen-way radial type unequal power divider and eighteen three-bit diode phase shifters constitute the beamformer module which is used to scan the beams electronically. A complete hybrid mode pointing system was also developed. The major features of the antenna system are broad coverage, low profile, and fast acquisition and tracking performance, even under fading conditions. Excellent intersatellite isolation (better than 26 dB) was realized, which will provide good quality mobile satellite communication in the future.

  5. Development of a C-Scan phased array ultrasonic imaging system using a 64-element 35MHz transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Hu, Changhong; Zhang, Lequan; Snook, Kevin; Liang, Yu; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Liu, Ruibin; Geng, Xuecang; Jiang, Xiaoning; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-04-01

    Phased array imaging systems provide the features of electronic beam steering and dynamic depth focusing that cannot be obtained with conventional linear array systems. This paper presents a system design of a digital ultrasonic imaging system, which is capable of handling a 64-element 35MHz center frequency phased array transducer. The system consists of 5 parts: an analog front-end, a data digitizer, a DSP based beamformer, a computer controlled motorized linear stage, and a computer for post image processing and visualization. Using a motorized linear stage, C-scan images, parallel to the surface of scanned objects may be generated. This digital ultrasonic imaging system in combination a 35 MHz phased array appears to be a promising tool for NDT applications with high spatial resolution. It may also serve as an excellent research platform for high frequency phased array design and testing as well as ultrasonic array signal algorithm developing using system's raw RF data acquisition function.

  6. Ka-Band Phased Array System Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Johnson, S.; Sands, O.; Lambert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Phased Array Antennas (PAAs) using patch-radiating elements are projected to transmit data at rates several orders of magnitude higher than currently offered with reflector-based systems. However, there are a number of potential sources of degradation in the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of the communications link that are unique to PAA-based links. Short spacing of radiating elements can induce mutual coupling between radiating elements, long spacing can induce grating lobes, modulo 2 pi phase errors can add to Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), phase shifters and power divider network introduce losses into the system. This paper describes efforts underway to test and evaluate the effects of the performance degrading features of phased-array antennas when used in a high data rate modulation link. The tests and evaluations described here uncover the interaction between the electrical characteristics of a PAA and the BER performance of a communication link.

  7. RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF A GENERALIZED PHASED ARRAY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The phased array has become a key component in the design of advanced antenna systems. This computer program was developed to examine the radiation characteristics of a generalized phased array antenna. Using a very efficient numerical technique, this program calculates the array's radiated power and its directivity. The results can be used to determine the radiation pattern of a generalized phased array at near- or far-field observation points. This program is a key research tool at the NASA Lewis Research Center for analyzing advanced space communication antenna systems. Results from this program compare favorably with experimental Lewis results for arrays of 2x2 and 3x3 elements. Given the array geometry and element characteristics, generalized phased array attributes can be broken into two areas: 1) the power radiated and its directivity at any given point, and 2) the co- and cross-polarization field components. This program allows arbitrarily located source elements with an analytically described cosine pattern. The formulation is based on a Romberg integration scheme and takes into account arbitrary element polarization, E and H plane element patterns, and mutual coupling. The input consists of the array geometry; phase, amplitude, linear and circular polarization of each source element; and the cosine functions of the element pattern. The output is a series of observation angles with their associated field magnitude and polarizations. Total radiated power and peak directivity are also calculated. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 computer operating under TSS with a central memory requirement of approximately 22K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM Scientific Subroutine Package (SSP) is required to run the program. This program was developed in 1986.

  8. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The scope of this contract entails a configuration study for a phased array fed transmit antenna operating in the frequency band of 17.7 to 20.2 GHz. This initial contract provides a basis for understanding the design limitations and advantages of advanced phased array and cluster feeds (both utilizing intergral MMIC modules) illuminating folded reflector optics (both near field and focused types). Design parametric analyses are performed utilizing as constraints the objective secondary performance requirements of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (Table 1.0). The output of the study provides design information which serves as a data base for future active phased array fed antenna studies such as detailed designs required to support the development of a ground tested breadboard. In general, this study is significant because it provides the antenna community with an understanding of the basic principles which govern near field phased scanned feed effects on secondary reflector system performance. Although several articles have been written on analysis procedures and results for these systems, the authors of this report have observed phenomenon of near field antenna systems not previously documented. Because the physical justification for the exhibited performance is provided herein, the findings of this study add a new dimension to the available knowledge of the subject matter.

  9. Phased array antenna matching: Simulation and optimization of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudgeon, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized simulation of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements is reported using mutual coupling and wide angle impedance matching in phased arrays. Special emphasis is given to circular polarization. The aforementioned computer program has as variable inputs: frequency, polarization, grid geometry, element size, dielectric waveguide fill, dielectric plugs in the waveguide for impedance matching, and dielectric sheets covering the array surface for the purpose of wide angle impedance matching. Parameter combinations are found which produce reflection peaks interior to grating lobes, while dielectric cover sheets are successfully employed to extend the usable scan range of a phased array. The most exciting results came from the application of computer aided optimization techniques to the design of this type of array.

  10. Design of a K-Band Transmit Phased Array For Low Earth Orbit Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Thomas; Miller, Stephen; Kershner, Dennis; Anzic, Godfrey

    2000-01-01

    The design of a light weight, low cost phased array antenna is presented. Multilayer printed wiring board (PWB) technology is utilized for Radio Frequencies (RF) and DC/Logic manifold distribution. Transmit modules are soldered on one side and patch antenna elements are on the other, allowing the use of automated assembly processes. The 19 GHz antenna has two independently steerable beams, each capable of transferring data at 622 Mbps. A passive, self-contained phase change thermal management system is also presented.

  11. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  12. Phased array performance evaluation with photoelastic visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzel, Robert; Dao, Gavin

    2014-02-18

    New instrumentation and a widening range of phased array transducer options are affording the industry a greater potential. Visualization of the complex wave components using the photoelastic system can greatly enhance understanding of the generated signals. Diffraction, mode conversion and wave front interaction, together with beam forming for linear, sectorial and matrix arrays, will be viewed using the photoelastic system. Beam focus and steering performance will be shown with a range of embedded and surface targets within glass samples. This paper will present principles and sound field images using this visualization system.

  13. Phased array beamforming using nonlinear oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael; Larsen, Michael L.; Tsimring, Lev S.

    2004-10-01

    We describe a concept in which an array of coupled nonlinear oscillators is used for beamforming in phased array receivers. The signal that each sensing element receives, beam steered by time delays, is input to a nonlinear oscillator. The nonlinear oscillators for each element are in turn coupled to each other. For incident signals sufficiently close to the steering angle, the oscillator array will synchronize to the forcing signal whereas more obliquely incident signals will not induce synchronization. The beam pattern that results can show a narrower mainlobe and lower sidelobes than the equivalent conventional linear beamformer. We present a theoretical analysis to explain the beam pattern of the nonlinear oscillator array.

  14. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique. PMID:25636803

  15. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  16. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  17. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  18. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  19. Optimizing an ELF/VLF Phased Array at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimaru, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to maximize the amplitude of 1-5 kHz ELF/VLF waves generated by ionospheric HF heating and measured at a ground-based ELF/VLF receiver. The optimization makes use of experimental observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the amplitude, phase, and propagation delay of the ELF/VLF waves were carefully measured. The HF beam was aimed at 15 degrees zenith angle in 8 different azimuthal directions, equally spaced in a circle, while broadcasting a 3.25 MHz (X-mode) signal that was amplitude modulated (square wave) with a linear frequency-time chirp between 1 and 5 kHz. The experimental observations are used to provide reference amplitudes, phases, and propagation delays for ELF/VLF waves generated at these specific locations. The presented optimization accounts for the trade-off between duty cycle, heated area, and the distributed nature of the source region in order to construct a "most efficient" phased array. The amplitudes and phases generated by modulated heating at each location are combined in post-processing to find an optimal combination of duty cycle, heating location, and heating order.

  20. Joint stars phased array radar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnitkin, Harold

    1994-10-01

    The Joint STARS phased array radar system is capable of performing long range airborne surveillance and was used during the Persian Gulf war on two E8-A aircraft to fly many around-the-clock missions to monitor the Kuwait and Iraq battlefield from a safe distance behind the front lines. This paper is a follow-on to previous publications on the subject of the Joint STARS antenna and deals mainly with mission performance and technical aspects not previously covered. Radar data of troop movements and armament installations will be presented, a brief review of the antenna design is given, followed by technical discussions concerning the three-port interferometry, gain and sidelobe design approach, cost control, range test implementation and future improvements.

  1. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  2. Multiband Photonic Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Suning

    2015-01-01

    A multiband phased-array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. Crystal Research, Inc., has developed a multiband photonic antenna that is based on a high-speed, optical, true-time-delay beamformer. It is capable of simultaneously steering multiple independent radio frequency (RF) beams in less than 1,000 nanoseconds. This high steering speed is 3 orders of magnitude faster than any existing optical beamformer. Unlike other approaches, this technology uses a single controlling device per operation band, eliminating the need for massive optical switches, laser diodes, and fiber Bragg gratings. More importantly, only one beamformer is needed for all antenna elements.

  3. Ghost artifact cancellation using phased array processing.

    PubMed

    Kellman, P; McVeigh, E R

    2001-08-01

    In this article, a method for phased array combining is formulated which may be used to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including space variant distortions such as local flow or off-resonance. This method is based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the constraint of nulling ghost artifacts at known locations. The resultant technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation it is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The method is applied to multishot EPI with noninterleaved phase encode acquisition. A number of benefits, as compared to the conventional interleaved approach, are reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow, and EPI delay misalignment, as well as eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Experimental results demonstrate the cancellation for both phantom as well as cardiac imaging examples. PMID:11477638

  4. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  5. Synthesized Bistatic Echo Imaging Using Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, Mehrdad

    1990-01-01

    An object illuminated by a source produces a scattered signal; this signal depends upon both the source and the physical properties of the object. The problem of deducing coordinates, shape and/or certain physical properties of the object from the measurements of the returned signal is an inverse problem called echo imaging. The problem of echo imaging arises in medical imaging, remote sensing (radar; sonar; geophysical exploration), and non-destructive testing. In this paper, we address the problem of imaging an object form its returned signals using a phased array. Our approach is to exploit the array's various radiation patterns and the recordable portion of the returned signal's spectrum to generate the data base for this echo imaging system. Rapid steering of a phased array's radiation patterns can be achieved electronically. These steered waves can be utilized to synthesize waves with varying angles of propagation. In this case, the recorded returned signal for each direction of propagation can be viewed as data obtained by a bistatic array configuration. We first formulate the imaging problem for a plane wave source in a bistatic configuration. We utilize the two-way propagation time and amplitude of the returned signal to relate the object's properties, reflectivity function and coordinates, to the measured data (system modeling). This relationship is the basis for deducing the object's reflectivity function from the recorded data (inverse problem). We then extend these results for an arbitrary radiation pattern and synthesized radiation patterns generated by an array capable of beam steering in cross-range. We show that the recorded returned signals can be related to the spatial frequency contents of the reflectivity function. We also show that these array processing principles can be utilized to formulate a system model and inversion for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging that incorporates wavefront curvature.

  6. Nonmechanical beam steering using optical phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Thomas E.; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Mackrides, Daniel G.; Curt, Petersen F.; Bonnett, James; Prather, Dennis W.

    2011-11-01

    Beam steering is an enabling technology for establishment of ad hoc communication links, directed energy for infrared countermeasures, and other in-theater defense applications. The development of nonmechanical beam steering techniques is driven by requirements for low size, weight, and power, and high slew rate, among others. The predominant beam steering technology currently in use relies on gimbal mounts, which are relatively large, heavy, and slow, and furthermore create drag on the airframes to which they are mounted. Nonmechanical techniques for beam steering are currently being introduced or refined, such as those based on liquid crystal spatial light modulators; however, drawbacks inherent to some of these approaches include narrow field of regard, low speed operation, and low optical efficiency. An attractive method that we explore is based on optical phased arrays, which has the potential to overcome the aforementioned issues associated with other mechanical and nonmechanical beam steering techniques. The optical array phase locks a number of coherent optical emitters in addition to applying arbitrary phase profiles across the array, thereby synthesizing beam shapes that can be steered and utilized for a diverse range of applications.

  7. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  8. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  9. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  10. Phased-Array Study of Dual-Flow Jet Noise: Effect of Nozzles and Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soo Lee, Sang; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    A 16-microphone linear phased-array installed parallel to the jet axis and a 32-microphone azimuthal phased-array installed in the nozzle exit plane have been applied to identify the noise source distributions of nozzle exhaust systems with various internal mixers (lobed and axisymmetric) and nozzles (three different lengths). Measurements of velocity were also obtained using cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). Among the three nozzle lengths tested, the medium length nozzle was the quietest for all mixers at high frequency on the highest speed flow condition. Large differences in source strength distributions between nozzles and mixers occurred at or near the nozzle exit for this flow condition. The beamforming analyses from the azimuthal array for the 12-lobed mixer on the highest flow condition showed that the core flow and the lobe area were strong noise sources for the long and short nozzles. The 12 noisy spots associated with the lobe locations of the 12-lobed mixer with the long nozzle were very well detected for the frequencies 5 KHz and higher. Meanwhile, maps of the source strength of the axisymmetric splitter show that the outer shear layer was the most important noise source at most flow conditions. In general, there was a good correlation between the high turbulence regions from the PIV tests and the high noise source regions from the phased-array measurements.

  11. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of the following coplanar waveguide (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and printed dipole arrays is presented: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW (GCPW)/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  12. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-08-01

    The design and performance of the following coplanar waveguide (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and printed dipole arrays is presented: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW (GCPW)/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  13. S-band antenna phased array communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzer, D. R.; Chapman, J. E.; Griffin, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of an S-band antenna phased array for spacecraft to spacecraft communication is discussed. The system requirements, antenna array subsystem design, and hardware implementation are examined. It is stated that the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost. The objectives of the development contract are defined as: (1) design of a medium gain active phased array S-band communications antenna, (2) development and test of a model of a seven element planar array of radiating elements mounted in the appropriate cavity matrix, and (3) development and test of a breadboard transmit/receive microelectronics module.

  14. High Rate User Ka-Band Phased Array Antenna Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caroglanian, Armen; Perko, Kenneth; Seufert, Steve; Dod, Tom; Warshowsky, Jay; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The High Rate User Phased Array Antenna (HRUPAA) is a Ka-Band planar phased array designed by the Harris Corporation for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The HRUPAA permits a satellite to downlink data either to a ground station or through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The HRUPAA is scanned electronically by ground station / user satellite command over a 120 degree cone angle. The phased array has the advantage of not imparting attitude disturbances to the user spacecraft. The 288-element transmit-only array has distributed RF amplifiers integrated behind each of the printed patch antenna elements. The array has 33 dBW EIRP and is left-hand circularly polarized. An engineering model of a partially populated array has been developed and delivered to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This report deals with the testing of the engineering model at the Goddard Antenna Range near-field and compact range facilities. The antenna specifications are described first, followed by the test plan and test results.

  15. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  16. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  17. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John Frederick; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  18. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John F.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  19. Coherent optical monolithic phased-array antenna steering system

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    An optical-based RF beam steering system for phased-array antennas comprising a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The system is based on optical heterodyning employed to produce microwave phase shifting by a monolithic PIC constructed entirely of passive components. Microwave power and control signal distribution to the antenna is accomplished by optical fiber, permitting physical separation of the PIC and its control functions from the antenna. The system reduces size, weight, complexity, and cost of phased-array antenna systems.

  20. MSAT mobile electronically steered phased array antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Fred

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) breadboard antenna design demonstrates the feasibility of using a phased array in a mobile satellite application. An electronically steerable phased array capable of tracking geosynchronous satellites from anywhere in the Continental United States has been developed. The design is reviewed along with the test data. Cost analysis are presented which indicate that this design can be produced at a cost of $1620 per antenna.

  1. Optimizing Satellite Communications With Adaptive and Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, Mary Ann; Romanofsky, Robert; Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix; Popovic, Zoya; Langley, John; Barott, William C.; Ahmed, M. Usman; Mandl, Dan

    2004-01-01

    A new adaptive antenna array architecture for low-earth-orbiting satellite ground stations is being investigated. These ground stations are intended to have no moving parts and could potentially be operated in populated areas, where terrestrial interference is likely. The architecture includes multiple, moderately directive phased arrays. The phased arrays, each steered in the approximate direction of the satellite, are adaptively combined to enhance the Signal-to-Noise and Interference-Ratio (SNIR) of the desired satellite. The size of each phased array is to be traded-off with the number of phased arrays, to optimize cost, while meeting a bit-error-rate threshold. Also, two phased array architectures are being prototyped: a spacefed lens array and a reflect-array. If two co-channel satellites are in the field of view of the phased arrays, then multi-user detection techniques may enable simultaneous demodulation of the satellite signals, also known as Space Division Multiple Access (SDMA). We report on Phase I of the project, in which fixed directional elements are adaptively combined in a prototype to demodulate the S-band downlink of the EO-1 satellite, which is part of the New Millennium Program at NASA.

  2. Remoting alternatives for a multiple phased-array antenna network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zan; Foshee, James J.

    2001-10-01

    Significant improvements in technology have made phased array antennas an attractive alternative to the traditional dish antenna for use on wide body airplanes. These improvements have resulted in reduced size, reduced cost, reduced losses in the transmit and receive channels (simplifying the design), a significant extension in the bandwidth capability, and an increase in the functional capability. Flush mounting (thus reduced drag) and rapid beam switching are among the evolving desirable features of phased array antennas. Beam scanning of phased array antennas is limited to +/-45 degrees at best and therefore multiple phased array antennas would need to be used to insure instantaneous communications with any ground station (stations located at different geographical locations on the ground) and with other airborne stations. The exact number of phased array antennas and the specific installation location of each antenna on the wide body airplane would need to be determined by the specific communication requirements, but it is conceivable as many as five phased array antennas may need to be used to provide the required coverage. Control and switching of these antennas would need to be accomplished at a centralized location on the airplane and since these antennas would be at different locations on the airplane an efficient scheme of remoting would need to be used. To save in cost and keep the phased array antennas as small as possible the design of the phased array antennas would need to be kept simple. A dish antenna and a blade antenna (small size) could also be used to augment the system. Generating the RF signals at the central location and then using RF cables or waveguide to get the signal to any given antenna could result in significant RF losses. This paper will evaluate a number of remoting alternatives to keep the system design simple, reduce system cost, and utilize the functional capability of networking multiple phased array antennas on a wide body

  3. Optical phased arrays with evanescently-coupled antennas

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Jie; Watts, Michael R; Yaacobi, Ami; Timurdogan, Erman

    2015-03-24

    An optical phased array formed of a large number of nanophotonic antenna elements can be used to project complex images into the far field. These nanophotonic phased arrays, including the nanophotonic antenna elements and waveguides, can be formed on a single chip of silicon using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Directional couplers evanescently couple light from the waveguides to the nanophotonic antenna elements, which emit the light as beams with phases and amplitudes selected so that the emitted beams interfere in the far field to produce the desired pattern. In some cases, each antenna in the phased array may be optically coupled to a corresponding variable delay line, such as a thermo-optically tuned waveguide or a liquid-filled cell, which can be used to vary the phase of the antenna's output (and the resulting far-field interference pattern).

  4. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  5. Ultrasonic Phased-Array Characterization for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, John J.; Tennis, Richard F.; Pickens, Keith S.

    1995-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) recently fabricated and delivered the 100-channel Ultrasonic Phased-Array Testbed System (UPATS) for NASA's Langley Research Center. NASA prepared the specifications and provided the funding to develop UPATS in order to provide a tool for the improvement of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and characterization of materials. UPATS incorporates state-of-the-art phased-array concepts such as beam steering, focusing, apodization, and phase-sensitive detection which make it possible to develop more sophisticated testing methodologies. It also can be used to investigate fundamental ultrasonic propagation and detection phenomena such as refraction, diffraction, scattering, and beam broadening.

  6. Microwave power transmitting phased array antenna research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    An initial design study and the development results of an S band RF power transmitting phased array antenna experiment system are presented. The array was to be designed, constructed and instrumented to permit wireless power transmission technology evaluation measurements. The planned measurements were to provide data relative to the achievable performance in the state of the art of flexible surface, retrodirective arrays, as a step in technically evaluating the satellite power system concept for importing to earth, via microwave beams, the nearly continuous solar power available in geosynchronous orbit. Details of the microwave power transmitting phased array design, instrumentation approaches, system block diagrams, and measured component and breadboard characteristics achieved are presented.

  7. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nick; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Phased array antennas showcase many advantages over mechanically steered systems. However, they are also more complex, heavy and most importantly costly. This presentation paper presents a concept which overcomes these detrimental attributes by eliminating all of the phase array backend (including phase shifters). Instead, a wave velocity reconfigurable transmission line is used in a series fed array arrangement to allow phase shifting with one small (100mil) mechanical motion. Different configurations of the reconfigurable wave velocity transmission line are discussed and simulated and experimental results are presented.

  8. Ka-Band Multibeam Aperture Phased Array Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems offer many advantages to low-Earth-orbiting satellite systems. Their large scan angles and multibeam capabilities allow for vibration-free, rapid beam scanning and graceful degradation operation for high rate downlink of data to users on the ground. Technology advancements continue to reduce the power, weight, and cost of these systems to make phased arrays a competitive alternative in comparison to the gimbled reflector system commonly used in science missions. One effort to reduce the cost of phased arrays is the development of a Ka-band multibeam aperture (MBA) phased array by Boeing Corporation under a contract jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Office of Naval Research. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a space-qualifiable dual-beam Ka-band (26.5-GHz) phased-array antenna. The goals are to advance the state of the art in Ka-band active phased-array antennas and to develop and demonstrate multibeam transmission technology compatible with spacecraft in low Earth orbit to reduce the cost of future missions by retiring certain development risks. The frequency chosen is suitable for space-to-space and space-to-ground communication links. The phased-array antenna has a radiation pattern designed by combining a set of individual radiating elements, optimized with the type of radiating elements used, their positions in space, and the amplitude and phase of the currents feeding the elements. This arrangement produces a directional radiation pattern that is proportional to the number of individual radiating elements. The arrays of interest here can scan the main beam electronically with a computerized algorithm. The antenna is constructed using electronic components with no mechanical parts, and the steering is performed electronically, without any resulting vibration. The speed of the scanning is limited primarily by the control electronics. The radiation performance degrades gracefully if a portion of the elements

  9. High-Frequency Gated Oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berard, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    New gated oscillator generates bursts of high-frequency sine waves, square waves, and triangular waves in response to control signals. Each burst starts at zero phase, with tight tolerances on signal amplitude and frequency. Frequencies in megahertz range are made possible by using high-speed comparators and high-speed flip-flop as fast-response threshold detector.

  10. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  11. Guided wave phased array beamforming and imaging in composite plates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes phased array beamforming using guided waves in anisotropic composite plates. A generic phased array algorithm is presented, in which direction dependent guided wave parameters and the energy skew effect are considered. This beamforming at an angular direction is achieved based on the classic delay-and-sum principle by applying phase delays to signals received at array elements and adding up the delayed signals. The phase delays are determined with the goal to maximize the array output at the desired direction and minimize it otherwise. For array characterization, the beam pattern of rectangular grid arrays in composite plates is derived. In addition to the beam pattern, the beamforming factor in terms of wavenumber distribution is defined to provide intrinsic explanations for phased array beamforming. The beamforming and damage detection in a composite plate are demonstrated using rectangular grid arrays made by a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Detection images of the composite plate with multiple surface defects at various directions are obtained. The results show that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures. PMID:26907891

  12. Beam-pointing errors of planar-phased arrays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Cooper, W. K.; Stutzman, W. L.

    1973-01-01

    Using both analytical and Monte Carlo techniques, beam-pointing errors of planar-phased arrays are analyzed. The obtained simple formulas for rms pointing errors are applicable to uniform planar arrays with both uniform and Gaussian uncorrelated phase-error distributions and for any arbitrary scan angle.

  13. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  14. Low cost, electronically steered phased array for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strickland, Peter C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a multifaced, phased array antenna developed for general aviation satellite communications applications. The antenna design satisfies all INMARSAT Aeronautical SDM requirements. Unique features of this antenna include an integral LNA and diplexer, integral phase shifters which are shared among the array faces, a serial beam steering interface and low manufacturing cost.

  15. NASA Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA): An application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Lee, S. W.; Gee, W.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed orbital geometry for the adaptive multibeam phased array (AMPA) communication system is reviewed and some of the system's capabilities and preliminary specifications are highlighted. Typical AMPA user link models and calculations are presented, the principal AMPA features are described, and the implementation of the system is demonstrated. System tradeoffs and requirements are discussed. Recommendations are included.

  16. Looking Below the Surface with Ultrasonic Phased Array

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2010-10-01

    This article is a brief tutorial on the benefits of volumetric ultrasonic phased array line scanning. The article describes the need, the approach, and the methods/practices used to analyze the data for flaw detection and characterization in the nuclear power plant component arena.

  17. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S; Kadlec, Emil A; Shaner, Eric A; Klem, John F; Sinclair, Michael B; Brener, Igal

    2015-01-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (∼5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum. PMID:26126879

  18. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John Frederick; Sinclair, Michael B.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization.more » As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.« less

  19. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John F.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-01-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (∼5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum. PMID:26126879

  20. Robotic inspection of fiber reinforced composites using phased array UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Jeffrey T.; De Odorico, Walter

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound is the current NDE method of choice to inspect large fiber reinforced airframe structures. Over the last 15 years Cartesian based scanning machines using conventional ultrasound techniques have been employed by all airframe OEMs and their top tier suppliers to perform these inspections. Technical advances in both computing power and commercially available, multi-axis robots now facilitate a new generation of scanning machines. These machines use multiple end effector tools taking full advantage of phased array ultrasound technologies yielding substantial improvements in inspection quality and productivity. This paper outlines the general architecture for these new robotic scanning systems as well as details the variety of ultrasonic techniques available for use with them including advances such as wide area phased array scanning and sound field adaptation for non-flat, non-parallel surfaces.

  1. MSAT-X phased array antenna adaptions to airborne applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, C.; Chung, H. H.; Peng, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) phased array antenna is being modified to meet future requirements. The proposed system consists of two high gain antennas mounted on each side of a fuselage, and a low gain antenna mounted on top of the fuselage. Each antenna is an electronically steered phased array based on the design of the MSAT-X antenna. A beamforming network is connected to the array elements via coaxial cables. It is essential that the proposed antenna system be able to provide an adequate communication link over the required space coverage, which is 360 degrees in azimuth and from 20 degrees below the horizon to the zenith in elevation. Alternative design concepts are suggested. Both open loop and closed loop backup capabilities are discussed. Typical antenna performance data are also included.

  2. A design concept for an MMIC microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Smetana, J.; Acosta, R.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka band advanced satellite communication antenna systems. The proposed design concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required. The proposed design concept takes into consideration the RF characteristics and actual phyical dimensions of the MMIC devices. Also, solutions to spatial constraints and interconnections associated with currently available packaging designs are discussed. Finally, the design of the microstrip radiating elements and their radiation characteristics are examined.

  3. Large Phased Array Radar Using Networked Small Parabolic Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Multifunction phased array systems with radar, telecom, and imaging applications have already been established for flat plate phased arrays of dipoles, or waveguides. In this paper the design trades and candidate options for combining the radar and telecom functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN) into a single large transmit array of small parabolic reflectors will be discussed. In particular the effect of combing the radar and telecom functions on the sizes of individual antenna apertures and the corresponding spacing between the antenna elements of the array will be analyzed. A heterogeneous architecture for the DSN large transmit array is proposed to meet the radar and telecom requirements while considering the budget, scheduling, and strategic planning constrains.

  4. A novel serrated columnar phased array ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Cheng; Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Song, Hongwei; Chen, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Traditionally, wedges are required to generate transverse waves in a solid specimen and mechanical rotation device is needed for interrogation of a specimen with a hollow bore, such as high speed railway locomotive axles, turbine rotors, etc. In order to eliminate the mechanical rotation process, a novel array pattern of phased array ultrasonic transducers named as serrated columnar phased array ultrasonic transducer (SCPAUT) is designed. The elementary transducers are planar rectangular, located on the outside surface of a cylinder. This layout is aimed to generate electrically rotating transverse waveforms so as to inspect the longitudinal cracks on the outside surface of a specimen which has a hollow bore at the center, such as the high speed railway locomotive axles. The general geometry of the SCPAUT and the inspection system are illustrated. A FEM model and mockup experiment has been carried out. The experiment results are in good agreement with the FEM simulation results.

  5. Ultrasonic Phased Array Simulations of Welded Components at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate inspections of welded components have become of increasing importance as NASA develops new hardware such as Ares rocket segments for future exploration missions. Simulation and modeling will play an increasing role in the future for nondestructive evaluation in order to better understand the physics of the inspection process, to prove or disprove the feasibility for an inspection method or inspection scenario, for inspection optimization, for better understanding of experimental results, and for assessment of probability of detection. This study presents simulation and experimental results for an ultrasonic phased array inspection of a critical welded structure important for NASA future exploration vehicles. Keywords: nondestructive evaluation, computational simulation, ultrasonics, weld, modeling, phased array

  6. Removing Background Noise with Phased Array Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Stephens, David

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test conducted to determine how well microphone phased array processing software could pull an acoustic signal out of background noise. The array consisted of 24 microphones in an aerodynamic fairing designed to be mounted in-flow. The processing was conducted using Functional Beam forming software developed by Optinav combined with cross spectral matrix subtraction. The test was conducted in the free-jet of the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig at NASA GRC. The background noise was produced by the interaction of the free-jet flow with the solid surfaces in the flow. The acoustic signals were produced by acoustic drivers. The results show that the phased array processing was able to pull the acoustic signal out of the background noise provided the signal was no more than 20 dB below the background noise level measured using a conventional single microphone equipped with an aerodynamic forebody.

  7. Phased Array Probe Optimization for the Inspection of Titanium Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasselkorde, E.; Cooper, I.; Wallace, P.; Lupien, V.

    2010-02-01

    The manufacturing process of titanium billets can produce multiple sub-surface defects that are particularly difficult to detect during the early stages of production. Failure to detect these defects can lead to subsequent in-service failure. A new and novel automated quality control system is being developed for the inspection of titanium billets destined for use in aerospace applications. The sensors will be deployed by an automated system to minimise the use of manual inspections, which should improve the quality and reliability of these critical inspections early on in the manufacturing process. This paper presents the first part of the work, which is the design and the simulation of the phased array ultrasonic inspection of the billets. A series of phased array transducers were designed to optimise the ultrasonic inspection of a ten inch diameter billet made from Titanium 6Al-4V. A comparison was performed between different probes including a 2D annular sectorial array.

  8. Detection Performance of a Diffusive Wave Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Stephen P.

    2004-04-01

    Diffusive wave phased arrays have been demonstrated to be a sensitive method of detecting inhomogeneities embedded in heavily scattering media. However, the increase in sensitivity is coupled with an increase in noise, so that the optimum performance may not be obtained when the sources are modulated in antiphase. The performance of a range of configurations in the presence of Gaussian noise is investigated by using probabilistic detection theory. A model of diffusive wave propagation through scattering media is used to demonstrate that the phase performance can be improved by controlling the relative phase difference between the two sources. However, the best performance is obtained by using the amplitude response of a single source system. The major benefit of a phased array system is therefore the rejection of common systematic noise.

  9. Adaptive multibeam phased array design for a Spacelab experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noji, T. T.; Fass, S.; Fuoco, A. M.; Wang, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The parametric tradeoff analyses and design for an Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA) for a Spacelab experiment are described. This AMPA Experiment System was designed with particular emphasis to maximize channel capacity and minimize implementation and cost impacts for future austere maritime and aeronautical users, operating with a low gain hemispherical coverage antenna element, low effective radiated power, and low antenna gain-to-system noise temperature ratio.

  10. Method for calculating longitudinal microstrip antennas in planar phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indenbom, M. V.

    The characteristics of longitudinal microstrip antennas in a planar phased array are examined on the basis of the application of the finite element method to an integral equation for the 'charge' on the microstrip line. Microstrip dipoles, and Yagi and log-periodic antennas are examples of such radiators. The analysis takes into account the complex configuration of the conductors, both current components, and the presence of dielectric substrates and a protective coating.

  11. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  12. Phased-array design for MST and ST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    All of the existing radar systems fully dedicated to clear-air radar studies use some type of phased-array antennas. The effects of beam-steering techniques including feed networks and phase shifters; sidelobe control; ground-clutter suppression; low altitude coverage; arrays with integrated radiating elements and feed networks; analysis of coaxial-collinear antennas; use of arrays with multiple beams; and array testing and measure on structural design of the antenna are discussed.

  13. A 32-GHz phased array transmit feed for spacecraft telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. A.; Rascoe, D. L.; Crist, R. A.; Huang, J.; Wamhof, P. D.; Lansing, F. S.

    1992-01-01

    A 21-element phased array transmit feed was demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 34 GHz for future deep-space missions. Antenna pattern measurements demonstrating electronic beam steering of the two-dimensional array are reported and compared with predictions based on measured performance of MMIC-based phase shifter and amplifier modules and Vivaldi slotline radiating elements.

  14. MEMS-based phased arrays for army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Paul B.; Holt, James C.; Mullins, James H.; Hudson, Tracy; Rock, Janice

    2007-04-01

    The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) initiated a research and development project several years ago to develop Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based phased arrays to provide rapid beam steering for sensors, optical and Radio Frequency (RF) missile seekers, and RF communication links. In particular, the joint AMRDEC/Army Research Laboratory (ARL) project, which leverages low-cost phased array components developed under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Low Cost Cruise Missile Defense (LCCMD) project, is developing RF switches, phase shifters, and passive phased sub-arrays to provide a fast scanning capability for pointing, acquisition, tracking, and data communication; and rugged, optical MEMS-based phased arrays to be employed in small volume, low-cost Laser Detection and Ranging (LADAR) seekers. The current status of the project is disclosed in this paper. Critical technical challenges, which include design and fabrication of the RF switches and phase shifters, design and fabrication of micro lens arrays, control of beam steering, scanning angular resolution and array losses, are discussed. Our approach to overcoming the technical barriers and achieving required performance is also discussed. Finally, the validity of a MEMS technology approach against competing low cost technologies is presented.

  15. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection of Seeded Titanium Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, J. H.; Gray, T. A.; Khandelwal, P.; Dunhill, T.

    2004-02-01

    As part of efforts by Rolls-Royce to evaluate the use of ultrasonic phased arrays for inspection of titanium billets, a series of ultrasonic phased array inspections were performed at the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE). The inspections were performed using a sectorial-annular array designed especially for titanium billets by R/D Tech and supplied to Rolls-Royce. The billet test piece is seeded with thirteen yttria disks, each located at successive depths below the outer diameter surface to just past the billet centerline. The phased array inspections employed both fixed-focus and dynamic-depth-focus (DDF) focal laws in conjunction with several depth gating schemes. Aperture and focal parameters were changed as a function of depth when using fixed-focus focal laws. Results include characterization of transducer performance and delay-time correction of imperfections, signal-to-noise measurements for the yttria disks in the billet test piece, and effects of probe misalignment on flaw sensitivity.

  16. Mobile high frequency vibrator system

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, D.W.; Buller, P.L.

    1985-01-08

    A carrier mounted seismic vibrator system that is primarily adapted for generation of high force, high frequency seismic energy into an earth medium. The apparatus includes first and second vibrators as supported by first and second lift systems disposed in tandem juxtaposition generally centrally in said vehicle, and the lift systems are designed to maintain equal hold-down force on the vibrator coupling baseplates without exceeding the weight of the carrier vehicle. The juxtaposed vibrators are then energized in synchronized relationship to propagate increased amounts of higher frequency seismic energy into an earth medium.

  17. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study. Volume 1: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.; Gerson, H. I.; Srinivas, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The status of the technologies for phased-array-fed dual reflector systems is reviewed. The different aspects of these technologies, including optical performances, phased array systems, problems encountered in phased array design, beamforming networks, MMIC design and its incorporation into waveguide systems, reflector antenna structures, and reflector deployment mechanisms are addressed.

  18. Phased Arrays of Ground and Airborne Mobile Terminals for Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1996-01-01

    Phased array antenna is beginning to play an important in the arena of mobile/satellite communications. Two examples of mobile terminal phased arrays will be shown. Their technical background, challenges, and cost drivers will be discussed. A possible solution to combat some of the deficiencies of the conventional phased array by exploiting the phased reflectarray technology will be briefly presented.

  19. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  20. Jet Noise Source Localization Using Linear Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Ferni A.; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to further clarify the interpretation and application of linear phased array microphone results, for localizing aeroacoustics sources in aircraft exhaust jet. Two model engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array position was varied as well to determine best location for the array. The results showed that it is possible to resolve jet noise sources with bypass and other components separation. The results also showed that a focused near field image provides more realistic noise source localization at low to mid frequencies.

  1. 2-D scalable optical controlled phased-array antenna system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maggie Yihong; Howley, Brie; Wang, Xiaolong; Basile, Panoutsopoulos; Chen, Ray T.

    2006-02-01

    A novel optoelectronically-controlled wideband 2-D phased-array antenna system is demonstrated. The inclusion of WDM devices makes a highly scalable system structure. Only (M+N) delay lines are required to control a M×N array. The optical true-time delay lines are combination of polymer waveguides and optical switches, using a single polymeric platform and are monolithically integrated on a single substrate. The 16 time delays generated by the device are measured to range from 0 to 175 ps in 11.6 ps. Far-field patterns at different steering angles in X-band are measured.

  2. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection Simulations of Welded Components at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.; Schumacher, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate inspections of welded components have become of increasing importance as NASA develops new hardware such as Ares rocket segments for future exploration missions. Simulation and modeling will play an increased role in the future for nondestructive evaluation in order to better understand the physics of the inspection process and help explain the experimental results. It will also help to prove or disprove the feasibility for an inspection method or inspection scenario, help optimize inspections, and allow to a first approximation limits of detectability. This study presents simulation and experimental results for an ultrasonic phased array inspection of a critical welded structure important for NASA future exploration vehicles.

  3. Welding Process Feedback and Inspection Optimization Using Ultrasonic Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, D. L.; Neau, G. N.; Davis, W. B.

    2009-03-01

    Measurements performed on friction-stir butt welds in aluminum and resistance spot welds in galvanized steel are used to illustrate how ultrasonic phased arrays can be used to provide high-resolution images of welds. Examples are presented that demonstrate how information extracted from the ultrasonic signals can be used to provide reliable feedback to welding processes. Modeling results are used to demonstrate how weld inspections can be optimized using beam-forming strategies that help overcome the influence of surface conditions and part distortion.

  4. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for Radio Frequency and Optical Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic integrated circuits offer radiation-hardened solutions for satellite systems in addition to improved size, weight, power, and bandwidth characteristics. ODIS, Inc., has developed optoelectronic integrated circuit technology for sensing and data transfer in phased arrays. The technology applies integrated components (lasers, amplifiers, modulators, detectors, and optical waveguide switches) to a radio frequency (RF) array with true time delay for beamsteering. Optical beamsteering is achieved by controlling the current in a two-dimensional (2D) array. In this project, ODIS integrated key components to produce common RF-optical aperture operation.

  5. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas Keith; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discussed a novel phased array with an emphasis to simplify the array feed. Specifically, we will demonstrate a simple, low cost feeding approach by mechanically controlling the substrate thickness. The array feed lines are constructed from parallel plate transmission lines whose thickness are adjusted to control their effective dielectric constant (Epsilon_eff). As a result the phase delay/excitation at each array element will be adjusted per desired beam direction. The proposed antenna elements will be overlapping dipoles operating over a 2:1 bandwidth in the Ku-Band spectrum. Preliminary simulation and experimental demonstration of such an array will be presented.

  6. SAR processing with stepped chirps and phased array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Wideband radar signals are problematic for phased array antennas. Wideband radar signals can be generated from series or groups of narrow-band signals centered at different frequencies. An equivalent wideband LFM chirp can be assembled from lesser-bandwidth chirp segments in the data processing. The chirp segments can be transmitted as separate narrow-band pulses, each with their own steering phase operation. This overcomes the problematic dilemma of steering wideband chirps with phase shifters alone, that is, without true time-delay elements.

  7. High frequency dynamic nuclear polarization.

    PubMed

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K; Swager, Timothy M; Temkin, Richard J; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-09-17

    During the three decades 1980-2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical, and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = 1/2 species (13)C or (15)N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, such as (17)O or (27)Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime, roughly 150-660 GHz, and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades, scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  8. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  9. Special Aspects in Designing High - Frequency Betatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, A. A.; Kasyanov, S. V.; Kasyanov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to designing the high - frequency betatron. In high - frequency betatron most important problem is overheating of the elements of the body radiator unit. In an article some directions of solving this problem are shown.

  10. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  11. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  12. Manipulating Liquids With Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    1999-01-01

    High-intensity ultrasound waves can produce the effects of "Acoustic Radiation Pressure" (ARP) and "acoustic streaming." These effects can be used to propel liquid flows and to apply forces that can be used to move or manipulate floating objects or liquid surfaces. NASA's interest in ARP includes the remote-control agitation of liquids and the manipulation of bubbles and drops in liquid experiments and propellant systems. A high level of flexibility is attained by using a high-power acoustic phased array to generate, steer, and focus a beam of acoustic waves. This is called an Acoustic Radiation Pressure Phased Array, or ARPPA. In this approach, many acoustic transducer elements emit wavelets that converge into a single beam of sound waves. Electronically coordinating the timing, or "phase shift," of the acoustic waves makes it possible to form a beam with a predefined direction and focus. Therefore, a user can direct the ARP force at almost any desired point within a liquid volume. ARPPA lets experimenters manipulate objects anywhere in a test volume. This flexibility allow it to be used for multiple purposes, such as to agitate liquids, deploy and manipulate drops or bubbles, and even suppress sloshing in spacecraft propellant tanks.

  13. Simplified System Efficiency Functions for Linear Phased-Array Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetan, F. J.; Gray, T. A.; Huang, Ruiju

    2010-02-01

    Computer models are often used to simulate ultrasonic inspections of industrial components. One ingredient of such simulations is a frequency dependent function which describes the efficiency of the inspection system for converting electrical energy to sound and vice versa. For a phased-array transducer there are many such efficiency functions, namely one for each independent pair of piezoelectric elements. In this paper we describe a simplified, approximate approach for specifying these functions. Element-to-element differences are accounted for by two "residual" parameters: (1) a strength factor which describes the relative "hotness" of an element compared to its peers; and (2) a time delay which describes the extent to which an element fires later or earlier than its peers when all elements are instructed to fire in unison. These residuals are used to relate the system efficiency function for any pair of elements to that of an average efficiency which can be readily measured. The use of this approach is demonstrated using front-wall and back-wall responses from a stainless steel block, as acquired using a 5-MHz, 32-element, linear phased-array transducer. Good agreement was found between measured and simulated surface responses.

  14. A 220 GHz reflection-type phased array concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Wikner, David A.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this project is to enable light-weight, durable, and portable systems capable of performing standoff detection of person-borne improvised explosive devices (PB-IEDs) through the development of millimeter-wave reflection-type phased arrays. Electronic beam steering eliminates the need for complex mechanical scanners that are commonly implemented with millimeter-wave imaging systems and would reduce overall system size and weight. We present a concept study of a 220 GHz reflection-type phased array for the purpose of performing beam scanning of a confocal reflector system. Requirements for effective imaging of the desired target region are established, including spatial resolution, total scan angle, and number of image pixels achievable. We examine the effects of array architecture on beam characteristics as it is scanned off broadside, including Gaussicity and encircled energy. Benchmark requirements are determined and compared with the capabilities of several potential phase shifter technologies, including MEMS-based variable capacitor phase shifters, switches, and varactor diode-based phase shifters.

  15. Application of Phased-array Vibrator System in shallow oil shale exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Lin, J.; Xu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Due to the huge oil and gas demands in China, exploration of unconventional oil shale at shallow depths becomes more critical. 52.83% of the identified reserves in China are from Jilin province and Nong'an is one of the main areas of oil shale in Jilin. The average buried depth of oil shale in Nong'an is between 300m and 800m. Since explosive sources are not allowed to operate in civil area and the inconvenience of vibroseis, Phased-array Vibrator System (PAVS) is applied in the exploration of oil shale in Nong'an. We have developed a series electromagnetic Portable High-frequency Vibrator System (PHVS), including single, combination, and phased-array modes. Single mode is the simplest mode, with output force less than 500N, and thus is only suitable for engineering seismic prospecting. Combination mode is a source array, which uses a controller to synchronize all vibrator units and let them work consistently with each other. Thus, it can increase output force than single case. The field test indicates that it can improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of reflected waves in deep layer significantly. However, it contributes little for signals from shallow layers and sometimes it can even deteriorate shallow reflected signals than single source. This is because for signals reflected from shallow depths, the assumption in combination mode that seismic waves propagate along vertical rays is no longer valid. Therefore, they are not stacked constructively. Phased-array mode belongs to a new source array, whose key part is so-called delay/phase controller. By coordinating the signal of each unit using the controller, the seismic waves can be beamed into any interested direction, based on the underground structure and the depth of interested reflected layer. In this case, SNR of the concerned reflected wave can be improved apparently. PHVS in phased-array mode is called PAVS. We made two field tests to evaluate the performance of PAVS. In the first test, we compare PAVS with

  16. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  17. Receiver Would Control Phasing of a Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Charles E.; Young, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    In a proposed digital signal-processing technique, a radio receiver would control the phasing of a phased-array antenna to aim the peaks of the antenna radiation pattern toward desired signal sources while aiming the nulls of the pattern toward interfering signal sources. The technique was conceived for use in a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, for which the desired signal sources would be GPS satellites and typical interference sources would be terrestrial objects that cause multipath propagation. The technique could also be used to optimize reception in spread-spectrum cellular-telephone and military communication systems. During reception of radio signals in a conventional phased-array antenna system, received signals at their original carrier frequencies are phase-shifted, then combined by analog circuitry. The combination signal is then subjected to down-conversion and demodulation. In a system according to the proposed technique (see figure), the signal received by each antenna would be subjected to down-conversion, spread-spectrum demodulation, and correlation; this processing would be performed separately from, and simultaneously with, similar processing of signals received by the other antenna elements. Following analog down-conversion to baseband, the signals would be digitized, and all subsequent processing would be digital. In the digital process, residual carriers would be removed and each signal would be correlated with a locally generated model pseudorandum-noise code, all following normal GPS procedure. As part of this procedure, accumulated values would be added in software and the resulting signals would be phase-shifted in software by the amounts necessary to synthesize the desired antenna directional gain pattern of peaks and nulls. The principal advantage of this technique over the conventional radio-frequency-combining technique is that the parallel digital baseband processing of the signals from the various antenna elements would be

  18. Pressurized high frequency thermoacoustic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Nicholas D.

    Acoustic heat engines show much promise for converting waste heat to electricity. Since most applications require high power levels, high frequency thermoacoustic engines can reach such performance by operating with a pressurized working gas. Results on a 3 kHz prime mover, consisting of a quarter-wave resonator and a random stack material between two heat exchangers, show that the acoustic power from such a device is raised substantially as the working gas is pressurized. At pressures up to approximately 10 bar, the increase in acoustic power is approximately linear to the increase in pressure, and thus is an effective way to increase the power output of thermoacoustic engines. Since the heat input was not changed during the experiments, the increases in acoustic power translate directly to increases in engine efficiency which is calculated as the output acoustic power divided by the input heat power. In most experiments run in this study, the engine efficiency increased by a factor of at least 4 as the pressure was increased from 2 bar up to about 10 bar. Further increases in pressure lead to acoustic power saturation and eventual attenuation. This is most likely due to a combination of several factors including the shrinking thermal penetration depth, and the fact that the losses increase faster with pressure in a random stack material than in traditional parallel plates. Pressurization also leads to a lower DeltaT for onset of oscillations in the range of 10 bar of mean pressure, potentially opening up even more heat sources that can power a thermoacoustic engine. Results from another 3 kHz engine, one that was pressurized itself as opposed to being placed in a pressurized chamber, are also presented. The configuration of this engine solves the problem of how to simultaneously pressurize the engine and inject heat into the hot heat exchanger. It was also noted that the geometry of the resonator cavity in the quarter wavelength pressurized engine plays an

  19. Fabrication and characterization of a hybrid SOI 1×4 silicon-slot optical modulator array incorporating EO polymers for optical phased-array antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Richard S.; Szep, Attila; Usechak, Nicholas G.; Chen, Antao; Sun, Haishan; Shi, Shouyuan; Abeysinghe, Don; You, Young-Hwan; Dalton, Larry R.

    2012-03-01

    Optical phased arrays are promising candidates for both RF signal processing and optical beam forming and steering. These platforms not only enable accurate electrically controlled beam steering at high frequencies but also have the potential to significantly improve the performance of future free-space optical communications systems. In this work we exploit recent advancements in both nano-scale hybrid silicon-slot waveguides and electro-optic (EO) polymers to demonstrate an integrated optical phased-array antenna. Specifically, we create a hybrid integrated "photonic circuit" that connects an array of optical phase modulators, fed by a common optical signal and a 1x4 splitter, to a compact optical waveguide diffraction array for optical beam steering applications. The fundamental characteristics of the resulting integrated optical beam former, including the optical insertion loss, driving voltage, and phase control from the waveguide aperture are summarized in this letter.

  20. The frequency response of phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, B. C.

    1989-02-01

    The phased-array antenna will be examined from the point of view of effects caused by changes in frequency. Both simple linear arrays and the more complex conformal array are examined. For the conformal array, a comparison between a corporate-feed structure and a row series-feed structure is included. There are two primary effects which will be discussed: beam-pointing errors and distortion of large bandwidth signals. A formula for estimating the operating or tunable array bandwidth for narrow-bandwidth signals is derived. An expression for the wide-bandwidth-signal transfer function is also obtained and examined. It will be shown that the transfer function depends both on the array scan angle and the position within the mainbeam.

  1. The frequency response of phased-array antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, B.C.

    1989-02-01

    The phased-array antenna will be examined from the point of view of effects caused by changes in frequency. Both simple linear arrays and the more complex conformal array are examined. For the conformal array, a comparison between a corporate-feed structure and a row series-feed structure is included. There are two primary effects which will be discussed: beam-pointing errors and distortion of large bandwidth signals. A formula for estimating the operating or tunable array bandwidth for narrow-bandwidth signals is derived. An expression for the wide-bandwidth-signal transfer function is also obtained and examined. It will be shown that the transfer function depends both on the array scan angle and the position within the mainbeam. 25 figs.

  2. Low Noise Performance Perspectives Of Wideband Aperture Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woestenburg, E. E. M.; Kuenen, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    A general analysis of phased array noise properties and measurements, applied to one square meter tiles of the Thousand Element Array (THEA), has resulted in a procedure to define the noise budget for a THEA-tile (Woestenburg and Dijkstra, 2003). The THEA system temperature includes LNA and receiver noise, antenna connecting loss, noise coupling between antenna elements and other possible contributions. This paper discusses the various noise contributions to the THEA system temperature and identifies the areas where improvement can be realized. We will present better understanding of the individual noise contributions using measurements and analysis of single antenna/receiver elements. An improved design for a 1-m2 Low Noise Tile (LNT) will be discussed and optimized low noise performance for the LNT is presented. We will also give future perspectives of the noise performance for such tiles, in relation to the requirements for SKA in the 1 GHz frequency range.

  3. Hyperthermia and inhomogeneous tissue effects using an Annular Phased Array

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, P.F.

    1984-08-01

    A regional hyperthermia Annular Phased Array (APA) applicator is described, and examples of its various heating patterns, obtained by scanning the electric fields with a small E-field sensor, are illustrated. Also shown are the effects of different frequencies of an elliptical phantom cylinder having a 1-cm-thick artificial fat wall and the general dimensions of the human trunk. These studies show the APA's ability to achieve uniform heating at lower frequencies (below 70 MHz) or to focus central heating at moderately higher frequencies (above 70 MHz). The influence of human anatomical contours in altering heating patterns is discussed using results obtained with a female mannequin having a thin latex shell filled with tissue-equivalent phantom. Field perturbations caused by internally embedded low-dielectric structures are presented, showing the localized effects of small objects whose surfaces are perpendicular to the electric field.

  4. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOEpatents

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  5. Subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Akihiro; Sugawara, Azusa; Ohara, Yoshikazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To accurately measure closed crack length, we proposed an imaging method using a subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic waves (SAW SPACE) with water immersion. We applied SAW SPACE to the hole specimen in a fundamental array (FA) image. The hole was imaged with high resolution. Subsequently, SAW SPACE was applied to fatigue crack and stress corrosion crack (SCC) specimens. A fatigue crack was imaged in FA and subharmonic array (SA) images, and the length of this particular fatigue crack measured in the images was almost the same as that measured by optical observation. The SCC was imaged and its length was accurately measured in the SA image, whereas it was underestimated in the FA image and by optical observation. Thus, we demonstrated that SAW SPACE with water immersion is useful for the accurate measurement of closed crack length and for imaging the distribution of open and closed parts of cracks with high resolution.

  6. Phased array antenna investigation for CubeSat size satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Kien

    Increasing bandwidth of the communication link has been a challenge for CubeSat class satellite. Traditional satellites usually utilizes high gain antennas for this purpose, but these antenna are rarely seen in CubeSat because of its power, volume and weight constraints. To solve these issues, this dissertation presents a phased array antenna system prototyped at 2.45 GHz with 17.7 dBi gain at broadside, 14.2 dBi at +/-40°, 50 MHz bandwidth, and fits on a side of a 3U CubeSat. The gain can be increased by adding more antenna elements into the array as needed. Testing for electronic beam steering has been completed and detailed results will be presented.

  7. Cylindrical Antenna With Partly Adaptive Phased-Array Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Ziad; Hilland, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    A proposed design for a phased-array fed cylindrical-reflector microwave antenna would enable enhancement of the radiation pattern through partially adaptive amplitude and phase control of its edge radiating feed elements. Antennas based on this design concept would be attractive for use in radar (especially synthetic-aperture radar) and other systems that could exploit electronic directional scanning and in which there are requirements for specially shaped radiation patterns, including ones with low side lobes. One notable advantage of this design concept is that the transmitter/ receiver modules feeding all the elements except the edge ones could be identical and, as a result, the antenna would cost less than in the cases of prior design concepts in which these elements may not be identical.

  8. Phased-Array Measurements of Single Flow Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Lee, Sang Soo

    2005-01-01

    A 16 microphone phased-array system has been successfully applied to measure jet noise source distributions. In this study, a round convergent nozzle was tested at various hot and cold flow conditions: acoustic Mach numbers are between 0.35 and 1.6 and static temperature ratios are varied from cold to 2.7. The classical beamforming method was applied on narrowband frequencies. From the measured source distributions locations of peak strength were tracked and found to be very consistent between adjacent narrowband frequencies. In low speed heated and unheated jets, the peak source locations vary smoothly from the nozzle exit to downstream as the frequency is decreased. When the static temperature ratio was kept constant, the peak source position moved downstream with increasing acoustic Mach number for the Strouhal numbers smaller than about 1.5. It was also noted that the peak source locations of low frequencies occur farther downstream than the end of potential core.

  9. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Increased capacity in future satellite systems can be achieved through antenna systems which provide multiplicity of frequency reuses at K sub a band. A number of antenna configurations which can provide multiple fixed spot beams and multiple independent spot scanning beams at 20 GHz are addressed. Each design incorporates a phased array with distributed MMIC amplifiers and phasesifters feeding a two reflector optical system. The tradeoffs required for the design of these systems and the corresponding performances are presented. Five final designs are studied. In so doing, a type of MMIC/waveguide transition is described, and measured results of the breadboard model are presented. Other hardware components developed are described. This includes a square orthomode transducer, a subarray fed with a beamforming network to measure scanning performance, and another subarray used to study mutual coupling considerations. Discussions of the advantages and disadvantages of the final design are included.

  10. Feasibility of Using Lateral Mode Coupling Method for a Large Scale Ultrasound Phased Array for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    A hemispherical-focused, ultrasound phased array was designed and fabricated using 1372 cylindrical piezoelectric transducers that utilize lateral coupling for noninvasive transcranial therapy. The cylindrical transducers allowed the electrical impedance to be reduced by at least an order of magnitude, such that effective operation could be achieved without electronic matching circuits. In addition, the transducer elements generated the maximum acoustic average surface intensity of 27 W/cm2. The array, driven at the low (306 kHz) or high frequency (840 kHz), achieved excellent focusing through an ex vivo human skull and an adequate beam steering range for clinical brain treatments. It could electronically steer the ultrasound beam over cylindrical volumes of 100 mm in diameter and 60 mm in height at 306 kHz, and 30-mm in diameter and 30-mm in height at 840 kHz. A scanning laser vibrometer was used to investigate the radial and length mode vibrations of the element. The maximum pressure amplitudes through the skull at the geometric focus were predicted to be 5.5 MPa at 306 kHz and 3.7 MPa at 840 kHz for RF power of 1 W on each element. This is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using cylindrical transducer elements and lateral coupling in construction of ultrasound phased arrays. PMID:19695987

  11. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-12-31

    Outline: Discuss far-side weld problem and phased array techniques applied. Describe laboratory work on flawed piping specimens using L- and S-wave arrays and provide synopsis of results. Discuss conclusions ofr capability of phased array as applied to austenitic welds. Research Approach: Evaluate phased arrays on unifornly-welded piping specimens. Apply best methods to non-uniform welds. Correlate acoustic responses as function of weld microstructures.

  12. Further Development of a Conformable Phased Array Device for Inspection Over Irregular Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2008-02-01

    Further development of a conformable phased array device that allows reliable ultrasonic inspection of components with irregular surfaces has been undertaken. The device uses a standard linear phased array transducer, which is coupled to the surface under test by a water path, encapsulated by a low loss, castable polyurethane rubber membrane. It is shown that the conformable membrane coupled phased array device provides a solution for ultrasonic inspection around the weld region of welded pipes.

  13. Development of ultrasonic phased array systems for applications in tube and pipe inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanming; Yuan, Qingshan; Sun, Zhigang; Logan, Kevin; Lam, Clive

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports the development of ultrasonic phased array systems used for tubular inspection. First the design of a linear phased array is discussed with considerations of both theoretically and practically important factors. Then systems utilizing the linear phased array are introduced for different applications. To evaluate the system performance, tests were performed on flat bottom holes and artificial notches, including notches in longitudinal, transverse, and oblique orientations made according to API specifications. Test results have been presented.

  14. Broadband phased array transducer design with frequency-controlled two-dimensional capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafy, Amin

    1998-05-01

    With the wide acceptance of ultrasound medical imaging as the non-invasive diagnostic modality of choice, sonography equipment must offer the tools to complete the diagnosis, including multi-frequency operation for difficult-to-image patients. The trade-off between greater depth of penetration at low frequency for large organs and the improved detail resolution at high frequency is an essential capability that necessitates wideband transducer design and matching system hardware. This paper presents a phased array transducer design with variable ceramic thickness in the elevation direction. The design offers tow major contributions: first, -6dB round trip fractional bandwidth is increased by as much as 120 percent. This is done by controlling the thickness of the crystal from the middle to the outer edge. Since each sampling point in the crystal resonates freely at half wavelength in its fundamental mode, extended bandwidth is achieved for the single element in the phased array. This method has considerable advantage over the usual methods, such as backing the transducer with a matched lossy material. The drawback to backing the transducer is that the acoustic power consumed by the backing represents a severe insertion loss, especially if optimum bandwidth is desired. The second contribution of this design is the use of software to control the elevation slice thickness with axial symmetry around the 2D imaging plane. This is done by controlling the excitation frequency on transmit, and filtering on receive, thereby controlling the transmit and receive apertures independently during imaging. Compared to the standard elevation sampled 1.5D or 2D arrays with an increased number of hardware system channels and extensive cable wires needed, the new design offers simplicity and cost effectiveness. This represents a key development, especially with the advent of second harmonic imaging, both from a point of view of bandwidth requirement and slice thickness on receive. This

  15. High-frequency synthetic ultrasound array incorporating an actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Timothy A.; Shrout, Thomas R.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasound imaging at frequencies above 20 MHz relies almost exclusively on single-element transducers. IN order to apply array technology at these frequencies, several practical problems must be solved, including spatial scale and fabrication limitations, low device capacitance, and lack of a hardware beamformer. One method of circumventing these problems is to combine an array, an actuator, and a synthetic aperture software beamformer. The array can use relatively wide elements spaced on a coarse pitch. The actuator is used to move the array in short steps (less than the element pitch), and pulse-echo data is acquired at intermediate sample positions. The synthetic aperture beamformer reconstructs the image from the pulse-echo data. A 50 MHz example is analyzed in detail. Estimates of signal-to-noise reveal performance comparable to a standard phased array; furthermore, the actuated array requires half the number of elements, the elements are 8x wider, and only one channel is required. Simulated three-dimensional point spread functions demonstrate side lobe levels approaching - 40dB and main beam widths of 50 to 100 microns. A 50 MHz piezo-composite array design has been tested which displays experimental bandwidth of 70% while maintaining high sensitivity. Individual composite sub-elements are 18 microns wide. Once this array is integrated with a suitable actuator, it is anticipated that a tractable method of imaging with high frequency arrays will result.

  16. Cantilever RF-MEMS for monolithic integration with phased array antennas on a PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Armenta, C. J.; Porter, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development and operation of a novel electrostatic metal-to-metal contact cantilever radio-frequency microelectromechanical system (RF-MEMS) switch for monolithic integration with microstrip phased array antennas (PAAs) on a printed circuit board. The switch is fabricated using simple photolithography techniques on a Rogers 4003c substrate, with a footprint of 200 µm × 100 µm, based on a 1 µm-thick copper cantilever. An alternative wet-etching technique for effectively releasing the cantilever is described. Electrostatic and electromagnetic measurements show that the RF-MEMS presents an actuation voltage of 90 V for metal-to-metal contact, an isolation of -8.7 dB, insertion loss of -2.5 dB and a return loss of -15 dB on a 50 Ω microstrip line at 12.5 GHz. For proof-of-concept, a beam-steering 2 × 2 microstrip PAA, based on two 1-bit phase shifters suitable for the monolithic integration of the RF-MEMS, has been designed and measured at 12.5 GHz. Measurements show that the beam-steering system presents effective radiation characteristics with scanning capabilities from broadside towards 29° in the H-plane.

  17. PARAS program: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakubowski, Antoni K.; Haynes, David A.; Nuss, Ken; Hoffmann, Chris; Madden, Michael; Dungan, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBLI) scheme, would allow higher (than currently available) angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps, and the ability of observing rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using a passive phases array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150 meter diameter dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data is transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory pane is a hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and bottom triangle. Attitude control and stationkeeping functions are performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and six hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by a nuclear reactor. The total mass of the spacecraft is 22,060 kg.

  18. Project PARAS: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, Kenneth; Hoffmann, Christopher; Dungan, Michael; Madden, Michael; Bendakhlia, Monia

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) scheme, would allow higher than currently available angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps and the ability to observe rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using passive phased array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150-m diameter antenna dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data are transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory panel is a novel hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and the bottom triangle. Attitude control and station keeping functions will be performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and four hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by either a photovoltaic array or a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The total mass of the spacecraft is about 20,500 kg.

  19. Thermal dispersion method for an ultrasonic phased-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Euna; Lee, Wonseok; Roh, Yongrae

    2016-07-01

    When the driving voltage of an ultrasonic transducer is increased to improve the quality of ultrasound images, heat is generated inside the transducer, which can burn the patient’s skin and degrade transducer performance. In this study, the method to disperse the heat inside an ultrasonic phased-array transducer has been examined. The mechanism of temperature rise due to heat generation inside the transducer was investigated by numerical analysis and the effects of the thermal properties of the components of the transducer such as specific heat and thermal conductivity on the temperature rise were analyzed. On the basis of the results, a heat-dispersive structure was devised to reduce the temperature at the surface of the acoustic lens of the transducer. Prototype transducers were fabricated to check the efficacy of the heat-dispersive structure. By experiments, we have confirmed that the new heat-dispersive structure can reduce the internal temperature by as much as 50% in comparison with the conventional structure, which confirms the validity of the thermal dispersion mechanism developed in this work.

  20. Experimental assessment of phased-array heating of neck tumours.

    PubMed

    Gross, E J; Cetas, T C; Stauffer, P R; Liu, R L; Lumori, M L

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of phased-array microwave systems (PAMS) for non-invasively inducing hyperthermia, primarily in neck lesions, has been done with implications for applications at other sites such as lung and pelvis. Our general approach was to combine numerical and analytical approaches with parallel experimental studies. In this paper we will concentrate only on the experimental aspects. The object, such as a homogeneous cylindrical phantom or a neck phantom, was encircled with several standard applicators driven by a single source, but with relative phase and amplitude control over each applicator. The relative phases of the applicators were adjusted by using an implanted monopole antenna connected to an HP network analyser. Power was applied and the specific absorption rate (SAR) was determined by using split phantoms and thermography or by measuring temperature transients dT/dt, recorded by implanted thermometer probes. We found that at 915 MHz for our applicators (SMA Co.) the centre of an 11 cm diameter muscle-like phantom heated to about 33% of the value at the surface in front of the applicator. Similarly, we were able to show significant SAR at the centre of realistically sized neck phantoms using four phased apertures of 915 MHz. Furthermore, substantial improvement was observed if the frequency was lowered to about 400 MHz. PMID:2324581

  1. Performance limits of planar phased array with dome lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geren, W. P.; Taylor, Michael

    1998-10-01

    Communication systems based on low-earth-orbit (LEO) satellites have generated a requirement for high-performance phased array antennas with exceptional gain, sidelobe levels, and axial ratio over broad scan angles and 360 degree azimuth coverage. One approach to mitigating the effects of scan dependence is to cover the planar array with a hemispherical lens, or dome, which implements passive or active phase correction of the scanned beam. The phase correction over the dome surface may be represented as the function (Delta) (Phi) ((theta) , (phi) ), with (theta) and (phi) the polar and azimuth angles in a coordinate system having z-axis normal to the array. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance improvement achievable with such an ideal lens. Three cases were considered: a conventional lens with fixed optimum phase correction, an active lens with scan-dependent phase correction a function of polar angle only, and an active lens with phase correction a function of polar and azimuthal angles. In all cases, the planar array distribution had a fixed radial Taylor amplitude distribution and a phase taper consisting of a linear beam-pointing term and a non-linear focusing term.

  2. Evolutionary Adaptive Discovery of Phased Array Sensor Signal Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Milos Manic

    2011-05-01

    Tomography, used to create images of the internal properties and features of an object, from phased array ultasonics is improved through many sophisiticated methonds of post processing of data. One approach used to improve tomographic results is to prescribe the collection of more data, from different points of few so that data fusion might have a richer data set to work from. This approach can lead to rapid increase in the data needed to be stored and processed. It also does not necessarily lead to have the needed data. This article describes a novel approach to utilizing the data aquired as a basis for adapting the sensors focusing parameters to locate more precisely the features in the material: specifically, two evolutionary methods of autofocusing on a returned signal are coupled with the derivations of the forumulas for spatially locating the feature are given. Test results of the two novel methods of evolutionary based focusing (EBF) illustrate the improved signal strength and correction of the position of feature using the optimized focal timing parameters, called Focused Delay Identification (FoDI).

  3. Theory of metascreen-based acoustic passive phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Qi, Shuibao; Badreddine Assouar, M.

    2016-04-01

    The metascreen-based acoustic passive phased array provides a new degree of freedom for manipulating acoustic waves due to their fascinating properties, such as a fully shifting phase, keeping impedance matching, and holding subwavelength spatial resolution. We develop acoustic theories to analyze the transmission/reflection spectra and the refracted pressure fields of a metascreen composed of elements with four Helmholtz resonators (HRs) in series and a straight pipe. We find that these properties are also valid under oblique incidence with large angles, with the underlying physics stemming from the hybrid resonances between the HRs and the straight pipe. By imposing the desired phase profiles, the refracted fields can be tailored in an anomalous yet controllable manner. In particular, two types of negative refraction are exhibited, based on two distinct mechanisms: one is formed from classical diffraction theory and the other is dominated by the periodicity of the metascreen. Positive (normal) and negative refractions can be converted by simply changing the incident angle, with the coexistence of two types of refraction in a certain range of incident angles.

  4. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, David; Lafon, Cyril; Prat, Frederic; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-12-01

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm-2. By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  5. Matrix phased arrays for the inspection of CFRP-components

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutzbruck, M.; Brackrock, D.; Brekow, G.; Montag, H.-J.; Boehm, R.; Illerhaus, B.

    2014-02-18

    Lightweight components are increasingly used in different industrial sectors such as transportation, energy generation and automotive. This growing field includes different types of CFRP-structures, hybrid materials and glued components showing - compared to their pure metallic counterparts- a significant more complicated structure in terms of internal interfaces and anisotropy of material parameters. In this work we present the use of matrix phased array to increase the amount of obtained information to enhance the inspection quality. We used different types of carbon materials such as 6 mm thick uni- and bidirectional prepreg specimens containing impact damages. The latter were introduced with different energy levels ranging from 1.3 to 7.2 J. By scanning a 2.25 MHz matrix array with 6 × 10 elements above the prepreg surface and using different angels of incidence a complete 3D-image was generated which allows the detection of defects as small as 1mm in a depth of 4 mm. A comparison with conventional approaches show that the signal-to-noise ratio can be highly increased. This enables us to visualize the region of damage within the impact zone, clearly showing the cone-like damage distribution along increasing material depth. The detection quality allows the estimation of the opening angles of the cone shaped damage, which can be used for further evaluation and quantitation of energy dependent impact damages.

  6. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-18

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  7. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  8. Evolutionary Design of a Phased Array Antenna Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Linden, Derek; Lohn, Jason

    2006-01-01

    We present an evolved S-band phased array antenna element design that meets the requirements of NASA's TDRS-C communications satellite scheduled for launch early next decade. The original specification called for two types of elements, one for receive only and one for transmit/receive. We were able to evolve a single element design that meets both specifications thereby simplifying the antenna and reducing testing and integration costs. The highest performance antenna found using a genetic algorithm and stochastic hill-climbing has been fabricated and tested. Laboratory results are largely consistent with simulation. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years its computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Many antenna types have been investigated, including wire antennas, antenna arrays and quadrifilar helical antennas. In particular, our laboratory evolved a wire antenna design for NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. This antenna has been fabricated, tested, and is scheduled for launch on the three spacecraft in 2006.

  9. High power compatible internally sensed optical phased array.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lyle E; Ward, Robert L; Francis, Samuel P; Sibley, Paul G; Fleddermann, Roland; Sutton, Andrew J; Smith, Craig; McClelland, David E; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2016-06-13

    The technical embodiment of the Huygens-Fresnel principle, an optical phased array (OPA) is an arrangement of optical emitters with relative phases controlled to create a desired beam profile after propagation. One important application of an OPA is coherent beam combining (CBC), which can be used to create beams of higher power than is possible with a single laser source, especially for narrow linewidth sources. Here we present an all-fiber architecture that stabilizes the relative output phase by inferring the relative path length differences between lasers using the small fraction of light that is back-reflected into the fiber at the OPA's glass-air interface, without the need for any external sampling optics. This architecture is compatible with high power continuous wave laser sources (e.g., fiber amplifiers) up to 100 W per channel. The high-power compatible internally sensed OPA was implemented experimentally using commercial 15 W fiber amplifiers, demonstrating an output RMS phase stability of λ/194, and the ability to steer the beam at up to 10 kHz. PMID:27410363

  10. Multiple-frequency phased array patterns for therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, John R.; Liu, Dalong; Casper, Andrew J.; Wan, Yayun; Almekkawy, Mohamed; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2012-10-01

    Modern transducer technology allows for the design and implementation of therapeutic arrays with relatively wide bandwidths (>50%) and low cross coupling between elements. We present results from a 3.5 MHz, 64-element prototype designed for small-animal and superficial therapeutic HIFU applications (Imasonic, Inc.) This transducer has a 58% 6-dB fractional BW average on its elements allowing for therapeutic output in the frequency range of 2.7 - 4.6 MHz. We present a simulation/experimental study to evaluate and optimize the focusing capabilities of the phased array prototype when excited by multiple-frequency components. Preliminary results have shown that multiple-frequency excitation may be beneficial in enhancing the therapeutic effects of HIFU beams. A multiple-focus pattern synthesis algorithm for arrays excited by multiple-frequency signals has been developed and tested using linear pressure field simulations. The algorithm maintains the precise phase relationship between the frequency components at each focal spot to achieve a desirable outcome. Hydrophone measurements to validate the approach show that nonlinear effects at the focal location are more prominent with the frequency mixing compared to conventional single frequency excitation. An in vitro study of lesion formation in freshly excised porcine liver was investigated.

  11. Matrix phased arrays for the inspection of CFRP-components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzbruck, M.; Brackrock, D.; Brekow, G.; Montag, H.-J.; Boehm, R.; Illerhaus, B.

    2014-02-01

    Lightweight components are increasingly used in different industrial sectors such as transportation, energy generation and automotive. This growing field includes different types of CFRP-structures, hybrid materials and glued components showing - compared to their pure metallic counterparts- a significant more complicated structure in terms of internal interfaces and anisotropy of material parameters. In this work we present the use of matrix phased array to increase the amount of obtained information to enhance the inspection quality. We used different types of carbon materials such as 6 mm thick uni- and bidirectional prepreg specimens containing impact damages. The latter were introduced with different energy levels ranging from 1.3 to 7.2 J. By scanning a 2.25 MHz matrix array with 6 × 10 elements above the prepreg surface and using different angels of incidence a complete 3D-image was generated which allows the detection of defects as small as 1mm in a depth of 4 mm. A comparison with conventional approaches show that the signal-to-noise ratio can be highly increased. This enables us to visualize the region of damage within the impact zone, clearly showing the cone-like damage distribution along increasing material depth. The detection quality allows the estimation of the opening angles of the cone shaped damage, which can be used for further evaluation and quantitation of energy dependent impact damages.

  12. KPAF (K-band phased array feed) instrument concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Lisa; Claude, Stéphane; Bornemann, Jens; Henke, Doug; Di Francesco, James; Jiang, Frank; Garcia, Dominic; Wevers, Ivan; Niranjanan, Pat

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical surveys are demanding more throughput from telescope receivers. Currently, microwave/millimeter telescopes with mature cryogenic single pixel receivers are upgrading to multi-pixel receivers by replacing the conventional feed horns with phased array feeds (PAFs) to increase the field of view and, thus, imaging speeds. This step in astronomy instrumentation has been taken by only a few research laboratories world-wide and primarily in Lband (0.7-1.5 GHz). We present a K-band (18-26 GHz) 5x5 modular PAF to demonstrate the feasibility of higher frequency receiving arrays. The KPAF system includes a tapered slot antenna array, a cryogenic commercial GaAs MMIC amplifier block, and a mixing stage to down-convert to L band for an existing beamformer. The noise temperature and power budget are outlined. Full antenna S-parameters and far-field beam patterns are simulated and measured using both planar near-field and far-field techniques. Cryogenic and room temperature amplifier noise measurements with varying bias levels are presented.

  13. Ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging technology for NDT of offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Baohua; Wang, Hua; Liang, Yongning; Duan, Zhongdong; Ou, Jinping

    2008-03-01

    In order to improve inspection result repetition and flaw ration veracity of manual ultrasonic inspection of offshore platform structure, an ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging technology for NDT of offshore platform structures is proposed in this paper. Aimed at the practical requirement of tubular joint welds inspection of offshore platform structures, the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system for offshore platform structures is developed, which is composed of computer, ultrasonic circuit system, scanning device, phased array transducer and inspection imaging software system. The experiment of Y shape tubular joint model of 60 degree is performed with the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system for offshore platform structures, the flaws characteristic could be exactly estimated and the flaws size could be measured through ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging software system for offshore platform structures. Experiment results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging technology for offshore platform structures is feasible, the ultrasonic phased array inspection imaging system could detect flaws in tubular joint model, the whole development trend of flaws is factually imaging by the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology of offshore platform structures.

  14. Phased array beamforming and imaging in composite laminates using guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Yu, Lingyu

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the phased array beamforming and imaging using guided waves in anisotropic composite laminates. A generic phased array beamforming formula is presented, based on the classic delay-and-sum principle. The generic formula considers direction-dependent guided wave properties induced by the anisotropic material properties of composites. Moreover, the array beamforming and imaging are performed in frequency domain where the guided wave dispersion effect has been considered. The presented phased array method is implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) to detect multiple simulated defects at different locations in an anisotropic composite plate. The array is constructed of scan points in a small area rapidly scanned by the SLDV. Using the phased array method, multiple simulated defects at different locations are successfully detected. Our study shows that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  15. Phased Array Beamforming and Imaging in Composite Laminates Using Guided Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Yu, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the phased array beamforming and imaging using guided waves in anisotropic composite laminates. A generic phased array beamforming formula is presented, based on the classic delay-and-sum principle. The generic formula considers direction-dependent guided wave properties induced by the anisotropic material properties of composites. Moreover, the array beamforming and imaging are performed in frequency domain where the guided wave dispersion effect has been considered. The presented phased array method is implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) to detect multiple defects at different locations in an anisotropic composite plate. The array is constructed of scan points in a small area rapidly scanned by the SLDV. Using the phased array method, multiple defects at different locations are successfully detected. Our study shows that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  16. High frequency oscillations in the intact brain

    PubMed Central

    Buzsáki, György; da Silva, Fernando Lopes

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs) constitute a novel trend in neurophysiology that is fascinating neuroscientists in general, and epileptologists in particular. But what are HFOs? What is the frequency range of HFOs? Are there different types of HFOs, physiological and pathological? How are HFOs generated? Can HFOs represent temporal codes for cognitive processes? These questions are pressing and this symposium volume attempts to give constructive answers. As a prelude to this exciting discussion, we summarize the physiological high frequency patterns in the intact brain, concentrating mainly on hippocampal patterns, where the mechanisms of high frequency oscillations are perhaps best understood. PMID:22449727

  17. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Phased Array Demonstrated With ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) arrays developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rome Laboratory were demonstrated in aeronautical terminals and in mobile or fixed Earth terminals linked with NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Four K/Ka-band experimental arrays were demonstrated between May 1994 and May 1995. Each array had GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The 30-GHz transmit array used in uplinks to ACTS was developed by Lewis and Texas Instruments. The three 20-GHz receive arrays used in downlinks from ACTS were developed in cooperation with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force integrated-circuit, active-phased-array development contracts with the Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin Corporation. Four demonstrations, each related to an application of high interest to both commercial and Department of Defense organizations, were conducted. The location, type of link, and the data rate achieved for each of the applications is shown. In one demonstration-- an aeronautical terminal experiment called AERO-X--a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the Lewis Learjet and ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice links (and in one case, interactive video links as well) between ACTS and an Army high-mobility, multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV, or "humvee"). In the fourth demonstration, the array was on a fixed mount and was electronically steered toward ACTS. Lewis served as project manager for all demonstrations and as overall system integrator. Lewis engineers developed the array system including a controller for open-loop tracking of ACTS during flight and HMMWV motion, as well as a laptop data display and recording system used in all demonstrations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory supported the AERO-X program, providing elements of the ACTS Mobile Terminal. The successful

  18. Airborne ultrasonic phased arrays using ferroelectrets: a new fabrication approach.

    PubMed

    Ealo, Joao L; Camacho, Jorge J; Fritsch, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    In this work, a novel procedure that considerably simplifies the fabrication process of ferroelectret-based multielement array transducers is proposed and evaluated. Also, the potential of ferroelectrets being used as active material for air-coupled ultrasonic transducer design is demonstrated. The new construction method of multi-element transducers introduces 2 distinctive improvements. First, active ferroelectret material is not discretized into elements, and second, the need of structuring upper and/or lower electrodes in advance of the permanent polarization of the film is removed. The aperture discretization and the mechanical connection are achieved in one step using a through-thickness conductive tape. To validate the procedure, 2 linear array prototypes of 32 elements, with a pitch of 3.43 mm and a wide usable frequency range from 30 to 300 kHz, were built and evaluated using a commercial phased-array system. A low crosstalk among elements, below -30 dB, was measured by interferometry. Likewise, a homogeneous response of the array elements, with a maximum deviation of +/-1.8 dB, was obtained. Acoustic beam steering measurements were accomplished at different deflection angles using a calibrated microphone. The ultrasonic beam parameters, namely, lateral resolution, side lobe level, grating lobes, and focus depth, were congruent with theory. Acoustic images of a single reflector were obtained using one of the array elements as the receiver. Resulting images are also in accordance with numerical simulation, demonstrating the feasibility of using these arrays in pulse-echo mode. The proposed procedure simplifies the manufacturing of multidimensional arrays with arbitrary shape elements and not uniformly distributed. Furthermore, this concept can be extended to nonflat arrays as long as the transducer substrate conforms to a developable surface. PMID:19406714

  19. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, G.E.; Loudin, W.J.; Paton, D.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The development of reliable mechanistic models for prediction of conventional and fluidized-bed combustor and gasifier operation and solids flow behavior in silos or other solids handling and storage components requires knowledge of the contained solids flow characteristics. This knowledge is gained from dynamic experimental measurements of bed top surface contours in addition to measurements of bulk bed properties. The surface contour mapping system (SCMS) provides a means of generating surface contour maps in real time with a unique, automatically focused, density-compensated, digital phased-array scanning, ultrasonic-range measurement system. The system is designed to operate in environments having gas temperatures up to 1,600 {degree}F and pressures to 1,000 psig. Computer simulation of several SCMS candidates and acoustic carrier modulation techniques indicates that a surface measurement resolution of {plus_minus}2 inches over a range of 5 to 20 feet distance between the transmit/receive (T/R) transducers and the bed surface can be expected. The simulation of a particular design, a 9-T/R, 25-pixel bed surface, in which the level of each pixel was randomly set between 5 and 7 feet below the plane of the T/R transducers, then measured using two different modulation techniques, produced excellent results. The simulation of this surface contour mapping system determined the value of the level of each of the 25 pixels to within {plus_minus}1 inch for over 95 percent of more than 100 test cases for one of the modulation techniques, and for over 99 percent of about 100 test cases for a second modulation technique. A hardware implementation of the design simulated but using only a two-T/R, three-pixel SCMS produced results very closely approximating those obtained during the simulation.

  20. High-speed 32×32 MEMS optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megens, Mischa; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-03-01

    Optical phased arrays (OPAs) with fast response time are of great interest for various applications such as displays, free space optical communications, and lidar. Existing liquid crystal OPAs have millisecond response time and small beam steering angle. Here, we report on a novel 32×32 MEMS OPA with fast response time (<4 microseconds), large field of view (+/-2°), and narrow beam divergence (0.1°). The OPA is composed of high-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors which function as phase shifters. Relative to beam steering systems based on a single rotating MEMS mirror, which are typically limited to bandwidths below 50 kHz, the MEMS OPA described here has the advantage of greatly reduced mass and therefore achieves a bandwidth over 500 kHz. The OPA is fabricated using deep UV lithography to create submicron mechanical springs and electrical interconnects, enabling a high (85%) fill-factor. Each HCG mirror is composed of only a single layer of polysilicon and achieves >99% reflectivity through the use of a subwavelength grating patterned into the mirror's polysilicon surface. Conventional metal-coated MEMS mirrors must be thick (1- 50 μm) to prevent warpage arising from thermal and residual stress. The single material construction used here results in a high degree of flatness even in a thin 400 nm HCG mirror. Beam steering is demonstrated using binary phase patterns and is accomplished with the help of a closed-loop phase control system based on a phase-shifting interferometer that provides in-situ measurement of the phase shift of each mirror in the array.

  1. W-band Phased Array Systems using Silicon Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Young

    This thesis presents the silicon-based on-chip W-band phased array systems. An improved quadrature all-pass filter (QAF) and its implementation in 60--80 GHz active phase shifter using 0.13 microm SiGe BiCMOS technology is presented. It is demonstrated that with the inclusion of an Rs/R in the high Q branches of C and L, the sensitivity to the loading capacitance, therefore the I/Q phase and amplitude errors are minimized. This technique is especially suited for wideband millimeter-wave circuits where the loading capacitance (CL) is comparable to the filter capacitance (C). A prototype 60--80 GHz active phased shifter using the improved QAF is demonstrated. The overall chip size is 1.15 x 0.92 mm2 with the power consumption of 108 mW. The measured S11 and S22 are < -10 dB at 60--80 GHz and 60--73 GHz, respectively. The measured average power gain is 11.0--14.7 dB at 60--79 GHz with the rms gain error of < 1.3 dB at 60--78 GHz for 4-bit phase states. And the rms phase error is < 9.1 degree at 60--78.5 GHz showing wideband 4-bit performance. The measured NF is 9--11.6 dB at 63--75 GHz and the measured P 1dB is -27 dBm at 70 GHz. In another project, a 67--78 GHz 4-bit passive phase shifter using 0.13 microm CMOS switches is demonstrated. The phase shifter is based on a low-pass pi-network. The chip size is 0.45 x 0.3 mm2 without pads and consumes virtually no power. The measured S11 and S22 is < -10 dB at 67--81 GHz for all 16 phase states. The measured gain of 4-bit phase shifter is -19.2 +/- 3.7 dB at 77 GHz with the rms gain error of < 11.25 degree at 67--78 GHz. And the measured rms phase error is < 2.5 dB at 67--78 GHz. The measured P1dB is > 8 dBm and the simulated IIP3 is > 22 dBm. A low-power 76--84 GHz 4-element phased array receiver using the designed passive phase shifter is presented. The power consumption is minimized by using a single-ended design and alternating the amplifiers and phase shifter cells to result in a low noise figure at a low power

  2. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  3. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  4. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  5. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm. PMID:23482053

  6. Impact: a low cost, reconfigurable, digital beamforming common module building block for next generation phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Lee; Hoffmann, Ted; Fulton, Caleb; Yeary, Mark; Saunders, Austin; Thompson, Dan; Chen, Bill; Guo, Alex; Murmann, Boris

    2015-05-01

    Phased array systems offer numerous advantages to the modern warfighter in multiple application spaces, including Radar, Electronic Warfare, Signals Intelligence, and Communications. However, a lack of commonality in the underlying technology base for DoD Phased Arrays has led to static systems with long development cycles, slow technology refreshes in response to emerging threats, and expensive, application-specific sub-components. The IMPACT module (Integrated Multi-use Phased Array Common Tile) is a multi-channel, reconfigurable, cost-effective beamformer that provides a common building block for multiple, disparate array applications.

  7. Pulse-Echo Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Pat H.

    2010-01-01

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading. Keywords: Phased Array, Ultrasonics, Composites, Out-of-Autoclave

  8. Phased Array Inspection of Titanium Disk Forgings Targeting no. 1/2 FBH Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.A.; Friedl, J.

    2005-04-09

    The phased array implementation of a focused zoned ultrasonic inspection to achieve a >3dB signal-to-noise for no. 1/2 flat bottom holes (FBH) in titanium is reported. Previous work established the ultrasound focusing required to achieve the targeted sensitivity. This work reports on the design of a phased array transducer capable of maintaining the needed focus to the depths required in the forging inspection. The performance of the phased array inspection is verified by examining signal-to-noise of no. 1/2 FBHs contained in coupons cut from actual forgings.

  9. A portable ultrasonic phased array device for tabular joint weld inspection of offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Baohua; Li, Jingan; Duan, Zhongdong; Ou, Jinping; Shen, Wei

    2012-05-01

    To meet the inspection need for complex tabular joints weld of offshore platform structures, a portable ultrasonic phased array inspection device is developed. The integrated device is small and portable. As designed, the device can implement different algorithm of the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology. With proposed inspection plan, the experiment of Y tubular joint model was performed in lab. Experiment results indicate that the possible ultrasonic phased array inspection device can detect and visualize the flaws on Y tubular joint weld, which are nearly consistent with the actual condition.

  10. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  11. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  12. New customizable phased array UT instrument opens door for furthering research and better industrial implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, Gavin; Ginzel, Robert

    2014-02-18

    Phased array UT as an inspection technique in itself continues to gain wide acceptance. However, there is much room for improvement in terms of implementation of Phased Array (PA) technology for every unique NDT application across several industries (e.g. oil and petroleum, nuclear and power generation, steel manufacturing, etc.). Having full control of the phased array instrument and customizing a software solution is necessary for more seamless and efficient inspections, from setting the PA parameters, collecting data and reporting, to the final analysis. NDT researchers and academics also need a flexible and open platform to be able to control various aspects of the phased array process. A high performance instrument with advanced PA features, faster data rates, a smaller form factor, and capability to adapt to specific applications, will be discussed.

  13. Monolithic optical integrated control circuitry for GaAs MMIC-based phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Ponchak, G. E.; Kascak, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) show promise in phased-array antenna applications for future space communications systems. Their efficient usage will depend on the control of amplitude and phase signals for each MMIC element in the phased array and in the low-loss radiofrequency feed. For a phased array contining several MMIC elements a complex system is required to control and feed each element. The characteristics of GaAs MMIC's for 20/30-GHz phased-array systems are discussed. The optical/MMIC interface and the desired characteristics of optical integrated circuits (OIC's) for such an interface are described. Anticipated fabrication considerations for eventual full monolithic integration of optical integrated circuits with MMIC's on a GaAs substrate are presented.

  14. Development of components for an S-band phased array antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The system requirements, module test data, and S-band phased array subsystem test data are discussed. Of the two approaches to achieving antenna gain (mechanically steered reflector or electronically steered phased array), the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost (size, weight, power, and dollars) for this medium gain. A competitive system design is described as well as hardware evaluation which will lead to timely availability of this technology for implementing such a system. The objectives of the study were: to fabricate and test six engineering model transmit/receive microelectronics modules; to design, fabricate, and test one dc and logic multilayer manifold; and to integrate and test an S-band phased array antenna subsystem composed of antenna elements, seven T/R modules, RF manifolds and dc manifold.

  15. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Phased Array Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-05-31

    This study maps the phased array-generated acoustic sound fields through three types of CASS microstructure in four specimens to quantitatively assess the beam formation effectiveness in these materials.

  19. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  20. An Update on Phased Array Results Obtained on the GE Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane

    2013-01-01

    Beamform maps have been generated from 1) simulated data generated by the LINPROP code and 2) actual experimental phased array data obtained on the GE Counter-rotating open rotor model. The beamform maps show that many of the tones in the experimental data come from their corresponding Mach radius. If the phased array points to the Mach radius associated with a tone then it is likely that the tone is a result of the loading and thickness noise on the blades. In this case, the phased array correctly points to where the noise is coming from and indicates the axial location of the loudest source in the image but not necessarily the correct vertical location. If the phased array does not point to the Mach radius associated with a tone then some mechanism other than loading and thickness noise may control the amplitude of the tone. In this case, the phased array may or may not point to the actual source. If the source is not rotating it is likely that the phased array points to the source. If the source is rotating it is likely that the phased array indicates the axial location of the loudest source but not necessarily the correct vertical location. These results indicate that you have to be careful in how you interpret phased array data obtained on an open rotor since they may show the tones coming from a location other than the source location. With a subsonic tip speed open rotor the tones can come form locations outboard of the blade tips. This has implications regarding noise shielding.

  1. Phased-array grating compression for high-energy chirped pulse amplification lasers.

    PubMed

    Cotel, A; Castaing, M; Pichon, P; Le Blanc, C

    2007-03-01

    The development of phased-array grating compressor is a crucial issue for high-energy, ultra-short pulse petawatt-class lasers. We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of two-grating phasing in a broadband pulse mosaic compressor. The phase defaults induced by misaligned gratings are studied. Monochromatic grating phasing is experimentally achieved with an interferometric technique and pulse compression is demonstrated with a two-phased-array grating system. PMID:19532511

  2. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, S.; Engel, J.; Kimbrough, D.; Suits, M.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination that was developed for the examination of a limited access circumferential Inconel 718 fusion weld of a Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle - Cone. The paper discusses the selection and formation criteria used for the phased array focal laws, the reference standard that simulated hardware conditions, the examination concept, and results. Several unique constraints present during this examination included limited probe movement to a single axis and one-sided access to the weld.

  3. Infinite phased array of microstrip dipoles in two layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaneda, Jesus A.

    1989-01-01

    A method has been devised for the analysis of the infinite printed strip dipole array in a two layer microstrip substrate structure. The complete dynamic Green's function appropriate to the two-layer substrate-superstrate structure was used in the formulation of the method of moments solution. In this way all the substrate effects, including the surface wave related phenomena, have been included in the development and solution. The solution provides a means by which the most important performance characteristics of the finite-but-large phase-scanned microstrip array can be studied. Attention has been focused on the characterization of the active input impedance as a function of the equivalent scan angle.

  4. Optical phased array using single crystalline silicon high-contrast-gratings for beamsteering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Megens, Mischa; Sun, Tianbo; Yang, Weijian; Rao, Yi; Horsley, David A.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.

    2013-03-01

    We present a single crystalline silicon optical phased array using high-contrast-gratings (HCG) for fast two dimensional beamforming and beamsteering at 0.5 MHz. Since there are various applications for beamforming and beamsteering such as 3D imaging, optical communications, and light detection and ranging (LIDAR), it is great interest to develop ultrafast optical phased arrays. However, the beamsteering speed of optical phased arrays using liquid crystal and electro-wetting are typically limited to tens of milliseconds. Optical phased arrays using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies can operate in the submegahertz range, but generally require metal coatings. The metal coating unfortunately cause bending of mirrors due to thermally induced stress. The novel MEMS-based optical phased array presented here consists of electrostatically driven 8 × 8 HCG pixels fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The HCG mirror is designed to have 99.9% reflectivity at 1550 nm wavelength without any reflective coating. The size of the HCG mirror is 20 × 20 μm2 and the mass is only 140 pg, much lighter than traditional MEMS mirrors. Our 8 × 8 optical phased array has a total field of view of +/-10° × 10° and a beam width of 2°. The maximum phase shift regarding the actuation gap defined by a 2 μm buried oxide layer of a SOI wafer is 1.7π at 20 V.

  5. A study program on large aperture electronic scanning phased array antennas for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Fundamental phased array theory and performance parameters are discussed in terms of their application to microwave radiometry, and four scanning phased arrays representing current examples of state-of-the-art phased array technology are evaluated for potential use as components of the multispectral antenna system for the space shuttle imaging microwave system (SIMS). A discussion of problem areas, both in performance and fabrication is included, with extrapolations of performance characteristics for phased array antennas of increased sizes up to 20 m by 20 m. The possibility of interlacing two or more phased arrays to achieve a multifrequency aperture is considered, and, finally, a specific antenna system is recommended for use with SIMS.

  6. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers.

    PubMed

    Vanapalli, S; ter Brake, H J M; Jansen, H V; Zhao, Y; Holland, H J; Burger, J F; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-04-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pressure oscillator is presented with the aim to power a micropulse tube cryocooler operating between 300 and 80 K, delivering a cooling power of 10 mW. Piezoelectric actuators operate efficiently at high frequencies and have high power density making them good candidates as drivers for high frequency pressure oscillator. The pressure oscillator described in this work consists of a membrane driven by a piezoelectric actuator. A pressure ratio of about 1.11 was achieved with a filling pressure of 2.5 MPa and compression volume of about 22.6 mm(3) when operating the actuator with a peak-to-peak sinusoidal voltage of 100 V at a frequency of 1 kHz. The electrical power input was 2.73 W. The high pressure ratio and low electrical input power at high frequencies would herald development of microminiature cryocoolers. PMID:18447548

  7. Transponder System for High-Frequency Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, C. L.; Shores, P. W.; Kobayashi, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    Transponder system uses phase difference between transmitted and reflected high-frequency radio waves to measure distance to target. To suppress spurious measurements of reflections from objects near target at transmitted frequency and its harmonics, transponder at target generates return signal at half transmitted frequency. System useful in such applications as surveying, docking of ships, and short-range navigation.

  8. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  9. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  10. Piezoelectric phased array acousto-ultrasonic interrogation of damage in thin plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purekar, Ashish S.

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) and Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) systems can provide substantial benefits for aging aerospace systems as well as newer systems still in the design process. In aging aerospace systems, a retrofitted SHM system would alert users of incipient damage preventing catastrophic failure. For newer systems, incorporating a SHM approach and using CBM techniques can reduce life-cycle costs. Central to such SHM and CBM systems is the ability to detect damage in a structure. Traditional approaches to damage detection in structures involve one of two methods. In the modal dynamics approach, the natural frequencies and modeshapes of a structure shift when damage occurs. The location, type, and amount of damage is determined by the shifts in the modal properties due to damage. Alternately, in an Ultrasonics approach, the structure is scanned with a specialized transducer which induces high frequency vibrations in the structure. Damage in the structure is inferred when these vibrations are altered. In the same vein as Ultrasonics, Acoustic Emission based methods listen for energy release in the structure upon defect growth. All of these techniques have limitations which hinder their usage in a practical system. This thesis attempts to develop a methodology with the benefits of the modal approach as well as the Ultrasonics/Acoustic Emission approach. The methodology is commonly referred to as an Acousto-Ultrasonic technique for damage detection. The structural dynamics of plate structures is described as wavelike in nature where the plate is a medium for wave propagation. For thin plates, bulk wave propagation is described using Lamb wave modes. The two fundamental modes of wave propagation are the in-plane acoustic mode and the transverse bending mode. The interaction of these waves with a discontinuity or damaged region changes the way the waves propagate. Part of the incident wavefront is reflected back while the rest is transmitted through

  11. Piezoelectric Behaviour of Sputtered Aluminium Nitride Thin Film for High Frequency Ultrasonic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, T.; Walter, S.; Bartzsch, H.; Gittner, M.; Gloess, D.; Heuer, H.

    2011-06-01

    Many new materials and processes require non destructive evaluation in higher resolutions by phased array ultrasonic techniques in a frequency range up to 250 MHz. This paper presents aluminium nitride, a promising material for the use as a piezoelectric sensor material in the considered frequency range, which contains the potential for high frequency phased array application in the future. This work represents the fundamental development of piezoelectric aluminium nitride films with a thickness of up to 10 μm. We have investigated and optimized the deposition process of the aluminium nitride thin film layers regarding their piezoelectric behavior. Therefore a specific test setup and a measuring station were created to determine the piezoelectric charge constant (d33) and the electro acoustic behavior of the sensor. Single element transducers were deposited on silicon substrates with aluminium electrodes for top and bottom, using different parameters for the magnetron sputter process, like pressure and bias voltage. Afterwards acoustical measurements up to 500 MHz in pulse echo mode have been carried out and the electrical and electromechanical properties were qualified. In two different parameter sets for the sputtering process excellent piezoelectric charge constant of about 8.0 pC/N maximum were obtained.

  12. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  13. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  14. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  15. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period. PMID:12199947

  16. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  17. Investigating a stepped ultrasonic phased array transducer for the evaluation and characterization of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohenick, M.; Blickley, E.; Tittmann, B. R.; Kropf, M.

    2007-04-01

    Previous work has led to the design, simulation, and development of a linear phased array transducer. The intention of the array is to be used as a non-destructive ultrasonic device to monitor and evaluate the health of a given specimen. The phased array has been manufactured and tested for the detection and characterization of defects on a target. The array was fabricated with a four-row "stepped" design with four wires to transfer data and one wire for grounding. The "stepped" design allows for the interrogation of a larger region using time delays and beam sweeping without the use of additional electrical channels. The array was designed to be utilized in a water immersion environment with about one inch between the array and the target specimen. An OmniScan MX system was used to operate the phased array and perform real-time linear and sectorial scans on a set of rectangular plates. S-scans allow for beam sweeping over an angle range as well as adjustments for time delays and a true-depth display. The array was operated with sixteen active elements and an angle range of 0 to 30 degrees. The phased array was tested with a variety of targets and was used to investigate and characterize different types of defects such as cracking, warping, and corrosion. The ability of the phased array to distinguish between defect types as well as resolve defect size was evaluated.

  18. A Study of Phased Array Antennas for NASA's Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Huang, John; Cesarone, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we briefly discuss various options but focus on the feasibility of the phased arrays as a viable option for this application. Of particular concern and consideration will be the cost, reliability, and performance compared to the present 70-meter antenna system, particularly the gain/noise temperature levels in the receive mode. Many alternative phased arrays including planar horizontal arrays, hybrid mechanically/electronically steered arrays, phased array of mechanically steered reflectors, multi-faceted planar arrays, phased array-fed lens antennas, and planar reflect-arrays are compared and their viability is assessed. Although they have many advantages including higher reliability, near-instantaneous beam switching or steering capability, the cost of such arrays is presently prohibitive and it is concluded that the only viable array options at the present are the arrays of a few or many small reflectors. The active planar phased arrays, however, may become feasible options in the next decade and can be considered for deployment in smaller configurations as supplementary options.

  19. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  20. Nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam models and measurement models for phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Gang, Tie

    2009-01-01

    A nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model is proposed in order to overcome the limitation that paraxial Gaussian beam models lose accuracy in simulating the beam steering behavior of phased array transducers. Using this nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model, the focusing and steering sound fields generated by an ultrasonic linear phased array transducer are calculated and compared with the corresponding results obtained by paraxial multi-Gaussian beam model and more exact Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral model. In addition, with help of this novel nonparaxial method, an ultrasonic measurement model is provided to investigate the sensitivity of linear phased array transducers versus steering angles. Also the comparisons of model predictions with experimental results are presented to certify the accuracy of this provided measurement model. PMID:18774152

  1. Free space optical communication link using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Pruessner, Marcel; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Park, Doe; Fleet, Erin; DePrenger, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Many components for free space optical communication systems have shrunken in size over the last decade. However, the steering systems have remained large and power hungry. Non-mechanical beam steering offers a path to reducing the size of these systems. Optical phased arrays can allow integrated beam steering elements. One of the most important aspects of an optical phased array technology is its scalability to a large number of elements. Silicon photonics can potentially offer this scalability using CMOS foundry techniques. In this paper a small-scale silicon photonic optical phased array is demonstrated for both the transmitter and receiver functions in a free space optical link. The device using an array of thermo-optically controlled waveguide phase shifters and demonstrates one-dimensional steering with a single control electrode. Transmission of a digitized video data stream over the link is shown.

  2. Phased-array antenna control by a monolithic photonic integrated circuit, COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, S.H.; Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.; Meyer, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems are well known for rapid beam steering and their ability to bring high power to the target. Such systems are also quite complex and heavy, which have limited their usefulness. The issues of weight, size, power use, and complexity have been addressed through a system named COMPASS (Coherent Optical Monolithic Phased Array Steering System). All phased-array antenna systems need: (1) small size; (2) low power use; (3) high-speed beam steering; and (4) digitally-controlled phase shifting. COMPASS meets these basic requirements, and provides some very desirable additional features. These are: (1) phase control separate from the transmit/receive module; (2) simple expansion to large arrays; (3) fiber optic interconnect for reduced sensitivity to EMI; (4) an intrinsically radiation-hard GaAs chip; and (5) optical power provided by a commercially available continuous wave (CW) laser. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Adhesive defect detection in composite adhesive joints using phased array transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2015-03-01

    Composite materials are widely used in aircraft structures due to their high specific stiffness and strength. The laminated nature of composite structures makes them subject to disbond and delamination. These types of defects will compromise the integrity of the structure and therefore need to be monitored. To monitor aircraft structures, light weight transducers capable of large area coverage are beneficial. Ultrasonic guided waves are able to travel long distance and are sensitive to localized defects. The multi-modal characteristic of propagating guided waves requires optimal mode selection and excitation. Phased array transducers provide good versatility for optimal mode excitation since they can excite different guided wave modes preferentially. Phased array transducers designed for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications are employed in this work to study the interaction between adhesive defects and guided wave modes. Amplitude ratios and wave packet composition are utilized as defect indicators that are uniquely available due to the phased array transducers.

  4. Partially coherent analysis of imaging and interferometric phased arrays: noise, correlations, and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Withington, Stafford; Saklatvala, George; Hobson, Michael P

    2006-06-01

    Phased arrays are of considerable importance for far-infrared, submillimeter-wave, and microwave astronomy; they are also being developed for areas as diverse as optical switching, radar, and radio communications. We present a discretized, modal theory of imaging and interferometric phased arrays. It is shown that the average powers, field correlations, power fluctuations, and correlations between power fluctuations at the output ports of an imaging, or interferometric, phased array can be determined for a source in any state of spatial coherence and polarization, once the synthesized beam patterns are known. It is not necessary to know anything about the internal construction of the beam-forming networks; indeed, the beam patterns can be taken from experimental data. The synthesized beams can be nonorthogonal and even linearly dependent. Our theory leads to many conceptual insights and opens the way to a range of new design and simulation techniques. PMID:16715152

  5. Phased array feed design technology for Large Aperture Microwave Radiometer (LAMR) Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuman, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the potential and limitations of phased array antennas in space-based geophysical precision radiometry is described. Mathematical models exhibiting the dependence of system and scene temperatures and system sensitivity on phased array antenna parameters and components such as phase shifters and low noise amplifiers (LNA) are developed. Emphasis is given to minimum noise temperature designs wherein the LNA's are located at the array level, one per element or subarray. Two types of combiners are considered: array lenses (space feeds) and corporate networks. The result of a survey of suitable components and devices is described. The data obtained from that survey are used in conjunction with the mathematical models to yield an assessment of effective array antenna noise temperature for representative geostationary and low Earth orbit systems. Practical methods of calibrating a space-based, phased array radiometer are briefly addressed as well.

  6. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  7. High frequency ultrasonic mitigation of microbial corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahamedh, Hussain H.; Meegan, G. Douglas; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.; Spear, John R.

    2012-05-01

    Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion (MIC) is a major problem in oil industry facilities, and considerable effort has been spent to mitigate this costly issue. More environmentally benign methods are under consideration as alternatives to biocides, among which are ultrasonic techniques. In this study, a high frequency ultrasonic technique (HFUT) was used as a mitigation method for MIC. The killing percentages of the HFUT were higher than 99.8 percent and their corrosivity on steel was reduced by more than 50 percent. The practice and result will be discussed.

  8. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  9. Inviscid fluid in high frequency excitation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of high frequency excitations (HFE) on a fluid is investigated. The response to these excitations is decomposed in two parts: 'slow' motion, which practically remains unchanged during the vanishingly small period tau, and 'fast' motion whose value during this period is negligible in terms of displacements, but is essential in terms of the kinetic energy. After such a decomposition the 'slow' and 'fast' motions become nonlinearly coupled by the corresponding governing equations. This coupling leads to an 'effective' potential energy which imparts some 'elastic' properties to the fluid and stabilizes laminar flows.

  10. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  11. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  12. Self compensating phase control for Venetian blind steering in phased arrays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohle, R. H.; Stubbs, D. M.

    1988-10-01

    The term "self compensating phase control" is a name for the approach to use the rotation of each array element (e.g. telescopes) in the phased array to provide most of the large optical path length shift required for phasing during a phased array look angle shift by individual telescope slew (i.e. venetian blind steering). The optical train configuration discussed here provides about 97% of the optical path length compensation required for a slew of ±20 degrees from the array normal. This greatly reduces the amplitude required of the piston control mirror.

  13. Pulse-echo phased array ultrasonic inspection of pultruded rod stitched efficient unitized structure (PRSEUS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, P. H.

    2011-06-23

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading.

  14. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam-forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  15. A design concept for an MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Smetana, Jerry; Acosta, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka proposed design, which concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required.

  16. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection for an Isogrid Structural Element with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.; Schumacher, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this investigation, a T-shaped aluminum alloy isogrid stiffener element used in aerospace applications was inspected with ultrasonic phased array methods. The isogrid stiffener element had various crack configurations emanating from bolt holes. Computational simulation methods were used to mimic the experiments in order to help understand experimental results. The results of this study indicate that it is at least partly feasible to interrogate this type of geometry with the given flaw configurations using phased array ultrasonics. The simulation methods were critical in helping explain the experimental results and, with some limitation, can be used to predict inspection results.

  17. Simulation of Transrib HIFU Propagation and the Strategy of Phased-array Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Mingjun

    Liver ablation is challenging in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) because of the presence of ribs and great inhomogeneity in multi-layer tissue. In this study, angular spectrum approach (ASA) has been used in the wave propagation from phased-array HIFU transducer, and diffraction, attenuation and the nonlinearity are accounted for by means of second order operator splitting method. Bioheat equation is used to simulate the subsequent temperature elevation and lesion formation with the formation of shifted focus and multiple foci. In summary, our approach could simulate the performance of phased-array HIFU in the clinics and then develop an appropriate treatment plan.

  18. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design, and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  19. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  20. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  1. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  2. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  3. Leaf Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles W.

    1985-01-01

    Using many different media, students can turn leaves into images which can be used for study, bulletin boards, collections, and identification. The simple techniques described include pastel printing, smoke prints, ink or tempura printing, bleach printing on t-shirts, ditto machine printing using carbon paper, and making cutouts. (DH)

  4. Printed-Circuit Cross-Slot Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foy, Wong; Chung, Hsien-Hsien; Peng, Sheng Y.

    1990-01-01

    Coupling between perpendicular slots suppressed. Balanced feed configuration minimizes coupling between slots of printed-circuit cross-slot antenna unit. Unit and array have conventional cavity-backed-printed-circuit, crossed-slot antenna design. Strip-line feeders behind planar conductive antenna element deliver power to horizontal slot in opposite phase. As result, little or no power propagates into vertical slot. Similar considerations apply to strip lines that feed vertical slot. Units of this type elements of phased-array antennas for radar, mobile/satellite communications, and other applications requiring flush mounting and/or rapid steering of beams with circular polarization.

  5. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased-Array Ultrasonic Probes.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-08-05

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of phased-array ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of these welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm diameter, 36mm thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches range in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through wall to 64% through wall. The welds were examined with two phased-array probes, a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive longitudinal wave array and a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive shear wave array. These examinations showed that both phased-array transducers were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, all of the notches and flaws through the welds. The phased-array results were not strongly affected by the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  6. Solid-state retrodirective phased array concepts for microwave power transmission from Solar Power Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, K. G.; Petroff, I. K.

    1980-01-01

    Two prototype solid-state phased array systems concepts for potential use in the Solar Power Satellite are described. In both concepts, the beam is centered on the rectenna by means of phase conjugation of a pilot signal emanating from the ground. Also discussed is on-going solid-state amplifier development.

  7. Characteristics of block-periodic phased-array antennas with circular polarization of the radiated field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhoded, Iu. V.; Mironnikov, A. S.

    1990-02-01

    The paper presents results of a numerical investigation of the directivity characteristics of a block-periodic waveguide phased-array antenna with circular polarization of the radiated field. The advantages of this array from the viewpoint of maximining the ellipticity coefficent of the radiated field in the scanning sector are pointed out.

  8. Two dimensional thermo-optic beam steering using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Rita; Preussner, Marcel W.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Kozak, Dmitry A.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Murphy, James L.

    2016-03-01

    Components for free space optical communication terminals such as lasers, amplifiers, and receivers have all seen substantial reduction in both size and power consumption over the past several decades. However, pointing systems, such as fast steering mirrors and gimbals, have remained large, slow and power-hungry. Optical phased arrays provide a possible solution for non-mechanical beam steering devices that can be compact and lower in power. Silicon photonics is a promising technology for phased arrays because it has the potential to scale to many elements and may be compatible with CMOS technology thereby enabling batch fabrication. For most free space optical communication applications, two-dimensional beam steering is needed. To date, silicon photonic phased arrays have achieved two-dimensional steering by combining thermo-optic steering, in-plane, with wavelength tuning by means of an output grating to give angular tuning, out-of-plane. While this architecture might work for certain static communication links, it would be difficult to implement for moving platforms. Other approaches have required N2 controls for an NxN element phased array, which leads to complexity. Hence, in this work we demonstrate steering using the thermo-optic effect for both dimensions with a simplified steering mechanism requiring only two control signals, one for each steering dimension.

  9. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  10. Inline high frequency ultrasonic particle sizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, F.; Petit, J.; Nassar, G.; Debreyne, P.; Delaplace, G.; Nongaillard, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports the development of a new method of particle sizing in a liquid. This method uses high frequency focused ultrasounds to detect particles crossing the focal zone of an ultrasonic sensor and to determine their size distribution by processing the reflected echoes. The major advantage of this technique compared to optical sizing methods is its ability to measure the size of particles suspended in an opaque liquid without any dedicated sample preparation. Validations of ultrasonic measurements were achieved on suspensions of polymethyl methacrylate beads in a size range extending from a few micrometer to several hundred micrometer with a temporal resolution of 1 s. The inline detection of aggregate formation was also demonstrated.