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Sample records for prism-grating coupled surface

  1. Optical design of prism-grating-prism imaging spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shanbing; Tang, Minxue; Ji, Yiqun; Gong, Guangbiao; Zhang, Ruirui; Shen, Weimin

    2008-12-01

    Imaging spectrometers can provide imagery and spectrum information of objects and form so-called three-dimensional spectral imagery, two spatial and one spectral dimension. Most of imaging spectrometers use conventional spectroscopic elements or systems, such as reflective diffraction gratings, prisms, filters, spatial modulated interferometers, and so on. Here a special imaging spectrometer which is based on a novel cemented Prism-Grating-Prism (PGP) is reported. Its spectroscopic element PGP consists of two prisms and a holographic transmission volume grating, which is cemented between these prisms. The two prisms mainly function as beam deviation, the grating as a disperser. In addition to the high light efficiency of the volume gratings that is required for high spectral resolution, the cementing difficulty when surface relief gratings are used can be avoided due to its voluminal characteristic. The PGP imaging spectrometer has advantages of direct vision, dispersion uniform, compactness, low cost, and facility to be used. The principle, structure, and optimized design of the PGP imaging spectrometer are given in detail. Its front collimation optics and rear focusing lenses are same so as to reduce its cost further. The spectral coverage, resolution, and track length of the designed system are respectively visible light from 400nm to 800nm, 1.6nm/pixel, and 85mm. From its performance evaluation, it is shown that the PGP imaging spectrometer has the potentiality to be used in microscopic hyperspectral imagers and hyperspectral imaging remote sensors.

  2. Advanced prism-grating-prism imaging spectrograph in online industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaarala, Tapio; Aikio, Mauri; Keraenen, Heimo

    1997-08-01

    Imaging spectrographs have traditionally been utilized in aerial and remote sensing applications. A novel, compact and inexpensive imaging spectrograph developed by VTT Electronics is now available. It contains a multichannel fiber optic sensor head, a dispersive prism-grating-prism (PGP) component and digital CCD matrix camera capable of area integration. In rolled steel manufacturing, a protective oil film is applied on steel to resist corrosion while in transport and storage. The main problems in the oiling machine are film thickness control and jet failures. In this application, the spectrum of fluorescence of an oil film was measured simultaneously with parallel fibers. A relatively simple calibration and analysis procedure was used to calculate the oil film thickness. On-line color control for color reproduction is essential in both consumer and industrial products. The instrument was tested and analyzed for measuring differences in color by multivariate analysis of the spectra and by color space coordinate estimation. In general, a continuous spectrum is not absolute requirement. In these two examples, filter-based measurement would probably cost less thana PGP spectrograph solution. On the other hand, by measuring the spectrum and using an advanced signal processing algorithm one production version will cover all installations in both applications. In practice, only the fiber sensor mechanics need to be modified.

  3. Digital spatial wavelength domain multiplexing (DSWDM) using a prism-grating-prism (PGP) and a CMOS imager: implementation and initial testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Martin B.; Chen, Steve; Baldwin, Christopher S.; Niemczuk, John B.; Kiddy, Jason S.; Chen, Peter C.; Kopola, Harri K.; Aikio, Mauri; Suopajarvi, Pekka; Buckley, Steven G.

    2001-08-01

    A CMOS imager-based spectrometer is used to interrogate a network containing a large number of Bragg grating sensors on multiple fibers as part of a proprietary structural health monitoring system. The spectrometer uses a Prism-Grating-Prism (PGP) to spectrally separate serially multiplexed Bragg reflections on a single fiber. As a result, each Bragg grating produces a discrete spot on the CMOS imager that shifts horizontally as the Bragg grating experiences changes in strain or temperature. The reflected wavelength of the Bragg grating can be determined by finding the center of the spot produced. The use of a random addressing CMOS imager enables a flexible sampling rate. Some fibers can be interrogated at a high sampling rate while others can be interrogated at a lower sampling rate. However, the use of a CMOS camera brings several specific problems in terms of signal processing. These include a logarithmic pixel response, a low signal-to-noise ratio, the long pixel time constant, obtaining sufficient process priority for the control program, and proper selection of the window of interest. In this paper we investigate computer algorithms and hardware solutions to address these problems. We also present experimental data to validate these solutions including calibration data and initial field-testing data with 24 sensors on 4 fibers.

  4. Magnetoelectric coupling at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Lukas; Yamada, T.K.; Balashov, T.; Takacs, A. F.; Wesselink, R.J.H.; Daene, Markus W; Fechner, M.; Ostanin, S.; Ernst, Arthur; Mertig, I.; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2010-10-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling allows the magnetic state of a material to be changed by an applied electric field. To date, this phenomenon has mainly been observed in insulating materials such as complex multiferroic oxides. Bulk metallic systems do not exhibit magnetoelectric coupling, because applied electric fields are screened by conduction electrons. We demonstrate strong magnetoelectric coupling at the surface of thin iron films using the electric field from a scanning tunnelling microscope, and are able to write, store and read information to areas with sides of a few nanometres. Our work demonstrates that high-density, non-volatile information storage is possible in metals.

  5. Exciton coupling of surface complexes on a nanocrystal surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangxing; Ji, Jianwei; Wang, Guan; You, Xiaozeng

    2014-08-25

    Exciton coupling may arise when chromophores are brought into close spatial proximity. Herein the intra-nanocrystal exciton coupling of the surface complexes formed by coordination of 8-hydroxyquinoline to ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) is reported. It is studied by absorption, photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation (PLE), and PL lifetime measurements. The exciton coupling of the surface complexes tunes the PL color and broadens the absorption and PLE windows of the NCs, and thus is a potential strategy for improving the light-harvesting efficiency of NC solar cells and photocatalysts. PMID:24863364

  6. Critically coupled surface phonon-polariton excitation in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Burton; Korobkin, Dmitriy; Fietz, Chris; Carole, Davy; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-09-01

    We observe critical coupling to surface phonon-polaritons in silicon carbide by attenuated total reflection of mid-IR radiation. Reflectance measurements demonstrate critical coupling by a double scan of wavelength and incidence angle. Critical coupling occurs when prism coupling loss is equal to losses in silicon carbide and the substrate, resulting in maximal electric field enhancement. PMID:19724526

  7. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  8. Surface-to-surface transition via electromagnetic coupling of coplanar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Robert W.; Matolak, David W.

    1987-11-01

    A transition is investigated which couples coplanar waveguide on one substrate surface (a motherboard) to coplanar waveguide on another substrate surface (a semiconductor chip or subarray) placed above the first. No wire bonds are necessary. A full-wave analysis using coupled line theory is presented and verified experimentally. The use of this transition for coupling to millimeter-wave integrated circuits is discussed.

  9. Coupled land surface/hydrologic/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger; Steyaert, Lou; Arritt, Ray; Lahtakia, Mercedes; Smith, Chris; Ziegler, Conrad; Soong, Su Tzai; Avissar, Roni; Wetzel, Peter; Sellers, Piers

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: prototype land cover characteristics data base for the conterminous United States; surface evapotranspiration effects on cumulus convection and implications for mesoscale models; the use of complex treatment of surface hydrology and thermodynamics within a mesoscale model and some related issues; initialization of soil-water content for regional-scale atmospheric prediction models; impact of surface properties on dryline and MCS evolution; a numerical simulation of heavy precipitation over the complex topography of California; representing mesoscale fluxes induced by landscape discontinuities in global climate models; emphasizing the role of subgrid-scale heterogeneity in surface-air interaction; and problems with modeling and measuring biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, and carbon on large scales.

  10. Surface-plasmon-coupled emission microscopy with a polarization converter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yikai; Zhang, Douguo; Han, Lu; Rui, Guanghao; Wang, Xiangxian; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai

    2013-03-01

    Although surface-plasmon-coupled emission-based fluorescence microscopy proves high sensitivity for surface imaging, its donut shape point spread function (PSF) leads to low optical resolution and inefficient signal collection. In this Letter, we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of solving this problem by the use of a liquid-crystal plate, which could convert the polarization state of surface-plasmon-coupled fluorescence from radial to linear. After being focused by the collection lens, an Airy disk-like PSF of small size can be realized. Experimental results reveal that both the lateral resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio can be enhanced simultaneously. PMID:23455282

  11. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-15

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity.

  12. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frédéric; Beddar, A Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-01

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity. PMID:17022248

  13. Radiative decay engineering 3. Surface plasmon-coupled directional emission

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of fluorescence detection that promises to increase sensitivity by 20- to 1000-fold is described. This method will also decrease the contribution of sample autofluorescence to the detected signal. The method depends on the coupling of excited fluorophores with the surface plasmon resonance present in thin metal films, typically silver and gold. The phenomenon of surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) occurs for fluorophores 20–250 nm from the metal surface, allowing detection of fluorophores over substantial distances beyond the metal–sample interface. SPCE depends on interactions of the excited fluorophore with the metal surface. This interaction is independent of the mode of excitation; that is, it does not require evanescent wave or surface-plasmon excitation. In a sense, SPCE is the inverse process of the surface plasmon resonance absorption of thin metal films. Importantly, SPCE occurs over a narrow angular distribution, converting normally isotropic emission into easily collected directional emission. Up to 50% of the emission from unoriented samples can be collected, much larger than typical fluorescence collection efficiencies near 1% or less. SPCE is due only to fluorophores near the metal surface and may be regarded as emission from the induced surface plasmons. Autofluorescence from more distal parts of the sample is decreased due to decreased coupling. SPCE is highly polarized and autofluorescence can be further decreased by collecting only the polarized component or only the light propagating with the appropriate angle. Examples showing how simple optical configurations can be used in diagnostics, sensing, or biotechnology applications are presented. Surface plasmon-coupled emission is likely to find widespread applications throughout the biosciences. PMID:14690679

  14. Surface-confined Ullmann coupling of thiophene substituted porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beggan, J. P.; Boyle, N. M.; Pryce, M. T.; Cafolla, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The covalent coupling of (5,10,15,20-tetrabromothien-2-ylporphyrinato)zinc(II) (TBrThP) molecules on the Ag(111) surface has been investigated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, using scanning tunnelling microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The findings provide atomic-level insight into surface-confined Ullmann coupling of thiophene substituted porphyrins, analyzing the progression of organometallic intermediate to final coupled state. Adsorption of the TBrThP molecules on the Ag(111) surface at room temperature is found to result in the reductive dehalogenation of the bromothienyl substituents and the subsequent formation of single strand and crosslinked coordination networks. The coordinated substrate atoms bridge the proximal thienyl groups of the organometallic intermediate, while the cleaved bromine atoms are bound on the adjacent Ag(111) surface. The intermediate complex displays a thermal lability at ˜423 K that results in the dissociation of the proximal thienyl groups with the concomitant loss of the surface bound bromine. At the thermally induced dissociation of the intermediate complex the resultant thienylporphyrin derivatives covalently couple, leading to the formation of a polymeric network of thiophene linked and meso-meso fused porphyrins.

  15. Surface-confined Ullmann coupling of thiophene substituted porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Beggan, J P; Boyle, N M; Pryce, M T; Cafolla, A A

    2015-09-11

    The covalent coupling of (5,10,15,20-tetrabromothien-2-ylporphyrinato)zinc(II) (TBrThP) molecules on the Ag(111) surface has been investigated under ultra-high-vacuum conditions, using scanning tunnelling microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The findings provide atomic-level insight into surface-confined Ullmann coupling of thiophene substituted porphyrins, analyzing the progression of organometallic intermediate to final coupled state. Adsorption of the TBrThP molecules on the Ag(111) surface at room temperature is found to result in the reductive dehalogenation of the bromothienyl substituents and the subsequent formation of single strand and crosslinked coordination networks. The coordinated substrate atoms bridge the proximal thienyl groups of the organometallic intermediate, while the cleaved bromine atoms are bound on the adjacent Ag(111) surface. The intermediate complex displays a thermal lability at ∼423 K that results in the dissociation of the proximal thienyl groups with the concomitant loss of the surface bound bromine. At the thermally induced dissociation of the intermediate complex the resultant thienylporphyrin derivatives covalently couple, leading to the formation of a polymeric network of thiophene linked and meso-meso fused porphyrins. PMID:26294321

  16. Strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and emitters: a review.

    PubMed

    Törmä, P; Barnes, W L

    2015-01-01

    In this review we look at the concepts and state-of-the-art concerning the strong coupling of surface plasmon-polariton modes to states associated with quantum emitters such as excitons in J-aggregates, dye molecules and quantum dots. We explore the phenomenon of strong coupling with reference to a number of examples involving electromagnetic fields and matter. We then provide a concise description of the relevant background physics of surface plasmon polaritons. An extensive overview of the historical background and a detailed discussion of more recent relevant experimental advances concerning strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and quantum emitters is then presented. Three conceptual frameworks are then discussed and compared in depth: classical, semi-classical and fully quantum mechanical; these theoretical frameworks will have relevance to strong coupling beyond that involving surface plasmon polaritons. We conclude our review with a perspective on the future of this rapidly emerging field, one we are sure will grow to encompass more intriguing physics and will develop in scope to be of relevance to other areas of science. PMID:25536670

  17. Strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and emitters: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmä, P.; Barnes, W. L.

    2015-01-01

    In this review we look at the concepts and state-of-the-art concerning the strong coupling of surface plasmon-polariton modes to states associated with quantum emitters such as excitons in J-aggregates, dye molecules and quantum dots. We explore the phenomenon of strong coupling with reference to a number of examples involving electromagnetic fields and matter. We then provide a concise description of the relevant background physics of surface plasmon polaritons. An extensive overview of the historical background and a detailed discussion of more recent relevant experimental advances concerning strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and quantum emitters is then presented. Three conceptual frameworks are then discussed and compared in depth: classical, semi-classical and fully quantum mechanical; these theoretical frameworks will have relevance to strong coupling beyond that involving surface plasmon polaritons. We conclude our review with a perspective on the future of this rapidly emerging field, one we are sure will grow to encompass more intriguing physics and will develop in scope to be of relevance to other areas of science.

  18. External iterative coupling strategy for surface-subsurface flow calculations in surface irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupling the unsteady open-channel flow equations of surface irrigation with the equation of variably saturated porous media flow is a computationally complex problem, because of the dependence of infiltration on flow depths. Several models of this coupled process have been developed, all of which ...

  19. Enhanced Electron-Phonon Coupling at Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, Ward E.

    2010-08-04

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) decouples electronic from nuclear motion, providing a focal point for most quantum mechanics textbooks. However, a multitude of important chemical, physical and biological phenomena are driven by violations of this approximation. Vibronic interactions are a necessary ingredient in any process that makes or breaks a covalent bond, for example, conventional catalysis or enzymatically delivered biological reactions. Metastable phenomena associated with defects and dopants in semiconductors, oxides, and glasses entail violation of the BOA. Charge exchange in inorganic polymers, organic slats and biological systems involves charge- induced distortions of the local structure. A classic example is conventional superconductivity, which is driven by the electron-lattice interaction. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments are yielding new insight into the microscopic origin of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in anisotropic two-dimensional systems. Our recent surface phonon measurement on the surface of a high-Tc material clearly indicates an important momentum dependent EPC in these materials. In the last few years we have shifted our research focus from solely looking at electron phonon coupling to examining the structure/functionality relationship at the surface of complex transition metal compounds. The investigation on electron phonon coupling has allowed us to move to systems where there is coupling between the lattice, the electrons and the spin.

  20. Deriving Albedo from Coupled MERIS and MODIS Surface Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lucht, Wolfgang; Strahler, Alan

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  1. Coupling surface and mantle dynamics: A novel experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca; Sembroni, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Recent modeling shows that surface processes, such as erosion and deposition, may drive the deformation of the Earth's surface, interfering with deeper crustal and mantle signals. To investigate the coupling between the surface and deep process, we designed a three-dimensional laboratory apparatus, to analyze the role of erosion and sedimentation, triggered by deep mantle instability. The setup is constituted and scaled down to natural gravity field using a thin viscous sheet model, with mantle and lithosphere simulated by Newtonian viscous glucose syrup and silicon putty, respectively. The surface process is simulated assuming a simple erosion law producing the downhill flow of a thin viscous material away from high topography. The deep mantle upwelling is triggered by the rise of a buoyant sphere. The results of these models along with the parametric analysis show how surface processes influence uplift velocity and topography signals.

  2. Strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and Sulforhodamine 101 dye

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and Sulforhodamine 101 dye molecules. Dispersion curves for surface plasmon polaritons on samples with a thin layer of silver covered with Sulforhodamine 101 molecules embedded in SU-8 polymer are obtained experimentally by reflectometry measurements and compared to the dispersion of samples without molecules. Clear Rabi splittings, with energies up to 360 and 190 meV, are observed at the positions of the dye absorption maxima. The split energies are dependent on the number of Sulforhodamine 101 molecules involved in the coupling process. Transfer matrix and coupled oscillator methods are used to model the studied multilayer structures with a great agreement with the experiments. Detection of the scattered radiation after the propagation provides another way to obtain the dispersion relation of the surface plasmon polaritons and, thus, provides insight into dynamics of the surface plasmon polariton/dye interaction, beyond the refrectometry measurements. PACS: 42.50.Hz, 33.80.-b, 78.67.-n PMID:22429311

  3. Arctic Cloud-driven Mixed Layers and Surface Coupling State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupe, M.; Persson, O. P.; Solomon, A.; de Boer, G.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic low-level clouds interact with the atmosphere and underlying surface via many inter-related processes. The balance of cloud radiative warming and cooling effects imparts a strong control on the net surface energy budget. Cloud-driven atmospheric circulations can impact surface turbulent heat fluxes and influence the vertical mixing of atmospheric state parameters and aerosols. Large-scale advection of heat and moisture provides the background context within which these local interactions unfold. Importantly, these radiative, dynamical, and advective processes also contribute to a complex web of self-sustaining cloud processes that can promote cloud maintenance over long periods of time. We examine many of these processes, with a specific focus on the dynamical linkages between Arctic clouds and the surface that influence low-level atmospheric structure and mixing. Comprehensive, ground-based observations from meteorological towers, remote-sensors, and radiosondes are used to simultaneously characterize surface fluxes, atmospheric structure, cloud properties, in-cloud motions, and the depth of the cloud-driven mixed layer in multiple Arctic environments. Relationships among these parameters are explored to elucidate the properties of the system that determine the degree of vertical atmospheric mixing and the coupling state between cloud and surface. The influence of temperature and moisture inversions on this system is also explored. Transitions in the coupling state are utilized to illustrate the relative roles of different processes. Cases from a coastal Arctic site at Barrow, Alaska and a station embedded in the Arctic sea-ice pack are used to contrast conditional influences related to season and surface type. It is found that over sea-ice, where surface turbulent fluxes are weak, the coupling of cloud-level processes to the surface layer is largely due to proximity of the cloud-driven mixed layer to the surface, which appears to be primarily influenced by

  4. Diagnosing coupled watershed processes using a fully-coupled groundwater, land-surface, surface water and mesoscale atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Kollet, S. J.; Chow, F. K.

    2007-12-01

    A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with an integrated overland flow component, a land-surface model and a mesoscale atmospheric model is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes. These processes are influenced by land-surface topography and subsurface heterogeneity. This parallel, integrated model simulates spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. Spatial statistics are used to demonstrate spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating. Additionally, spectral transforms of subsurface arrival times are computed using a transient Lagrangian transport simulation. Macrodispersion is used to mimic the effects of subsurface heterogeneity for a range of Peclet numbers. The slopes of these transforms indicate fractal scaling of this system over a range of timescales. All of these techniques point to importance of realistically representing coupled processes and the need to understand and diagnose these processes in nature. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under contract W-7405-Eng-48. This project was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL

  5. Coupling TOUGH2 with CLM3: Developing a Coupled Land Surface andSubsurface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2006-05-19

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions among atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys to understanding the water cycling system that supports life on earth. The inherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures among subsystems make such interactions difficult to simulate. In this paper, we present a model that simulates the land surface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing. This model combines a state-of-the-art land-surface model, the NCAR Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variably saturated groundwater model, TOUGH2, through an internal interface that includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels. Specifically, TOUGH2 uses infiltration, evaporation, and root-uptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms in its simulation; CLM3 uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles, calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables in its simulation. This new model, CLMT2, preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state-of-the-art modeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes (including snow, runoff, freezing/melting, evapotranspiration, radiation, and biophysiological processes) from CLM3 and the more realistic physical-process-based modeling capability of subsurface hydrologic processes (including heterogeneity, three-dimensional flow, seamless combining of unsaturated and saturated zone, and water table) from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulation results show that the coupled model greatly improved the predictions of the groundwater table, evapotranspiration, and surface temperature at a real watershed, as evaluated using 18 years of observed data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with an atmospheric simulation model, to form one of the first top of the atmosphere to deep groundwater atmosphere-land-surface-subsurface models.

  6. Viscoplasticity with dynamic yield surface coupled to damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.; Runesson, K.

    1997-07-01

    A formulation of viscoplasticity theory, with kinetic coupling to damage, is presented. The main purpose is to describe rate-dependent material behavior and failure processes, including creep-rupture (for constant load) and creep-fatigue (for cyclic load). The Duvaut-Lions' formulation of viscoplasticity is adopted with quite general hardening of the quasistatic yield surface. The formulation is thermodynamically consistent, i.e. the dissipation inequality is satisfied. Like in the classical viscoplasticity formulations, the rate-independent response is activated at a very small loading rate. In addition, an (unconventional) dynamic yield surface is introduced, and this is approached asymptotically at infinite loading rate. Explicit constitutive relations are established for a quasistatic yield surface of von Mises type with nonlinear hardening. The resulting model is assessed for a variety of loading situations.

  7. Capacitive-coupled Series Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Ren, Jian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to realize stopband within the operating frequency of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is presented. The stopband is introduced by a new kind of capacitive-coupled series spoof SPPs. Two conventional H-shaped unit cells are proposed to construct a new unit cell, and every two new unit cells are separated by a gap with certain distance, which is designed to implement capacitive coupling. The original surface impedance matching is disturbed by the capacitive coupling, leading to the stopband during the transmission of SPPs. The proposed method is verified by both numerical simulations and experiments, and the simulated and measured results have good agreements. It is shown that the proposed structure exhibits a stopband in 9–9.5 GHz while the band-pass feature maintains in 5–9 GHz and 9.5–11 GHz. In the passband, the reflection coefficient is less than −10 dB, and the transmission loss is around 3 dB; in the stopband, the reflection coefficient is −2 dB, and the transmission coefficient is less than −30 dB. The compact size, easy fabrication and good band-pass and band-stop features make the proposed structure a promising plasmonic device in SPP communication systems. PMID:27089949

  8. Capacitive-coupled Series Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Ren, Jian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    A novel method to realize stopband within the operating frequency of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is presented. The stopband is introduced by a new kind of capacitive-coupled series spoof SPPs. Two conventional H-shaped unit cells are proposed to construct a new unit cell, and every two new unit cells are separated by a gap with certain distance, which is designed to implement capacitive coupling. The original surface impedance matching is disturbed by the capacitive coupling, leading to the stopband during the transmission of SPPs. The proposed method is verified by both numerical simulations and experiments, and the simulated and measured results have good agreements. It is shown that the proposed structure exhibits a stopband in 9–9.5 GHz while the band-pass feature maintains in 5–9 GHz and 9.5–11 GHz. In the passband, the reflection coefficient is less than ‑10 dB, and the transmission loss is around 3 dB in the stopband, the reflection coefficient is ‑2 dB, and the transmission coefficient is less than ‑30 dB. The compact size, easy fabrication and good band-pass and band-stop features make the proposed structure a promising plasmonic device in SPP communication systems.

  9. Capacitive-coupled Series Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Ren, Jian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to realize stopband within the operating frequency of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is presented. The stopband is introduced by a new kind of capacitive-coupled series spoof SPPs. Two conventional H-shaped unit cells are proposed to construct a new unit cell, and every two new unit cells are separated by a gap with certain distance, which is designed to implement capacitive coupling. The original surface impedance matching is disturbed by the capacitive coupling, leading to the stopband during the transmission of SPPs. The proposed method is verified by both numerical simulations and experiments, and the simulated and measured results have good agreements. It is shown that the proposed structure exhibits a stopband in 9-9.5 GHz while the band-pass feature maintains in 5-9 GHz and 9.5-11 GHz. In the passband, the reflection coefficient is less than -10 dB, and the transmission loss is around 3 dB; in the stopband, the reflection coefficient is -2 dB, and the transmission coefficient is less than -30 dB. The compact size, easy fabrication and good band-pass and band-stop features make the proposed structure a promising plasmonic device in SPP communication systems. PMID:27089949

  10. Surface plasmon polaritons mode conversion via a coupled plasmonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Hao

    2016-05-01

    A coupled plasmonic system for effective mode conversion between single interface surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in a metal-dielectric waveguide and gap SPP in a metal-dielectric-metal waveguide is proposed. With the modal analysis, it is shown that the interference of the two plasmonic modes in a metal-dielectric-metal-dielectric coupled structure plays the key role in the mode conversion. With typical parameters, the conversion efficiency is as high as 61% (equivalent to 87% of the output total energy flow) at 1μm wavelength, and 1 dB bandwidth is as broad as 300 nm. The proposed structure can be used to implement an SPP mode convertor, router and beam splitter, which enables the interconnection between two important waveguides in plasmonics. The method presented here is fully-analytical, and is tested against fully-vectorial numerical results.

  11. Coupled surface-water and ground-water model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1991-01-01

    In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well connected ground-water and surface-water systems, it is desirable that stream-aquifer interaction be simulated with models of equal sophistication and accuracy. Accordingly, a new, coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water model and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate flow in open-channel networks. Because time steps used in ground-water modeling commonly are much longer than those used in surface-water simulations, provision has been made for handling multiple BRANCH time steps within one MODFLOW time step. Verification testing of the coupled model was done using data from previous studies and by comparing results with output from a simpler four-point implicit open-channel flow model linked with MODFLOW.

  12. Prospects for coupling Surface Acoustic Waves to superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Recent years have seen great development in the quantum control of mechanical resonators. These usually consist of membranes, cantilevers or suspended beams, whose vibrational modes can be cooled to the quantum ground state. This presentation will focus on a different kind of micromechanical system, where the motion is not confined to a mode with fixed boundaries, but propagates along the surface of a microchip. These modes are known as Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs), and superficially resemble ripples on water, moving with low loss along the surfaces of solids. On a piezoelectric substrate, electrode gratings known as Interdigital Transducers (IDTs) can be used to convert power between the electric and acoustic domains. Devices based on this effect are of profound technological importance as filters and analog signal processors in the RF domain. In the realm of quantum information processing, SAWs have primarily been used to transport carriers and excitons through piezoelectric semiconductors, in the electric potential wells propagating along with the mechanical wave. Our approach, however, is different in that we aim to explore the mechanical wave itself as a carrier of quantum information. We have previously shown that a single-electron transistor can be used as a local probe for SAWs, with encouraging sensitivity levels. Building on this, we now investigate the prospects for coupling a SAW beam directly to a superconducting qubit. By merging a circuit model for an IDT with a quasi-classical description of a transmon qubit, we estimate that the qubit can couple to an acoustic transmission line with approximately the same strength as to an electrical one. This type of coupling opens for acoustic analogs of recent experiments in microwave quantum optics, including the generation of non-classical acoustic states.

  13. A Coupled Surface/Subsurface Model for Hydrological Drought Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musuuza, J. L.; Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L. E.; Fischer, T.; Kolditz, O.; Attinger, S.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrological droughts occur when storage in the ground and surface-water bodies falls below statistical average. Due to the inclusion of regional groundwater, hydrological droughts evolve relatively slowly. The atmospheric and surface components of the hydrological cycle have been widely studied, are well understood, and their prognoses are fairly accurate. In large-scale land surface models on the other hand, subsurface (groundwater) flow processes are usually assumed unidirectional and limited to the vertically-downward percolation and the horizontal runoffs. The vertical feedback from groundwater to the unsaturated zone as well as the groundwater recharge from surface waters are usually misrepresented, resulting in poor model performance during low-flow periods. The feedback is important during meteorological droughts because it replenishes soil moisture from ground- and surface water, thereby delaying the onset of agricultural droughts. If sustained for long periods however, the depletion can significantly reduce surface and subsurface storage and lead to severe hydrological droughts. We hypothesise that an explicit incorporation of the groundwater component into an existing land surface model would lead to better representation of low flows, which is critical for drought analyses. It would also improve the model performance during low-flow periods. For this purpose, we coupled the process-based mHM surface model (Samaniego et al. 2010) with MODFLOW (Harbaugh 2005) to analyse droughts in the Unstrut catchment, one of the tributaries of the Elbe. The catchment is located in one of the most drought-prone areas of Germany. We present results for stand-alone and coupled mHM simulations for the period 1970-2000. References Arlen W. Harbaugh. MODFLOW-2005, The U.S. Geological Survey Modular Ground-water Model-the Ground-water Flow Process, chapter Modelling techniques, sec. A. Ground water, pages 1:1-9:62. USGS, 2005. Luis Samaniego, Rohini Kumar, and Sabine Attinger

  14. Coherent transport of nanowire surface plasmons coupled to quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Guang-Yin; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2010-05-10

    The coherent transport of surface plasmons with nonlinear dispersion relations on a metal nanowire coupled to two-level emitters is investigated theoretically. Real-space Hamiltonians are used to obtain the transmission and reflection spectra of the surface plasmons. For the single-dot case, we find that the scattering spectra can show completely different features due to the non-linear quadratic dispersion relation. For the double-dot case, we obtain the interference behavior in transmission and reflection spectra, similar to that in resonant tunneling through a double-barrier potential. Moreover, Fano-like line shape of the transmission spectrum is obtained due to the quadratic dispersion relation. All these peculiar behaviors indicate that the dot-nanowire system provides a onedimensional platform to demonstrate the bandgap feature widely observed in photonic crystals. PMID:20588891

  15. Adsorption and coupling of 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero-Irurueta, G.; Martínez, J. I.; Bueno, R. A.; Palomares, F. J.; Salavagione, H. J.; Singh, M. K.; Méndez, J.; Ellis, G. J.; López, M. F.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    We have deposited 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and studied the strength of its adsorption through a combination of STM, LEED, XPS and ab initio calculations. Although an ordered (2√3 × 2√3)R30° phase appears, we have observed that molecule-substrate interaction dominates the adsorption geometry and properties of the system. At RT the high catalytic activity of Pt induces aminophenol to lose the H atom from the hydroxyl group, and a proportion of the molecules lose the complete hydroxyl group. After annealing above 420 K, all deposited aminophenol molecules have lost the OH moiety and some hydrogen atoms from the amino groups. At this temperature, short single-molecule oligomer chains can be observed. These chains are the product of a new reaction that proceeds via the coupling of radical species that is favored by surface diffusion.

  16. Adsorption and Coupling of 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Irurueta, G.; Martínez, J. I.; Bueno, R.A.; Palomares, F. J.; Salavagione, H. J.; Singh, M. K.; Méndez, J.; Ellis, G. J.; López, M. F.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We have deposited 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and studied the strength of its adsorption through a combination of STM, LEED, XPS and ab initio calculations. Although an ordered (2√3×2√3)R30° phase appears, we have observed that molecule-substrate interaction dominates the adsorption geometry and properties of the system. At RT the high catalytic activity of Pt induces aminophenol to lose the H atom from the hydroxyl group, and a proportion of the molecules lose the complete hydroxyl group. After annealing above 420K, all deposited aminophenol molecules have lost the OH moiety and some hydrogen atoms from the amino groups. At this temperature, short single-molecule oligomer chains can be observed. These chains are the product of a new reaction that proceeds via the coupling of radical species that is favoured by surface diffusion. PMID:27279673

  17. Antigen-specific T cell phenotyping microarrays using Grating Coupled Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging and Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James M.; Stern, Lawrence J.; Guignon, Ernest F.; Lawrence, David A.; Lynes, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The circulating population of peripheral T lymphocytes obtained from a blood sample can provide a large amount of information about an individual's medical status and history. Recent evidence indicates that the detection and functional characterization of antigen-specific T cell subsets within the circulating population may provide a diagnostic indicator of disease and has the potential to predict an individual's response to therapy. In this report, a microarray detection platform that combines grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance imaging (GCSPRI) and grating-coupled surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) fluorescence detection modalities was used to detect and characterize CD4+ T cells. The microspot regions of interest (ROIs) printed on the array consisted of immobilized antibodies or peptide loaded MHC monomers (p/MHC) as T cell capture ligands mixed with additional antibodies as cytokine capture ligands covalently bound to the surface of a corrugated gold sensor chip. Using optimized parameters, an unlabelled influenza peptide reactive T cell clone could be detected at a frequency of 0.1% in a mixed T cell sample using GCSPRI. Additionally, after cell binding was quantified, differential TH1 cytokine secretion patterns from a T cell clone cultured under TH1 or TH2 inducing conditions was detected using an SPCE fluorescence based assay. Differences in the secretion patterns of 3 cytokines, characteristic of the inducing conditions, indicated that differences were a consequence of the functional status of the captured cells. A dual mode GCSPRI/SPCE assay can provide a rapid, high content T cell screening/characterization tool that is useful for diagnosing disease, evaluating vaccination efficacy, or assessing responses to immunotherapeutics. PMID:22104646

  18. Monolithic phononic crystals with a surface acoustic band gap from surface phonon-polariton coupling.

    PubMed

    Yudistira, D; Boes, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Pennec, Y; Yeo, L Y; Mitchell, A; Friend, J R

    2014-11-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the existence of complete surface acoustic wave band gaps in surface phonon-polariton phononic crystals, in a completely monolithic structure formed from a two-dimensional honeycomb array of hexagonal shape domain-inverted inclusions in single crystal piezoelectric Z-cut lithium niobate. The band gaps appear at a frequency of about twice the Bragg band gap at the center of the Brillouin zone, formed through phonon-polariton coupling. The structure is mechanically, electromagnetically, and topographically homogeneous, without any physical alteration of the surface, offering an ideal platform for many acoustic wave applications for photonics, phononics, and microfluidics. PMID:25479504

  19. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  20. Asymmetric excitation of surface plasmons by dark mode coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Quan; Li, Quan; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Chunmei; Liu, Yongmin; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-02-01

    Control over surface plasmons (SPs) is essential in a variety of cutting-edge applications, such as highly integrated photonic signal processing systems, deep-subwavelength lasing, high-resolution imaging, and ultrasensitive biomedical detection. Recently, asymmetric excitation of SPs has attracted enormous interest. In free space, the analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in metamaterials has been widely investigated to uniquely manipulate the electromagnetic waves. In the near field, we show that the dark mode coupling mechanism of the classical EIT effect enables an exotic and straightforward excitation of SPs in a metasurface system. This leads to not only resonant excitation of asymmetric SPs but also controllable exotic SP focusing by the use of the Huygens-Fresnel principle. Our experimental findings manifest the potential of developing plasmonic metadevices with unique functionalities. PMID:26989777

  1. Asymmetric excitation of surface plasmons by dark mode coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Quan; Li, Quan; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Chunmei; Liu, Yongmin; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-01-01

    Control over surface plasmons (SPs) is essential in a variety of cutting-edge applications, such as highly integrated photonic signal processing systems, deep-subwavelength lasing, high-resolution imaging, and ultrasensitive biomedical detection. Recently, asymmetric excitation of SPs has attracted enormous interest. In free space, the analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in metamaterials has been widely investigated to uniquely manipulate the electromagnetic waves. In the near field, we show that the dark mode coupling mechanism of the classical EIT effect enables an exotic and straightforward excitation of SPs in a metasurface system. This leads to not only resonant excitation of asymmetric SPs but also controllable exotic SP focusing by the use of the Huygens-Fresnel principle. Our experimental findings manifest the potential of developing plasmonic metadevices with unique functionalities. PMID:26989777

  2. Surface plasmon resonance applied to G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus; Gorshkova, Inna

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are integral membrane proteins that transmit signals from external stimuli to the cell interior via activation of GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) thereby mediating key sensorial, hormonal, metabolic, immunological, and neurotransmission processes. Elucidating their structure and mechanism of interaction with extracellular and intracellular binding partners is of fundamental importance and highly relevant to rational design of new effective drugs. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a method of choice for studying biomolecular interactions at interfaces because measurements take place in real-time and do not require labeling of any of the interactants. However, due to the particular challenges imposed by the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins and the great diversity of receptor-stimulating ligands, the application of this technique to characterize interactions of GPCR is still in the developmental phase. Here we give an overview of the principle of SPR and analyze current approaches for the preparation of the sensor chip surface, capture and stabilization of GPCR, and experimental design to characterize their interaction with ligands, G proteins and specific antibodies. PMID:24466506

  3. Surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence during adsorption of oxygen on magnesium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecules on magnesium surfaces represents a non-adiabatic reaction exhibiting exoelectron emission, chemicurrent generation, and weak chemiluminescence. Using thin film Mg/Ag/p-Si(111) Schottky diodes with 1 nm Mg on a 10-60 nm thick Ag layer as 2π-photodetectors, the chemiluminescence is internally detected with a much larger efficiency than external methods. The chemically induced photoyield shows a maximum for a Ag film thickness of 45 nm. The enhancement is explained by surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence, i.e., surface plasmon polaritons are effectively excited in the Ag layer by the oxidation reaction and decay radiatively leading to the observed photocurrent. Model calculations of the maximum absorption in attenuated total reflection geometry support the interpretation. The study demonstrates the extreme sensitivity and the practical usage of internal detection schemes for investigating surface chemiluminescence.

  4. Surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence during adsorption of oxygen on magnesium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2015-12-28

    The dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecules on magnesium surfaces represents a non-adiabatic reaction exhibiting exoelectron emission, chemicurrent generation, and weak chemiluminescence. Using thin film Mg/Ag/p-Si(111) Schottky diodes with 1 nm Mg on a 10-60 nm thick Ag layer as 2π-photodetectors, the chemiluminescence is internally detected with a much larger efficiency than external methods. The chemically induced photoyield shows a maximum for a Ag film thickness of 45 nm. The enhancement is explained by surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence, i.e., surface plasmon polaritons are effectively excited in the Ag layer by the oxidation reaction and decay radiatively leading to the observed photocurrent. Model calculations of the maximum absorption in attenuated total reflection geometry support the interpretation. The study demonstrates the extreme sensitivity and the practical usage of internal detection schemes for investigating surface chemiluminescence.

  5. Hydromechanical Normal Deformation Experiments and Coupling to Fracture Surface Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thörn, J.; Fransson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Civil engineering structures founded in fractured crystalline rock, such as the Fennoscandian Shield (Norway-Sweden-Finland) requires allowance for both stability and/or deformations of the rock mass and groundwater ingress and groundwater pressure changes. Coupling these issues could be the key to solving the challenges that arise from construction of e.g. hydropower dams, road and railroad tunnels, and most certainly the construction of nuclear waste repositories within fractured crystalline rock, all of which are currently planned in Sweden. Excavation related deformation in fractures may cause groundwater leakage even from the most elaborate pre-excavation grouting works. A better understanding on hydraulically (or grouting) induced deformations in the near-field of tunnels, where the stress field is re-distributed due to the opening may both provide a basis for more accurate numerical modelling and grouting or excavation procedures that minimize the damage on the completed grouting fans. Subjects of this study were experiments conducted as measurement of deformations in boreholes close to tunnels due to stepwise injection tests, and laboratory hydromechanical experiments conducted as flow and normal deformation measurements in a permeameter during cycles of up to 2.5 MPa confining pressure, and subsequent surface scanning of the samples for coupling of HM-results to geometric appearance, aperture and contact geometry. When expressed in terms of hydraulic aperture (b) and fracture normal stiffness (kn) the results of both in situ and lab experiments support a previously suggested relationship based on field data where kn is inversely proportional to roughly b2. The relationship was assumed to be valid for low compressive stress across fractures with limited previous deformation. One important data set used to establish the relationship was transmissivity and storage coefficients from hydraulic interference tests previously performed at Äspö Hard Rock

  6. Controlled reflectance surfaces with film-coupled colloidal nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Antoine; Ciraci, Cristian; Mock, Jack J.; Hill, Ryan T.; Wang, Qiang; Wiley, Benjamin J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Smith, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and tunable absorption is essential for a variety of applications, such as the design of controlled emissivity surfaces for thermophotovoltaic devices1; tailoring of the infrared spectrum for controlled thermal dissipation2; and detector elements for imaging3. Metamaterials based on metallic elements are particularly efficient as absorbing media, because both the electrical and the magnetic properties of a metamaterial can be tuned by structured design4. To date, metamaterial absorbers in the infrared or visible range have been fabricated using lithographically patterned metallic structures2,5–9, making them inherently difficult to produce over large areas and hence reducing their applicability. We demonstrate here an extraordinarily simple method to create a metamaterial absorber by randomly adsorbing chemically synthesized silver nanocubes onto a nanoscale thick polymer spacer layer on a gold film –making no effort to control the spatial arrangement of the cubes on the film– and show that the film-coupled nanocubes provide a reflectance spectrum that can be tailored by varying the geometry. Each nanocube is the optical analog of the well-known grounded patch antenna, with a nearly identical local field structure that is modified by the plasmonic response of the metal dielectric function, and with an anomalously large absorption efficiency that can be partly attributed to an interferometric effect10. The absorptivity of large surface areas can be controlled using this method, at scales out of reach of lithographic approaches like e-beam lithography otherwise required to manipulate matter at the nanometer scale. PMID:23222613

  7. G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Surface Display and Biosensor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurchie, Edward; Leifert, Wayne

    Signal transduction by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) underpins a multitude of physiological processes. Ligand recognition by the receptor leads to the activation of a generic molecular switch involving heterotrimeric G-proteins and guanine nucleotides. With growing interest and commercial investment in GPCRs in areas such as drug targets, orphan receptors, high-throughput screening of drugs and biosensors, greater attention will focus on assay development to allow for miniaturization, ultrahigh-throughput and, eventually, microarray/biochip assay formats that will require nanotechnology-based approaches. Stable, robust, cell-free signaling assemblies comprising receptor and appropriate molecular switching components will form the basis of future GPCR/G-protein platforms, which should be able to be adapted to such applications as microarrays and biosensors. This chapter focuses on cell-free GPCR assay nanotechnologies and describes some molecular biological approaches for the construction of more sophisticated, surface-immobilized, homogeneous, functional GPCR sensors. The latter points should greatly extend the range of applications to which technologies based on GPCRs could be applied.

  8. Explosives detection and identification using surface plasmon-coupled emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja, Shiou-Jyh

    2012-06-01

    To fight against the explosives-related threats in defense and homeland security applications, a smarter sensing device that not only detects but differentiates multiple true threats from false positives caused by environmental interferents is essential. A new optical detection system is proposed to address these issues by using the temporal and spectroscopic information generated by the surface plasmon coupling emission (SPCE) effect. Innovative SPCE optics have been designed using Zemax software to project the fluorescence signal into clear "rainbow rings" on a CCD with subnanometer wavelength resolution. The spectroscopic change of the fluorescence signal and the time history of such changes due to the presence of a certain explosive analyte are unique and can be used to identify explosives. Thanks to high optical efficiency, reporter depositions as small as 160-μm in diameter can generate a sufficient signal, allowing a dense array of different reporters to be interrogated with wavelength multiplexing and detect a wide range of explosives. We have demonstrated detection and classification of explosives, such as TNT, NT, NM, RDX, PETN, and AN, with two sensing materials in a prototype.

  9. Double resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates: an intuitive coupled oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yizhuo; Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2011-08-01

    The strong coupling between localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons in a double resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate is described by a classical coupled oscillator model. The effects of the particle density, the particle size and the SiO2 spacer thickness on the coupling strength are experimentally investigated. We demonstrate that by tuning the geometrical parameters of the double resonance substrate, we can readily control the resonance frequencies and tailor the SERS enhancement spectrum. PMID:21934853

  10. On-Surface Domino Reactions: Glaser Coupling and Dehydrogenative Coupling of a Biscarboxylic Acid To Form Polymeric Bisacylperoxides.

    PubMed

    Held, Philipp Alexander; Gao, Hong-Ying; Liu, Lacheng; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Timmer, Alexander; Mönig, Harry; Barton, Dennis; Neugebauer, Johannes; Fuchs, Harald; Studer, Armido

    2016-08-01

    Herein we report the on-surface oxidative homocoupling of 6,6'-(1,4-buta-1,3-diynyl)bis(2-naphthoic acid) (BDNA) via bisacylperoxide formation on different Au substrates. By using this unprecedented dehydrogenative polymerization of a biscarboxylic acid, linear poly-BDNA with a chain length of over 100 nm was prepared. It is shown that the monomer BDNA can be prepared in situ at the surface via on-surface Glaser coupling of 6-ethynyl-2-naphthoic acid (ENA). Under the Glaser coupling conditions, BDNA directly undergoes polymerization to give the polymeric peroxide (poly-BDNA) representing a first example of an on-surface domino reaction. It is shown that the reaction outcome varies as a function of surface topography (Au(111) or Au(100)) and also of the surface coverage, to give branched polymers, linear polymers, or 2D metal-organic networks. PMID:27410485

  11. A study of the coupling relationship between concrete surface temperature and concrete surface emissivity in natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lin-Ling; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Jia-Ning; Zhao, Hong-Mei; Huang, Qi-Ting

    2014-07-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) has already been recognized as a crucial parameter for the determination of land surface temperature (LST). There is an ill-posed problem for the retrieval of LST and LSE. And laboratory-based emissivity is measured in natural constant conditions, which is limited in the application in thermal remote sensing. To solve the above problems, the coupling of LST and LSE is explored to eliminate temperature effects and improve the accuracy of LES. And then, the estimation accuracy of LST from passive remote sensing images will be improved. For different land surface materials, the coupling of land surface emissivity and land surface temperature is various. This paper focuses on studying concrete surface that is one of the typical man-made materials in urban. First the experiments of measuring concrete surface emissivity and concrete surface temperature in natural conditions are arranged reasonably and the suitable data are selected under ideal atmosphere conductions. Then to improve the determination accuracy of concrete surface emissivity, the algorithm worked on the computer of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroradiometer (FTIR) has been improved by the most adapted temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. Finally the coupling of concrete surface temperature and concrete surface emissivity is analyzed and the coupling model of concrete surface temperature and concrete surface emissivity is established. The results show that there is a highest correlation coefficient between the second derivative of emissivity spectra and concrete surface temperature, and the correlation coefficient is -0.925 1. The best coupling model is the stepwise regression model, whose determination coefficient (R2) is 0.886. The determination coefficient (R2) is 0.905 and the root mean squares error (RMSE) is 0.292 1 in the validation of the model. The coupling model of concrete surface temperature and concrete surface emissivity under natural conditions

  12. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed. PMID:27119268

  13. Coupling of surface energy with electric potential makes superhydrophobic surfaces corrosion-resistant.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2015-10-14

    We study the correlation of wetting properties and corrosion rates on hydrophobized cast iron. Samples of different surface roughnesses (abraded by sandpaper) are studied without coating and with two types of hydrophobic coatings (stearic acid and a liquid repelling spray). The contact angles and contact angle hysteresis are measured using a goniometer while corrosion rates are measured by a potentiodynamic polarization test. The data show a decrease in corrosion current density and an increase in corrosion potential after superhydrophobization. A similar trend is also found in the recent literature data. We conclude that a decrease in the corrosion rate can be attributed to the changing open circuit potential of a coated surface and increased surface area making the non-homogeneous (Cassie-Baxter) state possible. We interpret these results in light of the idea that the inherent surface energy is coupled with the electric potential in accordance with the Lippmann law of electrowetting and Le Châtelier's principle and, therefore, hydrophobization leads to a decrease in the corrosion potential. This approach can be used for novel anti-corrosive coatings. PMID:26344151

  14. Near-Field Infrared Pump-Probe Imaging of Surface Phonon Coupling in Boron Nitride Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gilburd, Leonid; Xu, Xiaoji G; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Walker, Gilbert C

    2016-01-21

    Surface phonon modes are lattice vibrational modes of a solid surface. Two common surface modes, called longitudinal and transverse optical modes, exhibit lattice vibration along or perpendicular to the direction of the wave. We report a two-color, infrared pump-infrared probe technique based on scattering type near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) to spatially resolve coupling between surface phonon modes. Spatially varying couplings between the longitudinal optical and surface phonon polariton modes of boron nitride nanotubes are observed, and a simple model is proposed. PMID:26727539

  15. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type divided into two compartments by a membrane is disclosed. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid to produce a positive electric potential. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid to produce a negative potential. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the lead deplates from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode acts as a catalyst to increase current density.

  16. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J.

    1981-06-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type divided into two compartments by a membrane is disclosed. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid to produce a positive electric potential. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid to produce a negative potential. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the lead deplates from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode acts as a catalyst to increase current density.

  17. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic REDOX couple

    SciTech Connect

    Giner, J.D.; Cahill, K.J.

    1981-06-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type divided into two compartments by a membrane is disclosed. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid to produce a positive electric potential. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid to produce a negative potential. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the lead deplates from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode acts as a catalyst to increase current density.

  18. Stability analysis and simulations of coupled bulk-surface reaction–diffusion systems

    PubMed Central

    Madzvamuse, Anotida; Chung, Andy H. W.; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we formulate new models for coupled systems of bulk-surface reaction–diffusion equations on stationary volumes. The bulk reaction–diffusion equations are coupled to the surface reaction–diffusion equations through linear Robin-type boundary conditions. We then state and prove the necessary conditions for diffusion-driven instability for the coupled system. Owing to the nature of the coupling between bulk and surface dynamics, we are able to decouple the stability analysis of the bulk and surface dynamics. Under a suitable choice of model parameter values, the bulk reaction–diffusion system can induce patterning on the surface independent of whether the surface reaction–diffusion system produces or not, patterning. On the other hand, the surface reaction–diffusion system cannot generate patterns everywhere in the bulk in the absence of patterning from the bulk reaction–diffusion system. For this case, patterns can be induced only in regions close to the surface membrane. Various numerical experiments are presented to support our theoretical findings. Our most revealing numerical result is that, Robin-type boundary conditions seem to introduce a boundary layer coupling the bulk and surface dynamics. PMID:25792948

  19. Coupling surface and subsurface flows with curved interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pu; Yotov, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    A mortar multiscale method is developed for the coupled Stokes andDarcy flows with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition in irregular domains. Conforming Stokes elements and multipoint flux mixed finite elements in Darcy are used to discretize the subdomains on the fine scale. A coarse scale mortar finite element space is used to approximate interface stresses and pressures and impose weakly continuity of velocities and fluxes. Matching conditions on curved interfaces are imposed by mapping the physical grids to reference grids with flat interfaces.

  20. Coupled Subsurface-Surface-Atmosphere Feedbacks: Comparison of Two Coupled Modelling Platforms Applied to a Real Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihani, J.; Larsen, M.; Stisen, S.; Refsgaard, J.; Jensen, K.; Simmer, C.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, a number of simulation platforms with varying complexity which couple groundwater, land surface, and atmospheric models have emerged. These platforms are designed to include processes affecting energy fluxes and soil moisture variations at the land surface such as shallow groundwater, overland flow, and subsurface lateral flow. Previous studies demonstrate the sensitivity of atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and precipitation to land surface energy fluxes and groundwater dynamics, as well as the importance of capturing these interactions through coupled models. This study compares two distributed, physically-based, state-of-the-art hydrological modelling platforms: The ParFlow-CLM-COSMO platform TerrSysMP (Terrestrial System Modelling Platform), developed within the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 32 (TR32), and the HIRHAM-MIKE SHE platform developed within the HOBE Centre for Hydrology and the HYdrological Modelling for Assessing Climate Change Impacts at differeNT Scales (HYACINTS) project. Both platforms differ in the handling of subsurface processes in the unsaturated zone as well as in the coupling approach used. We focus in particular on the inclusion of lateral flow in the unsaturated zone. While both models use the 3D groundwater flow equation in the saturated subsurface region, MIKE SHE implements the 1D Richards' equation to simulate water flow in the unsaturated zone using simulated dynamic groundwater levels from its saturated zone module. ParFlow within TerrSysMP on the other hand includes lateral flows in the unsaturated zone by implementing the 3D Richards' equation for the entire subsurface region. Some of the main questions investigated by this work are: 1. Is the dynamic approach of including lateral flows in the unsaturated zone needed within real watersheds? 2. If so, at which locations and times does it become important? 3. How does lateral flow in the unsaturated zone affect location and effectiveness of zones of

  1. Session on coupled land surface/hydrological/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger

    1993-01-01

    The current model capabilities in the context of land surface interactions with the atmosphere include only one-dimensional characteristics of vegetation and soil surface heat, moisture, momentum, and selected other trace gas fluxes (e.g., CO2). The influence of spatially coherent fluxes that result from landscape heterogeneity were not included. Valuable representations of several aspects of the landscape pattern currently exist. These include digital elevation data and measures of the leaf area index (i.e., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data). A major deficiency, however, is the lack of an ability to sample spatially representative shallow and (especially) deep soil moisture. Numerous mesoscale modeling and observed studies demonstrated the sensitivity of planetary boundary layer structure and deep convection to the magnitude of the surface moisture flux.

  2. Spin-orbit coupling at surfaces and 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Krasovskii, E E

    2015-12-16

    Spin-orbit interaction gives rise to a splitting of surface states via the Rashba effect, and in topological insulators it leads to the existence of topological surface states. The resulting k(//) momentum separation between states with the opposite spin underlies a wide range of new phenomena at surfaces and interfaces, such as spin transfer, spin accumulation, spin-to-charge current conversion, which are interesting for fundamental science and may become the basis for a breakthrough in the spintronic technology. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to reveal the microscopic structure and mechanisms of spin-orbit driven phenomena with the focus on angle and spin-resolved photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy. PMID:26580290

  3. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J.

    1980-03-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type is described. The cell is divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing a solid inert electrode. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid which is circulated through one of the compartments to produce a positive electric potential disposed therein. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid which is circulated through the second compartment to produce a negative potential on an electrode disposed therein. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which was added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the current flows between the electrodes causing the lead to deplate from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode will act as a catalyst to cause increased current density.

  4. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic Redox couple

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, K.J.; Frosch, R.A.; Giner, J.D.

    1981-06-02

    There is disclosed an electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (Redox) type divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing a solid inert electrode. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid which is circulated through one of the compartments to produce a positive electric potential disposed therein. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid which is circulated through the second compartment to produce a negative potential on an electrode disposed therein. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the redox cell is then discharged, the current flows between the electrodes causing the lead to deplate from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode will act as a catalyst to cause increased current density.

  5. Laccase catalyzed covalent coupling of fluorophenols increases lignocellulose surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Kudanga, Tukayi; Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Widsten, Petri; Kandelbauer, Andreas; Jury, Sandra; Heathcote, Carol; Sipilä, Jussi; Weber, Hansjoerg; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2010-04-01

    This work presents for the first time the mechanistic evidence of a laccase-catalyzed method of covalently grafting hydrophobicity enhancing fluorophenols onto Fagus sylvatica veneers. Coupling of fluorophenols onto complex lignin model compounds guaiacylglycerol beta-guaiacyl ether and syringylglycerol beta-guaiacyl ether was demonstrated by LC-MS and NMR. Laccase-mediated coupling increased binding of 4-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]phenol (4,4-F3MPP) and 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenol (4-F3MP) to veneers by 77.1% and 39.2%, respectively. XPS studies showed that laccase-catalyzed grafting of fluorophenols resulted in a fluorine content of 6.39% for 4,4-F3MPP, 3.01% for 4-F3MP and 0.26% for 4-fluoro-2-methylphenol (4,2-FMP). Grafting of the fluorophenols 4,2-FMP, 4-F3MP and 4,4-F3MPP led to a 9.6%, 28.6% and 65.5% increase in hydrophobicity, respectively, when compared to treatments with the respective fluorophenols in the absence of laccase, in good agreement with XPS data. PMID:20044252

  6. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type is described. The cell is divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing a solid inert electrode. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid which is circulated through one of the compartments to produce a positive electric potential disposed therein. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid which is circulated through the second compartment to produce a negative potential on an electrode disposed therein. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which was added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the current flows between the electrodes causing the lead to deplate from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode will act as a catalyst to cause increased current density.

  7. A Coupled Finite-Volume Model for 2-D Surface and 3-D Subsurface Flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface-subsurface interactions are an intrinsic component of the hydrologic response within a watershed; therefore, hydrologic modeling tools should consider these interactions to provide reliable predictions, especially during rainfall-runoff processes. This paper presents a fully implicit coupled...

  8. Coherent coupling of independent grating-surface-emitting diode laser arrays using an external prism

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.W.; Evans, G.A.; Lurie, M.; Hammer, J.M.; Kaiser, C.J.; Liew, S.K. )

    1990-01-08

    Pairs of grating surface-emitting arrays, on a single wafer but free-running, were externally coupled with a prism. The prism acted as an optical coupler between one distributed Bragg reflector in each array. Injection locking was demonstrated by observing a dramatic increase in the lateral coherence of the far field of the prism-coupled arrays.

  9. Surface reactions on thin layers of silane coupling agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, D.G.; Bein, T. )

    1993-11-01

    The reactivity of immobilized functional groups in thin layers of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APS), (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane, (3-bromopropyl)trimethoxysilane, and (8-bromooctyl)trimethoxysilane on oxidized aluminum substrates was studied with reflection-adsorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR), optical ellipsometry and contact-angle measurements. Mass changes on the surface associated with the surface-confined reactions were measured with the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Single layers of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane on oxidized aluminum react with chlorodimethylsilane to give [(-O)[sub 3]Si(CH[sub 2])[sub 3]NH[sub 2][sup +]SiMe[sub 2]H]Cl[sup [minus

  10. Evanescent coupling between surface and linear-defect guided modes in phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicek, Ahmet; Salman, Aysevil; Adem Kaya, Olgun; Ulug, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Evanescent coupling between surface and linear-defect waveguide modes in a two-dimensional phononic crystal of steel cylinders in air is numerically demonstrated. When the ratio of scatterer radii to the lattice constant is set to 0.47 in the square phononic crystal, the two types of modes start interacting if there is one-row separation between the surface and waveguide. Supercell band structure computations through the Finite Element Method suggest that the waveguide band is displaced significantly, whereas the surface band remains almost intact when the waveguide and surface are in close proximity. The two resultant hybrid bands are such that the coupling length, which varies between 8 and 22 periods, initially changes linearly with frequency, while a much sharper variation is observed towards the top of the lower hybrid band. Such small values facilitate the design of compact devices based on heterogeneous coupling. Finite-element simulations demonstrate bilateral coupling behaviour, where waves incident from either the surface or waveguide can efficiently couple to the other side. The coupling lengths calculated from simulation results are in agreement with the values predicted from the supercell band structure. The possible utilisation of the coupling scheme in sensing applications, especially in acoustic Doppler velocimetry, is discussed.

  11. Spin waves in a thin film with magnetoelectric coupling at the surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T.; Camley, R. E.; Livesey, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    The standing spin waves in a thin ferromagnetic film are calculated when the surface magnetization is influenced by magnetoelectric coupling. At the interfaces, inversion symmetry is broken allowing for an energy term that is linear in the electric polarization in the film. For the two film surfaces, the magnetoelectric coupling is opposite in sign and therefore results in asymmetric pinning of the dynamic magnetization. The magnetoelectric pinning alters the spin wave frequencies and also the power absorbed by the material at these resonances.

  12. On the coupling between a supersonic boundary layer and a flexible surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between a two-dimensional, supersonic, laminar boundary layer and a flexible surface is studied using direct numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the plate equation. The flexible surface is forced to vibrate by plane acoustic waves at normal incidence emanated by a sound source located on the side of the flexible surface opposite to the boundary layer. The effect of the source excitation frequency on the surface vibration and boundary layer stability is analyzed. We find that, for frequencies near the fifth natural frequency of the surface or lower, large disturbances are introduced in the boundary layer which may alter its stability characteristics. The interaction between a stable two-dimensional disturbance of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type with the vibrating surface is also studied. We find that the disturbance level is higher over the vibrating flexible surface than that obtained when the surface is rigid, which indicates a strong coupling between flow and structure. However, in the absence of the sound source the disturbance level over the rigid and flexible surfaces are identical. This result is due to the high frequency of the TS disturbance which does not couple with the flexible surface.

  13. Representing Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces Coupled by Conical Intersections in their Full Dimensionality Using Coupled Quasi-Diabatic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarkony, David

    2015-03-01

    The construction of fit single state potential energy surfaces (PESs), analytic representations of ab initio electronic energies and energy gradients, is now well established. These single state PESs, which are essential for accurate quantum dynamics and have found wide application in more approximate quasi-classical treatments, have revolutionized adiabatic dynamics. The situation for nonadiabatic processes involving dissociative and large amplitude motion is less sanguine. In these cases, compared to single electronic state dynamics, both the electronic structure data and the representation are more challenging to determine. We describe the recent development and applications of algorithms that enable description of multiple adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces coupled by conical intersections in their full dimensionality using coupled quasi-diabatic states. These representations are demonstrably quasi-diabatic, provide accurate representations of conical intersection seams and can smooth out the discontinuities in electronic structure energies due to changing active orbital spaces that routinely afflict global multistate representations.

  14. Interfacial Modification of Silica Surfaces Through gamma-Isocyanatopropyl Triethoxy Silane-Amine Coupling Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel,B.; DeLongchamp, D.; Mahoney, C.; Lucas, L.; Fischer, D.; Lin, E.

    2008-01-01

    The development of robust, cost-effective methods to modify surfaces and interfaces without the specialized synthesis of unique coupling agents could provide readily accessible routes to optimize and tailor interfacial properties. We demonstrate that -isocyanatopropyl triethoxysilane (ISO) provides a convenient route to functionalize silica surfaces through coupling reactions with readily available reagents. ISO coupling agents layers (CALs) can be prepared from toluene with triethylamine (TEA), but the coupling reaction of an amine to the ISO CAL does not proceed. We use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and sessile drop contact angle to demonstrate the isocyanate layer is not degraded under coupling conditions. Access to silanes with chemical functionality is possible with ISO by performing the coupling reaction in solution and then depositing the product onto the surface. Two model CAL surfaces are prepared to demonstrate the ease and robust nature of this procedure. The surfaces prepared using this method are the ISO reacted with octadecylamine to produce a hydrocarbon surface of similar quality to octadecyl trichlorosilane (OTS) CALs and with 9-aminofluorene (AFL), an aromatic amine functionality whose silane is otherwise unavailable commercially.

  15. Metamaterial-inspired miniaturized microwave edge coupled surface scanning probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiwatcharagoses, Nophadon; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet; Udpa, Lalita

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a new concept on sub-wavelength resolution imaging and surface scanning using metamaterial based near field sensor array. Multiple split ring resonator structures (SRRs), having different band stop frequencies, are implemented in a microstrip transmission line configuration. A mirror image copy of these resonators is also incorporated on the transmission line to achieve built in frequency references. A smart card is scanned to detect buried antenna and Si chip within the plastic card.

  16. MODFLOW-Based Coupled Surface Water Routing and Groundwater-Flow Simulation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J D; Langevin, C D; White, J T

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible approach for simulating one- and two-dimensional routing of surface water using a numerical surface water routing (SWR) code implicitly coupled to the groundwater-flow process in MODFLOW. Surface water routing in SWR can be simulated using a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations and/or a simplified level-pool approach. SWR can account for surface water flow controlled by backwater conditions caused by small water-surface gradients or surface water control structures. A number of typical surface water control structures, such as culverts, weirs, and gates, can be represented, and it is possible to implement operational rules to manage surface water stages and streamflow. The nonlinear system of surface water flow equations formulated in SWR is solved by using Newton methods and direct or iterative solvers. SWR was tested by simulating the (1) Lal axisymmetric overland flow, (2) V-catchment, and (3) modified Pinder-Sauer problems. Simulated results for these problems compare well with other published results and indicate that SWR provides accurate results for surface water-only and coupled surface water/groundwater problems. Results for an application of SWR and MODFLOW to the Snapper Creek area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA are also presented and demonstrate the value of coupled surface water and groundwater simulation in managed, low-relief coastal settings. PMID:24902965

  17. MODFLOW-based coupled surface water routing and groundwater-flow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; White, Jeremy T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible approach for simulating one- and two-dimensional routing of surface water using a numerical surface water routing (SWR) code implicitly coupled to the groundwater-flow process in MODFLOW. Surface water routing in SWR can be simulated using a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations and/or a simplified level-pool approach. SWR can account for surface water flow controlled by backwater conditions caused by small water-surface gradients or surface water control structures. A number of typical surface water control structures, such as culverts, weirs, and gates, can be represented, and it is possible to implement operational rules to manage surface water stages and streamflow. The nonlinear system of surface water flow equations formulated in SWR is solved by using Newton methods and direct or iterative solvers. SWR was tested by simulating the (1) Lal axisymmetric overland flow, (2) V-catchment, and (3) modified Pinder-Sauer problems. Simulated results for these problems compare well with other published results and indicate that SWR provides accurate results for surface water-only and coupled surface water/groundwater problems. Results for an application of SWR and MODFLOW to the Snapper Creek area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA are also presented and demonstrate the value of coupled surface water and groundwater simulation in managed, low-relief coastal settings.

  18. Photoinduced coupling and adsorption of caffeic acid on silver surface studied by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cortés, S.; García-Ramos, J. V.

    1999-12-01

    The effect of light on the caffeic acid (CA) oxidative coupling is studied in aqueous solution and on silver by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). CA can polymerize in aqueous solution or on a metal surface through an oxidative mechanism involving the formation of the corresponding quinone giving rise to characteristic Raman features in each case. We show here that the effect of light in relation to this oxidative coupling is crucial taking place mainly in the solution bulk. The products derived from such polymerization can then adsorb on the silver surface employed for SERS measurements, thus allowing its detection by Raman spectroscopy. The influence of irradiation time and the wavelength of the light employed for the photoinduced coupling was investigated.

  19. Effect of surface modes on coupling to fast waves in the LHRF

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.; Colestock, P.L.

    1990-09-16

    The effect of surface modes of propagation on coupling to fast waves in the LHRF is studied theoretically and experimentally. The previously reported up-down' poloidal phasing asymmetry for coupling to a uniform plasma is shown to be due to the properties of a mode which carries energy along the plasma-conducting wall interface. Comparison of the theory with coupling experiments performed on the PLT tokamak with a phased array of twelve dielectric-loaded waveguides at 800 MHz shows that the observed dependence of the net reflection coefficient on toroidal phase angle can be explained only if the surface wave is taken into account. 43 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Analysis of coupling errors in a physically-based integrated surface water-groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagès, Cécile; Paniconi, Claudio; Sulis, Mauro

    2012-12-01

    Several physically-based models that couple 1D or 2D surface and 3D subsurface flow have recently been developed, but few studies have evaluated the errors directly associated with the different coupling schemes. In this paper we analyze the causes of mass balance error for a conventional and a modified sequential coupling scheme in worst-case scenario simulations of Hortonian runoff generation on a sloping plane catchment. The conventional scheme is noniterative, whereas for the modified scheme the surface-subsurface exchange fluxes are determined via a boundary condition switching procedure that is performed iteratively during resolution of the nonlinear subsurface flow equation. It is shown that the modified scheme generates much lower coupling mass balance errors than the conventional sequential scheme. While both coupling schemes are sensitive to time discretization, the iterative control of infiltration in the modified scheme greatly limits its sensitivity to temporal resolution. Little sensitivity to spatial discretization is observed for both schemes. For the modified scheme the different factors contributing to coupling error are isolated, and the error is observed to be highly correlated to the flood recession duration. More testing, under broader hydrologic contexts and including other coupling schemes, is recommended so that the findings from this first analysis of coupling errors can be extended to other surface water-groundwater models.

  1. Isolating Effects of Terrain and Subsurface Heterogeneity on Land Surface Energy Fluxes using Coupled Surface-Subsurface Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihani, J.; Maxwell, R. M.; Chow, F. K.

    2009-12-01

    Idealized simulations are used to study effects of terrain, subsurface formations, properties, land cover and climatology on the feedbacks between water table depth and energy fluxes at the land surface. Vertical and lateral water transport are taken into account in an interactive manner between overland and subsurface flow while having an explicit representation of the water table. This is done by using a three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater code (ParFlow) coupled to a land surface model (the Common Land Model). Results indicate a strong coupling between water table depth and land surface energy fluxes in certain transitional areas between very shallow and very deep water table locations along the hillsides of the simulation cases. Subsurface formations and properties are identified as having the strongest effect on the location, extent, and strength of coupling between water table depth and energy fluxes. These feedbacks are strongly affected by changing thickness of the top-most subsurface formation, and they become more complex as more layers are introduced in the system. Terrain has a more pronounced effect on the hydrology of the system than on the coupling between water table and energy fluxes. Vegetative land cover on the other hand has a small effect on hydrology and water table dynamics, but a large effect on the energy fluxes at the land surface. Two different climatologies are tested and similar trends are observed even with dramatically different atmospheric forcings. A drier climate however will produce narrower transition zones of coupling. This demonstrates that lateral surface and subsurface flows have a great effect on land surface fluxes even for very simplistic terrain and geologic settings. It is thus important that these results are extended to more realistic settings and applied to understand the more complicated coupling processes that occur in a real watershed.

  2. Roles of Surface and Interface Spins in Exchange Coupled Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Manh-Huong

    Exchange bias (EB) in magnetic nanostructures has remained a topic of global interest because of its potential use in spin valves, MRAM circuits, magnetic tunnel junctions, and spintronic devices. The exploration of EB on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to overcoming the superparamagnetic limit and increasing the thermoremanence of magnetic nanoparticles, a critical bottleneck for magnetic data storage applications. Recent advances in chemical synthesis have given us a unique opportunity to explore the EB in a variety of nanoparticle systems ranging from core/shell nanoparticles of Fe/γFe2O3, Co/CoO,and FeO/Fe3O4 to hollow nanoparticles of γFe2O3 and hybrid composite nanoparticles of Au/Fe3O4. Our studies have addressed the following fundamental and important questions: (i) Can one decouple collective contributions of the interface and surface spins to the EB in a core/shell nanoparticle system? (ii) Can the dynamic and static response of the core and shell be identified separately? (iii) Can one tune ``minor loop'' to ``exchange bias'' effects in magnetic hollow nanoparticles by varying the number of surface spins? (iv) Can one decouple collective contributions of the inner and outer surface spins to the EB in a hollow nanoparticle system? (v) Can EB be induced in a magnetic nanoparticle by forming its interface with a non-magnetic metal? Such knowledge is essential to tailor EB in magnetic nanostructures for spintronics applications. In this talk, we will discuss the aforementioned findings in terms of our experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies. The work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award No. DE-FG02-07ER46438.

  3. Localized Surface Plasmons Selectively Coupled to Resonant Light in Tubular Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yin; Li, Shilong; Böttner, Stefan; Yuan, Feifei; Giudicatti, Silvia; Saei Ghareh Naz, Ehsan; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-06-24

    Vertical gold nanogaps are created on microtubular cavities to explore the coupling between resonant light supported by the microcavities and surface plasmons localized at the nanogaps. Selective coupling of optical axial modes and localized surface plasmons critically depends on the exact location of the gold nanogap on the microcavities, which is conveniently achieved by rolling up specially designed thin dielectric films into three-dimensional microtube cavities. The coupling phenomenon is explained by a modified quasipotential model based on perturbation theory. Our work reveals the coupling of surface plasmon resonances localized at the nanoscale to optical resonances confined in microtubular cavities at the microscale, implying a promising strategy for the investigation of light-matter interactions. PMID:27391725

  4. Localized Surface Plasmons Selectively Coupled to Resonant Light in Tubular Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yin; Li, Shilong; Böttner, Stefan; Yuan, Feifei; Giudicatti, Silvia; Saei Ghareh Naz, Ehsan; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical gold nanogaps are created on microtubular cavities to explore the coupling between resonant light supported by the microcavities and surface plasmons localized at the nanogaps. Selective coupling of optical axial modes and localized surface plasmons critically depends on the exact location of the gold nanogap on the microcavities, which is conveniently achieved by rolling up specially designed thin dielectric films into three-dimensional microtube cavities. The coupling phenomenon is explained by a modified quasipotential model based on perturbation theory. Our work reveals the coupling of surface plasmon resonances localized at the nanoscale to optical resonances confined in microtubular cavities at the microscale, implying a promising strategy for the investigation of light-matter interactions.

  5. Spoof surface plasmon polaritons in terahertz transmission through subwavelength hole arrays analyzed by coupled oscillator model

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shan; Lu, Xinchao; Xu, Ningning; Wang, Shuang; E., Yiwen; Pan, Xuecong; Xu, Xinlong; Liu, Hongyao; Chen, Lu; Zhang, Weili; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Both the localized resonance and excitation of spoof surface plasmon polaritons are observed in the terahertz transmission spectra of periodic subwavelength hole arrays. Analyzing with the coupled oscillator model, we find that the terahertz transmission is actually facilitated by three successive processes: the incident terahertz field first initiates the localized oscillation around each hole, and then the spoof surface plasmon polaritons are excited by the localized resonance, and finally the two resonances couple and contribute to the transmission. Tailoring the localized resonance by hole size, the coupling strength between spoof surface plasmon polaritons and localized resonances is quantitatively extracted. The hole size dependent transmittance and the coupling mechanism are further confirmed by fitting the measured spectra to a modified multi-order Fano model. PMID:26548493

  6. Coupling between mantle and surface processes: Insights from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Ágnes; Sembroni, Andrea; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Thermal or density anomalies located beneath the lithosphere are thought to generate dynamic topography. Such a topographic signal compensates the viscous stresses originating from the anomaly driven mantle flow. It has been demonstrated that the erosion modulates the dynamic signal of topography changing the uplift rate by unload. The characteristic time for adjustments of dynamic topography due to surface erosion is likely similar to post-glacial rebound time (10000 - 50000 years). Here we present preliminary results of a new set of analogue models realized to study and quantify the contribution given by erosion to dynamic topography, during a process specifically driven by a positively buoyant deep anomaly. The adopted set up consists of a Plexiglas box (40x40x50 cm3) filled with glucose syrup as analogue upper mantle. A silicon plate positioned on the top of the syrup simulates the lithosphere. On the silicone plate is placed a thin layer of a high viscous glucose syrup which reproduces the upper, erodible layer of the crust. To simulate the positively buoyant anomaly we used an elastic, undeformable silicon ball free to rise by buoyancy in the syrup until the floating silicone plate is hit. The changes in topography have been monitored by using a 3D laser scan, while a side-view camera recorded the position of the rising ball in time. Data have been post-processed with image analysis techniques (e.g., Particle Image Velocimetry) in order to obtain the evolution of topography, uplift rate, erosion patterns of the top layer, bulge width and mantle circulation during the experiment. We ran experiments with and without the shallow, erodible crustal layer in order to quantify the effect of erosion on dynamic topography. Preliminary results showed that both the maximum topography and uplift rate are inversely proportional to the lithospheric thickness. The maximum uplift rate and the deformation of the lithospheric plate occurred just before the arrival of the

  7. High-Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound Used for Three-Dimensional Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    2001-01-01

    To interface with other solids, many surfaces are engineered via methods such as plating, coating, and machining to produce a functional surface ensuring successful end products. In addition, subsurface properties such as hardness, residual stress, deformation, chemical composition, and microstructure are often linked to surface characteristics. Surface topography, therefore, contains the signatures of the surface and possibly links to volumetric properties, and as a result serves as a vital link between surface design, manufacturing, and performance. Hence, surface topography can be used to diagnose, monitor, and control fabrication methods. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the measurement of surface topography is important in developing high-temperature structural materials and for profiling the surface changes of materials during microgravity combustion experiments. A prior study demonstrated that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz could profile surfaces with a 25-m depth resolution and a 400-m lateral resolution over a 1.4-mm depth range. In this work, we address the question of whether higher frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications. To this end, we employed 10- and 25-MHz focused ultrasonic transducers in the water-coupled mode. The surface profile results seen in this investigation for 25-MHz water-coupled ultrasound, in comparison to those for 1-MHz air-coupled ultrasound, represent an 8 times improvement in depth resolution (3 vs. 25 m seen in practice), an improvement of at least 2 times in lateral resolution (180 vs. 400 m calculated and observed in practice), and an improvement in vertical depth range of 4 times (calculated).

  8. Air coupled ultrasonic detection of surface defects in food cans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seco, Fernando; Ramón Jiménez, Antonio; del Castillo, María Dolores

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we describe an ultrasonic inspection system used for detection of surface defects in food cans. The system operates in the pulse-echo mode and analyses the 220 kHz ultrasonic signal backscattered by the object. The classification of samples into valid or defective is achieved with χ2 statistics and the k nearest neighbour method, applied to features computed from the envelope of the ultrasonic echo. The performance of the system is demonstrated empirically in detection of the presence of the pull tab on the removable lid of easy-open food cans, in a production line. It is found that three factors limit the performance of the classification: the misalignment of the samples, their separation of the ultrasonic transducer, and the vibration of the conveyor belt. When these factors are controlled, classification success rates between 94% and 99% are achieved.

  9. Coupled ferric oxides and sulfates on the Martian surface.

    PubMed

    Bibring, J-P; Arvidson, R E; Gendrin, A; Gondet, B; Langevin, Y; Le Mouelic, S; Mangold, N; Morris, R V; Mustard, J F; Poulet, F; Quantin, C; Sotin, C

    2007-08-31

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER), Opportunity, showed that layered sulfate deposits in Meridiani Planum formed during a period of rising acidic ground water. Crystalline hematite spherules formed in the deposits as a consequence of aqueous alteration and were concentrated on the surface as a lag deposit as wind eroded the softer sulfate rocks. On the basis of Mars Express Observatoire pour la Minéralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Activité (OMEGA) orbital data, we demonstrate that crystalline hematite deposits are associated with layered sulfates in other areas on Mars, implying that Meridiani-like ground water systems were indeed widespread and representative of an extensive acid sulfate aqueous system. PMID:17673623

  10. Cleaning of optical surfaces by capacitively coupled RF discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, P. K. Rai, S. K.; Nayak, M.; Lodha, G. S.; Kumar, M.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Mukherjee, C.

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, we report cleaning of carbon capped molybdenum (Mo) thin film by in-house developed radio frequency (RF) plasma reactor, at different powers and exposure time. Carbon capped Mo films were exposed to oxygen plasma for different durations at three different power settings, at a constant pressure. After each exposure, the thickness of the carbon layer and the roughness of the film were determined by hard x-ray reflectivity measurements. It was observed that most of the carbon film got removed in first 15 minutes exposure. A high density layer formed on top of the Mo film was also observed and it was noted that this layer cannot be removed by successive exposures at different powers. A significant improvement in interface roughness with a slight improvement in top film roughness was observed. The surface roughness of the exposed and unexposed samples was also confirmed by atomic force microscopy measurements.

  11. Use of coupled passivants and consolidants on calcite mineral surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, K.L.; Cygan, R.T.; Brinker, C.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Scotto, C.S.

    1997-02-01

    Deterioration of monuments, buildings, and works of art constructed of carbonate-based stone potentially can be arrested by applying a combination of chemical passivants and consolidants that prevent hydrolytic attack and mechanical weakening. The authors used molecular modeling and laboratory synthesis to develop an improved passivating agent for the calcite mineral surface based on binding strength and molecular packing density. The effectiveness of the passivating agent with and without a linked outer layer of consolidant against chemical weathering was determined through leaching tests conducted with a pH-stat apparatus at pH 5 and 25 C. For the range of molecules considered, modeling results indicate that the strongest-binding passivant is the trimethoxy dianionic form of silylalkylaminocarboxylate (SAAC). The same form of silylalkylphosphonate (SAP) is the second strongest binder and the trisilanol neutral form of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) is ranked third. Short-term leaching tests on calcite powders coated with the trisilanol derivative of SAAC, the triethoxy neutral form of SAP, and the trimethoxy neutral form of AEAPS show that the passivant alone does not significantly slow the dissolution rate. However, all passivants when linked to the sol consolidant result in decreased rates. Combined AEAPS plus consolidant results in a coating that performs better than the commercial product Conservare{reg_sign} OH and at least as well as Conservare{reg_sign} H. The modeling results indicate that there may be a threshold binding energy for the passivant above which the dissolution rate of calcite is actually enhanced. More strongly-binding passivants may aid in the dissolution mechanism or dissociate in aqueous solution exposing the calcite surface to water.

  12. Surface modification of basalt with silane coupling agent on asphalt mixture moisture damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Yahong; Fang, Ying; Huang, Xiaojun; Zhu, Yinhui; Li, Wensheng; Yuan, Jianmin; Tan, Ligang; Wang, Shuangyin; Wu, Zhenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new silane coupling agent was synthesized based on γ-(methacryloyloxy) propyltrimethoxysilane (KH570). The surface of basalt rocks was modified by KH570 and the new silane coupling agent (NSCA), and the interfacial interaction between silane coupling agent and basalt was also studied. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis showed that the silane coupling agent molecule bound strongly with basalt rocks. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) observation showed that a thin layer of coupling agent was formed on the surface of modified basalt. The boiling test and immersion Marshall test confirmed that the moisture sensitivity of basalt modified with the new silane coupling agent increased more significantly than that untreated and treated with KH570. The Retained Marshall Strength of basalt modified with the new coupling agent increased from 71.74% to 87.79% compared with untreated basalt. The results indicated that the new silane coupling agent played an important role in improving the interfacial performance between basalt and asphalt.

  13. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Hawke, B.C.

    1963-02-26

    This patent relates to a releasable coupling connecting a control rod to a control rod drive. This remotely operable coupling mechanism can connect two elements which are laterally and angviarly misaligned, and provides a means for sensing the locked condition of the elements. The coupling utilizes a spherical bayonet joint which is locked against rotation by a ball detent lock. (AEC)

  14. Collective properties and strong coupling in the near-field of a meta-surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felbacq, Didier

    2015-08-01

    Meta{surfaces or 2D metamaterials are generally seen as a device able to control the far-field behavior of light. Several studies have shown the possibility of controlling the polarization state, the directivity, the light-by-light manipulation or the generation of second harmonic signal. However, because of their resonant properties, meta{ surfaces also have interesting properties in the near-field. In the present work, a meta{surface made of a set of parallel line distributed dipoles was studied. The coupling of a quantum emitter with the photonic surface modes supported by the meta{surface is investigated.

  15. Vegetation controls on surface heat flux partitioning, and land-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian N.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-11-01

    We provide observational evidence that land-atmosphere coupling is underestimated by a conventional metric defined by the correlation between soil moisture and surface evaporative fraction (latent heat flux normalized by the sum of sensible and latent heat flux). Land-atmosphere coupling is 3 times stronger when using leaf area index as a correlate of evaporative fraction instead of soil moisture, in the Southern Great Plains. The role of vegetation was confirmed using adjacent flux measurement sites having identical atmospheric forcing but different vegetation phenology. Transpiration makes the relationship between evaporative fraction and soil moisture nonlinear and gives the appearance of weak coupling when using linear soil moisture metrics. Regions of substantial coupling extend to semiarid and humid continental climates across the United States, in terms of correlations between vegetation metrics and evaporative fraction. The hydrological cycle is more tightly constrained by the land surface than previously inferred from soil moisture.

  16. Satellite Retrieval of Marine Stratocumulus Surface Coupling State and its Effect on the Clouds Cellular Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, T.; Rosenfeld, D.

    2014-12-01

    A methodology for a complete description of the marine stratocumulus clouds geometrical and microphysical properties was developed and tested. These include, among others, coupling state and cloud geometrical depth. The methodology combines simultaneous observations from several A-TRAIN instruments (CALIPSO, CloudSat and MODIS) and re-analysis data. Analysis of different types of Marine Stratocumulus (MSC) scenes revealed interesting features. While most of the MSC that we have analyzed existed within a coupled Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), those that existed in a de-coupled MBL, i.e., cloud layer that is de-coupled from the ocean surface, lacked the typical spatial cellular organization. It was found that the occurrence of rain within closed cells breaks and organizes them into open cells only when the clouds are coupled with the surface. Otherwise the closed cells remain as thin lightly precipitating stratiform clouds having low cloud water. The coupling state was also found to affect the ability of drizzle to break closed cells, so that closed cells in a de-coupled MBL tend to produce stronger drizzle before breaking up. We hypothesize that rain driven downdrafts hit the surface and form gust fronts that trigger convective elements, which break the cloud deck, only when the clouds are coupled to the surface. Among the other problems that can be answered by using the presented methodology is disentangling the role of large scale meteorology and aerosols on the development of precipitation (i.e., cloud depth versus droplet concentrations as a limiting factor for drizzle initiation). Examples will be shown together with their physical interpretation.

  17. Coupled atmospheric, land surface, and subsurface modeling: Exploring water and energy feedbacks in three-dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Jason H.; Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Sudicky, Edward A.; Lin, John C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities amplified by climate change pose a significant threat to the sustainability of water resources. Coupled climate-hydrologic simulations commonly predict these threats by combining shallow 1-D land surface models (LSMs) with traditional 2-D and 3-D hydrology models. However, these coupled models limit the moisture and energy-feedback dynamics to the shallow near-surface. This paper presents a novel analysis by applying an integrated variably-saturated subsurface/surface hydrology and heat transport model, HydroGeoSphere (HGS), as a land surface model (LSM). Furthermore, this article demonstrates the coupling of HGS to a simple 0-D atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) model. We then applied our coupled HGS-ABL model to three separate test cases and reproduced the strong correlation between the atmospheric energy balance to the depth of the groundwater table. From our simulations, we found that conventional LSMs may overestimate surface temperatures for extended drought periods because they underestimate the heat storage in the groundwater zone. Our final test case of the atmospheric response to drought conditions illustrated that deeper roots buffered the atmosphere better than shallow roots by maintaining higher latent heat fluxes, lower sensible heat fluxes, and lower surface and atmospheric temperatures.

  18. Strong coupling electrostatics for randomly charged surfaces: antifragility and effective interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-05-01

    We study the effective interaction mediated by strongly coupled Coulomb fluids between dielectric surfaces carrying quenched, random monopolar charges with equal mean and variance, both when the Coulomb fluid consists only of mobile multivalent counterions and when it consists of an asymmetric ionic mixture containing multivalent and monovalent (salt) ions in equilibrium with an aqueous bulk reservoir. We analyze the consequences that follow from the interplay between surface charge disorder, dielectric and salt image effects, and the strong electrostatic coupling that results from multivalent counterions on the distribution of these ions and the effective interaction pressure they mediate between the surfaces. In a dielectrically homogeneous system, we show that the multivalent counterions are attracted towards the surfaces with a singular, disorder-induced potential that diverges logarithmically on approach to the surfaces, creating a singular but integrable counterion density profile that exhibits an algebraic divergence at the surfaces with an exponent that depends on the surface charge (disorder) variance. This effect drives the system towards a state of lower thermal 'disorder', one that can be described by a renormalized temperature, exhibiting thus a remarkable antifragility. In the presence of an interfacial dielectric discontinuity, the singular behavior of counterion density at the surfaces is removed but multivalent counterions are still accumulated much more strongly close to randomly charged surfaces as compared with uniformly charged ones. The interaction pressure acting on the surfaces displays in general a highly non-monotonic behavior as a function of the inter-surface separation with a prominent regime of attraction at small to intermediate separations. This attraction is caused directly by the combined effects from charge disorder and strong coupling electrostatics of multivalent counterions, which dominate the surface-surface repulsion due to

  19. Properties Data for Adhesion and Surface Chemistry of Aluminum: Sapphire-Aluminum, Single-Crystal Couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pohlchuck, Bobby; Whitle, Neville C.; Hector, Louis G., Jr.; Adams, Jim

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and surface chemistry of single-crystal aluminum in contact with single-crystal sapphire (alumina). Pull-off force (adhesion) measurements were conducted under loads of 0. I to I mN in a vacuum of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) at room temperature. An Auger electron spectroscopy analyzer incorporated directly into an adhesion-measuring vacuum system was primarily used to define the chemical nature of the surfaces before and after adhesion measurements. The surfaces were cleaned by argon ion sputtering. With a clean aluminum-clean -sapphire couple the mean value and standard deviation of pull-off forces required to separate the surfaces were 3015 and 298 micro-N, respectively. With a contaminated aluminum-clean sapphire couple these values were 231 and 241 micro-N. The presence of a contaminant film on the aluminum surface reduced adhesion by a factor of 13. Therefore, surfaces cleanliness, particularly aluminum cleanliness, played an important role in the adhesion of the aluminum-sapphire couples. Pressures on the order of 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) maintained a clean aluminum surface for only a short time (less then 1 hr) but maintained a clean sapphire surface, once it was achieved, for a much longer time.

  20. Efficient coupling of light to graphene plasmons by compressing surface polaritons with tapered bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, A Yu; Alonso-González, P; Hillenbrand, R

    2014-05-14

    Graphene plasmons promise exciting nanophotonic and optoelectronic applications. Owing to their extremely short wavelengths, however, the efficient coupling of photons to propagating graphene plasmons-critical for the development of future devices-can be challenging. Here, we propose and numerically demonstrate coupling between infrared photons and graphene plasmons by the compression of surface polaritons on tapered bulk slabs of both polar and doped semiconductor materials. Propagation of surface phonon polaritons (in SiC) and surface plasmon polaritons (in n-GaAs) along the tapered slabs compresses the polariton wavelengths from several micrometers to around 200 nm, which perfectly matches the wavelengths of graphene plasmons. The proposed coupling device allows for a 25% conversion of the incident energy into graphene plasmons and, therefore, could become an efficient route toward graphene plasmon circuitry. PMID:24773123

  1. Time-dependent couplings and crossover length scales in nonequilibrium surface roughening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradas, Marc; López, Juan M.; Hernández-Machado, A.

    2007-07-01

    We show that time-dependent couplings may lead to nontrivial scaling properties of the surface fluctuations of the asymptotic regime in nonequilibrium kinetic roughening models. Three typical situations are studied. In the case of a crossover between two different rough regimes, the time-dependent coupling may result in anomalous scaling for scales above the crossover length. In a different setting, for a crossover from a rough to either a flat or damping regime, the time-dependent crossover length may conspire to produce a rough surface, although the most relevant term tends to flatten the surface. In addition, our analysis sheds light into an existing debate in the problem of spontaneous imbibition, where time-dependent couplings naturally arise in theoretical models and experiments.

  2. Investigation of Surface Flux Feedbacks for Coupled and Uncoupled Atmosphere-Ocean Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, F. R.

    2010-01-01

    Variability in the atmosphere and ocean are linked through coupled processes via the surface exchanges of heat, moisture, and momentum. This coupling can occur predominantly via one-way (ocean forcing atmosphere or atmosphere forcing ocean) or two-way interactions. The dominant type of interaction can vary both regionally and with season. The existence of the coupled variability can act to enhance the persistence of anomalies and therefore may be important to seasonal (and longer) forecasts. The leading components of surface exchange that regulate the damping of the atmospheric and oceanic anomalies most likely also varies regionally and seasonally. This study seeks to elucidate the roles of the various surface flux components using satellite based data sets. Using dynamical relationships expected for one-way forcing regimes, coupled and uncoupled variability is isolated and used in conjunction with composite-type analyses to reveal the nature of these coupling mechanisms and their variation in space and time. Results of this study can be useful in examining the veracity of general circulation model output by understanding how the coupling mechanisms are replicated as found in satellite based observations.

  3. Applications of time-domain spectroscopy to electron-phonon coupling dynamics at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu

    2014-10-01

    Photochemistry is one of the most important branches in chemistry to promote and control chemical reactions. In particular, there has been growing interest in photoinduced processes at solid surfaces and interfaces with liquids such as water for developing efficient solar energy conversion. For example, photoinduced charge transfer between adsorbates and semiconductor substrates at the surfaces of metal oxides induced by photogenerated holes and electrons is a core process in photovoltaics and photocatalysis. In these photoinduced processes, electron-phonon coupling plays a central role. This paper describes how time-domain spectroscopy is applied to elucidate electron-phonon coupling dynamics at metal and semiconductor surfaces. Because nuclear dynamics induced by electronic excitation through electron-phonon coupling take place in the femtosecond time domain, the pump-and-probe method with ultrashort pulses used in time-domain spectroscopy is a natural choice for elucidating the electron-phonon coupling at metal and semiconductor surfaces. Starting with a phenomenological theory of coherent phonons generated by impulsive electronic excitation, this paper describes a couple of illustrative examples of the applications of linear and nonlinear time-domain spectroscopy to a simple adsorption system, alkali metal on Cu(111), and more complex photocatalyst systems. PMID:25139240

  4. Estimating long-term surface hydrological components by coupling remote sensing observation with surface flux model.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.

    2002-05-02

    A model framework for parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) has been applied to use satellite data, models, and routine surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture content and evapotranspiration rate with moderate spatial resolution within Walnut River Watershed in Kansas. Biweekly composite normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) data are derived from observations by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Local surface observations provide data on downwelling solar irradiance, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. Surface parameters including roughness length, albedo, surface water conductance, and the ratio of soil heat flux to net radiation are estimated; pixel-specific near-surface meteorological conditions such as air temperature, vapor pressure, and wind speed are adjusted according to local surface forcing. The PASS modeling system makes effective use of satellite data and can be run for large areas for which flux data do not exist and surface meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. The long-term surface hydrological budget is evaluated using radar-derived precipitation estimates, surface meteorological observations, and satellite data. The modeled hydrological components in the Walnut River Watershed compare well with stream gauge data and observed surface fluxes during 1999.

  5. Efficient coupling and transport of a surface plasmon at 780 nm in a gold nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-08-01

    We study plasmonic nanostructures in single-crystal gold with scanning electron and femtosecond photoemission electron microscopies. We design an integrated laser coupling and nanowire waveguide structure by focused ion beam lithography in single-crystal gold flakes. The photoemission results show that the laser field is efficiently coupled into a propagating surface plasmon by a simple hole structure and propagates efficiently in an adjacent nano-bar waveguide. A strong local field is created by the propagating surface plasmon at the nano-bar tip. A similar structure, with a decreased waveguide width and thickness, displayed significantly more intense photoemission indicating enhanced local electric field at the sharper tip.

  6. Efficient out-coupling and beaming of Tamm optical states via surface plasmon polariton excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Garcia, M.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Taverne, M. P. C.; Chen, L.-F.; Rarity, J. G.; Oulton, R.; Murshidy, M. M.; Edwards, A. P.; Adawi, A. M.; Serry, M. Y.

    2014-06-09

    We present evidence of optical Tamm states to surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupling. We experimentally demonstrate that for a Bragg stack with a thin metal layer on the surface, hybrid Tamm-SPP modes may be excited when a grating on the air-metal interface is introduced. Out-coupling via the grating to free space propagation is shown to enhance the transmission as well as the directionality and polarization selection for the transmitted beam. We suggest that this system will be useful on those devices, where a metallic electrical contact as well as beaming and polarization control is needed.

  7. Efficient Coupling and Transport of a Surface Plasmon at 780 nm in a Gold Nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-08-28

    We studied plasmonic nanostructures in single-crystal gold with scanning electron and femtosecond photoemission electron microscopies. We designed an integrated laser coupling and nanowire waveguide structure by focused ion beam lithography in single-crystal gold flakes. The photoemission results show that the laser field is efficiently coupled into a propagating surface plasmon by a simple hole structure and propagates efficiently in an adjacent nano-bar waveguide. A strong local field is created by the propagating surface plasmon at the nano-bar tip. A similar structure, with a decreased waveguide width and thickness, displayed significantly more intense photoemission indicating enhanced local electric field at the sharper tip.

  8. Phononic crystal surface mode coupling and its use in acoustic Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Ahmet; Salman, Aysevil; Kaya, Olgun Adem; Ulug, Bulent

    2016-02-01

    It is numerically shown that surface modes of two-dimensional phononic crystals, which are Bloch modes bound to the interface between the phononic crystal and the surrounding host, can couple back and forth between the surfaces in a length scale determined by the separation of two surfaces and frequency. Supercell band structure computations through the finite-element method reveal that the surface band of an isolated surface splits into two bands which support either symmetric or antisymmetric hybrid modes. When the surface separation is 3.5 times the lattice constant, a coupling length varying between 30 and 48 periods can be obtained which first increases linearly with frequency and, then, decreases rapidly. In the linear regime, variation of coupling length can be used as a means of measuring speeds of objects on the order of 0.1m/s by incorporating the Doppler shift. Speed sensitivity can be improved by increasing surface separation at the cost of larger device sizes. PMID:26565078

  9. Building Conjugated Organic Structures on Si(111) Surfaces via Microwave-Assisted Sonogashira Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jui-Ching; Kim, Jun-Hyun; Kellar, Joshua A.; Hersam, Mark C.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Bedzyk, Michael J.

    2010-08-27

    A novel step-by-step method employing microwave-assisted Sonogashira coupling is developed to grow fully conjugated organosilicon structures. As the first case study, p-(4-bromophenyl)acetylene is covalently conjugated to a p-(4-iodophenyl)acetylene-derived monolayer on a Si(111) surface. By bridging the two aromatic rings with C {triple_bond} C, the pregrown monolayer is structurally extended outward from the Si surface, forming a fully conjugated (p-(4-bromophenylethynyl)phenyl)vinylene film. The film growth process, which reaches 90% yield after 2 h, is characterized thoroughly at each step by using X-ray reflectivity (XRR), X-ray standing waves (XSW), and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The high yield and short reaction time offered by microwave-assisted surface Sonogashira coupling chemistry make it a promising strategy for functionalizing Si surfaces.

  10. Long-term Simulations of Pluto's Atmosphere and Surface as a Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, Angela M.

    2015-11-01

    Previous work has modeled either Pluto's atmosphere or surface/subsurface as separate entities. In reality, these two regions should be coupled energetically and physically because of the accumulation, sublimation, and transport of volatiles (here, N2). Simulation results over multi-Pluto years are presented from a general circulation model that has both detailed atmospheric and surface/subsurface modules. As the initial model conditions that will ultimately reproduce the observed surface pressures from New Horizons, stellar occultation data, and spectroscopic observations are not known, by trial and error the model is initialized with different surface pressures and amounts of surface ice (collectively known as the volatile inventory). This “brute force” method is now a viable strategy given the ongoing development of the Pluto general circulation model (based on the MIT general circulation model dynamical core; Zalucha & Michaels 2013) and modern supercomputing power. The coupled atmosphere and surface/subsurface model is run until a yearly repeatable frost cycle occurs (if at all). Surface coverage of volatiles and surface pressure will be presented from the various scenarios. Ancillary variables such temperature (of both the atmosphere and surface/subsurface) and wind direction and magnitude will also be shown for cases of particular interest.

  11. Linking Tectonics and Surface Processes through SNAC-CHILD Coupling: Preliminary Results Towards Interoperable Modeling Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E.; Kelbert, A.; Peckham, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that code coupling can be an efficient and flexible method for modeling complicated two-way interactions between tectonic and surface processes with SNAC-CHILD coupling as an example. SNAC is a deep earth process model (a geodynamic/tectonics model), built upon a scientific software framework called StGermain and also compatible with a model coupling framework called Pyre. CHILD is a popular surface process model (a landscape evolution model), interfaced to the CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System) modeling framework. We first present proof-of-concept but non-trivial results from a simplistic coupling scheme. We then report progress towards augmenting SNAC with a Basic Model Interface (BMI), a framework-agnostic standard interface developed by CSDMS that uses the CSDMS Standard Names as controlled vocabulary for model communication across domains. Newly interfaced to BMI, SNAC will be easily coupled with CHILD as well as other BMI-compatible models. In broader context, this work will test BMI as a general and easy-to-implement mechanism for sharing models between modeling frameworks and is a part of the NSF-funded EarthCube Building Blocks project, "Earth System Bridge: Spanning Scientific Communities with Interoperable Modeling Frameworks."

  12. A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced grating-coupling phase-interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Sonato, A; Agostini, M; Ruffato, G; Gazzola, E; Liuni, D; Greco, G; Travagliati, M; Cecchini, M; Romanato, F

    2016-03-23

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor in which SAW-induced mixing and phase-interrogation grating-coupling SPR are combined in a single lithium niobate lab-on-a-chip is demonstrated. Thiol-polyethylene glycol adsorption and avidin/biotin binding kinetics were monitored by exploiting the high sensitivity of grating-coupling SPR under azimuthal control. A time saturation binding kinetics reduction of 82% and 24% for polyethylene and avidin adsorption was obtained, respectively, due to the fluid mixing enhancement by means of the SAW-generated chaotic advection. These results represent the first implementation of a nanostructured SAW-SPR microfluidic biochip capable of significantly improving the molecule binding kinetics on a single, portable device. In addition, the biochip here proposed is suitable for a great variety of biosensing applications. PMID:26932784

  13. Experimental and theoretical evaluation of surface plasmon-coupled emission for sensitive fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Trnavsky, Michal; Enderlein, Joerg; Ruckstuhl, Thomas; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D

    2008-01-01

    Surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) is a phenomenon whereby the light emitted from a fluorescent molecule can couple into the surface plasmon of an adjacent metal layer, resulting in highly directional emission in the region of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angle. In addition to high directionality of emission, SPCE has the added advantage of surface selectivity in that the coupling diminishes with increasing distance from the surface. This effect can be exploited in bioassays whereby a fluorescing background from the sample can be suppressed. We have investigated, both theoretically and experimentally, the SPCE effect for a Cy5-spacer-Ag layer system. Both the angular dependence of emission and the dependence of SPCE emission intensity on Cy5-metal separation were investigated. It is demonstrated that SPCE leads to lower total fluorescence signal than that obtained in the absence of a metal layer. This is the first experimental verification of the reduction in SPCE intensity compared to the metal-free case. Our results are in a good agreement with theoretical models. The validation of the theoretical model provides a basis for optimizing biosensor platform performance, particularly in the context of the advantages offered by SPCE of highly directional emission and surface selectivity. PMID:19021401

  14. Enhanced electron-phonon coupling for a semiconductor charge qubit in a surface phonon cavity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J. C. H.; Sato, Y.; Kosaka, R.; Hashisaka, M.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a major decoherence mechanism, which often causes scattering and energy dissipation in semiconductor electronic systems. However, this electron-phonon coupling may be used in a positive way for reaching the strong or ultra-strong coupling regime in an acoustic version of the cavity quantum electrodynamic system. Here we propose and demonstrate a phonon cavity for surface acoustic waves, which is made of periodic metal fingers that constitute Bragg reflectors on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Phonon band gap and cavity phonon modes are identified by frequency, time and spatially resolved measurements of the piezoelectric potential. Tunneling spectroscopy on a double quantum dot indicates the enhancement of phonon assisted transitions in a charge qubit. This encourages studying of acoustic cavity quantum electrodynamics with surface phonons. PMID:26469629

  15. Enhanced electron-phonon coupling for a semiconductor charge qubit in a surface phonon cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. C. H.; Sato, Y.; Kosaka, R.; Hashisaka, M.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2015-10-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a major decoherence mechanism, which often causes scattering and energy dissipation in semiconductor electronic systems. However, this electron-phonon coupling may be used in a positive way for reaching the strong or ultra-strong coupling regime in an acoustic version of the cavity quantum electrodynamic system. Here we propose and demonstrate a phonon cavity for surface acoustic waves, which is made of periodic metal fingers that constitute Bragg reflectors on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Phonon band gap and cavity phonon modes are identified by frequency, time and spatially resolved measurements of the piezoelectric potential. Tunneling spectroscopy on a double quantum dot indicates the enhancement of phonon assisted transitions in a charge qubit. This encourages studying of acoustic cavity quantum electrodynamics with surface phonons.

  16. Plasmonic coupled-cavity system for enhancement of surface plasmon localization in plasmonic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, K. J. A.; Bai, P.; Gu, M. X.; Ang, L. K.

    2012-07-01

    A plasmonic coupled-cavity system, which consists of a quarter-wave coupler cavity, a resonant Fabry-Pérot detector nanocavity, and an off-resonant reflector cavity, is used to enhance the localization of surface plasmons in a plasmonic detector. The coupler cavity is designed based on transmission line theory and wavelength scaling rules in the optical regime, while the reflector cavity is derived from off-resonant resonator structures to attenuate transmission of plasmonic waves. We observed strong coupling of the cavities in simulation results, with an 86% improvement of surface plasmon localization achieved. The plasmonic coupled-cavity system may find useful applications in areas of nanoscale photodetectors, sensors, and an assortment of plasmonic-circuit devices.

  17. Enhanced electron-phonon coupling for a semiconductor charge qubit in a surface phonon cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, J C H; Sato, Y; Kosaka, R; Hashisaka, M; Muraki, K; Fujisawa, T

    2015-01-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a major decoherence mechanism, which often causes scattering and energy dissipation in semiconductor electronic systems. However, this electron-phonon coupling may be used in a positive way for reaching the strong or ultra-strong coupling regime in an acoustic version of the cavity quantum electrodynamic system. Here we propose and demonstrate a phonon cavity for surface acoustic waves, which is made of periodic metal fingers that constitute Bragg reflectors on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Phonon band gap and cavity phonon modes are identified by frequency, time and spatially resolved measurements of the piezoelectric potential. Tunneling spectroscopy on a double quantum dot indicates the enhancement of phonon assisted transitions in a charge qubit. This encourages studying of acoustic cavity quantum electrodynamics with surface phonons. PMID:26469629

  18. Coupling of a dipolar emitter into one-dimensional surface plasmon

    PubMed Central

    Barthes, Julien; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Dereux, Alain; Francs, Gérard Colas des

    2013-01-01

    Quantum plasmonics relies on a new paradigm for light–matter interaction. It benefits from strong confinement of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) that ensures efficient coupling at a deep subwavelength scale, instead of working with a long lifetime cavity polariton that increases the duration of interaction. The large bandwidth and the strong confinement of one dimensional SPP enable controlled manipulation of a nearby quantum emitter. This paves the way to ultrafast nanooptical devices. However, the large SPP bandwidth originates from strong losses so that a clear understanding of the coupling process is needed. In this report, we investigate in details the coupling between a single emitter and a plasmonic nanowire, but also SPP mediated coupling between two emitters. We notably clarify the role of losses in the Purcell factor, unavoidable to achieve nanoscale confinement down to 10−4(λ/n)3. Both the retarded and band-edge quasi-static regimes are discussed. PMID:24061164

  19. Using High Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound for 3-D Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. A prior study was performed demonstrating that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz was capable of profiling surfaces with 25 micron depth resolution and 400 micron lateral resolution over a 1.4 mm depth range. In this article, the question of whether higher-frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications is addressed. 10 and 25 MHz focused ultrasonic transducers were employed in the water-coupled mode. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface were acquired and converted to depth / surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in water (V). Results are compared for the two frequencies used and with those from the 1 MHz air-coupled configuration.

  20. Organisation and ordering of 1D porphyrin polymers synthesised by on-surface Glaser coupling.

    PubMed

    Saywell, Alex; Browning, Abigail S; Rahe, Philipp; Anderson, Harry L; Beton, Peter H

    2016-08-16

    One-dimensional polymer chains consisting of π-conjugated porphyrin units are formed via Glaser coupling on a Ag(111) surface. Scanning probe microscopy reveals the covalent structure of the products and their ordering. The conformational flexibility within the chains is investigated via a comparision of room temperature and cryogenic measurements. PMID:27348050

  1. Purcell factor based understanding of enhancements in surface plasmon-coupled emission with DNA architectures.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, S; Badiya, Pradeep Kumar; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2016-01-14

    We demonstrate the successful application of DNA thin films as dynamic bio-spacers in a surface plasmon-coupled emission platform. Site-directed DNA modification using silver and carbon nanomaterials resulted in an amplified Purcell factor (PF) and >130-fold fluorescence enhancements. We present unique architectures of DNA as a plasmonic spacer in metal-dielectric-metal substrates. PMID:26651026

  2. Tamm plasmon- and surface plasmon-coupled emission from hybrid plasmonic–photonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yikai; Zhang, Douguo; Zhu, Liangfu; Wang, Ruxue; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Photonic and plasmon-coupled emissions present new opportunities for control on light emission from fluorophores, and have many applications in the physical and biological sciences. The mechanism of and the influencing factors for the coupling between the fluorescent molecules and plasmon and/or photonic modes are active areas of research. In this paper, we describe a hybrid photonic–plasmonic structure that simultaneously contains two plasmon modes: surface plasmons (SPs) and Tamm plasmons (TPs), both of which can modulate fluorescence emission. Experimental results show that both SP-coupled emission (SPCE) and TP-coupled emission (TPCE) can be observed simultaneously with this hybrid structure. Due to the different resonant angles of the TP and SP modes, the TPCE and SPCE can be beamed in different directions and can be separated easily. Back focal plane images of the fluorescence emission show that the relative intensities of the SPCE and TPCE can be changed if the probes are at different locations inside the hybrid structure, which reveals the probe location-dependent different coupling strengths of the fluorescent molecules with SPs and TPs. The different coupling strengths are ascribed to the electric field distribution of the two modes in the structure. Here, we present an understanding of these factors influencing mode coupling with probes, which is vital for structure design for suitable applications in sensing and diagnostics. PMID:26526929

  3. Development of a Coupled Land Surface and Ground Water Model for use in Watershed Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Miller, N. L.

    2003-12-01

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budgets that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, models for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM2.0) and a variably-saturated groundwater model (ParFlow) have been coupled as a single column model. An initial set of simulations based on data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) and synthetic data demonstrate the temporal dynamics of both of the coupled models. Changes in soil moisture and movement of the water table are used as indicators of conservation of mass between the two models. Sensitivity studies demonstrate the affect of precipitation, evapotransporation, radiation, subsurface geology and heterogeneity on predicted watershed flow. The coupled model will ultimately be used to assist in the development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs - a surface water quality standard) for a number of pollutants in an urban watershed in Southern California in the United States. Sensitivity studies demonstrating the

  4. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  5. A hierarchical framework for coupling surface fluxes to atompsheric general circulation models: The homogeneity test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.

    1993-01-01

    The atmosphere and the biosphere are inherently coupled to one another. Atmospheric surface state variables such as temperature, winds, water vapor, precipitation, and radiation control biophysical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes at the surface and subsurface. At the same time, surface fluxes of momentum, moisture, heat, and trace gases act as time-dependent boundary conditions providing feedback on atmospheric processes. To understand such phenomena, a coupled set of interactive models is required. Costs are still prohibitive for computing surface/subsurface fluxes directly for medium-resolution atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs), but a technique has been developed for testing large-scale homogeneity and accessing surface parameterizations and models to reduce this computational cost and maintain accuracy. This modeling system potentially bridges the observed spatial and temporal ranges yet allows the incorporation of necessary details about individual ecological community types or biomes and simulates the net momentum, heat, moisture, and trace gas fluxes. This suite of coupled models is defined here as the hierarchical systems flux scheme (HSFS).

  6. Selectable Surface and Bulk Fluorescence Imaging with Plasmon-Coupled Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruxue; Zhang, Douguo; Zhu, Liangfu; Wen, Xiaolei; Chen, Junxue; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, we propose a new method for selective imaging of surface bound probes or simultaneous imaging of surface bound plus fluorescence from dye molecules in bulk water solution. The principle of this method relies on use of two optical modes with different mode distributions, filed decay lengths and polarization states that are sustaining in a plasmon waveguide. The two modes with different decay lengths couple with dye molecules of different regions, at different distances from the PCW-water interface. The emission from two different regions occur as two coupled emission rings with different polarizations and emitting angles in the back focal plane (BFP) images. By using an electric-driven liquid crystal in BFP imaging, we selectively imaged surface or surface plus bulk fluorescence. Accordingly two coupled emissions can be switched ON or OFF independently, that are for either surface or bulk fluorescence imaging. Our work provides a new method for fluorescence imaging or sensing just by using a planar multilayer film, which may be a useful for fluorescence-based techniques in chemistry, materials science, molecular biology, and medicine. PMID:26523158

  7. A hierarchical framework for coupling surface fluxes to atompsheric general circulation models: The homogeneity test

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.

    1993-12-31

    The atmosphere and the biosphere are inherently coupled to one another. Atmospheric surface state variables such as temperature, winds, water vapor, precipitation, and radiation control biophysical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes at the surface and subsurface. At the same time, surface fluxes of momentum, moisture, heat, and trace gases act as time-dependent boundary conditions providing feedback on atmospheric processes. To understand such phenomena, a coupled set of interactive models is required. Costs are still prohibitive for computing surface/subsurface fluxes directly for medium-resolution atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs), but a technique has been developed for testing large-scale homogeneity and accessing surface parameterizations and models to reduce this computational cost and maintain accuracy. This modeling system potentially bridges the observed spatial and temporal ranges yet allows the incorporation of necessary details about individual ecological community types or biomes and simulates the net momentum, heat, moisture, and trace gas fluxes. This suite of coupled models is defined here as the hierarchical systems flux scheme (HSFS).

  8. Precision Surface-Coupled Optical-Trapping Assay with One-Basepair Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Ashley R.; Seol, Yeonee; Perkins, Thomas T.

    2009-01-01

    The most commonly used optical-trapping assays are coupled to surfaces, yet such assays lack atomic-scale (∼0.1 nm) spatial resolution due to drift between the surface and trap. We used active stabilization techniques to minimize surface motion to 0.1 nm in three dimensions and decrease multiple types of trap laser noise (pointing, intensity, mode, and polarization). As a result, we achieved nearly the thermal limit (<0.05 nm) of bead detection over a broad range of trap stiffness (kT = 0.05–0.5 pN/nm) and frequency (Δf = 0.03–100 Hz). We next demonstrated sensitivity to one-basepair (0.34-nm) steps along DNA in a surface-coupled assay at moderate force (6 pN). Moreover, basepair stability was achieved immediately after substantial (3.4 pN) changes in force. Active intensity stabilization also led to enhanced force precision (∼0.01%) that resolved 0.1-pN force-induced changes in DNA hairpin unfolding dynamics. This work brings the benefit of atomic-scale resolution, currently limited to dual-beam trapping assays, along with enhanced force precision to the widely used, surface-coupled optical-trapping assay. PMID:19348774

  9. A Coupled Land Surface-Subsurface Biogeochemical Model for Aqueous and Gaseous Nitrogen Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Maggi, F.; Riley, W.; Pan, L.; Xu, T.; Oldenburg, C.; Miller, N.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to nitrate (NOB3PB-P) water pollution and atmospheric pollution of nitrous oxide (NB2BO), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NHB3B). Characterizing the amount and species of N losses is therefore essential in developing a strategy to estimate and mitigate N leaching and emission to the atmosphere. Indeed, transformations of nitrogen depend strongly on water content, soil temperature, and nitrogen concentration. Land surface processes therefore have to be taken into account to properly characterize N biogeochemical cycling. However, most current nitrogen biogeochemical models take the land surface as the upper boundary by lumping the complex processes above the surface as known boundary conditions. In this study, an extant subsurface mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was coupled with the community land model (CLM). The resulting coupled model extends the modeling capability of TOUGHREACT-N to include the important energy, momentum, and moisture dynamics provided by CLM. The coupled model showed a significant impact of land-surface diurnal forcing on soil temperature and moisture and on nitrogen fluxes. We also discuss field applications of the model and discuss how temporal dynamics of nitrogen fluxes are affected by land surface processes.

  10. Areal and Shear Strain Coupling of PBO Borehole Strainmeters From Teleseismic Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeloffs, E.; McCausland, W.

    2007-12-01

    In order to compare borehole strainmeter data with tectonic models, we must know the coupling parameters relating elastic deformation of the strainmeter to strain in the surrounding rock. At least two coupling parameters are required: the ratios of instrument areal and shear strain to formation areal and shear strain, respectively. These coupling parameters depend on the relative elastic moduli of the formation, grout, and strainmeter, and typical elastic moduli yield nominal coupling parameters of 1.5 and 3. More accurate coupling parameters must be determined by analyzing each strainmeter's response to a known deformation source after the instrument has been grouted into the borehole. Borehole strainmeters installed by the National Science Foundation-funded Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) consist of four gauges, sampled at 20 Hz, that measure extension along distinct azimuths. Teleseismic Love and Rayleigh waves that produce fractional gauge elongations > 10-7 , such as those from the M8.3 Kuril Islands earthquake of November 15, 2006, can be used to constrain the coupling parameters. A planar Love or Rayleigh wave is expected to have a simple strain field that produces the same waveform on all four gauges of a strainmeter. The two-parameter coupling model is consistent with the variation of surface wave amplitudes as functions of azimuth for the borehole strainmeter data analyzed to date, although most of the PBO strainmeters require that differences in the relative gains of the four gauges be estimated as well. Fits to the data can be improved for some strainmeters by allowing for two distinct shear strain coupling parameters, and/or for a small (<10 degrees) error in the orientation of the strainmeter as measured during installation. However, data from more earthquakes will need to be analyzed before these refinements can be called significant. The Rayleigh wave data provide tight constraints on the ratio of shear to areal coupling. For borehole

  11. Orbital control of Rashba spin orbit coupling in noble metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shi-Jing; Cai, Jia; Yao, Qun-Fang; Tong, Wen-Yi; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang; Chu, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Rashba spin orbit coupling (SOC) in noble metal surfaces is of great importance for the application of metal films in spintronic devices. By combining the density-functional theory calculations with our recently developed orbital selective external potential method, we investigate the Rashba SOC in the Shockley surface states of Au(111) and Ag(111). We find that the large Rashba SOC in the sp-character surface states of Au(111) is mainly contributed by the minor d-orbitals in the surface states. While for the sd-character surface states, although they are dominated by the d-orbitals, Rashba splitting is found to be rather small. Band structure analysis reveals that this is mainly because the sd-character surface states are well below the Fermi level and can be less influenced by the asymmetric surface potential. We demonstrate that the Rashba SOC in noble metal surfaces can be effectively manipulated by shifting the d-orbitals in the surface states, which can be physically implemented through surface decoration. Our investigation provides a deep understanding on Rashba SOC in noble metal surfaces and could be helpful to their applications in spintronic devices.

  12. Translation of Land Surface Model Accuracy and Uncertainty into Coupled Land-Atmosphere Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A.; Kumar, Sujay; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Zhou, Shuija

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) Interactions playa critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface heat and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty estimation module in NASA's Land Information System (US-OPT/UE), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to a land cover and soil type mapping of the observation sites to the full model domain. The impact of calibrated parameters on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF Simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity, and the potential for combining this approach with satellite remote sensing data are also discussed.

  13. Liquid extraction surface analysis in-line coupled with capillary electrophoresis for direct analysis of a solid surface sample.

    PubMed

    Sung, In Hye; Lee, Young Woo; Chung, Doo Soo

    2014-08-01

    A surface-sampling technique of liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) was in-line coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE) to expand the specimen types for CE to solid surfaces. The new direct surface analysis method of LESA-CE was applied to the determination of organophosphorus pesticides, including glufosinate-ammonium, aminomethylphosphonic acid, and glyphosate on the external surface of a fruit such as apple. Without any sample pretreatment, the analytes sprayed on the surface of a half apple were directly extracted into a liquid microjunction formed by dispensing the extractant from the inlet tip of a separation capillary. After extraction, the analytes were derivatized in-capillary with a fluorophore 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole and analyzed with CE-laser induced fluorescence (LIF). The limits of detection for glufosinate-ammonium, aminomethylphosphonic acid, and glyphosate were 2.5, 1, and 10ppb, respectively, which are at least 20 times lower than the tolerance limits established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Thus, we demonstrated that LESA-CE is a quite sensitive and convenient method to determine analytes on a solid surface avoiding the dilution from sample pretreatment procedures including homogenization of a bulk sample. PMID:25064242

  14. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  15. Influence of spacer length on heparin coupling efficiency and fibrinogen adsorption of modified titanium surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tebbe, David; Thull, Roger; Gbureck, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    Background Chemical bonding of the drug onto surfaces by means of spacer molecules is accompanied with a reduction of the biological activity of the drug due to a constricted mobility since normally only short spacer molecule like aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APMS) are used for drug coupling. This work aimed to study covalent attachment of heparin to titanium(oxide) surfaces by varying the length of the silane coupling agent, which should affect the biological potency of the drug due to a higher mobility with longer spacer chains. Methods Covalent attachment of heparin to titanium metal and TiO2 powder was carried out using the coupling agents 3-(Trimethoxysilyl)-propylamine (APMS), N- [3-(Trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylenediamine (Diamino-APMS) and N1- [3-(Trimethoxy-silyl)-propyl]diethylenetriamine (Triamino-APMS). The amount of bound coupling agent and heparin was quantified photometrically by the ninhydrin reaction and the tolidine-blue test. The biological potency of heparin was determined photometrically by the chromogenic substrate Chromozym TH and fibrinogen adsorption to the modified surfaces was researched using the QCM-D (Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring) technique. Results Zeta-potential measurements confirmed the successful coupling reaction; the potential of the unmodified anatase surface (approx. -26 mV) shifted into the positive range (> + 40 mV) after silanisation. Binding of heparin results in a strongly negatively charged surface with zeta-potentials of approx. -39 mV. The retaining biological activity of heparin was highest for the spacer molecule Triamino-APMS. QCM-D measurements showed a lower viscosity for adsorbed fibrinogen films on heparinised surfaces by means of Triamino-APMS. Conclusion The remaining activity of heparin was found to be highest for the covalent attachment with Triamino-APMS as coupling agent due to the long chain of this spacer molecule and therefore the highest mobility of the drug. Furthermore, the

  16. A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer for determination of the posture of a reflective surface.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Peng-Cheng; Ding, Xue-Mei; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2016-08-01

    A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer capable of determining of the posture of a reflective surface of a measuring mirror is proposed. The newly constructed instrument combines fiber-coupled displacement and angular measurement technologies. The proposed interferometer has advantages of both the fiber-coupled and the spatially beam-separated interferometer. A portable dual-position sensitive detector (PSD)-based unit within this proposed interferometer measures the parallelism of the two source beams to guide the fiber-coupling adjustment. The portable dual PSD-based unit measures not only the pitch and yaw of the retro-reflector but also measures the posture of the reflective surface. The experimental results of displacement calibration show that the deviations between the proposed interferometer and a reference one, Agilent 5530, at two different common beam directions are both less than ±35 nm, thus verifying the effectiveness of the beam parallelism measurement. The experimental results of angular calibration show that deviations of pitch and yaw with the auto-collimator (as a reference) are less than ±2 arc sec, thus proving the proposed interferometer's effectiveness for determination of the posture of a reflective surface. PMID:27587101

  17. Beyond Passing Variables: Thinking Like a Coupled Surface-Atmosphere Model (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofgren, B. M.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of evapotranspiration algorithms or surface-atmosphere transfer schemes, from a hydrologic point of view, is to project variables such as soil moisture, runoff, and streamflow. From a meteorological point of view, it is to derive lower boundary conditions for fluxes of sensible heat, water vapor, and radiation, often with a much shorter time scale of interest. Coupled modeling needs to take all of these interests into account, and process-based modeling at the interface seems to be a necessity to do this. Furthermore, a shift to coupled algorithms can also require an adjustment in one's "mental model" or paradigm. For example, in climate change, rather than thinking that the air warms and this has consequences for the surface, a more accurate picture is that warming of both the surface and the troposphere occurs in a tight two-way coupling between them. Examples from the Laurentian Great Lakes region will be shown of paradigms gone amiss, substitution of more energy budget-based approaches to climate change effects on regional hydrology, and regional coupled atmosphere-hydrology models.

  18. Directional Surface Plasmon Coupled Luminescence for Analytical Sensing Applications: Which Metal, What Wavelength, What Observation Angle?

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Kadir; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of luminescent species in the near-field to both induce and couple to surface plasmons has been known for many years, with highly directional emission from films (Surface Plasmon Coupled Luminescence, SPCL) facilitating the development of sensitive near-field assay sensing platforms, to name but just one application. Because of the near-field nature of the effect, only luminescent species (fluorescence, chemiluminescence and phosphorescence) within a few hundred nanometers from the surface play a role in coupling, which in terms of biosensing, provides for limited penetration into optically dense media, such as in whole blood. Another attractive feature is the highly polarized and angular dependent emission which allows both fixed angle and wavelength dependent emission angles to be realized at high polarization ratios. In this paper, a generic procedure based on theoretical Fresnel calculations, which outlines the step-by-step selection of an appropriate metal for SPCL applications is presented. It is also shown that 11 different metals have differing properties in different spectral regions and offer either fixed angle or wavelength-dependent angular shifts in emission. In addition, it is shown that both chemiluminescence and phosphorescence can also be observed in a highly directional manner similar to coupled fluorescence. PMID:19601619

  19. Effects of sensor locations on air-coupled surface wave transmission measurements across a surface-breaking crack.

    PubMed

    Kee, Seong-Hoon; Zhu, Jinying

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies show that the surface wave transmission (SWT) method is effective to determine the depth of a surface-breaking crack in solid materials. However, nearfield wave scattering caused by the crack affects the reliability and consistency of surface wave transmission measurements. Prior studies on near-field scattering have focused on the case where crack depth h is greater than wavelength λ of surface waves (i.e., h/λ > 1). Near-field scattering of surface waves remains not completely understood in the range of h/λ for the SWT method (i.e., 0 ≤ h/λ ≤ 1/3), where the transmission coefficient is sensitive to crack depth change and monotonically decreases with increasing h/λ. In this study, the authors thoroughly investigated the near-field scattering of surface waves caused by a surface-breaking crack using experimental tests and numerical simulations for 0 ≤ h/λ ≤ 1/3. First, the effects of sensor locations on surface wave transmission coefficients across a surface-breaking crack are studied experimentally. Data are collected from Plexiglas and concrete specimens using air-coupled sensors. As a result, the variation of transmission coefficients is expressed in terms of the normalized crack depth (h/λ) as well as the normalized sensor location (x/λ). The validity of finite element models is also verified by comparing experimental results with numerical simulations (finite element method). Second, a series of parametric studies is performed using the verified finite element model to obtain more complete understanding of near-field scattering of surface waves propagating in various solid materials with different mechanical properties and geometric conditions. Finally, a guideline for selecting appropriate sensor arrangements to reliably obtain the crack depth using the SWT method is suggested. PMID:21342828

  20. Polarization-insensitive unidirectional spoof surface plasmon polaritons coupling by gradient metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong-yu, Shi; An-xue, Zhang; Jian-zhong, Chen; Jia-fu, Wang; Song, Xia; Zhuo, Xu

    2016-07-01

    A polarization-insensitive unidirectional spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupler mediated by a gradient metasurface is proposed. The field distributions and average Poynting vector of the coupled spoof SPPs are analyzed. The simulated and experimental results support the theoretical analysis and indicate that the designed gradient metasurface can couple both the parallel-polarized and normally-polarized incident waves to the spoof SPPs propagating in the same direction at about 5 GHz. Project supported by the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2015M580849) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471292, 61501365, 61471388, 61331005, 41404095, and 41390454).

  1. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  2. Surface plasmon mediated strong exciton-photon coupling in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gómez, D E; Vernon, K C; Mulvaney, P; Davis, T J

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental demonstration of strong coupling between a surface plasmon propagating on a planar silver thin film and the lowest excited state of CdSe nanocrystals. Attenuated total reflection measurements demonstrate the formation of plasmon-exciton mixed states, characterized by a Rabi splitting of approximately 112 meV at room temperature. Such a coherent interaction has the potential for the development of nonlinear plasmonic devices, and furthermore, this system is akin to those studied in cavity quantum electrodynamics, thus offering the possibility to study the regime of strong light-matter coupling in semiconductor nanocrystals under easily accessible experimental conditions. PMID:20000744

  3. Simulation of land-atmosphere gaseous exchange using a coupled land surface-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Riley, W. J.; Perez, T. J.; Pan, L.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to develop and evaluate biogeochemical models that on the one hand represent vegetation and soil dynamics and on the other hand provide energy and water fluxes in a temporal resolution suitable for biogeochemical processes. In this study, we present a consistent coupling between a common land surface model (CLM3.0) and a recently developed biogeochemical model (TOUGHREACT-N). The model TOUGHREACT-N (TR-N) is one of the few process-based models that simulate green house gases fluxes by using an implicit scheme to solve the diffusion equations governing soil heat and water fluxes. By coupling with CLM3.0, we have significantly improved TR-N by including realistic representations of surface water, energy, and momentum exchanges, through the use of improved formulations for soil evaporation, plant transpiration, vegetation growth, and plant nitrogen uptake embedded in CLM3.0. The coupled CLMTR-N model is a first step for a full coupling of land surface and biogeochemical processes. The model is evaluated with measurements of soil temperature, soil water content, and N2O and N2 gaseous emission data from fallow, corn, and forest sites in Venezuela. The results demonstrate that the CLMTR-N model simulates realistic diurnal variation of soil temperature, soil water content, and N gaseous fluxes. For example, mean differences between predicted and observed midday near-surface soil water content were 8, 11, and 4 % in July, August, and September. The sensitivity of the biogeochemical processes and resulting N emissions to variation in environmental drivers is high, which indicates the need to calculate biogeochemical processes in, at least, two hourly time steps using dynamically updated (rather than daily averaged) soil environmental conditions. The development in CLMTR-N of such a complex representation of processes will allow us to characterize relevant processes and simplifications appropriate for regional to global-scale coupled biogeochemical and

  4. Sensitivity analysis of coupled groundwater processes within a land surface model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Miller, N. L.; Kollet, S. J.

    2004-05-01

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budgets that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, models for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM2.0) and a variably-saturated groundwater model (ParFlow) have been coupled as single model, in single-column and distributed form. An initial set of single column simulations based on data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) and synthetic data demonstrate the temporal dynamics of both of the coupled models. A 15-year single-column simulation using the data from the Usadievskiy catchment in Valdai, Russia demonstrate the coupled model's ability to accurately predict the soil moisture profile and location of the water table, in addition to water and energy balance within the watershed. The distributed coupled model will also be demonstrated using a series of spatially variable subsurface parameter runs, which will be used to investigate upscaling in land-surface models. The coupled model will ultimately be used to assist

  5. Sensitivity Analysis of Coupled Groundwater Processes within a Land Surface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Miller, N L; Kollet, S J

    2004-05-05

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budgets that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, models for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM2.0) and a variably-saturated groundwater model (ParFlow) have been coupled as single model, in single-column and distributed form. An initial set of single column simulations based on data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) and synthetic data demonstrate the temporal dynamics of both of the coupled models. A 15-year single-column simulation using the data from the Usadievskiy catchment in Valdai, Russia demonstrate the coupled model's ability to accurately predict the soil moisture profile and location of the water table, in addition to water and energy balance within the watershed. The distributed coupled model will also be demonstrated using a series of spatially variable subsurface parameter runs, which will be used to investigate upscaling in land-surface models. The coupled model will ultimately be used to assist

  6. Integrated Coupling of Surface and Subsurface Flow with HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Anne; Šimůnek, Jirka; Wöhling, Thomas; Schütze, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Describing interactions between surface and subsurface flow processes is important to adequately define water flow in natural systems. Since overland flow generation is highly influenced by rainfall and infiltration, both highly spatially heterogeneous processes, overland flow is unsteady and varies spatially. The prediction of overland flow needs to include an appropriate description of the interactions between the surface and subsurface flow. Coupling surface and subsurface water flow is a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed during the last few years, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. A new approach by Weill et al. (2009) to couple overland flow and subsurface flow based on a generalized Richards equation was implemented into the well-known subsurface flow model HYDRUS-2D (Šimůnek et al., 2011). This approach utilizes the one-dimensional diffusion wave equation to model overland flow. The diffusion wave model is integrated in HYDRUS-2D by replacing the terms of the Richards equation in a pre-defined runoff layer by terms defining the diffusion wave equation. Using this approach, pressure and flux continuity along the interface between both flow domains is provided. This direct coupling approach provides a strong coupling of both systems based on the definition of a single global system matrix to numerically solve the coupled flow problem. The advantage of the direct coupling approach, compared to the loosely coupled approach, is supposed to be a higher robustness, when many convergence problems can be avoided (Takizawa et al., 2014). The HYDRUS-2D implementation was verified using a) different test cases, including a direct comparison with the results of Weill et al. (2009), b) an analytical solution of the kinematic wave equation, and c) the results of a benchmark test of Maxwell et al. (2014), that included several known coupled surface subsurface flow models. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects

  7. Couple molecular excitons to surface plasmon polaritons in an organic-dye-doped nanostructured cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Shi, Wen-Bo; Wang, Di; Xu, Yue; Peng, Ru-Wen; Fan, Ren-Hao; Wang, Qian-Jin; Wang, Mu

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate experimentally the hybrid coupling among molecular excitons, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and Fabry-Perot (FP) mode in a nanostructured cavity, where a J-aggregates doped PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) layer is inserted between a silver grating and a thick silver film. By tuning the thickness of the doped PVA layer, the FP cavity mode efficiently couples with the molecular excitons, forming two nearly dispersion-free modes. The dispersive SPPs interact with these two modes while increasing the incident angle, leading to the formation of three hybrid polariton bands. By retrieving the mixing fractions of the polariton band components from the measured angular reflection spectra, we find all these three bands result from the strong coupling among SPPs, FP mode, and excitons. This work may inspire related studies on hybrid light-matter interactions, and achieve potential applications on multimode polariton lasers and optical spectroscopy.

  8. Investigation of Surface Flux Feedbacks for Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Pete

    2010-01-01

    The use of "dynamical coupling" rules allows for identifying coupled vs. uncoupled anomalies and one-way interaction. Results of this study are consistent with those of Pena et al. (2003,2004) although using a more recent reanalysis at higher resolution. Find more atmosphere-forcing coupled anomalies in the extratropics and ocean-forcing anomalies in the tropics. The LHF and SWR show the largest magnitude anomalies in the composite analysis. The turbulent flux responses are due to interactions between the differing responses in wind speed and near-surface gradients. The radiative fluxes responses are primarily tied to changes in cloud fraction, as expected, though longwave response can be tied more to changes in the upwelling component.

  9. Mid-infrared surface plasmon polariton chemical sensing on fiber-coupled ITO coated glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Javier; Ródenas, Airán; Aguiló, Magdalena; Fernandez, Toney; Solis, Javier; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-06-01

    A novel fiber-coupled ITO coated glass slide sensor for performing surface plasmon polariton chemical monitoring in the 3.5 um mid-IR range is reported. Efficient mid-IR fiber coupling is achieved with 3D laser written waveguides, and the coupling of glass waveguide modes to ITO SPPs is driven by the varying phase matching conditions of different aqueous analytes across the anomalous dispersion range determined by their molecular fingerprints. By means of using both a mid-IR fiber supercontinuum source and a diode laser the excitation of SPPs is demonstrated. The efficient optical monitoring of mid-IR SPPs in smart glass could have a broad range of applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  10. Vapour-phase gold-surface-mediated coupling of aldehydes with methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingjun; Liu, Xiaoying; Haubrich, Jan; Friend, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    Selective coupling of oxygenates is critical to many synthetic processes, including those necessary for the development of alternative fuels. We report a general process for selective coupling of aldehydes and methanol as a route to ester synthesis. All steps are mediated by oxygen-covered metallic gold nanoparticles on Au(111). Remarkably, cross-coupling of methanol with formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzaldehyde and benzeneacetaldehyde to methyl esters is promoted by oxygen-covered Au(111) below room temperature with high selectivity. The high selectivity is attributed to the ease of nucleophilic attack of the aldehydes by the methoxy intermediate-formed from methanol on the surface-which yields the methyl esters. The competing combustion occurs via attack of both methanol and the aldehydes by oxygen. The mechanistic model constructed in this study provides insight into factors that control selectivity and clearly elucidates the crucial role of Au nanoparticles as active species in the catalytic oxidation of alcohols, even in solution.

  11. On the Representation of Heterogeneity in Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vrese, Philipp; Schulz, Jan-Peter; Hagemann, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    A realistic representation of processes that are not resolved by the model grid is one of the key challenges in Earth-system modelling. In particular, the non-linear nature of processes involved makes a representation of the link between the atmosphere and the land surface difficult. This is especially so when the land surface is horizontally strongly heterogeneous. In the majority of present day Earth system models two strategies are pursued to couple the land surface and the atmosphere. In the first approach, surface heterogeneity is not explicitly accounted for, instead effective parameters are used to represent the entirety of the land surface in a model's grid box (parameter-aggregation). In the second approach, subgrid-scale variability at the surface is explicitly represented, but it is assumed that the blending height is located below the lowest atmospheric model level (simple flux-aggregation). Thus, in both approaches the state of the atmosphere is treated as being horizontally homogeneous within a given grid box. Based upon the blending height concept, an approach is proposed that allows for a land-surface-atmosphere coupling in which horizontal heterogeneity is considered not only at the surface, but also within the lowest layers of the atmosphere (the VERTEX scheme). Below the blending height, the scheme refines the turbulent mixing process with respect to atmospheric subgrid fractions, which correspond to different surface features. These subgrid fractions are not treated independently of each other, since an explicit horizontal component is integrated into the turbulent mixing process. The scheme was implemented into the JSBACH model, the land component of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's Earth-system model, when coupled to the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM. The single-column version of the Earth system model is used in two example cases in order to demonstrate how the effects of surface heterogeneity are transferred into the

  12. On the Representation of Heterogeneity in Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vrese, Philipp; Schulz, Jan-Peter; Hagemann, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    A realistic representation of processes that are not resolved by the model grid is one of the key challenges in Earth-system modelling. In particular, the non-linear nature of processes involved makes a representation of the link between the atmosphere and the land surface difficult. This is especially so when the land surface is horizontally strongly heterogeneous. In the majority of present day Earth system models two strategies are pursued to couple the land surface and the atmosphere. In the first approach, surface heterogeneity is not explicitly accounted for, instead effective parameters are used to represent the entirety of the land surface in a model's grid box (parameter-aggregation). In the second approach, subgrid-scale variability at the surface is explicitly represented, but it is assumed that the blending height is located below the lowest atmospheric model level (simple flux-aggregation). Thus, in both approaches the state of the atmosphere is treated as being horizontally homogeneous within a given grid box. Based upon the blending height concept, an approach is proposed that allows for a land-surface-atmosphere coupling in which horizontal heterogeneity is considered not only at the surface, but also within the lowest layers of the atmosphere (the VERTEX scheme). Below the blending height, the scheme refines the turbulent mixing process with respect to atmospheric subgrid fractions, which correspond to different surface features. These subgrid fractions are not treated independently of each other, since an explicit horizontal component is integrated into the turbulent mixing process. The scheme was implemented into the JSBACH model, the land component of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's Earth-system model, when coupled to the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM. The single-column version of the Earth system model is used in two example cases in order to demonstrate how the effects of surface heterogeneity are transferred into the

  13. Ag/Au mixed sites promote oxidative coupling of methanol on the alloy surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Siler, Cassandra G F; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2014-04-14

    Nanoporous gold, a dilute alloy of Ag in Au, activates molecular oxygen and promotes the oxygen-assisted catalytic coupling of methanol. Because this trace amount of Ag inherent to nanoporous gold has been proposed as the source of oxygen activation, a thin film Ag/Au alloy surface was studied as a model system for probing the origin of this reactivity. Thin alloy layers of Ag(x)Au(1-x), with 0.15≤x≤0.40, were examined for dioxygen activation and methanol self-coupling. These alloy surfaces recombine atomic oxygen at different temperatures depending on the alloy composition. Total conversion of methanol to selective oxidation products, that is, formaldehyde and methyl formate, was achieved at low initial oxygen coverage and at low temperature. Reaction channels for methyl formate formation occurred on both Au and Au/Ag mixed sites with a ratio, as was predicted from the local 2-dimensional composition. PMID:24633724

  14. Coupling of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with Finite Volume method for free-surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, S.; Di Mascio, A.; Le Touzé, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for the solution of free surface flows with large front deformation and fragmentation is presented. The algorithm is obtained by coupling a classical Finite Volume (FV) approach, that discretizes the Navier-Stokes equations on a block structured Eulerian grid, with an approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, implemented in a Lagrangian framework. The coupling procedure is formulated in such a way that each solver is applied in the region where its intrinsic characteristics can be exploited in the most efficient and accurate way: the FV solver is used to resolve the bulk flow and the wall regions, whereas the SPH solver is implemented in the free surface region to capture details of the front evolution. The reported results clearly prove that the combined use of the two solvers is convenient from the point of view of both accuracy and computing time.

  15. Pliocene pre-glacial North Atlantic: A coupled sea surface-deep ocean circulation climate response

    SciTech Connect

    Ishman, S.E.; Dowsett, H.J. . National Center)

    1992-01-01

    A latitudinal transect of North Atlantic Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes from the equatorial region to 56 N in the 2,300- to 3,000-meter depth range was designed for a high-resolution study of coupled sea surface and deep ocean response to climate change. Precise age control was provided using magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data from the cores to identify the 4.0 to 2.2 Ma interval, a period of warm-to-cool climatic transitions in the North Atlantic. The objective is to evaluate incremental (10 kyr) changes in sea surface temperatures (SST) and deep North Atlantic circulation patterns between 4.0 and 2.2 Ma to develop a coupled sea surface-deep ocean circulation response model. Sea surface temperature (SST) estimates are based on planktic foraminifer-based factor-analytic transfer functions. Oxygen isotopic data from paired samples provide tests of the estimated temperature gradients between localities. Benthic foraminifer assemblage data and [partial derivative]O-18 and [partial derivative]C-13 Isotopic data are used to quantitatively determine changes in deep North Atlantic circulation. These data are used to determine changes in source area (North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) or Antarctic Bottom Water) and (or) in the components of NADW that were present (Upper or Lower NADW). These paired paleoceanographic sea surface and deep circulation interpretations over a 1.8 my interval form the basis for a coupled sea surface-deep circulation response model for the Pliocene North Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Sensitivity of Land Surface Parameters on Thunderstorm Simulation through HRLDAS-WRF Coupling Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, Krishan; Mohanty, U. C.; Kisore Osuri, Krishna

    2016-07-01

    Land surface characteristics play an important role in large scale, regional and mesoscale atmospheric process. Representation of land surface characteristics can be improved through coupling of mesoscale atmospheric models with land surface models. Mesoscale atmospheric models depend on Land Surface Models (LSM) to provide land surface variables such as fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum for lower boundary layer evolution. Studies have shown that land surface properties such as soil moisture, soil temperature, soil roughness, vegetation cover, have considerable effect on lower boundary layer. Although, the necessity to initialize soil moisture accurately in NWP models is widely acknowledged, monitoring soil moisture at regional and global scale is a very tough task due to high spatial and temporal variability. As a result, the available observation network is unable to provide the required spatial and temporal data for the most part of the globe. Therefore, model for land surface initializations rely on updated land surface properties from LSM. The solution for NWP land-state initialization can be found by combining data assimilation techniques, satellite-derived soil data, and land surface models. Further, it requires an intermediate step to use observed rainfall, satellite derived surface insolation, and meteorological analyses to run an uncoupled (offline) integration of LSM, so that the evolution of modeled soil moisture can be forced by observed forcing conditions. Therefore, for accurate land-state initialization, high resolution land data assimilation system (HRLDAS) is used to provide the essential land surface parameters. Offline-coupling of HRLDAS-WRF has shown much improved results over Delhi, India for four thunder storm events. The evolution of land surface variables particularly soil moisture, soil temperature and surface fluxes have provided more realistic condition. Results have shown that most of domain part became wetter and warmer after

  17. Studies on Hdpe-Coconut Flour Composites: Effect of Coupling Agents and Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, C.; González, J.; Hernández, M.; Ichazo, M. N.; Alvarado, Sinai; Ziegler, Dulce Maria

    2008-08-01

    This study investigates the mechanical, thermal and morphological behavior of coconut flour/polyethylene composites, with special interest on the influence of the surface modification of coconut flour and the presence of different coupling agents on the interfacial bonding. The different treatments of the composites with an EAA copolymer, with titanate, with 5 and 18 wt% of NaOH and acetylating, confirm the better tensile behavior of these composites.

  18. Coupled wire model of symmetric Majorana surfaces of topological superconductors I: 4-fermion gapping interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sharmistha; Zhang, Zhao; Teo, Jeffrey

    Time reversal symmetric topological superconductors in three spatial dimensions carry gapless surface Majorana fermions. They are robust against any time reversal symmetric single-body perturbation weaker than the bulk energy gap. We mimic the massless surface Majorana's by coupled wire models in two spatial dimensions. We introduce explicit many-body interwire interactions that preserve time reversal symmetry and give energy gaps to all low energy degrees of freedom. The gapping 4-fermion interactions are constructed by interwire Kac-Moody current backscattering and rely on the fractionalization or conformal embedding of the Majorana wires.

  19. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  20. Helium-surface interaction potential of Sb(111) from scattering experiments and close-coupling calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, M.; Kraus, P.; Tamtögl, A.; Miret-Artés, S.; Ernst, W. E.

    2013-11-01

    Helium atom scattering (HAS) was used to study the antimony Sb(111) surface beyond the hard-wall model. HAS angular distributions and drift spectra show a number of selective adsorption resonance features, which correspond to five bound-state energies for He atoms trapped in the surface-averaged He-Sb(111) potential. As their best representation, a 9-3 potential with a depth of 4.4±0.1 meV was determined. Furthermore, the charge density corrugation of the surface was analyzed using close-coupling calculations. By using a hybrid potential, consisting of a corrugated Morse potential (short range) and a 9-3 potential (long range), a peak-to-peak corrugation of 17% was obtained. The kinematic focusing effects that occurred were in good agreement with surface phonon dispersion curves from already published density functional perturbation theory calculations.

  1. Determination of surface density of nonporous membranes with air-coupled ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, T. P.

    2015-03-01

    The surface density or mass per unit area of a membrane is an important material property often used in acoustics and ultrasonics. In this paper, a new measurement and analysis technique for estimating the surface density as a function of frequency for a nonporous membrane or foil is introduced. This new, broadband technique is derived from the Thompson-Gray measurement model which can be simplified to the fluid layer transfer function commonly used in acoustics. The fluid layer transfer function can be further simplified to the limp-wall mass law for acoustically 'thin' membranes whose thickness is much less than a wavelength. The transfer function of the membrane can be efficiently measured with commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers from which the surface density can be computed. Surface density estimates are presented for four membrane-like materials: aluminum foil, brass shim, polyester and polyethylene sheets.

  2. Linearly perturbed MHD equilibria and 3D eddy current coupling via the control surface method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portone, A.; Villone, F.; Liu, Y.; Albanese, R.; Rubinacci, G.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, a coupling strategy based on the control surface concept is used to self-consistently couple linear MHD solvers to 3D codes for the eddy current computation of eddy currents in the metallic structures surrounding the plasma. The coupling is performed by assuming that the plasma inertia (and, with it, all Alfven wave-like phenomena) can be neglected on the time scale of interest, which is dictated by the relevant electromagnetic time of the metallic structures. As is shown, plasma coupling with the metallic structures results in perturbations to the inductance matrix operator. In particular, by adopting the Fourier decomposition in poloidal and toroidal modes, it turns out that each toroidal mode can be associated with a matrix (additively) perturbing the inductance matrix that commonly describes the magnetic coupling of currents in vacuum. In this way, the treatment of resistive wall modes instabilities of various toroidal mode numbers and their possible cross-talk through the currents induced in the metallic structures can be easily studied.

  3. Deep-subwavelength magnetic-coupling-dominant interaction among magnetic localized surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic coupling is generally much weaker than electric Coulomb interaction. This also applies to the well-known magnetic "meta-atoms," or split-ring resonators (SRRs) as originally proposed by Pendry et al. [IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 47, 2075 (1999), 10.1109/22.798002], in which the associated electric dipole moments usually dictate their interaction. As a result, stereometamaterials, a stack of identical SRRs, were found with electric coupling so strong that the dispersion from merely magnetic coupling was overturned. Recently, other workers have proposed a new concept of magnetic localized surface plasmons, supported on metallic spiral structures (MSSs) at a deep-subwavelength scale. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that a stack of these magnetic "meta-atoms" can have dominant magnetic coupling in both of its two configurations. This allows magnetic-coupling-dominant energy transport along a one-dimensional stack of MSSs, as demonstrated with near-field transmission measurement. Our work not only applies this type of magnetic "meta-atom" into metamaterial construction, but also provides possibilities of magnetic metamaterial design in which the electric interaction no longer takes precedence.

  4. An exploration of coupled surface-subsurface solute transport in a fully integrated catchment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggett, Jessica E.; Partington, Daniel; Frei, Sven; Werner, Adrian D.; Simmons, Craig T.; Fleckenstein, Jan H.

    2015-10-01

    Coupling surface and subsurface water flow in fully integrated hydrological codes is becoming common in hydrological research; however, the coupling of surface-subsurface solute transport has received much less attention. Previous studies on fully integrated solute transport focus on small scales, simple geometric domains, and have not utilised many different field data sources. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the inclusion of both flow and solute transport in a 3D, fully integrated catchment model, utilising high resolution observations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) export from a wetland complex during a rainfall event. A sensitivity analysis is performed to span a range of transport conditions for the surface-subsurface boundary (e.g. advective exchange only, advection plus diffusion, advection plus full mechanical dispersion) and subsurface dispersivities. The catchment model captures some aspects of observed catchment behaviour (e.g. solute discharge at the catchment outlet, increasing discharge from wetlands with increased stream discharge, and counter-clockwise concentration-discharge relationships), although other known behaviours are not well represented in the model (e.g. slope of concentration-discharge plots). Including surface-subsurface solute transport aids in evaluating internal model processes, however there are challenges related to the influence of dispersion across the surface-subsurface interface, and non-uniqueness of the solute transport solution. This highlights that obtaining solute field data is especially important for constraining integrated models of solute transport.

  5. Localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence fiber-optic biosensor with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Chang, Ying-Feng; Ng, Ming-Yaw; Liu, Wei-Chih; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Chou, Chien

    2007-05-01

    A novel fiber-optic biosensor based on a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (LSPCF) system is proposed and developed. This biosensor consists of a biomolecular complex in a sandwich format of . It is immobilized on the surface of an optical fiber where a complex forms the fluorescence probe and is produced by mixing Cy5-labeled antibody and protein A conjugated gold nanoparticles (Au-PA). The LSPCF is excited by localized surface plasmon on the GNP surface where the evanescent field is applied near the core surface of the optical fiber. At the same time, the fluorescence signal is detected by a photomultiplier tube located beside the unclad optical fiber with high collection efficiency. Experimentally, this novel LSPCF biosensor is able to detect mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) at a minimum concentration of 1 pg/mL (7 fM) during the biomolecular interaction of the IgG with anti-mouse IgG. The analysis is expanded by a discussion of the amplification of the LSPCF intensity by GNP coupling, and overall, this LSPCF biosensor is confirmed experimentally as a biosensor with very high sensitivity. PMID:17378542

  6. Optical Phased Array Antennas using Coupled Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Carl H.; Rojas, Roberto A.; Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    High data rate communication links are needed to meet the needs of NASA as well as other organizations to develop space-based optical communication systems. These systems must be robust to high radiation environments, reliable, and operate over a wide temperature range. Highly desirable features include beam steering capability, reconfigurability, low power consumption, and small aperture size. Optical communication links, using coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser radiating elements are promising candidates for the transmit portion of these communication links. In this talk we describe a mission scenario, and how the antenna requirements are derived from the mission needs. We describe a potential architecture for this type of antenna, and outline the advantages and drawbacks of this approach relative to competing technologies. The technology we are proposing used coupled arrays of 1550 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for transmission. The feasibility of coupling these arrays together, to form coherent high-power beams that can be modulated at data rates exceeding 1 Gbps, will be explored. We will propose an architecture that enables electronic beam steering, thus mitigating the need for ancillary acquisition, tracking and beam pointing equipment such as needed for current optical communicatin systems. The beam-steering capability we are proposing also opens the possibility of using this technology for inter-satellite communicatin links, and satellite-to-surface links.

  7. Optical coupling between two lasers on a dielectric surface: experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Md Mozammal K.

    In order to understand the concept of qubit (or quantum bit) and use it for quantum computation purposes we analyze the phenomenon of "electromagnetically induced transparency" (EIT) from both quantum theoretical and experimental standpoint. The purpose of this work is to couple two lasers through a simultaneous interaction on the surface of a dielectric material. This research led to the use of a capacitor-type configuration for modifying the wavelength of a probe laser field using a voltage across the dielectric, and next, to lock the probe field on the dielectric surface by using a stronger coupling laser. The inclusion of a second stronger coupling laser creates an interference effect, similar as in the case of EIT, with the probe laser of adjusted wavelength due to the capacitor voltage. The Brewster angle method which uses polarized light reflected by surfaces allows us to experimentally observe the EIT feature as a wavy structure embedded in the parabolic shape of the Brewster region. This study can be extended towards many applications such as optical switches, quantum memory, quantum encryption, quantum repeater, fingerprint investigation, to name a few.

  8. Coupled instabilities of surface crease and bulk bending during fast free swelling of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Riku; Ikura, Yumihiko; King, Daniel R; Nonoyama, Takayuki; Nakajima, Tasuku; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Kuroda, Hirotoshi; Tonegawa, Yoshihiro; Gong, Jian Ping

    2016-06-21

    Most studies on hydrogel swelling instability have been focused on a constrained boundary condition. In this paper, we studied the mechanical instability of a piece of disc-shaped hydrogel during free swelling. The fast swelling of the gel induces two swelling mismatches; a surface-inner layer mismatch and an annulus-disc mismatch, which lead to the formation of a surface crease pattern and a saddle-like bulk bending, respectively. For the first time, a stripe-like surface crease that is at a right angle on the two surfaces of the gel was observed. This stripe pattern is related to the mechanical coupling of surface instability and bulk bending, which is justified by investigating the swelling-induced surface pattern on thin hydrogel sheets fixed onto a saddle-shaped substrate prior to swelling. A theoretical mechanism based on an energy model was developed to show an anisotropic stripe-like surface crease pattern on a saddle-shaped surface. These results might be helpful to develop novel strategies for controlling crease patterns on soft and wet materials by changing their three-dimensional shape. PMID:27108760

  9. Coherence of Coupled Dangling-Bond Pairs on the Silicon Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaterzadeh-Yazdi, Zahra

    We characterize coherent dynamics of closely-spaced dangling bond (DB) pairs positioned on a silicon surface and sharing an excess electron. We investigate whether a coupled-DB pair is a potential candidate for a charge qubit. A dangling bond is an atomic-scale entity that acts like a quantum dot. By shrinking the scale of the quantum dots and the spacing between them, we expect that the excess-electron tunneling rate increases dramatically with decreasing inter-dot separation, while decoherence scales weakly. Our analysis of the coherent dynamics of coupled-DB pairs shows promise in this respect. The extremely high tunneling rate of the DB excess charge greatly exceeds the expected decoherence rates for a silicon-based system, thereby overcoming the critical obstacle of charge qubits for quantum computing purposes. However, this scaling advantage comes at the price of requiring rapid control and readout. We devise a scheme for measuring the DB-pair dynamics, but investigating the fast control is beyond the scope of this thesis. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of the silicon-surface structure on the coherence of a coupled-DB pair. The silicon surface of interest is well patterned, but it has an anisotropic structure. Therefore, the coupling strength of a DB pair depends on the arrangement of the DBs on the silicon surface. We employ ab initio techniques and calculate the energy splitting for a wide variety of coupled DB-pair configurations on this surface. The results show that the energy splitting (and consequently the tunneling rate of the DB-pair excess charge) is a function of the DBs' location on the surface and also it strongly depends on the structural orientation of the DBs' orbital. Based on the results, DB-pair configurations are categorized into four groups, such that the changing rate of energy splitting versus DB-pair separation is different among the groups. Knowing about the effect of the surface structure on the DB-pair energy splitting is

  10. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  11. Coupled community cohesion and surface water hydrology determinants of groundwater use sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernald, A.

    2013-12-01

    Water table elevations are dropping in irrigated locations of the western U.S. and the world where use exceeds recharge. Along the Rio Grande, community irrigation systems have been developed that are particularly suited to high interannual precipitation variability. These same systems that efficiently and equitable allocate surface irrigation water seem to also generate feedback loops that balance groundwater recharge with use. To identify drivers of groundwater sustainability, we studied the coupled human and natural system components of surface water - groundwater interactions at distinctive sites along the Rio Grande: vibrant community irrigation systems of northern New Mexico; separately controlled surface and groundwater irrigation systems of southern New Mexico; and groundwater irrigation systems that had entirely lost their historic community surface irrigation systems in northern Chihuahua, Mexico. At the northern New Mexico site we found both the hydrology and the community irrigation system generate positive feedback loops for sustainable groundwater and for return flow to the river that benefits downstream users. In southern New Mexico, positive feedbacks of reduced irrigation district surface deliveries lead to more groundwater pumping that in turn causes less efficient surface delivery, additional pumping and stressed groundwater systems. At the sites in Mexico, lack of community cohesion coupled with decades of groundwater pumping has led to negative feedbacks where additional pumping causes drops in groundwater levels that increase pumping costs and reduce the rate of groundwater declines. In ongoing work, we are using socio-cultural and hydrological data to inform a system dynamics model that will identify groundwater sustainability tipping points in terms of community cohesion and the balance between irrigation water use and groundwater recharge in surface water connected systems.

  12. Processes, observations and parameters in a coupled surface water-groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foglia, Laura; Hill, Mary; Mehl, Steffen; Burlando, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Hydrological models of surface-water flow and infiltration allow for a process-based representation of recharge to ground water models. Recharge is a fundamental and often difficult to quantify component of a groundwater system, in part because recharge and hydraulic conductivity changes tend to similarly affect hydraulic heads, the most common kind of observations in groundwater systems. Here the goal is to analyze the importance of using recharge derived from hydrologic processes for groundwater model development and furthermore the importance of a spatially distributed value of recharge. To achieve the goal we followed this procedure: 1) independently calibrate and test the groundwater and hydrological models (accomplished as described in Foglia et al., 2007GW, 2009WRR, in press WRR); 2) for the hydrological model, we present a new sensitivity analysis and calibration obtained with a set of observations that provides more detail at low flows, which was identified as important by Foglia et al. (2009); 3) couple the two models (here, one-way coupling transfers infiltration from the surface-water model to the groundwater model after multiplying by an estimated factor); 4) identify important parameters and observations using a sensitivity analysis conducted with linear statistics for this computationally demanding model; 5) use regression in an hypothesis testing framework to explore parameter and observation importance further and also explore resulting estimates and model fit. The analysis is carried out using s physically based models of groundwater flow (MOFLOW-2000) and surface hydrology (TOPKAPI) developed for the Maggia Valley in Southern Switzerland. Calibration and sensitivity analysis were performed using UCODE_2005. Sensitivity analysis is used to identify the most important observations for both the individual and coupled models. As expected, the observations belonging to the hydrological model play a more significant role in the coupled calibration

  13. The dissipated energy of electrode surfaces: Temperature jumps from coupled transport processes

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeaux, D.; Ratkje, S.K.

    1996-03-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics for surfaces has been applied to the electrode surfaces of an electrochemical cell. It is shown that the temperature of the surface differs from that of the adjacent electrolyte and electrode, and that a temperature jump exists across the surface. mathematical expressions are derived for the temperature profiles of two cells at steady-state conditions. Methods for estimating transport coefficients for the coupled transport processes at the electrode surface are discussed. Possible numerical results for the temperature profile, the overpotential, and the dissipated energy are reported. The results reflect the relative importance of heat conductivities, electric conductivities, and the Peltier coefficients for the electrode surface phenomena in combination with bulk properties. Significant temperature jumps may occur at normal electrolysis conditions 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} A/m, and for temperature jump coefficients which are smaller than 10{sup 3} J/s K{sup 2} m{sup 2}. The overpotential may have contributions from the Peltier coefficients for the surface larger than the ohmic contribution. The method of analysis gives new information useful for heat control of electrochemical cells, electrode kinetic studies, and interpretation of overpotentials.

  14. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-21

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  15. Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System and its CSDMS Modeling Tool to couple models and data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Csdms Scientific; Software Team

    2010-12-01

    CSDMS is the virtual home for a diverse community who foster and promote the modeling of earth surface processes, with emphasis on the movement of fluids, sediment and solutes through landscapes, seascapes and through their sedimentary basins. CSDMS develops, integrates, disseminates & archives software (> 150 models and 3million+ lines of code) that reflects and predicts earth surface processes over a broad range of time and space scales. CSDMS deals with the Earth's surface—the ever-changing, dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere. CSDMS employs state-of-the-art architectures, interface standards and frameworks that make it possible to convert stand-alone models into flexible, "plug-and-play" components that can be assembled into larger applications. The CSDMS model-coupling environment offers language interoperability, structured and unstructured grids, and serves as a migration pathway for surface dynamics modelers towards High-Performance Computing (HPC). The CSDMS Modeling Tool is a key product of the overall project, as it allows earth scientists with relatively modest computer coding experience to use the CSDMS modules for earth surface dynamics research and education. The CMT Tool is platform independent. CMT can easily couple models that have followed the CSDMS protocols for model contribution: 1) Open-source license; 2) Available; 3) Vetted; 4) Open-source language; 5) Refactored for componentization; 6) Metadata & test files; 7) Clean and documented using keywords.

  16. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-01

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  17. Self-accelerating massive gravity: Superluminality, Cauchy surfaces, and strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motloch, Pavel; Hu, Wayne; Joyce, Austin; Motohashi, Hayato

    2015-08-01

    Self-accelerating solutions in massive gravity provide explicit, calculable examples that exhibit the general interplay between superluminality, the well-posedness of the Cauchy problem, and strong coupling. For three particular classes of vacuum solutions, one of which is new to this work, we construct the conformal diagram for the characteristic surfaces on which isotropic stress-energy perturbations propagate. With one exception, all solutions necessarily possess spacelike characteristics, indicating perturbative superluminality. Foliating the spacetime with these surfaces gives a pathological frame where kinetic terms of the perturbations vanish, confusing the Hamiltonian counting of degrees of freedom. This frame dependence distinguishes the vanishing of kinetic terms from strong coupling of perturbations or an ill-posed Cauchy problem. We give examples where spacelike characteristics do and do not originate from a point where perturbation theory breaks down and where spacelike surfaces do or do not intersect all characteristics in the past light cone of a given observer. The global structure of spacetime also reveals issues that are unique to theories with two metrics: in all three classes of solutions, the Minkowski fiducial space fails to cover the entire de Sitter spacetime allowing worldlines of observers to end in finite proper time at determinant singularities. Characteristics run tangent to these surfaces requiring ad hoc rules to establish continuity across singularities.

  18. On the development of a coupled land surface and groundwater model

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R.M.; Miller, N.L.

    2004-05-04

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the LSM lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budget models that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, groundwater models (GWM) for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM) and a variably-saturated GWM (ParFlow) have been coupled as a single column model. A set of simulations based on synthetic data and data from the Project for Intercomparison of Landsurface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS), version 2(d), 18-year dataset from Valdai, Russia demonstrate the temporal dynamics of this coupled modeling system. Changes in soil moisture and movement of the water table are used as indicators of mass conservation between the LSM and GWM. This study demonstrates the affect of aquifer storage and a dynamic water table on predicted watershed flow. The model's ability to capture certain cold processes such as frozen soil and freeze/thaw processes are discussed. Comparisons of the uncoupled and coupled modes are presented and the differences in simulations of soil moisture and shallow and deeper ground processes are

  19. Progress in Understanding Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling from LBA Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Silva Dias, Maria AssunçÃ.£O. F.

    2010-02-01

    LBA research has deepened our understanding of the role of soil water storage, clouds and aerosols in land-atmosphere coupling. We show how the reformulation of cloud forcing in terms of an effective cloud albedo per unit area of surface gives a useful measure of the role of clouds in the surface energy budget over the Amazon. We show that the diurnal temperature range has a quasi-linear relation to the daily mean longwave cooling; and to effective cloud albedo because of the tight coupling between the near-surface climate, the boundary layer and the cloud field. The coupling of surface and atmospheric processes is critical to the seasonal cycle: deep forest rooting systems make water available throughout the year, whereas in the dry season the shortwave cloud forcing is reduced by regional scale subsidence, so that more light is available for photosynthesis. At sites with an annual precipitation above 1900 mm and a dry season length less than 4 months, evaporation rates increased in the dry season, coincident with increased radiation. In contrast, ecosystems with precipitation less than 1700 mm and a longer dry season showed clear evidence of reduced evaporation in the dry season coming from water stress. In all these sites, the seasonal variation of the effective cloud albedo is a major factor in determining the surface available energy. Dry season fires add substantial aerosol to the atmosphere. Aerosol scattering and absorption both reduce the total downward surface radiative flux, but increase the diffuse/direct flux ratio, which increases photosynthetic efficiency. Convective plumes produced by fires enhance the vertical transport of aerosols over the Amazon, and effectively inject smoke aerosol and gases directly into the middle troposphere with substantial impacts on mid-tropospheric dispersion. In the rainy season in Rondônia, convection in low-level westerly flows with low aerosol content resembles oceanic convection with precipitation from warm rain

  20. Impact of Sea Surface Salinity on Coupled Dynamics for the Tropical Indo Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busalacchi, A. J.; Hackert, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation we assess the impact of in situ and satellite sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on seasonal to interannual variability of tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean dynamics as well as on dynamical ENSO forecasts using a Hybrid Coupled Model (HCM) for 1993-2007 (cf., Hackert et al., 2011) and August 2011 until February 2014 (cf., Hackert et al., 2014). The HCM is composed of a primitive equation ocean model coupled with a SVD-based statistical atmospheric model for the tropical Indo-Pacific region. An Ensemble Reduced Order Kalman Filter (EROKF) is used to assimilate observations to constrain dynamics and thermodynamics for initialization of the HCM. Including SSS generally improves NINO3 sea surface temperature anomaly validation. Assimilating SSS gives significant improvement versus just subsurface temperature for all forecast lead times after 5 months. We find that the positive impact of SSS assimilation is brought about by surface freshening in the western Pacific warm pool that leads to increased barrier layer thickness (BLT) and shallower mixed layer depths. Thus, in the west the net effect of assimilating SSS is to increase stability and reduce mixing, which concentrates the wind impact of ENSO coupling. Specifically, the main benefit of SSS assimilation for 1993-2007 comes from improvement to the Spring Predictability Barrier (SPB) period. In the east, the impact of Aquarius satellite SSS is to induce more cooling in the NINO3 region as a result of being relatively more salty than in situ SSS in the eastern Pacific leading to increased mixing and entrainment. This, in turn, sets up an enhanced west to east SST gradient and intensified Bjerknes coupling. For the 2011-2014 period, consensus coupled model forecasts compiled by the IRI tend to erroneously predict NINO3 warming; SSS assimilation corrects this defect. Finally, we plan to update our analysis and report on the dynamical impact of including Aquarius SSS for the most-recent, ongoing 2014

  1. Surface Proton Hopping and Coupling Pathway of Water Oxidation on Cobalt Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hieu; Cheng, Mu-Jeng; Frei, Heinz; Wang, Lin-Wang

    We propose an oxidation pathway of water splitting on cobalt oxide surface with clear thermodynamic and kinetic details. The density-functional theory studies suggest that the coupled proton-electron transfer is not necessarily sequential and implicit in every elementary step of this mechanistic cycle. Instead, the initial O-O bond could be formed by the landing of water molecule on the surface oxos, which is then followed by the dispatch of protons through the hopping manner and subsequent release of di-oxygen. Our theoretical investigations of intermediates and transition states indicate that all chemical conversions in this pathway, including the proton transfers, are possible with low activation barriers, in addition to their favorable thermodynamics. Our hypothesis is supported by recent experimental observations of surface superoxide that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding to adjacent hydroxyl group, as an intermediate on fast-kinetics catalytic site.

  2. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  3. A COUPLED LAND-SURFACE AND DRY DEPOSITION MODEL AND COMPARISON TO FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF SURFACE HEAT, MOISTURE, AND OZONE FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a coupled land-surface and dry deposition model for realistic treatment of surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and chemical dry deposition within a comprehensive air quality modeling system. A new land-surface model (LSM) with explicit treatment of soil moisture...

  4. Observational study of land-surface-cloud-atmosphere coupling on daily timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan; Desjardins, Raymond; Beljaars, Anton; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2015-04-01

    Our aim is to provide an observational reference for the evaluation of the surface and boundary layer parameterizations used in large-scale models using the remarkable long-term Canadian Prairie hourly dataset. First we use shortwave and longwave data from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) station at Bratt’s Lake, Saskatchewan, and clear sky radiative fluxes from ERA-Interim, to show the coupling between the diurnal cycle of temperature and relative humidity and effective cloud albedo and net longwave flux. Then we calibrate the nearby opaque cloud observations at Regina, Saskatchewan in terms of the BSRN radiation fluxes. We find that in the warm season, we can determine effective cloud albedo to ±0.08 from daytime opaque cloud, and net long-wave radiation to ±8 W/m2 from daily mean opaque cloud and relative humidity. This enables us to extend our analysis to the 55 years of hourly observations of opaque cloud cover, temperature, relative humidity, and daily precipitation from 11 climate stations across the Canadian Prairies. We show the land-surface-atmosphere coupling on daily timescales in summer by stratifying the Prairie data by opaque cloud, relative humidity, surface wind, day-night cloud asymmetry and monthly weighted precipitation anomalies. The multiple linear regression fits relating key diurnal climate variables, the diurnal temperature range, afternoon relative humidity and lifting condensation level, to daily mean net longwave flux, wind-speed and precipitation anomalies have R2 values between 0.61 and 0.69. These fits will be a useful guide for evaluating the fully coupled system in models.

  5. Surface wave effects in the NEMO ocean model: Forced and coupled experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breivik, Øyvind; Mogensen, Kristian; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.

    2015-04-01

    The NEMO general circulation ocean model is extended to incorporate three physical processes related to ocean surface waves, namely the surface stress (modified by growth and dissipation of the oceanic wavefield), the turbulent kinetic energy flux from breaking waves, and the Stokes-Coriolis force. Experiments are done with NEMO in ocean-only (forced) mode and coupled to the ECMWF atmospheric and wave models. Ocean-only integrations are forced with fields from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. All three effects are noticeable in the extratropics, but the sea-state-dependent turbulent kinetic energy flux yields by far the largest difference. This is partly because the control run has too vigorous deep mixing due to an empirical mixing term in NEMO. We investigate the relation between this ad hoc mixing and Langmuir turbulence and find that it is much more effective than the Langmuir parameterization used in NEMO. The biases in sea surface temperature as well as subsurface temperature are reduced, and the total ocean heat content exhibits a trend closer to that observed in a recent ocean reanalysis (ORAS4) when wave effects are included. Seasonal integrations of the coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model consisting of NEMO, the wave model ECWAM, and the atmospheric model of ECMWF similarly show that the sea surface temperature biases are greatly reduced when the mixing is controlled by the sea state and properly weighted by the thickness of the uppermost level of the ocean model. These wave-related physical processes were recently implemented in the operational coupled ensemble forecast system of ECMWF.

  6. Waterless Coupling of Ultrasound from Planar Contact Transducers to Curved and Irregular Surfaces during Non-destructive Ultrasonic Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Jones, Anthony M.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Wells, Mondell D.

    2012-04-30

    The Applied Physics group at the Pacific The Applied Physics group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA has evaluated a method for waterless/liquidless coupling of ultrasonic energy from planar ultrasonic contact transducers to irregular test surfaces for ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation applications. Dry couplant material placed between a planar transducer face and a curved or uneven steel or plastic surface allows for effective sound energy coupling and preserves the integrity of the planar transducer sound field by serving as an acoustic impedance matching layer, providing good surface area contact between geometrically dissimilar surfaces and conforming to rough and unsmooth surfaces. Sound fields radiating from planar ultrasonic contact transducers coupled to curved and uneven surfaces using the dry coupling method were scanned and mapped using a Pinducer receiver connected to a raster scanner. Transducer sound field coverage at several ultrasonic frequencies and several distances from the transducer contact locations were found to be in good agreement with theoretical beam divergence and sound field coverage predictions for planar transducers coupled to simple, planar surfaces. This method is valuable for applications that do not allow for the use of traditional liquid-based ultrasonic couplants due to the sensitivity of the test materials to liquids and for applications that might otherwise require curved transducers or custom coupling wedges. The selection of dry coupling material is reported along with the results of theoretical sound field predictions, the laboratory testing apparatus and the empirical sound field data.

  7. Improved ENSO forecasts by assimilating sea surface temperature observations into an intermediate coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, F.; Zhu, J.; Zhang, R. H.; Zhou, G. Q.

    2006-07-01

    A simple method for initializing intermediate coupled models (ICMs) using only sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly data is comprehensively tested in two sets of hindcasts with a new ICM. In the initialization scheme, both the magnitude of the nudging parameter and the duration of the assimilation are considered, and initial conditions for both atmosphere and ocean are generated by running the coupled model with SST anomalies nudged to the observations. A comparison with the observations indicates that the scheme can generate realistic thermal fields and surface dynamic fields in the equatorial Pacific through hindcast experiments. An ideal experiment is performed to get the optimal nudging parameters which include the nudging intensity and nudging time length. Twelve-month-long hindcast experiments are performed with the model over the period 1984-2003 and the period 1997-2003. Compared with the original prediction results, the model prediction skills are significantly improved by the nudging method especially beyond a 6-month lead time during the two different periods. Potential problems and further improvements are discussed regarding the new coupled assimilation system.

  8. Mid-infrared surface plasmon polariton chemical sensing on fiber-coupled ITO coated glass.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Javier; Ródenas, Airán; Aguiló, Magdalena; Fernandez, Toney; Solis, Javier; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-06-01

    A novel fiber-coupled indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slide sensor for performing surface plasmon polariton chemical monitoring in the ∼3.5  μm mid-infrared (IR) range is reported. Efficient mid-IR fiber coupling is achieved with 3D laser written waveguides, and the coupling of glass waveguide modes to ITO surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is driven by the varying phase matching conditions of different aqueous analytes across the anomalous dispersion range determined by their molecular fingerprints. By means of using both a mid-IR fiber supercontinuum source and a diode laser, the excitation of SPPs is demonstrated. The sensor sensitivity is tested by discriminating CH from OH features of ethanol in water solutions, demonstrating an instrumental ethanol limit of detection of 0.02% in a wide concentration range of at least 0%-50%. The efficient optical monitoring of mid-IR SPPs in smart glass could have a broad range of applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:27244397

  9. Luminescence of Quantum Dots by Coupling with Nonradiative Surface Plasmon Modes in a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, M. J.; van de Lagemaat, J.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic coupling between quantum dots (QDs) and surface plasmons (SPs) is investigated by a luminescence spectroscopy based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). We show that tunneling luminescence from the dot is excited by coupling with the nonradiative plasmon mode oscillating at the metallic tunneling gap formed during the STM operation. This approach to the SP excitation reveals aspects of the SP-QD coupling not accessible to the more conventional optical excitation of SPs. In the STM, luminescence from the dot is observed when and only when the SP is in resonance with the fundamental transition of the dot. The tunneling luminescence spectrum also suggests that excited SP-QD hybrid states can participate in the excitation of QD luminescence. Not only the SP excitation regulates the QD luminescence but the presence of the dot at the tunneling gap imposes restrictions to the SP that can be excited in the STM, in which the SP cannot exceed the energy of the fundamental transition of the dot. The superior SP-QD coupling observed in the STM is due to the tunneling gap acting as a tunable plasmonic resonator in which the dot is fully immersed.

  10. Interface for Online Coupling of Surface Plasmon Resonance to Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Li, Xianjiang; Nie, Honggang; Yang, Li; Li, Ze; Bai, Yu; Niu, Li; Song, Daqian; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    The online coupling of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with mass spectrometry (MS) has been highly desired for the complementary information provided by each of the two techniques. In this work, a novel interface for direct and online coupling of SPR to direct analysis in real time (DART) MS was developed. A spray tip connected with the outlet of the SPR flow solution was conducted as the sampling part of the DART-MS, with which the online coupling interface of SPR-MS was realized. Four model samples, acetaminophen, metronidazole, quinine, and hippuric acid, dissolved in three kinds of common buffers were used in the SPR-DART-MS experiments for performance evaluation of the interface and the optimization of DART conditions. The results showed consistent signal changes and high tolerance of nonvolatile salts of this SPR-MS system, demonstrating the feasibility of the interface for online coupling of SPR with MS and the potential application in the characterization of interaction under physiological conditions. PMID:26067340

  11. 3-D Surface Depression Profiling Using High Frequency Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. This article shows quantitative surface topography profiles as obtained using only high-frequency focused air-coupled ultrasonic pulses. The profiles were obtained using a profiling system developed by NASA Glenn Research Center and Sonix, Inc (via a formal cooperative agreement). (The air transducers are available as off-the-shelf items from several companies.) The method is simple and reproducible because it relies mainly on knowledge and constancy of the sound velocity through the air. The air transducer is scanned across the surface and sends pulses to the sample surface where they are reflected back from the surface along the same path as the incident wave. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface are acquired and converted to depth/surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in air (V). The system has the ability to resolve surface depression variations as small as 25 microns, is useable over a 1.4 mm vertical depth range, and can profile large areas only limited by the scan limits of the particular ultrasonic system. (Best-case depth resolution is 0.25 microns which may be achievable with improved isolation from vibration and air currents.) The method using an optimized configuration is reasonably rapid and has all quantitative analysis facilities on-line including 2-D and 3-D visualization capability, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling capability. Air-coupled surface profilometry is applicable to plate-like and curved samples. In this article, results are shown for several proof-of-concept samples, plastic samples burned in microgravity on the STS-54 space shuttle mission, and a partially-coated cylindrical ceramic

  12. Van der Waals enhancement of optical atom potentials via resonant coupling to surface polaritons.

    PubMed

    Kerckhoff, Joseph; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-08-17

    Contemporary experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) with gas-phase neutral atoms rely increasingly on laser cooling and optical, magneto-optical or magnetostatic trapping methods to provide atomic localization with sub-micron uncertainty. Difficult to achieve in free space, this goal is further frustrated by atom-surface interactions if the desired atomic placement approaches within several hundred nanometers of a solid surface, as can be the case in setups incorporating monolithic dielectric optical resonators such as microspheres, microtoroids, microdisks or photonic crystal defect cavities. Typically in such scenarios, the smallest atom-surface separation at which the van der Waals interaction can be neglected is taken to be the optimal localization point for associated trapping schemes, but this sort of conservative strategy generally compromises the achievable cavity QED coupling strength. Here we suggest a new approach to the design of optical dipole traps for atom confinement near surfaces that exploits strong surface interactions, rather than avoiding them, and present the results of a numerical study based on (39)K atoms and indium tin oxide (ITO). Our theoretical framework points to the possibility of utilizing nanopatterning methods to engineer novel modifications of atom-surface interactions. PMID:19687952

  13. An Analytical Solution of Radiative Transfer in the Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean System with Rough Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rutledge, Ken; Knut Stamnes; Wang, Yingjian

    2006-01-01

    Using the efficient discrete-ordinate method, we present an analytical solution for radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system with rough air-water interface. The theoretical formulations of the radiative transfer equation and solution are described. The effects of surface roughness on radiation field in the atmosphere and ocean are studied and compared with measurements. The results show that ocean surface roughness has significant effects on the upwelling radiation in the atmosphere and the downwelling radiation in the ocean. As wind speed increases, the angular domain of sunglint broadens, the surface albedo decreases, and the transmission to ocean increases. The downward radiance field in the upper ocean is highly anisotropic, but this anisotropy decreases rapidly as surface wind increases and as depth in ocean increases. The effects of surface roughness on radiation also depend greatly on both wavelength and angle of incidence (i.e., solar elevation); these effects are significantly smaller throughout the spectrum at high sun. The model-observation discrepancies may indicate that the Cox-Munk surface roughness model is not sufficient for high wind conditions.

  14. Gain-coupled distributed feedback laser based on periodic surface anode canals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Jia, Peng; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Li; Chen, Hong; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Xing; Shan, Xiaonan; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2015-10-20

    A single-longitude-mode, broad-stripe, gain-coupled, distributed-feedback laser based on periodic surface anode canals (PSACs) is demonstrated. The PSACs, produced by i-line lithography, enhance the contrast of periodic current density in the active layer without introducing effective photon coupling; calculated grating κL is only 0.026. Power of 144.6 mW at 968.8 nm, with spectrum linewidth less than 0.04 nm on every uncoated cleavage facet, is obtained at a current of 1.2 A with a side-mode suppression ratio >29  dB. PMID:26560371

  15. Constraints on axion-nucleon coupling constants from measuring the Casimir force between corrugated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Romero, C.

    2014-09-01

    We obtain stronger laboratory constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons from measurements of the normal and lateral Casimir forces between sinusoidally corrugated surfaces of a sphere and a plate. For this purpose, the normal and lateral additional forces arising in the experimental configurations due to the two-axion exchange between protons and neutrons are calculated. Our constraints following from measurements of the normal and lateral Casimir forces are stronger than the laboratory constraints reported so far for masses of axion-like particles larger than 11 and 8 eV, respectively. A comparison between various laboratory constraints on the coupling constants of axion-like particles to nucleons obtained from the magnetometer measurements, Eötvos- and Cavendish-type experiments, and from the Casimir effect is performed over the wide range of masses of axion-like particles from 10-10 to 20 eV.

  16. Ultrafast Photophysics of Pentacene Coupled to Surface Plasmon Active Nanohole Films

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J. C.; Reilly III, T. R.; Kanarr, A. C.; van de Lagemaat, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pentacene, a model organic semiconductor, is shown to couple with surface plasmon (SP) active silver nanohole films to produce enhanced excited-state absorption. In addition, the dynamics of triplet formation and decay on a subpicosecond time scale are altered due to the coupling of the excited state with the resonant SP, possibly involving the interplay between singlet fission and triplet-triplet annihilation. Shifting the resonance of the SP with respect to the pentacene excitations and introducing a dielectric spacer between pentacene and metal lead to changes in the spectra and dynamics that can be explained qualitatively. These results are compared with recent literature reports of molecule/plasmon hybridization and are placed in context with efforts to utilize SPs for enhanced solar energy conversion.

  17. The coupling of mechanical dynamics and induced currents in plates and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenburger, D.W.; Bialek, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    Significant mechanical reactions and deflections may be produced when electrical eddy currents induced in a conducting structure by transformer-like electromotive forces interact with background magnetic fields. Additional eddy currents induced by structural motion through the background fields modify both the mechanical and electrical dynamic behavior of the system. The observed effects of these motional eddy currents are sometimes referred to as magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness. This paper addresses the coupled structural deformation and eddy currents in flat plates and simple two-dimensional surfaces in three-space. A coupled system of equations has been formulated using finite element techniques for the mechanical aspects and a mesh network method for the electrical aspects of the problem.

  18. Surface code architecture for donors and dots in silicon with imprecise and nonuniform qubit couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, G.; Lovett, B. W.; Bhatt, R. N.; Schenkel, T.; Lyon, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    A scaled quantum computer with donor spins in silicon would benefit from a viable semiconductor framework and a strong inherent decoupling of the qubits from the noisy environment. Coupling neighboring spins via the natural exchange interaction according to current designs requires gate control structures with extremely small length scales. We present a silicon architecture where bismuth donors with long coherence times are coupled to electrons that can shuttle between adjacent quantum dots, thus relaxing the pitch requirements and allowing space between donors for classical control devices. An adiabatic SWAP operation within each donor/dot pair solves the scalability issues intrinsic to exchange-based two-qubit gates, as it does not rely on subnanometer precision in donor placement and is robust against noise in the control fields. We use this SWAP together with well established global microwave Rabi pulses and parallel electron shuttling to construct a surface code that needs minimal, feasible local control.

  19. Radiative decay engineering 4. Experimental studies of surface plasmon-coupled directional emission

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Ignacy; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence is typically isotropic in space and collected with low efficiency. In this paper we describe surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE), which displays unique optical properties and can be collected with an efficiency near 50%. SPCE occurs for fluorophores within about 200 nm of a thin metallic film, in our case a 50-nm-thick silver film on a glass substrate. We show that fluorophore proximity to this film converts the normally isotropic emission into highly directional emission through the glass substrate at a well-defined angle from the normal axis. Depending on the thickness of the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film on the silver, the coupling efficiency of sulforhodamine 101 in PVA ranged from 30 to 49%. Directional SPCE was observed whether the fluorophore was excited directly or by the evanescent field due to the surface plasmon resonance. The emission is always polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence, irrespective of the polarization of the incident light. The lifetimes are not substantially changed, indicating a mechanism somewhat different from that observed previously for the effects of silver particles on fluorophores. Remarkably, the directional emission shows intrinsic spectral resolution because the coupling angles depend on wavelength. The distances over which SPCE occurs, 10 to 200 nm, are useful because a large number of fluorophores can be localized within this volume. The emission of more distant fluorophores does not couple into the glass, allowing background suppression from biological samples. SPCE can be expected to become rapidly useful in a variety of analytical and medical sensing applications. PMID:14690680

  20. Relationship of magnetic behavior and surface spin coupling in Hematite nanowires bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. P.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, P. F.; Xu, J. C.; Han, Y. B.; Jin, H. X.; Jin, D. F.; Peng, X. L.; Hong, B.; Li, J.; Yang, Y. T.; Gong, J.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanowires were synthesized using mesoporous SBA-15 silica as the hard templates, and then the well-dispersed α-Fe2O3 nanowires (NWS) were separated from the ordered α-Fe2O3 nanowires bundles (NWBS) by the centrifugation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surperconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) were used to characterize the microstructure and magnetic properties of the as-prepared samples. All results indicated that the α-Fe2O3 NWS and NWBS with the different interwires distance presented the same diameter for nanowires, which was possible to reveal the exchange interaction between α-Fe2O3 NWBs. Both samples showed ferromagnetism and α-Fe2O3 NWS presented superparamagnetism at high temperature. The magnetic results indicated the surface spin between the neighboring nanowires of α-Fe2O3 NWBs coupled each other. The saturation magnetization of α-Fe2O3 NWBS was lower than that of α-Fe2O3 NWS, while the coercivity and Curie temperature were larger. It was concluded that the surface spin coupling could weaken the surface effect on the magnetic properties for nanostructures.

  1. A Modular Approach to Coupling Surface Water and Ground Water Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markstrom, S. L.; Boyle, D. P.; Pohll, G. M.; Viger, R. J.; Fluegel, W.; Leavesley, G. H.; McConnell, J. R.

    2002-12-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of environmental and water-resource problems, modeling techniques are required that simulate, on a basin scale, both the surface and subsurface hydrology. In previous studies, precipitation-runoff models have been used to generate groundwater-recharge information for subsurface models; however, incompatibilities in the spatial and temporal resolutions have been a significant impediment to a robust coupling of these models. Surface water models and groundwater models need to be integrated to provide the feedback between the models to allow a water balance to be achieved. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Modular Modeling System (MMS) provides a common framework where the most appropriate algorithms can be combined in ways that address a specific user's needs and constraints. In this study, several hybrid MMS model applications with varying levels of representation (spatial and vertical) of subsurface hydrologic processes are constructed using algorithms from the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) surface-water model and the MODFLOW groundwater model. The coupled models are applied and tested on watersheds in the USGS and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Watershed and River System Management Program (WaRSMP). Multi-criteria performance comparisons are used to evaluate the benefits of the different levels of subsurface process representation.

  2. Surface modification of polypropylene separators in lithium-ion batteries using inductively coupled plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Son, Jinyoung; Kim, Min-Sik; Lee, Hyun Woo; Yu, Jong-Sung; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    We describe herein an improvement in the surface wettability of plasma-treated separators for use in lithium-ion batteries. We treated the separators with an O2/Ar inductively coupled plasma to increase their surface energy. The plasma treatment on the separator and plasma diagnostic experiments were performed in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor. The fraction of Ar in the O2/Ar plasma was changed from 0% to 100%. The plasma diagnostics were performed using optical emission spectroscopy and a double Langmuir probe. To confirm the morphological change of the separator membrane by the plasma treatment, we used the scanning electron microscopy. The surface energy measurements were performed using the drop method. We found that the plasma treatment transformed the separator from a hydrophobic membrane to a hydrophilic one, thereby achieving high separator wettability. After the treatment of the separators with O2/Ar plasma, the batteries exhibited better cycle performance and rate capacity than those employing the untreated ones. PMID:25971067

  3. Surface Plasmon-Coupled Directional Enhanced Raman Scattering by Means of the Reverse Kretschmann Configuration.

    PubMed

    Huo, Si-Xin; Liu, Qian; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Cai, Wei-Peng; Meng, Ling-Yan; Xie, Kai-Xin; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Zong, Cheng; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Ren, Bin; Li, Yao-Qun

    2015-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a unique analytical technique that provides fingerprint spectra, yet facing the obstacle of low collection efficiency. In this study, we demonstrated a simple approach to measure surface plasmon-coupled directional enhanced Raman scattering by means of the reverse Kretschmann configuration (RK-SPCR). Highly directional and p-polarized Raman scattering of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was observed on a nanoparticle-on-film substrate at 46° through the prism coupler with a sharp angle distribution (full width at half-maximum of ∼3.3°). Because of the improved collection efficiency, the Raman scattering signal was enhanced 30-fold over the conventional SERS mode; this was consistent with finite-difference time-domain simulations. The effect of nanoparticles on the coupling efficiency of propagated surface plasmons was investigated. Possessing straightforward implementation and directional enhancement of Raman scattering, RK-SPCR is anticipated to simplify SERS instruments and to be broadly applicable to biochemical assays. PMID:26266494

  4. Non-adiabatic dynamics around a conical intersection with surface-hopping coupled coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-01

    A surface-hopping extension of the coupled coherent states-method [D. Shalashilin and M. Child, Chem. Phys. 304, 103-120 (2004)] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both interference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution if convergence with respect to the number of trajectories is achieved and the potential energy surfaces are known globally. The method is tested on a 2D model for a conical intersection [A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 5517 (1996)], where a nuclear wavepacket encircles the point of degeneracy between two potential energy surfaces and interferes with itself. These interference effects are absent in classical trajectory-based molecular dynamics but can be fully incorpo rated if trajectories are replaced by surface hopping coupled coherent states.

  5. Non-adiabatic dynamics around a conical intersection with surface-hopping coupled coherent states.

    PubMed

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-21

    A surface-hopping extension of the coupled coherent states-method [D. Shalashilin and M. Child, Chem. Phys. 304, 103-120 (2004)] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both interference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution if convergence with respect to the number of trajectories is achieved and the potential energy surfaces are known globally. The method is tested on a 2D model for a conical intersection [A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 5517 (1996)], where a nuclear wavepacket encircles the point of degeneracy between two potential energy surfaces and interferes with itself. These interference effects are absent in classical trajectory-based molecular dynamics but can be fully incorpo rated if trajectories are replaced by surface hopping coupled coherent states. PMID:27334155

  6. Modelling surface water flood risk using coupled numerical and physical modelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Pattison, I.; Yu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs due to intense precipitation events where rainfall cannot infiltrate into the sub-surface or drain via storm water systems. The perceived risk appears to have increased in recent years with pluvial flood events seeming more severe and frequent within the UK. Surface water flood risk currently accounts for one third of all UK flood risk, with approximately two million people living in urban areas being at risk of a 1 in 200 year flood event. Surface water flooding research often focuses upon using 1D, 2D or 1D-2D coupled numerical modelling techniques to understand the extent, depth and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although much research has been conducted using numerical modelling, field data available for model calibration and validation is limited due to the complexities associated with data collection in surface water flood conditions. Ultimately, the data which numerical models are based upon is often erroneous and inconclusive. Physical models offer an alternative and innovative environment to collect data within. A controlled, closed system allows independent variables to be altered individually to investigate cause and effect relationships. Despite this, physical modelling approaches are seldom used in surface water flooding research. Scaled laboratory experiments using a 9m2, two-tiered physical model consisting of: (i) a mist nozzle type rainfall simulator able to simulate a range of rainfall intensities similar to those observed within the United Kingdom, and; (ii) a fully interchangeable, scaled plot surface have been conducted to investigate and quantify the influence of factors such as slope, impermeability, building density/configuration and storm dynamics on overland flow and rainfall-runoff patterns within a range of terrestrial surface conditions. Results obtained within the physical modelling environment will be compared with numerical modelling results using FloodMap (Yu & Lane, 2006

  7. Finite temperature vibronic spectra of harmonic surfaces: a time-dependent coupled cluster approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar Reddy, Ch.; Durga Prasad, M.

    2015-10-01

    An algorithm to compute vibronic spectra of harmonic surfaces including Dushinsky rotation and Hertzberg-Teller terms is described. The method, inspired by thermo field dynamics, maps the thermal density matrix onto the vacuum state and uses the time-dependent coupled cluster ansatz to propagate it in time. In the Franck-Condon approximation where the dipole matrix elements are taken to be constants, this reduces to the auto correlation function of the new vacuum. In the Hertzberg-Teller approximation, the full time evolution operator is needed. This too is governed by a closed set of equations. The theoretical development is presented along with an application to anthracene.

  8. Surface Modification of Nanometre Silicon Carbide Powder with Polystyrene by Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Gang; Meng, Yuedong; Zhong, Shaofeng; Liu, Feng; Jiang, Zhongqing; Shu, Xingsheng; Ren, Zhaoxing; Wang, Xiangke

    2008-02-01

    An investigation was made into polystyrene (PS) grafted onto nanometre silicon carbide (SiC) particles. In our experiment, the grafting polymerization reaction was induced by a radio frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) treatment of the nanometre powder. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectrum) and XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) results reveal that PS is grafted onto the surface of silicon carbide powder. An analysis is presented on the effectiveness of this approach as a function of plasma operating variables including the plasma treating power, treating time, and grafting reaction temperature and time.

  9. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  10. Effects from detuning the resonant coupling between fiber gratings and localized surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidemann, Bárbara R.; Pereira, Júlia C.; Chiamenti, Ismael; Oliveira, Marcela M.; Muller, Marcia; Fabris, José L.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the effect of detuning the resonant coupling between a long period grating and the plasmonic band of gold nanoparticles on the device sensitivity. In an intensity coded configuration, the sensitivity was measured at 568.12 nm and 598.62 nm, for surroundings refractive indexes ranging from 1.3629 to 1.4184. A comparison between the responses of the two dips centered at these wavelengths resulted in a sensitivity enhancement of about 17 times for the dip localized close to the center of the localized surface plasmon resonance.

  11. Growth of metal phthalocyanine on deactivated semiconducting surfaces steered by selective orbital coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Sean R.; Feng, Jiagui; Yoon, Mina; Zhang, Pengpeng; Huang, Bing; Park, Changwon

    2015-08-25

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory, we show that the molecular ordering and orientation of metal phthalocyanine molecules on the deactivated Si surface display a strong dependency on the central transition-metal ion, driven by the degree of orbital hybridization at the heterointerface via selective p – d orbital coupling. As a result, this Letter identifies a selective mechanism for modifying the molecule-substrate interaction which impacts the growth behavior of transition-metal-incorporated organic molecules on a technologically relevant substrate for silicon-based devices.

  12. Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence from nickel thin films: Fixed angle observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberg, Micah; Aslan, Kadir; Hortle, Elinor; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-04-01

    Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence (SPCC) from nickel thin films is demonstrated. Free-space and angular-dependent SPCC emission from blue, green and turquoise chemiluminescent solutions placed onto nickel thin films attached to a hemispherical prism were measured. SPCC emission was found to be highly directional and preferentially p-polarized, in contrast to the unpolarized and isotropic chemiluminescence emission. The largest SPCC emission for all chemiluminescence solutions was observed at a fixed observation angle of 60°, which was also predicted by theoretical Fresnel calculations. It was found that nickel thin films did not have a catalytic effect on chemiluminescence emission.

  13. In-Depth Electrochemical Investigation of Surface Attachment Chemistry via Carbodiimide Coupling.

    PubMed

    Booth, Marsilea Adela; Kannappan, Karthik; Hosseini, Ali; Partridge, Ashton

    2015-07-28

    Aminoferrocene is used as an electroactive indicator to investigate carbodiimide coupling reactions on a carboxylic acid-functionalized self-assembled monolayer. The commonly used attachment chemistry with 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) is used for surface activation. A number of conditions are investigated, including EDC and NHS concentration, buffer solutions, incubation timing, and aminoferrocene concentration. Ferrocene is a well-documented electroactive species, and the number of surface-bound ferrocene species can be calculated using electrochemical methods. This capability allows determination of optimal conditions, as well as providing a method for comparing and investigating novel carboxylated surfaces. An EDC-mediated procedure with ∼5 mM EDC and NHS (1:1) made in water, with a full acid monolayer, with 250 μM aminoferrocene for 40 min was found to give the highest ferrocene attachment. An application of this is demonstrated for preparing a probe-DNA-coated surface for DNA sensing. By backfilling with aminoferrocene, a differential quantification of the amount of probe DNA available for sensing can be obtained. This provides an elegant method to monitor an important aspect, namely, probe surface characterization, which will be highly useful for biosensing purposes. PMID:26107592

  14. Aryl diazonium salts: a new class of coupling agents for bonding polymers, biomacromolecules and nanoparticles to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mahouche-Chergui, Samia; Gam-Derouich, Sarra; Mangeney, Claire; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2011-07-01

    This critical review summarizes existing knowledge on the use of diazonium salts as a new generation of surface modifiers and coupling agents for binding synthetic polymers, biomacromolecules, and nanoparticles to surfaces. Polymer grafts can be directly grown at surfaces through the so-called grafting from approaches based on several polymerization methods but can also be pre-formed in solution and then grafted to surfaces through grafting onto strategies including "click" reactions. Several routes are also described for binding biomacromolecules through aryl layers in view of developing biosensors and protein arrays, while the use of aryl diazonium coupling agents is extended to the attachment of nanoparticles. Patents and industrial applications of the surface chemistry of diazonium compounds are covered. This review stresses the paramount role of aryl diazonium coupling agents in adhesion, surface and materials sciences (114 references). PMID:21479328

  15. Size stabilization of surface-supported liquid aerosols using tapered optical fiber coupling.

    PubMed

    Karadag, Yasin; Jonáš, Alexandr; Kucukkara, Ibrahim; Kiraz, Alper

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate long-term size stabilization of surface-supported liquid aerosols of salt-water. Single tapered optical fibers were used to couple the light from independent heating and probe lasers into individual microdroplets that were kept on a superhydrophobic surface in a high-humidity chamber. Size stabilization of microdroplets resulted from competition between resonant absorption of the infrared heating laser by a microdroplet whispering gallery mode and water condensation in the sample chamber. Microdroplet size was continuously monitored using the tunable red probe laser. Thanks to the narrow linewidth of the heating laser, stabilization of the 110 μm radius of a microdroplet with a precision down to 0.54 nm was achieved for a period of 410 s. PMID:23455301

  16. [Research on glucose measuring technique by surface plasmon resonance based on thiol coupling].

    PubMed

    Li, Da-Chao; Yang, Di; Yang, Jia; Zhang, Jing-Xin; Wu, Peng; Yu, Hai-Xia; Xu, Ke-Xin

    2014-03-01

    In the glucose measuring technique by surface plasmon resonance, D-galactose/D-glucose binding protein (GGBP) that can specifically adsorb glucose was introduced, and high-precision specific detection of glucose concentration was realized. In the present paper, the GGBP protein was bound on the surface of SPR sensor through thiol coupling method. GGBP binding experiment was carried out on SPR sensor and then glucose concentration experiment was conducted with this sensor. The results indicated that the SPR sensor had good linearity, stability and repeatability in the range of 0.1-10 mg x dL(-1). SPR sensor bound with GGBP would have great potential and vast development prospects. PMID:25208374

  17. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  18. Hafnium dioxide as a dielectric for highly-sensitive waveguide-coupled surface plasmon resonance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Kunal; Sharma, Suresh C.; Hozhabri, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Hafnium dioxide has been recognized as an excellent dielectric for microelectronics. However, its usefulness for the surface plasmon based sensors has not yet been tested. Here we investigate its usefulness for waveguide-coupled bi-metallic surface plasmon resonance sensors. Several Ag/HfO2/Au multilayer structure sensors were fabricated and evaluated by optical measurements and computer simulations. The resulting data establish correlations between the growth parameters and sensor performance. The sensor sensitivity to refractive index of analytes is determined to be S n = /∂ θ SPR ∂ n ≥ 4 7 0 . The sensitivity data are supported by simulations, which also predict 314 nm for the evanescent field decay length in air.

  19. Temporal Changes in Land-Surface Coupling Strength: an Example in a Semi-Arid Region of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, M. H.; Wu, W. Y.; Ryu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface models provide the boundary conditions for the land-atmosphere interaction in the global climate models; hence, the mechanisms whereby water transport influences terrestrial water storage might impact the climate. The high spatial and temporal variability in soil water storage over Australia plays an essential role in affecting the variability of land-surface coupling strength. While previous studies focused more on the spatial variations of land-atmosphere interaction and resulting hotspots, in this study, we attempt to explore temporal variations of the land-surface coupling strength in the semi-arid regions. Preliminary results show high temporal variability of the coupling strength across the seasons. The land-surface coupling strength usually increases with soil moisture in the semi-arid climate. However, during the flood events, the coupling strength decreases when the evaporation approaches to the potential evaporation. After recovering from the floods, the coupling strength increases again during the recessing phase of soil water. Such temporal variations of the land-surface coupling strength have important implications to land-atmosphere interactions and climate predictions, and warrant further investigations using observational datasets.

  20. Control of coupling mass balance error in a process-based numerical model of surface-subsurface flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, Marcello; Orlandini, Stefano; Paniconi, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    A process-based numerical model of integrated surface-subsurface flow is analyzed in order to identify, track, and reduce the mass balance errors affiliated with the model's coupling scheme. The sources of coupling error include a surface-subsurface grid interface that requires node-to-cell and cell-to-node interpolation of exchange fluxes and ponding heads, and a sequential iterative time matching procedure that includes a time lag in these same exchange terms. Based on numerical experiments carried out for two synthetic test cases and for a complex drainage basin in northern Italy, it is shown that the coupling mass balance error increases during the flood recession limb when the rate of change in the fluxes exchanged between the surface and subsurface is highest. A dimensionless index that quantifies the degree of coupling and a saturated area index are introduced to monitor the sensitivity of the model to coupling error. Error reduction is achieved through improvements to the heuristic procedure used to control and adapt the time step interval and to the interpolation algorithm used to pass exchange variables from nodes to cells. The analysis presented illustrates the trade-offs between a flexible description of surface and subsurface flow processes and the numerical errors inherent in sequential iterative coupling with staggered nodal points at the land surface interface, and it reveals mitigation strategies that are applicable to all integrated models sharing this coupling and discretization approach.

  1. Quantum Yield of Single Surface Plasmons Generated by a Quantum Dot Coupled with a Silver Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between surface plasmons (SPs) in metal nanostructures and excitons in quantum emitters (QEs) lead to many interesting phenomena and potential applications that are strongly dependent on the quantum yield of SPs. The difficulty in distinguishing all the possible exciton recombination channels hinders the experimental determination of SP quantum yield. Here, we experimentally measured for the first time the quantum yield of single SPs generated by the exciton-plasmon coupling in a system composed of a single quantum dot and a silver nanowire (NW). By utilizing the SP guiding property of the NW, the decay rates of all the exciton recombination channels, i.e., direct free space radiation channel, SP generation channel, and nonradiative damping channel, are quantitatively obtained. It is determined that the optimum emitter-NW coupling distance for the largest SP quantum yield is about 10 nm, resulting from the different distance-dependent decay rates of the three channels. These results are important for manipulating the coupling between plasmonic nanostructures and QEs and developing on-chip quantum plasmonic devices for potential nanophotonic and quantum information applications. PMID:26583200

  2. Estimation of actual evapotranspiration through model coupling and data assimilation with remotely sensed land surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalskyy, V.; Henebry, G.

    2009-05-01

    We report on preliminary results from the coupling of two models and satellite observations to track evapotranspiration (ET) dynamics in Northern Great Plains of the USA. The approach takes advantage of high- quality microclimate and irradiance/radiance measurements in a data assimilation scheme to estimate actual ET through a stepwise simulation of foliage dynamics, corrected by remotely sensed land surface properties. We used a recently developed VegET model that uses water balance principles and phenological constraints (Senay 2008) coupled with an event driven phenology model (EDPM) to simulate canopy dynamics unfolding in response to changing environmental conditions and disturbance events. We used NDVI derived from MODIS Collection 5 Nadir BRDF Adjusted Reflectance (NBAR; MCD43B4V5) to amend the outputs of the EDPM using one-dimensional Kalman filtering to achieve a better representation of changing canopy conditions. The model was trained on level 1 flux tower data from cropland sites at Mead, Nebraska and refined using similar records from Bondville, Illinois. Results from the test runs demonstrated the ability of EDPM to drive the phenological constrains of VegET with reasonable accuracy (RMSE 0.03-0.10 at Nebraska sites). Filtered and unfiltered results from the coupled model were compared with actual evapotranspiration recorded on flux towers and with tower NDVI (Wittich and Kraft 2008). Depending on vegetation type and location, Pearson correlation coefficients between model estimates and observed values ranged between 0.8 and 0.9.

  3. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has been based on a big-leaf approach, with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Furthermore, to be stable, that is to say, over large time steps and without large iterations, a surface layer model should be capable of implicit coupling to the atmospheric model. Surface models with large time steps, however, have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. Here we outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multi-layer long-wave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare-soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of the canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoomed model). As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer-term eddy-covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of energy and water fluxes, as well as the vertical gradients of temperature and of sensible heat fluxes.

  4. Nitrate reduction coupled with pyrite oxidation in the surface sediments of a sulfide-rich ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Mizuho; Asano, Ryoki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Hidaka, Shin

    2013-06-01

    studies of denitrification have focused on organic carbon as an electron donor, but reduced sulfur can also support denitrification. Few studies have reported nitrate (NO3-) reduction coupled with pyrite oxidation and its stoichiometry in surface sediments, especially without experimental pyrite addition. In this study, we evaluated NO3- reduction coupled with sulfur oxidation by long-term incubation of surface sediments from a sulfide-rich ecosystem in Akita Prefecture, Japan. The surface sediments were sampled from a mud pool and a riverbed. Fresh sediments and water were incubated under anoxic conditions (and one oxic condition) at 20°C. NO3- addition increased the SO42- concentration and decreased the NO3- concentration. SO42- production (∆SO42-) was strongly and linearly correlated with NO3- consumption (∆NO3-) during the incubation period (R2 = 0.983, P < 0.01, and n = 8), and the slope of the regression (∆NO3-/∆SO42-) and the stoichiometry indicated sulfur-driven NO3- reduction by indigenous autotrophic denitrifying bacteria. Framboidal pyrite and marcasite (both FeS2) were present in the sediments and functioned as the electron donors for autotrophic denitrification. Both ∆NO3- and ∆SO42- were higher in the riverbed sediment than in the mud pool sediment, likely because of the higher amount of easily oxidizable S (pyrite) in the riverbed sediment. Consistently low ammonium (NH4+) concentrations indicated that NO3- reduction by dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ was small but could not be disregarded. Our results demonstrate that sulfide-rich ecosystems with easily oxidizable metal-bound sulfides such as FeS2 near the ground surface may act as denitrification hot spots.

  5. Investigating enhanced atmospheric-sea surface coupling and interactions in the Irish Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskell, John; Horsburgh, Kevin; Plater, Andy J.

    2013-02-01

    Enhanced atmospheric-sea surface coupling is investigated in the Irish Sea. The implications for so-called Proudman resonance are considered for a hindcast of an event that produced a significant, pressure-induced storm surge at the port of Liverpool. Time-series of non-dimensional gain along the depression track show resonant enhancement of the pressure-driven residual elevations in the central, deeper region of the Irish Sea when a depression moves at the speed of a shallow water wave (gh0.5). However, in the relatively shallow eastern Irish Sea the wind stress is the dominant surge-generating mechanism. Wind-generated surge magnitude is influenced by the propagation speed of the depression which controls the timing of momentum input with respect to tidal depth variations. Large surges at Liverpool are mostly caused by an almost linear summation of the wind- and pressure-induced surge components when the wind stress acts over low water and/or the rising tide. However, it is possible for the interaction of wind stress and pressure to reduce the total surge when a pressure-induced sea-level increase reduces the effect of the wind stress. The Irish Sea is too small for significant resonant enhancement due to atmospheric-sea surface coupling and surge magnitudes are strongly dependent on the intensity of the depression and the magnitude of the wind stress.

  6. Diffusion on a Curved Surface Coupled to Diffusion in the Volume: Application to Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Igor L.; Gao, Fei; Choi, Yung-Sze; Resasco, Diana; Schaff, James C.; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2007-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for solving a diffusion equation on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume, a problem often arising in cell biology. It applies to pixilated surfaces obtained from experimental images and performs at low computational cost. In the method, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is approximated locally by the Laplacian on the tangential plane and then a finite volume discretization scheme based on a Voronoi decomposition is applied. Convergence studies show that mass conservation built in the discretization scheme and cancellation of sampling error ensure convergence of the solution in space with an order between 1 and 2. The method is applied to a cell-biological problem where a signaling molecule, G-protein Rac, cycles between the cytoplasm and cell membrane thus coupling its diffusion in the membrane to that in the cell interior. Simulations on realistic cell geometry are performed to validate, and determine the accuracy of, a recently proposed simplified quantitative analysis of fluorescence loss in photobleaching. The method is implemented within the Virtual Cell computational framework freely accessible at www.vcell.org. PMID:18836520

  7. Understanding Coupled Earth-Surface Processes through Experiments and Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, I.; Kim, W.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, both numerical models and experiments have been purposefully designed to ';isolate' singular components or certain processes of a larger mountain to deep-ocean interconnected source-to-sink (S2S) transport system. Controlling factors driven by processes outside of the domain of immediate interest were treated and simplified as input or as boundary conditions. Increasingly, earth surface processes scientists appreciate feedbacks and explore these feedbacks with more dynamically coupled approaches to their experiments and models. Here, we discuss key concepts and recent advances made in coupled modeling and experimental setups. In addition, we emphasize challenges and new frontiers to coupled experiments. Experiments have highlighted the important role of self-organization; river and delta systems do not always need to be forced by external processes to change or develop characteristic morphologies. Similarly modeling f.e. has shown that intricate networks in tidal deltas are stable because of the interplay between river avulsions and the tidal current scouring with both processes being important to develop and maintain the dentritic networks. Both models and experiment have demonstrated that seemingly stable systems can be perturbed slightly and show dramatic responses. Source-to-sink models were developed for both the Fly River System in Papua New Guinea and the Waipaoa River in New Zealand. These models pointed to the importance of upstream-downstream effects and enforced our view of the S2S system as a signal transfer and dampening conveyor belt. Coupled modeling showed that deforestation had extreme effects on sediment fluxes draining from the catchment of the Waipaoa River in New Zealand, and that this increase in sediment production rapidly shifted the locus of offshore deposition. The challenge in designing coupled models and experiments is both technological as well as intellectual. Our community advances to make numerical model coupling more

  8. Spectrum and properties of mesoscopic surface-coupled phonons in rectangular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patamia, Steven Eugene

    This dissertation presents original analytical derivations of the propagating modes of coupled mesoscopic phonons in an isotropic rectangular wire with stress-free surfaces. Incidental to the derivations, novel consequences of the derived cutoff modes are presented as they affect the low-energy heat conductance of such wires, or indeed any property that depends upon the dimensionality of the phase space within which the modes reside. Owing to nonseparability of the free-surface boundary conditions, an analytic description of coupled mesoscopic modes has heretofore been presumed to be underivable. Results presented herein show that the mode spectrum of coupled mesoscopic phonons is both subtle and rich, but considerable success in their analytic derivation is achieved. Using numerical methods developed for resonance problems, at least one contemporary researcher has purported to exhibit the lowest dispersion branches of propagating mesoscopic phonon modes in GaAs---which is not isotropic. The accuracy of these branches has not been measured, but they bear a qualitative consistency with isotropic modes derived herein. Since before the beginning of the 20th century, analytical solutions have been known for the infinite thin plate and even the case of waveguides with circular cross sections. Solutions for these special cases take the form of transcendental relations among the wavenumber and boundary parameters, but the underlying wavefunctions are separable in the coordinates. The analytical results presented herein for the general rectangular case involve nonseparable solutions whose separable components do not individually satisfy the boundary conditions. These solutions also take the form of transcendental relations, but there are sets of transcendental relations for each family of the cases that partition the problem. Consequently, the eigenspectrum, while defined by exact forms, must be enumerated by identifying plotted intersections of the root families of these

  9. Improving coupling of surface and groundwater for high resolution water cycle models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, N.; Bulygina, N.; Butler, A. P.; Jackson, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    The JULES land surface model is widely used for global and regional scale water cycle modelling, and its hydrological component has been proposed as a potentially suitable for water resources and water quality modelling purposes. Current research is exploring the applicability of JULES at high resolution (e.g. 1km2) in terms of suitability of process representation, data needs and parameter estimation challenges. Our work on process representation research is focussing on improved coupling of groundwater models with JULES. Current operational versions of JULES include semi-empirical representations of saturated areas, using the probability distributed moisture (PDM) model and TOPMODEL. However these models do not attempt to provide realistic groundwater-unsaturated zone interactions or lateral movement of groundwater, and the empirical nature of these groundwater models also requires parameter calibration. All these limitations may become more relevant as model spatial resolutions become higher. We have coupled alternative groundwater models with JULES and tested the integrated models on the Kennet catchment, a mainly permeable subcatchment of the Thames basin in southern England. One of the integrated models uses a modification of the existing TOPMODEL that aims to provide an improved representation of the deep unsaturated zone; and the second uses the physics-based ZOOMQ3D groundwater model that aims to provide a realistic regional groundwater surface, groundwater level dynamics and lateral movement of groundwater. All are applied at the 1 x 1 km scale. Results for the Kennet for these coupled JULES-groundwater models are presented and performance is assessed relative to observations in terms of soil mositure and river flows. The models are critically discussed in terms of performance and potential range of applicability.

  10. Impact of surface coupling grids on tropical cyclone extremes in high-resolution atmospheric simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarzycki, Colin M.; Reed, Kevin A.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Craig, Anthony P.; Bates, Susan C.; Rosenbloom, Nan A.

    2016-02-25

    This article discusses the sensitivity of tropical cyclone climatology to surface coupling strategy in high-resolution configurations of the Community Earth System Model. Using two supported model setups, we demonstrate that the choice of grid on which the lowest model level wind stress and surface fluxes are computed may lead to differences in cyclone strength in multi-decadal climate simulations, particularly for the most intense cyclones. Using a deterministic framework, we show that when these surface quantities are calculated on an ocean grid that is coarser than the atmosphere, the computed frictional stress is misaligned with wind vectors in individual atmospheric gridmore » cells. This reduces the effective surface drag, and results in more intense cyclones when compared to a model configuration where the ocean and atmosphere are of equivalent resolution. Our results demonstrate that the choice of computation grid for atmosphere–ocean interactions is non-negligible when considering climate extremes at high horizontal resolution, especially when model components are on highly disparate grids.« less

  11. Surface roughening of ground fused silica processed by atmospheric inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qiang; Li, Na; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bo; Li, Guo; Ding, Fei; Jin, Huiliang

    2015-06-01

    Subsurface damage (SSD) is a defect that is inevitably induced during mechanical processes, such as grinding and polishing. This defect dramatically reduces the mechanical strength and the laser damage thresholds of optical elements. Compared with traditional mechanical machining, atmospheric pressure plasma processing (APPP) is a relatively novel technology that induces almost no SSD during the processing of silica-based optical materials. In this paper, a form of APPP, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), is used to process fused silica substrates with fluorocarbon precursor under atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology evolution of ICP-processed substrates was observed and characterized by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the roughness evolves with the etching depth, and the roughness evolution is a single-peaked curve. This curve results from the opening and the coalescing of surface cracks and fractures. The coalescence procedure of these microstructures was simulated with two common etched pits on a polished fused silica surface. Understanding the roughness evolution of plasma-processed surface might be helpful in optimizing the optical fabrication chain that contains APPP.

  12. Impact of surface coupling grids on tropical cyclone extremes in high-resolution atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzycki, Colin M.; Reed, Kevin A.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Craig, Anthony P.; Bates, Susan C.; Rosenbloom, Nan A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses the sensitivity of tropical cyclone climatology to surface coupling strategy in high-resolution configurations of the Community Earth System Model. Using two supported model setups, we demonstrate that the choice of grid on which the lowest model level wind stress and surface fluxes are computed may lead to differences in cyclone strength in multi-decadal climate simulations, particularly for the most intense cyclones. Using a deterministic framework, we show that when these surface quantities are calculated on an ocean grid that is coarser than the atmosphere, the computed frictional stress is misaligned with wind vectors in individual atmospheric grid cells. This reduces the effective surface drag, and results in more intense cyclones when compared to a model configuration where the ocean and atmosphere are of equivalent resolution. Our results demonstrate that the choice of computation grid for atmosphere-ocean interactions is non-negligible when considering climate extremes at high horizontal resolution, especially when model components are on highly disparate grids.

  13. Surface models for coupled modelling of runoff and sewer flow in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Ettrich, N; Steiner, K; Thomas, M; Rothe, R

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods fail for the purpose of simulating the complete flow process in urban areas as a consequence of heavy rainfall and as required by the European Standard EN-752 since the bi-directional coupling between sewer and surface is not properly handled. The new methodology, developed in the EUREKA-project RisUrSim, solves this problem by carrying out the runoff on the basis of shallow water equations solved on high-resolution surface grids. Exchange nodes between the sewer and the surface, like inlets and manholes, are located in the computational grid and water leaving the sewer in case of surcharge is further distributed on the surface. Dense topographical information is needed to build a model suitable for hydrodynamic runoff calculations; in urban areas, in addition, many line-shaped elements like houses, curbs, etc. guide the runoff of water and require polygonal input. Airborne data collection methods offer a great chance to economically gather densely sampled input data. PMID:16248177

  14. Coupling frontal photopolymerization and surface instabilities for a novel 3D patterning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Alessandra; Hennessy, Matthew; Matar, Omar; Douglas, Jack; Cabral, João

    2015-03-01

    Patterning of soft matter provides an exceptional route for the generation of micro/nanostructured and functional surfaces. We describe a new 3D fabrication process based on coupling frontal photopolymerization (FPP) with precisely controlled, yet spontaneous, interfacial wrinkling. FPP is a complex spatio-temporal process that can lead to well-defined propagating fronts of network formation, both stable and unstable. We investigate this process focusing on the interfacial monomer-to-polymer conversion profile and its wave propagation. A simple coarse-grained model is found to describe remarkably well the planar frontal logarithmic kinetics, capturing the effects of UV light exposure time (or dose) and temperature, as well as the front position. In defined conditions, surface instabilities are introduced and interfere with wave planarity, resulting in the formation of ``minimal'' surfaces with complex 3D geometries. Building on this understanding on the propagation of wavefronts of network formation during photopolymerization, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of 3D patterned polymer materials with tunable shapes with optical and surface functionality.

  15. Impact of surface coupling grids on tropical cyclone extremes in high-resolution atmospheric simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzycki, Colin M.; Reed, Kevin A.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Craig, Anthony P.; Bates, Susan C.; Rosenbloom, Nan A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the sensitivity of tropical cyclone climatology to surface coupling strategy in high-resolution configurations of the Community Earth System Model. Using two supported model setups, we demonstrate that the choice of grid on which the lowest model level wind stress and surface fluxes are computed may lead to differences in cyclone strength in multi-decadal climate simulations, particularly for the most intense cyclones. Using a deterministic framework, we show that when these surface quantities are calculated on an ocean grid that is coarser than the atmosphere, the computed frictional stress is misaligned with wind vectors in individual atmospheric grid cells. This reduces the effective surface drag, and results in more intense cyclones when compared to a model configuration where the ocean and atmosphere are of equivalent resolution. Our results demonstrate that the choice of computation grid for atmosphere–ocean interactions is non-negligible when considering climate extremes at high horizontal resolution, especially when model components are on highly disparate grids.

  16. Further reduction of efficiency droop effect by adding a lower-index dielectric interlayer in a surface plasmon coupled blue light-emitting diode with surface metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chun-Han; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Hui; Yao, Yu-Feng; Shih, Pei-Ying; Chen, Horng-Shyang; Hsieh, Chieh; Kiang, Yean-Woei Yang, C. C.; Kuo, Yang

    2014-09-08

    Further reduction of the efficiency droop effect and further enhancements of internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and output intensity of a surface plasmon coupled, blue-emitting light-emitting diode (LED) by inserting a dielectric interlayer (DI) of a lower refractive index between p-GaN and surface Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated. The insertion of a DI leads to a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance spectrum and increases the LSP coupling strength at the quantum well emitting wavelength in the blue range. With SiO{sub 2} as the DI, a thinner DI leads to a stronger LSP coupling effect, when compared with the case of a thicker DI. By using GaZnO, which is a dielectric in the optical range and a good conductor under direct-current operation, as the DI, the LSP coupling results in the highest IQE, highest LED output intensity, and weakest droop effect.

  17. Coupled surface water and groundwater modeling over the White Volta Basin, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittinger, S. T.; Alo, C. A.; Bitew, M. M.; Yidana, S. M.; Alfa, B.

    2012-12-01

    Sustainable livelihood in the semiarid White Volta Basin in Northern Ghana is dependent on the availability and sustainable development and management of water resources for agricultural activities. Currently, almost all agricultural activities are rain-fed and thus depend on the frequency, spatial, and temporal distribution of rainfall. Recent erratic patterns in the temporal and spatial distribution of rainfall in the basin—largely consistent with the effects of a warming climate—have led to dwindling fortunes in the rain-fed agricultural enterprise. On the other hand, surface water bodies in the forms of rivers and streams are ephemeral and therefore do not serve the immediate irrigation needs of the populations especially in the dry seasons. The conjunctive use of surface and groundwater resources to support local irrigation schemes in the basin has been suggested as a possible buffer against the effects of dwindling rainfall on agriculture in the basin and has the potential of raising the standard of living of the communities dwelling there. Conjunctive surface water/groundwater use involves the balanced application of both groundwater and surface water resources for maximal socio-economic benefit whilst ensuring ecological integrity. However, a detailed assessment of the potentials of the aquifers for commercial development has been constrained by the limited or no understanding of the surface water-groundwater interactions in the basin within the context of climate change/evolving patterns of climate variability and human activities. Here, we present preliminary results from simulations of coupled surface water and groundwater availability and flow over the Volta Basin using an integrated hydrological model.

  18. Assessment of model land skin temperature and surface-atmosphere coupling using remotely sensed estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Isabel; Boussetta, Souhail; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Viterbo, Pedro; Beljaars, Anton; Sandu, Irina

    2016-04-01

    The coupling between land surface and the atmosphere is a key feature in Earth System Modelling for exploiting the predictability of slowly evolving geophysical variables (e.g., soil moisture or vegetation state), and for correctly representing rapid variations within the diurnal cycle, particularly relevant in data assimilation applications. Land Surface Temperature (LST) routinely estimated from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) by the LandSAF is used to assess the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) skin temperature. LST can be interpreted as a radiative temperature of the model surface, which is close to the ECMWF modelled skin temperature. It is shown that the model tends to slightly overestimate skin temperature during night-time and underestimate daytime values. Such underestimation of daily amplitudes is particularly pronounced in (semi-)arid regions, suggesting a misrepresentation of surface energy fluxes in those areas. The LST estimated from MSG is used to evaluate the impact of changes in some of the ECMWF model surface parameters. The introduction of more realistic model vegetation is shown to have a positive, but limited impact on skin temperature: long integration leads to an equilibrium state where changes in the latent heat flux and soil moisture availability compensate each other. Revised surface roughness lengths for heat and momentum, however, lead to overall positive impact on daytime skin temperature, mostly due to a reduction of sensible heat flux. This is particularly relevant in non-vegetated areas, unaffected by model vegetation. The reduction of skin conductivity, a parameter which controls the heat transfer to ground by diffusion, is shown to further improve the model skin temperature. A revision of the vertical soil discretization is also expected to improve the match to the LST, particularly over sparsely vegetated areas. The impact of a finer discretization (10-layer soil) is currently ongoing; preliminary

  19. Surface scanning through a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid for clinical microwave breast imaging exams

    SciTech Connect

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Meaney, Paul M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Microwave tomographic image quality can be improved significantly with prior knowledge of the breast surface geometry. The authors have developed a novel laser scanning system capable of accurately recovering surface renderings of breast-shaped phantoms immersed within a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid which resides completely external to the tank (and the aqueous environment) and overcomes the challenges associated with the optical distortions caused by refraction from the air, tank wall, and liquid bath interfaces. Methods: The scanner utilizes two laser line generators and a small CCD camera mounted concentrically on a rotating gantry about the microwave imaging tank. Various calibration methods were considered for optimizing the accuracy of the scanner in the presence of the optical distortions including traditional ray tracing and image registration approaches. In this paper, the authors describe the construction and operation of the laser scanner, compare the efficacy of several calibration methods-including analytical ray tracing and piecewise linear, polynomial, locally weighted mean, and thin-plate-spline (TPS) image registrations-and report outcomes from preliminary phantom experiments. Results: The results show that errors in calibrating camera angles and position prevented analytical ray tracing from achieving submillimeter accuracy in the surface renderings obtained from our scanner configuration. Conversely, calibration by image registration reliably attained mean surface errors of less than 0.5 mm depending on the geometric complexity of the object scanned. While each of the image registration approaches outperformed the ray tracing strategy, the authors found global polynomial methods produced the best compromise between average surface error and scanner robustness. Conclusions: The laser scanning system provides a fast and accurate method of three dimensional surface capture in the aqueous environment commonly found in microwave breast

  20. Surface scanning through a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid for clinical microwave breast imaging exams

    PubMed Central

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Meaney, Paul M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Microwave tomographic image quality can be improved significantly with prior knowledge of the breast surface geometry. The authors have developed a novel laser scanning system capable of accurately recovering surface renderings of breast-shaped phantoms immersed within a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid which resides completely external to the tank (and the aqueous environment) and overcomes the challenges associated with the optical distortions caused by refraction from the air, tank wall, and liquid bath interfaces. Methods: The scanner utilizes two laser line generators and a small CCD camera mounted concentrically on a rotating gantry about the microwave imaging tank. Various calibration methods were considered for optimizing the accuracy of the scanner in the presence of the optical distortions including traditional ray tracing and image registration approaches. In this paper, the authors describe the construction and operation of the laser scanner, compare the efficacy of several calibration methods—including analytical ray tracing and piecewise linear, polynomial, locally weighted mean, and thin-plate-spline (TPS) image registrations—and report outcomes from preliminary phantom experiments. Results: The results show that errors in calibrating camera angles and position prevented analytical ray tracing from achieving submillimeter accuracy in the surface renderings obtained from our scanner configuration. Conversely, calibration by image registration reliably attained mean surface errors of less than 0.5 mm depending on the geometric complexity of the object scanned. While each of the image registration approaches outperformed the ray tracing strategy, the authors found global polynomial methods produced the best compromise between average surface error and scanner robustness. Conclusions: The laser scanning system provides a fast and accurate method of three dimensional surface capture in the aqueous environment commonly found in microwave

  1. Electromagnetic penetration through narrow slots in conducting surfaces and coupling to structures on the shadow side

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, E.K.; Butler, C.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1990-07-01

    Electromagnetic field penetration through a curved narrow slot in a planar conducting surface and coupling to a curved, loaded thin wire on the shadow side are determined in the time domain (TD) and the frequency domain (FD) by integral equation methods. Coupled integral equations are derived and solved numerically for the equivalent magnetic current in the slot and the electric current on the wire, from which the field that penetrates the slotted surface is determined. One employs a piecewise linear approximation of the unknown currents and performs equation enforcement by pulse testing. The resulting TD equations are solved by a scheme incorporating a finite-difference approximation for a second partial time derivative which allows one to solve for the unknown currents at a discrete time instant t + 1 in terms of the known excitation and currents calculated at a discrete time instant t and earlier. The FD equations are solved by the method of moments. A hybrid time-domain integral equation -- finite-difference time-domain solution technique is described whereby one solves for the field which penetrates a slotted cavity-backed surface. One models the fields in the exterior region and in the slot with integral operators and models the fields inside the cavity with a discretized form of Maxwell's equations. Narrow slots following various contours were chemically etched in thin bass sheets and an apparatus was fabricated to measure shadow-side fields, electric current on a thin wire on the shadow side, and, separately, fields inside a rectangular cavity which backed the slotted brass sheet. The experimentation was conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on a frequency-domain test range employing a monocone source over a large ground plane. One observes very good agreement among the experimental and theoretical results.

  2. Cyclic Evolution of Coronal Fields from a Coupled Dynamo Potential-Field Source-Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikpati, Mausumi; Suresh, Akshaya; Burkepile, Joan

    2016-02-01

    The structure of the Sun's corona varies with the solar-cycle phase, from a near spherical symmetry at solar maximum to an axial dipole at solar minimum. It is widely accepted that the large-scale coronal structure is governed by magnetic fields that are most likely generated by dynamo action in the solar interior. In order to understand the variation in coronal structure, we couple a potential-field source-surface model with a cyclic dynamo model. In this coupled model, the magnetic field inside the convection zone is governed by the dynamo equation; these dynamo-generated fields are extended from the photosphere to the corona using a potential-field source-surface model. Assuming axisymmetry, we take linear combinations of associated Legendre polynomials that match the more complex coronal structures. Choosing images of the global corona from the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory at each Carrington rotation over half a cycle (1986 - 1991), we compute the coefficients of the associated Legendre polynomials up to degree eight and compare with observations. We show that at minimum the dipole term dominates, but it fades as the cycle progresses; higher-order multipolar terms begin to dominate. The amplitudes of these terms are not exactly the same for the two limbs, indicating that there is a longitude dependence. While both the 1986 and the 1996 minimum coronas were dipolar, the minimum in 2008 was unusual, since there was a substantial departure from a dipole. We investigate the physical cause of this departure by including a North-South asymmetry in the surface source of the magnetic fields in our flux-transport dynamo model, and find that this asymmetry could be one of the reasons for departure from the dipole in the 2008 minimum.

  3. Numerical simulations of cataclysmic floods: A coupling model of surface and subsurface flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Komatsu, G.; Ito, K.; Tosaka, H.; Tokunaga, T.

    1999-09-01

    The Martian outflow channels are considered to have been formed by catastrophic water flood processes analogous to the Lake Missoula floods responsible for the formation of the Channeled Scabland in Washington State [e.g., Baker and Milton, 1974]. The estimations of peak discharge rates and total amounts of water play critical roles for the discussion of the Martian water cycle. Therefore, for a more realistic estimation we developed a three-dimensional numerical code of surface flows coupled with subsurface flows. Coupling both surface and subsurface flows in the model is very important because the origin of the outflows is thought to be strongly linked to subsurface aquifers [e.g., Baker, et al., 1991]. Our model can calculate air-water movements on the surface and in the subsurface under various hydrological and geological conditions. We concentrated on the water movement as the first step. We applied our model to the glacial Lake Missoula floods to test our code and to study parameter sensitivities. We followed the glacial lake failure scenario and gave a well-constrained high discharge rate at an area of the lake failure. After the breakout, the flood water flows down-slope and covers a wide area. We compared the calculated areal coverage of the floods and the peak water levels with field observations. We obtained a reasonable result of the water coverage within a DTM containing the Cordilleran Ice Sheet. And also the computed time sequential behaviors of the floods, such as the hydraulic ponding in the Pasco Basin, are consistent with the field data. However, there are significant discrepancies in terms of the water depths between the calculated values and some field observations. This may indicate that the history of the floodings is more complex than our assumption.

  4. Coupling groundwater and land surface processes: Idealized simulations to identify effects of terrain and subsurface heterogeneity on land surface energy fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihani, Jehan F.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Chow, Fotini K.

    2010-12-01

    This work investigates the role of terrain and subsurface heterogeneity on the interactions between groundwater dynamics and land surface energy fluxes using idealized simulations. A three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater code (ParFlow) coupled to a land surface model (Common Land Model) is used to account for both vertical and lateral water and pressure movement. This creates a fully integrated approach, coupling overland and subsurface flow while having an explicit representation of the water table and all land surface processes forced by atmospheric data. Because the water table is explicitly represented in these simulations, regions with stronger interaction between water table depth and the land surface energy balance (known as critical zones) can be identified. This study uses simple terrain and geologic configurations to demonstrate the importance of lateral surface and subsurface flows in determining land surface heat and moisture fluxes. Strong correlations are found between the land surface fluxes and water table depth across all cases, including terrain shape, subsurface heterogeneity, vegetation type, and climatological region. Results show that different land forms and subsurface heterogeneities produce very different water table dynamics and land surface flux responses to atmospheric forcing. Subsurface formation and properties have the greatest effect on the coupling between the water table and surface heat and moisture fluxes. Changes in landform and land surface slope also have an effect on these interactions by influencing the fraction of rainfall contributing to overland flow versus infiltration. This directly affects the extent of the critical zone with highest coupling strength along the hillside. Vegetative land cover, as seen in these simulations, has a large effect on the energy balance at the land surface but a small effect on streamflow and water table dynamics and thus a limited impact on the land surface-subsurface interactions

  5. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Groundwater and Surface Water Interactions in an Urban Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Rihani, J F; Maxwell, R M

    2007-09-26

    balance and hydrology of DCW, a parallel, distributed watershed model that treats flow in groundwater and surface water in a dynamically coupled manner will be used to build a flow model of the watershed. This coupled model forms the basis for modeling and understanding the transport of contaminants through the Dominguez Channel Watershed, which can be used in designing and implementing TMDLs to manage the water quality in this basin. In this report, the coupled surface water-groundwater flow model of DCW will be presented. This flow model was calibrated against a storm that occurred in February 21st, 2004. The model and approach are explained further in the following sections.

  6. Internal detection of surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence during chlorination of potassium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Felix; Krix, David; Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of chlorine with potassium surfaces is a prototype reaction with a strong non-adiabatic energy transfer leading to exoemission and chemiluminescence. Thin film K/Ag/p-Si(111) Schottky diodes with 8 nm potassium on a 5-200 nm thick Ag layer are used as 2π-photodetectors for the chemiluminescence during chlorination of the K film at 110 K. The observed photocurrent shows a sharp maximum for small exposures and decreases gradually with the increasing chloride layer. The time dependence can be explained by the reaction kinetics, which is governed initially by second-order adsorption processes followed by an electric field-assisted diffusion. The detector current corresponds to a yield of a few percent of elementary charge per reacting chlorine molecule and is orders of magnitude larger than for external detection. The photoyield can be enhanced by increasing the Ag film thickness. For Ag films of 30 and 50 nm, the yield exhibits a maximum indicating surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence. Surface plasmon polaritons in the Ag layer are excited by the reaction and decay radiatively into Si leading to the observed currents. A model calculation for the reverse process in attenuated total reflection is applied to explain the observed current yield maxima.

  7. Internal detection of surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence during chlorination of potassium thin films.

    PubMed

    Becker, Felix; Krix, David; Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2013-01-21

    The interaction of chlorine with potassium surfaces is a prototype reaction with a strong non-adiabatic energy transfer leading to exoemission and chemiluminescence. Thin film K/Ag/p-Si(111) Schottky diodes with 8 nm potassium on a 5-200 nm thick Ag layer are used as 2π-photodetectors for the chemiluminescence during chlorination of the K film at 110 K. The observed photocurrent shows a sharp maximum for small exposures and decreases gradually with the increasing chloride layer. The time dependence can be explained by the reaction kinetics, which is governed initially by second-order adsorption processes followed by an electric field-assisted diffusion. The detector current corresponds to a yield of a few percent of elementary charge per reacting chlorine molecule and is orders of magnitude larger than for external detection. The photoyield can be enhanced by increasing the Ag film thickness. For Ag films of 30 and 50 nm, the yield exhibits a maximum indicating surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence. Surface plasmon polaritons in the Ag layer are excited by the reaction and decay radiatively into Si leading to the observed currents. A model calculation for the reverse process in attenuated total reflection is applied to explain the observed current yield maxima. PMID:23343296

  8. GGA3 Interacts with a G Protein-Coupled Receptor and Modulates Its Cell Surface Export.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maoxiang; Davis, Jason E; Li, Chunman; Gao, Jie; Huang, Wei; Lambert, Nevin A; Terry, Alvin V; Wu, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms governing the anterograde trafficking of nascent G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are poorly understood. Here, we have studied the regulation of cell surface transport of α2-adrenergic receptors (α2-ARs) by GGA3 (Golgi-localized, γ-adaptin ear domain homology, ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3), a multidomain clathrin adaptor protein that sorts cargo proteins at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome/lysosome pathway. By using an inducible system, we demonstrated that GGA3 knockdown significantly inhibited the cell surface expression of newly synthesized α2B-AR without altering overall receptor synthesis and internalization. The receptors were arrested in the TGN. Furthermore, GGA3 knockdown attenuated α2B-AR-mediated signaling, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation and cyclic AMP (cAMP) inhibition. More interestingly, GGA3 physically interacted with α2B-AR, and the interaction sites were identified as the triple Arg motif in the third intracellular loop of the receptor and the acidic motif EDWE in the VHS domain of GGA3. In contrast, α2A-AR did not interact with GGA3 and its cell surface export and signaling were not affected by GGA3 knockdown. These data reveal a novel function of GGA3 in export trafficking of a GPCR that is mediated via a specific interaction with the receptor. PMID:26811329

  9. A cut finite element method for coupled bulk-surface problems on time-dependent domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansbo, Peter; Larson, Mats G.; Zahedi, Sara

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution we present a new computational method for coupled bulk-surface problems on time-dependent domains. The method is based on a space-time formulation using discontinuous piecewise linear elements in time and continuous piecewise linear elements in space on a fixed background mesh. The domain is represented using a piecewise linear level set function on the background mesh and a cut finite element method is used to discretize the bulk and surface problems. In the cut finite element method the bilinear forms associated with the weak formulation of the problem are directly evaluated on the bulk domain and the surface defined by the level set, essentially using the restrictions of the piecewise linear functions to the computational domain. In addition a stabilization term is added to stabilize convection as well as the resulting algebraic system that is solved in each time step. We show in numerical examples that the resulting method is accurate and stable and results in well conditioned algebraic systems independent of the position of the interface relative to the background mesh.

  10. Surface Structure of Bi(111) from Helium Atom Scattering Measurements. Inelastic Close-Coupling Formalism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic close-coupling (CC) calculations have been used to extract information about the corrugation amplitude and the surface vibrational atomic displacement by fitting to several experimental diffraction patterns. To model the three-dimensional interaction between the He atom and the Bi(111) surface under investigation, a corrugated Morse potential has been assumed. Two different types of calculations are used to obtain theoretical diffraction intensities at three surface temperatures along the two symmetry directions. Type one consists of solving the elastic CC (eCC) and attenuating the corresponding diffraction intensities by a global Debye–Waller (DW) factor. The second one, within a unitary theory, is derived from merely solving the inelastic CC (iCC) equations, where no DW factor is necessary to include. While both methods arrive at similar predictions for the peak-to-peak corrugation value, the variance of the value obtained by the iCC method is much better. Furthermore, the more extensive calculation is better suited to model the temperature induced signal asymmetries and renders the inclusion for a second Debye temperature for the diffraction peaks futile. PMID:26257838

  11. Plasma surface kinetics studies of silicon dioxide etch process in inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Won-Seok; Yu, Dong-Hun; Cho, Deog-Gyun; Yook, Yeong-Geun; Chun, Poo-Reum; Lee, Se-Ah; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Im, Yeon-Ho

    2013-09-01

    With continuous decrease of nanoscale design rule, plasma etching processes to form high aspect ratio contact hole still remains a challenge to overcome their inherent drawbacks such as bowing and twisted feature. Due to their complexities there still exist big gaps between current research status and predictable modeling of this process. To address this issue, we proposed a surface kinetic model of silicon nitride etch process under inductively coupled fluorocarbon plasmas. For this work, the cut-off probe and quadrapole mass spectroscopy were used for measuring electrical plasma properties, the ion and neutral radical species. Furthermore, the systematic surface analysis was performed to investigate the thickness and chemical bonding of polymer passivation layer during the etch process. The proposed semi-global surface kinetic model can consider deposition of polymer passivation layer and silicon nitride etching self-consistently. The predicted modeling results showed good agreement with experimental data. We believe that our research will provide valuable information to avoid the empirical development of plasma etching process.

  12. Air-coupled detection of nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves to assess material nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Sebastian; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J

    2014-08-01

    This research presents a new technique for nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurements that uses a non-contact, air-coupled ultrasonic transducer; this receiver is less dependent on surface conditions than laser-based detection, and is much more accurate and efficient than detection with a contact wedge transducer. A viable experimental setup is presented that enables the robust, non-contact measurement of nonlinear Rayleigh surface waves over a range of propagation distances. The relative nonlinearity parameter is obtained as the slope of the normalized second harmonic amplitudes plotted versus propagation distance. This experimental setup is then used to assess the relative nonlinearity parameters of two aluminum alloy specimens (Al 2024-T351 and Al 7075-T651). These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique - the average standard deviation of the normalized second harmonic amplitudes, measured at locations along the propagation path, is below 2%. Experimental validation is provided by a comparison of the ratio of the measured nonlinearity parameters of these specimens with ratios from the absolute nonlinearity parameters for the same materials measured by capacitive detection of nonlinear longitudinal waves. PMID:24836962

  13. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, Sylva; Bolanz, Ralph M; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Siddique, Jamal A; Komárek, Michael

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3-10), ionic strengths (0.001-0.1M KNO3), sorbate concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6)M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50-500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes. PMID:27450335

  14. Coupled integral equations for sound propagation above a hard ground surface with trench cuttings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gong Li; Chew, Weng Cho; White, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    A set of coupled integral equations is formulated for the investigation of sound propagation from an infinitesimal harmonic line source above a hard ground surface corrugated with cuttings. Two half-space Green's functions are employed in the formulation. The first one defined for the upper half space is used to reduce the problem size and eliminate the edge effect resulting from the boundary truncation; the other one for the lower half space is to simplify the representation of the Neumann-Dirichlet map. As a result, the unknowns are only distributed over the corrugated part of the surface, which leads to substantial reduction in the size of the final linear system. The computational complexity of the Neumann-Dirichlet map is also reduced. The method is used to analyze the behavior of sound propagation above textured surfaces the impedance of which is expectedly altered. The effects of number and opening of trench cuttings, and the effect of source height are investigated. The conclusions drawn can be used for reference in a practical problem of mitigating gun blast noise. PMID:17004443

  15. Using air-coupled sensors to determine the depth of a surface-breaking crack in concrete.

    PubMed

    Kee, Seong-Hoon; Zhu, Jinying

    2010-03-01

    Previous studies showed that the surface wave transmission coefficient across a surface-breaking crack in concrete can be used to estimate the crack depth. However, inconsistencies in the surface wave transmission measurements limit the test accuracy and application of this technique. The inconsistencies come from near-field scattering by the crack tip and inconsistent sensor coupling conditions on rough concrete surfaces. This study first investigates the near-field size based on numerical analyses, and then suggests that reliable surface wave transmission should be measured in the far field. Based on the far-field measurement, the relationship between the surface wave transmission ratio and the normalized crack depth (crack depth/wavelength) is obtained. In the experimental study, the air-coupled sensing method is proposed as a solution to the sensor coupling problem. Owing to the non-contact feature, the air-coupled sensing method not only improves testing speed but also enables more consistent signal measurement. The experimental study using air-coupled sensors shows good agreement with the results of numerical simulation and analytic solution. PMID:20329827

  16. Waveguide-coupled surface phonon resonance sensors with super-resolution in the mid-infrared region.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gaige; Chen, Yunyun; Bu, Lingbing; Xu, Linhua; Su, Wei

    2016-04-01

    A waveguide-coupled surface phonon resonance (SPhR) sensor with super-resolution based on Fano resonance (FR) by using a multilayer system within the Kretschmann configuration in the mid-infrared wavelength region is proposed. Due to the coherent interference of the waveguide and the surface phonon polariton modes, the calculated reflectivity spectrum possesses sharp asymmetric FR dips. An ultra-small linewidth is formed because of the Fano coupling, and the physical features contribute to a highly efficient nano-sensor for refractive index sensing. The bulk and surface sensitivity by intensities are greatly enhanced relative to those of conventional SPhR sensors. PMID:27192292

  17. On the diffusion-strain coupling and dispersion of surface waves in transversely isotropic laser-excited solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzade, F.

    2015-10-01

    The present paper is aimed at studying the boundary value problem in elasticity theory concerning the propagation behavior of harmonic waves and vibrations on the surface of the transversely isotropic laser-excited crystalline solids with atomic defect generation. Coupled dynamical diffusion--deformation interaction model is employed to study this problem. The frequency equations of surface waves in closed form are derived and discussed. The three motions, namely, longitudinal, transverse, and diffusion of the medium are found to be dispersive and coupled with each other due to the defect concentration changes and anisotropic effects. The phase velocity and attenuation coefficient of the surface waves get modified due-to the defect-strain coupling and anisotropic effects, and are also influenced by the defect relaxation time. A softening of frequencies of surface acoustic waves (instability of frequencies) is obtained. Relevant results of previous investigations are deduced as special and limiting cases.

  18. Enhanced fluorescence by surface plasmon coupling of Au nanoparticles in an organic electroluminescence diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, A.; Uemura, T.; Zettsu, N.; Akai-Kasaya, M.; Saito, A.; Kuwahara, Y.

    2010-01-01

    A significant increase in electroluminescence was achieved through coupling with localized surface plasmons in a single layer of Au nanoparticles. We fabricated a thin-film organic electroluminescence diode, which consists of an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode, a Au nanoparticle array, a Cu phthalocyanine hole transport layer, a tris(8-hydroxylquinolianato) aluminum (III) electron transport layer, a LiF electron injection layer, and an Al cathode. The device structure, with size-controlled Au particles embedded on ITO, can be used to realize the optimum distance for exciton-plasmon interactions by simply adjusting the thickness of the hole transport layer. We observed a 20-fold increase in the molecular fluorescence compared with that of a conventional diode structure.

  19. Nanoplasmonic biosensor: coupling electrochemistry to localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy on nanocup arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Diming; Lu, Yanli; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Yao, Yao; Wang, Ping; Chen, Bilian; Cheng, Qiaoyuan; Liu, Gang Logan; Liu, Qingjun

    2015-05-15

    The nanoscale Lycurgus cup arrays were hybrid structures of nanocups and nanoparticles with ultrasensitivity to refractive index change. In this study, an electrochemical localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor was developed by coupling electrochemistry to LSPR spectroscopy measurement on the nanoscale cup arrays (nanoCA). Based on the combination of electrochemistry and LSPR measurement, the electrochemical LSPR on nanoCA was observed with significant resonance wavelength shifts in electrochemical modulation. The synchronous implementation of cyclic voltammetry and optical transmission spectrum can be used to obtain multiply sensing information and investigate the enhancement for LSPR from electrochemical scanning. The electrochemical enhanced LSPR was utilized as biosensor to detect biomolecules. The electrochemical LSPR biosensor with synchronous electrochemical and optical implement showed higher sensitivity than that of conventional optical LSPR measurement. Detecting with multi-transducer parameters and high sensitivity, the electrochemical LSPR provided a promising approach for chemical and biological detection. PMID:25172029

  20. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2015-01-21

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F({sup 2}P) + HCl and F({sup 2}P) + H{sub 2} reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  1. Quantum Brownian motion on potential surfaces coupled via tunneling in an external electric field[-2mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrapsaniotis, E. G.

    2001-07-01

    The present paper deals with the motion of a Brownian particle on two identical but shifted potential surfaces, coupled via a tunneling matrix element in an external electric field. Dissipation is induced by a heat bath represented by an infinite set of harmonic oscillators with a continuum range of frequencies. We derive a perturbative solution for the quantum coherence term of the particle system after performing a small-polaron-like transformation. This is subsequently necessary for the extraction of an equation that describes the reduced dynamics and the minimal action path of the Brownian particle. Finally we extract expressions for the population relaxation rate and the pure quantum-dephasing rate of the two-level system.

  2. Emergence and coupling of topological surface states in tunable TI-non TI heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew; Liu, Jianpeng; Salehi, Maryam; Yusufaly, Tahir; Vanderbilt, David; Oh, Seongshik

    2015-03-01

    The most distinctive feature of topological insulators (TI) is the topologically protected surface states (TSS) that reside at the interface between TI and trivial insulators (non-TI). These TSS have been difficult to probe with transport measurements so far due to deleterious bulk conduction. Using atomically engineered TI - non TI heterostructures, we have studied the emergence and coupling of TSS at TI-non TI interfaces by tuning the thickness and transparency of the non-TI layer. Theoretical analysis based on first principle calculations as well as tunneling model are fully consistent with the observed experimental results and altogether provide a coherent picture of evolution of TSS at TI - non TI interface in such tunable heterostrucutres. Being near ideal systems for tuning TSS and allowing them to be probed via transport measurement such heterostructures open will new avenues for future research and applications.

  3. Indirect coupling of an organic semiconductor to a d -orbital surface state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingying; Dougherty, Daniel B.

    2015-10-01

    Adsorption of the organic semiconductor perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride onto Cr (001 ) decreases the metal d -derived surface-state lifetime without causing a shift in its energy. This suggests an indirect electronic interaction that contrasts sharply with expectations of p-d electronic coupling based on direct chemisorption. Lifetime changes are measured with scanning tunneling spectroscopy as a function of temperature and quantified as arising from a molecule-induced increase in electron-electron scattering rate into bulk bands within Fermi-liquid theory. Adsorbate-induced effects extend far beyond the adsorption site of the molecule, decaying exponentially away with a characteristic length scale of ˜2.4 nm , similar to the carrier mean free path in Cr.

  4. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F(2P) + HCl and F(2P) + H2 reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  5. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H

    2015-01-21

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F((2)P) + HCl and F((2)P) + H2 reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use. PMID:25612690

  6. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    McAnally, Michael O; McMahon, Jeffrey M; Van Duyne, Richard P; Schatz, George C

    2016-09-01

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gpu|(2)ImχR(ω)gst (2)/ImχR(ω), where |gpu|(2) is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering. PMID:27608988

  7. Growth of metal phthalocyanine on deactivated semiconducting surfaces steered by selective orbital coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Sean R.; Huang, Bing; Park, Changwon; Feng, Jiagui; Yoon, Mina; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2015-08-26

    Poor control of the interactions that govern organic molecular growth continues to hinder the prospect of organic electronic nano- architectures. Particularly, a selective mechanism for tuning the molecule-substrate interaction has been a long sought after goal towards tailored molecular growth. Here, combining scanning tun- neling microscopy and density functional theory we show that by controlling the strength of orbital hybridization between phthalo- cyanine molecules and the deactivated Si surface via the selective p-d orbital coupling, we can tune the molecular ordering and molecular orientation at the hetero-interface. This mechanism offers a novel approach to balance the critical interactions, leading tomore » controlled long-ranged ordered molecular growth that can be incorporated into modern electronics.« less

  8. Growth of metal phthalocyanine on deactivated semiconducting surfaces steered by selective orbital coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Sean R.; Huang, Bing; Park, Changwon; Feng, Jiagui; Yoon, Mina; Zhang, Pengpeng

    2015-08-26

    Poor control of the interactions that govern organic molecular growth continues to hinder the prospect of organic electronic nano- architectures. Particularly, a selective mechanism for tuning the molecule-substrate interaction has been a long sought after goal towards tailored molecular growth. Here, combining scanning tun- neling microscopy and density functional theory we show that by controlling the strength of orbital hybridization between phthalo- cyanine molecules and the deactivated Si surface via the selective p-d orbital coupling, we can tune the molecular ordering and molecular orientation at the hetero-interface. This mechanism offers a novel approach to balance the critical interactions, leading to controlled long-ranged ordered molecular growth that can be incorporated into modern electronics.

  9. Measuring binding kinetics of biomolecular interactions using a localized surface plasmon couple fluorescence fiber optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Hsieh, Jo-Ping; Su, Li-Chen; Li, Ying-Chang; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Chien

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we describe a novel method for analyzing protein-protein binding kinetics at ultra-low concentration (1 pg/mL) using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence fiber-optic biosensor (LSPCF-FOB). The association and dissociation rate constants, ka and kd, respectively, for the binding kinetics of the mouse IgG/ anti-mouse IgG interaction have been calculated to be ka = (5.9928+/-3.1540)x106 M-1s-1 and kd = (1.0587+/-0.5572)x10-3 s-1. The theoretical basis of this analytical approach is a rapid-mixing model integrated with a two-compartment model; has been experimentally verified in this study as well. The LSPCF-FOB provides a potentially alternative option for characterizing the interaction of biomolecules at ultra-low concentrations.

  10. Copper-Free Sonogashira Coupling for High-Surface-Area Conjugated Microporous Poly(aryleneethynylene) Networks.

    PubMed

    Trunk, Matthias; Herrmann, Anna; Bildirir, Hakan; Yassin, Ali; Schmidt, Johannes; Thomas, Arne

    2016-05-17

    A modified one-pot Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction based on a copper-free methodology has been applied for the synthesis of conjugated microporous poly(aryleneethynylene) networks (CMPs) from readily available iodoarylenes and 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene. The polymerization reactions were carried out by using equimolar amounts of halogen and terminal alkyne moieties with extremely small loadings of palladium catalyst as low as 0.65 mol %. For the first time, CMPs with rigorously controlled structures were obtained without any indications of side reactions, as proven by FTIR and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, while showing Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas higher than any poly(aryleneethynylene) network reported before, reaching up to 2552 m(2)  g(-1) . PMID:27080951

  11. Coupling between Buoyancy Forces and Electroconvective Instability near Ion-Selective Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Elif; Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Wessling, Matthias; Mani, Ali

    2016-05-13

    Recent investigations have revealed that ion transport from aqueous electrolytes to ion-selective surfaces is subject to electroconvective instability that stems from coupling of hydrodynamics with electrostatic forces. These systems inherently involve fluid density variation set by salinity gradients. However, the coupling between the buoyancy effects and electroconvective instability has not yet been investigated although a wide range of electrochemical systems are naturally prone to these interplaying effects. In this study we thoroughly examine the interplay of gravitational convection and chaotic electroconvection. Our results reveal that buoyant forces can significantly influence the transport rates, otherwise set by electroconvection, when the Rayleigh number Ra of the system exceeds a value Ra∼1000. We show that buoyancy forces can significantly alter the flow patterns in these systems. When the buoyancy acts in the stabilizing direction, it limits the extent of penetration of electroconvection, but without eliminating it. When the buoyancy destabilizes the flow, it alters the electroconvective patterns by introducing upward and downward fingers of respectively light and heavy fluids. PMID:27232024

  12. Coupling between Buoyancy Forces and Electroconvective Instability near Ion-Selective Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatay, Elif; Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Wessling, Matthias; Mani, Ali

    2016-05-01

    Recent investigations have revealed that ion transport from aqueous electrolytes to ion-selective surfaces is subject to electroconvective instability that stems from coupling of hydrodynamics with electrostatic forces. These systems inherently involve fluid density variation set by salinity gradients. However, the coupling between the buoyancy effects and electroconvective instability has not yet been investigated although a wide range of electrochemical systems are naturally prone to these interplaying effects. In this study we thoroughly examine the interplay of gravitational convection and chaotic electroconvection. Our results reveal that buoyant forces can significantly influence the transport rates, otherwise set by electroconvection, when the Rayleigh number Ra of the system exceeds a value Ra ˜1000 . We show that buoyancy forces can significantly alter the flow patterns in these systems. When the buoyancy acts in the stabilizing direction, it limits the extent of penetration of electroconvection, but without eliminating it. When the buoyancy destabilizes the flow, it alters the electroconvective patterns by introducing upward and downward fingers of respectively light and heavy fluids.

  13. Bioactive glass coupling with natural polyphenols: Surface modification, bioactivity and anti-oxidant ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzola, Martina; Corazzari, Ingrid; Prenesti, Enrico; Bertone, Elisa; Vernè, Enrica; Ferraris, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Polyphenols are actually achieving an increasing interest due to their potential health benefits, such as antioxidant, anticancer, antibacterial and bone stimulation abilities. However their poor bioavailability and stability hamper an effective clinical application as therapeutic principles. The opportunity to couple these biomolecules with synthetic biomaterials, in order to obtain local delivery at the site of interest, improve their bioavailability and stability and combine their properties with the ones of the substrate, is a challenging opportunity for the biomedical research. A silica based bioactive glass, CEL2, has been successfully coupled with gallic acid and natural polyphenols extracted from red grape skins and green tea leaves. The effectiveness of grafting has been verified by means of XPS analyses and the Folin&Ciocalteu tests. In vitro bioactivity has been investigated by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF). Surface modification after functionalization and early stage reactivity in SBF have been studied by means of zeta potential electrokinetic measurements in KCl and SBF. Finally the antioxidant properties of bare and modified bioactive glasses has been investigated by means of the evaluation of free radical scavenging activity by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR)/spin trapping technique after UV photolysis of H2O2 highlighting scavenging activity of the bioactive glass.

  14. Surface binding of polymer coated nanoparticles: Coupling of physical interactions, molecular organization, and chemical state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nap, Rikkert; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-03-01

    A key challenge in nanomedicine is to design carrier system for drug delivery that selectively binds to target cells without binding to healthy cells. A common strategy is to end-functionalize the polymers coating of the delivery device with specific ligands that bind strongly to overexpressed receptors. Such devices are usually unable to discriminate between receptors found on benign and malignant cells. We demonstrate, theoretically, how one can achieve selective binding to target cells by using multiple physical and chemical interactions. We study the effective interactions between a polymer decorated nanosized micelle or solid nanoparticle with model lipid layers. The polymer coating contains a mixture of two polymers, one neutral for protection and the other a polybase with a functional end-group to optimize specific binding and electrostatic interactions with the charged lipid head-groups found on the lipid surface. The strength of the binding for the combined system is much larger than the sum of the independent electrostatic or specific ligand-receptor binding. The search for optimal binding conditions lead to the finding of a non-additive coupling that exists in systems where chemical equilibrium, molecular organization, and physical interactions are coupled together.

  15. Effects of Sample Thickness on the Optical Properties of Surface Plasmon-Coupled Emission

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Ignacy; Malicka, Joanna; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent reports, we demonstrated coupling of excited fluorophores with thin silver or gold films resulting in directional surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) through the silver film and into the glass substrate. In the present report, we describe the spectral and spatial properties of SPCE from sulforhomamine 101 in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films of various thicknesses on 50-nm silver films. The PVA thickness varied from about 30 to 750 nm. In thin PVA films with a thickness less than 160 nm, SPCE occurred at a single angle in the glass substrate and displayed only p polarization. As the PVA thickness increased to 300 nm, we observed SPCE at two angles, with different s or p polarization for each angle. For PVA films from 500 to 750 nm thick, we observed SPCE at three or four angles, with alternating s and p polarizations. The multiple rings of SPCE and the unusual s-polarized emission are consistent with the expected waveguide modes in the silver–PVA composite film. However, in contrast to our expectations, the average lifetimes of SPCE were not substantially changed from the PVA films. The observation of SPCE at multiple angles and with different polarization opens new opportunities for the use of SPCE to study anisotropic systems or to develop unique sensing devices. PMID:27340372

  16. Real time characterization of polymer surface modifications by an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet: Electrically coupled versus remote mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, A. J.; Luan, P.; Bartis, E. A. J.; Hart, C.; Raitses, Y.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2014-10-01

    We characterize and distinguish two regimes of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) polymer interactions depending on whether the electrical interaction of the plasma plume with the surface is significant (coupled) or not (remote). When the plasma is coupled to the surface, localized energy deposition by charged species in filaments dominates the interactions with the surface and produces contained damaged areas with high etch rates that decrease rapidly with plasma source-to-sample distance. For remote APP surface treatments, when only reactive neutral species interact with the surface, we established specific surface-chemical changes and very slow etching of polymer films. Remote treatments appear uniform with etch rates that are highly sensitive to feed gas chemistry and APP source temperature.

  17. Optimization of a catchment-scale coupled surface-subsurface hydrological model using pilot points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danapour, Mehrdis; Stisen, Simon; Lajer Højberg, Anker

    2016-04-01

    Transient coupled surface-subsurface models are usually complex and contain a large amount of spatio-temporal information. In the traditional calibration approach, model parameters are adjusted against only few spatially aggregated observations of discharge or individual point observations of groundwater head. However, this approach doesn't enable an assessment of spatially explicit predictive model capabilities at the intermediate scale relevant for many applications. The overall objectives of this project is to develop a new model calibration and evaluation framework by combining distributed model parameterization and regularization with new types of objective functions focusing on optimizing spatial patterns rather than individual points or catchment scale features. Inclusion of detailed observed spatial patterns of hydraulic head gradients or relevant information obtained from remote sensing data in the calibration process could allow for a better representation of spatial variability of hydraulic properties. Pilot Points as an alternative to classical parameterization approaches, introduce great flexibility when calibrating heterogeneous systems without neglecting expert knowledge (Doherty, 2003). A highly parameterized optimization of complex distributed hydrological models at catchment scale is challenging due to the computational burden that comes with it. In this study the physically-based coupled surface-subsurface model MIKE SHE is calibrated for the 8,500 km2 area of central Jylland (Denmark) that is characterized by heterogeneous geology and considerable groundwater flow across topographical catchment boundaries. The calibration of the distributed conductivity fields is carried out with a pilot point-based approach, implemented using the PEST parameter estimation tool. To reduce the high number of calibration parameters, PEST's advanced singular value decomposition combined with regularization was utilized and a reduction of the model's complexity was

  18. Quantifying the surface-subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, P.W.; Gall, M.P.; Silver, M.W.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2008-02-25

    A central question addressed by the VERTIGO (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size-partitioning of Net Primary Production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, F{sub v}/F{sub m} (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size-partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2 x export flux at 150 m (E{sub 150}). At K2, export was 111 mg C m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8 x E{sub 150}) and 33 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4 x E{sub 150}) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E{sub 150}. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 to 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence

  19. Quantifying the surface subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Gall, Mark P.; Silver, Mary W.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.; Bishop, James L. K. B.

    2008-07-01

    A central question addressed by the VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size partitioning of net primary production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, Fv/ Fm (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m -2 d -1 at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2×export flux at 150 m ( E150). At K2, export was 111 mg C m -2 d -1 (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8× E150) and 33 mg POC m -2 d -1 (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4× E150) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E150. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 and 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence to what extent sinking particles are further broken down in the

  20. Controlled Dissolution of Surface Layers for Elemental Analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Elizabeth Lorge

    2007-12-01

    Determining the composition of thin layers is increasingly important for a variety of industrial materials such as adhesives, coatings and microelectronics. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are some of the techniques that are currently employed for the direct analysis of the sample surface. Although these techniques do not suffer from the contamination problems that often plague sample dissolution studies, they do require matrix matched standards for quantification. Often, these standards are not readily available. Despite the costs of clean hoods, Teflon pipette tips and bottles, and pure acids, partial sample dissolution is the primary method used in the semiconductor industry to quantify surface impurities. Specifically, vapor phase decomposition (VPD) coupled to ICP-MS or total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) provides elemental information from the top most surface layers at detection sensitivities in the 10{sup 7}-10{sup 10}atoms/cm{sup 2} range. The ability to quantify with standard solutions is a main advantage of these techniques. Li and Houk applied a VPD-like technique to steel. The signal ratio of trace element to matrix element was used for quantification. Although controlled dissolution concentrations determined for some of the dissolved elements agreed with the certified values, concentrations determined for refractory elements (Ti, Nb and Ta) were too low. LA-ICP-MS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements indicated that carbide grains distributed throughout the matrix were high in these refractory elements. These elements dissolved at a slower rate than the matrix element, Fe. If the analyte element is not removed at a rate similar to the matrix element a true representation of the

  1. Sonogashira couplings on the surface of montmorillonite-supported Pd/Cu nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Huaming; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Guofang; Zhang, Weiqiang; Gao, Ziwei

    2014-11-26

    To explore the true identity of palladium-catalyzed Sonogashira coupling reaction, montmorillonite (MMT)-supported transition metal nanoparticles (MMT@M, M=Pd, Cu, Fe, and Ni) were prepared, characterized, and evaluated systematically. Among all MMT@M catalysts, MMT@Pd/Cu showed the highest activity, and it was successfully extended to 20 examples with 57%-97% yields. The morphology characterization of MMT@Pd/Cu revealed that the crystalline bimetallic particles were dispersed on a MMT layer as nanoalloy with diameters ranged from 10 to 11 nm. In situ IR analysis using CO as molecular probe and XPS characterization found that the surface of Pd/Cu particles consisted of both catalytic active sites of Pd(0) and Cu(I). The experiments on the catalytic activities of MMT@M found that Pd/Cu catalyst system exhibited high activity only in nanoalloy form. Therefore, the Pd/Cu nanoalloy was identified as catalyst, on which the interatom Pd/Cu transmetalation between surfaces was proposed to be responsible for its synergistic activity. PMID:25315209

  2. Coupling Solar Energy into Reactions: Materials Design for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Li, Yu; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-08-26

    Enabled by surface plasmons, noble metal nanostructures can interact with and harvest incident light. As such, they may serve as unique media to generate heat, supply energetic electrons, and provide strong local electromagnetic fields for chemical reactions through different mechanisms. This solar-to-chemical pathway provides a new approach to solar energy utilization, alternative to conventional semiconductor-based photocatalysis. To provide readers with a clear picture of this newly recognized process, this review presents coupling solar energy into chemical reactions through plasmonic nanostructures. It starts with a brief introduction of surface plasmons in metallic nanostructures, followed by a demonstration of tuning plasmonic features by tailoring their physical parameters. Owing to their tunable plasmonic properties, metallic materials offer a platform to trigger and drive chemical reactions at the nanoscale, as systematically overviewed in this article. The design rules for plasmonic materials for catalytic applications are further outlined based on existing examples. At the end of this article, the challenges and opportunities for further development of plasmonic-mediated catalysis toward energy and environmental applications are discussed. PMID:26097101

  3. Theoretical study of surface plasmons coupling in transition metallic alloy 2D binary grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhibi, Abdelhak; Khemiri, Mehdi; Oumezzine, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    The excitation of a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave on a metal-air interface by a 2D diffraction grating is numerically investigated. The grating consists of homogeneous alloys of two metals of a formula AxB1-x, or three metals of a formula AxByCz, where A, B and C could be silver (Ag), copper (Cu), gold (Au) or aluminum (Al). It is observed that all the alloys of two metals present a very small change of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) irrespective of composition x. Moreover, the addition of 25% of Al to two metals alloy is insufficient to change the SPR curves. The influence of the different grating parameters is discussed in details using rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) method. Furthermore, the SPR is highly dependent on grating periods (dx and dy) and the height of the grating h. The results reveal that dx= dy= 700 nm, h=40 nm and duty cycle w=0.5 are the optimal parameters for exciting SPP.

  4. Optimization of laccase production using response surface methodology coupled with differential evolution.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sukanta Shekhar; Garlapati, Vijay Kumar; Banerjee, Rintu

    2011-01-31

    In the present study, laccase production from a locally isolated hyperactive strain of Pleurotus sp. under solid state fermentation (SSF) was carried out and the interactions between different parameters of fermentation were studied using response surface methodology. The saddle shaped response surface plots depicting dual conditions for the enhanced production indicated the presence of isozymes with production optima at different conditions which was verified experimentally. Isoelectric focusing of the enzyme extract revealed that two isoforms were found with a widely varying pI of 3.8 and 9.3 emphasizing the capacity of the enzyme to be deployed at both acidic and alkaline conditions. Optimization of production conditions by coupling the regression equation with differential evolution technique yielded over 54,600IU/gds (3,412,500U/L) with a surfactant concentration of 0.016%, pH 7.99, particle size of 0.25cm, liquid to solid ratio of 4.99 and an incubation period of 8 days. In this study, the optimization process yielded highest titer value of laccase reported to date. PMID:20541634

  5. Reactive coupling of 4-vinylaniline with hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surfaces for electroless metal and "synthetic metal" deposition.

    PubMed

    Xu, D; Kang, E T; Neoh, K G; Tay, A A O

    2004-04-13

    Pristine and resist-patterned Si(100) substrates were etched by aqueous HF to produce hydrogen-terminated silicon (H-Si(100)) surfaces. The H-Si(100) surface was then subjected to UV-induced reactive coupling of 4-vinylaniline (VAn) to produce the VAn monolayer-modified silicon (VAn-Si) surface. The VAn-Si surface was first functionalized with a "synthetic metal" by oxidative graft polymerization of aniline with the aniline moieties of the coupled VAn molecules. The composition and topography of the VAn-Si and polyaniline (PAn)-grafted VAn-Si (PAn-VAn-Si) surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The doping-undoping (protonation-deprotonation) and redox-coupling (metal reduction) behavior, as well as the electrical conductivity, of the surface-grafted PAn were found to be similar to those of the aniline homopolymer. The VAn-Si surface was also funtionalized by the electroless plating of copper. Not only did the VAn layer provide chemisorption sites for the palladium catalyst, in the absence of prior sensitization by SnCl2, during the electroless plating process, it also served as an adhesion promotion layer and a low-temperature diffusion barrier for the electrolessly deposited copper. Finally, micropatterning of the grafted PAn and of the electrolessly deposited copper were demonstrated on the resist-patterned VAn-Si surfaces. PMID:15875865

  6. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  7. Exploring Rotation-Vibration Coupling in Highly Fluxional Molecules Using Surface Hopping Diffusion Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Andrew S.; McCoy, Anne B.

    2012-06-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) has widely been shown to be a powerful technique for studying ro-vibrational states of highly fluxional molecules and clusters. An extension of DMC to multiple potential energy surfaces (PESs) based on the Tully surface hopping approach has previously been developed by our group. Here, we report an application of this approach to the calculation of rotationally excited states of systems with pronounced rotation-vibration coupling and large-amplitude, zero-point vibrational motion. More specifically, for a chosen value of J, each walker in the DMC ensemble is expanded in a symmetric top basis. The expansion coefficients are updated each time-step based on the action of the rigid-rotor asymmetric top Hamiltonian. This Hamiltonian is constructed using the inverse moment of inertia tensor evaluated in the Eckart frame at the walker's position in configuration space. Each walker is then localized onto a single, K-dependent effective PES, and the effective potential energy associated with the walker's position on that surface determines the evolution of its weight in the DMC ensemble. Preliminary results of the application of this methodology to model systems such as H_3^+ and H_2D^+ will be discussed as well as its prospect for accurately evaluating ro-vibrational states of systems like CH_5^+. Finally, a comparison of this technique with our previously developed fixed-node DMC approach for the evaluation of ro-vibrational energies and wave functions will be presented. J. C. Tully, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990). A.B. McCoy, Chem. Phys. Lett. 321, 71 (2000). A. S. Petit, B. A. Wellen, and A. B. McCoy, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 074101 (2012).

  8. Original coupled FEM/BIE numerical model for analyzing infinite periodic surface acoustic wave transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Frédéric; Ventura, Pascal; Dufilié, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical coupled Finite Element Method/Boundary Integral Equations (FEM/BIE) technique which allows the 2D physical simulation of Surface Acoustic Waves (SAWs) transducers infinitely periodic in one direction. This new technique could be generalized to various periodic acoustic 2D simulations. This new method uses an original Variational Formulation (VF) which formally includes harmonic periodic boundary conditions, and, efficient boundary integral formulations allowing to account for the semi-infinite dielectric and piezoelectric spaces. In the case of the piezoelectric semi-space, the Green's functions are efficiently computed using Fahmy-Adler's method [8]. Only periodic boundary conditions are needed, which greatly simplifies the code implementation. This numerical model has been developed to analyze an Inter-Digital Transducer (IDT) with complex electrode shape (unburied, buried or raised electrodes). The use of buried electrodes in SAW transducer designs on quartz has important advantages when compared with unburied metal electrodes on the surface. One important property is the suppression of transverse waveguide modes in transducers. A second advantage is the ability to use thicker metal thereby reducing the resistive losses. Buried electrodes have also been shown to increase the quality factor of Surface Transverse Wave (STW) resonators [15]. This numerical model is a very useful tool for optimizing the electrode geometry. Analysis of raised electrodes is useful for predicting the effects of Reactive Ion Etch (RIE) on the SAW or STW electrical filter characteristics. RIE is commonly used as a frequency trimming technique for SAW or STW filters on Quartz. The first part of the paper presents the theory, and, the second part is devoted to numerical validations and numerical results.

  9. Tuning of Coupling and Surface Quality of PbS Nanocrystals via a Combined Ammonium Sulfide and Iodine Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Yang, Jun; Chen, Jiun-Ruey; Engstrom, James R; Hanrath, Tobias; Wise, Frank W

    2016-02-18

    Surface states of colloidal nanocrystals are typically created when organic surfactants are removed. We report a chemical process that reduces surface traps and tunes the interparticle coupling in PbS nanocrystal thin films after the surfactant ligands have been stripped off. This process produces PbS/PbI2 core/shell nanocrystal thin films via a combined ammonium sulfide and iodine treatment. These all-inorganic nanocrystal thin films are air-stable and exhibit bright emission with optimum photoluminescence quantum yield close to that of pristine PbS nanocrystals passivated by oleate ligands. Interparticle coupling of post-treatment nanocrystal thin films is continuously tunable by varying the iodine treatment process. Optical studies reveal that this method can produce PbS nanocrystal thin films superior in both coupling and surface quality to nanocrystals linked by small molecules such as ethanedithiol or 3-mercaptopropionic acid. PMID:26807665

  10. Effect of adatom deposition on surface magnetism and exchange coupling parameter in (0001) SmCo{sub 5} slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P.; Saravanan, P.; Kamat, S. V.

    2015-04-07

    First principles calculations are performed on 3d-transition metal atom deposited (0001) surface of SmCo{sub 5} to understand the magnetic properties and the improvement of Curie temperature (T{sub c}). Various atomic sites are examined to identify the energetically feasible adsorption of adatom and it is found that the void site of Co-rich (0001) SmCo{sub 5} surface is the most favourable one to deposit. The surface magnetic moments of various adatom deposited SmCo{sub 5} surfaces are larger than the clean surface except for Cu and Zn. Eventually, the surface exchange coupling of clean and adatom deposited surface is found to increase for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu deposited surfaces and this improvement results in the increase in T{sub c} of SmCo{sub 5} slab.

  11. Surface-coupling of Cerenkov radiation from a modified metallic metamaterial slab via Brillouin-band folding.

    PubMed

    Bera, Anirban; Barik, Ranjan Kumar; Sattorov, Matlabjon; Kwon, Ohjoon; Min, Sun-Hong; Baek, In-Keun; Kim, Seontae; So, Jin-Kyu; Park, Gun-Sik

    2014-02-10

    Metallic metamaterials with positive dielectric responses are promising as an alternative to dielectrics for the generation of Cerenkov radiation [J.-K. So et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97(15), 151107 (2010)]. We propose here by theoretical analysis a mechanism to couple out Cerenkov radiation from the slab surfaces in the transverse direction. The proposed method based on Brillouin-zone folding is to periodically modify the thickness of the metamaterial slab in the axial direction. Moreover, the intensity of the surface-coupled radiation by this mechanism shows an order-of-magnitude enhancement compared to that of ordinary Smith-Purcell radiation. PMID:24663594

  12. A broadened classical master equation approach for nonadiabatic dynamics at metal surfaces: Beyond the weak molecule-metal coupling limit.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wenjie; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2016-01-14

    A broadened classical master equation (BCME) is proposed for modeling nonadiabatic dynamics for molecules near metal surfaces over a wide range of parameter values and with arbitrary initial conditions. Compared with a standard classical master equation-which is valid in the limit of weak molecule-metal couplings-this BCME should be valid for both weak and strong molecule-metal couplings. (The BCME can be mapped to a Fokker-Planck equation that captures level broadening correctly.) Finally, our BCME can be solved with a simple surface hopping algorithm; numerical tests of equilibrium and dynamical observables look very promising. PMID:26772563

  13. Effects of the rotation angle on surface plasmon coupling of nanoprisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Miao-Hsuan; Nien, Li-Wei; Chao, Bo-Kai; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2016-02-01

    We studied the effects of relative orientation of bowtie nanostructures on the plasmon resonance both experimentally and theoretically in this work. Specifically, we fabricated gold bowtie nanoantennas with rotated nanoprisms, measured the near-field and the far-field resonance behaviors using Raman spectroscopy and scattering microspectroscopy, and simulated the effects of the rotation angle on the localized surface plasmonic resonance using finite-difference time-domain simulations. In addition to the widely-discussed dipolar resonance in regular bowtie nanostructures, defined as tip-mode resonance in the present study, the excitations of edge-mode resonance were discovered under certain rotation angles of nanoprisms. Because of the resonances of different modes at different wavelengths, two different incident laser sources were used to measure the Raman spectra to provide evidence for the evolution of different resonance modes. Also, both the tip-mode and edge-mode resonances were verified by the simulated charge density distribution and their trends were discussed. Based on the discovered trend, a plasmon protractor was created with a near-exponential decay relationship between the relative resonance wavelength shift and cosine of the rotation angle. A plasmon hybridization model was also proposed for rotated bowties to explain the coupling between nanoprisms during rotation.We studied the effects of relative orientation of bowtie nanostructures on the plasmon resonance both experimentally and theoretically in this work. Specifically, we fabricated gold bowtie nanoantennas with rotated nanoprisms, measured the near-field and the far-field resonance behaviors using Raman spectroscopy and scattering microspectroscopy, and simulated the effects of the rotation angle on the localized surface plasmonic resonance using finite-difference time-domain simulations. In addition to the widely-discussed dipolar resonance in regular bowtie nanostructures, defined as tip

  14. Towing tank tests for surface combatant for coupled pitch and heave and free roll decay motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Martin, Jr.

    Towing-tank experiments are performed for an advancing surface combatant in free roll decay and coupled pitch and heave motions. For free roll decay experiments, results are presented for motions (surge, sway, heave, roll, pitch and yaw), forces (resistance, sway and heave), moments (pitch and yaw), phase-averaged velocities (U, V and W) for measurement region near bilge keel and free surface elevations. For coupled pitch and heave experiments, results are presented for pitch and heave transfer functions, and pitch and heave phase angles. The geometry of interest is DTMB model 5512, which is a 1/46.6 scale geosym of DTMB model 5415 (DDG-51), with L = 3.048 m. The experiments are performed in a 3 x 3 x 100m towing tank equipped with a plunger-type wavemaker. The measurement systems include Krypton contactless motion tracker, 4-component load cell, towed 2-D particle image velocimetry (PIV) system, and servo wave probes with 2-D traverse. Uncertainty assessment following standard procedures is used to evaluate the quality of the data. Pitch and heave transfer functions and phase angles collapse to a single value independent of wave steepness. Free roll decay results show the addition of bilge keels to a ship model increases roll period and roll damping. Results show non-linear roll decay for Fr ≤ 0.138, a transition region for 0.190 ≤ Fr ≤ 0.340, and linear roll decay for Fr ≥ 0.410 for both without and with bilge keels. Phase-averaged flow-field velocity results show the evolution and subsequent decay of the bilge keel vortex. The vortex trails the motion of the bilge keel rotating clockwise for counter-clockwise model rotation (rolling to port) and rotates counter-clockwise for clockwise model rotation (rolling to starboard). The phase-averaged wave-field resembles the steady wave pattern (Kelvin wave pattern) with a superimposed oscillation due to the rolling motion of the model. As the model rolls, alternating crests and troughs radiate from the hull

  15. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  16. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  17. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashan, M. A. M.; Kalavally, V.; Lee, H. W.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface.

  18. Deformation Processes In SE Tibet: How Coupled Are The Surface And The Deeper Lithosphere? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitler, P. K.; Meltzer, A.

    2010-12-01

    We all like to cite the Himalayan collision as a type example of continent-continent collision, and the region has been used as a natural laboratory by a considerable number of diverse investigations. Southeastern Tibet and the Lhasa Block provide an interesting case to consider in this context. Surrounding portions of the Himalayan-Tibet system have been and are being intensely deformed, whereas the Andean-arc lithosphere of the Lhasa Block has remained enigmatically unscathed. High elevations throughout much of the terrane are fairly uniform but the eastern and western portions of block have experienced very different degrees of exhumation. Regions that experienced more exhumation have thinner crustal thicknesses, with the results that that Moho is warped up with respect to the surface. Thicker, less-exhumed portions of the Lhasa Block currently are underlain by what is inferred to be eclogitized lower crust, but this eclogitization is not seen where exhumation is significant. Beneath SE Tibet, subduction of the Indian lithosphere has been complicated, with tomographic imaging showing variations in mantle structure that do not register with the strike of surface features. Adjacent to the Lhasa Block, the Namche Barwa-Gyala metamorphic massif demonstrates a strong coupling between shallower crustal flow and localized erosion that is significant for the evolution of the Lhasa Block in the way that this feature controls base level for the upper Tsangpo drainage and thus the erosional driver for the system. More broadly, a weak lower crust and lower-crustal flow have been invoked by many workers to explain aspects of the region’s deformation patterns and topography. Thus it would seem that in SE Tibet, mid-to-upper crustal, lower-crustal, and whole-lithosphere processes all have the potential to either impact Earth-surface dynamics or be impacted by them. This leads to a number of questions about the 4D nature and scale of compensation, controls on the evolution of

  19. Influence of molecular orientation on the coupling of surface plasmons to excitons in semitransparent inverted organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Mark; Mayr, Michael; Lampe, Thomas; Gallheber, Björn-Christoph; Scholz, Bert J.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the coupling between surface plasmons and excitons for different donor materials in semitransparent organic solar cells. Surface plasmons can be excited at the interface between the semitransparent anode and the surrounding dielectric medium in Kretschmann configuration, if the resonance condition for wavelength and angle is fulfilled. In solar cells with nearly upright standing diindenoperylene donor molecules in close proximity to the metal, this can lead to an enhancement in photo-current. By contrast, for cells with dibenzo-tetraphenyl-periflanthen as donor, the lying orientation of molecules is unfavorable for coupling to surface plasmons. In this case, the excitation of surface plasmons acts like a parasitic absorption and reduces the photo-current.

  20. Surface soil humidity retrieval by means of a semi-empirical coupled SAR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capodici, F.; La Loggia, G.; D'Urso, G.; Maltese, A.; Ciraolo, G.

    2010-10-01

    In the last years, the availability of new technologies of Earth Observation encouraged researches to use integrated approaches for environmental monitoring. Even for agro-hydrological applications, remotely sensed data are available on wide areas allowing the retrieval of cost-effective and representative estimation of high spatial and temporal variability of the soil-vegetation system variables. In particular, soil water content plays an important role determining the partition of precipitation between surface runoff and infiltration and, moreover, influences the distribution of the incoming radiation between latent and sensible heat flux. As a consequence, distributed soil water content maps are essential data for watershed applications such as flood prediction and crop irrigation scheduling. Since cloud cover has been highlighted as the main limitation of SW/TIR traditional techniques, this research is focused on the applicability of soil moisture models based on active microwave. In particular, a Semi Empirical Coupled Model (SECM) is proposed. Reliable assessments of both surface roughness and dielectric constant (thus soil moisture) are retrieved by means of two iterative modules, without any calibration phase. The validation with in situ soil moisture, taken at a depth comparable to the RADAR penetration, gives a good agreement for bare-sparse vegetation coverage. The research is carried out on the 24 km² test-site of DEMMIN (Görmin farm, Mecklenburg Vorpommern), in the North-East of Germany. Data were acquired within the ESA-funded AgriSAR project, between April and July 2006. The implemented model uses HH, VV and HV polarized L-bands, acquired by the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt - DLR) using an airborne platform.

  1. The coupling between flame surface dynamics and species mass conservation in premixed turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trouve, A.; Veynante, D.; Bray, K. N. C.; Mantel, T.

    1994-01-01

    Current flamelot models based on a description of the flame surface dynamics require the closure of two inter-related equations: a transport equation for the mean reaction progress variable, (tilde)c, and a transport equation for the flame surface density, Sigma. The coupling between these two equations is investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS) with emphasis on the correlation between the turbulent fluxes of (tilde)c, bar(pu''c''), and Sigma, (u'')(sub S)Sigma. Two different DNS databases are used in the present work: a database developed at CTR by A. Trouve and a database developed by C. J. Rutland using a different code. Both databases correspond to statistically one-dimensional premixed flames in isotropic turbulent flow. The run parameters, however, are significantly different, and the two databases correspond to different combustion regimes. It is found that in all simulated flames, the correlation between bar(pu''c'') and (u'')(sub S)Sigma is always strong. The sign, however, of the turbulent flux of (tilde)c or Sigma with respect to the mean gradients, delta(tilde)c/delta(x) or delta(Sigma)/delta(x), is case-dependent. The CTR database is found to exhibit gradient turbulent transport of (tilde)c and Sigma, whereas the Rutland DNS features counter-gradient diffusion. The two databases are analyzed and compared using various tools (a local analysis of the flow field near the flame, a classical analysis of the conservation equation for (tilde)(u''c''), and a thin flame theoretical analysis). A mechanism is then proposed to explain the discrepancies between the two databases and a preliminary simple criterion is derived to predict the occurrence of gradient/counter-gradient turbulent diffusion.

  2. A regional coupled surface water/groundwater model of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Peter; Gumbricht, Thomas; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2006-04-01

    In the endorheic Okavango River system in southern Africa a balance between human and environmental water demands has to be achieved. The runoff generated in the humid tropical highlands of Angola flows through arid Namibia and Botswana before forming a large inland delta and eventually being consumed by evapotranspiration. With an approximate size of about 30,000 km2, the Okavango Delta is the world's largest site protected under the convention on wetlands of international importance, signed in 1971 in Ramsar, Iran. The extended wetlands of the Okavango Delta, which sustain a rich ecology, spectacular wildlife, and a first-class tourism infrastructure, depend on the combined effect of the highly seasonal runoff in the Okavango River and variable local climate. The annual fluctuations in the inflow are transformed into vast areas of seasonally inundated floodplains. Water abstraction and reservoir building in the upstream countries are expected to reduce and/or redistribute the available flows for the Okavango Delta ecosystem. To study the impacts of upstream and local interventions, a large-scale (1 km2 grid), coupled surface water/groundwater model has been developed. It is composed of a surface water flow component based on the diffusive wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations, a groundwater component, and a relatively simple vadose zone component for calculating the net water exchange between land and atmosphere. The numerical scheme is based on the groundwater simulation software MODFLOW-96. Since the primary model output is the spatiotemporal distribution of flooded areas and since hydrologic data on the large and inaccessible floodplains and tributaries are sparse and unreliable, the model was not calibrated with point hydrographs but with a time series of flooding patterns derived from satellite imagery (NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer). Scenarios were designed to study major upstream and local interventions and their expected impacts

  3. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2014-12-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has long been based on a "big-leaf approach", with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Such models have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. We here outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multilayer longwave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of tha canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz. As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer term eddy covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of fluxes, as well as the gradients of sensible heat fluxes. However, the model overestimates sensible heat flux against an underestimate of the radiation budget. Improved performance is expected through the implementation of a more detailed calculation of stand albedo and a more up-to-date stomatal conductance calculation.

  4. Delineating the extracellular water-accessible surface of the proton-coupled folate transporter.

    PubMed

    Duddempudi, Phaneendra Kumar; Goyal, Raman; Date, Swapneeta Sanjay; Jansen, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was recently identified as the major uptake route for dietary folates in humans. The three-dimensional structure of PCFT and its detailed interplay with function remain to be determined. We screened the water-accessible extracellular surface of HsPCFT using the substituted-cysteine accessibility method, to investigate the boundaries between the water-accessible surface and inaccessible buried protein segments. Single-cysteines, engineered individually at 40 positions in a functional cysteine-less HsPCFT background construct, were probed for plasma-membrane expression in Xenopus oocytes with a bilayer-impermeant primary-amine-reactive biotinylating agent (sulfosuccinimidyl 6-(biotinamido) hexanoate), and additionally for water-accessibility of the respective engineered cysteine with the sulfhydryl-selective biotinylating agent 2-((biotinoyl)amino)ethyl methanethiosulfonate. The ratio between Cys-selective over amine-selective labeling was further used to evaluate three-dimensional models of HsPCFT generated by homology / threading modeling. The closest homologues of HsPCFT with a known experimentally-determined three-dimensional structure are all members of one of the largest membrane protein super-families, the major facilitator superfamily (MFS). The low sequence identity--14% or less--between HsPCFT and these templates necessitates experiment-based evaluation and model refinement of homology/threading models. With the present set of single-cysteine accessibilities, the models based on GlpT and PepTSt are most promising for further refinement. PMID:24205192

  5. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Guerra, Germano; Parisi, Melania; De Marinis, Marta; Tafuri, Domenico; Cinelli, Mariapia; Ammendola, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors. Herein, we

  6. Radio Tomography of Ionospheric Structures (probably) due to Underground-Surface-Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunitsyn, V.; Nesterov, I.; Andreeva, E.; Rekenthaler, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ionospheric radio-tomography (RT) utilizes radio signals transmitted from the global navigational satellite systems (GNSS), including low-orbiting (LO) navigational systems such as Transit, Tsikada, etc., and high-orbiting (HO) navigational systems such as GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou, etc. The signals that are transmitted from the LO navigational satellites and recorded by ground receiving chains can be inverted for almost instantaneous (5-8 min) 2D snapshots of electron density. The data from the networks of ground receivers that record the signals of the HO satellites are suitable for implementing high-orbital RT (HORT), i.e. reconstructing the 4D distributions of the ionospheric electron density (one 3D image every 20-30 min). In the regions densely covered by the GNSS receivers, it is currently possible to get a time step of 2-4 min. The LORT and HORT approaches have a common methodical basis: in both these techniques, the integrals of electron density along the ray between the satellite and the receiver are measured, and then the tomographic procedures are applied to reconstruct the distributions of electron density. We present several examples of the experiments on the ionospheric RT, which are related to the Underground-Surface-Atmosphere-Ionosphere (USAI) coupling. In particular, we demonstrate examples of RT images of the ionosphere after industrial explosions, rocket launches, and modification of the ionosphere by high-power radio waves. We also show RT cross sections reflecting ionospheric disturbances caused by the earthquakes (EQ) and tsunami waves. In these cases, there is an evident cause-and-effect relationship. The perturbations are transferred between the geospheres predominantly by acoustic gravity waves (AGW), whose amplitudes increase with increasing height. As far as EQ are concerned, the cause of the USAI coupling mechanism is not obvious. It is clear, however, that the regular RT studies can promote the solution of this challenging problem

  7. Local excitation of strongly coupled exciton-surface plasmons polaritons by a single nanoantenna

    SciTech Connect

    Eizner, E. Ellenbogen, T.

    2014-06-02

    We demonstrate experimentally local coupling of light from free space to exciton-surface plasmon polaritons (X-SPPs). This is achieved by using a single, sub-wavelength gold nanowire on top of a thin silver film which is covered with a 30 nm thick layer of J-aggregating dyes in polyvinyl alcohol. We show that the nanowire acts as an antenna that resonantly scatters light to X-SPPs states with a Rabi splitting of 0.1 eV. The locally excited X-SPPs properties are studied by angle resolved spectroscopy of the far-field leaky photons and are compared to the large-scale response through Kretschmann reflection measurements and to theoretical calculations. The nanowire scattering properties are studied by dark-field scattering measurements and finite-difference time-domain simulations. This method to locally excite X-SPPs can potentially be useful for future applications of hybrid light matter states.

  8. Confined surface plasmon sensors based on strongly coupled disk-in-volcano arrays.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Wang, Limin; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yu, Ye; Zhang, Gang

    2015-02-14

    Disk-in-volcano arrays are reported to greatly enhance the sensing performance due to strong coupling in the nanogaps between the nanovolcanos and nanodisks. The designed structure, which is composed of a nanovolcano array film and a disk in each cavity, is fabricated by a simple and efficient colloidal lithography method. By tuning structural parameters, the disk-in-volcano arrays show greatly enhanced resonances in the nanogaps formed by the disks and the inner wall of the volcanos. Therefore they respond to the surrounding environment with a sensitivity as high as 977 nm per RIU and with excellent linear dependence on the refraction index. Moreover, through mastering the fabrication process, biological sensing can be easily confined to the cavities of the nanovolcanos. The local responsivity has the advantages of maximum surface plasmon energy density in the nanogaps, reducing the sensing background and saving expensive reagents. The disk-in-volcano arrays also possess great potential in applications of optical and electrical trapping and single-molecule analysis, because they enable establishment of electric fields across the gaps. PMID:25384425

  9. Effects of the rotation angle on surface plasmon coupling of nanoprisms.

    PubMed

    Chien, Miao-Hsuan; Nien, Li-Wei; Chao, Bo-Kai; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2016-02-14

    We studied the effects of relative orientation of bowtie nanostructures on the plasmon resonance both experimentally and theoretically in this work. Specifically, we fabricated gold bowtie nanoantennas with rotated nanoprisms, measured the near-field and the far-field resonance behaviors using Raman spectroscopy and scattering microspectroscopy, and simulated the effects of the rotation angle on the localized surface plasmonic resonance using finite-difference time-domain simulations. In addition to the widely-discussed dipolar resonance in regular bowtie nanostructures, defined as tip-mode resonance in the present study, the excitations of edge-mode resonance were discovered under certain rotation angles of nanoprisms. Because of the resonances of different modes at different wavelengths, two different incident laser sources were used to measure the Raman spectra to provide evidence for the evolution of different resonance modes. Also, both the tip-mode and edge-mode resonances were verified by the simulated charge density distribution and their trends were discussed. Based on the discovered trend, a plasmon protractor was created with a near-exponential decay relationship between the relative resonance wavelength shift and cosine of the rotation angle. A plasmon hybridization model was also proposed for rotated bowties to explain the coupling between nanoprisms during rotation. PMID:26809737

  10. Carotid Artery Wall Segmentation in Multispectral MRI by Coupled Optimal Surface Graph Cuts.

    PubMed

    Arias-Lorza, Andres M; Petersen, Jens; van Engelen, Arna; Selwaness, Mariana; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2016-03-01

    We present a new three-dimensional coupled optimal surface graph-cut algorithm to segment the wall of the carotid artery bifurcation from Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. The method combines the search for both inner and outer borders into a single graph cut and uses cost functions that integrate information from multiple sequences. Our approach requires manual localization of only three seed points indicating the start and end points of the segmentation in the internal, external, and common carotid artery. We performed a quantitative validation using images of 57 carotid arteries. Dice overlap of 0.86 ± 0.06 for the complete vessel and 0.89 ± 0.05 for the lumen compared to manual annotation were obtained. Reproducibility tests were performed in 60 scans acquired with an interval of 15 ± 9 days, showing good agreement between baseline and follow-up segmentations with intraclass correlations of 0.96 and 0.74 for the lumen and complete vessel volumes respectively. PMID:26595912

  11. Studying G protein-coupled receptors: immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, phosphorylation, surface labeling, and cross-linking protocols.

    PubMed

    Pal, Kasturi; Badgandi, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are signaling organelles that have been shown to coordinate cellular responses to extracellular cues during physiological processes ranging from organ patterning to cell cycle regulation. A variety of receptors, including G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), downstream effectors (adenylyl cyclases), and second messengers, such as calcium, accumulate in the ciliary compartment. Isolation of GPCRs is essential for studying posttranslational modifications, intracellular trafficking, and protein-protein interactions that are important in downstream signaling. However, the presence of multiple hydrophobic transmembrane domains, and the inherent conformational flexibility of GPCRs make their extraction from membranes and solubilization particularly challenging. Here, we describe detailed methods for immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of GPCRs from whole cell extracts. These methods are applicable for studying other multipass transmembrane proteins (such as adenylyl cyclases). We also describe methods for determining GPCR phosphorylation, surface labeling by biotinylation, and cross-linking to detect transient interactions with other proteins. These methods are amenable for studying both ciliary and nonciliary GPCRs in the context of cellular signaling pathways. PMID:25837398

  12. Monte Carlo Simulations of Coupled Diffusion and Surface Reactions during the Aqueous Corrosion of Borosilicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75-x) mol% SiO2 (12.5+x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5+x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditions at a surface-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick’s 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.

  13. The groundwater land-surface atmosphere connection: Soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Chow, Fotini Katopodes; Kollet, Stefan J.

    2007-12-01

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can simulate spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-h period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land-surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  14. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  15. Reproduction of 20th century inter- to multi-decadel surface temperature variablilty in radiatively forced coupled climate models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 simulations of surface temperature were evaluated over the period 1902-1999 to assess their ability to reproduce historical temperature variability at 211 global locations. Model performance was evaluated using the running Mann Whitney-Z method, a technique th...

  16. Recent Advances in Modeling of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Land Surface in the Coupled WRF-CMAQ Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in the land surface model (LSM) and planetary boundary layer (PBL) components of the WRF-CMAQ coupled meteorology and air quality modeling system are described. The aim of these modifications was primarily to improve the modeling of ground level concentrations of trace c...

  17. Decomposition of the scattering amplitude into shadow and surface components with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Melo, German; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2008-09-15

    We propose a decomposition of the scattering amplitude into shadow and surface components for proton scattering against calcium isotopes as targets at 21 MeV. We account for spin-orbit coupling effects for the optical potential in the nonrelativistic limit. Our calculations show very good agreement with experimental trends.

  18. Surface-atmosphere interactions with coupled within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and canopy reflection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmermans, J.; van der Tol, C.; Verhoef, W.; Su, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Models that describe the exchange of CO2 and H2O between the surface and atmosphere use bulk-parametrization of the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and leaf area density (eq. LAI). This bulk parametrization is based on the Monin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory. The MOS theory however breaks down for sparse canopies and it cannot couple profiles in the leaf density to profiles in the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance. The objective of this research is to create a simple model that is able to couple the within-canopy aerodynamic resistance and canopy reflection for different levels in the canopy. This model should be able to represent the canopy using as fewer parameters as possible, in order to facilitate inversion of remote sensing imagery. A virtual canopy was simulated using an L-systems approach, Lindenmayer 1968. The L-system approach was chosen because it describes the canopy with fractals. It therefore needs very little inputs to simulate a virtual canopy. A vertical profile of leaf density was calculated for 60 levels from this virtual canopy. The within-canopy aerodynamic resistance was modeled from the vertical leaf density profile using foliage drag coefficient, Massman 1997. A modified version of the SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observations and Photosynthesis) model was used to calculate the H2O and CO2 fluxes using the vertical profiles of leaf density and within-canopy aerodynamic resistance. The simulated fluxes are compared with field measurements over a vineyard and a forested area. The field measurements in both areas are acquired using the same setup: a basic flux tower in addition with an eddy-covariance setup. We present in this article the methodology and the results, as a proof of concept. references Massman, W.J., An Analytical One-Dimensional Model of Momentum Transfer by vegetation of arbitrary structure, Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 1997, 83, 407-421 Lindenmayer, A., Mathematical Models for Cellular Interactions in Development, Journal of

  19. Detecting surface changes of slope to channel coupling in an alpine catchment using terrestrial laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascher, Eric; Sass, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the evolution and functions of a river system and interpreting the morphology and the dynamics of the channel is a key factor in fluvial geomorphology. For this purpose it is essential to analyse the processes of sediment input and output within and between river reaches and to detect the various forms of storage types on hillslopes and in the channel network. From these processes catchment scale sediment fluxes are derived and result in sediment budgets showing the amount and motion of sediment through the system. Sediment connectivity is a highly important characteristic of catchments when sediment transfer processes are studied. In this context, connectivity controls the sediment fluxes throughout the landscape which means the transfer of sediment from sediment sources to sinks and particularly the potential of a particle to move through the system. This study focuses on slope to channel coupling in the Johnsbach Valley, a typical, non-glaciated alpine catchment in the eastern Austrian Alps. The valley covers an area of 65 km² with altitudes ranging from 584 m a.s.l. at the outlet to 2369 m a.s.l. (Hochtor). The valley is drained by the Johnsbach River which originates in a crystalline bedrock dominated part of the catchment. After approximately 10 km of the distance downstream the lithology changes to calcareous bedrock. In this part of the Johnsbach Valley most of the sediment contributing areas are situated. To detect slope to channel coupling surface changes were measured and mass balances were quantified by terrestrial laser scanning using a RIEGL LMS-Z620. Four field sites were chosen were side channels are directly connected to the main fluvial system. Additionally two field sites show sediment movement in between the side channels. Field campaigns were carried out in September and October of 2013 as well as in April, July, August and October of 2014. First results show that sediment contribution from the side channels and erosion of

  20. On the development of a coupled land surface and ground water model for use in watershed management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Miller, N. L.

    2003-04-01

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budgets that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, models for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM2.0) and a variably-saturated groundwater model (ParFlow) have been coupled as a single column model. An initial set of simulations based on data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) and synthetic data demonstrate the temporal dynamics of both of the coupled models. Changes in soil moisture and movement of the water table are used as indicators of conservation of mass between the two models. Sensitivity studies demonstrate the affect of precipitation, evapotranspiration, radiation, subsurface geology and heterogeneity on predicted watershed flow. Studies demonstrating the effects of watershed flow in uncoupled and coupled modes will be presented. The coupled model will ultimately be used to assist in the development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs- a surface water quality standard) for a number of pollutants in an

  1. Lysozyme-coupled poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)-stainless steel hybrids and their antifouling and antibacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaojun; Wan, Dong; Liang, Bin; Pehkonen, S O; Ting, Y P; Neoh, K G; Kang, E T

    2011-03-15

    An environmentally benign approach to impart stainless steel (SS) surfaces with antifouling and antibacterial functionalities was described. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of poly(ethylene glycol) monomethacrylate) (PEGMA) from the SS surface-coupled catecholic L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) with terminal alkyl halide initiator was first carried out, followed by the immobilization of lysozyme at the chain ends of poly(ethylene glycol) branches of the grafted PEGMA polymer brushes. The functionalized SS surfaces were shown to be effective in preventing bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption and in reducing bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. The surfaces also exhibited good bactericidal effects against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The concomitant incorporation of antifouling hydrophilic brushes and antibacterial enzymes or peptides onto metal surfaces via catecholic anchors should be readily adaptable to other metal substrates, and is potentially useful for biomedical and biomaterial applications. PMID:21338094

  2. Coupled resonances allow studying the aging of adhesive contacts between a QCM surface and single, micrometer-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschel, Astrid; Langhoff, Arne; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2015-12-01

    Interparticle contacts and contacts between particles and surfaces are known to change over time. The contact area, the contact stiffness, and the contact strength usually increase as the contact ages. Contact aging is mostly driven by capillary forces, but also by plastic deformation. Making use of acoustic resonators, we have studied the stiffness of contacts between the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and individual, micrometer-sized particles adsorbed to the resonator surface. Studying single particles avoids ensemble-averaging. Central to the analysis is the coupled resonance, occurring when a surface-attached particle together with the link forms a resonator of its own. If the frequency of this second resonator comes close to one of the crystal’s overtones, plots of shifts in resonance bandwidth versus overtone order display a resonance curve. This secondary resonance is caused by the coupling between the particle’s resonance and the main resonance. One can read the frequency of the coupled resonance from this plot. Similarly, resonance curves are observed in plots of frequency and bandwidth versus time, if the contact stiffness varies smoothly with time. Because the coupled resonance is a characteristic feature, it is easily identified even in cases where frequency shifts of some other origin are superimposed onto the data. For the cases studied here, the links stiffened while they dried. Interestingly, the efficiency of coupling between the particle resonance and the main resonance decreased at the same time. This can be explained with an increase in the link’s bending stiffness. The analysis highlights that a QCM experiment amounts to vibrational spectroscopy on surface-attached particles. Among the application examples is the adsorption and drying of a lycopodium spore. Clearly, the technique is also applicable to problems of bioadhesion.

  3. Space Weather Simulators Developed at NICT : the Solar Surface-Solar Wind Coupling Model and the Next Generation Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, Mitsue; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Tanaka, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru; Kubo, Yuki; Kubota, Yasubumi; Washimi, Haruichi

    We report two global MHD simulators developed at NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology): one is for the solar surface-solar wind coupling system and the other is for the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system. One important feature of our simulation model is the 3-D grid system, which has no polar singularity despite of a spherical grid configuration. By this grid system, fine grids can be allocated near the inner boundary which represents the sun or the earth. Some complicated magnetic structures on the solar surface is closely related with the solar disturbances, and in the same way the ionospheric aurora is closely related with the the magnetospheric reconfiguration processes. In views of these situation, it is very crucial for both models to achieve the simultaneous implementations for the fine grid structure on the inner boundary and the wide range grids in global configuration. For the solar surface-solar wind coupling system, the observed magnetic field data are input at the inner boundary, and the solar wind structure can be updated at every day by optimizing the simulation code. For the magnetospheric model, we are developing "the next generation" realtime MHD simulation system. The model is developed by NICT and co-workers, and the extreme phenomena such as the magnetopause crossing are simulated successfully. For the magnetic disturbance event, the westward traveling surge, the most characteristic feature of the substorm, is reproduced quite realistically. In this paper, we describe those two space weather simulator systems and represent several numerical results obtained by using these models.

  4. Reflection and transmission at the boundary surface of modified couple stress thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Kumar, K.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper the reflection and transmission at a plane interface in modified couple stress generalized thermoelastic solid half spaces in the context of Loard-Shulman (LS) and Green-Lindsay (GL) theories in welded contact are investigated. Amplitude ratios of various reflected and transmitted waves are obtained due to incidence of a set of coupled longitudinal waves and coupled transverse waves. It is found that the amplitude ratios of various reflected and transmitted waves are functions of the angle of incidence, frequency and are affected by the couple stress properties of the media. Some special cases are deduced from the present formulation.

  5. Coupled Molecular Switching Processes in Ordered Mono- and Multilayers of Stimulus-Responsive Rotaxanes on Gold Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces provide the structural basis for function as, for example, encountered in nature in the membrane-embedded photosystem or in technology in solar cells. Synthetic functional multilayers of molecules cooperating in a coupled manner can be fabricated on surfaces through layer-by-layer self-assembly. Ordered arrays of stimulus-responsive rotaxanes undergoing well-controlled axle shuttling are excellent candidates for coupled mechanical motion. Such stimulus-responsive surfaces may help integrate synthetic molecular machines in larger systems exhibiting even macroscopic effects or generating mechanical work from chemical energy through cooperative action. The present work demonstrates the successful deposition of ordered mono- and multilayers of chemically switchable rotaxanes on gold surfaces. Rotaxane mono- and multilayers are shown to reversibly switch in a coupled manner between two ordered states as revealed by linear dichroism effects in angle-resolved NEXAFS spectra. Such a concerted switching process is observed only when the surfaces are well packed, while less densely packed surfaces lacking lateral order do not exhibit such effects. PMID:25782057

  6. Grating-coupled Otto configuration for hybridized surface phonon polariton excitation for local refractive index sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Zheng, Gaige; Shen, Hong; Lei, Dang Yuan; Somekh, Michael G

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate numerically through rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) that replacing the prism in the Otto configuration with gratings enables us to excite and control different modes and field patterns of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) through the incident wavelength and height of the Otto spacing layer. This modified Otto configuration provides us the following multiple modes, namely, SPhP mode, Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity resonance, dielectric waveguide grating resonance (DWGR) and hybridized between different combinations of the above mentioned modes. We show that this modified grating-coupled Otto configuration has a highly confined field pattern within the structure, making it more sensitive to local refractive index changes on the SiC surface. The hybridized surface phonon polariton modes also provide a stronger field enhancement compared to conventional pure mode excitation. PMID:27557229

  7. Thermo-mechanically coupled subduction with a free surface using ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraters, Menno; Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Spakman, Wim

    2014-05-01

    ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012), short for Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion, is a new Finite Element code which was originally designed for thermally driven (mantle) convection and is built on state of the art numerical methods (adaptive mesh refinement, linear and nonlinear solver, stabilization of transport dominated processes and a high scalability on multiple processors). Here we present an application of ASPECT to modeling of fully thermo-mechanically coupled subduction. Our subduction model contains three different compositions: a crustal composition on top of both the subducting slab and the overriding plate, a mantle composition and a sticky air composition, which allows for simulating a free surface for modeling topography build-up. We implemented a visco-plastic rheology using frictional plasticity and a composite viscosity defined by diffusion and dislocation creep. The lithospheric mantle has the same composition as the mantle but has a higher viscosity because of a lower temperature. The temperature field is implemented in ASPECT as follows: a linear temperature gradient for the lithosphere and an adiabatic geotherm for the sublithospheric mantle. Initial slab temperature is defined using the analytical solution of McKenzie (1970). The plates can be pushed from the sides of the model, and it is possible to define an additional independent mantle in/out flow through the boundaries. We will show a preliminary set of models, highlighting the codes capabilities, such as the Adaptive Mesh Refinement, topography development and the influence of mantle flow on the subduction evolution. Kronbichler, M., Heister, T., and Bangerth, W. (2012), High accuracy mantle convection simulation through modern numerical methods, Geophysical Journal International,191, 12-29, doi:10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05609. McKenzie, D.P. (1970), Temperature and potential temperature beneath island arcs, Teconophysics, 10, 357-366, doi:10.1016/0040-1951(70)90115-0.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of coupled diffusion and surface reactions during the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-09-19

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, in this paper three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75 - x) mol% SiO2 (12.5 + x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5 + x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditionsmore » at a surface-area-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick's 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Finally, models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.« less

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of coupled diffusion and surface reactions during the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-09-19

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, in this paper three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75 - x) mol% SiO2 (12.5 + x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5 + x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditions at a surface-area-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick's 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Finally, models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.

  10. Impact of Calibrated Land Surface Model Parameters on the Accuracy and Uncertainty of Land-Atmosphere Coupling in WRF Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Ken; Zhou, Shujia

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty estimation module in NASA's Land Information System (LIS-OPT/UE), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to a land cover and soil type mapping of the observation sites to the full model domain. The impact of calibrated parameters on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity, and the potential for combining this approach with satellite remote sensing data are also discussed.

  11. Coupled surface-subsurface hydrologic measurements reveal infiltration, recharge, and discharge dynamics across the swash zone of a sandy beach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, James W.; Puleo, Jack A.; Ullman, William J.; Michael, Holly A.

    2015-11-01

    Swash-groundwater interactions affect the biogeochemistry of beach aquifers and the transport of solutes and sediment across the beachface. Improved understanding of the complex, coupled dynamics of surface and subsurface flow processes in the swash zone is required to better estimate chemical fluxes to the sea and predict the morphological evolution of beaches. Simultaneous high-frequency measurements of saturation, water table elevation, and the cross-shore locations of runup and the boundary between the saturated and unsaturated beachface (surface saturation boundary) were collected on a sandy beach to link groundwater flow dynamics with swash zone forcing. Saturation and lysimeter measurements showed the dynamic response of subsurface saturation to swash events and permitted estimation of infiltration rates. Surface and subsurface observations revealed a decoupling of the surface saturation boundary and the intersection between the water table and the beachface. Surface measurements alone were insufficient to delineate the infiltration and discharge zones, which moved independently of the surface saturation boundary. Results show for the first time the motion and areal extent of infiltration and recharge zones, and constrain the maximum size of the subaerial discharge zone over swash and tidal time scales. The width of the infiltration zone was controlled by swash processes, and subaerial discharge was controlled primarily by tidal processes. These dynamics reveal the tightly coupled nature of surface and subsurface processes over multiple time scales, with implications for sediment transport and fluid and solute fluxes through the hydrologically and biogeochemically active intertidal zone of sandy beaches.

  12. STM probe on the surface electronic states of spin-orbit coupled materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenwen

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is the interaction of an electron's intrinsic angular momentum (spin) with its orbital momentum. The strength of this interaction is proportional to Z4 where Z is the atomic number, so generally it is stronger in atoms with higher atomic number, such as bismuth (Z=83) and iridium (Z=77). In materials composed of such heavy elements, the prominent SOC can be sufficient to modify the band structure of the system and lead to distinct phase of matter. In recent years, SOC has been demonstrated to play a critical role in determining the unusual properties of a variety of compounds. SOC associated materials with exotic electronic states have also provided a fertile platform for studying emergent phenomena as well as new physics. As a consequence, the research on these interesting materials with any insight into understanding the microscopic origin of their unique properties and complex phases is of great importance. In this context, we implement scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to explore the surface states (SS) of the two major categories of SOC involved materials, Bi-based topological insulators (TI) and Ir-based transition metal oxides (TMO). As a powerful tool in surface science which has achieved great success in wide variety of material fields, STM/STS is ideal to study the local density of states of the subject material with nanometer length scales and is able to offer detailed information about the surface electronic structure. In the first part of this thesis, we report on the electronic band structures of three-dimensional TIs Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se 3. Topological insulators are distinct quantum states of matter that have been intensely studied nowadays. Although they behave like ordinary insulators in showing fully gapped bulk bands, they host a topologically protected surface state consisting of two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions which exhibits metallic behavior. Indeed, this unique gapless surface state is a

  13. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110m wide and 50m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere. PMID:26583741

  14. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110 m wide and 50 m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  15. Coupled Soil Water and Heat Transport Near the Land Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions - Multi-Domain Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Yang, Zhenlei

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather as well as climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for water vapor diffusion only, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended and improved by several researchers by explicitly taking water vapor convection, dispersion or air flow into account. It is generally believed that the soil moisture is usually low in the near surface layer under highly transient field conditions, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, and that accurate characterization of water vapor transport is critical when modeling simultaneous water and heat transport in the shallow field soils. The first objective of this study is thus mainly to test existing coupled water and heat transport theories and to develop reasonable and simplified numerical models using field experimental data collected under semi-arid and arid hydro-climatic conditions. In addition, more complex multi-domain models are developed for ubiquitous heterogeneous terrestrial surfaces such as horizontal textural contrasts or structured heterogeneity including macropores (fractures, cracks, root channels, etc.). This would make coupled water and heat transfer models applicable in such non-homogeneous soils more meaningful and enhance the skill of land-atmosphere interaction models at a larger context.

  16. Cross-surface interface element for coupling built-up structural subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, C. G.; Ransom, J. B.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    A new finite element for coupling built-up shell substructures is presented. The present work extends the hybrid variational formulation of the interface element developed by Aminpour and Ransom to permit coupling between two intersecting substructures. Designed for the assembly of independently built-up finite element models, this technique provides a level of modeling flexibility previously unavailable.

  17. Impact of Optimized land Surface Parameters on the Land-Atmosphere Coupling in WRF Simulations of Dry and Wet Extremes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Sujay; Santanello, Joseph; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Harrison, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty module in NASA's Land Information System (LIS-OPT), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to the land cover and soil type mapping of the observations and the full domain. The impact of the calibrated parameters on the a) spin up of land surface states used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture fluxes of the coupled (LIS-WRF) simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather, PBL budgets, and precipitation along with L-A coupling diagnostics. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, normal) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity (e.g.,. relating to the representation of the spatial dependence of parameters) and the feasibility of calibrating to multiple observational datasets are also discussed.

  18. Analytical evaluation of a surface integral expressing the coupling between interior and exterior volumes in a FE-IE approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuffada, C.; Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.

    1993-01-01

    Recently an approach which combines the finite element technique and an integral equation to determine the fields scattered by inhomogeneous bodies of complicated shape has been proposed. Basically, a mathematical surface which encloses the scatterers is introduced, thus dividing the space into an interior and an exterior volume, in which the finite element technique and an integral equation for EM scattering, respectively, are applied. The integral equation is set up for the tangential components of the fields at the surface, while the interior volume the unknowns are the total fields. Continuity of the tangential fields at the boundary, as required by Maxwell's equations, is imposed, thus coupling the two methods to obtain a consistent solution. The coupling term is expressed by a surface integral formed by the dot product of a FE basis function and an IE testing function, or viceversa. By choosing the boundary to be a surface of revolution and by making a convenient selection of IE basis (testing) functions, it is possible to evaluate the integrals analytically on surfaces such as curved triangles, curved quadrilaterals and curved pentagons. We will illustrate the salient steps involved in setting up and carrying out these integrals and discuss what class of basis (testing) functions and analytic surfaces of revolution they are applicable to. Analytic calculations offer the advantage of better accuracy than purely numerical ones, and, when combined with them, often shed light on issues of numerical convergence and limiting values. Furthermore, they may reduce computation time and storage requirements.

  19. Modelling the effects of tides and storm surges on coastal aquifers using a coupled surface-subsurface approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Coastal aquifers are complex hydrologic systems because many physical processes interact: (i) variably saturated flow, (ii) spatial-temporal fluid density variations, (iii) tidal fluctuations, (iv) storm surges overtopping dykes, and (v) surface runoff of storm water. The HydroGeoSphere model is used to numerically simulate coastal flow dynamics, assuming a fully coupled surface-subsurface approach, accounting for all processes listed above. The diffusive wave approximation of the St. Venant equation is used to describe surface flow. Surface flow and salt transport are fully coupled with subsurficial variably saturated, variable-density flow and salt transport through mathematical terms that represent exchange of fluid mass and solute mass, respectively. Tides and storm surges induce a time-variant head that is applied to nodes of the surface domain. The approach is applied to real cases of tide and storm surge events. Tide simulation results confirm the existence of a recirculating zone, forming beneath the upper part of the intertidal zone. By monitoring the exchange fluid flux rates through the beach, it was found that the major inflow to the aquifer takes place at the upper part of the intertidal zone, which explains the formation of the recirculating zone. The recirculating zone is forming particularly during rising tide. Results from a storm surge simulation show that plume fingers develop below the flooded land surface. Natural remediation by seaward flowing freshwater is relatively slow, such that reducing the salt concentration in the aquifer down to drinking water standards takes up to 10 years. PMID:23603354

  20. Strong Coupling of the Cyclotron Motion of Surface Electrons on Liquid Helium to a Microwave Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhimov, L. V.; Yamashiro, R.; Badrutdinov, A. O.; Konstantinov, D.

    2016-07-01

    The strong coupling regime is observed in a system of two-dimensional electrons whose cyclotron motion is coupled to an electromagnetic mode in a Fabry-Perot cavity resonator. Rabi splitting of eigenfrequencies of the coupled motion is observed both in the cavity reflection spectrum and ac current of the electrons, the latter probed by measuring their bolometric photoresponse. Despite the fact that similar observations of Rabi splitting in many-particle systems have been described as a quantum-mechanical effect, we show that the observed splitting can be explained completely by a model based on classical electrodynamics.

  1. Strong Coupling of the Cyclotron Motion of Surface Electrons on Liquid Helium to a Microwave Cavity.

    PubMed

    Abdurakhimov, L V; Yamashiro, R; Badrutdinov, A O; Konstantinov, D

    2016-07-29

    The strong coupling regime is observed in a system of two-dimensional electrons whose cyclotron motion is coupled to an electromagnetic mode in a Fabry-Perot cavity resonator. Rabi splitting of eigenfrequencies of the coupled motion is observed both in the cavity reflection spectrum and ac current of the electrons, the latter probed by measuring their bolometric photoresponse. Despite the fact that similar observations of Rabi splitting in many-particle systems have been described as a quantum-mechanical effect, we show that the observed splitting can be explained completely by a model based on classical electrodynamics. PMID:27517786

  2. Spatial modulation of light transmission through a single microcavity by coupling of photosynthetic complex excitations to surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Itai; Cohen, Moshik; Heifler, Omri; Lilach, Yigal; Zalevsky, Zeev; Mujica, Vladimiro; Richter, Shachar

    2015-06-01

    Molecule-plasmon interactions have been shown to have a definite role in light propagation through optical microcavities due to strong coupling between molecular excitations and surface plasmons. This coupling can lead to macroscopic extended coherent states exhibiting increment in temporal and spatial coherency and a large Rabi splitting. Here, we demonstrate spatial modulation of light transmission through a single microcavity patterned on a free-standing Au film, strongly coupled to one of the most efficient energy transfer photosynthetic proteins in nature, photosystem I. Here we observe a clear correlation between the appearance of spatial modulation of light and molecular photon absorption, accompanied by a 13-fold enhancement in light transmission and the emergence of a distinct electromagnetic standing wave pattern in the cavity. This study provides the path for engineering various types of bio-photonic devices based on the vast diversity of biological molecules in nature.

  3. One-dimensional counterion gas between charged surfaces: Exact results compared with weak- and strong-coupling analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David S.; Horgan, Ron R.; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate exactly the statistical integral for an inhomogeneous one-dimensional (1D) counterion-only Coulomb gas between two charged boundaries and from this compute the effective interaction, or disjoining pressure, between the bounding surfaces. Our exact results are compared to the limiting cases of weak and strong couplings which are the same for 1D and three-dimensional (3D) systems. For systems with a large number of counterions it is found that the weak-coupling (mean-field) approximation for the disjoining pressure works perfectly and that fluctuations around the mean-field in 1D are much smaller than in 3D. In the case of few counterions it works less well and strong-coupling approximation performs much better as it takes into account properly the discreteness of the counterion charges. PMID:19275406

  4. Quantitative control of poly(ethylene oxide) surface antifouling and biodetection through azimuthally enhanced grating coupled-surface plasmon resonance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonato, Agnese; Silvestri, Davide; Ruffato, Gianluca; Zacco, Gabriele; Romanato, Filippo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2013-12-01

    Grating Coupled-Surface Plasmon reflectivity measurements carried out under azimuth and polarization control (GC-SPR φ ≠ 0°) were used to optimize the process of gold surface dressing with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) derivatives of different molecular weight, with the final goal to maximize the discrimination between specific and non-specific binding events occurring at the surface. The kinetics of surface deposition of thiol-ending PEOs (0.3, 2 and 5 kDa), introduced as antifouling layers, was monitored. Non-specific binding events upon immersion of the surfaces into buffers containing either 0.1% bovine serum albumin or 1% Goat Serum, were evaluated as a function of polymer size and density. A biorecognition event between avidin and biotin was then monitored in both buffers at selected low and high polymer surface densities and the contribution of analyte and fouling elements to the signal was precisely quantified. The 0.3 kDa PEO film was unable to protect the surface from non-specific interactions at any tested density. On the other hand, the 2 and 5 kDa polymers at their highest surface densities guaranteed full protection from non-specific interactions from both buffers. These densities were reached upon a long deposition time (24-30 h). The results pave the way toward the application of this platform for the detection of low concentration and small dimension analytes, for which both non-fouling and high instrumental sensitivity are fundamental requirements.

  5. Plasmonic Coupling via Au@stimuli-responsive polymer Hybrid Core@shell Nanoparticles Monitored by Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Chung, Kyungwha; Kim, Dong Ha

    2013-03-01

    Noble metal nanostructures with responsive polymers can be used to probe unique plasmonic properties associated with swelling-shrinking transitions in polymer chains triggered by a specific external stimulus. The phase transition causes changes in the refractive index in the vicinity of the particle surface and induces concurrent changes in the characteristic inter-particle distance. We designed a plasmonic-coupling-based sensing device consisting of Au nanoparticles separated from the Au substrate in Kretschmann configuration SPR spectroscopy through a thermo-responsive polymer linker layer. Concretely, Au NPs having stimuli-responsive polymer chains tethered to the Au surface were first fabricated through SI-ATRP. The optical properties of these stimuli-responsive devices were investigated by both in-situ and static SPR analysis. Also, we demonstrate that bimetallic nanostructures containing another type of metal NP at the stimuli-responsive polymer periphery exhibit a controlled optical sensing property based on LSPR coupling phenomenon.

  6. A coupled channel study of HN2 unimolecular decay based on a global ab initio potential surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Schatz, George C.; Walch, Stephen P.

    1991-01-01

    The unimolecular decay lifetimes of several vibrational states of HN2 are determined on the basis of an accurate coupled channel dynamics study using a global analytical potential surface. The surface reproduces the ab initio points with an rms error of 0.08 kcal/mol for energies below 20 kcal/mol. Modifications to the potential that describe the effect of improving the basis set in the ab initio calculations are provided. Converged coupled channel calculations are performed for the ground rotational state of HN2 to determine the lifetimes of the lowest ten vibrational states. Only the ground vibrational state (000) and first excited bend (001) are found to have lifetimes longer than 1 ps. The lifetimes of these states are estimated at 3 x 10 to the -9th and 2 x 10 to the -10th s, respectively. Variation of these results with quality of the ab initio calculations is not more than a factor of 5.

  7. Ultra-thin and polarization-independent phase gradient metasurface for high-efficiency spoof surface-plasmon-polariton coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chenjun; Cheng, Yongzhi; Wang, Wenying; He, Bo; Gong, Rongzhou

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a polarization-independent phase-gradient metasurface (PGM) for spoof surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) coupling is proposed and investigated using theoretical simulations and experiments. The designed PGM is composed of a periodic array, which consists of a dielectric spacer sandwiched between a metallic petal structure and metal film. The numerical results indicate that, when the composite surface wave vector is greater than that of the incident wave, an arbitrarily incident linearly polarized electromagnetic wave can be efficiently coupled to yield a spoof SPP. The results obtained from both simulation and experiments are consistent with theoretical predictions. The PGM spoof SPP coupler design is polarization independent and highly efficient at the X-band.

  8. Analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission for efficient collection of Fluorescence/Raman light from surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical method based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel theory has been developed for the analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission technique, which is useful for the surface Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy. The Kretschmann-type waveguide with a molecular dipole located above or inside the core layer serves as the simulation model. The two-dimensional (2D) pattern of power density for the waveguide-coupled emission from the molecular dipole was calculated using the theoretical method. According to the results, with a given waveguide the 2D pattern of power density is highly dependent on both the orientation and position of the dipole. The maximum fraction of power occupied by the waveguide-coupled emission is 87% with the plasmon waveguide and 95% with the resonant mirror. Compared with the dipole emission in free space, the waveguide-coupled directional emission possesses easy collection, which is benefit for the detection of weak Fluorescence and Raman signals. From this point, the theoretical method used here is helpful for design and optimization of Kretschmann-type waveguide structures for high-sensitivity surface monitoring by Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy.

  9. Analytic free-form lens design in 3D: coupling three ray sets using two lens surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duerr, Fabian; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-05-01

    The two-dimensional analytic optics design method presented in a previous paper [Opt. Express 20, 5576-5585 (2012)] is extended in this work to the three-dimensional case, enabling the coupling of three ray sets with two free-form lens surfaces. Fermat's principle is used to deduce additional sets of functional differential equations which make it possible to calculate the lens surfaces. Ray tracing simulations demonstrate the excellent imaging performance of the resulting free-form lenses described by more than 100 coefficients. PMID:22565708

  10. Surface-confined crystalline two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks via on-surface Schiff-base coupling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lirong; Zhou, Xin; Yu, Yanxia; Tian, Wei Quan; Ma, Jun; Lei, Shengbin

    2013-09-24

    We performed a co-condensation reaction between aromatic aldehyde and aromatic diamine monomers on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface either at a solid/liquid interface at room temperature or in low vacuum with moderate heating. With this simple and moderate methodology, we have obtained surface-confined 2D covalent organic frameworks (COFs) with few defects and almost entire surface coverage. The single crystalline domain can extend to more than 1 μm(2). By varying the backbone length of aromatic diamines the pore size of 2D surface COFs is tunable from ∼1.7 to 3.5 nm. In addition, the nature of the surface COF can be modified by introducing functional groups into the aromatic amine precursor, which has been demonstrated by introducing methyl groups to the backbone of the diamine. Formation of small portions of bilayers was observed by both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and AFM, which clearly reveals an eclipsed stacking manner. PMID:23924203

  11. Influence of surface conditions on plasma dynamics and electron heating in a radio-frequency driven capacitively coupled oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greb, Arthur; Gibson, Andrew Robert; Niemi, Kari; O'Connell, Deborah; Gans, Timo

    2015-08-01

    The impact of changing surface condition on plasma dynamics and electron heating is investigated by means of numerical simulations, based on a semi-kinetic fluid model approach, and compared with measurements of the nanosecond electron dynamics in the plasma-surface interface region using phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES). The simulations are conducted in a one-dimensional domain and account for a geometrical asymmetry comparable to the experimental setup of a radio-frequency driven capacitively coupled plasma in a gaseous electronics conference reference cell. A simple reaction scheme is considered, including electrons, \\text{O}2+ positive ions, {{\\text{O}}-} negative ions and {{\\text{O}}2}{≤ft(1Δ\\right)} metastable singlet delta oxygen (SDO) as individual species. The role of surface loss and effective lifetime of SDO is discussed. To simulate different surface conditions, the SDO surface loss probability and the secondary electron emission coefficient were varied in the model. It is found that a change in surface condition significantly influences the metastable concentration, electronegativity, spatial particle distributions and densities as well as the ionization and electron heating dynamics. The excitation dynamics obtained from simulations are compared with PROES measurements. This allows to determine experimentally relevant SDO surface loss probabilities and secondary electron emission coefficient values in-situ and is demonstrated for two different surface materials, namely aluminum and Teflon.

  12. Fully-coupled hydrogeophysical inversion of surface deformation measurements for the monitoring of geological CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, M. A.; Stadler, G.

    2011-12-01

    The In Salah project in Algeria has shown that CO2 injection into deep saline aquifers leads to measurable and transient deformation of the surface. Time-series measurements of surface deformation with PS-InSAR and GPS are a promising monitoring tool for geological CO2 storage. These measurements have to be integrated with other observations to extract quantitative information about the properties of the reservoir and to constrain the evolution of the pressure distribution in the subsurface. This data integration requires a fully-coupled hydrogeophysical inversion for the reservoir parameters, based on a geomechanical and hydrological process model. As a first step, we formulate a fully-coupled hydrogeophysical inverse problem to infer the permeability distribution in a quasi-static poroelastic model. In this approach, the misfit between model prediction and observed surface deformation and hydrological data is minimized under the constraint given by the poroelastic equations. The resulting least-squares optimization problem is solved using a Newton method, which uses derivatives computed efficiently through the adjoint poroelastic equations. Both state and adjoint equations are solved with a discretely consistent fully-coupled continuous Galerkin spatial discretization and implicit time integration. The state equation has been benchmarked against the analytic solution to the Mandel-Cryer problem and a modified Mandel-Cryer problem is used to test our inverse formulation. Finally, we discuss the ability of surface deformation measurements to constrain the permeability distribution in a CO2 storage reservoir. In a numerical study we analyze how well lateral permeability variations can be retrieved from a combination of surface deformation and hydrological data.

  13. Controlled surface modification of Ti-40Nb implant alloy by electrochemically assisted inductively coupled RF plasma oxidation.

    PubMed

    Göttlicher, Markus; Rohnke, Marcus; Helth, Arne; Leichtweiß, Thomas; Gemming, Thomas; Gebert, Annett; Eckert, Jürgen; Janek, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    Low temperature metal oxidation induced by plasma in the absence of liquid electrolytes can be useful for the surface preparation of orthopedic devices since residues from these may be harmful and need to be removed before implantation. In this study the oxidation of Ti-40Nb for biomedical application was achieved by employing an inductively coupled radio frequency oxygen plasma. The correlation between the growth mode of the surface oxide and the electric conductivity ratio of the plasma and the oxide phase were studied by varying the sample temperature, oxygen gas pressure and additional bias potential. The plasma treated samples were characterised by confocal laser microscopy, SEM, EBSD, XPS, TEM and ToF-SIMS. The surface energy was determined by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. Well adhering oxide layers consisting of TiO2 and Nb2O5 with thicknesses between 50 and 150 nm were obtained. Surface roughness values and microstructure indicate that the growth mode of the oxide can be well controlled by the sample temperature and oxygen gas pressure. At temperatures above 450°C a migration of Ti ions towards the surface controls the growth process. A bias potential higher than +50 V causes rough and defective surfaces with high surface energies. PMID:23891813

  14. Manipulation of surface plasmon polariton propagation on isotropic and anisotropic two-dimensional materials coupled to boron nitride heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inampudi, Sandeep; Nazari, Mina; Forouzmand, Ali; Mosallaei, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of surface plasmon polariton dispersion characteristics associated with isotropic and anisotropic two-dimensional atomically thin layered materials (2D sheets) coupled to h-BN heterostructures. A scattering matrix based approach is presented to compute the electromagnetic fields and related dispersion characteristics of stacked layered systems composed of anisotropic 2D sheets and uniaxial bulk materials. We analyze specifically the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) dispersion characteristics in case of isolated and coupled two-dimensional layers with isotropic and anisotropic conductivities. An analysis based on residue theorem is utilized to identify optimum optical parameters (surface conductivity) and geometrical parameters (separation between layers) to maximize the SPP field at a given position. The effect of type and degree of anisotropy on the shapes of iso-frequency curves and propagation characteristics is discussed in detail. The analysis presented in this paper gives an insight to identify optimum setup to enhance the SPP field at a given position and in a given direction on the surface of two-dimensional materials.

  15. A capture coupling method for the covalent immobilization of hexahistidine tagged proteins for surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Kimple, Adam J; Muller, Robin E; Siderovski, David P; Willard, Francis S

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a robust method to detect and quantify macromolecular interactions; however, to measure binding interactions, one component must be immobilized on a sensor surface. This is typically achieved using covalent immobilization via free amines or thiols, or noncovalent immobilization using high-affinity interactions such as biotin/streptavidin or antibody/antigen. In this chapter we describe a robust method to covalently immobilize His(6) fusion proteins on the sensor surface for SPR analysis. PMID:20217615

  16. A capture coupling method for the covalent immobilization of hexahistidine tagged proteins for surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Adam J.; Muller, Robin E.; Siderovski, David P.; Willard, Francis S.

    2011-01-01

    i. Summary Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is a robust method to detect and quantify macromolecular interactions; however, to measure binding interactions, one component must be immobilized on a sensor surface. This is typically achieved using covalent immobilization via free amines or thiols, or noncovalent immobilization using high affinity interactions such as biotin/streptavidin or antibody/antigen. In this Chapter we describe a robust method to covalently immobilize His6 fusion proteins on the sensor surface for SPR analysis. PMID:20217615

  17. Direct surface analysis coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals heterogeneous composition of the cuticle of Hibiscus trionum petals.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Chiara; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J; Skelton, Paul C; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Plant cuticle, which is the outermost layer covering the aerial parts of all plants including petals and leaves, can present a wide range of patterns that, combined with cell shape, can generate unique physical, mechanical, or optical properties. For example, arrays of regularly spaced nanoridges have been found on the dark (anthocyanin-rich) portion at the base of the petals of Hibiscus trionum. Those ridges act as a diffraction grating, producing an iridescent effect. Because the surface of the distal white region of the petals is smooth and noniridescent, a selective chemical characterization of the surface of the petals on different portions (i.e., ridged vs smooth) is needed to understand whether distinct cuticular patterns correlate with distinct chemical compositions of the cuticle. In the present study, a rapid screening method has been developed for the direct surface analysis of Hibiscus trionum petals using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry. The optimized method was used to characterize a wide range of plant metabolites and cuticle monomers on the upper (adaxial) surface of the petals on both the white/smooth and anthocyanic/ridged regions, and on the lower (abaxial) surface, which is entirely smooth. The main components detected on the surface of the petals are low-molecular-weight organic acids, sugars, and flavonoids. The ridged portion on the upper surface of the petal is enriched in long-chain fatty acids, which are constituents of the wax fraction of the cuticle. These compounds were not detected on the white/smooth region of the upper petal surface or on the smooth lower surface. PMID:26335385

  18. Surface modification of organic polymers with bioactive titanium oxide without the aid of a silane-coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Balas, F; Kokubo, T; Kawashita, M; Nakamura, T

    2007-06-01

    Polyethylene (PE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH), and poly(epsilon-caprolactam) (Nylon 6) were successfully modified with a thin crystalline titanium oxide layer on their surfaces by a simple dipping into a titanium alkoxide solution and a subsequent soak in hot HCl solution, without the aid of a silane-coupling agent. The surface modified polymers formed a bone-like apatite layer in a simulated body fluid (SBF) within a period of 2 days. PE, PET, and Nylon 6 formed an apatite layer faster and had a higher adhesive strength to the apatite. Three-dimensional fabrics with open spaces in various sizes containing such surface modified polymer fibers are expected to be useful as bone substitutes, since they may be able to form apatite on their constituent fibers in the living body, and thus, integrate with living bone. PMID:17277978

  19. Orbital dependent Rashba splitting and electron-phonon coupling of 2D Bi phase on Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiani, Pierluigi; Lisi, Simone; Betti, Maria Grazia; Ibrahimi, Amina Taleb; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Chiodo, Letizia

    2013-11-14

    A monolayer of bismuth deposited on the Cu(100) surface forms a highly ordered c(2×2) reconstructed phase. The low energy single particle excitations of the c(2×2) Bi/Cu(100) present Bi-induced states with a parabolic dispersion in the energy region close to the Fermi level, as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic state dispersion, the charge density localization, and the spin-orbit coupling have been investigated combining photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, unraveling a two-dimensional Bi phase with charge density well localized at the interface. The Bi-induced states present a Rashba splitting, when the charge density is strongly localized in the Bi plane. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the spectral density close to the Fermi level has been evaluated. Dispersive electronic states offer a large number of decay channels for transitions coupled to phonons and the strength of the electron-phonon coupling for the Bi/Cu(100) system is shown to be stronger than for Bi surfaces and to depend on the electronic state symmetry and localization.

  20. Photodissociation of ozone in the Hartley band: Potential energy surfaces, nonadiabatic couplings, and singlet/triplet branching ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinke, R.; McBane, G. C.

    2010-01-01

    The lowest five A1' states of ozone, involved in the photodissociation with UV light, are analyzed on the basis of multireference configuration interaction electronic structure calculations with emphasis on the various avoided crossings in different regions of coordinate space. Global diabatic potential energy surfaces are constructed for the lowest four states termed X, A, B, and R. In addition, the off-diagonal potentials that couple the initially excited state B with states R and A are constructed to reflect results from additional electronic structure calculations, including the calculation of nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The A/X and A/R couplings are also considered, although in a less ambitious manner. The photodissociation dynamics are studied by means of trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations with the branching ratio between the singlet, O(D1)+O2(Δ1g), and triplet, O(P3)+O2(Σ3g-), channels being the main focus. The semiclassical branching ratio agrees well with quantum mechanical results except for wavelengths close to the threshold of the singlet channel. The calculated O(D1) quantum yield is approximately 0.90-0.95 across the main part of the Hartley band, in good agreement with experimental data. TSH calculations including all four states show that transitions B→A are relatively unimportant and subsequent transitions A→X/R to the triplet channel are negligible.

  1. Codeine-binding RNA aptamers and rapid determination of their binding constants using a direct coupling surface plasmon resonance assay

    PubMed Central

    Win, Maung Nyan; Klein, Joshua S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2006-01-01

    RNA aptamers that bind the opium alkaloid codeine were generated using an iterative in vitro selection process. The binding properties of these aptamers, including equilibrium and kinetic rate constants, were determined through a rapid, high-throughput approach using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis to measure real-time binding. The approach involves direct coupling of the target small molecule onto a sensor chip without utilization of a carrier protein. Two highest binding aptamer sequences, FC5 and FC45 with Kd values of 2.50 and 4.00 μM, respectively, were extensively studied. Corresponding mini-aptamers for FC5 and FC45 were subsequently identified through the described direct coupling Biacore assays. These assays were also employed to confirm the proposed secondary structures of the mini-aptamers. Both aptamers exhibit high specificity to codeine over morphine, which differs from codeine by a methyl group. Finally, the direct coupling method was demonstrated to eliminate potential non-specific interactions that may be associated with indirect coupling methods in which protein linkers are commonly employed. Therefore, in addition to presenting the first RNA aptamers to a subclass of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid molecules, this work highlights a method for characterizing small molecule aptamers that is more robust, precise, rapid and high-throughput than other commonly employed techniques. PMID:17038331

  2. Bubbles trapped at the coupling surface of the treatment head significantly reduce acoustic energy delivered in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Beard, Spencer; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2006-05-01

    The coupling efficiency of a "dry head" electromagnetic lithotripter (Dornier Compact Delta) was studied in vitro. A fiber-optic probe hydrophone (FOPH-500) was positioned in a test tank filled with degassed water. The tank was coupled through a semi-transparent latex membrane to the water-filled cushion of the lithotripter head, so that bubbles (air pockets) trapped between the two coupling surfaces could be easily observed and photographed. When gel was applied to both the latex membrane and the water cushion, numerous bubbles (some several millimeters in diameter) could be seen at the coupling interface. Hydrophone measurements in the geometric focus of the lithotripter showed that the acoustic pressure could be two times lower when bubbles were present than when they were manually removed. In our in vitro design, trapped bubbles could be easily observed and therefore removed from the acoustic path. However, during patient treatment with a dry-head lithotripter one cannot see whether bubbles are trapped against the skin. This study provides a demonstration of the dramatic effect that trapped bubbles can have on the amount of acoustic energy actually delivered for treatment.

  3. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models.

    PubMed

    Holland, Marika M; Landrum, Laura

    2015-07-13

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  4. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Marika M.; Landrum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  5. Self-induced oscillation of free surface coupled with the axisymmetric jet and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji; Madarame, Haruki

    1996-08-01

    New self-induced free-surface oscillations were discovered, which were caused by the interaction between a jet, a free surface and a structure. A submerged upward round jet was injected into a cylindrical tank from an inlet nozzle at the bottom center. The jet impinged on a cylindrical rod (UIS) which was set just beneath the free surface of the tank. Then, the jet turned its direction along UIS and reached the free surface making a swell around UIS. Under a certain condition of jet velocity and UIS depth, several kinds of self-induced free surface oscillation were observed, which were roughly classified into two modes with their surface shapes. One had no diametric node and two nodal circles, (0,2), and the other had one node in each direction, (1,1). The (0,2) mode oscillation was divided into two types with their flow pattern. In the (0,2) mode with outward surface velocity, (0,2){sub OUT}, its oscillating frequency decreased with increasing jet velocity. The swell of the free surface characterized (0,2){sub OUT} mode oscillation which was different from the theoretical (0,2) mode sloshing. In the (0,2) mode with inward surface velocity, (0,2){sub IN}, its frequency was independent of jet velocity. Its growth mechanism was thought to be similar to that of self-induced sloshing in the previous study. The (1,1) mode oscillation was also divided into two types with the appearance of the swell around UIS. The (1,1) mode with swelling of the free surface, (1,1){sub {alpha}}, was found to be the same as Jet-Flutter in a cylindrical tank without UIS. This is important to evaluate performance of LMFBR.

  6. Enhanced chiral response from the Fabry–Perot cavity coupled meta-surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ze-Jian; Hu, De-Jiao; Gao, Fu-Hua; Hou, Yi-Dong

    2016-08-01

    The circular dichroism (CD) signal of a two-dimensional (2D) chiral meta-surface is usually weak, where the difference between the transmitted (or reflected) right and left circular polarization is barely small. We present a general method to enhance the reflective CD spectrum, by adding a layer of reflective film behind the meta-surface. The light passes through the chiral meta-surface and propagates towards the reflector, where it is reflected back and further interacts with the chiral meta-surface. The light is reflected back and forth between these two layers, forming a Fabry–Perot type resonance, which interacts with the localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR) mode and greatly enhances the CD signal of the light wave leaving the meta-surface. We numerically calculate the CD enhancing effect of an L-shaped chiral meta-surface on a gold film in the visible range. Compared with the single layer meta-surface, the L-shaped chiral meta-surface has a CD maximum that is dramatically increased to 1. The analysis of reflection efficiency reveals that our design can be used to realize a reflective circular polarizer. Corresponding mode analysis shows that the huge CD originates from the hybrid mode comprised of FP mode and LSPR. Our results provide a general approach to enhancing the CD signal of a chiral meta-surface and can be used in areas like biosensing, circular polarizer, integrated photonics, etc. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61377054).

  7. Effects of surface treatment with coupling agents of PVDF-HFP fibers on the improvement of the adhesion characteristics on PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, O. M.; See, S. J.; Kim, S. S.; Hwang, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Surface treatment of polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) fibers was conducted with coupling agents such as epoxy silane, amino silane, and titanate to improve the adhesion characteristics of PVDF-HFP fibers and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The adhesion strength was largest when 4 wt% amino silane was used for surface treatment, showing a 250% improvement compared to the untreated case. Surface roughening and shrinking of the PVDF-HFP fibers were observed after surface treatment, but no chemical bonding occurred between the PVDF-HFP fibers and the coupling agents. It was thus concluded that the improvement of the adhesion characteristics of the PVDF-HFP fibers and PDMS was caused by the physical bonding between them due to the surface treatment with coupling agents. In addition, for the surface roughening mechanism, amino silane infiltration into the PVDF-HFP fibers during the surface treatment, followed by extraction during the drying process, was suggested.

  8. Comparison of model land skin temperature with remotely sensed estimates and assessment of surface-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, I. F.; Boussetta, S.; Viterbo, P.; Balsamo, G.; Beljaars, A.; Sandu, I.

    2015-12-01

    The coupling between land surface and the atmosphere is a key feature in Earth System Modeling for exploiting the predictability of slowly evolving geophysical variables (e.g., soil moisture or vegetation state), and for correctly representing rapid variations within the diurnal cycle, particularly relevant in data assimilation applications. In this study, land surface temperature (LST) estimated from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) is used to assess the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) skin temperature, which can be interpreted as a radiative temperature of the model surface. It is shown that the ECMWF model tends to slightly overestimate skin temperature during nighttime and underestimate daytime values. Such underestimation of daily amplitudes is particularly pronounced in (semiarid) arid regions, suggesting a misrepresentation of surface energy fluxes in those areas. The LST estimated from MSG is used to evaluate the impact of changes in some of the ECMWF model surface parameters. The introduction of more realistic model vegetation is shown to have a positive but limited impact on skin temperature: long integration leads to an equilibrium state where changes in the latent heat flux and soil moisture availability compensate each other. Revised surface roughness lengths for heat and momentum, however, lead to overall positive impact on daytime skin temperature, mostly due to a reduction of sensible heat flux. This is particularly relevant in nonvegetated areas, unaffected by model vegetation. The reduction of skin conductivity, a parameter which controls the heat transfer to ground by diffusion, is shown to further improve the model skin temperature.

  9. On-Surface Cross Coupling Methods for the Construction of Modified Electrode Assemblies with Tailored Morphologies †

    PubMed Central

    Gietter, Amber A. S.; Pupillo, Rachel C.; Yap, Glenn P. A.; Beebe, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the molecular topology of electrode–catalyst interfaces is a critical factor in engineering devices with specific electron transport kinetics and catalytic efficiencies. As such, the development of rational methods for the modular construction of tailorable electrode surfaces with robust molecular wires (MWs) exhibiting well-defined molecular topologies, conductivities and morphologies is critical to the evolution and implementation of electrochemical arrays for sensing and catalysis. In response to this need, we have established modular on-surface Sonogashira and Glaser cross-coupling processes to synthetically install arrays of ferrocene-capped MWs onto electrochemically functionalized surfaces. These methods are of comparable convenience and efficiency to more commonly employed Huisgen methods. Furthermore, unlike the Huisgen reaction, this new surface functionalization chemistry generates modified electrodes that do not contain unwanted ancillary metal binding sites, while allowing the bridge between the ferrocenyl moiety and electrode surface to be synthetically tailored. Electrochemical and surface analytical characterization of these platforms demonstrate that the linker topology and connectivity influences the ferrocene redox potential and the kinetics of charge transport at the interface. PMID:25520772

  10. Coupling Light from a High-Q Microsphere Resonator Using a UV-induced Surface Grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilchenko, V. S.; Starodubov, D. S.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Maleki, L.; Feinberg, J.

    2000-01-01

    High-Q microspheres with whispering-gallery modes have very narrow resonances that can be used for fiber-optic filters, ultra-compact narrow-linewidth lasers and optical/microwave oscillators. Whispering-gallery modes were previously excited in microspheres using evanescent optical fields. The necessary phase synchronism was obtained by adjusting the incident angle of input light beam (prism coupler) or adjustment of the waveguide propagation constant (fiber taper coupler). For many applications, however, bulky near-field couplers are undesirable. They compromise the symmetry and generate stray fields. Also, the control of coupling is crucial for the performance of microsphere resonators: in analogy with radio frequency circuits, the loading Q-factor should be less than the intrinsic Q-factor, Q(sub L) less than or equal to Q(sub O). Ideally one should combine a stable coupling element and a resonator into a single microsphere component.

  11. Electro-Focusing Liquid Extractive Surface Analysis (EF-LESA) Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the chemical composition of surfaces by liquid sampling devices interfaced to mass spectrometry is attractive as the sample stream can be continuously monitored at good sensitivity and selectivity. A sampling probe has been constructed that takes discrete liquid samples (typically <100 nL) of a surface. It incorporates an electrostatic lens system, comprising three electrodes, to which static and pulsed voltages are applied to form a conical “liquid tip”, employed to dissolve analytes at a surface. A prototype system demonstrates spatial resolution of 0.093 mm2. Time of contact between the liquid tip and the surface is controlled to standardize extraction. Calibration graphs of different analyte concentrations on a stainless surface have been measured, together with the probe’s reproducibility, carryover, and recovery. A leucine enkephalin-coated surface demonstrated good linearity (R2 = 0.9936), with a recovery of 90% and a limit of detection of 38 fmol per single spot sampled. The probe is compact and can be fitted into automated sample analysis equipment having potential for rapid analysis of surfaces at a good spatial resolution. PMID:24597530

  12. Sensitivity enhancement of a grating-based surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) biosensor chip using gold thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Jong Seol; Guignon, Ernest F.; Lynes, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to enhance the sensitivity of a grating-based surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) sensor by increasing the thickness of the metal film used in this system. The calculated optical properties of grating-based SPR spectra were significantly affected by both grating depth and by gold thickness. Higher angular sensitivity could be achieved at short wavelengths and under in situ measurement (analysis under aqueous condition). We confirmed the predicated enhancements of SPCE response using Alexa Fluor 647-labeled anti-mouse IgG immobilized on the SPCE sensor chips. Grating-coupled SPCE sensor chips can be used as a useful tool for high contents analysis of chemical and biomolecular interactions.

  13. 29 GHz directly modulated 980 nm vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers with bow-tie shape transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    A concept for the bandwidth enhancement of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) using a transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is proposed, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. A bow-tie shaped oxide aperture forms the transverse-coupled cavity resulting in optical feedback to boost the modulation speed. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs is 9-10 GHz, the 3 dB-bandwidth of the TCC VCSEL is increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. The maximum bandwidth is currently limited by the photo-detector used in the experiment. Clear 36 Gbps eye opening was attained with an extinction ratio of 4 dB.

  14. Quantitative Plasmon Mode and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Analyses of Strongly Coupled Plasmonic Nanotrimers with Diverse Geometries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haemi; Kim, Gyeong-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Nam Hoon; Nam, Jwa-Min; Suh, Yung Doug

    2015-07-01

    Here, we quantitatively monitored and analyzed the spectral redistributions of the coupled plasmonic modes of trimeric Au nanostructures with two ∼1 nm interparticle gaps and single-dye-labeled DNA in each gap as a function of varying trimer symmetries. Our precise Mie scattering measurement with the laser-scanning-assisted dark-field microscopy allows for individual visualization of the orientations of the radiation fields of the coupled plasmon modes of the trimers and analyzing the magnitude and direction of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals from the individual plasmonic trimers. We found that the geometric transition from acute-angled trimer to linear trimer induces the red shift of the longitudinally polarized mode and the blue shift of the axially polarized mode. The finite element method (FEM) calculation results show the distinct "on" and "off" of the plasmonic modes at the two gaps of the trimer. Importantly, the single-molecule-level systematic correlation studies among the near-field, far-field, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering reveal that the SERS signals from the trimers are determined by the largely excited coupled plasmon between the two competing plasmon modes, longitudinal and axial modes. Further, the FEM calculation revealed that even 0.5 nm or smaller discrepancy in the sizes of two gaps of the linear trimer led to >10-fold difference in the SERS signal. Granted that two gap sizes are not likely to be completely the same in actual experiments, one of two gaps plays a more significant role in generating the SERS signal. Overall, this work provides the knowledge and handles for the understanding and systematic control of the magnitude and polarization direction of the both plasmonic response and SERS signal from trimeric nanostructures and sets up the platform for the optical properties and the applications of plasmonically coupled trimers and higher multimeric nanostructures. PMID:26075353

  15. Implementation and use of direct-flow connections in a coupled ground-water and surface-water model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's MODFLOW finite-difference ground-water flow model has been coupled with three surface-water packages - the MODBRANCH, River, and Stream packages - to simulate surface water and its interaction with ground water. Prior to the development of the coupling packages, the only interaction between these modeling packages was that leakage values could be passed between MODFLOW and the three surface-water packages. To facilitate wider and more flexible uses of the models, a computer program was developed and added to MODFLOW to allow direct flows or stages to be passed between any of the packages and MODFLOW. The flows or stages calculated in one package can be set as boundary discharges or stages to be used in another package. Several modeling packages can be used in the same simulation depending upon the level of sophistication needed in the various reaches being modeled. This computer program is especially useful when any of the River, Stream, or MODBRANCH packages are used to model a river flowing directly into or out of wetlands in direct connection with the aquifer and represented in the model as an aquifer block. A field case study is shown to illustrate an application.

  16. Surface plasmon coupled metal enhanced spectral and charge transport properties of poly(3,3'''-dialkylquarterthiophene) Langmuir Schaefer films.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rajiv K; Yadav, Swatantra K; Upadhyay, Chandan; Prakash, Rajiv; Mishra, Hirdyesh

    2015-04-14

    The coupling of organic molecule excitons with metal nano-structure surface plasmons can improve the performance of optoelectronic devices. This paper presents the effect of localized silver metal surface plasmons on spectral as well as charge transport properties of ordered molecular Langmuir Schaefer (LS) films of a fluorescent conducting multifunctional organic polymer: poly (3,3'''-dialkylquarterthiophene) [PQT-12]. The stability and thickness of the PQT-12 LS film were studied by the pressure vs. area isotherm curve. Atomic force microscopy images indicate the formation of a smooth ordered polymer thin LS film of PQT-12 over silver nanostructure island films [SNIF] (∼40 to 50 nm in size). Raman, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral measurements of the PQT-12 LS film, near SNIF i.e. the near field, show a plasmon coupled enhancement of ∼13 fold in the intensity of Raman bands along with a two-fold enhancement in the absorption band (531 nm) and a six-fold enhancement in the fluorescence band (665 nm) coupled with a decrease in fluorescence decay time with improved photostability as compared to an identical control sample containing no SNIF i.e. the far field condition. These results indicate the formation of a plasmon coupled unified fluorophore system due to adsorption of the PQT-12 LS film over SNIF. The effect of plasmonic coupling is also studied by applying an electric field in sandwiched structures of Al/PQT-12 LS/SNIF/ITO with respect to Al/PQT-12 LS/ITO. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement in the current density (J-V plot) of the PQT-12 LS film is observed in the presence of SNIF, which further increases, on illuminating the film by green laser light [532 nm], while the fluorescence intensity and decay time decrease. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of SNIF also show a red shift in 3d3/2 and 3d5/2 transitions of silver in the PQT-12 coated LS film, which indicates partial charge transfer from the PQT-12 polymer

  17. Understanding the coupled surface energy flux-valley wind system using observations in an alpine valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Mage, R.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Buoyancy-driven diurnal valley winds depend on relative partitioning of incoming solar radiation into the sensible and latent heat fluxes. Evaporation and transpiration at the surface contribute to the latent heat flux, while heating of the air near the surface results from the sensible heat flux. Thus if more moisture is available at the surface, (e.g. as soil moisture or dew) then more energy will be partitioned into the latent heat flux, and less will be available for the sensible heat flux. Presented here is an analysis of observations from surface weather stations placed throughout the La Fouly catchment (~20 km^2) in southern Switzerland during the summers of 2009 and 2010. The stations were equipped with sensors to measure atmospheric and land surface variables including: incoming solar radiation, 2 m air temperature, skin temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, precipitation, soil moisture, and soil temperature. Scaling analysis is used to show how the balance between sensible and latent heat fluxes influences the buoyancy-driven valley winds. A preliminary analysis indicates that increased surface soil moisture tends to decrease the strength of slope winds both during the day and at night, while decreased soil moisture has the opposite effect. While this type of relation has been previously investigated through numerical simulations of valley or slope flows, it has not (to the authors' knowledge), been previously observed in the field.

  18. All-Weather Sounding of Moisture and Temperature From Microwave Sensors Using a Coupled Surface/Atmosphere Inversion Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukabara, S. A.; Garrett, K.

    2014-12-01

    A one-dimensional variational retrieval system has been developed, capable of producing temperature and water vapor profiles in clear, cloudy and precipitating conditions. The algorithm, known as the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS), is currently running operationally at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS), and is applied to a variety of data from the AMSU-A/MHS sensors on board the NOAA-18, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A/B polar satellite platforms, as well as SSMI/S on board both DMSP F-16 and F18, and from the NPP ATMS sensor. MiRS inverts microwave brightness temperatures into atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, along with hydrometeors and surface parameters, simultaneously. This atmosphere/surface coupled inversion allows for more accurate retrievals in the lower tropospheric layers by accounting for the surface emissivity impact on the measurements. It also allows the inversion of the soundings in all-weather conditions thanks to the incorporation of the hydrometeors parameters in the inverted state vector as well as to the inclusion of the emissivity in the same state vector, which is accounted for dynamically for the highly variable surface conditions found under precipitating atmospheres. The inversion is constrained in precipitating conditions by the inclusion of covariances for hydrometeors, to take advantage of the natural correlations that exist between temperature and water vapor with liquid and ice cloud along with rain water. In this study, we present a full assessment of temperature and water vapor retrieval performances in all-weather conditions and over all surface types (ocean, sea-ice, land, and snow) using matchups with radiosonde as well as Numerical Weather Prediction and other satellite retrieval algorithms as references. An emphasis is placed on retrievals in cloudy and precipitating atmospheres, including extreme weather events

  19. Large-eddy simulation of coupled turbulence, free surface, and sand wave evolution in an open channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosronejad, A.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2013-12-01

    We develop and validate a coupled 3D numerical model for carrying out three-phase large-eddy simulations of turbulence, free-surface, and sand waves-bed morphodynamics under live bed conditions. We employ the Fluid-Structure Interaction Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (FSI-CURVIB) method of Khosronejad et al. (Adv. in Water Res., 2011). The LES is implemented in the context of the CURVIB method using wall modeling (Kang and Sotiropoulos, Adv. in Water Res., 2011). Free-surface motion is simulated by coupling the CURVIB method with a two-phase level set approach as in Kang and Sotiropoulos (Adv. in Water Res., 2012). The mobile channel bed is discretized with an unstructured triangular grid and treated as the sharp-interface immersed boundary embedded in a background curvilinear mesh. Transport of bed load and suspended load sediments are combined in the non-equilibrium form of the Exner-Poyla for the bed surface elevation, which evolves due to the spatio-temporally varying bed shear stress field induced by the turbulent flow. Simulations are carried out for the rectangular flume experiments of Venditti et al. (2005). It is shown that the model can accurately capture sand-wave initiation, growth, and migration processes observed in the experiment. The simulated bed-forms are found to have amplitude and wave length scales of ~5 cm and ~30 cm, respectively. The effects of free-surface on bed-form dynamics is also quantified by comparing the three-phase simulation results with two-phase simulations using a fixed rigid-lid as the water surface.

  20. Selective excitation of coupled CO vibrations on a dissipative Cu(100) surface by shaped infrared laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Tremblay, Jean Christophe; Beyvers, Stephanie; Saalfrank, Peter

    2008-05-21

    In a previous paper [Beyvers et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 234706 (2006)], the possibility to mode and state selectively excite various vibrational modes of a CO molecule adsorbed on a dissipative Cu(100) surface by shaped IR pulses was examined. Reduced-dimensionality models with stretching-only coordinates were employed to do so. This model is now extended with the goal to include rotational modes. First, we present an analysis of the bound states of the adsorbed CO molecule in full dimension; i.e., six-dimensional eigenstates are obtained by diagonalizing the six-dimensional Hamiltonian containing the semiempirical potential of Tully et al. [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 11, 1914 (1993)]. This is achieved by using a contracted iterative eigensolver based on the coupled two-term Lanczos algorithm with full reorthogonalization. Reduced-dimension subsystem eigenvectors are also computed and then used to study the selective excitation of the molecule in the presence of dissipation within the density matrix formalism for open systems. In the density matrix propagations, up to four degrees of freedom were included, namely, r (the C-O distance), Z (the molecule-surface distance), and {phi} and {theta} (the azimuthal and polar angles of the molecular axis with respect to the surface). Short, intense laser pulses are rationally engineered and further refined with optimal control theory, again with the goal for mode and state selective excitation. Also, IR-laser induced desorption is studied. For the calculations, the previous two-mode (r,Z) dipole surface is extended to include the angular dependence and the model for the coupling of the molecule to the surface electronic degrees of freedom is refined.

  1. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  2. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW.

  3. Control of grating-coupled ultrafast surface plasmon pulse and its nonlinear emission by shaping femtosecond laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, Kazunori; Masaki, Yuta; Kusaba, Miyuki; Hirosawa, Kenichi; Kannari, Fumihiko

    2015-09-01

    Spatiotemporal nanofocusing of ultrafast surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) coupled on a metal Au tapered tip with a curvature radius of a few tens of nanometers is deterministically controlled based on the measured plasmon response function. We control the SPP pulse shape and the second harmonic generation at the apex of the Au tapered tip by shaping the excitation femtosecond laser pulses based on the response function. We also adapted a similar control scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and achieved selective CARS excitation of a single Raman mode of carbon nanotubes with only a single excitation laser pulse at the apex of the tip.

  4. A coupled surface-water and ground-water flow model (MODBRANCH) for simulation of stream-aquifer interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water flow models traditionally have been developed separately, with interaction between subsurface flow and streamflow either not simulated at all or accounted for by simple formulations. In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well-connected ground-water and surface-water systems, stream-aquifer interaction should be simulated using deterministic responses of both systems coupled at the stream-aquifer interface. Accordingly, a new coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH; the interfacing code is referred to as MODBRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference ground-water model, and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate unsteady flow in open- channel networks. MODFLOW was originally written with the River package, which calculates leakage between the aquifer and stream, assuming that the stream's stage remains constant during one model stress period. A simple streamflow routing model has been added to MODFLOW, but is limited to steady flow in rectangular, prismatic channels. To overcome these limitations, the BRANCH model, which simulates unsteady, nonuniform flow by solving the St. Venant equations, was restructured and incorporated into MODFLOW. Terms that describe leakage between stream and aquifer as a function of streambed conductance and differences in aquifer and stream stage were added to the continuity equation in BRANCH. Thus, leakage between the aquifer and stream can be calculated separately in each model, or leakages calculated in BRANCH can be used in MODFLOW. Total mass in the coupled models is accounted for and conserved. The BRANCH model calculates new stream stages for each time interval in a transient simulation based on upstream boundary conditions, stream properties, and initial estimates of aquifer heads. Next, aquifer heads are calculated in MODFLOW based on stream

  5. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  6. Asymmetric coupling and dispersion of surface-plasmon-polariton waves on a periodically patterned anisotropic metal film

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Jhuma; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-07

    The morphology of a columnar thin film (CTF) of silver renders it an effectively biaxially anisotropic continuum. CTFs of silver deposited on one-dimensional gratings of photoresist showed strong blazing action and asymmetrically coupled optical radiation to surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves propagating only along one direction supported by either the CTF/photoresist or the CTF/air interfaces. Homogenization of the CTFs using the Bruggeman formalism revealed them to display hyperbolic dispersion, and the dispersion of SPP waves was adequately described thereby.

  7. Sub-gigahertz beam switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with transverse coupled cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahama, M.; Gu, X.; Sakaguchi, T.; Matsutani, A.; Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A.; Koyama, F.

    2015-08-17

    We report a high-speed electrical beam switching of vertical cavity surface emitting laser with a transverse coupled cavity. A high speed (sub-gigahertz) and large deflection angle (>30°) beam switching is demonstrated by employing the transverse mode switching. The angular switching speed of 900 MHz is achieved with narrow beam divergence of below 4° and extinction ratio of 8 dB. We also measured the near- and far-field patterns to clarify the origin of the beam switching. We present a simple one-dimensional Bragg reflector waveguide model, which well predicts the beam switching characteristic.

  8. Sub-gigahertz beam switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahama, M.; Gu, X.; Sakaguchi, T.; Matsutani, A.; Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A.; Koyama, F.

    2015-08-01

    We report a high-speed electrical beam switching of vertical cavity surface emitting laser with a transverse coupled cavity. A high speed (sub-gigahertz) and large deflection angle (>30°) beam switching is demonstrated by employing the transverse mode switching. The angular switching speed of 900 MHz is achieved with narrow beam divergence of below 4° and extinction ratio of 8 dB. We also measured the near- and far-field patterns to clarify the origin of the beam switching. We present a simple one-dimensional Bragg reflector waveguide model, which well predicts the beam switching characteristic.

  9. Surface-catalyzed C-C covalent coupling strategies toward the synthesis of low-dimensional carbon-based nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qitang; Gottfried, J Michael; Zhu, Junfa

    2015-08-18

    Carbon-based nanostructures have attracted tremendous interest because of their versatile and tunable properties, which depend on the bonding type of the constituting carbon atoms. Graphene, as the most prominent representative of the π-conjugated carbon-based materials, consists entirely of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms and exhibits a zero band gap. Recently, countless efforts were made to open and tune the band gap of graphene for its applications in semiconductor devices. One promising method is periodic perforation, resulting in a graphene nanomesh (GNM), which opens the band gap while maintaining the exceptional transport properties. However, the typically employed lithographic approach for graphene perforation is difficult to control at the atomic level. The complementary bottom-up method using surface-assisted carbon-carbon (C-C) covalent coupling between organic molecules has opened up new possibilities for atomically precise fabrication of conjugated nanostructures like GNM and graphene nanoribbons (GNR), although with limited maturity. A general drawback of the bottom-up approach is that the desired structure usually does not represent the global thermodynamic minimum. It is therefore impossible to improve the long-range order by postannealing, because once the C-C bond formation becomes reversible, graphene as the thermodynamically most stable structure will be formed. This means that only carefully chosen precursors and reaction conditions can lead to the desired (non-graphene) material. One of the most popular and frequently used organic reactions for on-surface C-C coupling is the Ullmann reaction of aromatic halides. While experimentally simple to perform, the irreversibility of the C-C bond formation makes it a challenge to obtain long-range ordered nanostructures. With no postreaction structural improvement possible, the assembly process must be optimized to result in defect-free nanostructures during the initial reaction, requiring complete

  10. An improved thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling using a surface sampling probe electrospray ion trap system

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2004-01-01

    A combined surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used for the direct read out of unmodified reversed-phase C18 thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The operation of the surface sampling electrospray ionization interface in positive and negative ionization modes was demonstrated through the direct analysis of TLC plates on which a commercial test mix comprised of four dye compounds viz., rhodamine B, fluorescein, naphthol blue black, and fast green FCF, and an extract of the caffeine-containing plant Ilex vomitoria, were spotted and developed. Acquisition of full-scan mass spectra and automated collection of MS/MS product ion spectra while scanning a development lane along the surface of a TLC plate demonstrated the advantages of using an ion trap in this combination. Details of the sampling system, benefits of analyzing a developed lane in both positive ion and negative ion modes, levels of detection while surface scanning, surface scan speed effects, and the utility of three-dimensional data display, are also discussed.

  11. Coupled modes of rainfall over China and the pacific sea surface temperature in boreal summertime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun; Ma, Hao

    2011-09-01

    In addition, the possible atmospheric teleconnections of the coupled rainfall and SST modes were discussed. For the ENSO-NC mode, anomalous low-pressure and high-pressure over the Asian continent induces moisture divergence over North China and reduces summer rainfall there. For the WTP-YRV mode, East Asia-Pacific teleconnection induces moisture convergence over the Yangtze River valley and enhances the summer rainfall there. The TPMM SST and the summer rainfall anomalies over the YRVL are linked by a circumglobal, wave-train-like, atmospheric teleconnection.

  12. How important is mode-coupling in global surface wave tomography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikesell, Dylan; Nolet, Guust; Voronin, Sergey; Ritsema, Jeroen; Van Heijst, Hendrik-Jan

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the influence of mode coupling for fundamental mode Rayleigh waves with periods between 64 and 174s, we analysed 3,505,902 phase measurements obtained along minor arc trajectories as well as 2,163,474 phases along major arcs. This is a selection of five frequency bands from the data set of Van Heijst and Woodhouse, extended with more recent earthquakes, that served to define upper mantle S velocity in model S40RTS. Since accurate estimation of the misfits (as represented by χ2) is essential, we used the method of Voronin et al. (GJI 199:276, 2014) to obtain objective estimates of the standard errors in this data set. We adapted Voronin's method slightly to avoid that systematic errors along clusters of raypaths can be accommodated by source corrections. This was done by simultaneously analysing multiple clusters of raypaths originating from the same group of earthquakes but traveling in different directions. For the minor arc data, phase errors at the one sigma level range from 0.26 rad at a period of 174s to 0.89 rad at 64s. For the major arcs, these errors are roughly twice as high (0.40 and 2.09 rad, respectively). In the subsequent inversion we removed any outliers that could not be fitted at the 3 sigma level in an almost undamped inversion. Using these error estimates and the theory of finite-frequency tomography to include the effects of scattering, we solved for models with χ2 = N (the number of data) both including and excluding the effect of mode coupling between Love and Rayleigh waves. We shall present some dramatic differences between the two models, notably near ocean-continent boundaries (e.g. California) where mode conversions are likely to be largest. But a sharpening of other features, such as cratons and high-velocity blobs in the oceanic domain, is also observed when mode coupling is taken into account. An investigation of the influence of coupling on azimuthal anisotropy is still under way at the time of writing of this

  13. Surface modification of apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic by synthetic coupling agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Qin; Zhou, Da-Li; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Jia-Bei

    2014-06-01

    In this study, lysine was introduced into the surface of apatite—wollastonite glass ceramic (AW-GC) to improve its cytocompatibility by two steps reaction procedure. Firstly, lysine connected to N-β-(aminoethyl)-γ-aminopropyl trimethoxy silane (A-1120) by covalent binding of amide group. Secondly, the lysine-functionalized A-1120 was deposited on the surface of AW-GC through a silanization reaction involving a covalent attachment. FTIR spectra indicated that lysine had been immobilized onto the surface of AW-GC successfully. Bioactivity of the surface modified AW-GC was investigated by simulated body fluid (SBF), and the in vitro cytocompatibility was evaluated by coculturing with human osteosarcoma cell MG63. The results showed that the process of hydroxyapatite layer formed on the modified material was similar to AW-GC while the mode of hydroxyapatite deposition was changed. The growth of MG63 cells showed that modifying the AW-GC surface with lysine enhances the cell adhesion and proliferation.

  14. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave–current coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave–current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave–current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave–current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave–wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  15. Absorption-induced scattering and surface plasmon out-coupling from absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhoff, Christopher E.; O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between absorbers and plasmonic metasurfaces can give rise to unique optical properties not present for either of the individual materials and can influence the performance of a host of optical sensing and thin-film optoelectronic applications. Here we identify three distinct mode types of absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces: localized and propagating surface plasmons and a previously unidentified optical mode type called absorption-induced scattering. The extinction of the latter mode type can be tuned by controlling the morphology of the absorber coating and the spectral overlap of the absorber with the plasmonic modes. Furthermore, we show that surface plasmons are backscattered when the crystallinity of the absorber is low but are absorbed for more crystalline absorber coatings. This work furthers our understanding of light–matter interactions between absorbers and surface plasmons to enable practical optoelectronic applications of metasurfaces. PMID:26271900

  16. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermalmore » exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.« less

  17. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  18. Direct coupling of photonic modes and surface plasmon polaritons observed in 2-photon PEEM.

    PubMed

    Word, Robert C; Fitzgerald, Joseph P S; Könenkamp, Rolf

    2013-12-16

    We report the direct microscopic observation of optical energy transfer from guided photonic modes in an indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film to surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) at the surfaces of a single crystalline gold platelet. The photonic and SPP modes appear as an interference pattern in the photoelectron emission yield across the surface of the specimen. We explore the momentum match between the photonic and SPP modes in terms of simple waveguide theory and the three-layer slab model for bound SPP modes of thin metal films. We show that because the gold is thin (30-40 nm), two SPP modes exist and that momentum of the spatially confined asymmetric field mode coincides with the dominant mode of the ITO waveguide. The results demonstrate that photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) can be an important tool for the observation of photonic to SPP interactions in the study of integrated photonic circuits. PMID:24514628

  19. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-11-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light-matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ~60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light-matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation.

  20. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light–matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ∼60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light–matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation. PMID:26584781

  1. Use of rigorous vector coupled-wave theory for designing and tolerancing surface-relief diffractive components for magneto-optical heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggans, Charles W.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1991-01-01

    A rigorous coupled wave model is presented, experimentally validated, and used for tolerancing surface relief diffractive elements. Applications of the model in the design and tolerancing of components for magneto optical (M-O) data storage heads are investigated.

  2. Simulation and inversion of borehole temperature profiles in surrogate climates: Spatial distribution and surface coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Rouco, J. F.; Beltrami, H.; Zorita, E.; von Storch, H.

    2006-01-01

    A heat-conduction forward model driven by ground surface temperature from three 1000-year climate simulations with the state-of-the-art ECHO-g model has been used to simulate underground temperature perturbation profiles. An inversion approach has been applied to reconstruct ground surface temperature histories from the simulated profiles and to compare them with the climate model temperatures. Results support the skill of borehole inversion methods to retrieve long-term temperature trends, and the robustness of using the present-day borehole network for reconstructing SAT variations.

  3. Role of nonlocality and Landau damping in the dynamics of a quantum dot coupled to surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagov, A.; Larkin, I. A.; Croitoru, M. D.; Axt, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a quantum emitter (quantum dot) placed in the vicinity of a flat metal surface. The dynamics is induced by the coupling between the emitter and surface plasmon-polaritons. The plasmon-polariton modes are described within a continuous media model with a nonlocal Lindhard-type dielectric response of the metal. The analytic solution of the dynamical equations is obtained in the rotating wave approximation. The results demonstrate a considerable influence of the nonlocality of the electromagnetic response and the Landau damping in the metal. In particular, the relaxation dynamics is characterized by two distinct times that may differ by large amounts as a consequence of the nonlocality of the response. It is also shown that one of the contributions to the relaxation can have a power-law long-time asymptote, leading to notable changes in the dynamical pattern.

  4. A Sliding Mode Controller Using Nonlinear Sliding Surface Improved With Fuzzy Logic: Application to the Coupled Tanks System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boubakir, A.; Boudjema, F.; Boubakir, C.

    2008-06-01

    This paper proposes an approach of hybrid control that is based on the concept of combining fuzzy logic and the methodology of sliding mode control (SMC). In the present works, a first-order nonlinear sliding surface is presented, on which the developed control law is based. Mathematical proof for the stability and convergence of the system is presented. In order to reduce the chattering in sliding mode control, a fixed boundary layer around the switch surface is used. Within the boundary layer, since the fuzzy logic control is applied, the chattering phenomenon, which is inherent in a sliding mode control, is avoided by smoothing the switch signal. Outside the boundary, the sliding mode control is applied to driving the system states into the boundary layer. Experimental studies carried out on a coupled Tanks system indicate that the proposed fuzzy sliding mode control (FSMC) is a good candidate for control applications.

  5. Surface plasmon coupled metal enhanced spectral and charge transport properties of poly(3,3'''-dialkylquarterthiophene) Langmuir Schaefer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Rajiv K.; Yadav, Swatantra K.; Upadhyay, Chandan; Prakash, Rajiv; Mishra, Hirdyesh

    2015-03-01

    The coupling of organic molecule excitons with metal nano-structure surface plasmons can improve the performance of optoelectronic devices. This paper presents the effect of localized silver metal surface plasmons on spectral as well as charge transport properties of ordered molecular Langmuir Schaefer (LS) films of a fluorescent conducting multifunctional organic polymer: poly (3,3'''-dialkylquarterthiophene) [PQT-12]. The stability and thickness of the PQT-12 LS film were studied by the pressure vs. area isotherm curve. Atomic force microscopy images indicate the formation of a smooth ordered polymer thin LS film of PQT-12 over silver nanostructure island films [SNIF] (~40 to 50 nm in size). Raman, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral measurements of the PQT-12 LS film, near SNIF i.e. the near field, show a plasmon coupled enhancement of ~13 fold in the intensity of Raman bands along with a two-fold enhancement in the absorption band (531 nm) and a six-fold enhancement in the fluorescence band (665 nm) coupled with a decrease in fluorescence decay time with improved photostability as compared to an identical control sample containing no SNIF i.e. the far field condition. These results indicate the formation of a plasmon coupled unified fluorophore system due to adsorption of the PQT-12 LS film over SNIF. The effect of plasmonic coupling is also studied by applying an electric field in sandwiched structures of Al/PQT-12 LS/SNIF/ITO with respect to Al/PQT-12 LS/ITO. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement in the current density (J-V plot) of the PQT-12 LS film is observed in the presence of SNIF, which further increases, on illuminating the film by green laser light [532 nm], while the fluorescence intensity and decay time decrease. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of SNIF also show a red shift in 3d3/2 and 3d5/2 transitions of silver in the PQT-12 coated LS film, which indicates partial charge transfer from the PQT-12 polymer backbone

  6. Atomic-scale identification of Pd leaching in nanoparticle catalyzed C–C coupling: Effects of particle surface disorder

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briggs, Beverly D.; Bedford, Nicholas M.; Seifert, Soenke; Koerner, Hilmar; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Knecht, Marc R.

    2015-07-23

    C–C coupling reactions are of great importance in the synthesis of numerous organic compounds, where Pd nanoparticle catalyzed systems represent new materials to efficiently drive these reactions. Despite their pervasive utility, the catalytic mechanism of these particle-based reactions remains highly contested. Herein we present evidence of an atom leaching mechanism for Stille coupling under aqueous conditions using peptide-capped Pd nanoparticles. EXAFS analysis revealed Pd coordination changes in the nanoparticle consistent with Pd atom abstraction, where sizing analysis by SAXS confirmed particle size changes associated with a leaching process. It is likely that recently discovered highly disordered surface Pd atoms aremore » the favored catalytic active sites and are leached during oxidative addition, resulting in smaller particles. Thus, probing the mechanism of nanoparticle-driven C–C coupling reactions through structural analyses provides fundamental information concerning these active sites and their reactivity at the atomic-scale, which can be used to improve catalytic performance to meet important sustainability goals.« less

  7. Atomic-scale identification of Pd leaching in nanoparticle catalyzed C–C coupling: Effects of particle surface disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Beverly D.; Bedford, Nicholas M.; Seifert, Soenke; Koerner, Hilmar; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Knecht, Marc R.

    2015-07-23

    C–C coupling reactions are of great importance in the synthesis of numerous organic compounds, where Pd nanoparticle catalyzed systems represent new materials to efficiently drive these reactions. Despite their pervasive utility, the catalytic mechanism of these particle-based reactions remains highly contested. Herein we present evidence of an atom leaching mechanism for Stille coupling under aqueous conditions using peptide-capped Pd nanoparticles. EXAFS analysis revealed Pd coordination changes in the nanoparticle consistent with Pd atom abstraction, where sizing analysis by SAXS confirmed particle size changes associated with a leaching process. It is likely that recently discovered highly disordered surface Pd atoms are the favored catalytic active sites and are leached during oxidative addition, resulting in smaller particles. Thus, probing the mechanism of nanoparticle-driven C–C coupling reactions through structural analyses provides fundamental information concerning these active sites and their reactivity at the atomic-scale, which can be used to improve catalytic performance to meet important sustainability goals.

  8. The linkage between stratospheric water vapor and surface temperature in an observation-constrained coupled general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Read, William G.; Anderson, John

    2016-06-01

    We assess the interactions between stratospheric water vapor (SWV) and surface temperature during the past two decades using satellite observations and the Community Earth System Model (CESM). From 1992 to 2013, to first order, the observed SWV exhibited three distinct piece-wise trends: a steady increase from 1992 to 2000, an abrupt drop from 2000 to 2004, and a gradual recovery after 2004, while the global-mean surface temperature experienced a strong increase until 2000 and a warming hiatus after 2000. The atmosphere-only CESM shows that the seasonal variation of tropical-mean (30°S-30°N) SWV is anticorrelated with that of the tropical-mean sea surface temperature (SST), while the correlation between the tropical SWV and SST anomalies on the interannual time scale is rather weak. By nudging the modeled SWV to prescribed profiles in coupled atmosphere-slab ocean experiments, we investigate the impact of SWV variations on surface temperature change. We find that a uniform 1 ppmv (0.5 ppmv) SWV increase (decrease) leads to an equilibrium global mean surface warming (cooling) of 0.12 ± 0.05 °C (-0.07 ± 0.05 °C). Sensitivity experiments show that the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature to SWV perturbations over the extratropics is larger than that over the tropics. The observed sudden drop of SWV from 2000 to 2004 produces a global mean surface cooling of about -0.048 ± 0.041 °C, which suggests that a persistent change in SWV would make an imprint on long-term variations of global-mean surface temperature. A constant linear increase in SWV based on the satellite-observed rate of SWV change yields a global mean surface warming of 0.03 ± 0.01 °C/decade over a 50-year period, which accounts for about 19 % of the observed surface temperature increase prior to the warming hiatus. In the same experiment, trend analyses during different periods reveal a multi-year adjustment of surface temperature before the response to SWV forcing becomes

  9. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry as an alternative to cloud point extraction based methods for rapid quantification of silver ions and surface coated silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Linder, Sean W.

    2016-01-01

    Speciation and accurate quantification of ionic silver and metallic silver nanoparticles are critical to investigate silver toxicity and to determine the shelf-life of products that contain nano silver under various storage conditions. We developed a rapid method for quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The addition of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (tiopronin) to the background electrolyte was used to facilitate the chromatographic separation of ionic silver and maintain the oxidation state of silver. The obtained limits of detection were 0.05 μg kg−1 of silver nanoparticles and 0.03 μg kg−1 of ionic silver. Nanoparticles of varied sizes (10–110 nm) with different surface coating, including citrate acid, lipoic acid, polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were successfully analyzed. Particularly good recoveries (>93%) were obtained for both ionic silver and silver nanoparticle in the presence of excess amount of BSA. The method was further tested with six commercially available dietary supplements which varied in concentration and matrix components. The summed values of silver ions and silver nanoparticles correlated well with the total silver concentration determined by ICPMS after acid digestion. This method can serve as an alternative to cloud point extraction technique when the extraction efficiency for protein coated nanoparticles is low. PMID:26724893

  10. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry as an alternative to cloud point extraction based methods for rapid quantification of silver ions and surface coated silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K; Linder, Sean W

    2016-01-15

    Speciation and accurate quantification of ionic silver and metallic silver nanoparticles are critical to investigate silver toxicity and to determine the shelf-life of products that contain nano silver under various storage conditions. We developed a rapid method for quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The addition of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (tiopronin) to the background electrolyte was used to facilitate the chromatographic separation of ionic silver and maintain the oxidation state of silver. The obtained limits of detection were 0.05 μg kg(-1) of silver nanoparticles and 0.03 μg kg(-1) of ionic silver. Nanoparticles of varied sizes (10-110 nm) with different surface coating, including citrate acid, lipoic acid, polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were successfully analyzed. Particularly good recoveries (>93%) were obtained for both ionic silver and silver nanoparticle in the presence of excess amount of BSA. The method was further tested with six commercially available dietary supplements which varied in concentration and matrix components. The summed values of silver ions and silver nanoparticles correlated well with the total silver concentration determined by ICPMS after acid digestion. This method can serve as an alternative to cloud point extraction technique when the extraction efficiency for protein coated nanoparticles is low. PMID:26724893

  11. Coupling of surface temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the Palaeozoic era.

    PubMed

    Came, Rosemarie E; Eiler, John M; Veizer, Ján; Azmy, Karem; Brand, Uwe; Weidman, Christopher R

    2007-09-13

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations seem to have been several times modern levels during much of the Palaeozoic era (543-248 million years ago), but decreased during the Carboniferous period to concentrations similar to that of today. Given that carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas, it has been proposed that surface temperatures were significantly higher during the earlier portions of the Palaeozoic era. A reconstruction of tropical sea surface temperatures based on the delta18O of carbonate fossils indicates, however, that the magnitude of temperature variability throughout this period was small, suggesting that global climate may be independent of variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Here we present estimates of sea surface temperatures that were obtained from fossil brachiopod and mollusc shells using the 'carbonate clumped isotope' method-an approach that, unlike the delta18O method, does not require independent estimates of the isotopic composition of the Palaeozoic ocean. Our results indicate that tropical sea surface temperatures were significantly higher than today during the Early Silurian period (443-423 Myr ago), when carbon dioxide concentrations are thought to have been relatively high, and were broadly similar to today during the Late Carboniferous period (314-300 Myr ago), when carbon dioxide concentrations are thought to have been similar to the present-day value. Our results are consistent with the proposal that increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations drive or amplify increased global temperatures. PMID:17851520

  12. Coupled interactions between tungsten surfaces and transient high-heat-flux deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, S.; Uesugi, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental studies on the interactions between transient deuterium-plasma heat pulses and tungsten surfaces were carried out in terms of electrical, mechanical and thermal response in a compact plasma device AIT-PID (Aichi Institute of Technology-Plasma Irradiation Device). Firstly, electron-emission-induced surface-temperature increase is discussed in the surface-temperature range near tungsten's melting point, which is accomplished by controlling the sheath voltage and power transmission factor. Secondly, anomalous penetration of tungsten atomic efflux into the surrounding plasma was observed in addition to a normal layered population; it is discussed in terms of the effect of substantial tungsten influx into the deuterium plasma, which causes dissipation of plasma electron energy. Thirdly, a momentum input from pulsed plasma onto a tungsten target was observed visually. The force is estimated numerically by the accelerated ion flow to the target as well as the reaction of tungsten-vapour efflux. Finally, a discussion follows on the effects of the plasma heat pulses on the morphology of tungsten surface (originally a helium-induced ‘fuzzy’ nanostructure). A kind of bifurcated effect is obtained: melting and annealing. Open questions remain for all the phenomena observed, although sheath-voltage-dependent plasma-heat input may be a key parameter. Discussions on all these phenomena are provided by considering their implications to tokamak fusion devices.

  13. Coupled simulation of surface runoff and soil water flow using multi-objective parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhne, John Maximilian; Wöhling, Thomas; Pot, Valérie; Benoit, Pierre; Leguédois, Sophie; Le Bissonnais, Yves; Šimůnek, Jirka

    2011-06-01

    SummaryA comprehensive description of water flow in environmental and agricultural systems requires an account of both surface and subsurface pathways. We present a new model which combines a 1D overland flow model and the 2D subsurface flow HYDRUS-2D model, and uses the multi-objective global search method AMALGAM for inverse parameter estimation. Furthermore, we present data from bench-scale flow experiments which were conducted with two 5-m long replicate soil channels. While rainfall was applied, surface runoff was recorded at the downstream end of the soil channel, subsurface drainage waters were sampled at three positions equally spaced along the channels, and pressure heads were recorded at five depths. The experimental observations were used to evaluate the performance of our modeling system. The complexity of the modeling approach was increased in three steps. First, only runoff and total drainage were simulated, then drainage flows from individual compartments were additionally evaluated, and finally a surface crust and immobile soil water were also considered. The results showed that a good match between measured and observed surface runoff and total drainage does not guarantee accurate representation of the flow process. An inspection of the Pareto results of different multiobjective calibration runs revealed a significant trade-off between individual objectives, showing that no single solution existed to match spatial variability in the flow. In spite of the observed crust formation, its consideration in the more complex model structure did not significantly improve the fit between the model and measurements. Accounting for immobile water regions only slightly improved the fit for one of the two replicate soil channels. Discrepancies between relatively complex model simulations and seemingly simple soil channel experiments suggest the presence of additional unknowns, such as heterogeneity of the soil hydraulic properties. Nevertheless, with its

  14. Pattern Selection in Plants: Coupling Chemical Dynamics to Surface Growth in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, David M.; Harrison, Lionel G.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims A study is made by computation of the interplay between the pattern formation of growth catalysts on a plant surface and the expansion of the surface to generate organismal shape. Consideration is made of the localization of morphogenetically active regions, and the occurrence within them of symmetry-breaking processes such as branching from an initially dome-shaped tip or meristem. Representation of a changing and growing three-dimensional shape is necessary, as two-dimensional work cannot distinguish, for example, formation of an annulus from dichotomous branching. Methods For the formation of patterns of chemical concentrations, the Brusselator reaction-diffusion model is used, applied on a hemispherical shell and generating patterns that initiate as surface spherical harmonics. The initial shape is hemispherical, represented as a mesh of triangles. These are combined into finite elements, each made up of all the triangles surrounding each node. Chemical pattern is converted into shape change by moving nodes outwards according to the concentration of growth catalyst at each, to relieve misfits caused by area increase of the finite element. New triangles are added to restore the refinement of the mesh in rapidly growing regions. Key Results The postulated mechanism successfully generates: tip growth (or stalk extension by an apical meristem) to ten times original hemisphere height; tip flattening and resumption of apical advance; and dichotomous branching and higher-order branching to make whorled structures. Control of the branching plane in successive dichotomous branchings is tackled with partial success and clarification of the issues. Conclusions The representation of a growing plant surface in computations by an expanding mesh that has no artefacts constraining changes of shape and symmetry has been achieved. It is shown that one type of pattern-forming mechanism, Turing-type reaction-diffusion, acting within a surface to pattern a

  15. On-Demand Coupling of Electrically Generated Excitons with Surface Plasmons via Voltage-Controlled Emission Zone Position

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to confine and manipulate light below the diffraction limit is a major goal of future multifunctional optoelectronic/plasmonic systems. Here, we demonstrate the design and realization of a tunable and localized electrical source of excitons coupled to surface plasmons based on a polymer light-emitting field-effect transistor (LEFET). Gold nanorods that are integrated into the channel support localized surface plasmons and serve as nanoantennas for enhanced electroluminescence. By precise spatial control of the near-infrared emission zone in the LEFET via the applied voltages the near-field coupling between electrically generated excitons and the nanorods can be turned on or off as visualized by a change of electroluminescence intensity. Numerical calculations and spectroscopic measurements corroborate significant local electroluminescence enhancement due to the high local density of photonic states in the vicinity of the gold nanorods. Importantly, the integration of plasmonic nanostructures hardly influences the electrical performance of the LEFETs, thus, highlighting their mutual compatibility in novel active plasmonic devices. PMID:26878028

  16. RGD-functionalisation of PLLA nanofibers by surface coupling using plasma treatment: influence on stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paletta, Jürgen Rudolf Josef; Bockelmann, Sarah; Walz, Andreas; Theisen, Christina; Wendorff, Joachim Heinz; Greiner, Andreas; Fuchs-Winkelmann, Susanne; Schofer, Markus Dietmar

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to functionalize the surface of synthetic poly-(l-lactic) (PLLA) nanofibers with RGD peptide, in order to promote growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in vitro. The cRGD was coupled onto PLLA nanofibers using oxygen plasma combined with EDC/sulfo-NHS activation. Matrices were seeded with hMSC and cultivated over a period of 22 days under growth conditions and analyzed during the course of cultivation. The plasma activation of PLLA nanofibers resulted in a reduction of hydrophobicity as well as a formation of carboxyl groups on the surface of the fibers. Furthermore, maximum load, but not young's modulus was influenced by the treatment with oxygen plasma. When hMSC were cultured onto the cRGD functionalized scaffolds, cells showed no increased proliferation or cell density but an induction of genes associated with the osteoblast lineage. In brief, this study indicates that functional peptides of the extracellular matrix can be coupled onto PLLA nanofibers using plasma treatment in combination with EDC/sulfo-NHS treatment. These groups are accessible for the growing cell and mediate probably some osteoinductive properties of collagen nanofibers. PMID:19943087

  17. Scratching beneath the surface while coupling atmosphere, ocean and waves: Analysis of a dense water formation event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, Sandro; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Ricchi, Antonio; Sclavo, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Cold Air Outbreaks (CAOs) over shallow seas may lead to dense water formation episodes, enhancing water, heat, nutrient and sediment exchanges across the continental margin, with associated seabed reshaping. During winter 2012, a CAO episode characterised by exceptional intensity stroke the northern Adriatic Sea, one of the most effective cool engines driving the Mediterranean circulation, providing a paramount opportunity for an integrated investigation of dense shelf water dynamics. In the present study, we describe this event using a fully coupled modeling approach exploring the effects of mutual interactions among atmosphere, ocean currents and sea surface waves, usually not completely accounted for, in the resulting dense water formation. Whilst atmospheric fields appear to be marginally affected by coupled dynamics in the present case, implications for sea surface elevation and circulation are far from negligible. Measurements collected in the northern Adriatic Sea showed that a physically consistent description of energy exchanges between ocean and atmosphere provides an improved estimate of heat fluxes and of air and sea temperatures. In addition, the explicit inclusion of wave action within the modeling system further enhances the modulation of air-sea exchanges and the propagation of its effect along the water column, resulting in a different intensity of northern Adriatic gyres and in different water fluxes flowing through the formation basin. Through these main controls on the water volume involved in the densification process and on the intensity of momentum input and cooling, a coupled modeling strategy accounting for atmosphere-waves-currents interactions can turn out to be crucial for improving the quantification of thermohaline properties and energy content, newly formed dense water mass, and provide a better description of its migration pathways and rates of off-shelf descent.

  18. Calibrating a large-extent high-resolution coupled groundwater-land surface model using soil moisture and discharge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutanudjaja, E. H.; van Beek, L. P. H.; de Jong, S. M.; van Geer, F. C.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using remotely sensed soil moisture data and in situ discharge observations to calibrate a large-extent hydrological model. The model used is PCR-GLOBWB-MOD, which is a physically based and fully coupled groundwater-land surface model operating at a daily basis and having a resolution of 30 arc sec (about 1 km at the equator). As a test bed, we use the combined Rhine-Meuse basin (total area: about 200,000 km2), where there are 4250 point-scale observed groundwater head time series that are used to verify the model results. Calibration is performed by simulating 3045 model runs with varying parameter values affecting groundwater head dynamics. The simulation results of all runs are evaluated against the remotely sensed soil moisture time series of SWI (Soil Water Index) and field discharge data. The former is derived from European Remote Sensing scatterometers and provides estimates of the first meter profile soil moisture content at 30 arc min resolution (50 km at the equator). From the evaluation of these runs, we then introduce a stepwise calibration approach that considers stream discharge first, then soil moisture, and finally verify the resulting simulation to groundwater head observations. Our results indicate that the remotely sensed soil moisture data can be used for the calibration of upper soil hydraulic conductivities determining simulated groundwater recharge of the model. However, discharge data should be included to obtain full calibration of the coupled model, specifically to constrain aquifer transmissivities and runoff-infiltration partitioning processes. The stepwise approach introduced in this study, using both discharge and soil moisture data, can calibrate both discharge and soil moisture, as well as predicting groundwater head dynamics with acceptable accuracy. As our approach to parameterize and calibrate the model uses globally available data sets only, it opens up the possibility to set up large-extent coupled

  19. Incorporating 3-D Subsurface Hydrologic Processes within the Community Land Surface Model (CLM): Coupling PFLOTRAN and CLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Mills, R. T.; Hoffman, F. M.; Thornton, P. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Hammond, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown a positive soil moisture-rainfall feedback through observational data, as well as, modeling studies. Spatial variability of topography, soils, and vegetation play a significant role in determining the response of land surface states (soil moisture) and fluxes (runoff, evapotranspirtiaon); but their explicit accounting within Land Surface Models (LSMs) is computa- tionally expensive. Additionally, anthropogenic climate change is altering the hydrologic cycle at global and regional scales. Characterizing the sensitivity of groundwater recharge is critical for understanding the effects of climate change on water resources. In order to explicitly represent lateral redistribution of soil moisture and unified treatment of the unsaturated-saturated zone in the subsurface within the CLM, we propose coupling PFLOTRAN and CLM. PFLOTRAN is a parallel multiphase-multicomponent subsurface reactive flow and transport code for modeling subsurface processes and has been devel- oped under a DOE SciDAC-2 project. PFLOTRAN is written in Fortran 90 using a modular, object-oriented approach. PFLOTRAN utilizes fully implicit time-stepping and is built on top of the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc). The PFLOTRAN model is capable of simulating fluid flow through porous media with fluid phases of air, water, and supercritical CO2. PFLOTRAN has been successfully employed on up to 131,072 cores on Jaguar, the massively parallel Cray XT4/XT5 at ORNL, for problems composed of up to 2 billion degrees of freedom. In this work, we will present a strategy of coupling the two models, CLM and PFLOTRAN, along with a few preliminary results obtained from the coupled model.

  20. Vibration modes of a two-dimensional Wigner lattice coupled to ripplons on a liquid-helium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguiluz, A. G.; Maradudin, A. A.; Elliott, R. J.

    1981-07-01

    We present a theory of the vibration modes of a two-dimensional Wigner lattice coupled to ripplons on a liquid-helium surface based on the use of thermodynamic Green's functions. Starting from the phonon-ripplon Hamiltonian proposed by Fisher, Halperin, and Platzman, the effects of the electron-ripplon interaction (and hence the effects of the temperature and pressing electric field) on the frequencies of the coupled phonon-ripplon modes are obtained from the poles of the Green's function for the phonons of the Wigner lattice. The nature of these poles is determined by the phonon self-energy, which clearly displays the resonant coupling between the phonons and the ripplons. Our theory gives a first-principles derivation of the weights of the ripplon-induced resonances. We present approximate analytical results for the frequencies of the coupled modes. Our results are in qualitative agreement with the experiments of Grimes and Adams and the theory of Fisher et al. However, we do not find justification for the quantitative agreement with experiment that has been reported by Fisher et al. This discrepancy has to do with the fact that we show that the aforementioned weights are not given in terms of an effective Debye-Waller factor for the 2D Wigner lattice, but rather in terms of an exponential whose argument originates from the difference in electron displacement correlation functions given by .u-->(l1t1)q-->.u-->(l2t2)>-<(q-->.u-->)2>. This being the case, the normal modes of the phonon-ripplon Hamiltonian have frequencies whose values are somewhat smaller than the frequencies of the resonances measured by Grimes and Adams.

  1. The surface modification of TiN nano-particles using macromolecular coupling agents, and their resulting dispersibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Guojun; Qian, Jiasheng; Miao, Jibin; Yang, Bin; Xia, Ru; Chen, Peng

    2014-05-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) nano-particles were modified by the grafting of a random copolymerization functionalized macromolecular coupling agent (F-MCA) via a direct blending method. The hydroxyl groups on the surface of the nano-TiN particles interact with the silanol groups [SiOCH3] of the F-MCA to form an organic coating layer. The formation of covalent bonds [TiOSi] was verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. An X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the presence of the F-MCA inhibited the growth of the crystal plane but did not change the crystal structure of the TiN. Thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle measurement indicated that the F-MCA molecules were adsorbed or anchored to the surface of the nano-TiN particles, which hindered their aggregation. Pristine nano-TiN particles are poorly dispersed in ethyl acetate. Compared with the pristine TiN particles, the modified TiN particles show good dispersibility and form a stable colloidal dispersion in ethyl acetate. The surface hydrophobicity of the modified TiN increases, and the F-MCA molecules are anchored on the surface of the TiN particles. TiN particles modified by a F-MCA can be used in polymer blends, thermoplastic elastomers and polymer nanocomposites that have a better performance and longer life cycle.

  2. Coupled heat and vapor transport: The thermostat effect of a freely evaporating land surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Schepers, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Analytical solutions of the 2-D heat and vapor transport equations for a surface moisture jump are often based on a constant streamwise temperature (Tws) assumption over the wet vegetated surface. By analyzing 90 thermal infrared images taken over center-pivot irrigated areas in Nebraska, it has been demonstrated for the first time that such an assumption is realistic. Average temperature difference between the perimeter and core of the irrigated full or half circles stayed between -0.11 and 0.09°C (standard deviation of 0.25-0.41°C). It was further demonstrated that wet-bulb temperatures (a proxy of Tws) remain near constant during drying of the environment when net radiation and wind conditions stay largely unchanged, enabling estimation of Tws at any stage of drying, thus improving evaporation estimates of the Priestley-Taylor equation in arid and semiarid environments.

  3. Enhancing surface plasmon polariton propagation lengths via coupling to asymmetric waveguide structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2008-03-01

    We determine and analyze the properties of regenerated surface plasmon polaritons (R-SPPs) in an asymmetric waveguide structure [T.-W. Lee and S. K. Gray, Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 141105 (2005)]. Both finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations and frequency-domain modal analysis are employed. The FDTD results, which explicitly include excitation via attenuated total reflection, show an oscillatory dependence of the R-SPP propagation length L{sub x} as a function of core layer thickness d, with maxima corresponding to 30-fold propagation enhancements. For fixed incident light wavelength and angle, a variety of thicknesses can therefore be used to excite very long propagating SPPs. Modal analysis shows that the oscillations are due to tuning d through the opening of new transverse magnetic waveguide modes. In addition to increased propagation lengths, surface confinement is not significantly deteriorated and large intensity enhancements in the propagation region can also be achieved.

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Surface Sampling/Ionization Techniques for Direct Coupling of Planar Separations with Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2010-01-01

    Planar separations, which include thin layer chromatography and gel electrophoresis, are in widespread use as important and powerful tools for conducting separations of complex mixtures. To increase the utility of planar separations, new methods are needed that allow in-situ characterization of the individual components of the separated mixtures. A large number of atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques for use with mass spectrometry have emerged in the past several years, and several have been investigated as a means for mass spectrometric read-out of planar separations. In this article, we review the atmospheric pressure surface sampling and ionization techniques that have been used for the read-out of planar separation media. For each technique, we briefly explain the operational basics and discuss the analyte type for which it is appropriate and some specific applications from the literature.

  5. Synthesis of nano-hydroxyapatite and its rapid mediated surface functionalization by silane coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Sarish; Khan, Kishwar; Mujahid, Mohammad; Nosheen, Shaneela

    2016-01-01

    In this work, hydroxyapatite (HA) nanorods were synthesized by simple one step wet precipitation method followed by their rapid surface functionalization via aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) to give modified (HA-APTS) product. Functionalized hydroxyapatite (HA-APTS) holds amino groups on their surface that can be further functionalized with other bioactive molecules. The extent of functionalization of HA was studied under three different processing conditions; at room temperature, at 80 °C and under microwave condition (600 W). Three different temperatures have been use for the purpose of comparison between the functionalized products so that we can judge that whether there is any effect of temperature on the final products. In the last we conclude that temperature has no effect. So microwave condition is best to carried out the functionalization in just 5 min. PMID:26478359

  6. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  7. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  8. Coupling between diffusion and orientation of pentacene molecules on an organic surface.

    PubMed

    Rotter, Paul; Lechner, Barbara A J; Morherr, Antonia; Chisnall, David M; Ward, David J; Jardine, Andrew P; Ellis, John; Allison, William; Eckhardt, Bruno; Witte, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The realization of efficient organic electronic devices requires the controlled preparation of molecular thin films and heterostructures. As top-down structuring methods such as lithography cannot be applied to van der Waals bound materials, surface diffusion becomes a structure-determining factor that requires microscopic understanding. Scanning probe techniques provide atomic resolution, but are limited to observations of slow movements, and therefore constrained to low temperatures. In contrast, the helium-3 spin-echo (HeSE) technique achieves spatial and time resolution on the nm and ps scale, respectively, thus enabling measurements at elevated temperatures. Here we use HeSE to unveil the intricate motion of pentacene admolecules diffusing on a chemisorbed monolayer of pentacene on Cu(110) that serves as a stable, well-ordered organic model surface. We find that pentacene moves along rails parallel and perpendicular to the surface molecules. The experimental data are explained by admolecule rotation that enables a switching between diffusion directions, which extends our molecular level understanding of diffusion in complex organic systems. PMID:26901514

  9. Sea Surface Temperature Coupling to Madden-Julian Oscillations over the Indonesian Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, A. M.; Gordon, A. L.; Pujiana, K.

    2014-12-01

    The intraseasonal SST characteristics within the Indonesian Seas and their responses to the Madden-Julian Oscillations [MJO] are examined through analyses of observed and reanalysis datasets. Intraseasonal variation accounts for about 30% of SST variability, with the strongest signature is observed in Banda and Timor seas. The MJO signature in SST is evident in the form of energy peak at 35-45 days, amplification during the Northwest Monsoon (boreal winter), and eastward propagation. SST responds to sea-air heat flux associated with MJO with net heat flux into the ocean (atmosphere) characterizing the suppressed (active) phase of MJO. The influence of MJO on Banda Sea SST is greatest during La Niña periods, which are favorable for deeper thermocline conditions, which diminish the role of ocean processes driving vertical heat transfer between subsurface and surface layers. Diminished influence of ocean processes results in dominance of surface heat fluxes associated with MJO in governing intraseasonal SST variability. During El Niño, the role of ocean processes is favorable to mediate heat transfer between lower and upper layer of the ocean surface as thermocline is shallower. The ocean component heat fluxes then compete with MJO forced heat fluxes in governing SST variability as indicated by less pronounced eastward propagation.

  10. Coupling between diffusion and orientation of pentacene molecules on an organic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, Paul; Lechner, Barbara A. J.; Morherr, Antonia; Chisnall, David M.; Ward, David J.; Jardine, Andrew P.; Ellis, John; Allison, William; Eckhardt, Bruno; Witte, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The realization of efficient organic electronic devices requires the controlled preparation of molecular thin films and heterostructures. As top-down structuring methods such as lithography cannot be applied to van der Waals bound materials, surface diffusion becomes a structure-determining factor that requires microscopic understanding. Scanning probe techniques provide atomic resolution, but are limited to observations of slow movements, and therefore constrained to low temperatures. In contrast, the helium-3 spin-echo (HeSE) technique achieves spatial and time resolution on the nm and ps scale, respectively, thus enabling measurements at elevated temperatures. Here we use HeSE to unveil the intricate motion of pentacene admolecules diffusing on a chemisorbed monolayer of pentacene on Cu(110) that serves as a stable, well-ordered organic model surface. We find that pentacene moves along rails parallel and perpendicular to the surface molecules. The experimental data are explained by admolecule rotation that enables a switching between diffusion directions, which extends our molecular level understanding of diffusion in complex organic systems.

  11. Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

    2004-03-29

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration is being considered as a way to offset fossil-fuel-related CO{sub 2} emissions to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The accumulation of vast quantities of injected carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic sequestration sites may entail health and environmental risks from potential leakage and seepage of CO{sub 2} into the near-surface environment. We are developing and applying a coupled subsurface and atmospheric surface-layer modeling capability built within the framework of the integral finite difference reservoir simulator TOUGH2. The overall purpose of modeling studies is to predict CO{sub 2} concentration distributions under a variety of seepage scenarios and geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric conditions. These concentration distributions will provide the basis for determining above-ground and near-surface instrumentation needs for carbon sequestration monitoring and verification, as well as for assessing health, safety, and environmental risks. A key feature of CO{sub 2} is its large density ({rho} = 1.8 kg m{sup -3}) relative to air ({rho} = 1.2 kg m{sup -3}), a property that may allow small leaks to cause concentrations in air above the occupational exposure limit of 4 percent in low-lying and enclosed areas such as valleys and basements where dilution rates are low. The approach we take to coupled modeling involves development of T2CA, a TOUGH2 module for modeling the multicomponent transport of water, brine, CO{sub 2}, gas tracer, and air in the subsurface. For the atmospheric surface-layer advection and dispersion, we use a logarithmic vertical velocity profile to specify constant time-averaged ambient winds, and atmospheric dispersion approaches to model mixing due to eddies and turbulence. Initial simulations with the coupled model suggest that atmospheric dispersion quickly dilutes diffuse CO{sub 2} seepage fluxes to negligible concentrations, and that rainfall

  12. SABAE-HW3D: a Meteor-Hydrological Model Coupling the Land Surface to Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loukili, Y.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    A new coupled model linking the land surface scheme SABAE-HW with the saturated groundwater flow is introduced. SABAE-HW stands for: Soil Atmosphere Boundary, Accurate Evaluations of Heat and Water. It was presented (Loukili et al., 2007) as a parallel extension to the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) which permits a free choice of soil column depth and layers. This development is important as it allows for the coupling of the atmosphere, land surface and subsurface zones. The generic domain under study is subdivided into soil columns whose surface areas represent GCM grid squares. The depths of columns extend to the saturated zone where a water table lower boundary condition is prescribed. In each column the unsaturated flow is forced by the corresponding meteorological data, and the moisture (liquid and frozen) and temperature profiles are computed by SABAE-HW using the half hour time step. The horizontal flow in the saturated zone is described by the vertically integrated model incorporating a storage term, and discretized using a finite volume scheme operating on the same GCM quadrilateral mesh. Since the saturated flow model affords larger time steps, bottom drainages from soil columns are summed up and input as cell recharges. Meanwhile, as the water table fluctuates, the individual column's mesh is allowed to deform. This physically based coupling strategy was selected for its superiority in providing stable and consistent results. In fact, the convergence to steady state situations in both the unsaturated and saturated zones is realized in many validation numerical tests. Moreover, our SABAE-HW3D code was successfully benchmarked against the finite element code Seep/W (Geo-Slope International, 2002) for steady and transient groundwater flows through different soil types. Even when handling coarse grids, SABAE-HW3D solutions are free of moisture oscillation and under or overshoot near the water table. The model is used to understand and assess properly

  13. Atomistic simulation of charge effects: From tunable thin film growth to isolation of surface states with spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Wenmei

    This dissertation revitalizes the importance of surface charge effects in semiconductor nanostructures, in particular in the context of thin film growth and exotic electronic structures under delicate spin-orbit coupling. A combination of simulation techniques, including density functional theory calculation, kinetic Monte Carlo method, nonequilibrium Green's function method, and tight binding method, were employed to reveal the underlying physical mechanisms of four topics: (1) Effects of Li doping on H-diffusion in MgH 2 for hydrogen storage. It addresses both the effect of Fermi level tuning by charged dopant and the effect of dopant-defect interaction, and the latter was largely neglected in previous works; (2) Tuning nucleation density of the metal island with charge doping of the graphene substrate. It is the first time that the surface charge doping effect is proposed and studied as an effective approach to tune the kinetics of island nucleation at the early stage of thin film growth; (3) Complete isolation of Rashba surface states on the saturated semiconductor surface. It shows that the naturally saturated semiconductor surface of InSe(0001) with Au single layer film provides a mechanism for the formation of Rashba states with large spin splitting; it opens up an innovative route to obtaining ideal Rashba states without the overwhelming bulk spin-degenerate carriers in spin-dependent transport; (4) Formation of large band gap quantum spin Hall state on Si surface. This study reveals the importance of atomic orbital composition in the formation of a topological insulator, and shows promisingly the possible integration of topological insulator technology into Si-based modern electronic devices.

  14. Kinetics of surface dissolution: A coupled thermodynamics-climatic approach for Titan and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Thomas; Cordier, Daniel; Le Bahers, Tangui; Bourgeois, Olivier; Fleurant, Cyril; Le Mouélic, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    Titan, Saturn's major icy moon, like the Earth, possesses large bodies of present liquids on its surface under the form of seas, lakes and rivers, and likely of past liquids in currently empty topographic depressions. Titan's seas and lacustrine depressions strongly differ in shape, which likely suggests a difference in terms of geological formation processes. On the one hand, the seas have dendritic contours, are several hundreds of kilometers in width, and seem to develop in areas with significant reliefs and fluvial networks. On the other hand, lacustrine depressions, be they filled currently or not, are typically isolated, have rounded or lobate contours and seem to grow by coalescence. Their sizes vary from a few kilometers to a few tens of kilometers in diameter, and they seem to develop in relatively flat areas without visible connection with fluvial networks. The depths of the seas and lacustrine depressions have been evaluated to several hundreds of meters for the seas (recent estimates from the Cassini RADAR altimeter echoes analysis over Ligeia Mare indicates a depth of about 170 m), when they are a few hundred/tens of meters for the lacustrine depressions. Given the above morphological settings, several formation mechanisms have been proposed for Titan's lacustrine depressions, the most likely one being associated with the dissolution of the surface, such as what is seen in karstic or karsto-evaporitic areas on Earth. However, due to Titan's surface physical properties (T=90-95 K) and composition, the materials that would be involved in such dissolution processes are exotic. In karstic terrains on Earth, the solvent is water and the solutes are rock minerals (e.g., calcite, dolomite, gypsum, anhydrite and halite). On Titan, the solvent is mainly composed of liquid hydrocarbons (methane and/or ethane) and the solutes are probably made of solid hydrocarbons (acetylene, benzene, butane,...), nitriles (hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen,...), tholins and ices

  15. A hybrid surface layer parameterization scheme for the two-way fully coupled atmosphere-ocean wave system WEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsafados, Petros; Papadopoulos, Anastasios; Varlas, George; Korres, Gerasimos

    2015-04-01

    The two-way fully coupled atmosphere-ocean wave system WEW has been recently developed in order to study the factors that contribute to the air-sea interaction processes and feedbacks. The coupled system consists of two components: the atmospheric component which is based on the Workstation Eta non-hydrostatic limited area model and the ocean-wave component which is based on the fourth generation OpenMP (OMP) version of the WAM model. The WEW has been already evaluated in a number of high-impact weather and sea state events where generally a more realistic representation of the momentum exchanges in the ocean wind-wave system has been shown However, the new developed wind-wave parameterization scheme reduces both the near surface wind speed and the significant wave height as a response to the increased aerodynamic drag considered by the atmospheric model over rough sea surfaces. Such behavior is mainly attributed to the surface layer parameterization scheme of the atmospheric component which is based on the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ) scheme. It is noted that this scheme has been adjusted to support independent atmospheric simulations. Therefore, we proceed to develop a new hybrid surface layer parameterization based on the MYJ and the Janssen schemes that operate in the atmospheric and ocean wave components of the WEW, respectively. In this case the roughness length depends on the wave age instead of the Charnock parameter following the formulation proposed by Vickers and Mahrt. The spatial variability of the wave age is estimated at each ocean wave component time step and it is directly provided to the MYJ scheme. The parameterization of the viscous sublayer and the universal functions for the estimation of the near surface wind speed have been also revised accordingly. In this study, a test version of the new hybrid scheme of WEW has been statistically evaluated against a number of buoys and satellite retrievals over the Mediterranean Sea in a case study of high

  16. Single-molecular surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering as a quantitative probe of local electromagnetic field: The case of strong coupling between plasmonic and excitonic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Yamamoto, Yuko S.; Tamaru, Hiroharu; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Wakida, Shin-ichi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-05-01

    We investigate electromagnetic coupling between plasmonic and molecular electronic resonances using single-molecular surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) from single silver nanoparticle dimers. When dimers exhibit SERRS activity, their elastic light scattering spectra show two lines, which are temporally closing toward each other. The higher energy line eventually disappears at the time of SERRS quenching. A coupled-oscillator model composed of plasmonic and molecular electronic resonances consistently reproduces the above interesting results by decreasing coupling energy, indicating that SERRS can be a quantitative probe for strong coupling between the two resonances.

  17. Improving the WRF model's simulation over sea ice surface through coupling with a complex thermodynamic sea ice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Huang, J.; Luo, Y.; Zhao, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the air-ice-ocean interaction, but it is often represented simply in many regional atmospheric models. The Noah sea ice model, which has been widely used in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, exhibits cold bias in simulating the Arctic sea ice temperature when validated against the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) in situ observations. According to sensitivity tests, this bias is attributed not only to the simulation of snow depth and turbulent fluxes but also to the heat conduction within snow and ice. Compared with the Noah sea ice model, the high-resolution thermodynamic snow and ice model (HIGHTSI) has smaller bias in simulating the sea ice temperature. HIGHTSI is further coupled with the WRF model to evaluate the possible added value from better resolving the heat transport and solar penetration in sea ice from a complex thermodynamic sea ice model. The cold bias in simulating the surface temperature over sea ice in winter by the original Polar WRF is reduced when HIGHTSI rather than Noah is coupled with the WRF model, and this also leads to a better representation of surface upward longwave radiation and 2 m air temperature. A discussion on the impact of specifying sea ice thickness in the WRF model is presented. Consistent with previous research, prescribing the sea ice thickness with observational information would result in the best simulation among the available methods. If no observational information is available, using an empirical method based on the relationship between sea ice concentration and sea ice thickness could mimic the large-scale spatial feature of sea ice thickness. The potential application of a thermodynamic sea ice model in predicting the change in sea ice thickness in a RCM is limited by the lack of sea ice dynamic processes in the model and the coarse assumption on the initial value of sea ice thickness.

  18. Coupling to the surface of liposomes alters the immunogenicity of hepatitis C virus-derived peptides and confers sterile immunity.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Akira; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Taneichi, Maiko; Uchida, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes consisting of unsaturated fatty acids were cross-presented by antigen presenting cells to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Liposomal form of immunodominant CTL epitope peptides derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus exhibited highly efficient antiviral CTL responses in immunized mice. In this study, we coupled 15 highly conserved immunodominant CTL epitope peptides derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) to the surface of liposomes. We also emulsified the peptides in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, and compared the immune responses of the two methods of presenting the peptides by cytotoxicity induction and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD8(+) T cells of the immunized mice. We noticed significant variations of the immunogenicity of each peptide between the two antigen delivery systems. In addition, the immunogenicity profiles of the peptides were also different from those observed in the mice infected with recombinant adenoviruses expressing HCV proteins as previously reported. Induction of anti-viral immunity by liposomal peptides was tested by the challenge experiments using recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing corresponding HCV epitopes. One D(b)-restricted and three HLA-A(*)0201-restricted HCV CTL epitope peptides on the surface of liposomes were found to confer complete protection to immunized mice with establishment of long-term memory. Interestingly, their protective efficacy seemed to correlate with the induction of IFN-γ producing cells rather than the cytotoxicity induction suggesting that the immunized mice were protected through non-cytolytic mechanisms. Thus, these liposomal peptides might be useful as HCV vaccines not only for prevention but also for therapeutic use. PMID:23159619

  19. Electroelastic coupling between membrane surface fluctuations and membrane-embedded charges: Continuum multidielectric treatment

    PubMed Central

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Partenskii, Michael B.; Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    The coupling of electric fields and charges with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations affects membrane electroporation, ionic conductance, and voltage gating. A modified continuum model is introduced to study charge interaction with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations in multidielectric environments. By surrounding a point charge with a low dielectric sphere, the linear Poisson–Boltzmann equation is directly solved by calculating the reaction field potential via a method that eliminates singularity contributions. This allows treatment of charges located at dielectric boundaries. Two complementary mechanisms governing charge-fluctuation interactions are considered: (1) electroelastic deformation (EED), treating the membrane as an elastic slab (smectic bilayer model), and (2) electrohydrophobic solvation (EHS), accounting for water penetration into the membrane’s hydrophobic core. EED often leads to large membrane thickness perturbations, far larger than those consistent with elastic model descriptions [M. B. Partenskii, G. V. Miloshevsky, and P. C. Jordan, Isr. J. Chem. 47, 385 (2007)]. We argue that a switch from EED to EHS can be energetically advantageous at intermediate perturbation amplitudes. Both perturbation mechanisms are simulated by introducing adjustable shapes optimized by the kinetic Monte Carlo reaction path following approach [G. V. Miloshevsky and P. C. Jordan, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214901 (2005)]. The resulting energy profiles agree with those of recent atomistic molecular dynamics studies on translating a charged residue across a lipid bilayer [S. Dorairaj and T. W. Allen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 4943 (2007)]. PMID:20572734

  20. Pore-Scale Process Coupling and Effective Surface Reaction Rates in Heterogeneous Subsurface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript provides a review of pore-scale researches in literature including experimental and numerical approaches, and scale-dependent behavior of geochemical and biogeochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media. A mathematical equation that can be used to predict the scale-dependent behavior of geochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media has been derived. The derived effective rate expression explicitly links the effective reaction rate constant to the intrinsic rate constant, and to the pore-scale variations in reactant concentrations in porous media. Molecular simulations to calculate the intrinsic rate constants were provided. A few examples of pore-scale simulations were used to demonstrate the application of the equation to calculate effective rate constants in heterogeneous materials. The results indicate that the deviation of effective rate constant from the intrinsic rate in heterogeneous porous media is caused by the pore-scale distributions of reactants and their correlation, which are affected by the pore-scale coupling of reactions and transport.

  1. Electroelastic coupling between membrane surface fluctuations and membrane-embedded charges: Continuum multidielectric treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V.; Hassanein, Ahmed; Partenskii, Michael B.; Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-06-01

    The coupling of electric fields and charges with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations affects membrane electroporation, ionic conductance, and voltage gating. A modified continuum model is introduced to study charge interaction with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations in multidielectric environments. By surrounding a point charge with a low dielectric sphere, the linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation is directly solved by calculating the reaction field potential via a method that eliminates singularity contributions. This allows treatment of charges located at dielectric boundaries. Two complementary mechanisms governing charge-fluctuation interactions are considered: (1) electroelastic deformation (EED), treating the membrane as an elastic slab (smectic bilayer model), and (2) electrohydrophobic solvation (EHS), accounting for water penetration into the membrane's hydrophobic core. EED often leads to large membrane thickness perturbations, far larger than those consistent with elastic model descriptions [M. B. Partenskii, G. V. Miloshevsky, and P. C. Jordan, Isr. J. Chem. 47, 385 (2007)]. We argue that a switch from EED to EHS can be energetically advantageous at intermediate perturbation amplitudes. Both perturbation mechanisms are simulated by introducing adjustable shapes optimized by the kinetic Monte Carlo reaction path following approach [G. V. Miloshevsky and P. C. Jordan, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214901 (2005)]. The resulting energy profiles agree with those of recent atomistic molecular dynamics studies on translating a charged residue across a lipid bilayer [S. Dorairaj and T. W. Allen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 4943 (2007)].

  2. Proton Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions at the Surface of Metal Oxide Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braten, Miles N.

    Nanostructured metal oxide materials are found in many products and processes in our society today, but they play a particularly important role in the conversion and storage of energy. The materials are used as catalysts and redox active supports in devices such as dye sensitized solar cells, solid oxide fuel cells, and flow batteries, where they transfer and store electrons and charge balancing cations. Oftentimes electron transfer is modulated by the cations and when the cation is a proton, these redox reactions are known as proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions. The work described in this dissertation focuses on understanding the PCET reactivity of nanocrystalline metal oxide materials. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of PCET and provides background information on the zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals (NCs) which the majority of the research is focused on. Chapter 2 examines the chemistry that occurs during the photoreduction of ZnO NCs. Chapter 3 describes experiments probing how ZnO NC capping ligand concentration and NC size modulate PCET reaction rates. Chapter 4 describes experiments that compare the PCET reactivity of ZnO NCs with different numbers of electrons and protons stored on them. Chapter 5 describes attempts to observe the electrochemical reduction of ZnO NCs attached to gold electrodes. Finally, Chapter 6 contains attempts to identify a nanostructured metal oxide alkane oxidation catalyst for use in fuel cell.

  3. Grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance gas sensing based on titania anatase nanoporous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzola, Enrico; Cittadini, Michela; Brigo, Laura; Brusatin, Giovanna; Guglielmi, Massimo; Romanato, Filippo; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    Nanoporous TiO2 anatase film has been investigated as sensitive layer in Surface Plasmon Resonance sensors for the detection of hydrogen and Volatile Organic Compounds, specifically methanol and isopropanol. The sensors consist of a TiO2 nanoporous matrix deposited above a metallic plasmonic grating, which can support propagating Surface Plasmon Polaritons. The spectral position of the plasmonic resonance dip in the reflectance spectra was monitored and correlated to the interaction with the target gases. Reversible blue-shifts of the resonance frequency, up to more than 2 THz, were recorded in response to the exposure to 10000 ppm of H2 in N2 at 300°C. This shift cannot be explained by the mere refractive index variation due to the target gas filling the pores, that is negligible. Reversible red-shifts were instead recorded in response to the exposure to 3000 ppm of methanol or isopropanol at room temperature, of magnitudes up to 14 THz and 9 THz, respectively. In contrast, if the only sensing mechanism was the mere pores filling, the shifts should have been larger during the isopropanol detection. We therefore suggest that other mechanisms intervene in the analyte/matrix interaction, capable to produce an injection of electrons into the sensitive matrix, which in turn induces a decrease of the refractive index.

  4. Validation of a Coupled Source Surface to MHD Model System at ACE and Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detman, T.; Fry, C. D.; Smith, Z.; Dryer, M.; Intriligator, D.

    2005-05-01

    The Potential Field Source Surface model [Wang and Sheeley, 1988] combined with the Current Sheet modification [Schatten, 1971] is now in routine operation at the NWS Space Environment Center of NOAA. We use the sequence of source surface current sheet (SSCS) maps so produced. We developed a set of relatively simple empirical relationships to translate the SSCS map parameters into time-dependent MHD model lower boundary conditions at 0.1 AU. This system provides the 3D time-dependent slowly evolving background solar wind conditions in the inner heliosphere. To this system we add shock initiation perturbations to the lower boundary condition based on observed solar flares, CMEs and Type II solar radio bursts. The necessary shock descriptive parameters are generated in near real-time from these data. We compare simulated results with ACE solar wind observations. We have retrospectively adjusted the shock initiation parameters to maximize agreement with ACE observations, and extended the MHD model outer boundary to 10 AU. We will show results and comparisons of model results with Ulysses observations during the 2003 Halloween epoch. This work was partially funded by a NASA Living With a Star (LWS) TR&T grant through NOAA Work Order No.W-10,118 (ZS and TRD) and NASA Grant NAG-12527 (CDF and MD), by University Partnering for Operational Support program (UPOS) sponsored jointly by the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army (CDF and MD), and by Carmel Research Center (DI).

  5. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C.-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2008-05-15

    To better understand the role of groundwater-level changes on rock-slope deformation and damage, a carbonate rock slope (30 m x 30 m x 15 m) was extensively instrumented for mesoscale hydraulic and mechanical measurements during water-level changes. The slope is naturally drained by a spring that can be artificially closed or opened by a water gate. In this study, a 2-hour slope-dewatering experiment was analyzed. Changes in fluid pressure and deformation were simultaneously monitored, both at discontinuities and in the intact rock, using short-base extensometers and pressure gauges as well as tiltmeters fixed at the slope surface. Field data were analyzed with different coupled hydromechanical (HM) codes (ROCMAS, FLAC{sup 3D}, and UDEC). Field data indicate that in the faults, a 40 kPa pressure fall occurs in 2 minutes and induces a 0.5 to 31 x 10{sup -6} m normal closure. Pressure fall is slower in the bedding-planes, lasting 120 minutes with no normal deformation. No pressure change or deformation is observed in the intact rock. The slope surface displays a complex tilt towards the interior of the slope, with magnitudes ranging from 0.6 to 15 x 10{sup -6} rad. Close agreement with model for both slope surface and internal measurements is obtained when a high variability in slope-element properties is introduced into the models, with normal stiffnesses of k{sub n{_}faults} = 10{sup -3} x k{sub n{_}bedding-planes} and permeabilities of k{sub h{_}faults} = 10{sup 3} x k{sub h{_}bedding-planes}. A nonlinear correlation between hydraulic and mechanical discontinuity properties is proposed and related to discontinuity damage. A parametric study shows that 90% of slope deformation depends on HM effects in a few highly permeable and highly deformable discontinuities located in the basal, saturated part of the slope while the remaining 10% are related to elasto-plastic deformations in the low-permeability discontinuities induced by complex stress/strain transfers from

  6. Modelling the coupled surface water and groundwater system of the Middle Upper Rhine Valley and its response to climate change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queguiner, Solen; Martin, Eric; Thierion, Charlotte; Habets, Florence; Ackerer, Philippe; Lecluse, Simon; Majdalani, Samer

    2010-05-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben hydrosystem holds one of the most important groundwater resources in Europe. This alluvial aquifer provides three-quarters of the regional needs for water. Its functioning is tightly linked to the hydrographic network in the alluvial plain. Indeed an important part of the available groundwater comes from the infiltration of rivers in the very permeable alluvial material of the plain. In other places in the plain a heavy drainage of the aquifer occurs, contributing to the very dense river network. Consequently, this hydrosystem has to be studied in a coupled way, taking into account the complex interaction between surface and subsurface processes. In the framework of the VULNAR project several surface, hydrological and aquifer models are used to study the vulnerability of the Rhine aquifer. This presentation will focuses on the meteorological and surface aspects and their coupling with hydrological models. The Safran-Isba-Modcou (SIM) chain is used to estimate the climate change impact on the hydrology of the region. SIM is composed of a meteorological analysis system (SAFRAN), a land surface model describing the exchange with the atmosphere (ISBA) and a hydrogeological model (MODCOU). A specific version of MODCOU is currently being developed for the region of study. The mass and energy exchanges between the continental surface (including vegetation and snow) and the atmosphere are simulated by ISBA. The LAI (Leaf Area Index) is provided by the ECOCLIMAP2 database and the vegetation is divided into 12 types. The SAFRAN meteorological analysis is used at a resolution of 8 km in the plain and down to a 1km resolution on the mountains bordering the alluvial plain. In a first step a simulation of the water balance on the studied area is presented. The simulation covers a period of 17 years: 1986-2002. The drainage and the runoff are provided to MODCOU and a comparison of the discharges with the observations is presented. Several developments are

  7. Influence of Idealized Heterogeneity on Wet and Dry Planetary Boundary Layers Coupled to the Land Surface. 2; Phase-Averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor); Patton, Edward G.; Sullivan, Peter P.; Moeng, Chin-Hoh

    2003-01-01

    We examine the influence of surface heterogeneity on boundary layers using a large-eddy simulation coupled to a land-surface model. Heterogeneity, imposed in strips varying from 2-30 km (1 less than lambda/z(sub i) less than 18), is found to dramatically alter the structure of the free convective boundary layer by inducing significant organized circulations. A conditional sampling technique, based on the scale of the surface heterogeneity (phase averaging), is used to identify and quantify the organized surface fluxes and motions in the atmospheric boundary layer. The impact of the organized motions on turbulent transport depends critically on the scale of the heterogeneity lambda, the boundary layer height zi and the initial moisture state of the boundary layer. Dynamical and scalar fields respond differently as the scale of the heterogeneity varies. Surface heterogeneity of scale 4 less than lamba/z(sub i) less than 9 induces the strongest organized flow fields (up, wp) while heterogeneity with smaller or larger lambda/z(sub i) induces little organized motion. However, the organized components of the scalar fields (virtual potential temperature and mixing ratio) grow continuously in magnitude and horizontal scale, as lambda/z(sub i) increases. For some cases, the organized motions can contribute nearly 100% of the total vertical moisture flux. Patch-induced fluxes are shown to dramatically impact point measurements that assume the time-average vertical velocity to be zero. The magnitude and sign of this impact depends on the location of the measurement within the region of heterogeneity.

  8. Coupled isotopic systematics of surface cerium and neodymium in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazoe, H.; Obata, H.; Gamo, T.

    2011-04-01

    Trace metals are known to be essential elements in marine ecosystems. Radiogenic isotopes of neodymium (Nd) have been used as tracers in many recent oceanic trace metal studies, although, among rare earth elements, cerium (Ce) isotopes might be an interesting complementary tracer for particle reactive and lithogenic metals such as manganese. This study determined the 138Ce/142Ce ratios in surface waters of the Pacific Ocean and its surrounding marginal seas: the Sulu Sea, the South China Sea, the East China Sea, and the South Australian Basin. The 138Ce/142Ce and 143Nd/144Nd data are discussed in terms of the sources of rare earth elements and elemental fractionation between Ce and Nd in the marine environment. In the Western North Pacific Central Water, East China Sea, and South China Sea, isotopic compositions of Ce (ɛCe = +0.7 to 1.4) are most affected by radiogenic Ce of continental origin. In contrast, less radiogenic isotopic compositions of Ce (ɛCe = -0.4 to +0.3) in the Pacific Equatorial Water were observed locally near volcanic islands such as New Guinea Island, suggesting the influence of mantle-derived Ce. Compared with Nd, the isotopic composition of Ce showed a heterogeneous distribution in a given surface water mass, reflecting the importance of local sources. Variations of isotopic compositions and concentrations of Ce in the western Equatorial Pacific and the East China Sea suggest that lithogenic Ce is supplied and scavenged by particle-dissolved interaction near the margins. Radiogenic Ce in the Western North Pacific Central Water, which is more continental-like than Nd isotopes, suggests direct input by atmospheric dust into the North Pacific Ocean. The isotopic distribution of Ce is sensitive to aeolian supply to the surface waters of the open ocean. This unique feature indicates that the 138Ce/142Ce ratio can be a useful chemical tracer for lithogenic trace elements such as iron and manganese, which have short oceanic residence time.

  9. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  10. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C; Jansen, A P J

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature. PMID:23406093

  11. Estradiol coupling to human monocyte nitric oxide release is dependent on intracellular calcium transients: evidence for an estrogen surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Prevot, V; Beauvillain, J C; Fimiani, C; Welters, I; Cadet, P; Breton, C; Pestel, J; Salzet, M; Bilfinger, T V

    1999-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that estrogen acutely stimulates constitutive NO synthase (cNOS) activity in human peripheral monocytes by acting on an estrogen surface receptor. NO release was measured in real time with an amperometric probe. 17beta-estradiol exposure to monocytes stimulated NO release within seconds in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas 17alpha-estradiol had no effect. 17beta-estradiol conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) also stimulated NO release, suggesting mediation by a membrane surface receptor. Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor inhibitor, antagonized the action of both 17beta-estradiol and E2-BSA, whereas ICI 182,780, a selective inhibitor of the nuclear estrogen receptor, had no effect. We further showed, using a dual emission microfluorometry in a calcium-free medium, that the 17beta-estradiol-stimulated release of monocyte NO was dependent on the initial stimulation of intracellular calcium transients in a tamoxifen-sensitive process. Leeching out the intracellular calcium stores abolished the effect of 17beta-estradiol on NO release. RT-PCR analysis of RNA obtained from the cells revealed a strong estrogen receptor-alpha amplification signal and a weak beta signal. Taken together, a physiological dose of estrogen acutely stimulates NO release from human monocytes via the activation of an estrogen surface receptor that is coupled to increases in intracellular calcium. PMID:10490972

  12. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  13. Deep GaN etching by inductively coupled plasma and induced surface defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ladroue, J.; Meritan, A.; Boufnichel, M.; Lefaucheux, P.; Ranson, P.; Dussart, R.

    2010-09-15

    GaN etching was studied in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas as a function of process parameters. In addition, for a better understanding of the etching mechanisms, Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were carried out. Etch rate was found to depend strongly on bias power. After optimization, an etch rate greater than 1000 nm/min was achieved. A second part of this work is dedicated to the etched surface defects. An original method to estimate GaN dislocation density and to localize nanopipes in the material is presented. Columnar defects could also appear with impurities in the etching reactor. The authors also present a possible formation mechanism of those columnar defects.

  14. Mode I crack surface displacements for a round compact specimen subject to a couple and force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1979-01-01

    Mode I displacement coefficients along the crack surface are presented for a radially cracked round compact specimen, treated as a plane elastostatic problem, subjected to two types of loading; a uniform tensile stress and a nominal bending stress distribution across the net section. By superposition the resultant displacement coefficient or the corresponding influence coefficient can be obtained for any practical load location. Load line displacements are presented for A/D ratios ranging from 0.40 to 0.95, where A is the crack length measured from the crack mouth to the crack tip and D is the specimen diameter. Through a linear extrapolation procedure crack mouth displacements are also obtained. Experimental evidence shows that the results of this study are valid over the range of A/D ratios analyzed for a practical pin loaded round compact specimen.

  15. Mode 1 crack surface displacements for a round compact specimen subject to a couple and force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.

    1979-01-01

    Mode I displacement coefficients along the crack surface are presented for a radially cracked round compact specimen, treated as a plane elastostatic problem, subjected to two types of loading; a uniform tensile stress and a nominal bending stress distribution across the net section. By superposition the resultant displacement coefficient or the corresponding influence coefficient can be obtained for any practical load location. Load line displacements are presented for A/D ratios ranging from 0.40 to 0.95, where A is the crack length measured from the crack mouth to the crack tip and D is the specimen diameter. Through a linear extrapolation procedure crack mouth displacements are also obtained. Experimental evidence shows that the results are valid over the range of A/D ratios analyzed for a practical pin loaded round compact specimen.

  16. Characterizing the free and surface-coupled vibrations of heated-tip atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Killgore, Jason P; Tung, Ryan C; Hurley, Donna C

    2014-08-29

    Combining heated-tip atomic force microscopy (HT-AFM) with quantitative methods for determining surface mechanical properties, such as contact resonance force microscopy, creates an avenue for nanoscale thermomechanical property characterization. For nanomechanical methods that employ an atomic force microscope cantilever's vibrational modes, it is essential to understand how the vibrations of the U-shaped HT-AFM cantilever differ from those of a more traditional rectangular lever, for which analytical techniques are better developed. Here we show, with a combination of finite element analysis (FEA) and experiments, that the HT-AFM cantilever exhibits many more readily-excited vibrational modes over typical AFM frequencies compared to a rectangular cantilever. The arms of U-shaped HT-AFM cantilevers exhibit two distinct forms of flexural vibrations that differ depending on whether the two arms are vibrating in-phase or out-of-phase with one another. The in-phase vibrations are qualitatively similar to flexural vibrations in rectangular cantilevers and generally show larger sensitivity to surface stiffness changes than the out-of-phase vibrations. Vibration types can be identified from their frequency and by considering vibration amplitudes in the horizontal and vertical channels of the AFM at different laser spot positions on the cantilever. For identifying contact resonance vibrational modes, we also consider the sensitivity of the resonant frequencies to a change in applied force and hence to tip-sample contact stiffness. Finally, we assess how existing analytical models can be used to accurately predict contact stiffness from contact-resonance HT-AFM results. A simple two-parameter Euler-Bernoulli beam model provided good agreement with FEA for in-phase modes up to a contact stiffness 500 times the cantilever spring constant. By providing insight into cantilever vibrations and exploring the potential of current analysis techniques, our results lay the groundwork

  17. Development of a 3D Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) coupled to a Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.; Lorenzetti, D.; Tang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Exchange of water between the atmosphere and biosphere via evapotranspiration (ET) influences global hydrological, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. Isotopic analysis has shown that evapotranspiration over the continents is largely dominated by transpiration. Water is taken up from soil by plant roots, transported through the plant's vascular system, and evaporated from the leaves. Yet current Land Surface Models (LSMs) integrated into Earth System Models (ESMs) treat plant roots as passive components. These models distribute the ET sink vertically over the soil column, neglect the vertical pressure distribution along the plant vascular system, and assume that leaves can directly access water from any soil layer within the root zone. Numerous studies have suggested that increased warming due to climate change will lead drought and heat-induced tree mortality. A more mechanistic treatment of water dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC) is essential for investigating the fate of ecosystems under a warmer climate. In this work, we describe a 3D SPAC model that can be coupled to a LSM. The SPAC model uses the variably saturated Richards equations to simulate water transport. The model uses individual governing equations and constitutive relationships for the various SPAC components (i.e., soil, root, and xylem). Finite volume spatial discretization and backward Euler temporal discretization is used to solve the SPAC model. The Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) is used to numerically integrate the discretized system of equations. Furthermore, PETSc's multi-physics coupling capability (DMComposite) is used to solve the tightly coupled system of equations of the SPAC model. Numerical results are presented for multiple test problems.

  18. Coupled carbon-nitrogen land surface modelling for UK agricultural landscapes using JULES and JULES-ECOSSE-FUN (JEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comyn-Platt, Edward; Clark, Douglas; Blyth, Eleanor

    2016-04-01

    The UK is required to provide accurate estimates of the UK greenhouse gas (GHG; CO2, CH4 and N2O) emissions for the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). Process based land surface models (LSMs), such as the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), attempt to provide such estimates based on environmental (e.g. land use and soil type) and meteorological conditions. The standard release of JULES focusses on the water and carbon cycles, however, it has long been suggested that a coupled carbon-nitrogen scheme could enhance simulations. This is of particular importance when estimating agricultural emission inventories where the carbon cycle is effectively managed via the human application of nitrogen based fertilizers. JULES-ECOSSE-FUN (JEF) links JULES with the Estimation of Carbon in Organic Soils - Sequestration and Emission (ECOSSE) model and the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN) model as a means of simulating C:N coupling. This work presents simulations from the standard release of JULES and the most recent incarnation of the JEF coupled system at the point and field scale. Various configurations of JULES and JEF were calibrated and fine-tuned based on comparisons with observations from three UK field campaigns (Crichton, Harwood Forest and Brattleby) specifically chosen to represent the managed vegetation types that cover the UK. The campaigns included flux tower and chamber measurements of CO2, CH4 and N2O amongst other meteorological parameters and records of land management such as application of fertilizer and harvest date at the agricultural sites. Based on the results of these comparisons, JULES and/or JEF will be used to provide simulations on the regional and national scales in order to provide improved estimates of the total UK emission inventory.

  19. C60 as an Active Smart Spacer Material on Silver Thin Film Substrates for Enhanced Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission

    PubMed Central

    Mulpur, Pradyumna; Podila, Ramakrishna; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah; Rao, Apparao M.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present the use of C60 as an active spacer material on a silver (Ag) based surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) platform. In addition to its primary role of protecting the Ag thin film from oxidation, the incorporation of C60 facilitated the achievement of 30-fold enhancement in the emission intensity of rhodamine b (RhB) fluorophore. The high signal yield was attributed to the unique π-π interactions between C60 thin films and RhB, which enabled efficient transfer of energy of RhB emission to Ag plasmon modes. Furthermore, minor variations in the C60 film thickness yielded large changes in the enhancement and angularity properties of the SPCE signal, which can be exploited for sensing applications. Finally, the low-cost fabrication process of the Ag-C60 thin film stacks render C60 based SPCE substrates ideal, for the economic and simplistic detection of analytes. PMID:25785916

  20. A proposal and a theoretical analysis of an enhanced surface plasmon coupled emission structure for single molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Shiekh Zia; Tanvir, Mukhlasur Rahman; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman

    2016-05-01

    We propose a structure that can be used for enhanced single molecule detection using surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE). In the proposed structure, instead of a single metal layer on the glass prism of a typical SPCE structure for fluorescence microscopy, a metal-dielectric-metal structure is used. We theoretically show that the proposed structure significantly decreases the excitation volume of the fluorescently labeled sample, and simultaneously increases the peak SPCE intensity and SPCE power. Therefore, the signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity of an SPCE based fluorescence microscopy system can be significantly increased using the proposed structure, which will be helpful for enhanced single molecule detection, especially, in a less pure biological sample.

  1. Enhanced near-field radiative heat transfer between a nanosphere and a hyperbolic metamaterial mediated by coupled surface phonon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Liu, Linhua

    2015-06-01

    We study the near-field radiative heat transfer between a silicon carbide (SiC) nanosphere and a SiC-SiO2 multi-layered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) by means of fluctuational electrodynamics. Results show that the absorbed mean power at the volume resonant frequency of the SiC nanosphere is one order of magnitude stronger than that of bulk SiC medium. This enhancement of near-field radiative heat transfer is mediated by the coupled surface phonon polaritons at the forbidden region of the Bloch mode. Moreover, the forbidden region of the Bloch mode is tuned by the geometry structure of the multi-layered HMM and overlapped with the volume resonant frequency of the SiC nanosphere, thus generating stronger absorption.

  2. Energy coupling of nuclear bursts in and above the ocean surface: source region calculations and experimental validation

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, D.B.; Harben, P.E.; Rock, D.W.; White, J.W.; Piacsek, A.

    1997-07-01

    In support of the Comprehensive Test Ban, research is under way on the long range propagation of signals from nuclear explosions in deep underwater sound (SOFAR) channel. Initially our work at LLNL on signals in the source region considered explosions in or above deep ocean. We studied the variation of wave properties and source region energy coupling as a function of height or depth of burst. Initial calculations on the CALE hydrodynamics code were linked at a few hundred milliseconds to a version of NRL`s weak code, NPE, which solves the nonlinear progressive wave equation. The simulation of the wave propagation was carried down to 5000 m depth and out to 10,000 m range. We have completed ten such simulations at a variety of heights and depths below the ocean surface.

  3. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi; Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0% ∼ 2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  4. Magnetic immunoassay for cancer biomarker detection based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zhen; Wang, Chongwen; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Donggen; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-10-15

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Capture antibody-coated silver shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag MNPs) were utilized as the CEA enrichment platform and the SERRS signal amplification substrate. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were coated with a thin silver shell to be in resonance with the resonant Raman dye diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC) and the excitation wavelength at 785nm. The silver-coated AuNRs (Au@Ag NRs) were then modified with detection antibody as the SERRS tags. Sandwich immune complexes formed in the presence of the target biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and this formation induced the plasmonic coupling between the Au@Ag NRs and Fe3O4@Ag MNPs. The SERRS signal of DTTC molecules located in the coupled plasmonic nanostructures was significantly enhanced. As a result, the proposed SERRS sensor was able to detect CEA with a low limit of detection of 4.75fg/mL and a wide dynamic linear range from 10fg/mL to 100ng/mL. The sensor provides a novel SERRS strategy for trace analyte detection and has a potential for clinical applications. PMID:27149164

  5. A dielectric barrier discharge ionization based interface for online coupling surface plasmon resonance with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Xu, Shuting; Wen, Luhong; Bai, Yu; Niu, Li; Song, Daqian; Liu, Huwei

    2016-05-23

    The online combination of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with mass spectrometry (MS) could be beneficial for accurately acquiring molecular interaction data simultaneously with their structural information at high throughputs. In this work, a novel SPR-MS interface was developed using a dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI) source. The DBDI source was placed in front of the MS inlet, generating an ionization plasma jet. A spray tip was set between the DBDI source outlet and the MS inlet, nebulizing the SPR sample solution. Using this interface, samples could first be studied by SPR, then sprayed and ionized, finally analyzed by MS. By analyzing model samples containing small-molecule drugs dissolved in salt containing solutions, the practicability of this SPR-DBDI-MS interface was proved, observing the consistent change of SPR and MS signals. Compared with our previously developed direct analysis in real time (DART) based SPR-MS interface, this new interface exhibited a higher and better tolerance to non-volatile salts, and different ionization capabilities for various samples. These results indicated that the interface could find further utilization in SPR-MS studies especially when physiological conditions were needed. PMID:27116712

  6. Influence of Surface Material on the BCl Density in Inductively Coupled Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Hamilton, T.W.; Hebner, G.A.

    1999-03-15

    The relative density of BCl radicals has been measured in a modified Applied Materials DPS metal etch chamber using laser-induced fluorescence. In plasmas containing mixtures of BCl{sub 3} with Cl{sub 2}, Ar and/or N{sub 2}, the relative BCl density was measured as a function of source and bias power, pressure, flow rate, BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} ratio and argon addition. To determine the influence of surface materials on the bulk plasma properties, the relative BCl density was measured using four different substrate types; aluminum, alumina, photoresist, and photoresist-patterned aluminum. In most cases, the relative BCl density was highest above photoresist-coated wafers and lowest above blanket aluminum wafers. The BCl density increased with increasing source power and the ratio of BCl{sub 3} to Cl{sub 2}, while the addition of N{sub 2} to a BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} plasma resulted in a decrease in BCl density. The BCl density was relatively insensitive to changes in the other plasma parameters.

  7. Effects of the interfacial polarization on tunneling in surface coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virk, Kuljit S.; Reichman, David R.; Hybertsen, Mark S.

    2012-10-01

    Polarization effects are included exactly in a model for a quantum dot in close proximity to a planar interface. Efficient incorporation of this potential into the Schrödinger equation is utilized to map out the influence of the image potential effects on carrier tunneling in such heterostructures. In particular, the interplay between carrier mass and the dielectric constants of a quantum dot, its surrounding matrix, and the electrode is studied. We find that the polarizability of the planar electrode structure can significantly increase the tunneling rates for heavier carriers, potentially resulting in a qualitative change in the dependence of tunneling rate on mass. Our method for treating polarization can be generalized to the screening of two-particle interactions and can thus be applied to calculations such as exciton dissociation and the Coulomb blockade. In contrast to tunneling via intermediate surface localized states of the quantum dot, our work identifies the parameter space over which volume states undergo significant modification in their tunneling characteristics.

  8. Investigation of surface-plasmon coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well with Ag nanostructures coated on GaN surface

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Liu, Bin E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Rong E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, JiangPing; Tao, Tao; Zhi, Ting; Zhang, Guogang; Chen, Peng; Ren, Fangfang; Zhao, Hong; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-04-21

    Surface-plasmon (SP) coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structure is fabricated and investigated. The centre wavelength of 5-period InGaN/GaN MQW structure is about 620 nm. The intensity of photoluminescence (PL) for InGaN QW with naked Ag nano-structures (NS) is only slightly increased due to the oxidation of Ag NS as compared to that for the InGaN QW. However, InGaN QW with Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure can evidently enhance the emission efficiency due to the elimination of surface oxide layer of Ag NS. With increasing the laser excitation power, the PL intensity is enhanced by 25%–53% as compared to that for the SiO{sub 2} coating InGaN QW. The steady-state electric field distribution obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is different for both structures. The proportion of the field distributed in the Ag NS for the GaN/Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure is smaller as compared to that for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure. As a result, the energy loss of localized SP modes for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure will be larger due to the absorption of Ag layer.

  9. Surface wave effects on water temperature in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on water temperature distribution and heat exchange at regional scale (the Baltic Sea). Four scenarios—including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination these forcings—were simulated to test the impact of different terms on simulated temperature distribution. The scenario simulations were compared to a control simulation, which included a constant wave-breaking coefficient, but otherwise was without any wave effects. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwelling's. Overall, when all three wave effects were accounted for, did the estimates of temperature improve compared to control simulation. During the summer, the wave-induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea, a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations in summer months. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data, e.g. the control simulation was too cold compared to measurements. The warming is related to sea-state dependent energy flux. This implies that a spatio-temporally varying wave-breaking coefficient is necessary, because it depends on actual sea state. Wave-induced cooling is mostly observed in near-coastal areas and is the result of intensified upwelling in the scenario, when Stokes-Coriolis forcing is accounted for. Accounting for sea-state dependent momentum flux results in modified heat exchange at the water-air boundary which consequently leads to warming of surface water compared to control simulation.

  10. Surface wave effects on water temperature in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on water temperature distribution and heat exchange at regional scale (the Baltic Sea). Four scenarios—including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination these forcings—were simulated to test the impact of different terms on simulated temperature distribution. The scenario simulations were compared to a control simulation, which included a constant wave-breaking coefficient, but otherwise was without any wave effects. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwelling's. Overall, when all three wave effects were accounted for, did the estimates of temperature improve compared to control simulation. During the summer, the wave-induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea, a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations in summer months. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data, e.g. the control simulation was too cold compared to measurements. The warming is related to sea-state dependent energy flux. This implies that a spatio-temporally varying wave-breaking coefficient is necessary, because it depends on actual sea state. Wave-induced cooling is mostly observed in near-coastal areas and is the result of intensified upwelling in the scenario, when Stokes-Coriolis forcing is accounted for. Accounting for sea-state dependent momentum flux results in modified heat exchange at the water-air boundary which consequently leads to warming of surface water compared to control simulation.

  11. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5 eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.

  12. Overland flow from plant patches: Coupled effects of preferential infiltration, surface roughness and depression storage at the semiarid Patagonian Monte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, María J.; Ares, Jorge O.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize and quantify the overland flow generated from the plant patch areas of spotted vegetation toward the immediate surrounding bare ground including the coupled effects of preferential infiltration, surface roughness and depression storage. To this aim a series of overland flow plot experiments were designed in areas of the Patagonian Monte where evidence of patch-to-soil overland flow was observed. The experiments produced data on the plot micro-topography and physical properties of the soil, root density and the frictional parameters of the overland flow as well as the extent of the areas of water depression storage. The obtained data were used to calibrate a spatial-explicit (CREST) hydrological model of the flows and pathways generated by stemflow and throughfall during characteristic storms in the area. Good agreement between the model estimates and the measured data was found. This work provides physically-based metrics of runoff redistribution from the plant patch areas toward the immediate surrounding bare soil areas, including the effect of plant roots and depression storage as influenced by various shapes of the plant patch slopes. It is concluded that water transport can result from stemflow and throughfall at the patch areas during typical rainfall events at the semiarid Patagonian Monte. Implications of this phenomenon in the surface distribution of water, nutrients and seeds may feasibly follow.

  13. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5more » eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.« less

  14. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5 eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states. PMID:25407432

  15. Defect detection in slab surface: a novel dual Charge-coupled Device imaging-based fuzzy connectedness strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liming; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Dengfu; Udupa, Jayaram K; Wang, Huiqian; Zeng, Yuebin

    2014-11-01

    To provide an accurate surface defects inspection system and make the automation of robust image segmentation method a reality in routine production line, a general approach is presented for continuous casting slab (CC-slab) surface defects extraction and delineation. The applicability of the system is not tied to CC-slab exclusively. We combined the line array CCD (Charge-coupled Device) traditional scanning imaging (LS-imaging) and area array CCD laser three-dimensional (3D) scanning imaging (AL-imaging) strategies in designing the system. Its aim is to suppress the respective imaging system's limitations. In the system, the images acquired from the two CCD sensors are carefully aligned in space and in time by maximum mutual information-based full-fledged registration schema. Subsequently, the image information is fused from these two subsystems such as the unbroken 2D information in LS-imaging and 3D depressed information in AL-imaging. Finally, on the basis of the established dual scanning imaging system the region of interest (ROI) localization by seed specification was designed, and the delineation for ROI by iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm was utilized to get a precise inspection result. Our method takes into account the complementary advantages in the two common machine vision (MV) systems and it performs competitively with the state-of-the-art as seen from the comparison of experimental results. For the first time, a joint imaging scanning strategy is proposed for CC-slab surface defect inspection that allows a feasible way of powerful ROI delineation strategies to be applied to the MV inspection field. Multi-ROI delineation by using IRFC in this research field may further improve the results. PMID:25430141

  16. Thermo-mechanically coupled subduction using AMR together with a true free surface and sticky air in ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraters, Menno; Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Spakman, Wim

    2015-04-01

    ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012), short for Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion, is a new Finite Element code which was originally designed for thermally driven (mantle) convection and is built on state of the art numerical methods (adaptive mesh refinement, linear and non-linear solver, stabilization of transport dominated processes and a high scalability on multiple processors). Here we present an application of ASPECT to the modelling of fully thermo-mechanically coupled subduction. Our model contains in the case of a true free surface three different compositions: two different crustal compositions, one on top of the subducting plate and one on top of the overriding plate, and a mantle composition. In the case of a free surface through a sticky air layer, a fourth composition representing this sticky air is added. We implemented a viscoplastic rheology using frictional plasticity and a composite viscosity defined by diffusion and dislocation creep. The lithospheric part of the mantle has the same composition as the rest of the mantle but has a higher viscosity because of a lower temperature. The temperature field is implemented in ASPECT as follows: a linear temperature gradient for the lithosphere and an adiabatic geotherm for the sublithospheric mantle. The Initial slab temperature is defined using the analytical solution of McKenzie (1970). The plates can be pushed from the sides of the model, and correspondingly it is possible to define an additional independent mantle in/out flow through the boundaries. We will show a preliminary set of models, highlighting the current codes capabilities, such as the fine tuned use of Adaptive Mesh Refinement in combination with topography development both through a true free surface and sticky air and solving for strongly non-linear rheologies.

  17. Improve the Strength of PLA/HA Composite Through the Use of Surface Initiated Polymerization and Phosphonic Acid Coupling Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C.; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav A.; Ting, Andy Hai; Dong, Quanxiao; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Bioresorbable composite made from degradable polymers, e.g., polylactide (PLA), and bioactive calcium phosphates, e.g., hydroxyapatite (HA), are clinically desirable for bone fixation, repair and tissue engineering because they do not need to be removed by surgery after the bone heals. However, preparation of PLA/HA composite from non-modified HA usually results in mechanical strength reductions due to a weak interface between PLA and HA. In this study, a calcium-phosphate/phosphonate hybrid shell was developed to introduce a greater amount of reactive hydroxyl groups onto the HA particles. Then, PLA was successfully grafted on HA by surface-initiated polymerization through the non-ionic surface hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis indiated that the amount of grafted PLA on HA can be up to 7 %, which is about 50 % greater than that from the literature. PLA grafted HA shows significantly different pH dependent ζ-potential and particle size profiles from those of uncoated HA. By combining the phosphonic acid coupling agent and surface initiated polymerization, PLA could directly link to HA through covalent bond so that the interfacial interaction in the PLA/HA composite can be significantly improved. The diametral tensile strength of PLA/HA composite prepared from PLA-grafted HA was found to be over twice that of the composite prepared from the non-modified HA. Moreover, the tensile strength of the improved composite was 23 % higher than that of PLA alone. By varying additional variables, this approach has the potential to produce bioresorbable composites with improved mechanical properties that are in the range of natural bones, and can have wide applications for bone fixation and repair in load-bearing areas. PMID:22399838

  18. Coupled Monitoring and Inverse Modeling to Investigate Surface - Subsurface Hydrological and Thermal Dynamics in the Arctic Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, A. P.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Bisht, G.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Wu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative characterization of the soil surface-subsurface hydrological and thermal processes is essential as they are primary factors that control the biogeochemical processes, ecological landscapes and greenhouse gas fluxes. In the Artic region, the surface-subsurface hydrological and thermal regimes co-interact and are both largely influenced by soil texture and soil organic content. In this study, we present a coupled inversion scheme that jointly inverts hydrological, thermal and geophysical data to estimate the vertical profiles of clay, sand and organic contents. Within this inversion scheme, the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) serves as a forward model to simulate the land-surface energy balance and subsurface hydrological-thermal processes. Soil electrical conductivity (from electrical resistivity tomography), temperature and water content are linked together via petrophysical and geophysical models. Particularly, the inversion scheme accounts for the influences of the soil organic and mineral content on both of the hydrological-thermal dynamics and the petrophysical relationship. We applied the inversion scheme to the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) intensive site in Barrow, AK, which is characterized by polygonal-shaped arctic tundra. The monitoring system autonomously provides a suite of above-ground measurements (e.g., precipitation, air temperature, wind speed, short-long wave radiation, canopy greenness and eddy covariance) as well as below-ground measurements (soil moisture, soil temperature, thaw layer thickness, snow thickness and soil electrical conductivity), which complement other periodic, manually collected measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the model can well reproduce the spatiotemporal dynamics of the soil temperature, and therefore, accurately predict the active layer thickness. The hydrological and thermal dynamics are closely linked to the polygon types and polygon features. The results also enable the

  19. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration under complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N. B.

    2010-07-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial scales. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at varying temporal and spatial scales under complex terrain. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can fully account for the dynamic impacts of complex terrain and changing land cover in concert with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement) over time. Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  20. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration over heterogeneous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N.-B.

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial coverage in the study areas. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at different temporal and spatial scales under heterogeneous terrain with varying elevations, slopes and aspects. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can account for the dynamic impacts of heterogeneous terrain and changing land cover with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement). Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  1. Couplings between the seasonal cycles of surface thermodynamics and radiative fluxes in the semi-arid Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, F.; Kergoat, L.; Mougin, E.; Timouk, F.; Bock, O.; Hiernaux, P.

    2009-04-01

    the total incoming radiation is limited to shorter time scales in Summer over this Central Sahelian location. However, observations also reveal astonishing radiative signatures of the monsoon on the surface incoming radiative flux. The incoming longwave flux does not reach its maximum during the monsoon season when the atmosphere is the most cloudy and humid, but earlier, prior to the onset of rainfall, as the dry and warmer atmosphere suddenly becomes moist. This feature points to the significance of the atmospheric cooling during the monsoon season and of the aerosol amounts in Spring. It also reveals that prior to the rainfall onset, the monsoon flow plays a major role on the diurnal cycle of the low-level temperature, due to its radiative properties. Conversely, the incoming solar radiation at the surface increases slightly from late Spring to the core monsoon season even though the atmosphere becomes moister and cloudier; this again involves the high aerosol optical thickness prevailing in late Spring and early Summer against a weaker shortwave forcing by monsoon clouds. The climatological combination of thermodynamic and radiative variations taking place during the monsoon eventually leads to a positive correlation between the equivalent potential temperature and Rnet. This correlation is, in turn, broadly consistent with an overall positive soil moisture rainfall feedback at this scale. Beyond these Sahelian-specific features, and in agreement with some previous studies, strong links are found between the atmospheric humidity and the net longwave flux, LWnet at the surface all year long, even across the much lower humidity ranges encountered in this region. They point to, and locally quantify the major control of water vapour and water-related processes on the surface-atmosphere thermal coupling as measured by LWnet. Namely, they are found to be more tightly coupled (LWnet closer to 0) when the atmosphere is moister and cloudier. Observational results such as

  2. Measuring groundwater flow at the Sanford Laboratory with coupled surface/subsurface time-lapse gravity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J.; Murdoch, L.; Long, A. J.; Koth, K.

    2011-12-01

    Limited options exist to measure groundwater processes, particularly at large depths. Coupled time-lapse gravity measurements at the surface and underground are one possibility, but despite recent advances in borehole instruments, no repeat underground gravity measurements of water-mass change have been reported. At the Sanford Laboratory-located at the Homestake Mine in Lead, South Dakota, and site of the proposed Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL)-the U.S. Geological Survey has established a network of 19 surface and 5 underground gravity stations to monitor groundwater-storage change over the projected 20-year existence of the underground laboratory. Continuous pumping is planned to dewater the mine to a depth of 2,500 m; the current pumping regime began in 2007 and current water levels (2011) are at a depth of about 1,700 m. Measurements using a field-portable A-10 absolute gravimeter have been made approximately annually at surface stations since 2007. Underground stations forming a vertical profile along the Ross Shaft on the 300, 800, 2000, 4100, and 4850 levels (numbers indicate approximate depth in feet) were established in 2011, and it is expected all stations will be surveyed annually. To date, surface time-lapse measurements show gravity increases of 50 to 100 nm/s^2 (10 nm/s^2 = 1 microgal) at some stations and equivalent decreases at others, indicating little evidence of water-mass change from pumping. Preliminary modeling, in which the dewatered zone is represented by a series of horizontal prisms that undergo mass change equal to the porosity (assumed 0.005, an average of rock porosity and mined-out voids), indicates that this is the expected result. At pumping rates required to maintain drawdown to a depth of 2,500 m, however, the expected gravity change increases from about 50 nm/s^2 at the surface to 250 nm/s^2 at the 4850 level. Gravity stations in the subsurface are advantageous because they are both closer to the water

  3. A comparison of surface air temperature variability in three 1000-Yr. coupled ocean-atmosphere model integrations

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, R.J.; Hegerl, G.; Tett, S.

    2000-02-01

    This study compares the variability of surface air temperature in three long coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model integrations. It is shown that the annual mean climatology of the surface air temperatures (SAT) in all three models is realistic and the linear trends over the 1,000-yr integrations are small over most areas of the globe. Second, although there are notable differences among the models, the models' SAT variability is fairly realistic on annual to decadal timescales, both in terms of the geographical distribution and of the global mean values. A notable exception is the poor simulation of observed tropical Pacific variability. In the HadCM2 model, the tropical variability is overestimated, while in the GFDL and HAM3L models, it is underestimated. Also, the ENSO-related spectral peak in the globally averaged observed SAT differs from that in any of the models. The relatively low resolution required to integrate models for long time periods inhibits the successful simulation of the variability in this region. On timescales longer than a few decades, the largest variance in the models is generally located near sea ice margins in high latitudes, which are also regions of deep oceanic convection and variability related to variations in the thermohaline circulation. However, the exact geographical location of these maxima varies from model to model. The preferred patterns of interdecadal variability that are common to all three coupled models can be isolated by computing empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of all model data simultaneously using the common EOF technique. A comparison of the variance each model associated with these common EOF patterns shows that the models generally agree on the most prominent patterns of variability. However, the amplitudes of the dominant models of variability differ to some extent between the models and between the models and observations. For example, two of the models have a mode with relatively large

  4. The coupling of surface charge and boundary slip at the solid-liquid interface and their combined effect on fluid drag: A review.

    PubMed

    Jing, Dalei; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-09-15

    Fluid drag of micro/nano fluidic systems has inspired wide scientific interest. Surface charge and boundary slip at the solid-liquid interface are believed to affect fluid drag. This review summarizes the recent studies on the coupling of surface charge and slip, and their combined effect on fluid drag at micro/nano scale. The effect of pH on surface charge of borosilicate glass and silica surfaces in deionized (DI) water and saline solution is discussed using a method based on colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). The boundary slip of various oil-solid interfaces are discussed for samples with different degrees of oleophobicity prepared by nanoparticle-binder system. By changing the pH of solution or applying an electric field, effect of surface charge on slip of a smooth hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) in DI water and saline solution is studied. A theoretical model incorporating the coupling relationship between surface charge and slip is used to discuss the combined effect of surface charge-induced electric double layer (EDL) and slip on fluid drag of pressure-driven flow in a one-dimensional parallel-plates microchannel. A theoretical method is used to reduce the fluid drag. The studies show that the increasing magnitude of surface charge density leads to a decrease in slip length. The surface charge results in a larger fluid drag, and the coupling of surface charge and slip can further increase the fluid drag. Surface charge-induced EDLs with asymmetric zeta potentials can effectively reduce the fluid drag. PMID:26021432

  5. Influence of Idealized Heterogeneity on Wet and Dry Planetary Boundary Layers Coupled to the Land Surface. 1; Instantaneous Fields and Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor); Patton, Edward G.; Sullivan, Peter P.; Moeng, Chin-Hoh

    2003-01-01

    This is the first in a two-part series of manuscripts describing numerical experiments on the influence of 2-30 km striplike heterogeneity on wet and dry boundary layers coupled to the land surface. The strip-like heterogeneity is shown to dramatically alter the structure of the free-convective boundary layer by inducing significant organized circulations that modify turbulent statistics. The coupling with the land-surface modifies the circulations compared to previous studies using fixed surface forcing. Total boundary layer turbulence kinetic energy increases significantly for surface heterogeneity at scales between Lambda/z(sub i) = 4 and 9, however entrainment rates for all cases are largely unaffected by the strip-like heterogeneity.

  6. Assessment of Snow-Water Equivalent Change in Regional Climate Simulations Coupled with Different Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Önol, Barış; Acar, Merve

    2014-05-01

    In this study, ICTP-RegCM4 simulations coupled with two land surface models, BATS (Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme) and CLM (Community Land Model), have been evaluated for present (1971-2000) and future period (2005-2100) over the Med-CORDEX domain. HaDGEM2 simulations forced by RCP8.5 have been used for lateral forcing to produce 50-km RCM simulation. In addition, we have also tested model results, driven by ERA-Interim, with observations to define deficiency of the model. Precipitation simulation biases are positive for nearly all over Anatolian mountains range (>1000m) in winter. The diverse bias pattern in precipitation is also calculated over lower regions of Alps and Turkey (<500m). Snow-water equivalent changes in future climate simulations are evaluated for two land surface models, BATS and CLM. Snow-water equivalent (SWE) has been analyzed considering snow-melt timing in spring season. In terms of SWE over Balkans, CLM simulation in April is not produced snow after the year of 2040. The dramatic decrease in SWE has been also determined for the highland of Turkey (>1500) in last three decades of the 21st century for both CLM and BATS simulations. After 2050's, SWE in CLM simulaton is less than 5 mm for the areas over Turkey where the elevation is lower than 1000 m. The decrease in BATS simulation is strengthened in the second half of century over the Alpine region (>1000m) and SWE change between the first and the second half of the century is 47% (67 mm). Especially, precipitation minus evaporation changes are diverse for both CLM and BATS driven simulations. The results based on daily and monthly time scales have been evaluated to assess hydrological impact in scenario simulations and snow-melt season shift for both simulations have been investigated over Med_CORDEX domain.

  7. Short-term water level forecasts for the Laurentian Great Lakes using coupled atmosphere, land-surface and lake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Vincent; Mackay, Murray; Casas-Prat, Mercè; Seglenieks, Frank; Dyck, Sarah; Dupont, Frédéric; Roy, François; Smith, Gregory C.

    2015-04-01

    Over the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Environment Canada operates a very successful short-term (48-h) environmental prediction system which includes the GEM atmospheric model, the ISBA land-surface model and the NEMO-CICE ice-ocean model. The positive impact of two-way coupling between the atmosphere and ocean is most clearly seen in winter, due to the presence of a dynamic ice cover and large heat fluxes over the ocean. This system is now being tested over the Laurentian Great Lakes, with the same objective of improving forecasts both for the atmosphere and the water bodies. In order to account for the significant impact of streamflow on the water level and water temperature of the Great Lakes, routing models for river flow and for connecting channels between lakes were added to the system. Offline tests demonstrated the capacity of the system to accurately simulate seasonal and multi-annual fluctuations in water levels and ice cover, as well as the need for consistent heat flux calculations in the atmospheric and ocean models. In this presentation, we focus on the skill of short-term water level forecasts. Over a few days, water levels of the Great Lakes mainly respond to the wind stress, but also change with surface pressure, precipitation, evaporation and river flow. The approach taken to account for each of these factors is described, and the skill of the resulting water level forecast is assessed over the fall of 2014 and the winter of 2015. It is shown that the system can accurately predict storm surges and seiches at the hourly time scale, with a skill that decreases slowly over 48-h, suggesting that skillful forecasts with longer lead times are feasible. A plan for increasing the lead time up to one month is presented.

  8. Direct observation of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water and relevance of approximate resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The theoretical framework of Weak Turbulence describes the statistical properties of a large collection of nonlinear waves. For a weakly nonlinear wave field, energy is assumed to be transferred only trough resonant interaction. This enables the computation of analytical solutions of the stationary statistical states (Zakhaorv spectrum). Some similarities with hydrodynamical turbulence appear : an energy cascade is present from the injection scale to the dissipation at small scales. The theory has been applied to numerous systems many of them being of geophysical or astrophysical nature (water surface waves, internal waves, inertial waves, solar winds) as well as superfluid turbulence, lasers, nonlinear optics in fibers or vibrated elastic plates. For water surface waves, experimental laboratory measurements often fail to reproduce quantitatively theoretical predictions. Gravity waves and capillary waves are often treated separately because of their different nature. For capillary waves, energy is supposed to be transferred trough 3-waves interactions, whereas for gravity waves the coupling involves 4 waves (because of the curvature of the dispersion relation which does not allow triadic solutions). In the laboratory, the range of exited wavelength are usually not strongly separated from the crossover between capillary and gravity waves (which occur near 13 Hz) due to size or measurement limitations. Near this crossover, the dispersion relation is significantly affected and this impacts most likely the theoretical predictions. To investigate how this special point may act on the phenomenology, we report laboratory experiments on gravity-capillary waves focused on the crossover (Aubourg,Mordant-PRL,2015). The setup consists in a 70 ∗ 40 cm2 vessel where waves are generated by horizontal