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Sample records for probing cosmic accelerators

  1. Observational probes of cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Mortonson, Michael J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hirata, Christopher; Riess, Adam G.; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades, implying that the universe is dominated by some form of “dark energy” with exotic physical properties, or that Einstein’s theory of gravity breaks down on cosmological scales. The profound implications of cosmic acceleration have inspired ambitious efforts to understand its origin, with experiments that aim to measure the history of expansion and growth of structure with percent-level precision or higher. We review in detail the four most well established methods for making such measurements: Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), weak gravitational lensing, and the abundance of galaxy clusters. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties in these techniques and to strategies for controlling them at the level needed to exploit “Stage IV” dark energy facilities such as BigBOSS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. We briefly review a number of other approaches including redshift-space distortions, the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and direct measurements of the Hubble constant H0. We present extensive forecasts for constraints on the dark energy equation of state and parameterized deviations from General Relativity, achievable with Stage III and Stage IV experimental programs that incorporate supernovae, BAO, weak lensing, and cosmic microwave background data. We also show the level of precision required for clusters or other methods to provide constraints competitive with those of these fiducial programs. We emphasize the value of a balanced program that employs several of the most powerful methods in combination, both to cross-check systematic uncertainties and to take advantage of complementary information. Surveys to probe cosmic acceleration produce data sets that support a wide range of scientific investigations, and they continue the longstanding astronomical tradition of mapping the universe in ever greater detail over ever

  2. Probing cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation with H{sub 3}{sup +} observations

    SciTech Connect

    Indriolo, Nick; Fields, Brian D.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-22

    As cosmic rays traverse the interstellar medium (ISM) they interact with the ambient gas in various ways. These include ionization of atoms and molecules, spallation of nuclei, excitation of nuclear states, and production of pions among others. All of these interactions produce potential observables which may be used to trace the flux of cosmic rays. One such observable is the molecular ion H{sub 3}{sup +}-produced via the ionization of an H{sub 2} molecule and its subsequent collision with another H{sub 2}-which can be identified by absorption lines in the 3.5-4 μm spectral region. We have detected H{sub 3}{sup +} in several Galactic diffuse cloud sight lines and used the derived column densities to infer ζ{sub 2}, the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H{sub 2}. Ionization rates determined in this way vary from about 7×10{sup −17} s{sup −1} to about 8×10{sup −16} s{sup −1}, and suggest the possibility of discrete sources producing high local fluxes of low-energy cosmic rays. Theoretical calculations of the ionization rate from postulated cosmic-ray spectra also support this possibility. Our recent observations of H{sub 3}{sup +} near the supernova remnant IC 443 (a likely site of cosmic-ray acceleration) point to even higher ionization rates, on the order of 10{sup −15} s{sup −1}. Together, all of these results can further our understanding of the cosmic-ray spectrum both near the acceleration source and in the general Galactic ISM.

  3. Cosmic Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Tajima, Toshiki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2002-10-01

    A cosmic acceleration mechanism is introduced which is based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically flowing plasma. We show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f([epsilon]) [is proportional to] 1/[epsilon]2. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations. [copyright] 2002 American Institute of Physics

  4. Cosmic ray antiprotons from nearby cosmic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Gupta, Nayantara

    2015-05-01

    The antiproton flux measured by PAMELA experiment might have originated from Galactic sources of cosmic rays. These antiprotons are expected to be produced in the interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei with cold protons. Gamma rays are also produced in similar interactions inside some of the cosmic accelerators. We consider a few nearby supernova remnants observed by Fermi LAT. Many of them are associated with molecular clouds. Gamma rays have been detected from these sources which most likely originate in decay of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions. The observed gamma ray fluxes from these SNRs are used to find out their contributions to the observed diffuse cosmic ray antiproton flux near the earth.

  5. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  6. Cosmic ray studies with an Interstellar Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    1990-01-01

    Among the NASA mission concepts that have been suggested for the 21st century is an Interstellar Probe that might be accelerated to a velocity of about 10 to 20 AU/yr, allowing it to leave the heliosphere, ultimately reaching a radial distance of about 500 to 1000 AU in about 50 years. Previous studies of such a mission, and its potential significance for cosmic ray studies, both within the heliosphere, and beyond, in interstellar space are discussed.

  7. Is cosmic acceleration slowing down?

    SciTech Connect

    Shafieloo, Arman; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2009-11-15

    We investigate the course of cosmic expansion in its recent past using the Constitution SN Ia sample, along with baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Allowing the equation of state of dark energy (DE) to vary, we find that a coasting model of the universe (q{sub 0}=0) fits the data about as well as Lambda cold dark matter. This effect, which is most clearly seen using the recently introduced Om diagnostic, corresponds to an increase of Om and q at redshifts z < or approx. 0.3. This suggests that cosmic acceleration may have already peaked and that we are currently witnessing its slowing down. The case for evolving DE strengthens if a subsample of the Constitution set consisting of SNLS+ESSENCE+CfA SN Ia data is analyzed in combination with BAO+CMB data. The effect we observe could correspond to DE decaying into dark matter (or something else)

  8. The cosmic-ray pathlength distribution at low energy - A new probe of the source/acceleration regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.; Wefel, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Compiled measurements of secondary to primary ratios covering the charge range Z = 3-26 and the energy range 0.05 - 50 GeV/nucleon are analyzed in energy dependent galactic propagation plus solar modulation calculations. The cosmic ray pathlength distribution is shown to consist of two energy dependent components interpreted as representing confinement in the galaxy and confinement in the 'source' regions.

  9. Matter creation and cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Rudnei O.; Vargas dos Santos, Marcelo; Waga, Ioav

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the creation of cold dark matter (CCDM) cosmology as an alternative to explain the cosmic acceleration. Particular attention is given to the evolution of density perturbations and constraints coming from recent observations. By assuming negligible effective sound speed we compare CCDM predictions with redshift-space-distortion based f(z)σ8(z) measurements. We identify a subtle issue associated with which contribution in the density contrast should be used in this test and then show that the CCDM results are the same as those obtained with ΛCDM. These results are then contrasted with the ones obtained at the background level. For the background tests we have used type Ia supernovae data (Union 2.1 compilation) in combination with baryonic acoustic oscillations and cosmic microwave background observations and also measurements of the Hubble parameter at different redshifts. As a consequence of the studies we have performed at both the background and perturbation levels, we explicitly show that CCDM is observationally degenerate with respect to ΛCDM (dark degeneracy). The need to overcome the lack of a fundamental microscopic basis for the CCDM is the major challenge for this kind of model.

  10. When did cosmic acceleration start?

    SciTech Connect

    Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Pandolfi, Stefania

    2007-08-15

    A precise determination, and comparison, of the epoch of the onset of cosmic acceleration, at redshift z{sub acc}, and of dark energy domination, at z{sub eq}, provides an interesting measure with which to parametrize dark energy models. By combining several cosmological data sets, we place constraints on the redshift and age of cosmological acceleration. For a {lambda}CDM model, we find the constraint z{sub acc}=0.76{+-}0.10 at 95% C.L., occurring 6.7{+-}0.4 Gyr ago. Allowing a constant equation of state but different from -1 changes the constraint to z{sub acc}=0.81{+-}0.12 (6.9{+-}0.5 Gyr ago), while dynamical models markedly increase the error on the constraint z{sub acc}=0.81{+-}0.30 (6.8{+-}1.4 Gyr ago). Unified dark energy models such as silent quartessence yield z{sub acc}=0.8{+-}0.16 (6.8{+-}0.6 Gyr ago). Interestingly, we find that the best fit z{sub acc} and z{sub eq} are remarkably insensitive to both the cosmological data sets and theoretical dark energy models considered.

  11. Ion acceleration to cosmic ray energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Martin A.

    1990-01-01

    The acceleration and transport environment of the outer heliosphere is described schematically. Acceleration occurs where the divergence of the solar-wind flow is negative, that is at shocks, and where second-order Fermi acceleration is possible in the solar-wind turbulence. Acceleration at the solar-wind termination shock is presented by reviewing the spherically-symmetric calculation of Webb et al. (1985). Reacceleration of galactic cosmic rays at the termination shock is not expected to be important in modifying the cosmic ray spectrum, but acceleration of ions injected at the shock up to energies not greater than 300 MeV/charge is expected to occur and to create the anomalous cosmic ray component. Acceleration of energetic particles by solar wind turbulence is expected to play almost no role in the outer heliosphere. The one exception is the energization of interstellar pickup ions beyond the threshold for acceleration at the quasi-perpendicular termination shock.

  12. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; et al

    2014-03-15

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansionmore » such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.« less

  13. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze; Van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2014-03-15

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.

  14. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  15. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E.; Becker Tjus, Julia

    2013-12-20

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  16. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  17. Cosmic Ray Origin, Acceleration and Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes highlights of the OG3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 sessions of the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference in Salt Lake City, which were devoted to issues of origin/composition, acceleration and propagation.

  18. Cosmic acceleration and Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M. Waheed, S.

    2012-10-15

    We study the accelerated expansion of the universe by exploring the Brans-Dicke parameter in different eras. For this, we take the FRW universe model with a viscous fluid (without potential) and the Bianchi type-I universe model with a barotropic fluid (with and without a potential). We evaluate the deceleration parameter and the Brans-Dicke parameter to explore cosmic acceleration. It is concluded that accelerated expansion of the universe can also be achieved for higher values of the Brans-Dicke parameter in some cases.

  19. Acceleration of cosmic rays in Tycho's SNR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlino, G.; Caprioli, D.

    We apply the non-linear diffusive shock acceleration theory in order to describe the properties of SN 1572 (G120.1+1.4, hereafter simply Tycho). By analyzing its multi-wavelength spectrum, we show how Tycho's forward shock (FS) is accelerating protons up to ˜ 500 TeV, channeling into cosmic rays more than 10 per cent of its kinetic energy. We find that the streaming instability induced by cosmic rays is consistent with all the observational evidences indicating a very efficient magnetic field amplification (up to ˜ 300 mu G), in particular the X-ray morphology of the remnant. We are able to explain the gamma-ray spectrum from the GeV up to the TeV band, recently measured respectively by Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, as due to pion decay produced in nuclear collisions by accelerated nuclei scattering against the background gas. We also show that emission due to the accelerated electrons does not play a relevant role in the observed gamma-ray spectrum.

  20. Superdiffusion of cosmic rays: Implications for cosmic ray acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Yan, Huirong

    2014-03-20

    Diffusion of cosmic rays (CRs) is the key process for understanding their propagation and acceleration. We employ the description of spatial separation of magnetic field lines in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in Lazarian and Vishniac to quantify the divergence of the magnetic field on scales less than the injection scale of turbulence and show that this divergence induces superdiffusion of CR in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. The perpendicular displacement squared increases, not as the distance x along the magnetic field, which is the case for a regular diffusion, but as the x {sup 3} for freely streaming CRs. The dependence changes to x {sup 3/2} for the CRs propagating diffusively along the magnetic field. In the latter case, we show that it is important to distinguish the perpendicular displacement with respect to the mean field and to the local magnetic field. We consider how superdiffusion changes the acceleration of CRs in shocks and show how it decreases efficiency of the CRs acceleration in perpendicular shocks. We also demonstrate that in the case when the small-scale magnetic field is generated in the pre-shock region, an efficient acceleration can take place for the CRs streaming without collisions along the magnetic loops.

  1. New cosmic accelerating scenario without dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Basilakos, S.; Costa, F. E. M.

    2012-11-01

    We propose an alternative, nonsingular, cosmic scenario based on gravitationally induced particle production. The model is an attempt to evade the coincidence and cosmological constant problems of the standard model (ΛCDM) and also to connect the early and late time accelerating stages of the Universe. Our space-time emerges from a pure initial de Sitter stage thereby providing a natural solution to the horizon problem. Subsequently, due to an instability provoked by the production of massless particles, the Universe evolves smoothly to the standard radiation dominated era thereby ending the production of radiation as required by the conformal invariance. Next, the radiation becomes subdominant with the Universe entering in the cold dark matter dominated era. Finally, the negative pressure associated with the creation of cold dark matter (CCDM model) particles accelerates the expansion and drives the Universe to a final de Sitter stage. The late time cosmic expansion history of the CCDM model is exactly like in the standard ΛCDM model; however, there is no dark energy. The model evolves between two limiting (early and late time) de Sitter regimes. All the stages are also discussed in terms of a scalar field description. This complete scenario is fully determined by two extreme energy densities, or equivalently, the associated de Sitter Hubble scales connected by ρI/ρf=(HI/Hf)2˜10122, a result that has no correlation with the cosmological constant problem. We also study the linear growth of matter perturbations at the final accelerating stage. It is found that the CCDM growth index can be written as a function of the Λ growth index, γΛ≃6/11. In this framework, we also compare the observed growth rate of clustering with that predicted by the current CCDM model. Performing a χ2 statistical test we show that the CCDM model provides growth rates that match sufficiently well with the observed growth rate of structure.

  2. New Kinematical Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steve W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger; /-KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-05-25

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t)=j, we measure q{sub 0}=-0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j=2.16 +0.81 -0.75, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible.

  3. PROBING THE UNIVERSE'S TILT WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND DIPOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov

    2011-06-10

    Conventional interpretation of the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole is that all of it is produced by local peculiar motions. Alternative explanations requiring part of the dipole to be primordial have received support from measurements of large-scale bulk flows. A test of the two hypotheses is whether other cosmic dipoles produced by collapsed structures later than the last scattering coincide with the CMB dipole. One background is the cosmic infrared background (CIB) whose absolute spectrum was measured to {approx}30% by the COBE satellite. Over the 100-500 {mu}m wavelength range its spectral energy distribution can provide a probe of its alignment with the CMB. This is tested with the COBE FIRAS data set which is available for such a measurement because of its low noise and frequency resolution which are important for Galaxy subtraction. Although the FIRAS instrument noise is in principle low enough to determine the CIB dipole, the Galactic foreground is sufficiently close spectrally to keep the CIB dipole hidden. A similar analysis is performed with DIRBE, which-because of the limited frequency coverage-provides a poorer data set. We discuss strategies for measuring the CIB dipole with future instruments to probe the tilt and apply it to the Planck, Herschel, and the proposed Pixie missions. We demonstrate that a future FIRAS-like instrument with instrument noise a factor of {approx}10 lower than FIRAS would make a statistically significant measurement of the CIB dipole. We find that the Planck and Herschel data sets will not allow a robust CIB dipole measurement. The Pixie instrument promises a determination of the CIB dipole and its alignment with either the CMB dipole or the dipole galaxy acceleration vector.

  4. Growth of cosmic structure: Probing dark energy beyond expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anže; van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2015-03-01

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. One way to explain the acceleration of the Universe is invoke dark energy parameterized by an equation of state w. Distance measurements provide one set of constraints on w, but dark energy also affects how rapidly structure grows; the greater the acceleration, the more suppressed the growth of structure. Upcoming surveys are therefore designed to probe w with direct observations of the distance scale and the growth of structure, each complementing the other on systematic errors and constraints on dark energy. A consistent set of results will greatly increase the reliability of the final answer. Another possibility is that there is no dark energy, but that General Relativity does not describe the laws of physics accurately on large scales. While the properties of gravity have been measured with exquisite precision at stellar system scales and densities, within our solar system and by binary pulsar systems, its properties in different environments are poorly constrained. To fully understand if General Relativity is the complete theory of gravity we must test gravity across a spectrum of scales and densities. Rapid developments in gravitational wave astronomy and numerical relativity are directed at testing gravity in the high

  5. Solar Cosmic Ray Acceleration and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The GOES data for emission of flare protons with the energies of 10 - 100 MeV are analyzed. Proton fluxes of ~1032 accelerated particles take place at the current sheet decay. Proton acceleration in a flare occurs along a singular line of the current sheet by the Lorentz electric field, as in the pinch gas discharge. The duration of proton flux measured on the Earth orbit is by 2 - 3 orders of magnitude longer than the duration of flares. The high energy proton flux from the flares that appear on the western part of the solar disk arrives to Earth with the time of flight. These particles propagate along magnetic lines of the Archimedes spiral connecting the flare with the Earth. Protons from the flare on the eastern part of the solar disk begin to register with a delay of several hours. Such particles cannot get on the magnetic field line connecting the flare with the Earth. These protons reach the Earth, moving across the interplanetary magnetic field. The particles captured by the magnetic field in the solar wind are transported with solar wind and due to diffusion across the magnetic field. The patterns of solar cosmic rays generation demonstrated in this paper are not always observed in the small ('1 cm-2 s-1 ster-1) proton events.

  6. Cosmic ray sources, acceleration and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ptuskin, V. S.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given of selected papers on the theory of cosmic ray (CR) propagation and acceleration. The high isotropy and a comparatively large age of galactic CR are explained by the effective interaction of relativistic particles with random and regular electromagnetic fields in interstellar medium. The kinetic theory of CR propagation in the Galaxy is formulated similarly to the elaborate theory of CR propagation in heliosphere. The substantial difference between these theories is explained by the necessity to take into account in some cases the collective effects due to a rather high density of relativisitc particles. In particular, the kinetic CR stream instability and the hydrodynamic Parker instability is studied. The interaction of relativistic particles with an ensemble of given weak random magnetic fields is calculated by perturbation theory. The theory of CR transfer is considered to be basically completed for this case. The main problem consists in poor information about the structure of the regular and the random galactic magnetic fields. An account is given of CR transfer in a turbulent medium.

  7. Stellar black holes and the origin of cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Afshordi, Niayesh; Balogh, Michael L.

    2009-08-15

    The discovery of cosmic acceleration has presented a unique challenge for cosmologists. As observational cosmology forges ahead, theorists have struggled to make sense of a standard model that requires extreme fine-tuning. This challenge is known as the cosmological constant problem. The theory of gravitational aether is an alternative to general relativity that does not suffer from this fine-tuning problem, as it decouples the quantum field theory vacuum from geometry, while remaining consistent with other tests of gravity. In this paper, we study static black hole solutions in this theory and show that it manifests a UV-IR coupling: Aether couples the space-time metric close to the black hole horizon, to metric at infinity. We then show that using the trans-Planckian ansatz (as a quantum gravity effect) close to the black hole horizon, leads to an accelerating cosmological solution, far from the horizon. Interestingly, this acceleration matches current observations for stellar-mass black holes. Based on our current understanding of the black hole accretion history in the Universe, we then make a prediction for how the effective dark energy density should evolve with redshift, which can be tested with future dark energy probes.

  8. Ionisation as indicator for cosmic ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuppan, F.; Röken, C.; Fedrau, N.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2014-06-01

    Astrospheres and wind bubbles of massive stars are believed to be sources of cosmic rays with energies E ≲ 1 TeV. These particles are not directly detectable, but their impact on surrounding matter, in particular ionisation of atomic and molecular hydrogen, can lead to observable signatures. A correlation study of both gamma ray emission, induced by proton-proton interactions of cosmic ray protons with kinetic energies Ep ≥ 280 MeV with ambient hydrogen, and ionisation induced by cosmic ray protons of kinetic energies Ep < 280 MeV can be performed in order to study potential sources of (sub)TeV cosmic rays.

  9. Particle acceleration in cosmic sites. Astrophysics issues in our understanding of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, R. L.

    2009-11-01

    Particles are accelerated in cosmic sites probably under conditions very different from those at terrestrial particle accelerator laboratories. Nevertheless, specific experiments which explore plasma conditions and stimulate particle acceleration carry significant potential to illuminate some aspects of the cosmic particle acceleration process. Here we summarize our understanding of cosmic particle acceleration, as derived from observations of the properties of cosmic ray particles, and through astronomical signatures caused by these near their sources or throughout their journey in interstellar space. We discuss the candidate-source object variety, and what has been learned about their particle-acceleration characteristics. We conclude identifying open issues as they are discussed among astrophysicists. - The cosmic ray differential intensity spectrum across energies from 1010 eV to 1021 eV reveals a rather smooth power-law spectrum. Two kinks occur at the “knee” (≃1015 eV) and at the “ankle” (≃ 3×1018 eV). It is unclear if these kinks are related to boundaries between different dominating sources, or rather related to characteristics of cosmic-ray propagation. Currently we believe that galactic sources dominate up to 1017 eV or even above, and the extragalactic origin of cosmic rays at highest energies merges rather smoothly with galactic contributions throughout the 1015-1018 eV range. Pulsars and supernova remnants are among the prime candidates for galactic cosmic-ray production, while nuclei of active galaxies are considered best candidates to produce ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays of extragalactic origin. The acceleration processes are probably related to shocks formed when matter is ejected into surrounding space from energetic sources such as supernova explosions or matter accreting onto black holes. Details of shock acceleration are complex, as relativistic particles modify the structure of the shock, and simple approximations or perturbation

  10. Cosmic-ray acceleration at stellar wind terminal shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Axford, W. I.; Forman, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state spherically symmetric analytic solutions of the cosmic-ray transport equations, applicable to the problem of acceleration of cosmic rays at the terminal shock to a stellar wind, are studied. The spectra, graidents, and flow patterns of particles modulated and accelerated by the stellar wind and shock are investigated by means of monoenergetic-source solutions at finite radius, as well as solutions with monoenergetic and power-law galactic spectra. On the basis of calculations given, early-type stars could supply a significant fraction of the 3 x 10 to the 40th ergs/sec required by galactic cosmic rays.

  11. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-19

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10^{-7}  GeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (pγ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ-ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments. PMID:26943524

  12. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10-7 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ -ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (p γ ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ -ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments.

  13. Secondary antiprotons - A valuable cosmic-ray probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1977-01-01

    Even in the absence of antiprotons in the primary cosmic rays, a flux of secondary antiprotons will be produced in collisions between cosmic rays and interstellar gas. The predicted antiproton fraction increases with increasing cosmic-ray confinement, so that observations of antiprotons will provide a probe of models of cosmic-ray confinement. It is shown that the expected antiproton fraction (for energies of at least about 10 GeV) ranges between 0.00023 for the 'leaky box' model and 0.0018 for the 'closed box' model. In addition, attention is called to the fact that a detection of cosmic-ray antiprotons at or above a level of 0.0002 will provide a valuable lower limit to the antiproton lifetime.

  14. Xenia: A Probe of Cosmic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Piro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Xenia is a concept study for a medium-size astrophysical cosmology mission addressing the Cosmic Origins key objective of NASA's Science Plan. The fundamental goal of this objective is to understand the formation and evolution of structures on various scales from the early Universe to the present time (stars, galaxies and the cosmic web). Xenia will use X-and y-ray monitoring and wide field X-ray imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy to collect essential information from three major tracers of these cosmic structures: the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), Galaxy Clusters and Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Our goal is to trace the chemo-dynamical history of the ubiquitous warm hot diffuse baryon component in the Universe residing in cosmic filaments and clusters of galaxies up to its formation epoch (at z =0-2) and to map star formation and galaxy metal enrichment into the re-ionization era beyond z 6. The concept of Xenia (Greek for "hospitality") evolved in parallel with the Explorer of Diffuse Emission and GRB Explosions (EDGE), a mission proposed by a multinational collaboration to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015. Xenia incorporates the European and Japanese collaborators into a U.S. led mission that builds on the scientific objectives and technological readiness of EDGE.

  15. Cosmic microwave background probes models of inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard L.; Hodges, Hardy M.; Smoot, George F.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    Inflation creates both scalar (density) and tensor (gravity wave) metric perturbations. We find that the tensor-mode contribution to the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on large-angular scales can only exceed that of the scalar mode in models where the spectrum of perturbations deviates significantly from scale invariance. If the tensor mode dominates at large-angular scales, then the value of DeltaT/T predicted on 1 deg is less than if the scalar mode dominates, and, for cold-dark-matter models, bias factors greater than 1 can be made consistent with Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) DMR results.

  16. Angular Anisotropies in the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background as a Probe of Its Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    Notwithstanding the advent of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, theoretical models predict that a significant fraction of the cosmic γ-ray background (CGB), at a level of 20% of the currently measured value, will remain unresolved. The angular power spectrum of intensity fluctuations of the CGB contains information on its origin. We show that probing the latter on scales from a few tens of arcminutes to several degrees, together with complementary GLAST observations of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters and the blazar luminosity function, can discriminate between a background that originates from unresolved blazars or cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks.

  17. Cosmic-ray shock acceleration in oblique MHD shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Drury, L. OC.; Volk, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional, steady-state hydrodynamical model of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique MHD shocks is presented. Upstream of the shock the incoming thermal plasma is subject to the adverse pressure gradient of the accelerated particles, the J x B force, as well as the thermal gas pressure gradient. The efficiency of the acceleration of cosmic-rays at the shock as a function of the upstream magnetic field obliquity and upstream plasma beta is investigated. Astrophysical applications of the results are briefly discussed.

  18. A cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays detected by Fermi in the Cygnus superbubble.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Belfiore, A; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hays, E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lee, S-H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Martin, P; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pohl, M; Prokhorov, D; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Parkinson, P M Saz; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; Bontemps, S

    2011-11-25

    The origin of Galactic cosmic rays is a century-long puzzle. Indirect evidence points to their acceleration by supernova shockwaves, but we know little of their escape from the shock and their evolution through the turbulent medium surrounding massive stars. Gamma rays can probe their spreading through the ambient gas and radiation fields. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed the star-forming region of Cygnus X. The 1- to 100-gigaelectronvolt images reveal a 50-parsec-wide cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays that flood the cavities carved by the stellar winds and ionization fronts from young stellar clusters. It provides an example to study the youth of cosmic rays in a superbubble environment before they merge into the older Galactic population. PMID:22116880

  19. Strangelets accelerated by pulsars in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K. S.; Usov, V. V.

    2006-12-15

    It is shown that nuggets of strange quark matter may be extracted from the surface of pulsars and accelerated by strong electric fields to high energies if pulsars are strange stars with the crusts, comprised of nuggets embedded in a uniform electron background. Such high energy nuggets called usually strangelets give an observable contribution into galactic cosmic rays and may be detected by the upcoming cosmic ray experiment Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02 on the International Space Station.

  20. Intergalactic shock acceleration and the cosmic gamma-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2002-11-01

    We investigate numerically the contribution to the cosmic gamma-ray background from cosmic-ray ions and electrons accelerated at intergalactic shocks associated with cosmological structure formation. We show that the kinetic energy of accretion flows in the low-redshift intergalactic medium is thermalized primarily through moderately strong shocks, which allow for an efficient conversion of shock ram pressure into cosmic-ray pressure. Cosmic rays accelerated at these shocks produce a diffuse gamma-ray flux which is dominated by inverse Compton emission from electrons scattering off cosmic microwave background photons. Decay of neutral π mesons generated in p-p inelastic collisions of the ionic cosmic-ray component with the thermal gas contribute about 30 per cent of the computed emission. Based on experimental upper limits on the photon flux above 100 MeV from nearby clusters we constrain the efficiency of conversion of shock ram pressure into relativistic CR electrons to <~1 per cent. Thus, we find that cosmic rays of cosmological origin can generate an overall significant fraction of order 20 per cent and no more than 30 per cent of the measured gamma-ray background.

  1. X-ray Observations of Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of cosmic rays, detection of their sources has remained elusive. A major breakthrough has come through the identification of synchrotron X-rays from the shocks of supernova remnants through imaging and spectroscopic observations by the most recent generation of X-ray observatories. This radiation is most likely produced by electrons accelerated to relativistic energy, and thus has offered the first, albeit indirect, observational evidence that diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants produces cosmic rays to TeV energies, possibly as high as the "knee" in the cosmic ray spectrum. X-ray observations have provided information about the maximum energy to which these shOCks accelerate electrons, as well as indirect evidence of proton acceleration. Shock morphologies measured in X-rays have indicated that a substantial fraction of the shock energy can be diverted into particle acceleration. This presentation will summarize what we have learned about cosmic ray acceleration from X-ray observations of supernova remnants over the past two decades.

  2. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-24

    An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.

  3. Constraint on electromagnetic acceleration of highest energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2003-04-01

    The energetics of electromagnetic acceleration of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is constrained both by confinement of a particle within an acceleration site and by radiative energy losses of the particle in the confining magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the detection of approximately 3 x 10(20) eV events is inconsistent with the hypothesis that compact cosmic accelerators with high magnetic fields can be the sources of UHECRs. This rules out the most popular candidates, namely spinning neutron stars, active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Galaxy clusters and, perhaps, AGN radio lobes and gamma-ray burst blast waves remain the only possible (although not very strong) candidates for UHECR acceleration sites. Our analysis places no limit on linear accelerators. With the data from the future Auger experiment one should be able to answer whether a conventional theory works or some new physics is required to explain the origin of UHECRs. PMID:12786427

  4. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  5. Probing cosmic strings with satellite CMB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, E.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Smoot, G.F. E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2010-09-01

    We study the problem of searching for cosmic string signal patterns in the present high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This article discusses a technique capable of recognizing Kaiser-Stebbins effect signatures in total intensity anisotropy maps from isolated strings. We derive the statistical distributions of null detections from purely Gaussian fluctuations and instrumental performances of the operating satellites, and show that the biggest factor that produces confusion is represented by the acoustic oscillation features of the scale comparable to the size of horizon at recombination. Simulations show that the distribution of null detections converges to a χ{sup 2} distribution, with detectability threshold at 99% confidence level corresponding to a string induced step signal with an amplitude of about 100 μK which corresponds to a limit of roughly Gμ ∼ 1.5 × 10{sup −6}. We implement simulations for deriving the statistics of spurious detections caused by extra-Galactic and Galactic foregrounds. For diffuse Galactic foregrounds, which represents the dominant source of contamination, we construct sky masks outlining the available region of the sky where the Galactic confusion is sub-dominant, specializing our analysis to the case represented by the frequency coverage and nominal sensitivity and resolution of the Planck experiment. As for other CMB measurements, the maximum available area, corresponding to 7%, is reached where the foreground emission is expected to be minimum, in the 70–100 GHz interval.

  6. Constraining the Cosmic-ray Acceleration Efficiency in the Supernova Remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Adam Michael; Federman, Steven R.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Caprioli, Damiano; Wallerstein, George

    2015-08-01

    Supernova remnants are widely believed to be the sources responsible for the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays. Over the last several years, observations made with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed that cosmic-ray nuclei are indeed accelerated in some supernova remnants, including IC 443, which is a prototype for supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds. However, the details concerning the particle acceleration processes in middle aged remnants are not fully understood, in part because the basic model parameters are not always well constrained. Here, we present preliminary results of a Hubble Space Telescope investigation into the physical conditions in diffuse molecular gas interacting with IC 443. We examine high-resolution FUV spectra of two stars, one that probes the interior region of the supernova remnant, and the other located just outside the visible edge of IC 443. With this arrangement, we are able to evaluate the densities and temperatures in neutral gas clumps positioned both ahead of and behind the supernova shock front. From these measurements, we obtain estimates for the post-shock temperature and the shock velocity in the interclump medium. We discuss the efficacy of these results for constraining both the age of IC 443, and also the cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency. Finally, we report the first detection of boron in a supernova remnant, and discuss the usefulness of the B/O ratio in constraining the cosmic-ray content of the gas interacting with IC 443.

  7. Probing exotic physics with cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Traditionally, collider experiments have been the primary tool used in searching for particle physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk, I will discuss alternative approaches for exploring exotic physics scenarios using high energy and ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos. Such neutrinos can be used to study interactions at energies higher, and over baselines longer, than those accessible to colliders. In this way, neutrino astronomy can provide a window into fundamental physics which is highly complementary to collider techniques. I will discuss the role of neutrino astronomy in fundamental physics, considering the use of such techniques in studying several specific scenarios including low scale gravity models, Standard Model electroweak instanton induced interactions, decaying neutrinos and quantum decoherence.

  8. On cosmic acceleration without dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Matarrese, S.; Riotto, A.; ,

    2005-06-01

    We elaborate on the proposal that the observed acceleration of the Universe is the result of the backreaction of cosmological perturbations, rather than the effect of a negative-pressure dark energy fluid or a modification of general relativity. Through the effective Friedmann equations describing an inhomogeneous Universe after smoothing, we demonstrate that acceleration in our local Hubble patch is possible even if fluid elements do not individually undergo accelerated expansion. This invalidates the no-go theorem that there can be no acceleration in our local Hubble patch if the Universe only contains irrotational dust. We then study perturbatively the time behavior of general-relativistic cosmological perturbations, applying, where possible, the renormalization group to regularize the dynamics. We show that an instability occurs in the perturbative expansion involving sub-Hubble modes, which indicates that acceleration in our Hubble patch may originate from the backreaction of cosmological perturbations on observable scales.

  9. Characterizing the Sites of Hadronic Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlstrom, Ylva; Mesler, R.; Sjouwerman, L.; Frail, D.; Claussen, M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued that supernova remnant (SNRs) shocks are the acceleration sites for galactic cosmic rays. While this has been established for electrons, solid evidence for hadrons constituting the bulk of the cosmic rays have been lacking. Models of hadronic cosmic ray acceleration in SNRs predict a gamma-ray flux density depending on parameters like the environment density and distance. Few reliable estimates of those parameters exist. SNRs with cosmic rays interacting with molecular clouds are expected to be bright gamma-ray sources, and these sites can be traced using 1720 MHz OH masers. The masers give information about the density and kinematical distance estimates. Only 10% of galactic SNRs harbor OH masers, and we have therefore searched for a more frequently occurring SNR/cloud interaction tracer. We have detected 36 GHz and 44 GHz methanol masers associated with a few SNRs. Here we report on the result of a search for methanol masers in 21 SNRs, and in particular the details of our detections in Sgr A East. Combining observations and modeling of methanol masers in SNRs, we aim to better constrain the density and distance to SNRs with TeV emission. The goal is to test the hadronic cosmic ray models and to understand the mechanisms of particle acceleration in SNRs. This project is supported under NASA-Fermi grant NNX10A055G.

  10. Acceleration and propagation of solar cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the solar cosmic ray measurements on the Geostationary Orbital Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft indicated that the duration of solar flare relativistic proton large pulses is comparable with the solar wind propagation duration from the Sun to the Earth. The front of the proton flux from flares on the western solar disk approaches the Earth with a flight time along the Archimedean spiral magnetic field line of 15-20 min. The proton flux from eastern flares is registered in the Earth's orbit 3-5 h after the flare onset. These particles apparently propagate across IMF owing to diffusion.

  11. Probing Inflation via Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2008-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has been a rich source of information about the early Universe. Detailed measurements of its spectrum and spatial distribution have helped solidify the Standard Model of Cosmology. However, many questions still remain. Standard Cosmology does not explain why the early Universe is geometrically flat, expanding, homogenous across the horizon, and riddled with a small anisotropy that provides the seed for structure formation. Inflation has been proposed as a mechanism that naturally solves these problems. In addition to solving these problems, inflation is expected to produce a spectrum of gravitational waves that will create a particular polarization pattern on the CMB. Detection of this polarized signal is a key test of inflation and will give a direct measurement of the energy scale at which inflation takes place. This polarized signature of inflation is expected to be -9 orders of magnitude below the 2.7 K monopole level of the CMB. This measurement will require good control of systematic errors, an array of many detectors having the requisite sensitivity, and a reliable method for removing polarized foregrounds, and nearly complete sky coverage. Ultimately, this measurement is likely to require a space mission. To this effect, technology and mission concept development are currently underway.

  12. Cosmic parallax as a probe of late time anisotropic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Quercellini, Claudia; Cabella, Paolo; Balbi, Amedeo; Amendola, Luca

    2009-09-15

    Cosmic parallax is the change of angular separation between a pair of sources at cosmological distances induced by an anisotropic expansion. An accurate astrometric experiment like Gaia could observe or put constraints on cosmic parallax. Examples of anisotropic cosmological models are Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi void models for off-center observers (introduced to explain the observed acceleration without the need for dark energy) and Bianchi metrics. If dark energy has an anisotropic equation of state, as suggested recently, then a substantial anisotropy could arise at z < or approx. 1 and escape the stringent constraints from the cosmic microwave background. In this paper we show that such models could be constrained by the Gaia satellite or by an upgraded future mission.

  13. Cosmic Accelerators: Engines of the Extreme Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan

    2009-06-23

    The universe is home to numerous exotic and beautiful phenomena, some of which can generate almost inconceivable amounts of energy. While the night sky appears calm, it is populated by colossal explosions, jets from supermassive black holes, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and shock waves of gas moving at supersonic speeds. These accelerators in the sky boost particles to energies far beyond those we can produce on earth. New types of telescopes, including the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbiting in space, are now discovering a host of new and more powerful accelerators. Please come and see how these observations are revising our picture of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  14. Constraining the efficiency of cosmic ray acceleration by cluster shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.; Wittor, D.; Gheller, C.; Eckert, D.; Stubbe, M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the acceleration of cosmic rays by collisionless structure formation shocks with ENZO grid simulations. Data from the Fermi satellite enable the use of galaxy clusters as a testbed for particle acceleration models. Based on advanced cosmological simulations that include different prescriptions for gas and cosmic rays physics, we use the predicted γ-ray emission to constrain the shock acceleration efficiency. We infer that the efficiency must be on average ≤10-3 for cosmic shocks, particularly for the M ˜ 2-5 merger shocks that are mostly responsible for the thermalization of the intracluster medium (ICM). These results emerge, both, from non-radiative and radiative runs including feedback from active galactic nuclei, as well as from zoomed resimulations of a cluster resembling MACSJ1752.0+0440. The limit on the acceleration efficiency we report is lower than what has been assumed in the literature so far. Combined with the information from radio emission in clusters, it appears that a revision of the present understanding of shock acceleration in the ICM is unavoidable.

  15. Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard

    2009-03-20

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{21} eV) is possible. PMID:19392185

  16. An overview of cosmic ray research - Composition, acceleration and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of cosmic ray (CR) research and its relationship to other areas of high-energy astrophysics is presented. Research being conducted on the composition of cosmic rays (CRs) is examined, including the study of the solar system 'template' for CRs, CR abundances at earth, solar energetic particles, the CR elements beyond zinc, and the study of electrons, positrons, antinuclei, and of isotopic composition of CRs. Research on the CR energy spectrum and anisotropy is briefly reviewed. The study of acceleration processes, particle confinement, and propagation of CRs is addressed. Finally, the investigation of source abundances in CRs is discussed.

  17. Holographic dark energy and late cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón, Diego

    2007-06-01

    It has been persuasively argued that the number of effective degrees of freedom of a macroscopic system is proportional to its area rather than to its volume. This entails interesting consequences for cosmology. Here we present a model based on this 'holographic principle' that accounts for the present stage of accelerated expansion of the Universe and significantly alleviates the coincidence problem also for non-spatially flat cosmologies. Likewise, we comment on a recently proposed late transition to a fresh decelerated phase.

  18. Cosmic acceleration and the helicity-0 graviton

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Pirtskhalava, David

    2011-05-15

    We explore cosmology in the decoupling limit of a nonlinear covariant extension of Fierz-Pauli massive gravity obtained recently in arXiv:1007.0443. In this limit the theory is a scalar-tensor model of a unique form defined by symmetries. We find that it admits a self-accelerated solution, with the Hubble parameter set by the graviton mass. The negative pressure causing the acceleration is due to a condensate of the helicity-0 component of the massive graviton, and the background evolution, in the approximation used, is indistinguishable from the {Lambda}CDM model. Fluctuations about the self-accelerated background are stable for a certain range of parameters involved. Most surprisingly, the fluctuation of the helicity-0 field above its background decouples from an arbitrary source in the linearized theory. We also show how massive gravity can remarkably screen an arbitrarily large cosmological constant in the decoupling limit, while evading issues with ghosts. The obtained static solution is stable against small perturbations, suggesting that the degravitation of the vacuum energy is possible in the full theory. Interestingly, however, this mechanism postpones the Vainshtein effect to shorter distance scales. Hence, fifth force measurements severely constrain the value of the cosmological constant that can be neutralized, making this scheme phenomenologically not viable for solving the old cosmological constant problem. We briefly speculate on a possible way out of this issue.

  19. Cosmic bullets as particle accelerators and radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung; Tregillis, I. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated in two dimensions the dynamical evolution of dense gas clouds(`cosmic bullets') moving supersonically through a uniform low-density medium. The diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic protons (cosmic rays) and their dynamical feedback on the background flow are included by the two-fluid model for this process. The acceleration of relativistic electrons is approximated by a test-particle model, and a passive magnetic field is followed by a simple advection scheme. Strong bow shocks, with Mach numbers similar to that of a bullet's motion, are the most important particle accelerators in the flow, while tail shocks and shocks inside the bullets do not play generally significant roles in this regard. For our simulation parameters, approximately greater than 10% of the initial bullet kinetic energy is converted to a combination of internal energy of gas and cosmic-ray protons by the time the bullets begin to be disrupted. Characteristically, the cosmic rays gain several percent of the available kinetic energy. Bullet destruction on timescales only a little larger than the ram pressure bullet crushing time begins in response to Kelvin-Helmholtz and especially to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the forward bullet surface. For dense bullets this happens before the bullet is stopped by ram pressure. According to our simple model for synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated and transported within the flows, that emission increases rapidly as the bullet begins to fragment, when it is strongly dominated by field enhancement in sheared flows. Synchrotron emission from the acceleration region within the bow shock is, by contrast, much weaker.

  20. Cosmic ray acceleration by spiral shocks in the galactic wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völk, H. J.; Zirakashvili, V. N.

    2004-04-01

    Cosmic ray acceleration by shocks related with Slipping Interaction Regions (SIRs) in the Galactic Wind is considered. SIRs are similar to Solar Wind Corotating Interaction Regions. The spiral structure of our Galaxy results in a strong nonuniformity of the Galactic Wind flow and in SIR formation at distances of 50 to 100 kpc. SIRs are not corotating with the gas and magnetic field because the angular velocity of the spiral pattern differs from that of the Galactic rotation. It is shown that the collective reacceleration of the cosmic ray particles with charge Ze in the resulting shock ensemble can explain the observable cosmic ray spectrum beyond the ``knee'' up to energies of the order of 1017 Z eV. For the reaccelerated particles the Galactic Wind termination shock acts as a reflecting boundary.

  1. Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Force Free Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Hui; Kronberg, Philipp

    2002-11-01

    Galactic, extragalactic, and cluster magnetic fields are in apparent pressure equilibrium with the in-fall pressure of matter from the external medium, IGM, onto the Galaxies and clusters, and from the voids onto the galaxy sheets, (walls), implying fields of 5 , 0.5, & 20 μG respectively. Equipartition or minimum energy, implies β_CR=n_CRm_pc^2/(B^2/8π)˜= 1. The total energy in field and CRs is then ˜= 10^55 ergs Galactic and ˜= 4 ot 10^60 ergs per galaxy in the IGM and less within clusters, e.g., radio lobes, synchrotron "glow" in the IGM (Kronberg), and the UHECRs spectrum, Γ =-2.6. CRs escape from the Galaxy to the IGM, τ˜=10^7y, and similarly from the walls to the voids, ˜=10^8y, less than the GZK cut-off time provided B_galaxy>B_IGM>B_voids. The free energy of black hole formation, The Los Alamos model, is just sufficient. The lack of shocks at the boundaries of over pressured radio lobes and the need for high acceleration efficiency suggests eE_allel˜= eη_reconJ_allel, acceleration by reconnection of these force-free fields.

  2. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, J.A.S.; Graef, L.L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons–Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current 'quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  3. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Graef, L. L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current `quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  4. Connecting inflation with late cosmic acceleration by particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-04-01

    A continuous process of creation of particles is investigated as a possible connection between the inflationary stage with late cosmic acceleration. In this model, the inflationary era occurs due to a continuous and fast process of creation of relativistic particles, and the recent accelerating phase is driven by the nonrelativistic matter creation from the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum, which finally results in an effective equation of state (EoS) less than ‑ 1. Thus, explaining recent results in favor of a phantom dynamics without the need of any modifications in the gravity theory has been proposed. Finally, we confront the model with recent observational data of type Ia Supernova, history of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

  5. Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    Our piece of cosmic real-estate, the heliosphere, is the domain of all human existence - an astrophysical case-history of the successful evolution of life in a habitable system. By exploring our global heliosphere and its myriad interactions, we develop key physical knowledge of the interstellar interactions that influence exoplanetary habitability as well as the distant history and destiny of our solar system and world. IBEX was the first mission to explore the global heliosphere and in concert with Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 is discovering a fundamentally new and uncharted physical domain of the outer heliosphere. In parallel, Cassini/INCA maps the global heliosphere at energies (~5-55 KeV) above those measured by IBEX. The enigmatic IBEX ribbon and the INCA belt were unanticipated discoveries demonstrating that much of what we know or think we understand about the outer heliosphere needs to be revised. The next quantum leap enabled by IMAP will open new windows on the frontier of Heliophysics at a time when the space environment is rapidly evolving. IMAP with 100 times the combined resolution and sensitivity of IBEX and INCA will discover the substructure of the IBEX ribbon and will reveal in unprecedented resolution global maps of our heliosphere. The remarkable synergy between IMAP, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will remain for at least the next decade as Voyager 1 pushes further into the interstellar domain and Voyager 2 moves through the heliosheath. The "A" in IMAP refers to acceleration of energetic particles. With its combination of highly sensitive pickup and suprathermal ion sensors, IMAP will provide the species and spectral coverage as well as unprecedented temporal resolution to associate emerging suprathermal tails with interplanetary structures and discover underlying physical acceleration processes. These key measurements will provide what has been a critical missing piece of suprathermal seed particles in our understanding of particle acceleration to high

  6. SPECTRUM OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS ACCELERATED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2010-07-20

    The spectra of high-energy protons and nuclei accelerated by supernova remnant (SNR) shocks are calculated, taking into account magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift both upstream and downstream of the shock for different types of SNRs during their evolution. The maximum energy of accelerated particles may reach 5 x 10{sup 18} eV for Fe ions in Type IIb SNRs. The calculated energy spectrum of cosmic rays after propagation through the Galaxy is in good agreement with the spectrum measured at the Earth.

  7. Is Cosmic Acceleration Telling Us Something About Gravity?

    ScienceCinema

    Trodden, Mark [Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, United States

    2009-09-01

    Among the possible explanations for the observed acceleration of the universe, perhaps the boldest is the idea that new gravitational physics might be the culprit. In this colloquium I will discuss some of the challenges of constructing a sensible phenomenological extension of General Relativity, give examples of some candidate models of modified gravity and survey existing observational constraints on this approach. I will conclude by discussing how we might hope to distinguish between modifications of General Relativity and dark energy as competing hypotheses to explain cosmic acceleration.

  8. Dark matter and cosmic acceleration from Wesson's IMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelit, Mark

    2009-12-01

    In the present work a procedure is build up, that allows obtaining dark matter (DM) and cosmic acceleration in our 4D universe embedded in a 5D manifold. Both, DM and the factor causing cosmic acceleration, as well ordinary matter are induced in the 4D space-time by a warped, but empty from matter, 5D bulk. The procedure is carried out in the framework of the Weyl-Dirac version (Israelit, Found Phys 35:1725, 2005; Israelit, Found Phys 35:1769, 2005) of Paul Wesson’s Induced Matter Theory (Wesson, Space-time matter, 1999) enriched by Rosen’s approach (Found Phys 12:213, 1982). Considering chaotically oriented Weyl vector fields, which exist in microscopic cells, we obtain cold dark matter (CDM) consisting of weylons, massive bosons having spin 1. Assuming homogeneity and isotropy at large scale we derive cosmological equations in which luminous matter, CDM and dark energy may be considered separately. Making in the given procedure use of present observational data one can develop a model of the Universe with conventional matter, DM and cosmic acceleration, induced by the 5D bulk.

  9. Cosmic ray drift, shock wave acceleration and the anomalous component of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Jokipii, J. R.; Eichler, D.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the anomalous component of the quiet-time cosmic ray flux is presented in which ex-interstellar neutral particles are accelerated continuously in the polar regions of the solar-wind termination shock, and then drift into the equatorial regions of the inner heliosphere. The observed solar-cycle variations, radial gradient, and apparent latitude gradient of the anomalous component are a natural consequence of this model.

  10. Cosmic acceleration of Earth and the Moon by dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordtvedt, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that the gravitational interaction between our Galaxy's dark matter and the ordinary matter in Earth and the Moon might not fulfill the equivalence principle (universality of free fall), we consider the pertinent perturbation of the lunar orbit -- a sidereal month period range oscillation resulting from a spatially fixed polarization of the orbit. Lunar laser ranging (LLR) data can measure this sidereal perturbation to an accuracy equal to or better than its existing measurement of the synodic month period range oscillation amplitude (+/- 3 cm) which has been used for testing whether Earth and the Moon accelerate at equal rates toward the Sun. Because of the slow precession rate of the Moon's perigree (8.9 yr period), the lunar orbit is particularly sensitive to a cosmic acceleration; the LLR fit of the orbit places an upper limit of 10(exp -13) cm/sq. s for any cosmic differential acceleration between Earth (Fe) and the Moon (silicates). This is 10(exp -5) of the total galactic acceleration of the solar system, of which, it has been suggested, a large portion is produced by dark matter.

  11. Cosmic acceleration in a model of fourth order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shreya; Jayswal, Nilesh; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate a fourth order model of gravity, having a free length parameter, and no cosmological constant or dark energy. We consider cosmological evolution of a flat Friedmann universe in this model for the case that the length parameter is of the order of the present Hubble radius. By making a suitable choice for the present value of the Hubble parameter, and the value of the third derivative of the scale factor (the jerk), we find that the model can explain cosmic acceleration to the same degree of accuracy as the standard concordance model. If the free length parameter is assumed to be time dependent, and of the order of the Hubble parameter of the corresponding epoch, the model can still explain cosmic acceleration, and provides a possible resolution of the cosmic coincidence problem. We work out the effective equation of state, and its time evolution, in our model. The fourth order correction terms are proportional to the metric, and hence mimic the cosmological constant. We also compare redshift drift in our model, with that in the standard model. The equation of state and the redshift drift serve to discriminate our model from the standard model.

  12. Cosmic Shear as a Probe of Galaxy Formation Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Simon; Becker, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-09-01

    We evaluate the potential for current and future cosmic shear measurements from large galaxy surveys to constrain the impact of baryonic physics on the matter power spectrum. We do so using a model-independent parameterization that describes deviations of the matter power spectrum from the dark-matter-only case as a set of principal components that are localized in wavenumber and redshift. We perform forecasts for a variety of current and future datasets, and find that at least ˜90% of the constraining power of these datasets is contained in no more than nine principal components. The constraining power of different surveys can be quantified using a figure of merit defined relative to currently available surveys. With this metric, we find that the final Dark Energy Survey dataset (DES Y5) and the Hyper Suprime Cam Survey will be roughly an order of magnitude more powerful than existing data in constraining baryonic effects. Upcoming Stage IV surveys (LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST) will improve upon this by a further factor of a few. We show that this conclusion is robust to marginalization over several key systematics. The ultimate power of cosmic shear to constrain galaxy formation is dependent on understanding systematics in the shear measurements at small (sub-arcminute) scales. If these systematics can be sufficiently controlled, cosmic shear measurements from DES Y5 and other future surveys have the potential to provide a very clean probe of galaxy formation and to strongly constrain a wide range of predictions from modern hydrodynamical simulations.

  13. Toward a Direct Measurement of the Cosmic Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremiah K.

    2013-01-01

    We present precise redshift measurements and place model-free constraints on cosmic acceleration and the acceleration of the Solar System in a universal context. HI 21 cm absorption lines observed over multiple epochs can constrain the secular redshift drift or the proper acceleration, Δv/Δto, with high precision. A comparison of literature analog spectra to contemporary digital spectra shows significant acceleration almost certainly attributable to systematic instrumental or calibration errors. However, robust constraints have been obtained by using digital data from a single telescope, the Green Bank Telescope. An ensemble of 10 objects spanning z = 0.09-0.69 observed over 13.5 years show Δz/Δto = (-1.8 ± 1.2) × 10-8 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = -4.0 ± 3.0 m s-1 yr-1. The best constraint from a single object, 3C286 at = 0.692153275(85), is dz/dto = (1.5 ± 4.7) × 10-8 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = 2.7 ± 8.4 m s-1 yr-1. These measurements are three orders of magnitude larger than the expected acceleration in the concordance dark energy cosmology at z=0.5, Δz/Δto = 2 × 10-11 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = 0.3 cm s-1 yr-1, but they demonstrate a lack of secular redshift drift in absorption line systems and the long-term frequency stability of modern radio telescopes. This measurement likewise constrains the barycentric proper acceleration in a cosmological reference frame (as opposed to the Galactic pulsar-defined reference frame), but currently lacks the precision of quasar proper motion observations. A comparison of rest-frame UV metal absorption lines to the HI 21 cm line places improved constraints on the cosmic variation of physical constants: Δ(α2 gp μ)/(α2 gp μ) = (-3.5 ± 1.4) × 10-6 in the redshift range z=0.24-2.04, consistent with no variation. We estimate that the cosmic acceleration could be directly measured with this technique in about 300 years using modern telescopes or in about 12 years using a Square Kilometer Array, provided that new systematic effects do

  14. ACCELERATION OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, L. A.; Gloeckler, G.

    2012-01-10

    Challenges have arisen to diffusive shock acceleration as the primary means to accelerate galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the interstellar medium. Diffusive shock acceleration is also under challenge in the heliosphere, where at least the simple application of diffusive shock acceleration cannot account for observations. In the heliosphere, a new acceleration mechanism has been invented-a pump mechanism, driven by ambient turbulence, in which particles are pumped up in energy out of a low-energy core particle population through a series of adiabatic compressions and expansions-that can account for observations not only at shocks but in quiet conditions in the solar wind and throughout the heliosheath. In this paper, the pump mechanism is applied to the acceleration of GCRs in the interstellar medium. With relatively straightforward assumptions about the magnetic field in the interstellar medium, and how GCRs propagate in this field, the pump mechanism yields (1) the overall shape of the GCR spectrum, a power law in particle kinetic energy, with a break at the so-called knee in the GCR spectrum to a slightly steeper power-law spectrum. (2) The rigidity dependence of the H/He ratio observed from the PAMELA satellite instrument.

  15. Nuclear Fusion Drives Present-Day Accelerated Cosmic Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Leong

    2010-09-30

    The widely accepted model of our cosmos is that it began from a Big Bang event some 13.7 billion years ago from a single point source. From a twin universe perspective, the standard stellar model of nuclear fusion can account for the Dark Energy needed to explain the mechanism for our present-day accelerated expansion. The same theories can also be used to account for the rapid inflationary expansion at the earliest time of creation, and predict the future cosmic expansion rate.

  16. TOWARD A DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE COSMIC ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Jeremy

    2012-12-20

    We present precise H I 21 cm absorption line redshifts observed in multiple epochs to directly constrain the secular redshift drift z-dot or the cosmic acceleration, {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle}. A comparison of literature analog spectra to contemporary digital spectra shows significant acceleration likely attributable to systematic instrumental errors. However, we obtain robust constraints using primarily Green Bank Telescope digital data. Ten objects spanning z = 0.09-0.69 observed over 13.5 years show z-dot = (-2.3 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = -5.5 {+-} 2.2 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The best constraint from a single object, 3C 286 at (z) = 0.692153275(85), is z-dot = (1.6 {+-} 4.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = 2.8 {+-} 8.4 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. These measurements are three orders of magnitude larger than the theoretically expected acceleration at z = 0.5, z-dot = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = 0.3 cm s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, but they demonstrate the lack of peculiar acceleration in absorption line systems and the long-term frequency stability of modern radio telescopes. A comparison of UV metal absorption lines to the 21 cm line improves constraints on the cosmic variation of physical constants: {Delta}({alpha}{sup 2} g{sub p} {mu})/{alpha}{sup 2} g{sub p} {mu} = (- 1.2 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} in the redshift range z = 0.24-2.04. The linear evolution over the last 10.4 Gyr is (- 0.2 {+-} 2.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} yr{sup -1}, consistent with no variation. The cosmic acceleration could be directly measured in {approx}125 years using current telescopes or in {approx}5 years using a Square Kilometer Array, but systematic effects will arise at the 1 cm s{sup -1} yr{sup -1} level.

  17. Acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova-remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that supernova-explosions are the dominant source of cosmic rays up to an energy of 10 to the 14th power eV/nucleon. Moreover, these high energy particles provide a major contribution to the energy density of the interstellar medium (ISM) and should therefore be included in calculations of interstellar dynamic phenomena. For the following the first order Fermi mechanism in shock waves are considered to be the main acceleration mechanism. The influence of this process is twofold; first, if the process is efficient (and in fact this is the cas) it will modify the dynamics and evolution of a supernova-remnant (SNR), and secondly, the existence of a significant high energy component changes the overall picture of the ISM. The complexity of the underlying physics prevented detailed investigations of the full non-linear selfconsistent problem. For example, in the context of the energy balance of the ISM it has not been investigated how much energy of a SN-explosion can be transfered to cosmic rays in a time-dependent selfconsistent model. Nevertheless, a lot of progress was made on many aspects of the acceleration mechanism.

  18. Cosmic rays as probes of atmospheric electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, O.; Trinh, G. T. N.; Schellart, P.; Ebert, U.; Rutjes, C.; Nelles, A.; Buitink, S.; ter Veen, S.; Horandel, J.; Corstanje, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Thoudam, S.; Falcke, H.; Koehn, C. C.; van den Berg, A. A. M.; de Vries, K. K. D.; Rossetto, L.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called an extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate radio waves which have been detected with LOFAR, a large and dense array of simple antennas primarily developed for radio-astronomy observations.LOFAR has observed air showers under fair-weather conditions as well as under atmospheric conditions where thunderstorms occur. For air showers under fair-weather conditions the intensity as well as the polarization of the radio emission can be understood rather accurately from the present models.For air showers measured under thunderstorm conditions we observe large differences in the intensity and polarization patterns from the fair weather models. We will show that the linear as well as the circular polarization of the radio waves carry clear information on the orientation of the electric fields at different heights in the thunderstorm clouds. We will show for the first time that the circular polarization of the radio waves tells about the change of orientation of the fields with altitude. We will show that from the measured data at LOFAR the thunderstorm electric fields can be reconstructed.We thus have established the measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays as a new tool to probe the atmospheric electric fields present in thunderclouds in a non-intrusive way.

  19. Nuclear Effects of Supernova-Accelerated Cosmic Rays on Early Solar System Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. S.; The, L.-S.; Johnson, J.

    2008-03-01

    The solar system apparently formed in the neighborhood of massive stars. Supernova explosions of these stars accelerate cosmic rays to 100s of TeVs. These cosmic rays could accelerate the beta decay of certain radioactive species in meteorite parent bodies.

  20. "Espresso" Acceleration of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2015-10-01

    We propose that ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) above 1018 eV are produced in relativistic jets of powerful active galactic nuclei via an original mechanism, which we dub “espresso” acceleration: “seed” galactic CRs with energies ≲1017 eV that penetrate the jet sideways receive a “one-shot” boost of a factor of ∼Γ2 in energy, where Γ is the Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow. For typical jet parameters, a few percent of the CRs in the host galaxy can undergo this process, and powerful blazars with Γ ≳ 30 may accelerate UHECRs up to more than 1020 eV. The chemical composition of espresso-accelerated UHECRs is determined by that at the Galactic CR knee and is expected to be proton-dominated at 1018 eV and increasingly heavy at higher energies, in agreement with recent observations made at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  1. A Comprehensive Investigation on the Slowing Down of Cosmic Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; Hu, Yazhou; Li, Miao; Li, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Shafieloo et al. first proposed the possibility that the current cosmic acceleration (CA) is slowing down. However, this is rather counterintuitive because a slowing down CA cannot be accommodated in most mainstream cosmological models. In this work, by exploring the evolutionary trajectories of the dark energy equation of state w(z) and deceleration parameter q(z), we present a comprehensive investigation on the slowing down of CA from both the theoretical and the observational sides. For the theoretical side, we study the impact of different w(z) using six parametrization models, and then we discuss the effects of spatial curvature. For the observational side, we investigate the effects of different type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We find that (1) the evolution of CA is insensitive to the specific form of w(z); in contrast, a non-flat universe favors a slowing down CA more than a flat universe. (2) SNLS3 SNe Ia data sets favor a slowing down CA at a 1σ confidence level, while JLA SNe Ia samples prefer an eternal CA; in contrast, the effects of different BAO data are negligible. (3) Compared with CMB distance prior data, full CMB data favor a slowing down CA more. (4) Due to the low significance, the slowing down of CA is still a theoretical possibility that cannot be confirmed by the current observations.

  2. Ringlike inelastic events in cosmic rays and accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dremin, I. M.; Orlov, A. M.; Tretyakova, M. I.

    1985-01-01

    In cosmic rays and in accelerators there were observed single inelastic processes with densely produced (azimuthally isotropic) groups of particles exhibiting spikes in the pseudorapidity plot of an individual event (i.e. ringlike events). Theoretically the existence of such processes was predicted as a consequence of Cerenkov gluon radiation or, more generally, of deconfinement radiation. Nowadays some tens of such events have been accumulated at 400 GeV and at 150 TeV. Analyzing ringlike events in proton-nucleon interactions at 400 GeV/c it is shown that they exhibit striking irregularity in the positions of pseudorapidity spikes' centers which tend to lie mostly at 55,90 and 125 deg in cms. It implies rather small deconfinement lengths of the order of some fermi.

  3. Cosmic slowing down of acceleration for several dark energy parametrizations

    SciTech Connect

    Magaña, Juan; Cárdenas, Víctor H.; Motta, Verónica E-mail: victor.cardenas@uv.cl

    2014-10-01

    We further investigate slowing down of acceleration of the universe scenario for five parametrizations of the equation of state of dark energy using four sets of Type Ia supernovae data. In a maximal probability analysis we also use the baryon acoustic oscillation and cosmic microwave background observations. We found the low redshift transition of the deceleration parameter appears, independently of the parametrization, using supernovae data alone except for the Union 2.1 sample. This feature disappears once we combine the Type Ia supernovae data with high redshift data. We conclude that the rapid variation of the deceleration parameter is independent of the parametrization. We also found more evidence for a tension among the supernovae samples, as well as for the low and high redshift data.

  4. Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) - Its Time Has Come!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N.; Kasper, J. C.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moebius, E.; Opher, M.; Spence, H. E.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2014-12-01

    Our piece of cosmic real-estate, the heliosphere, is the domain of all human existence -- an astrophysical case-history of the successful evolution of life in a habitable system. By exploring our global heliosphere and its myriad interactions, we develop key physical knowledge of the interstellar interactions that influence exoplanetary habitability as well as the distant history and destiny of our solar system and world. IBEX was the first mission to explore the global heliosphere and in concert with Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 is discovering a fundamentally new and uncharted physical domain of the outer heliosphere. The enigmatic IBEX ribbon is an unanticipated discovery demonstrating that much of what we know or think we understand about the outer heliosphere needs to be revised. The next quantum leap enabled by IMAP will open new windows on the frontier of Heliophysics at a time when the space environment is rapidly evolving. IMAP with 100 times the combined resolution and sensitivity of IBEX will discover the substructure of the IBEX ribbon and will reveal in unprecedented resolution global maps of our heliosphere. The remarkable synergy between IMAP, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will remain for at least the next decade as Voyager 1 pushes further into the interstellar domain and Voyager 2 moves through the heliosheath. Voyager 2 moves outward in the vicinity of the IBEX ribbon and its plasma measurements will create singular opportunities for discovery in the context of IMAP's global measurements. IMAP, like ACE before it, will be a keystone of the Heliophysics System Observatory by providing comprehensive cosmic ray, energetic particle, pickup ion, suprathermal ion, neutral atom, solar wind, solar wind heavy ion, and magnetic field observations to diagnose the changing space environment and understand the fundamental origins of particle acceleration. Thus, IMAP is a mission whose time has come. IMAP is the highest ranked next Solar Terrestrial Probe in the Decadal

  5. Estimating field scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, A. M.; Helgason, W. D.; Ireson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to "field scale", integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a two year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 5002 m2 area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field scale surface soil moisture, but accounted for less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (1) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time stable neutron probe monitoring location, (2) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (3) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.004 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.012 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. It is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  6. Estimating field-scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Amber M.; Helgason, Warren D.; Ireson, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological, and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to field scale, integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field-scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth-scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a 2-year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 500 m × 500 m study area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field-scale surface soil moisture, but measurements represented less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (a) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time-stable neutron probe monitoring location, (b) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (c) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.005 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.014 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. Based upon its observed performance and its minimal data requirements, it is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  7. Effects of cosmic acceleration on black hole thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Direct local impacts of cosmic acceleration upon a black hole are matters of interest. Babichev et. al. had published before that the Friedmann equations which are prevailing the part of fluid filled up in the universe to lead (or to be very specific, `dominate') the other constituents of universe and are forcing the universe to undergo present-day accelerating phase (or to lead to violate the strong energy condition and latter the week energy condition), will themselves tell that the rate of change of mass of the central black hole due to such exotic fluid's accretion will essentially shrink the mass of the black hole. But this is a global impact indeed. The local changes in the space time geometry next to the black hole can be analysed from a modified metric governing the surrounding space time of a black hole. A charged deSitter black hole solution encircled by quintessence field is chosen for this purpose. Different thermodynamic parameters are analysed for different values of quintessence equation of state parameter, ω_q. Specific jumps in the nature of the thermodynamic space near to the quintessence or phantom barrier are noted and physically interpreted as far as possible. Nature of phase transitions and the situations at which these transitions are taking place are also explored. It is determined that before quintessence starts to work (ω_q=-0.33>-1/3) it was preferable to have a small unstable black hole followed by a large stable one. But in quintessence (-1/3>ω_q>-1), black holes are destined to be unstable large ones pre-quelled by stable/ unstable small/ intermediate mass black holes.

  8. A class of effective field theory models of cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Flanagan, Éanna É.

    2012-10-01

    We explore a class of effective field theory models of cosmic acceleration involving a metric and a single scalar field. These models can be obtained by starting with a set of ultralight pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons whose couplings to matter satisfy the weak equivalence principle, assuming that one boson is lighter than all the others, and integrating out the heavier fields. The result is a quintessence model with matter coupling, together with a series of correction terms in the action in a covariant derivative expansion, with specific scalings for the coefficients. After eliminating higher derivative terms and exploiting the field redefinition freedom, we show that the resulting theory contains nine independent free functions of the scalar field when truncated at four derivatives. This is in contrast to the four free functions found in similar theories of single-field inflation, where matter is not present. We discuss several different representations of the theory that can be obtained using the field redefinition freedom. For perturbations to the quintessence field today on subhorizon lengthscales larger than the Compton wavelength of the heavy fields, the theory is weakly coupled and natural in the sense of t'Hooft. The theory admits a regime where the perturbations become modestly nonlinear, but very strong nonlinearities lie outside its domain of validity.

  9. The acceleration rate of cosmic rays at cosmic ray modified shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tatsuhiko; Hoshino, Masahiro; Amano, Takanobu

    It is a still controversial matter whether the production efficiency of cosmic rays (CRs) is relatively efficient or inefficient (e.g. Helder et al. 2009; Hughes et al. 2000; Fukui 2013). In upstream region of SNR shocks (the interstellar medium), the energy density of CRs is comparable to a substantial fraction of that of the thermal plasma (e.g. Ferriere 2001). In such a situation, CRs can possibly exert a back-reaction to the shocks and modify the global shock structure. These shocks are called cosmic ray modified shocks (CRMSs). In CRMSs, as a result of the nonlinear feedback, there are almost always up to three steady-state solutions for given upstream parameters, which are characterized by CR production efficiencies (efficient, intermediate and inefficient branch). We evaluate qualitatively the efficiency of the CR production in SNR shocks by considering the stability of CRMS, under the effects of i) magnetic fields and ii) injection, which play significant roles in efficiency of acceleration. By adopting two-fluid model (Drury & Voelk, 1981), we investigate the stability of CRMSs by means of time-dependent numerical simulations. As a result, we show explicitly the bi-stable feature of these multiple solutions, i.e., the efficient and inefficient branches are stable and the intermediate branch is unstable, and the intermediate branch transit to the inefficient one. This feature is independent of the effects of i) shock angles and ii) injection. Furthermore, we investigate the evolution from a hydrodynamic shock to CRMS in a self-consistent manner. From the results, we suggest qualitatively that the CR production efficiency at SNR shocks may be the least efficient.

  10. Cosmic-Ray Accelerators in Milky Way studied with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2012-05-04

    High-energy gamma-ray astrophysics is now situated at a confluence of particle physics, plasma physics and traditional astrophysics. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) and upgraded Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) have been invigorating this interdisciplinary area of research. Among many new developments, I focus on two types of cosmic accelerators in the Milky-Way galaxy (pulsar, pulsar wind nebula, and supernova remnants) and explain discoveries related to cosmic-ray acceleration.

  11. Probing gravitation, dark energy, and acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-02-20

    The acceleration of the expansion of the universe arises from unknown physical processes involving either new fields in high energy physics or modifications of gravitation theory. It is crucial for our understanding to characterize the properties of the dark energy or gravity through cosmological observations and compare and distinguish between them. In fact, close consistencies exist between a dark energy equation of state function w(z) and changes to the framework of the Friedmann cosmological equations as well as direct spacetime geometry quantities involving the acceleration, such as ''geometric dark energy'' from the Ricci scalar. We investigate these interrelationships, including for the case of super acceleration or phantom energy where the fate of the universe may be more gentle than the Big Rip.

  12. Probing Cosmic Gas Accretion with RESOLVE and ECO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Lagos, Claudia; Nasipak, Zachary; Moffett, Amanda J.; Baker, Ashley; Berlind, Andreas A.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Norris, Mark A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We review results bearing on the existence, controlling factors, and mechanisms of cosmic gas accretion in the RESOLVE and ECO surveys. Volume-limited analysis of RESOLVE's complete census of HI-to-stellar mass ratios and star formation histories for ~1500 galaxies points to the necessity of an "open box" model of galaxy fueling, with the most gas-dominated galaxies doubling their stellar masses on ~Gyr timescales in a regime of rapid accretion. Transitions in gas richness and disk-building activity for isolated or central galaxies with halo masses near ~10^11.5 Msun and ~10^12 Msun plausibly correspond to the endpoints of a theoretically predicted transition in halo gas temperature that slows accretion across this range. The same mass range is associated with the initial grouping of isolated galaxies into common halos, where "isolated" is defined relative to the survey baryonic mass limits of >~10^9 Msun. Above 10^11.5 Msun, patterns in central vs. satellite gas richness as a function of group halo mass suggest that galaxy refueling is valved off from the inside out as the halo grows, with total quenching beyond the virial radius for halo masses >~10^13-13.5 Msun. Within the transition range from ~10^11.5-10^12 Msun, theoretical models predict >3 dex dispersion in ratios of uncooled halo gas to cold gas in galaxies (or more generally gas and stars). In RESOLVE and ECO, the baryonic mass function of galaxies in this transitional halo mass range displays signs of stripping or destruction of satellites, leading us to investigate a possible connection with halo gas heating using central galaxy color and group dynamics to probe group evolutionary state. Finally, we take a first look at how internal variations in metallicity, dynamics, and star formation constrain accretion mechanisms such as cold streams, induced extraplanar gas cooling, isotropic halo gas cooling, and gas-rich merging in different mass and environment regimes. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been

  13. Late time cosmic acceleration from natural infrared cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, inspired by the ultraviolet deformation of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker geometry in loop quantum cosmology, we formulate an infrared-modified cosmological model. We obtain the associated deformed Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and we show that the late time cosmic acceleration can be addressed by the infrared corrections. As a particular example, we applied the setup to the case of matter dominated universe. This model has the same number of parameters as ΛCDM, but a dynamical dark energy generates in the matter dominated era at the late time. According to our model, as the universe expands, the energy density of the cold dark matter dilutes and when the Hubble parameter approaches to its minimum, the infrared effects dominate such that the effective equation of state parameter smoothly changes from weff = 0 to weff = - 2. Interestingly and nontrivially, the unstable de Sitter phase with weff = - 1 is corresponding to Ωm =Ωd = 0.5 and the universe crosses the phantom divide from the quintessence phase with weff > - 1 and Ωm >Ωd to the phantom phase with weff < - 1 and Ωm <Ωd which shows that the model is observationally viable. The results show that the universe finally ends up in a big rip singularity for a finite time proportional to the inverse of the minimum of the Hubble parameter. Moreover, we consider the dynamical stability of the model and we show that the universe starts from the matter dominated era at the past attractor with weff = 0 and ends up in a future attractor at the big rip with weff = - 2.

  14. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S.; Malka, V.

    2013-06-01

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  15. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S.

    2013-06-15

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  16. SUPERNOVA REMNANT KES 17: AN EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATOR INSIDE A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, Joseph D.; Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O.; Temim, Tea; Hughes, John P.; Rakowski, Cara E-mail: cara.rakowski@gmail.com

    2013-11-10

    The supernova remnant Kes 17 (SNR G304.6+0.1) is one of a few but growing number of remnants detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we analyze recent radio, X-ray, and γ-ray observations of this object, determining that efficient cosmic ray acceleration is required to explain its broadband non-thermal spectrum. These observations also suggest that Kes 17 is expanding inside a molecular cloud, though our determination of its age depends on whether thermal conduction or clump evaporation is primarily responsible for its center-filled thermal X-ray morphology. Evidence for efficient cosmic ray acceleration in Kes 17 supports recent theoretical work concluding that the strong magnetic field, turbulence, and clumpy nature of molecular clouds enhance cosmic ray production in supernova remnants. While additional observations are needed to confirm this interpretation, further study of Kes 17 is important for understanding how cosmic rays are accelerated in supernova remnants.

  17. Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as a Probe of Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacinti, Gwenael; Kirk, John

    2016-07-01

    IceTop and IceCube have observed a mysterious cold spot in the angular distribution of high energy (≳ 100 TeV) cosmic rays, thereby placing interesting constraints on their transport properties. In this paper we examine these constraints by comparing the observations with the predictions of pitch-angle diffusion in various kinds of turbulence. In the case of incompressible Alfvénic turbulence with a Goldreich-Sridhar power-spectrum, we show that pseudo-Alfvén modes produce a signature that is compatible with the observations, although they fail to provide enough scattering to confine cosmic rays in the galaxy. We confirm that adding fast magnetosonic modes can alleviate this problem, and further show that for physically relevant values of the turbulence parameters, this model can still match the observations. Finally, we study the imprint on the cosmic-ray anistropy of anistropic damping of the fast modes.

  18. Cascaded Gamma Rays as a Probe of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta

    2014-06-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE) and ultra-high-energy (UHE) gamma rays from extragalactic sources experience electromagnetic cascades during their propagation in intergalactic space. Recent gamma-ray data on TeV blazars and the diffuse gamma-ray background may have hints of the cascade emission, which are especially interesting if it comes from UHE cosmic rays. I show that cosmic-ray-induced cascades can be discriminated from gamma-ray-induced cascades with detailed gamma-ray spectra. I also discuss roles of structured magnetic fields, which suppress inverse-Compton pair halos/echoes but lead to guaranteed signals - synchrotron pair halos/echoes.

  19. Pointlike gamma ray sources as signatures of distant accelerators of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Gabici, Stefano; Aharonian, Felix A

    2005-12-16

    We discuss the possibility of observing distant accelerators of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in synchrotron gamma rays. Protons propagating away from their acceleration sites produce extremely energetic electrons during photopion interactions with cosmic microwave background photons. If the accelerator is embedded in a magnetized region, these electrons will emit high energy synchrotron radiation. The resulting synchrotron source is expected to be pointlike, steady, and detectable in the GeV-TeV energy range if the magnetic field is at the nanoGauss level. PMID:16384444

  20. The COBE cosmic 3 K anisotropy experiment: A gravity wave and cosmic string probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles L.; Smoot, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Among the experiments to be carried into orbit next year, by the COBE satellite, are differential microwave radiometers. They will make sensitive all-sky maps of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies, giving dipole, quadrupole, and higher order multipole measurements of the background radiation. The experiment will either detect, or place significant constraints on, the existence of cosmic strings and long wavelength gravity waves.

  1. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  2. The cosmic microwave background - A probe of particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The current status of spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is reviewed, with emphasis on the role played by weakly interacting particle dark matter. Theoretical predictions and recent observational results are described, and prospects for future progress are summarized.

  3. Stochastic Acceleration of Galactic Cosmic Rays by Compressible Plasma Fluctuations in Supernova Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    A theory of 2-stage acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays in supernova remnants is proposed. The first stage is accomplished by the supernova shock front, where a power-law spectrum is established up to a certain cutoff energy. It is followed by stochastic acceleration with compressible waves/turbulence in the downstream medium. With a broad \\propto {k}-2 spectrum for the compressible plasma fluctuations, the rate of stochastic acceleration is constant over a wide range of particle momentum. In this case, the stochastic acceleration process extends the power-law spectrum cutoff energy of Galactic cosmic rays to the knee without changing the spectral slope. This situation happens as long as the rate of stochastic acceleration is faster than 1/5 of the adiabatic cooling rate. A steeper spectrum of compressible plasma fluctuations that concentrate their power in long wavelengths will accelerate cosmic rays to the knee with a small bump before its cutoff in the comic-ray energy spectrum. This theory does not require a strong amplification of the magnetic field in the upstream interstellar medium in order to accelerate cosmic rays to the knee energy.

  4. An absence of neutrinos associated with cosmic-ray acceleration in γ-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    2012-04-19

    Very energetic astrophysical events are required to accelerate cosmic rays to above 10(18) electronvolts. GRBs (γ-ray bursts) have been proposed as possible candidate sources. In the GRB 'fireball' model, cosmic-ray acceleration should be accompanied by neutrinos produced in the decay of charged pions created in interactions between the high-energy cosmic-ray protons and γ-rays. Previous searches for such neutrinos found none, but the constraints were weak because the sensitivity was at best approximately equal to the predicted flux. Here we report an upper limit on the flux of energetic neutrinos associated with GRBs that is at least a factor of 3.7 below the predictions. This implies either that GRBs are not the only sources of cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10(18) electronvolts or that the efficiency of neutrino production is much lower than has been predicted. PMID:22517161

  5. Super-TIGER: A Balloon-Borne Instrument to Probe Galactic Cosmic Ray Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Super-TIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is a balloon-borne instrument under construction for a long-duration flight from Antarctica in 2012. It is designed to measure the relative abundances of the ultra-heavy (UH) Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with individual-element resolution from _{30}Zn to _{42}Mo and make exploratory measurements through _{56}Ba, as well as the energy spectra of the GCR from _{10}Ne to _{29}Cu between 0.8 and 10 GeV/nucleon. The UH measurements will test the OB association origin model of the GCR, as well as the model of preferential acceleration of refractory elements. The GCR spectrum measurements will probe for microquasars or other sources that could superpose spectral features. Super-TIGER is a ˜ 4 × larger evolution of the preceding TIGER instrument, and is comprised of two independent modules with a total area of 5.4 m^{2}. A combination of plastic scintillation detectors, acrylic and silica-aerogel Cherenkov detectors, and scintillating fiber hodoscopes are used to resolve particle charge, kinetic energy per nucleon, and trajectory. Refinements in the Super-TIGER design over TIGER, including reduced material in the beam, give it a collecting power that is ˜ 6.4× larger. This paper will report on the instrument development status, the expected flight performance, and the scientific impact of the anticipated Super-TIGER GCR measurements. This research was supported by NASA under Grant NNX09AC17G

  6. Laboratory laser acceleration and high energy astrophysics: {gamma}-ray bursts and cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.

    1998-08-20

    Recent experimental progress in laser acceleration of charged particles (electrons) and its associated processes has shown that intense electromagnetic pulses can promptly accelerate charged particles to high energies and that their energy spectrum is quite hard. On the other hand some of the high energy astrophysical phenomena such as extremely high energy cosmic rays and energetic components of {gamma}-ray bursts cry for new physical mechanisms for promptly accelerating particles to high energies. The authors suggest that the basic physics involved in laser acceleration experiments sheds light on some of the underlying mechanisms and their energy spectral characteristics of the promptly accelerated particles in these high energy astrophysical phenomena.

  7. Calibration of a catchment scale cosmic-ray probe network: A comparison of three parameterization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatz, R.; Bogena, H. R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Huisman, J. A.; Qu, W.; Montzka, C.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the accuracy of soil water content determination from neutron flux measured by cosmic-ray probes under humid climate conditions. Ten cosmic-ray probes were set up in the Rur catchment located in western Germany, and calibrated by gravimetric soil sampling campaigns. Aboveground biomass was estimated at the sites to investigate the role of vegetation cover on the neutron flux and the calibration procedure. Three parameterization methods were used to generate site-specific neutron flux - soil water content calibration curves: (i) the N0-method, (ii) the hydrogen molar fraction method (hmf-method), and (iii) the COSMIC-method. At five locations, calibration measurements were repeated to evaluate site-specific calibration parameters obtained in two different sampling campaigns. At two locations, soil water content determined by cosmic-ray probes was evaluated with horizontally and vertically weighted soil water content measurements of two distributed in situ soil water content sensor networks. All three methods were successfully calibrated to determine field scale soil water content continuously at the ten sites. The hmf-method and the COSMIC-method had more similar calibration curves than the N0-method. The three methods performed similarly well in the validation and errors were within the uncertainty of neutron flux measurements despite observed differences in the calibration curves and variable model complexity. In addition, we found that the obtained calibration parameters NCOSMIC, N0 and NS showed a strong correlation with aboveground biomass.

  8. Integration of cosmic-ray neutron probes into production agriculture: Lessons from the Platte River cosmic-ray neutron probe monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, W. A.; Finkenbiner, C. E.; Franz, T. E.; Nguy-Robertson, A. L.; Munoz-Arriola, F.; Suyker, A.; Arkebauer, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Projected increases in global population will put enormous pressure on fresh water resources in the coming decades. Approximately 70 percent of human water use is allocated to agriculture with 40 percent of global food production originating from irrigated lands. Growing demand for food will only worsen the strain placed on many irrigated agricultural systems resulting in an unsustainable reliance on groundwater. This work presents an overview of the Platte River Cosmic-ray Neutron Probe Monitoring Network, which consists of 10 fixed probes and 3 mobile probes located across the Platte River Basin. The network was installed in 2014 and is part of the larger US COSMOS (70+ probes) and global COSMOS networks (200+ probes). Here we will present an overview of the network, comparison of fixed neutron probe results across the basin, spatial mapping results of the mobile sensors at various sites and spatial scales, and lessons learned by working with various producers and water stakeholder groups. With the continued development of this technique, its incorporation for soil moisture management in large producer operations has the potential to increase irrigation water use efficiency in the Platte River Basin and beyond.

  9. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  10. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    ScienceCinema

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  11. Visual phenomena induced by cosmic rays and accelerated particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Budinger, T. F.; Leith, J. T.; Mamoon, A.; Chapman, P. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments, conducted at cyclotrons together with observations by Apollo astronauts, suggest with little doubt that cosmic nuclei interacting with the visual apparatus cause the phenomenon of light flashes seen on translunar and transearth coast over the past four Apollo missions. Other experiments with high and low energy neutrons and a helium ion beam suggest that slow protons and helium ions with a stopping power greater than 10 to the 8th power eV/gram sq cm can cause the phenomenon in the dark adapted eye. It was demonstrated that charged particles induced by neutrons and helium ions can stimulate the visual apparatus. Some approaches to understanding the long term mission effects of galactic cosmic nuclei interacting with man and his nervous system are outlined.

  12. An empirical vegetation correction for soil water content quantification using cosmic ray probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatz, R.; Bogena, H. R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Huisman, J. A.; Montzka, C.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-04-01

    Cosmic ray probes are an emerging technology to continuously monitor soil water content at a scale significant to land surface processes. However, the application of this method is hampered by its susceptibility to the presence of aboveground biomass. Here we present a simple empirical framework to account for moderation of fast neutrons by aboveground biomass in the calibration. The method extends the N0-calibration function and was developed using an extensive data set from a network of 10 cosmic ray probes located in the Rur catchment, Germany. The results suggest a 0.9% reduction in fast neutron intensity per 1 kg of dry aboveground biomass per m2 or per 2 kg of biomass water equivalent per m2. We successfully tested the novel vegetation correction using temporary cosmic ray probe measurements along a strong gradient in biomass due to deforestation, and using the COSMIC, and the hmf method as independent soil water content retrieval algorithms. The extended N0-calibration function was able to explain 95% of the overall variability in fast neutron intensity.

  13. A MODEL OF ACCELERATION OF ANOMALOUS COSMIC RAYS BY RECONNECTION IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Opher, M. E-mail: mopher@gmu.ed

    2009-09-20

    We discuss a model of cosmic ray acceleration that accounts for the observations of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) by Voyager 1 and 2. The model appeals to fast magnetic reconnection rather than shocks as the driver of acceleration. The ultimate source of energy is associated with magnetic field reversals that occur in the heliosheath. It is expected that the magnetic field reversals will occur throughout the heliosheath, but especially near the heliopause where the flows slow down and diverge with respect to the interstellar wind and also in the boundary sector in the heliospheric current sheet. While the first-order Fermi acceleration theory within reconnection layers is in its infancy, the predictions do not contradict the available data on ACR spectra measured by the spacecraft. We argue that the Voyager data are one of the first pieces of evidence favoring the acceleration within regions of fast magnetic reconnection, which we believe to be a widely spread astrophysical process.

  14. Generation of mesoscale magnetic fields and the dynamics of Cosmic Ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    The problem of the cosmic ray origin is discussed in connection with their acceleration in supernova remnant shocks. The diffusive shock acceleration mechanism is reviewed and its potential to accelerate particles to the maximum energy of (presumably) galactic cosmic rays (1018eV ) is considered. It is argued that to reach such energies, a strong magnetic field at scales larger than the particle gyroradius must be created as a result of the acceleration process, itself. One specific mechanism suggested here is based on the generation of Alfven wave at the gyroradius scale with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven waves. The generation mechanism is modulational instability of CR generated Alfven wave packets induced, in turn, by scattering off acoustic fluctuations in the shock precursor which are generated by Drury instability.

  15. Photon damping in cosmic-ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-04-07

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10/sup 20/ eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10/sup 15/. Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultra high energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can void disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultra high energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found.

  16. Particle acceleration in cosmic plasmas – paradigm change?

    SciTech Connect

    Lytikov, Maxim; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    The presentation begins by considering the requirements on the acceleration mechanism. It is found that at least some particles in high-energy sources are accelerated by magnetic reconnection (and not by shocks). The two paradigms can be distinguished by the hardness of the spectra. Shocks typically produce spectra with p > 2 (relativistic shocks have p ~ 2.2); non-linear shocks & drift acceleration may give p < 2, e.g. p=1.5; B-field dissipation can give p = 1. Then collapse of stressed magnetic X-point in force-free plasma and collapse of a system of magnetic islands are taken up, including Island merger: forced reconnection. Spectra as functions of sigma are shown, and gamma ~ 109 is addressed. It is concluded that reconnection in magnetically-dominated plasma can proceed explosively, is an efficient means of particle acceleration, and is an important (perhaps dominant for some phenomena) mechanism of particle acceleration in high energy sources.

  17. Probing Turbulence and Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Boettcher, Markus; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2016-04-01

    Acceleration at relativistic shocks is likely to be important in various astrophysical jet sources, including blazars and other radio-loud active galaxies. An important recent development for blazar science is the ability of Fermi-LAT data to pin down the power-law index of the high energy portion of emission in these sources, and therefore also the index of the underlying non-thermal particle population. This paper highlights how multiwavelength spectra including X-ray band and Fermi data can be used to probe diffusive acceleration in relativistic, oblique, MHD shocks in blazar jets. The spectral index of the non-thermal particle distributions resulting from Monte Carlo simulations of shock acceleration, and the fraction of thermal particles accelerated to non-thermal energies, depend sensitively on the particles' mean free path scale, and also on the mean magnetic field obliquity to the shock normal. We investigate the radiative synchrotron/Compton signatures of thermal and non-thermal particle distributions generated from the acceleration simulations. Important constraints on the frequency of particle scattering and the level of field turbulence are identified for the jet sources Mrk 501, AO 0235+164 and Bl Lacertae. Results suggest the interpretation that turbulence levels decline with remoteness from jet shocks, with a significant role for non-gyroresonant diffusion.

  18. X-Ray Probes of Cosmic Star-Formation History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; White, Nicholas E.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper we point out that the X-ray luminosity L(sub x) of a galaxy is driven by the evolution of its X-ray binary population and that the profile of L(sub x) with redshift can both serve as a diagnostic probe of the Star Formation Rate (SFR) profile and constrain evolutionary models for X-ray binaries. We update our previous work using a suite of more recently developed SFR profiles that span the currently plausible range. The first Chandra deep imaging results on L(sub x)-evolution are beginning to probe the SFR profile of bright spirals and the early results are consistent with predictions based on current SFR models. Using these new SFR profiles the resolution of the "birthrate problem" of lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and recycled, millisecond pulsars in terms of an evolving global SFR is more complete. We also discuss the possible impact of the variations in the SFR profile of individual galaxies.

  19. Cosmic microwave background anisotropy from nonlinear structures in accelerating universes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-09-15

    We study the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy due to spherically symmetric nonlinear structures in flat universes with dust and a cosmological constant. By modeling a time-evolving spherical compensated void/lump by Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetimes, we numerically solve the null geodesic equations with the Einstein equations. We find that a nonlinear void redshifts the CMB photons that pass through it regardless of the distance to it. In contrast, a nonlinear lump blueshifts (or redshifts) the CMB photons if it is located near (or sufficiently far from) us. The present analysis comprehensively covers previous works based on a thin-shell approximation and a linear/second-order perturbation method and the effects of shell thickness and full nonlinearity. Our results indicate that, if quasilinear and large (> or approx.100 Mpc) voids/lumps would exist, they could be observed as cold or hot spots with temperature variance > or approx. 10{sup -5} K in the CMB sky.

  20. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  1. Spontaneous excitation of a uniformly accelerated atom in the cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenting; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    We study, in the cosmic string spacetime, the average rate of change of energy for an atom coupled to massless scalar fields and uniformly accelerated in a direction parallel to the string in vacuum. We find that both the noninertial motion and the nontrivial global spacetime topology affect the atomic transition rates, so an accelerated atom (an Unruh detector) does feel the string contrary to claims in the literature. We demonstrate that the equivalence between the effect of uniform acceleration and that of thermal radiation on the transition rates of the atom, which is valid in the Minkowski spacetime, holds only on the string.

  2. Clusters of Galaxies as a Probe of the Cosmic Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richstone, Douglas

    1994-05-01

    We focus on the influence of cosmological model on the process of formation of clusters of galaxies. Richstone, Loeb and Turner (1992 ApJ 393, 477) have shown that under the assumptions of hierarchical formation and a Gaussian random field of perturbations, the rate at which matter is currently being added to the most massive virialized structures is a strong function of Omega_0 , and suggested that the observed frequency of substructure in clusters might be a probe of Omega . Evrard, Mohr, Fabricant and Geller (1993 ApJ Letters 419, L9) have shown that it is possible to compare SPH simulations of clusters to X-ray images of clusters using a test measuring the skewness of the image, to explore this effect. We report on calculations done in collaboration with Crone and Evrard, which explore the cosmological dependence of the cluster density profile and various tests of substructure in N-body simulations.

  3. Cosmic-ray acceleration during the impact of shocks on dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung

    1993-01-01

    In order to elucidate the properties of diffusive shock acceleration in nonuniform environments, an extensive set of simulations of the dynamical interactions between plane nonradiative shocks and dense gas clouds was carried out initially in static equilibrium with their environments. These time-dependent calculations are based on the two-fluid model for diffusive cosmic ray transport, and include the dynamically active energetic proton component of the cosmic rays as well as passive electron and magnetic field components. Except when the incident shock is itself already dominated by cosmic ray pressure, it is found that the presence of the cloud adds little to the net acceleration efficiency of the original shock and can, in fact, reduce slightly the net amount of energy transferred to cosmic rays after a given time. It is found that, in 2D cloud simulations, the always-weak bow shock and the shock inside the cloud are less important to acceleration during the interaction than the tail shock.

  4. Global universe anisotropy probed by the alignment of structures in the cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Wiaux, Y; Vielva, P; Martínez-González, E; Vandergheynst, P

    2006-04-21

    We question the global universe isotropy by probing the alignment of local structures in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. The original method proposed relies on a steerable wavelet decomposition of the CMB signal on the sphere. The analysis of the first-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data identifies a mean preferred plane with a normal direction close to the CMB dipole axis, and a mean preferred direction in this plane, very close to the ecliptic poles axis. Previous statistical anisotropy results are thereby synthesized, but further analyses are still required to establish their origin. PMID:16712146

  5. Black holes are neither particle accelerators nor dark matter probes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean T

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that maximally spinning black holes can serve as particle accelerators, reaching arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. Despite several objections regarding the practical achievability of such high energies, and demonstrations past and present that such large energies could never reach a distant observer, interest in this problem has remained substantial. We show that, unfortunately, a maximally spinning black hole can never serve as a probe of high energy collisions, even in principle and despite the correctness of the original diverging energy calculation. Black holes can indeed facilitate dark matter annihilation, but the most energetic photons can carry little more than the rest energy of the dark matter particles to a distant observer, and those photons are actually generated relatively far from the black hole where relativistic effects are negligible. Therefore, any strong gravitational potential could probe dark matter equally well, and an appeal to black holes for facilitating such collisions is unnecessary. PMID:23383773

  6. Fab 5: noncanonical kinetic gravity, self tuning, and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, Stephen A.; Linder, Eric V.; Felice, Antonio De E-mail: adefelic@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We investigate circumstances under which one can generalize Horndeski's most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Specifically we demonstrate that a nonlinear combination of purely kinetic gravity terms can give rise to an accelerating universe without the addition of extra propagating degrees of freedom on cosmological backgrounds, and exhibit self tuning to bring a large cosmological constant under control. This nonlinear approach leads to new properties that may be instructive for exploring the behaviors of gravity.

  7. Cosmic ray acceleration at perpendicular shocks in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Gilles; Danos, Rebecca J.; Shalchi, Andreas; Safi-Harb, Samar; Edmon, Paul; Mendygral, Peter

    2014-09-10

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to accelerate particles up to high energies through the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Except for direct plasma simulations, all modeling efforts must rely on a given form of the diffusion coefficient, a key parameter that embodies the interactions of energetic charged particles with magnetic turbulence. The so-called Bohm limit is commonly employed. In this paper, we revisit the question of acceleration at perpendicular shocks, by employing a realistic model of perpendicular diffusion. Our coefficient reduces to a power law in momentum for low momenta (of index α), but becomes independent of the particle momentum at high momenta (reaching a constant value κ{sub ∞} above some characteristic momentum p {sub c}). We first provide simple analytical expressions of the maximum momentum that can be reached at a given time with this coefficient. Then we perform time-dependent numerical simulations to investigate the shape of the particle distribution that can be obtained when the particle pressure back-reacts on the flow. We observe that for a given index α and injection level, the shock modifications are similar for different possible values of p {sub c}, whereas the particle spectra differ markedly. Of particular interest, low values of p {sub c} tend to remove the concavity once thought to be typical of non-linear DSA, and result in steep spectra, as required by recent high-energy observations of Galactic SNRs.

  8. New accelerators for femtosecond beam pump-and-probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Sakumi, Akira; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Yamaoka, Nobuaki; Zhidkov, Alexei; Ohkubo, Takeru; Ueda, Toru; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke; Iijima, Hokuto; Tomizawa, Hiromitsu; Kumagai, Noritaka

    2005-12-01

    Femtosecond electron beams are novel tool for pump-probe analysis of condensed matter. Progress in developing femtosecond electron beams with the use of both conventional accelerators and laser-plasma accelerators is discussed. In conventional accelerators, the critical issue is timing jitter and drift of the linac-laser synchronization system. Sophisticated electronic devices are developed to reduce the jitter to 330 fs (rms); the precise control of temperature at several parts of the accelerator lessens the drift to 1 ps (rms). We also report on a full-optical X-ray and e-beam system based on the laser-plasma cathode by using a 12 TW 50 fs laser, which enables 40 MeV (at maximum), 40 fs (cal.), 100 pC and quasi-monochromatic single electron bunches. Since the synchronization is done by a passive optical beam-splitter, this system intrinsically has no jitter and drift. It could achieve tens of femtoseconds time-resolved analysis in the near future.

  9. Cosmic gamma-ray propagation as a probe for intergalactic media and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Hao

    2012-05-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays beyond 100 GeV, coming from galactic and extragalactic sources, reflect the most energetic non-thermal processes in the universe. The emission of these photons indicates the acceleration of charged particles to very high energies or the existence of exotic particles that annihilate or decay to photons. Observations of VHE gamma rays probing this highest energy window of electromagnetic waves thus can reveal the underlying acceleration processes or new astrophysical particles. The fluxes tend to be power-law spectra and this poses a difficulty for direct observation due to the low flux at the high-energy end and to the limited effective area of space-borne instruments. Ground-based VHE gamma-ray observatories therefore take advantage of the earth atmosphere as a calorimeter and observe the gamma rays indirectly via the electromagnetic cascade shower particles they produce. The shower particles are detected either directly or via the Cherenkov radiation they emit while propagating through the air. The current-generation telescopes adopting this ground-based methodology have confirmed several source categories and are starting to answer various physical and astronomical questions, e.g., the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, the black hole accretion processes, etc. Together with multi-wavelength observations covering the full electromagnetic spectrum and astrophysical observatories of other particles (cosmic rays, neutrinos, etc.) VHE gamma-ray astronomy contributes as an indispensable part of the recently emerging field of multi-messenger particle astrophysics. When emitted by extragalactic sources, the VHE gamma rays undergo various interactions in the intergalactic medium as they propagate toward the earth. There is a guaranteed interaction, where the VHE gamma-ray photons are absorbed by the extragalactic background light (EBL), an isotropic background of optical-to-infrared photons coming from starlight or dust re

  10. Method for direct measurement of cosmic acceleration by 21-cm absorption systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li

    2014-07-25

    So far there is only indirect evidence that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21-cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the same objects separated by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a ΛCDM universe with 5σ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing and cannot be recovered retroactively. PMID:25105607

  11. The Evolution of the Acceleration Mechanisms of Cosmic Rays and Relativistic Electrons in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvyk, N.

    There are estimated an efficacy for different acceleration mechanisms of e- and p-cosmic rays (CRs) in radio galaxies, using an evolution model for jet gaps and shock fronts with a turbulence. It is shown that diffusion shock acceleration of the CRs is the most efficient mechanism in the FR II radio galaxies (RGs). At the same time, there are a break-pinch mechanism (for a short-term at a jet gap moment), and a stochastic turbulent mechanism (for an all time when RG exist), that to play a grate part in acceleration of the CRs (give to 10-50 % of the all acceleration efficiency). It is predicted what properties of radio emission spectra give us to recognize a type of acceleration mechanisms of e-CR in the RG.

  12. A Global Probe of Cosmic Magnetic Fields to High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, P. P.; Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J.; Short, M. B.; Higdon, D. M.

    2008-03-01

    Faraday rotation (rotation measure [RM]) probes of magnetic fields in the universe are sensitive to cosmological and evolutionary effects as z increases beyond ~1 because of the scalings of electron density and magnetic fields, and the growth in the number of expected intersections with galaxy-scale intervenors, dN/dz. In this new global analysis of an unprecedented large sample of RMs of high-latitude quasars extending out to z ~ 3.7, we find that the distribution of RM broadens with redshift in the 20-80 rad m-2 range, despite the (1 + z)-2 wavelength dilution expected in the observed Faraday rotation. Our results indicate that the universe becomes increasingly "Faraday-opaque" to sources beyond z ~ 2; that is, as z increases, progressively fewer sources are found with a "small" RM in the observer's frame. This is in contrast to sources at zlesssim 1. They suggest that the environments of galaxies were significantly magnetized at high redshifts, with magnetic field strengths that were at least as strong within a few Gyr of the big bang as at the current epoch. We separately investigate a simple unevolving toy model in which the RM is produced by Mg II absorber systems, and find that it can approximately reproduce the observed trend with redshift. An additional possibility is that the intrinsic RM associated with the radio sources was much higher in the past, and we show that this is not a trivial consequence of the higher radio luminosities of the high-redshift sources.

  13. Radio emission and nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays in the supernova SN 1993J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatischeff, V.

    2009-05-01

    Aims: The extensive observations of the supernova SN 1993J at radio wavelengths make this object a unique target for the study of particle acceleration in a supernova shock. Methods: To describe the radio synchrotron emission we use a model that couples a semianalytic description of nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration with self-similar solutions for the hydrodynamics of the supernova expansion. The synchrotron emission, which is assumed to be produced by relativistic electrons propagating in the postshock plasma, is worked out from radiative transfer calculations that include the process of synchrotron self-absorption. The model is applied to explain the morphology of the radio emission deduced from high-resolution VLBI imaging observations and the measured time evolution of the total flux density at six frequencies. Results: Both the light curves and the morphology of the radio emission indicate that the magnetic field was strongly amplified in the blast wave region shortly after the explosion, possibly via the nonresonant regime of the cosmic-ray streaming instability operating in the shock precursor. The amplified magnetic field immediately upstream from the subshock is determined to be Bu ≈ 50 (t/1 { day})-1 G. The turbulent magnetic field was not damped behind the shock but carried along by the plasma flow in the downstream region. Cosmic-ray protons were efficiently produced by diffusive shock acceleration at the blast wave. We find that during the first 8.5 years after the explosion, about 19% of the total energy processed by the forward shock was converted to cosmic-ray energy. However, the shock remained weakly modified by the cosmic-ray pressure. The high magnetic field amplification implies that protons were rapidly accelerated to energies well above 1015 eV. The results obtained for this supernova support the scenario that massive stars exploding into their former stellar wind are a major source of Galactic cosmic-rays of energies above 1015 eV. We

  14. A cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays detected by Fermi in the Cygnus superbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Isabelle A.; Tibaldo, Luigi; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    Conspicuous stellar clusters, with high densities of massive stars, powerful stellar winds, and intense UV flux, have formed over the past few million years in the large molecular clouds of the Cygnus X region, 1.4 kpc away from the Sun. By capturing the gamma-ray signal of young cosmic rays spreading in the interstellar medium surrounding the clusters, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has confirmed the long-standing hypothesis that massive-star forming regions host cosmic-ray factories. The 50-pc wide cocoon of energetic particles appears to fill the interstellar cavities carved by the stellar activity. The cocoon provides a first test case to study the impact of wind-powered turbulence on the early phases of cosmic-ray diffusion (between the sources and the Galaxy at large) and to study the acceleration potential of this type of superbubble environment for in-situ cosmic-ray production or to energize Galactic cosmic rays passing by.

  15. Late decaying dark matter, bulk viscosity, and the cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G. J.; Kolda, C.; Lan, N. Q.

    2008-08-15

    We discuss a cosmology in which cold dark matter begins to decay into relativistic particles at a recent epoch (z<1). We show that the large entropy production and associated bulk viscosity from such decays leads to an accelerating cosmology as required by observations. We investigate the effects of decaying cold dark matter in a {lambda}=0, flat, initially matter dominated cosmology. We show that this model satisfies the cosmological constraint from the redshift-distance relation for type Ia supernovae. The age in such models is also consistent with the constraints from the oldest stars and globular clusters. Possible candidates for this late decaying dark matter are suggested along with additional observational tests of this cosmological paradigm.

  16. Acceleration of cosmic rays by turbulence during reconnection events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Jim

    2007-05-01

    A Fermi-like model for energetic electron production during magnetic reconnection is described that converts a substantial fraction of released magnetic energy into energetic electrons [1]. Magnetic reconnection with a guide field leads to the growth and dynamics of multiple magnetic islands rather than a single large x-line. Electrons trapped within islands gain energy as they reflect from ends of contracting magnetic islands. The resulting rate of energy gain dominates that from parallel electric fields. The pressure from energetic electrons rises rapidly until the rate of electron energy gain balances the rate of magnetic energy release, establishing for the first time a link between the energy gain of electrons and the released magnetic energy. The energetic particle pressure therefore throttles the rate of reconnection. A transport equation for the distribution of energetic particles, including their feedback on island contraction, is obtained by averaging over the particle interaction with many islands. The steady state solutions in reconnection geometry result from convective losses balancing the Fermi drive. At high energy distribution functions take the form of a powerlaw whose spectral index depends only on the initial electron β, lower (higher) β producing harder (softer) spectra. The spectral index matches that seen in recent Wind spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail. Harder spectra are predicted for the low β conditions of the solar corona or other astrophysical systems. Ions can be similarly accelerated if they are above an energy threshold. 1. J. F. Drake, M. Swisdak, H. Che and M. Shay, Nature 443, 553, 2006.

  17. Power requirements for cosmic ray propagation models involving re-acceleration and a comment on second-order Fermi acceleration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornbury, Andrew; Drury, Luke O'C.

    2014-08-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the power transferred from interstellar turbulence to the Galactic cosmic rays in propagation models which include re-acceleration. This is used to estimate the power required in such models and the relative importance of the primary acceleration as against re-acceleration. The analysis provides a formal mathematical justification for Fermi's heuristic account of second-order acceleration in his classic 1949 paper.

  18. Probing the gravitational wave signature from cosmic phase transitions at different scales

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Lawrence M.; Dent, James; Jones-Smith, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh

    2010-08-15

    We present a new signature by which one could potentially discriminate between a spectrum of gravitational radiation generated by a self-ordering scalar field vs that of inflation, specifically a comparison of the magnitude of a flat spectrum at frequencies probed by future direct detection experiments to the magnitude of a possible polarization signal in the cosmic microwave background radiation. In the process we clarify several issues related to the proper calculation of such modes, focusing on the effect of post-horizon-crossing evolution.

  19. Cosmic far-ultraviolet background radiation - Probe of a dense hot intergalactic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, R. D.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    Line and continuum radiation fluxes have been computed for a wide range of enriched intergalactic medium (IGM) models. Observations of the diffuse extragalactic light at optical and far-ultraviolet wavelengths are found to provide a potentially important probe of a dense hot intergalactic medium. If the diffuse X-ray background is produced by this gas, the models constrain the cosmological density parameter (Omega) to be less than 0.4. The associated Compton distortions of the cosmic blackbody background radiation and the optical depths to distant quasars at X-ray wavelengths are also evaluated.

  20. VERITAS observations of supernova remnants for studies of cosmic ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nahee

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have been suggested as the main sites for acceleration of cosmic rays (CRs) with energies up to the knee region ( 10(15) eV). Gamma-ray emission from SNRs can provide a unique window to observe the cosmic ray acceleration and to test existing acceleration models in these objects. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is an array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes that measures gamma rays with energies higher than 100 GeV. Located in Arizona, USA, VERITAS has observed several SNRs in the northern hemisphere since the beginning of operations in 2007. These include two young SNRs of different types (Cassiopeia A and Tycho), as well as middle- to old-aged remnants with nearby target material such as molecular clouds. Gamma-ray data from different types of SNRs in different evolutionary stages are important to study SNRs as CR accelerators. Here we present a summary of VERITAS results on Galactic SNRs including Tycho, and discuss what these observations have taught us.

  1. Stochastic acceleration of solar cosmic rays in an expanding coronal magnetic bottle

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D.J.

    1980-04-01

    Several key features of the coronal propagation of solar cosmic rays have previously been explained by a ''magnetic bottle'' model proposed by Schatten and Mullan. The major apparent difficulty with that model is that expansion of the closed bottle might have a severe cooling effect on the cosmic rays trapped inside. In the present paper, we examine this difficulty by applying the equation for stochastic acceleration to an expanding bottle. Following our earlier suggestion, the scattering centers are taken to be small-scale magnetic inhomogeneities which are present in the corona prior to the flare, and which are set into turbulent motion when a flare-induced shock passes by. We identify the inhomogeneities with the collapsing magnetic neutral sheets discussed by Levine in the context of normal coronal heating. We find that the acceleration efficiencies can indeed be high enough to offset expansive cooling: within the time intervals that are typically available for closed bottle evolution (1000--3000 s), protons can be accelerated from 1 keV to 100 MeV and more. Our results indicate that the flux of particles which are accelerated to (say) 100 MeV is very sensitive to shock speed if this speed is less than about 10/sup 3/ km s/sup -1/.

  2. Overview of the SuperNova/Acceleration probe (SNAP)

    SciTech Connect

    galdering@lbl.gov

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a space-based experiment to measure the expansion history of the Universe and study both its dark energy and the dark matter. The experiment is motivated by the startling discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. A 0.7 square-degree imager comprised of 36 large format fully-depleted n-type CCD's sharing a focal plane with 36 HgCdTe detectors forms the heart of SNAP, allowing discovery and lightcurve measurements simultaneously for many supernovae. The imager and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph are coupled to a 2-m three mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope, which will be placed in a high-earth orbit. The SNAP mission can obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for over 2000 Type Ia supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7. The resulting data set can not only determine the amount of dark energy with high precision, but test the nature of the dark energy by examining its equation of state. In particular, dark energy due to a cosmological constant can be differentiated from alternatives such as ''quintessence'', by measuring the dark energy's equation of state to an accuracy of {+-} 0.05, and by studying its time dependence.

  3. Acceleration of High Energy Cosmic Rays in the Nonlinear Shock Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzhinsky, F.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    2006-10-01

    The problem of understanding acceleration of very energetic cosmic rays to energies above the 'knee' in the spectrum at 10^15-10^16eV remains one of the great challenges in modern physics. Recently, we have proposed a new approach to understanding high energy acceleration, based on exploiting scattering of cosmic rays by inhomogenities in the compressive nonlinear shock precursor, rather than by scattering across the main shock, as is conventionally assumed. We extend that theory by proposing a mechanism for the generation of mesoscale magnetic fields (krg<1, where rg is the cosmic ray gyroradius). The mechanism is the decay or modulational instability of resonantly generated Alfven waves scattering off ambient density perturbations in the precursors. Such perturbations can be produced by Drury instability. This mechanism leads to the generation of longer wavelength Alfven waves, thus enabling the confinement of higher energy particles. A simplified version of the theory, cast in the form of a Fokker-Planck equation for the Alfven population, will also be presented. This process also limits field generation on rg scales.

  4. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. III. EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Morlino, G.; Blasi, P.; Bandiera, R.; Amato, E.; Caprioli, D.

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we present the first formulation of the theory of nonlinear particle acceleration in collisionless shocks in the presence of neutral hydrogen in the acceleration region. The dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles, the magnetic field amplification, and the magnetic dynamical effects on the shock are also included. The main new aspect of this study, however, consists of accounting for charge exchange and the ionization of a neutral hydrogen, which profoundly change the structure of the shock, as discussed in our previous work. This important dynamical effect of neutrals is mainly associated with the so-called neutral return flux, namely the return of hot neutrals from the downstream region to upstream, where they deposit energy and momentum through charge exchange and ionization. We also present the self-consistent calculation of Balmer line emission from the shock region and discuss how to use measurements of the anomalous width of the different components of the Balmer line to infer cosmic ray acceleration efficiency in supernova remnants showing Balmer emission: the broad Balmer line, which is due to charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with hot ions downstream of the shock, is shown to become narrower as a result of the energy drainage into cosmic rays, while the narrow Balmer line, due to charge exchange in the cosmic-ray-induced precursor, is shown to become broader. In addition to these two well-known components, the neutral return flux leads to the formation of a third component with an intermediate width: this too contains information on ongoing processes at the shock.

  5. Probing the inner structure of blast furnaces by cosmic-ray muon radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, K.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Nakamura, S. N.; Ishida, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Shinotake, A.; Naito, M.; Hatanaka, A.

    By using the detection system of the near-horizontal cosmic-ray radiography originally developed for probing inner structure of volcanic mountains, a measurement was conducted to probe the inner structure and its time-dependent change of the blast furnace for iron-making. Precise determination (+/-5 cm) of the thickness of brick used for both base-plate and side-wall was made in 45 days; a crucial information to predict a life-time of the furnace. Also, the local density of iron-rich part was determined in +/-0.2 g/cm2 in 45 days; static structure as well as time-dependent behavior can be monitored for the iron-rich part of the furnace during operation.

  6. The difference PDF of 21-cm fluctuations: a powerful statistical tool for probing cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Rennan; Loeb, Abraham

    2008-03-01

    A new generation of radio telescopes are currently being built with the goal of tracing the cosmic distribution of atomic hydrogen at redshifts 6-15 through its 21-cm line. The observations will probe the large-scale brightness fluctuations sourced by ionization fluctuations during cosmic reionization. Since detailed maps will be difficult to extract due to noise and foreground emission, efforts have focused on a statistical detection of the 21-cm fluctuations. During cosmic reionization, these fluctuations are highly non-Gaussian and thus more information can be extracted than just the one-dimensional function that is usually considered, i.e. the correlation function. We calculate a two-dimensional function that if measured observationally would allow a more thorough investigation of the properties of the underlying ionizing sources. This function is the probability distribution function (PDF) of the difference in the 21-cm brightness temperature between two points, as a function of the separation between the points. While the standard correlation function is determined by a complicated mixture of contributions from density and ionization fluctuations, we show that the difference PDF holds the key to separately measuring the statistical properties of the ionized regions.

  7. Particle acceleration and turbulence in cosmic Ray shocks: possible pathways beyond the Bohm limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H.

    2007-08-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration is discussed in terms of its potential to accelerate cosmic rays (CR) to 1018 eV (beyond the ``knee,'' as observations suggest) and in terms of the related observational signatures (spectral features). One idea to reach this energy is to resonantly generate a turbulent magnetic field via accelerated particles much in excess of the background field. We identify difficulties with this scenario and suggest two separate mechanisms that can work in concert with one another leading to a significant acceleration enhancement. The first mechanism is based on a nonlinear modification of the flow ahead of the shock supported by particles already accelerated to some specific (knee) momentum. The particles gain energy by bouncing off converging magnetic irregularities frozen into the flow in the shock precursor and not so much by re-crossing the shock itself. The acceleration rate is determined by the gradient of the flow velocity and turns out to be formally independent of the particle mean free path. The velocity gradient is set by the knee-particles. The acceleration rate of particles above the knee does not decrease with energy, unlike in the linear acceleration regime. The knee (spectrum steepening) forms because particles above it are effectively confined to the shock only if they are within limited domains in the momentum space, while other particles fall into ``loss-islands'', similar to the ``loss-cone'' of magnetic traps. This also maintains the steep velocity gradient and high acceleration rate. The second mechanism is based on the generation of Alfven waves at the gyroradius scale at the background field level, with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven (A) waves.

  8. Cosmic Rays Across the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould Zweibel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic rays play an important role in the dynamics, energetics, and chemisry of gas inside and outside galaxies. It has long been recognized that gamma ray astronomy is a powerful probe of cosmic ray acceleration and propagation, and that gamma ray data, combined with other observations of cosmic rays and of the host medium and with modeling, can provide an integrated picture of cosmic rays and their environments. I will discuss the plasma physics underlying this picture, where it has been successful, and where issues remain.

  9. Origin of cosmic rays. II. The cosmic-ray distribution and the spiral structure of NGC 3310. III. Particle acceleration by global spiral shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Duric, N.

    1986-05-01

    The optical and radio continuum properties of the spiral arms of NGC 3310 are analyzed and intercompared. The likely presence of a strong density wave in NGC 3310 is demonstrated, and a number of observational results constraining the relationship between synchrotron emission, emission line radiation, and starlight are developed. The role of supernova remnants in the production of relativistic particles is investigated and found to be inconsistent with the constraints. The generation of cosmic rays by global spiral shocks via a Fermi-type shock acceleration process is shown to agree with all the major constraints, suggesting that the rotation of the galaxy powers the acceleration of particles to cosmic ray energies. A medium with temperature of 10,000 K, partially to fully ionized, is shown to support the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. 57 references.

  10. Relativistic cosmic ray spectra in the full non-linear theory of shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.; Ellison, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The non-linear theory of shock acceleration was generalized to include wave dynamics. In the limit of rapid wave damping, it is found that a finite ave velocity tempers the acceleration of high Mach number shocks and limits the maximum compression ratio even when energy loss is important. For a given spectrum, the efficiency of relativistic particle production is essentially independent of v sub Ph. For the three families shown, the percentage of kinetic energy flux going into relativistic particles is (1) 72%, 2) 44%, and (3) 26% (this includes the energy loss at the upper energy cuttoff). Even small v sub ph, typical of the HISM, produce quasi-universal spectra that depend only weakly on the acoustic Mach number. These spectra should be close enough to e(-2) to satisfy cosmic ray source requirements.

  11. Acceleration and propagation of high Z cosmic rays in a pulsar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Ryan, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The survival of high Z nuclei in the X-ray photon field of a pulsar is investigated. For heavy nuclei with energies greater than or equal to 100 GeV/nucleon, 100 keV X-ray photons have sufficient energy to cause photodisintegration with cross sections of approximately 10 to the minus 25th power sq cm. Using the observed properties of the Crab pulsar, extrapolation back to epochs when the pulsar was more active indicates that the photon field is sufficiently dense to prevent the acceleration of heavy nuclei within the velocity of light cylinder. On this model, the upper limit on the energy of the escaping nuclei varies with time. The models for cosmic ray acceleration in supernova explosions or by pulsars will be related to experimental observations.

  12. The solar wind structures associated with cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    The time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at times of all greater than 3 percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978 to 1982 are studied. Essentially all 59 of the decreases commenced at or before the passages of interplanetary shocks, the majority of which accelerated energetic particles. We use the intensity-time profiles of the energetic particles to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which we subsequently associate with four types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) can be associated with shocks which are driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events the ejecta is detected at 1 AU whereas this is not the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the depression of cosmic rays in class 2 events. In all class 1 and 2 events (which comprise 69 percent of the total) the departure time of the ejection from the sun (and hence the location) can be determined from the rapid onset of energetic particles several days before the shock passage at Earth. The class 1 events originate from within 50 deg of central meridian. Class 3 events (10 decreases) can be attributed to less energetic ejections which are directed towards the Earth. In these events the ejecta is more important than the shock in causing a depression in the cosmic ray intensity. The remaining events (14 percent of the total) can be attributed to corotating streams which have ejecta material embedded in them.

  13. Cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova remnants: non-linear theory revised

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2012-07-01

    A rapidly growing amount of evidences, mostly coming from the recent gamma-ray observations of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs), is seriously challenging our understanding of how particles are accelerated at fast shocks. The cosmic-ray (CR) spectra required to account for the observed phenomenology are in fact as steep as E{sup −2.2}–E{sup −2.4}, i.e., steeper than the test-particle prediction of first-order Fermi acceleration, and significantly steeper than what expected in a more refined non-linear theory of diffusive shock acceleration. By accounting for the dynamical back-reaction of the non-thermal particles, such a theory in fact predicts that the more efficient the particle acceleration, the flatter the CR spectrum. In this work we put forward a self-consistent scenario in which the account for the magnetic field amplification induced by CR streaming produces the conditions for reversing such a trend, allowing — at the same time — for rather steep spectra and CR acceleration efficiencies (about 20%) consistent with the hypothesis that SNRs are the sources of Galactic CRs. In particular, we quantitatively work out the details of instantaneous and cumulative CR spectra during the evolution of a typical SNR, also stressing the implications of the observed levels of magnetization on both the expected maximum energy and the predicted CR acceleration efficiency. The latter naturally turns out to saturate around 10-30%, almost independently of the fraction of particles injected into the acceleration process as long as this fraction is larger than about 10{sup −4}.

  14. Current and Prospective Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration using X-ray Galaxy Clusters and Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapetti, David A.; Allen, S. W.; Amin, M. A.; Blandford, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    We employ both a standard dynamical approach and a new kinematical approach to constrain cosmic acceleration using the three best available sets of redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements. The standard `dynamical' analysis employs the Friedmann equations and models dark energy as a fluid with an equation of state parameter, w. From a purely kinematical point of view, however, we can also construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q_0 and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). A convenient feature of this parameterization is that all LambdaCDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the LambdaCDM paradigm. We obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk j(t)=j, we measure q_0=-0.81+-0.14 and j=2.16+0.81-0.75. For a dynamical model with constant w we measure Omega_m=0.306+0.042-0.040 and w=-1.15+0.14-0.18. Both kinematical and dynamical results are consistent with LambdaCDM at the 1sigma level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. We argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible. Finally, we discuss the potential for future experiments including Constellation-X, which will constrain dark energy with comparable accuracy and in a beautifully complementary manner to the best other techniques available circa 2018.

  15. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a separate White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties leads to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. With early R&D funding, we have achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction. Pre-JDEM AO R&D support will further reduce technical and cost risk. Specific details on the SNAP mission can be found in Aldering et al. (2004, 2005). The primary goal of the SNAP supernova program is to provide a dataset which gives tight constraints on parameters which characterize the dark-energy, e.g. w{sub 0} and w{sub a} where w(a) = w{sub 0} + w{sub a}(1-a). SNAP data can also be used to directly test and discriminate among specific dark energy models. We will do so by building the Hubble diagram of high-redshift supernovae, the same methodology used in the original discovery of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe that established the existence of dark energy (Perlmutter et al. 1998; Garnavich et al. 1998; Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999). The SNAP SN Ia program focuses on minimizing the systematic floor of the supernova method through the use of characterized supernovae that can be sorted into subsets based on subtle signatures of heterogeneity. Subsets may be defined based on host-galaxy morphology, spectral-feature strength and velocity, early-time behavior, inter alia. Independent cosmological analysis of each subset of ''like'' supernovae can be

  16. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hoerandel, Joerg; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Joerg; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Rossetto, Laura; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-04-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called an extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate coherent radio wave emission that has been detected with LOFAR, a large and dense array of simple radio antennas primarily developed for radio-astronomy observations. Our measurements are performed in the 30-80 MHz frequency band. For fair weather conditions the observations are in excellent agreement with model calculations. However, for air showers measured under thunderstorm conditions we observe large differences in the intensity and polarization patterns from the predictions of fair weather models. We will show that the linear as well as the circular polarization of the radio waves carry clear information on the magnitude and orientation of the electric fields at different heights in the thunderstorm clouds. We will show that from the measured data at LOFAR the thunderstorm electric fields can be reconstructed. We thus have established the measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays as a new tool to probe the atmospheric electric fields present in thunderclouds in a non-intrusive way. In part this presentation is based on the work: P. Schellart et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 165001 (2015).

  17. Probing the effective number of neutrino species with the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

    2008-10-15

    We discuss how much we can probe the effective number of neutrino species N{sub {nu}} with the cosmic microwave background alone. Using the data of the WMAP, ACBAR, CBI, and BOOMERANG experiments, we obtain a constraint on the effective number of neutrino species as 0.96

  18. Simulation of Cosmic Ray Acceleration, Propagation And Interaction in SNR Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Kamae, T.; Ellison, D.C.; /North Carolina State U.

    2007-10-15

    Recent studies of young supernova remnants (SNRs) with Chandra, XMM, Suzaku and HESS have revealed complex morphologies and spectral features of the emission sites. The critical question of the relative importance of the two competing gamma-ray emission mechanisms in SNRs; inverse-Compton scattering by high-energy electrons and pion production by energetic protons, may be resolved by GLAST-LAT. To keep pace with the improved observations, we are developing a 3D model of particle acceleration, diffusion, and interaction in a SNR where broad-band emission from radio to multi-TeV energies, produced by shock accelerated electrons and ions, can be simulated for a given topology of shock fronts, magnetic field, and ISM densities. The 3D model takes as input, the particle spectra predicted by a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution where nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration is coupled to the remnant dynamics. We will present preliminary models of the Galactic Ridge SNR RX J1713-3946 for selected choices of SNR parameters, magnetic field topology, and ISM density distributions. When constrained by broad-band observations, our models should predict the extent of coupling between spectral shape and morphology and provide direct information on the acceleration efficiency of cosmic-ray electrons and ions in SNRs.

  19. EVIDENCE FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATION TO THE KNEE OF THE COSMIC RAY SPECTRUM IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Fesen, Robert; Ghavamian, Parviz; Moffett, David; Plucinksy, Paul P.; Slane, Patrick; Rakowski, Cara E.; Reynoso, Estela M.

    2011-02-20

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been assumed to be the source of cosmic rays (CRs) up to the 'knee' of the CR spectrum at 10{sup 15} eV, accelerating particles to relativistic energies in their blast waves by the process of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Since CR nuclei do not radiate efficiently, their presence must be inferred indirectly. Previous theoretical calculations and X-ray observations show that CR acceleration significantly modifies the structure of the SNR and greatly amplifies the interstellar magnetic field. We present new, deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572, henceforth Tycho), which reveal a previously unknown, strikingly ordered pattern of non-thermal high-emissivity stripes in the projected interior of the remnant, with spacing that corresponds to the gyroradii of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} eV protons. Spectroscopy of the stripes shows the plasma to be highly turbulent on the (smaller) scale of the Larmor radii of TeV energy electrons. Models of the shock amplification of magnetic fields produce structure on the scale of the gyroradius of the highest energy CRs present, but they do not predict the highly ordered pattern we observe. We interpret the stripes as evidence for acceleration of particles to near the knee of the CR spectrum in regions of enhanced magnetic turbulence, while the observed highly ordered pattern of these features provides a new challenge to models of DSA.

  20. ENTROPY AT THE OUTSKIRTS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AS IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMOLOGICAL COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-04-10

    Recently, gas entropy at the outskirts of galaxy clusters has attracted much attention. We propose that the entropy profiles could be used to study cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration around the clusters. If the CRs are effectively accelerated at the formation of clusters, the kinetic energy of infalling gas is consumed by the acceleration and the gas entropy should decrease. As a result, the entropy profiles become flat at the outskirts. If the acceleration is not efficient, the entropy should continue to increase outward. By comparing model predictions with X-ray observations with Suzaku, which show flat entropy profiles, we find that the CRs have carried {approx}< 7% of the kinetic energy of the gas away from the clusters. Moreover, the CR pressure at the outskirts can be {approx}< 40% of the total pressure. On the other hand, if the entropy profiles are not flat at the outskirts, as indicated by combined Plank and ROSAT observations, the carried energy and the CR pressure should be much smaller than the above estimations.

  1. Evidence for Particle Acceleration to the Knee of the Cosmic Ray Spectrum in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Fesen, Robert; Ghavamian, Parviz; Moffett, David; Plucinksy, Paul P.; Rakowski, Cara E.; Reynoso, Estela M.; Slane, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been assumed to be the source of cosmic rays (CRs) up to the "knee" of the CR spectrum at 1015 eV, accelerating particles to relativistic energies in their blast waves by the process of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Since CR nuclei do not radiate efficiently, their presence must be inferred indirectly. Previous theoretical calculations and X-ray observations show that CR acceleration significantly modifies the structure of the SNR and greatly amplifies the interstellar magnetic field. We present new, deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572, henceforth Tycho), which reveal a previously unknown, strikingly ordered pattern of non-thermal high-emissivity stripes in the projected interior of the remnant, with spacing that corresponds to the gyroradii of 1014-1015 eV protons. Spectroscopy of the stripes shows the plasma to be highly turbulent on the (smaller) scale of the Larmor radii of TeV energy electrons. Models of the shock amplification of magnetic fields produce structure on the scale of the gyroradius of the highest energy CRs present, but they do not predict the highly ordered pattern we observe. We interpret the stripes as evidence for acceleration of particles to near the knee of the CR spectrum in regions of enhanced magnetic turbulence, while the observed highly ordered pattern of these features provides a new challenge to models of DSA.

  2. Simulation of Cosmic Ray Acceleration, Propagation and Interaction in SNR Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Kamae, T.; Ellison, D. C.

    2007-07-01

    Recent studies of young supernova remnants (SNRs) with Chandra, XMM, Suzaku and HESS have revealed complex morphologies and spectral features of the emission sites. The critical question of the relative importance of the two competing gamma-ray emission mechanisms in SNRs; inverse-Compton scattering by high-energy electrons and pion production by energetic protons, may be resolved by GLAST-LAT. To keep pace with the improved observations, we are developing a 3D model of particle acceleration, diffusion, and interaction in a SNR where broad-band emission from radio to multi-TeV energies, produced by shock accelerated electrons and ions, can be simulated for a given topology of shock fronts, magnetic field, and ISM densities. The 3D model takes as input, the particle spectra predicted by a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution where nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration is coupled to the remnant dynamics (e.g., Ellison, Decourchelle & Ballet; Ellison & Cassam-Chenai Ellison, Berezhko & Baring). We will present preliminary models of the Galactic Ridge SNR RX J1713-3946 for selected choices of SNR parameters, magnetic field topology, and ISM density distributions. When constrained by broad-band observations, our models should predict the extent of coupling between spectral shape and morphology and provide direct information on the acceleration efficiency of cosmic-ray electrons and ions in SNRs.

  3. Calibration and correction procedures for cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture probes located across Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawdon, Aaron; McJannet, David; Wallace, Jim

    2014-06-01

    The cosmic-ray probe (CRP) provides continuous estimates of soil moisture over an area of ˜30 ha by counting fast neutrons produced from cosmic rays which are predominantly moderated by water molecules in the soil. This paper describes the setup, measurement correction procedures, and field calibration of CRPs at nine locations across Australia with contrasting soil type, climate, and land cover. These probes form the inaugural Australian CRP network, which is known as CosmOz. CRP measurements require neutron count rates to be corrected for effects of atmospheric pressure, water vapor pressure changes, and variations in incoming neutron intensity. We assess the magnitude and importance of these corrections and present standardized approaches for network-wide analysis. In particular, we present a new approach to correct for incoming neutron intensity variations and test its performance against existing procedures used in other studies. Our field calibration results indicate that a generalized calibration function for relating neutron counts to soil moisture is suitable for all soil types, with the possible exception of very sandy soils with low water content. Using multiple calibration data sets, we demonstrate that the generalized calibration function only applies after accounting for persistent sources of hydrogen in the soil profile. Finally, we demonstrate that by following standardized correction procedures and scaling neutron counting rates of all CRPs to a single reference location, differences in calibrations between sites are related to site biomass. This observation provides a means for estimating biomass at a given location or for deriving coefficients for the calibration function in the absence of field calibration data.

  4. Origin of high energy Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    The flux of cosmic ray antiprotons and the chemical composition in the region of the 'knee' of the cosmic ray energy spectrum are discussed. The importance of a direct determination of the energy spectrum of each major component of cosmic radiation through the knee region is stressed, and the necessary kinds of experiments are described. It is emphasized that antiprotons are a unique probe of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in the galaxy because of the high threshold for their production.

  5. Ongoing cosmic ray acceleration in the supernova remnant W51C revealed with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, J.; Reichardt, I.; Carmona, E.; Gozzini, S. R.; Jankowski, F.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) W51C interacts with the molecular clouds of the star-forming region W51B, making the W51 complex one of the most promising targets to study cosmic ray acceleration. Gamma-ray emission from this region was discovered by Fermi/LAT and H.E.S.S., although its location was compatible with the SNR shell, the molecular cloud (MC) and a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) candidate. The modeling of the spectral energy distribution presented by the Fermi/LAT collaboration suggests a hadronic emission mechanism. Furthermore indications of an enhanced flux of low energy cosmic rays in the interaction region between SNR and MC have been reported based on ionization measurements in the mm regime. MAGIC conducted deep observations of W51, yielding a detection of an extended emission with more than 11 standard deviations. We extend the spectrum from the highest Fermi/LAT energies to ~5 TeV and find that it follows a single power law with an index of 2.58+/-0.07stat+/-0.22syst. We restrict the main part of the emission region to the zone where the SNR interacts with the molecular clouds. We also find a tail extending towards the PWN candidate CXO J192318.5+140305, possibly contributing up to 20% of the total flux. The broad band spectral energy distribution can be explained with a hadronic model that implies proton acceleration at least up to 50 TeV. This result, together with the morphology of the source, suggests that we observe ongoing acceleration of ions in the interaction zone between the SNR and the cloud.

  6. Dodging the cosmic curvature to probe the constancy of the speed of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Yang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    We develop a new model-independent method to probe the constancy of the speed of light c. In our method, the degeneracy between the cosmic curvature and the speed of light can be eliminated, which makes the test more natural and general. Combining the independent observations of Hubble parameter H(z) and luminosity distance dL(z), we use the model-independent smoothing technique, Gaussian processes, to reconstruct them and then detect variation of the speed of light. We find no signal of deviation from the present value of the speed of light c0. Moreover, to demonstrate the improvement in probing the constancy of the speed of light from future experiments, we produce a series of simulated data. The Dark Energy Survey will be able to detect Δc/c0 ~ 1% at ~ 1.5σ confidence level and Δc/c0 ~ 2% at ~ 3σ confidence level. If the errors are reduced to one-tenth of the expected DES ones, it can detect a Δc/c0 ~ 0.1% variation at ~ 2σ confidence level.

  7. On ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration at the termination shock of young pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Kotera, Kumiko; Pétri, Jérôme

    2015-07-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are outstanding accelerators in Nature, in the sense that they accelerate electrons up to the radiation reaction limit. Motivated by this observation, this paper examines the possibility that young pulsar wind nebulae can accelerate ions to ultra-high energies at the termination shock of the pulsar wind. We consider here powerful PWNe, fed by pulsars born with ~ millisecond periods. Assuming that such pulsars exist, at least during a few years after the birth of the neutron star, and that they inject ions into the wind, we find that protons could be accelerated up to energies of the order of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off, for a fiducial rotation period P ~ 1 msec and a pulsar magnetic field Bstar ~ 1013 G, implying a fiducial wind luminosity Lp ~ 1045 erg/s and a spin-down time tsd ~ 3× 107 s. The main limiting factor is set by synchrotron losses in the nebula and by the size of the termination shock; ions with Z>= 1 may therefore be accelerated to even higher energies. We derive an associated neutrino flux produced by interactions in the source region. For a proton-dominated composition, our maximum flux lies slightly below the 5-year sensitivity of IceCube-86 and above the 3-year sensitivity of the projected Askaryan Radio Array. It might thus become detectable in the next decade, depending on the exact level of contribution of these millisecond pulsar wind nebulae to the ultra-high energy cosmic ray flux.

  8. Is the acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays affected by the geometry of the termination shock?

    SciTech Connect

    Senanayake, U. K.; Florinski, V. E-mail: vaf0001@uah.edu

    2013-12-01

    Historically, anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) were thought to be accelerated at the solar-wind termination shock (TS) by the diffusive shock acceleration process. When Voyager 1 crossed the TS in 2004, the measured ACR spectra did not match the theoretical prediction of a continuous power law, and the source of the high-energy ACRs was not observed. When the Voyager 2 crossed the TS in 2007, it produced similar results. Several possible explanations have since appeared in the literature, but we follow the suggestion that ACRs are still accelerated at the shock, only away from the Voyager crossing points. To investigate this hypothesis closer, we study ACR acceleration using a three-dimensional, non-spherical model of the heliosphere that is axisymmetric with respect to the interstellar flow direction. We then compare the results with those obtained for a spherical TS. A semi-analytic model of the plasma and magnetic field backgrounds is developed to permit an investigation over a wide range of parameters under controlled conditions. The model is applied to helium ACRs, whose phase-space trajectories are stochastically integrated backward in time until a pre-specified, low-energy boundary, taken to be 0.5 MeV n{sup –1} (the so-called injection energy), is reached. Our results show that ACR acceleration is quite efficient on the heliotail-facing part of the TS. For small values of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, our model yields a positive intensity gradient between the TS and about midway through the heliosheath, in agreement with the Voyager observations.

  9. Shock waves and cosmic ray acceleration in the outskirts of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sungwook E.; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-04-20

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters are continuously disturbed by mergers and gas infall along filaments, which in turn induce turbulent flow motions and shock waves. We examine the properties of shocks that form within r {sub 200} in sample galaxy clusters from structure formation simulations. While most of these shocks are weak and inefficient accelerators of cosmic rays (CRs), there are a number of strong, energetic shocks which can produce large amounts of CR protons via diffusive shock acceleration. We show that the energetic shocks reside mostly in the outskirts and a substantial fraction of them are induced by infall of the warm-hot intergalactic medium from filaments. As a result, the radial profile of the CR pressure in the intracluster medium is expected to be broad, dropping off more slowly than that of the gas pressure, and might be even temporarily inverted, peaking in the outskirts. The volume-integrated momentum spectrum of CR protons inside r {sub 200} has the power-law slope of 4.25-4.5, indicating that the average Mach number of the shocks of main CR production is in the range of {sub CR} ≈ 3-4. We suggest that some radio relics with relatively flat radio spectrum could be explained by primary electrons accelerated by energetic infall shocks with M{sub s} ≳ 3 induced in the cluster outskirts.

  10. Dynamics of rising magnetized cavities and ultrahigh energy cosmic ray acceleration in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-02-01

    We study the expansion of low-density cavities produced by active galactic nucleus jets in clusters of galaxies. The long-term stability of these cavities requires the presence of linked magnetic fields. We find solutions describing the self-similar expansion of structures containing large-scale electromagnetic fields. Unlike the force-free spheromak-like configurations, these solutions have no surface currents and, thus, are less susceptible to resistive decay. The cavities are internally confined by external pressure, with zero gradient at the surface. If the adiabatic index of the plasma within the cavity is Γ > 4/3, the expansion ultimately leads to the formation of large-scale current sheets. The resulting dissipation of the magnetic field can only partially offset the adiabatic and radiative losses of radio-emitting electrons. We demonstrate that if the formation of large-scale current sheets is accompanied by explosive reconnection of the magnetic field, the resulting reconnection layer can accelerate cosmic rays to ultrahigh energies. We speculate that the enhanced flux of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays towards Centaurus A originates at the cavities due to magnetic reconnection.

  11. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  12. A test of the nature of cosmic acceleration using galaxy redshift distortions.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, L; Pierleoni, M; Meneux, B; Branchini, E; Le Fèvre, O; Marinoni, C; Garilli, B; Blaizot, J; De Lucia, G; Pollo, A; McCracken, H J; Bottini, D; Le Brun, V; Maccagni, D; Picat, J P; Scaramella, R; Scodeggio, M; Tresse, L; Vettolani, G; Zanichelli, A; Adami, C; Arnouts, S; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Bongiorno, A; Cappi, A; Charlot, S; Ciliegi, P; Contini, T; Cucciati, O; de la Torre, S; Dolag, K; Foucaud, S; Franzetti, P; Gavignaud, I; Ilbert, O; Iovino, A; Lamareille, F; Marano, B; Mazure, A; Memeo, P; Merighi, R; Moscardini, L; Paltani, S; Pellò, R; Perez-Montero, E; Pozzetti, L; Radovich, M; Vergani, D; Zamorani, G; Zucca, E

    2008-01-31

    Observations of distant supernovae indicate that the Universe is now in a phase of accelerated expansion the physical cause of which is a mystery. Formally, this requires the inclusion of a term acting as a negative pressure in the equations of cosmic expansion, accounting for about 75 per cent of the total energy density in the Universe. The simplest option for this 'dark energy' corresponds to a 'cosmological constant', perhaps related to the quantum vacuum energy. Physically viable alternatives invoke either the presence of a scalar field with an evolving equation of state, or extensions of general relativity involving higher-order curvature terms or extra dimensions. Although they produce similar expansion rates, different models predict measurable differences in the growth rate of large-scale structure with cosmic time. A fingerprint of this growth is provided by coherent galaxy motions, which introduce a radial anisotropy in the clustering pattern reconstructed by galaxy redshift surveys. Here we report a measurement of this effect at a redshift of 0.8. Using a new survey of more than 10,000 faint galaxies, we measure the anisotropy parameter beta = 0.70 +/- 0.26, which corresponds to a growth rate of structure at that time of f = 0.91 +/- 0.36. This is consistent with the standard cosmological-constant model with low matter density and flat geometry, although the error bars are still too large to distinguish among alternative origins for the accelerated expansion. The correct origin could be determined with a further factor-of-ten increase in the sampled volume at similar redshift. PMID:18235494

  13. Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe Soil Water Measurements over Complex Terrain in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, Mariette; Weltin, Georg; Kheng Heng, Lee; Wahbi, Ammar; Oismueller, Markus; Dercon, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    The importance of surface soil water (rooting zone) has become evident with climate change affecting rainfall patterns and crop production. The use of Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe (CRNP) for measuring surface soil water has become increasingly popular. The advantage of CRNP is that it is a non-invasive technique for measuring soil water content at an area-wide scale, in contrast to more conventional, techniques which measure mainly at field scale (point level). The CRNP integrates over a circular area of ca. 600 meters in diameter, to a depth of 70 cm, giving an average value for soil water content. Cosmic radiation interacting with the Earth's atmosphere continuously generates neutrons. At Earth's surface, these neutrons interact with surface water, and are slowed down. At sub-micrometer geometrics, these neutrons affect semiconductor devices, so they can be counted, slow and fast ones separately. From the difference in numbers between fast and slow neutrons, soil water content is calculated. As first in Austria, a CRNP (CRS 1000/B model) consisting of two neutron counters (one tuned for slow, the other one for fast neutrons), data logger and an Iridium modem, has been installed at Petzenkirchen research station of the Doctoral Programme for Water Resource Systems (TU Vienna) at 48.14 latitude and 15.17 longitude, 100 km west of Vienna, in late autumn 2013. The research station is located in an undulating agricultural landscape, characterized by heavy Cambisols and Planosols, and winter wheat and barley as main crops in winter, and maize and sunflower in summer. In addition, an in-situ soil moisture network consisting of 32 stations of Time Domain Transmissivity (TDT) sensors measuring soil water at 4 depths (0.05, 0.10,0.20 and 0.50 m) over an area of 64 ha has been established. This TDT network is currently being used to validate the use of the innovative CRNP technique. First results will be shown at the EGU 2014.

  14. The Super-TIGER Instrument to Probe Galactic Cosmic Ray Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John W.; Binns, W. R.; Bose, R, G.; Braun, D. L.; Christian, E. R.; Daniels, W. M; DeNolfo, G. A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Hahne, D. J.; Hams, T.; Israel, M. H.; Klemic, J.; Labrador, A. W.; Link, J. T.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moore, P. R.; Murphy, R. P.; Olevitch, M. A.; Rauch, B. F.; SanSebastian, F.; Sasaki, M.; Simburger, G. E.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Super-TIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is under construction for the first of two planned Antarctic long-duration balloon flights in December 2012. This new instrument will measure the abundances of ultra-heavy elements (30Zn and heavier), with individual element resolution, to provide sensitive tests of the emerging model of cosmic-ray origins in OB associations and models of the mechanism for selection of nuclei for acceleration. Super-TIGER builds on the techniques of TIGER, which produced the first well-resolved measurements of elemental abundances of the elements 31Ga, 32Ge, and 34Se. Plastic scintillators together with acrylic and silica-aerogel Cherenkov detectors measure particle charge. Scintillating-fiber hodoscopes track particle trajectories. Super-TIGER has an active area of 5.4 sq m, divided into two independent modules. With reduced material thickness to decrease interactions, its effective geometry factor is approx.6.4 times larger than TIGER, allowing it to measure elements up to 42Mo with high statistical precision, and make exploratory measurements up to 56Ba. Super-TIGER will also accurately determine the energy spectra of the more abundant elements from l0Ne to 28Ni between 0.8 and 10 GeV/nucleon to test the hypothesis that microquasars or other sources could superpose spectral features. We will discuss the implications of Super-TIGER measurements for the study of cosmic-ray origins and will present the measurement technique, design, status, and expected performance, including numbers of events and resolution. Details of the hodoscopes, scintillators, and Cherenkov detectors will be given in other presentations at this conference.

  15. Model experiment of cosmic ray acceleration due to an incoherent wakefield induced by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Takeda, K.; Tampo, M.; Takabe, H.; Nakanii, N.; Kondo, K.; Tsuji, K.; Kimura, K.; Fukumochi, S.; Kashihara, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ishikura, T.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mori, Y.; Miura, E.; Kitagawa, Y.

    2011-01-15

    The first report on a model experiment of cosmic ray acceleration by using intense laser pulses is presented. Large amplitude light waves are considered to be excited in the upstream regions of relativistic astrophysical shocks and the wakefield acceleration of cosmic rays can take place. By substituting an intense laser pulse for the large amplitude light waves, such shock environments were modeled in a laboratory plasma. A plasma tube, which is created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder, was irradiated by an intense laser pulse. Nonthermal electrons were generated by the wakefield acceleration and the energy distribution functions of the electrons have a power-law component with an index of {approx}2. The maximum attainable energy of the electrons in the experiment is discussed by a simple analytic model. In the incoherent wakefield the maximum energy can be much larger than one in the coherent field due to the momentum space diffusion or the energy diffusion of electrons.

  16. GRB time profiles as cosmic probes: Is time dilation extrinsic or intrinsic?

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J. P.; Nemiroff, R. J.

    1998-05-16

    Recent detections of gamma-ray burst (GRB) counterparts confirm their great distances and consequent potential use as cosmic probes. However, GRB diversity may thwart this idea. The scatter of intrinsic GRB properties could easily mask the extrinsic effect of cosmological time dilation. Current investigations examine the question of temporal self-similarity: Extrinsic time dilation must be manifest with the same factor on all GRB timescales as a function of distance. Here we show that time-reversal-independent analysis of GRB time profiles using a peak alignment methodology reveals average profiles with approximately equal rise and decay timescales, per peak-flux group, except for the dimmest group. This departure from self-similarity is consistent with a selection effect: At sufficiently low peak fluxes, the BATSE causal trigger misses dim, slowly rising bursts. Interestingly, for GRB970508, the redshift-corrected time-dilation factor inferred for its peak flux is consistent with the measured redshift, z=0.835, if bright bursts lie at redshifts of a few tenths.

  17. Anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background after Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year data

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha E-mail: luca.pagano@roma1.infn.it E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it

    2008-06-15

    We search for the presence of cosmological neutrino background (CNB) anisotropies in recent Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year data using their signature imprinted on modifications to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. By parameterizing the neutrino background anisotropies with the speed viscosity parameter c{sub vis}, we find that the WMAP five-year data alone provide only a weak indication for CNB anisotropies with c{sub vis}{sup 2}>0.06 at the 95% confidence level. When we combine CMB anisotropy data with measurements of galaxy clustering, the SN-Ia Hubble diagram, and other cosmological information, the detection increases to c{sub vis}{sup 2}>0.16 at the same 95% confidence level. Future data from Planck, combined with a weak lensing survey such as the one expected with DUNE from space, will be able to measure the CNB anisotropy parameter at about 10% accuracy. We discuss the degeneracy between neutrino background anisotropies and other cosmological parameters such as the number of effective neutrinos species and the dark energy equation of state.

  18. Radius of influence for a cosmic-ray soil moisture probe : theory and Monte Carlo simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Desilets, Darin

    2011-02-01

    The lateral footprint of a cosmic-ray soil moisture probe was determined using diffusion theory and neutron transport simulations. The footprint is radial and can be described by a single parameter, an e-folding length that is closely related to the slowing down length in air. In our work the slowing down length is defined as the crow-flight distance traveled by a neutron from nuclear emission as a fast neutron to detection at a lower energy threshold defined by the detector. Here the footprint is defined as the area encompassed by two e-fold distances, i.e. the area from which 86% of the recorded neutrons originate. The slowing down length is approximately 150 m at sea level for neutrons detected over a wide range of energies - from 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 5} eV. Both theory and simulations indicate that the slowing down length is inversely proportional to air density and linearly proportional to the height of the sensor above the ground for heights up to 100 m. Simulations suggest that the radius of influence for neutrons >1 eV is only slightly influenced by soil moisture content, and depends weakly on the energy sensitivity of the neutron detector. Good agreement between the theoretical slowing down length in air and the simulated slowing down length near the air/ground interface support the conclusion that the footprint is determined mainly by the neutron scattering properties of air.

  19. Probing The Cosmic History of Light With High-Energy Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) holds answers to many questions of moderrn cosmology. The origin of the CMB lies in the early universe, and when it was released during the recombination phase the conditions were not yet right for new sources of light. But the first generation of stars born in a mostly neutral universe quickly re-ionized their surroubding baryonic environments, and dust was produced which allowed reprocessing of some star light into the infrared specral region. Black holes and other compact objects were born and the emissions from their accretion processes and relativistic jetted outflws contributed new light. Today, we observe this evolving radiation field as the Extragalactic Backgroud Light (EBL), ranging from the radio- to the gamma-ray band. The evolution of the diffuse electromagnetic energy content of the universe is the focus of this special session, and I will discuss its importance within the context of modern cosmology. I will emphasize the role of gamma-ray astronomy, which probes the EBL and the CMB through the opacity created by photon-photon pair production.

  20. Probing 'Parent Universe' in Loop Quantum Cosmology with B-mode Polarization in Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucky Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei

    2016-06-01

    We aim to use the observations of B-mode polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to probe the ‘parent universe’ under the context of Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC). In particular, we investigate the possibility for the gravitational waves (GW) such as those from the stellar binary systems in the parent universe to survive the big bounce and thus to be still observable today. Our study is based on the background dynamics with the zeroth-order holonomy correction using the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We propose a new framework in which transfer functions are invoked to bring the GWs in the parent universe through the big bounce, inflation, and big bang to reach today. This transparent and intuitive formalism allows us to accurately discuss the influence of the GWs from the parent universe on the B-mode polarization in the CMB today under backgrounds of different LQC parameters. These features can soon be tested by the forth-coming CMB observations and we note that the LQC backgrounds with symmetric bouncing scenarios are ruled out by the latest observational results from Planck and BICEP2/Keck experiments.

  1. Studying Star and Planet Formation with the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) is a far- infrared/submillimeter (40-640 micrometers) spaceborne interferometry concept, studied through the NASA Vision Missions program. SPECS is envisioned as a 1-km baseline Michelson interferometer with two 4- meter collecting mirrors. To maximize science return, SPECS will have three operational modes: a photometric imaging mode, an intermediate spectral resolution mode (R approximately equal to 1000-3000), and a high spectral resolution mode (R approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 5)). The first two of these modes will provide information on all sources within a 1 arcminute field-of-view (FOV), while the the third will include sources in a small (approximately equal to 5 arcsec) FOV. With this design, SPECS will have angular resolution comparable to the Hubble Space Telescope (50 mas) and sensitivity more than two orders of magnitude better than Spitzer (5sigma in 10ks of approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 7) Jy Hz). We present here some of the results of the recently-completed Vision Mission Study for SPECS, and discuss the application of this mission to future studies of star and planet formation.

  2. Probing the neutrino mass hierarchy with cosmic microwave background weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex C.; Challinor, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    We forecast constraints on cosmological parameters with primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy information and weak lensing reconstruction with a future post-Planck CMB experiment, the Cosmic Origins Explorer (COrE), using oscillation data on the neutrino mass splittings as prior information. Our Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations in flat models with a non-evolving equation of state of dark energy w give typical 68 per cent upper bounds on the total neutrino mass of 0.136 and 0.098 eV for the inverted and normal hierarchies, respectively, assuming the total summed mass is close to the minimum allowed by the oscillation data for the respective hierarchies (0.10 and 0.06 eV). Including geometric information from future baryon acoustic oscillation measurements with the complete Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, Type Ia supernovae distance moduli from Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and a realistic prior on the Hubble constant, these upper limits shrink to 0.118 and 0.080 eV for the inverted and normal hierarchies, respectively. Addition of these distance priors also yields per cent-level constraints on w. We find tension between our MCMC results and the results of a Fisher matrix analysis, most likely due to a strong geometric degeneracy between the total neutrino mass, the Hubble constant and w in the unlensed CMB power spectra. If the minimal-mass, normal hierarchy were realized in nature, the inverted hierarchy should be disfavoured by the full data combination at typically greater than the 2σ level. For the minimal-mass inverted hierarchy, we compute the Bayes factor between the two hierarchies for various combinations of our forecast data sets, and find that the future cosmological probes considered here should be able to provide 'strong' evidence (odds ratio 12:1) for the inverted hierarchy. Finally, we consider potential biases of the other cosmological parameters from assuming the wrong hierarchy and find that all

  3. A new limit on the time between the nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova remnants using the Co/Ni ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Gupta, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using new cross section measurements of Ni into Co, data on the Co/Ni ratio in cosmic rays from the HEAO C spacecraft have been reinterpreted in terms of the time between nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays, delta t. The observed Co/Ni ratio is now consistent with interstellar fragmentation only, leading to a small or zero source abundance. In terms of the decay of e-process nucleosynthesis nuclides into Co after a supernova explosion, this permits an estimate of delta t = 4-30,000 yr for the time between nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays if supernovae are the direct progenitors of cosmic rays. These age limits are used in conjunction with models of the expansion of supernova remnants (SNRs), to estimate that cosmic rays are accelerated when the radius of these remnants is between 0.1 and 25 pc.

  4. A 6% measurement of the Hubble parameter at z~0.45: direct evidence of the epoch of cosmic re-acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresco, Michele; Pozzetti, Lucia; Cimatti, Andrea; Jimenez, Raul; Maraston, Claudia; Verde, Licia; Thomas, Daniel; Citro, Annalisa; Tojeiro, Rita; Wilkinson, David

    2016-05-01

    Deriving the expansion history of the Universe is a major goal of modern cosmology. To date, the most accurate measurements have been obtained with Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), providing evidence for the existence of a transition epoch at which the expansion rate changes from decelerated to accelerated. However, these results have been obtained within the framework of specific cosmological models that must be implicitly or explicitly assumed in the measurement. It is therefore crucial to obtain measurements of the accelerated expansion of the Universe independently of assumptions on cosmological models. Here we exploit the unprecedented statistics provided by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS, [1-3]) Data Release 9 to provide new constraints on the Hubble parameter H(z) using the cosmic chronometers approach. We extract a sample of more than 130000 of the most massive and passively evolving galaxies, obtaining five new cosmology-independent H(z) measurements in the redshift range 0.3 < z < 0.5, with an accuracy of ~11–16% incorporating both statistical and systematic errors. Once combined, these measurements yield a 6% accuracy constraint of H(z = 0.4293) = 91.8 ± 5.3 km/s/Mpc. The new data are crucial to provide the first cosmology-independent determination of the transition redshift at high statistical significance, measuring zt = 0.4 ± 0.1, and to significantly disfavor the null hypothesis of no transition between decelerated and accelerated expansion at 99.9% confidence level. This analysis highlights the wide potential of the cosmic chronometers approach: it permits to derive constraints on the expansion history of the Universe with results competitive with standard probes, and most importantly, being the estimates independent of the cosmological model, it can constrain cosmologies beyond—and including—the ΛCDM model.

  5. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam–energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  6. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and (4)He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  7. Diffusive Cosmic-ray Acceleration at Relativistic Shock Waves with Magnetostatic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2015-08-01

    The analytical theory of diffusive cosmic-ray acceleration at parallel stationary shock waves with magnetostatic turbulence is generalized to arbitrary shock speeds {V}{{s}}={β }1c, including, in particular, relativistic speeds. This is achieved by applying the diffusion approximation to the relevant Fokker-Planck particle transport equation formulated in the mixed comoving coordinate system. In this coordinate system, the particle's momentum coordinates p and μ ={p}\\parallel /p are taken in the rest frame of the streaming plasma, whereas the time and space coordinates are taken in the observer's system. For magnetostatic slab turbulence, the diffusion-convection transport equation for the isotropic (in the rest frame of the streaming plasma) part of the particle's phase space density is derived. For a step-wise shock velocity profile, the steady-state diffusion-convection transport equation is solved. For a symmetric pitch-angle scattering Fokker-Planck coefficient, {D}μ μ (-μ )={D}μ μ (μ ), the steady-state solution is independent of the microphysical scattering details. For nonrelativistic mono-momentum particle injection at the shock, the differential number density of accelerated particles is a Lorentzian-type distribution function, which at large momenta approaches a power-law distribution function N(p≥slant {p}c)\\propto {p}-ξ with the spectral index ξ ({β }1)=1+[3/({{{Γ }}}1\\sqrt{{r}2-{β }12}-1)(1+3{β }12)]. For nonrelativistic ({β }1\\ll 1) shock speeds, this spectral index agrees with the known result ξ ({β }1\\ll 1)≃ (r+2)/(r-1), whereas for ultrarelativistic ({{{Γ }}}1\\gg 1) shock speeds the spectral index value is close to unity.

  8. ASSESSING THE FEASIBILITY OF COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION BY MAGNETIC TURBULENCE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fatuzzo, M.; Melia, F. E-mail: fmelia@email.arizona.edu

    2012-05-01

    The presence of relativistic particles at the center of our Galaxy is evidenced by the diffuse TeV emission detected from the inner {approx}2 Degree-Sign of the Galaxy. Although it is not yet entirely clear whether the origin of the TeV photons is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the distribution of molecular gas along the Galactic ridge strongly points to a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In previous work, we concluded that point-source candidates, such as the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (identified with the High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source J1745-290) or the pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the Galactic plane, could not account for the observed diffuse TeV emission from this region. Motivated by this result, we consider here the feasibility that the cosmic rays populating the Galactic center region are accelerated in situ by magnetic turbulence. Our results indicate that even in a highly conductive environment, this mechanism is efficient enough to energize protons within the intercloud medium to the {approx}>TeV energies required to produce the HESS emission.

  9. Aromatic units from the macromolecular material in meteorites: Molecular probes of cosmic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sephton, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Ancient meteorites contain several percent of organic matter that represents a chronicle of chemical evolution in the early solar system. Aromatic hydrocarbon units make up the majority of meteorite organic matter but reading their record of organic evolution is not straightforward and their formation mechanisms have remained elusive. Most aromatic units reside in a macromolecular material and new perceptions of its structure have been provided by a novel on-line hydrogenation approach. When applied to the Orgueil (CI1) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites the technique releases a range of aromatic hydrocarbons along with some oxygen, sulphur and nitrogen-containing aromatic units. When on-line hydrogenation is compared to conventional pyrolysis, more high molecular weight units and a wider range of liberated entities are evident. Comparisons of results from Orgueil and Murchison reveal variations that are most likely related to differing levels of parent body alteration. The enhancement of straight-chain hydrocarbons (n-alkanes) in the hydrogenation products imply a source of these common contaminants from straight-chain carboxylic acid (n-alkanoic acid) precursors, perhaps from bacterial contributions on Earth. The on-line hydrogenation data also highlight a long-standing but unexplained observation related to the relative preference for specific isomers in methyl-substituted benzenes (meta-, ortho- and para-xylenes). The new hydrogenation approach appears to release and transform macromolecular material meta-structures (benzenes with substituents separated by single carbon atoms) into their free hydrocarbon counterparts. Their release characteristics suggest that the meta-structures are bound by oxygen-linkages. The meta-structures may be molecular probes of specific ancient cosmic environments. Parent body processing may have performed a similar function as hydrogenation to produce the most common meta configuration for free substituted benzenes. Notably, this

  10. Narrowband Gyrosynchrotron Bursts: Probing Electron Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, in a few case studies we demonstrated that gyrosynchrotron microwave emission can be detected directly from the acceleration region when the trapped electron component is insignificant. For the statistical study reported here, we have identified events with steep (narrowband) microwave spectra that do not show a significant trapped component and, at the same time, show evidence of source uniformity, which simplifies the data analysis greatly. Initially, we identified a subset of more than 20 radio bursts with such narrow spectra, having low- and high-frequency spectral indices larger than three in absolute value. A steep low-frequency spectrum implies that the emission is nonthermal (for optically thick thermal emission, the spectral index cannot be steeper than two), and the source is reasonably dense and uniform. A steep high-frequency spectrum implies that no significant electron trapping occurs, otherwise a progressive spectral flattening would be observed. Roughly half of these radio bursts have RHESSI data, which allow for detailed, joint diagnostics of the source parameters and evolution. Based on an analysis of radio-to-X-ray spatial relationships, timing, and spectral fits, we conclude that the microwave emission in these narrowband bursts originates directly from the acceleration regions, which have a relatively strong magnetic field, high density, and low temperature. In contrast, the thermal X-ray emission comes from a distinct loop with a smaller magnetic field, lower density, but higher temperature. Therefore, these flares likely occurred due to interaction between two (or more) magnetic loops.

  11. Cosmology of a Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker 3-brane, late-time cosmic acceleration, and the cosmic coincidence.

    PubMed

    Doolin, Ciaran; Neupane, Ishwaree P

    2013-04-01

    A late epoch cosmic acceleration may be naturally entangled with cosmic coincidence--the observation that at the onset of acceleration the vacuum energy density fraction nearly coincides with the matter density fraction. In this Letter we show that this is indeed the case with the cosmology of a Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) 3-brane in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. We derive the four-dimensional effective action on a FLRW 3-brane, from which we obtain a mass-reduction formula, namely, M(P)(2) = ρ(b)/|Λ(5)|, where M(P) is the effective (normalized) Planck mass, Λ(5) is the five-dimensional cosmological constant, and ρ(b) is the sum of the 3-brane tension V and the matter density ρ. Although the range of variation in ρ(b) is strongly constrained, the big bang nucleosynthesis bound on the time variation of the effective Newton constant G(N) = (8πM(P)(2))(-1) is satisfied when the ratio V/ρ ≳ O(10(2)) on cosmological scales. The same bound leads to an effective equation of state close to -1 at late epochs in accordance with astrophysical and cosmological observations. PMID:25166976

  12. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  13. Influence of total biomass and rainfall interception on soil moisture measurements using cosmic-ray neutron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Hannah; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron probes are an emerging technology to continuously monitor soil water content at a scale significant to land surface processes. This method relies on the negative correlation between near-surface fast neutron counts and soil moisture content since hydrogen atoms in the soil, which are mainly present as water, moderate the secondary neutrons on the way back to the surface. Any application of this method needs to consider the sensitivity of the neutron counts to additional sources of hydrogen (e.g. above- and below-ground biomass, humidity of the lower atmosphere, lattice water of the soil minerals, organic matter and water in the litter layer, intercepted water in the canopy, and soil organic matter). In this study, we analyzed the effects of changing above- and below-ground biomass and intercepted water in the canopy on the cosmic-ray neutron counts and calibration parameters. For this, the arable field test site Selhausen, which is part of the TERENO and ICOS observation networks, was cropped with winter wheat and additionally instrumented with cosmic-ray neutron probes and a wireless sensor network with 108 soil moisture sensors. In order to increase the sensitivity of the cosmic-ray neutron measurements, we used seven neutron detectors simultaneously. In addition, we measured rainfall interception in the wheat canopy at several locations in the field. In order to track the changes in above and below-ground biomass of the winter wheat, roots and plants were sampled approximately every four weeks and LAI was measured weekly during the growing season. Weekly biomass changes were derived by relating LAI to total biomass. As expected, we found an increasing discrepancy between cosmic-ray-derived and in-situ measured soil moisture during the growing season and a sharp decrease in discrepancy after the harvest. In order to quantify the effect of hydrogen stored in the vegetation on fast neutron intensity, we derived a daily and weekly time series of

  14. Accuracy of the cosmic-ray soil water content probe in humid forest ecosystems: The worst case scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogena, H. R.; Huisman, J. A.; Baatz, R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.

    2013-09-01

    Soil water content is one of the key state variables in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum due to its important role in the exchange of water and energy at the soil surface. A new promising method to measure integral soil water content at the field or small catchment scale is the cosmic-ray probe (CRP). Recent studies of CRP measurements have mainly presented results from test sites located in very dry areas and from agricultural fields with sandy soils. In this study, distributed continuous soil water content measurements from a wireless sensor network (SoilNet) were used to investigate the accuracy of CRP measurements for soil water content determination in a humid forest ecosystem. Such ecosystems are less favorable for CRP applications due to the presence of a litter layer. In addition, lattice water and carbohydrates of soil organic matter and belowground biomass reduce the effective sensor depth and thus were accounted for in the calibration of the CRP. The hydrogen located in the biomass decreased the level of neutron count rates and thus also decreased the sensitivity of the cosmic-ray probe, which in turn resulted in an increase of the measurement uncertainty. This uncertainty was compensated by using longer integration times (e.g., 24 h). For the Wüstebach forest site, the cosmic-ray probe enabled the assessment of integral daily soil water content dynamics with a RMSE of about 0.03 cm3/cm3 without explicitly considering the litter layer. By including simulated water contents of the litter layer in the calibration, a better accuracy could be achieved.

  15. ANALYTIC SOLUTION FOR SELF-REGULATED COLLECTIVE ESCAPE OF COSMIC RAYS FROM THEIR ACCELERATION SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Aharonian, F. A.; Moskalenko, I. V. E-mail: pdiamond@ucsd.edu

    2013-05-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs), as the major contributors to the galactic cosmic rays (CRs), are believed to maintain an average CR spectrum by diffusive shock acceleration regardless of the way they release CRs into the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the interaction of the CRs with nearby gas clouds crucially depends on the release mechanism. We call into question two aspects of a popular paradigm of the CR injection into the ISM, according to which they passively and isotropically diffuse in the prescribed magnetic fluctuations as test particles. First, we treat the escaping CR and the Alfven waves excited by them on an equal footing. Second, we adopt field-aligned CR escape outside the source, where the waves become weak. An exact analytic self-similar solution for a CR ''cloud'' released by a dimmed accelerator strongly deviates from the test-particle result. The normalized CR partial pressure may be approximated as P(p,z,t)=2[|z|{sup 5/3}+z{sub dif}{sup 5/3}(p,t)]{sup -3/5} exp[-z{sup 2}/4D{sub ISM}(p)t], where p is the momentum of CR particle, and z is directed along the field. The core of the cloud expands as z{sub dif}{proportional_to}{radical}(D{sub NL}(p)t) and decays in time as p{proportional_to}2z{sup -1}{sub dif}(t). The diffusion coefficient D{sub NL} is strongly suppressed compared to its background ISM value D{sub ISM}: D{sub NL} {approx} D{sub ISM}exp (- {Pi}) << D{sub ISM} for sufficiently high field-line-integrated CR partial pressure, {Pi}. When {Pi} >> 1, the CRs drive Alfven waves efficiently enough to build a transport barrier (p Almost-Equal-To 2/ Divides z Divides -{sup p}edestal{sup )} that strongly reduces the leakage. The solution has a spectral break at p = p{sub br}, where p{sub br} satisfies the equation D{sub NL}(p{sub br}) {approx_equal} z {sup 2}/t.

  16. Cosmic-ray antiprotons as a probe of a photino-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Srednicki, M.

    1984-01-01

    Observational tests of the hypothesis that the universe is flat and dominated by dark matter in the form of massive photinos include the production of significant fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays in our galactic halo. Specification of the cosmological photino density and the masses of scalar quarks and leptons determines the present annihilation rate. The predicted number of low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons is comparable to the observed flux.

  17. Non Parametric Determination of Acceleration Characteristics in Supernova Shocks Based on Spectra of Cosmic Rays and Remnant Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an inversion method for determination of the characteristics of the acceleration mechanism directly and non-parametrically from observations, in contrast to the usual forward fitting of parametric model variables to observations. This is done in the frame work of the so-called leaky box model of acceleration, valid for isotropic momentum distribution and for volume integrated characteristics in a finite acceleration site. We consider both acceleration by shocks and stochastic acceleration where turbulence plays the primary role to determine the acceleration, scattering and escape rates. Assuming a knowledge of the background plasma the model has essentially two unknown parameters, namely the momentum and pitch angle scattering diffusion coefficients, which can be evaluated given two independent spectral observations. These coefficients are obtained directly from the spectrum of radiation from the supernova remnants (SNRs), which gives the spectrum of accelerated particles, and the observed spectrum of cosmic rays (CRs), which are related to the spectrum of particles escaping the SNRs. The results obtained from application of this method will be presented.

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in Type Ia supernova remnants undergoing cosmic ray particle acceleration - low adiabatic index solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Yueh

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates the evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities in Type Ia supernova remnants that are associated with a low adiabatic index γ, where γ < 5/3, which reflects the expected change in the supernova shock structure as a result of cosmic ray particle acceleration. Extreme cases, such as the case with the maximum compression ratio that corresponds to γ= 1.1, are examined. As γ decreases, the shock compression ratio rises, and an increasingly narrow intershock region with a more pronounced initial mixture of R-T unstable gas is produced. Consequently, the remnant outline may be perturbed by small-amplitude, small-wavelength bumps. However, as the instability decays over time, the extent of convective mixing in terms of the ratio of the radius of the R-T fingers to the blast wave does not strongly depend on the value of γ for γ≥ 1.2. As a result of the age of the remnant, the unstable gas cannot extend sufficiently far to form metal-enriched filaments of ejecta material close to the periphery of Tycho's supernova remnant. The consistency of the dynamic properties of Tycho's remnant with the adiabatic model γ= 5/3 reveals that the injection of cosmic rays is too weak to alter the shock structure. Even with very efficient acceleration of cosmic rays at the shock, significantly enhanced mixing is not expected in Type Ia supernova remnants.

  19. Studies into the nature of cosmic acceleration: Dark energy or a modification to gravity on cosmological scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossett, Jason Nicholas

    Since its discovery more than a decade ago, the problem of cosmic acceleration has become one of the largest in cosmology and physics as a whole. An unknown dark energy component of the universe is often invoked to explain this observation. Mathematically, this works because inserting a cosmic fluid with a negative equation of state into Einstein's equations provides an accelerated expansion. There are, however, alternative explanations for the observed cosmic acceleration. Perhaps the most promising of the alternatives is that, on the very largest cosmological scales, general relativity needs to be extended or a new, modified gravity theory must be used. Indeed, many modified gravity models are not only able to replicate the observed accelerated expansion without dark energy, but are also more compatible with a unified theory of physics. Thus it is the goal of this dissertation to develop and study robust tests that will be able to distinguish between these alternative theories of gravity and the need for a dark energy component of the universe. We will study multiple approaches using the growth history of large-scale structure in the universe as a way to accomplish this task. These approaches include studying what is known as the growth index parameter, a parameter that describes the logarithmic growth rate of structure in the universe, which describes the rate of formation of clusters and superclusters of galaxies over the entire age of the universe. We will explore the effectiveness of this parameter to distinguish between general relativity and modifications to gravity physics given realistic expectations of results from future experiments. Next, we will explore the modified growth formalism wherein deviations from the growth expected in general relativity are parameterized via changes to the growth equations, i.e. the perturbed Einstein's equations. We will also explore the impact of spatial curvature on these tests. Finally, we will study how dark energy

  20. Probing new physics with underground accelerators and radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Krnjaic, Gordan; Pospelov, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    New light, weakly coupled particles can be efficiently produced at existing and future high-intensity accelerators and radioactive sources in deep underground laboratories. Once produced, these particles can scatter or decay in large neutrino detectors (e.g. Super-K and Borexino) housed in the same facilities. We discuss the production of weakly coupled scalars ϕ via nuclear de-excitation of an excited element into the ground state in two viable concrete reactions: the decay of the 0+ excited state of 16O populated via a (p , α) reaction on fluorine and from radioactive 144Ce decay where the scalar is produced in the de-excitation of 144Nd*, which occurs along the decay chain. Subsequent scattering on electrons, e (ϕ , γ) e, yields a mono-energetic signal that is observable in neutrino detectors. We show that this proposed experimental setup can cover new territory for masses 250 keV ≤mϕ ≤ 2me and couplings to protons and electrons, 10-11 ≤gegp ≤10-7. This parameter space is motivated by explanations of the 'proton charge radius puzzle', thus this strategy adds a viable new physics component to the neutrino and nuclear astrophysics programs at underground facilities. For the LUNA-type setup, we show that such light particles can be efficiently produced by populating the first excited 6.05 MeV 0+ state of 16O in (p , α) reactions on fluorine. For the SOX-type setup we find similarly powerful sensitivity from the 144Ce-144Pr (νbare) radioactive source, which can produce a scalar with 2.19 or 1.49 MeV energies from the Nd144* de-excitation that occurs along the decay chain. The subsequent detection of a mono-energetic release in a Borexino-type detector with 6.05, 2.19, or 1.49 MeV will be free from substantial environmental backgrounds. The strategy proposed in this Letter is capable of advancing the sensitivity to such states by many orders of magnitude, completely covering the parameter space relevant for the rp puzzle.

  1. ON THE e{sup +}e{sup -} EXCESSES AND THE KNEE OF THE COSMIC RAY SPECTRA-HINTS OF COSMIC RAY ACCELERATION IN YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hongbo; Yuan Qiang; Wang Bo; Fan Chao; Zhang Jianli; Bi Xiaojun

    2009-08-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been regarded as sources of the Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) up to petaelectronvolts, but convincing evidence is still lacking. In this work we explore the common origin of the subtle features of the CR spectra, such as the knee of CR spectra and the excesses of electron/positron fluxes recently observed by ATIC, H.E.S.S., Fermi-LAT, and PAMELA. Numerical calculation shows that those features of CR spectra can be well reproduced in a scenario with e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production by interactions between high-energy CRs and background photons in an environment similar to the young SNR. The success of such a coherent explanation serves in turn as evidence that at least a portion of CRs might be accelerated in young SNRs.

  2. Cosmic Rays: "A Thin Rain of Charged Particles."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are balloons and electroscopes, understanding cosmic rays, cosmic ray paths, isotopes and cosmic-ray travel, sources of cosmic rays, and accelerating cosmic rays. Some of the history of the discovery and study of cosmic rays is presented. (CW)

  3. Spatiotemporal characterization of soil moisture fields in agricultural areas using cosmic-ray neutron probes and data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Trenton; Wang, Tiejun

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 40% of global food production comes from irrigated agriculture. With the increasing demand for food even greater pressures will be placed on water resources within these systems. In this work we aimed to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture at the field-scale (~500 m) using the newly developed cosmic-ray neutron rover near Waco, NE USA. Here we mapped soil moisture of 144 quarter section fields (a mix of maize, soybean, and natural areas) each week during the 2014 growing season (May to September). The 12 by 12 km study domain also contained three stationary cosmic-ray neutron probes for independent validation of the rover surveys. Basic statistical analysis of the domain indicated a strong relationship between the mean and variance of soil moisture at several averaging scales. The relationships between the mean and higher order moments were not significant. Scaling analysis indicated strong power law behavior between the variance of soil moisture and averaging area with minimal dependence of mean soil moisture on the slope of the power law function. In addition, we combined the data from the three stationary cosmic-ray neutron probes and mobile surveys using linear regression to derive a daily soil moisture product at 1, 3, and 12 km spatial resolutions for the entire growing season. The statistical relationships derived from the rover dataset offer a novel set of observations that will be useful in: 1) calibrating and validating land surface models, 2) calibrating and validating crop models, 3) soil moisture covariance estimates for statistical downscaling of remote sensing products such as SMOS and SMAP, and 4) provide daily center-pivot scale mean soil moisture data for optimal irrigation timing and volume amounts.

  4. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  5. TWO-STEP ACCELERATION MODEL OF COSMIC RAYS AT MIDDLE-AGED SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: UNIVERSALITY IN SECONDARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations of middle-aged supernova remnants revealed a mysterious broken power-law spectrum. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that the interaction between a supernova blast wave and interstellar clouds formed by thermal instability generates multiple reflected shocks. The typical Mach numbers of the reflected shocks are shown to be M{approx_equal} 2 depending on the density contrast between the diffuse intercloud gas and clouds. These secondary shocks can further energize cosmic-ray particles originally accelerated at the blast-wave shock. This 'two-step' acceleration scenario reproduces the observed gamma-ray spectrum and predicts the high-energy spectral index ranging approximately from 3 to 4.

  6. (Re-)Constraining the Cosmic-Ray Acceleration Efficiency and Magnetic Field Strength in the Northeast Rims of RCW 86

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2014-09-01

    Accurate determination of SNR's shock velocity and magnetic filed is essential to reveal the mechanism of cosmic-ray acceleration. A previous velocity measurement with Chandra for the SNR RCW 86 northeast rim revealed that a substantial fraction of the postshock pressure is produced by the accelerated particles. However, there are disagreement with a H-alpha-measured velocity, and large uncertainty in the X-ray measurement itself, since the observation dates of the two Chandra datasets that were used for the proper motion measurement were not well separated with each other. We thus propose an additional observation of this region to measure the expansion velocity accurately. We will also constrain the magnetic field by searching for short-time variability in the synchrotron X-ray flux.

  7. Two-step Acceleration Model of Cosmic Rays at Middle-aged Supernova Remnants: Universality in Secondary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations of middle-aged supernova remnants revealed a mysterious broken power-law spectrum. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that the interaction between a supernova blast wave and interstellar clouds formed by thermal instability generates multiple reflected shocks. The typical Mach numbers of the reflected shocks are shown to be Msime 2 depending on the density contrast between the diffuse intercloud gas and clouds. These secondary shocks can further energize cosmic-ray particles originally accelerated at the blast-wave shock. This "two-step" acceleration scenario reproduces the observed gamma-ray spectrum and predicts the high-energy spectral index ranging approximately from 3 to 4.

  8. Probing Dark Energy via Weak Gravitational Lensing with the Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    SNAP is a candidate for the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) that seeks to place constraints on the dark energy using two distinct methods. The first, Type Ia SN, is discussed in a separate white paper. The second method is weak gravitational lensing, which relies on the coherent distortions in the shapes of background galaxies by foreground mass structures. The excellent spatial resolution and photometric accuracy afforded by a 2-meter space-based observatory are crucial for achieving the high surface density of resolved galaxies, the tight control of systematic errors in the telescope's Point Spread Function (PSF), and the exquisite redshift accuracy and depth required by this project. These are achieved by the elimination of atmospheric distortion and much of the thermal and gravity loads on the telescope. The SN and WL methods for probing dark energy are highly complementary and the error contours from the two methods are largely orthogonal. The nominal SNAP weak lensing survey covers 1000 square degrees per year of operation in six optical and three near infrared filters (NIR) spanning the range 350 nm to 1.7 {micro}m. This survey will reach a depth of 26.6 AB magnitude in each of the nine filters and allow for approximately 100 resolved galaxies per square arcminute, {approx} 3 times that available from the best ground-based surveys. Photometric redshifts will be measured with statistical accuracy that enables scientific applications for even the faint, high redshift end of the sample. Ongoing work aims to meet the requirements on systematics in galaxy shape measurement, photometric redshift biases, and theoretical predictions.

  9. Cosmic Mach Number: a sensitive probe for the growth of structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Zhao, Gong-Bo E-mail: ostriker@princeton.edu

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the potential power of the Cosmic Mach Number (CMN), which is the ratio between the mean velocity and the velocity dispersion of galaxies as a function of cosmic scales, to constrain cosmologies. We first measure the CMN from 4 catalogs of galaxy peculiar velocity surveys at low redshift (z element of [0.002,0.03]), and use them to contrast cosmological models. Overall, current data is consistent with the WMAP7 ΛCDM model. We find that the CMN is highly sensitive to the growth of structure on scales k element of [0.01,0.1] h/Mpc in Fourier space. Therefore, modified gravity models, and models with massive neutrinos, in which the structure growth generically deviates from that of the ΛCDM model in a scale-dependent way, can be well differentiated from the ΛCDM model by using future CMN data.

  10. Probe of the solar magnetic field using the "cosmic-ray shadow" of the sun.

    PubMed

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Chen, T L; Chen, W Y; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; Hakamada, K; He, H H; He, Z T; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H J; Li, W J; Liu, C; Liu, J S; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Munakata, K; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ozawa, S; Qian, X L; Qu, X B; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shao, J; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, H; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yang, Z; Yasue, S; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhai, L M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2013-07-01

    We report on a clear solar-cycle variation of the Sun’s shadow in the 10 TeV cosmic-ray flux observed by the Tibet air shower array during a full solar cycle from 1996 to 2009. In order to clarify the physical implications of the observed solar cycle variation, we develop numerical simulations of the Sun’s shadow, using the potential field source surface model and the current sheet source surface (CSSS) model for the coronal magnetic field. We find that the intensity deficit in the simulated Sun’s shadow is very sensitive to the coronal magnetic field structure, and the observed variation of the Sun’s shadow is better reproduced by the CSSS model. This is the first successful attempt to evaluate the coronal magnetic field models by using the Sun’s shadow observed in the TeV cosmic-ray flux. PMID:24027782

  11. Combined analysis of soil moisture measurements from roving and fixed cosmic ray neutron probes for multiscale real-time monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Trenton E.; Wang, Tiejun; Avery, William; Finkenbiner, Catherine; Brocca, Luca

    2015-05-01

    Soil moisture partly controls land-atmosphere mass and energy exchanges and ecohydrological processes in natural and agricultural systems. Thus, many models and remote sensing products continue to improve their spatiotemporal resolution of soil moisture, with some land surface models reaching 1 km resolution. However, the reliability and accuracy of both modeled and remotely sensed soil moisture require comparison with ground measurements at the appropriate spatiotemporal scales. One promising technique is the cosmic ray neutron probe. Here we further assess the suitability of this technique for real-time monitoring across a large area by combining data from three fixed probes and roving surveys over a 12 km × 12 km area in eastern Nebraska. Regression analyses indicated linear relationships between the fixed probe averages and roving estimates of soil moisture for each grid cell, allowing us to derive an 8 h product at spatial resolutions of 1, 3, and 12 km, with root-mean-square error of 3%, 1.8%, and 0.9%.

  12. Diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background as a probe of cosmological gravitino regeneration and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K.A.; Silk, J.

    1985-11-18

    We predict the presence of a spectral feature in the isotropic cosmic gamma-ray background associated with gravitino decays at high red shifts. With a gravitino abundance that falls in the relatively narrow range expected for thermally regenerated gravitinos following an inflationary epoc in the very early universe, gravitinos of mass several gigaelectronvolts are found to yield an appreciable flux of 1--10-MeV diffuse gamma rays.

  13. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields. PMID:25955053

  14. Cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982 and the associated solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at the times of greater than 3-percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978-1982 are presented. The intensity-time profiles of the particles are used to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which are subsequently associated with three types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) are associated with shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events, the ejecta are detected at 1 AU, whereas this is not usually the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the cosmic ray depression in class 2 events. It is argued that since energetic particles (from MEV to GeV energies) seen at earth may respond to solar wind structures which are not detected at earth, consideration of particle observations over a wide range of energies is necessary for a full understanding of cosmic ray decreases.

  15. A New Mechanism of Magnetic Field Generation in Supernova Shock Waves and its Implication for Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    SNR shocks are the most probable source of galactic cosmic rays. We discuss the diffusive acceleration mechanism in terms of its potential to accelerate CRs to 10^18 eV, as observations imply. One possibility, currently discussed in the literature, is to resonantly generate a turbulent magnetic field via accelerated particles in excess of the background field. We indicate some difficulties of this scenario and suggest a different possibility, which is based on the generation of Alfven waves at the gyroradius scale at the background field level, with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven (A) waves. The essential idea is an A-->A+S decay instability process, where one of the interacting scatterers (i.e. the sound, or S-waves) are driven by the Drury instability process. This rapidly generates longer wavelength Alfven waves, which in turn resonate with high energy CRs thus binding them to the shock and enabling their further acceleration.

  16. PROBING THE EPOCH OF PRE-REIONIZATION BY CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC MICROWAVE AND INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: Alexander.Kashlinsky@nasa.gov

    2014-12-20

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from Euclid, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies, can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined, CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space- and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky Euclid CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales ∼5'-60' with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of up to S/N ∼ 4-8 depending on the contribution to the Thomson optical depth during those pre-reionization epochs (Δτ ≅ 0.05) and the temperature of the IGM (up to ∼10{sup 4} K). Such a measurement would offer a new window to explore the emergence and physical properties of these first light sources.

  17. DIFFUSE EMISSION MEASUREMENT WITH THE SPECTROMETER ON INTEGRAL AS AN INDIRECT PROBE OF COSMIC-RAY ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, Laurent; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Roques, Jean-Pierre; Strong, Andrew W.; Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2011-09-20

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the diffuse Galactic hard X-ray continuum emission using data from the INTEGRAL observatory. The diffuse hard power-law component seen with the SPectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) has been identified with inverse-Compton emission from relativistic (GeV) electrons on the cosmic microwave background and Galactic interstellar radiation field. In the present analysis, SPI data from 2003 to 2009, with a total exposure time of {approx}10{sup 8} s, are used to derive the Galactic ridge hard X-ray spatial distribution and spectrum between 20 keV and 2.4 MeV. Both are consistent with predictions from the GALPROP code. The good agreement between measured and predicted emission from keV to GeV energies suggests that the correct production mechanisms have been identified. We discuss the potential of the SPI data to provide an indirect probe of the interstellar cosmic-ray electron distribution, in particular for energies below a few GeV.

  18. Direct Acceleration of Pickup Ions at The Solar Wind Termination Shock: The Production of Anomalous Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.; Baring, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    We have modeled the injection and acceleration of pickup ions at the solar wind termination shock and investigated the parameters needed to produce the observed Anomalous Cosmic Ray (ACR) fluxes. A non-linear Monte Carlo technique was employed, which in effect solves the Boltzmann equation and is not restricted to near-isotropic particle distribution functions. This technique models the injection of thermal and pickup ions, the acceleration of these ions, and the determination of the shock structure under the influence of the accelerated ions. The essential effects of injection are treated in a mostly self-consistent manner, including effects from shock obliquity, cross- field diffusion, and pitch-angle scattering. Using recent determinations of pickup ion densities, we are able to match the absolute flux of hydrogen in the ACRs by assuming that pickup ion scattering mean free paths, at the termination shock, are much less than an AU and that modestly strong cross-field diffusion occurs. Simultaneously, we match the flux ratios He(+)/H(+) or O(+)/H(+) to within a factor approx. 5. If the conditions of strong scattering apply, no pre-termination-shock injection phase is required and the injection and acceleration of pickup ions at the termination shock is totally analogous to the injection and acceleration of ions at highly oblique interplanetary shocks recently observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. The fact that ACR fluxes can be modeled with standard shock assumptions suggests that the much-discussed "injection problem" for highly oblique shocks stems from incomplete (either mathematical or computer) modeling of these shocks rather than from any actual difficulty shocks may have in injecting and accelerating thermal or quasi-thermal particles.

  19. Probing the Light Speed Anisotropy with Respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Kashin, A.; Margarian, A.; Bartalini, O.; Bellini, V.; Castoldi, M.; D'Angelo, A.; Didelez, J.-P.; di Salvo, R.; Fantini, A.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Giusa, A.; Guidal, M.; Hourany, E.; Knyazyan, S.; Kouznetsov, V.; Kunne, R.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lleres, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Moricciani, D.; Nedorezov, V.; Perrin, C.; Rebreyend, D.; Russo, G.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Sperduto, M.-L.; Sutera, M.-C.; Turinge, A.

    We have studied the angular fluctuations in the speed of light with respect to the apex of the dipole of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using the experimental data obtained with GRAAL facility, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The measurements were based on the stability of the Compton edge of laser photons scattered on the 6 GeV monochromatic electron beam. The results enable one to obtain a conservative constraint on the anisotropy in the light speed variations Δc(θ)/c<3×10-12, i.e. with higher precision than from previous experiments.

  20. A new probe of the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2015-08-01

    Establishing the properties of magnetic fields on scales larger than galaxy clusters is critical for resolving the unknown origin and evolution of galactic and cluster magnetism. More generally, observations of magnetic fields on cosmic scales are needed for assessing the impacts of magnetism on cosmology, particle physics, and structure formation over the full history of the Universe. However, firm observational evidence for magnetic fields in large scale structure remains elusive. In an effort to address this problem, we have developed a novel statistical method to infer the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments using observation of the two-point correlation of Faraday rotation measures from a dense grid of extragalactic radio sources. Here we describe our approach, which embeds and extends the pioneering work of Kolatt (1998) within the context of Information Field Theory (a statistical theory for Bayesian inference on spatially distributed signals; Enfllin et al., 2009). We describe prospects for observation, for example with forthcoming data from the ultra-deep JVLA CHILES Con Pol survey and future surveys with the SKA.

  1. Modeling Focused Acceleration of Cosmic-Ray Particles by Stochastic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, C. K.; Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Craig, I. J. D.

    2012-10-01

    Schlickeiser & Shalchi suggested that a first-order Fermi mechanism of focused particle acceleration could be important in several astrophysical applications. In order to investigate focused acceleration, we express the Fokker-Planck equation as an equivalent system of stochastic differential equations. We simplify the system for a set of physically motivated parameters, extend the analytical theory, and determine the evolving particle distribution numerically. While our numerical results agree with the focused acceleration rate of Schlickeiser & Shalchi for a weakly anisotropic particle distribution, we establish significant limitations of the analytical approach. Momentum diffusion is found to be more significant than focused acceleration at early times. Most critically, the particle distribution rapidly becomes anisotropic, leading to a much slower momentum gain rate. We discuss the consequences of our results for the role of focused acceleration in astrophysics.

  2. Yang-Mills Gravity in Flat Space-Time II:. Gravitational Radiations and Lee-Yang Force for Accelerated Cosmic Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jong-Ping

    Within Yang-Mills gravity with translation group T(4) in flat space-time, the invariant action involving quadratic translation gauge-curvature leads to quadrupole radiations, which are shown to be consistent with experiments. The radiation power turns out to be the same as that in Einstein's gravity to the second-order approximation. We also discuss an interesting physical reason for the accelerated cosmic expansion based on the long-range Lee-Yang force of Ub(1) gauge field associated with the established conservation law of baryon number. We show that the Lee-Yang force can be related to a linear potential ∝ r, provided the gauge field satisfies a fourth-order differential equation in flat space-time. Furthermore, we consider an experimental test of the Lee-Yang force related to the accelerated cosmic expansion. The necessity of generalizing Lorentz transformations for accelerated frames of reference and accelerated Wu-Doppler effects are briefly discussed.

  3. Generation of the cosmic rays flux variations due to surfatron acceleration of charges by electromagnetic waves in space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhin, Nikolay; Loznikov, Vladimir; Shkevov, Rumen; Zolnikova, Nadezhda; Mikhailovskaya, Ludmila

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of experimental data on the spectra of cosmic rays (CR) has shown their variability on time scales of a few years, in particular, CR variations observed in E / Z range from TeV to 10000 TeV, where E is the energy of the particle, Z is its charge number. Consequently, the source of these variations must be located at a distance of no more than 1 parsec from the sun in the closest local interstellar clouds. As a mechanism of such variations appearance it is considered the surfatron acceleration of CR particles by electromagnetic wave in a relatively quiet space plasma. On the basis of developed model the numerical calculations were performed for particle capture dynamics (electrons, protons, helium and iron nuclei) in the wave effective potential well with a following growth their energy by 3-6 orders of magnitude. Optimal conditions for the implementation of charged particles surfatron acceleration in space plasma, the rate of trapped particles energy growth, the dynamics of wave phase on the captured particle trajectory, a temporal dynamics of components for charge impulse momentum and speed were studied. It is indicated that the capture of a small fraction of particles by wave for energies about TeV and less followed by their surfatron acceleration to an energy of about 10000 TeV will lead to a significant increase in the CR flux at such high energies. Thus CL flow variations are conditioned by changes in the space weather parameters

  4. Data acquisition, storage and control architecture for the SuperNova Acceleration Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, Alan; Cardoso, Guilherme; Chramowicz, John; Marriner, John; Rivera, Ryan; Turqueti, Marcos; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    The SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) instrument is being designed to collect image and spectroscopic data for the study of dark energy in the universe. In this paper, we describe a distributed architecture for the data acquisition system which interfaces to visible light and infrared imaging detectors. The architecture includes the use of NAND flash memory for the storage of exposures in a file system. Also described is an FPGA-based lossless data compression algorithm with a configurable pre-scaler based on a novel square root data compression method to improve compression performance. The required interactions of the distributed elements with an instrument control unit will be described as well.

  5. Multi-probing of the auroral acceleration region by Cluster (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G. T.; Sadeghi, S.; Karlsson, R.; Lindqvist, P.; Nilsson, H.; Pickett, J.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Forsyth, C.; Masson, A.

    2010-12-01

    Multi-probe in situ measurements in the auroral acceleration region became a reality in November 2008, when the orbit of the European Space Agency Cluster satellites, was lowered to cover this region, typically located between 5000 and 12000 km altitude above the polar atmosphere. Results are presented from Cluster crossings of this region, at different altitudes and with time separations of a few minutes between the spacecraft. The unique observations allow us to address the spatial and temporal properties of this region, such as the morphology and stability in space and time of the associated quasi-static electric potential structures. The formation of such acceleration structures is a fundamental and ubiquitous space plasma process, taking place not only around Earth, but around many other solar system planets, such as Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.

  6. Small-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropies as probe of the geometry of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We perform detailed calculations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in a cold dark matter (CDM)-dominated open universe with primordial adiabatic density perturbations for a variety of reionization histories. The CMB anisotropies depend primarily on the geometry of the universe, which in a matter-dominated universe is determined by Omega and the optical depth to the surface of last scattering. In particular, the location on the primary Doppler peak depends primarily on Omega and is fairly insensitive to the other unknown parameters, such as Omega(sub b), h, Lambda, and the shape of the power spectrum. Therefore, if the primordial density perturbations are adiabatic, measurements of CMB anisotropies on small scales may be used to determine Omega.

  7. Late time cosmic acceleration from vacuum Brans-Dicke theory in 5D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    2010-05-01

    We show that the scalar-vacuum Brans-Dicke equations in 5D are equivalent to Brans-Dicke theory in 4D with a self-interacting potential and an effective matter field. The cosmological implication, in the context of FRW models, is that the observed accelerated expansion of the universe comes naturally from the condition that the scalar field is not a ghost, i.e. ω > -3/2. We find an effective matter-dominated 4D universe which shows accelerated expansion if -3/2 < ω < -1. We study the question of whether accelerated expansion can be made compatible with large values of ω, within the framework of a 5D scalar-vacuum Brans-Dicke theory with variable, instead of constant, parameter ω. In this framework, and based on a general class of solutions of the field equations, we demonstrate that accelerated expansion is incompatible with large values of ω.

  8. Mass entrainment and turbulence-driven acceleration of ultra-high energy cosmic rays in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wykes, Sarka; Croston, Judith H.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Eilek, Jean A.; Biermann, Peter L.; Achterberg, Abraham; Bray, Justin D.; Lazarian, Alex; Haverkorn, Marijke; Protheroe, Ray J.; Bromberg, Omer

    2013-10-01

    Observations of the FR I radio galaxy Centaurus A in radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands provide evidence for lepton acceleration up to several TeV and clues about hadron acceleration to tens of EeV. Synthesising the available observational constraints on the physical conditions and particle content in the jets, inner lobes and giant lobes of Centaurus A, we aim to evaluate its feasibility as an ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray source. We apply several methods of determining jet power and affirm the consistency of various power estimates of ~1 × 1043 erg s-1. Employing scaling relations based on previous results for 3C 31, we estimate particle number densities in the jets, encompassing available radio through X-ray observations. Our model is compatible with the jets ingesting ~3 × 1021 g s-1 of matter via external entrainment from hot gas and ~7 × 1022 g s-1 via internal entrainment from jet-contained stars. This leads to an imbalance between the internal lobe pressure available from radiating particles and magnetic field, and our derived external pressure. Based on knowledge of the external environments of other FR I sources, we estimate the thermal pressure in the giant lobes as 1.5 × 10-12 dyn cm-2, from which we deduce a lower limit to the temperature of ~1.6 × 108 K. Using dynamical and buoyancy arguments, we infer ~440-645 Myr and ~560 Myr as the sound-crossing and buoyancy ages of the giant lobes respectively, inconsistent with their spectral ages. We re-investigate the feasibility of particle acceleration via stochastic processes in the lobes, placing new constraints on the energetics and on turbulent input to the lobes. The same "very hot" temperatures that allow self-consistency between the entrainment calculations and the missing pressure also allow stochastic UHECR acceleration models to work.

  9. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The analysis is confined to the test particle approximation and adiabatic losses are oversimplified, but unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum are included. Monoenergetic protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  10. Probing the cosmic distance duality with strong gravitational lensing and supernovae Ia data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Busti, V. C.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    We propose and perform a new test of the cosmic distance-duality relation (CDDR), DL(z) / DA(z) (1 + z)2 = 1, where DA is the angular diameter distance and DL is the luminosity distance to a given source at redshift z, using strong gravitational lensing (SGL) and type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) data. We show that the ratio D=DA12/DA2 and D*=DL12/DL2, where the subscripts 1 and 2 correspond, respectively, to redshifts z1 and z2, are linked by D/D*=(1+z1)2 if the CDDR is valid. We allow departures from the CDDR by defining two functions for η(z1), which equals unity when the CDDR is valid. We find that combination of SGL and SNe Ia data favours no violation of the CDDR at 1σ confidence level (η(z) simeq 1), in complete agreement with other tests and reinforcing the theoretical pillars of the CDDR.

  11. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray probes of large scale structure and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2004-08-01

    We study signatures of a structured universe in the multi-pole moments, auto-correlation function, and cluster statistics of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above 1019 eV. We compare scenarios where the sources are distributed homogeneously or according to the baryon density distribution obtained from a cosmological large scale structure simulation. The influence of extragalactic magnetic fields is studied by comparing the case of negligible fields with fields expected to be produced along large scale shocks with a maximal strength consistent with observations. We confirm that strongly magnetized observers would predict considerable anisotropy on large scales, which is already in conflict with current data. In the best fit scenario only the sources are strongly magnetized, although deflection can still be considerable, of order 20° up to 1020 eV, and a pronounced GZK cutoff is predicted. We then discuss signatures for future large scale full-sky detectors such as the Pierre Auger and EUSO projects. Auto-correlations are sensitive to the source density only if magnetic fields do not significantly affect propagation. In contrast, for a weakly magnetized observer, degree scale auto-correlations below a certain level indicate magnetized discrete sources. It may be difficult even for next generation experiments to distinguish between structured and unstructured source distributions.

  12. Three-dimensional electron density along the WSA and MSNA latitudes probed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F. Y.; Liu, J. Y.; Chang, L. C.; Lin, C. H.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we employ electron density profiles derived by the GPS radio occultation experiment aboard the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellites to examine the electron density on geographic latitudes of 40° to 80° in the Southern hemisphere and 30° to 60° in the Northern hemisphere at various global fixed local times from February 2009 to January 2010. The results reveal that an eastward shift of a single-peak plasma density feature occurs along the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) latitudes, while a double-peak plasma density feature appears along the northern Mid-latitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (MSNA) latitudes. A cross-comparison between three-dimensional F3/C electron density and HWM93 simulation confirms that the magnetic meridional effect and vertical effect caused by neutral winds exhibit the eastward shifts. Furthermore, we find that the eastward shift of the peaks when viewed as a function of local time suggests that they could be interpreted as being comprised of different tidal components with distinct zonal phase velocities in local time.

  13. ANISOTROPY AS A PROBE OF THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY PROPAGATION AND HALO MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo; Xue, Liang

    2012-05-01

    The anisotropy of cosmic rays (CRs) in the solar vicinity is generally attributed to CR streaming due to the discrete distribution of CR sources or local magnetic field modulation. Recently, the two-dimensional large-scale CR anisotropy has been measured by many experiments in the TeV-PeV energy range in both hemispheres. The tail-in excess along the tangential direction of the local spiral arm and the loss cone deficit pointing to the north Galactic pole direction agree with what have been obtained in tens to hundreds of GeV. The persistence of the two large-scale anisotropy structures in such a wide energy range suggests that the anisotropy might be due to global streaming of the Galactic CRs (GCRs). This work tries to extend the observed CR anisotropy picture from the solar system to the whole galaxy. In such a case, we can find a new interesting signature, a loop of GCR streaming, of the GCR propagation. We further calculate the overall GCR streaming induced magnetic field, and find a qualitative consistency with the observed structure of the halo magnetic field.

  14. Cosmic ray confinement and transport models for probing their putative sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Recent efforts in cosmic ray (CR) confinement and transport theory are discussed. Three problems are addressed as being crucial for understanding the present day observations and their possible telltale signs of the CR origin. The first problem concerns CR behavior right after their release from a source, such as a supernova remnant. At this phase, the CRs are confined near the source by self-emitted Alfven waves. The second is the problem of diffusive propagation of CRs through the turbulent interstellar medium. This is a seemingly straightforward and long-resolved problem, but it remains controversial and reveals paradoxes. A resolution based on the Chapman-Enskog asymptotic CR transport analysis, that also includes magnetic focusing, is suggested. The third problem is about a puzzling sharp ( ˜10 ° ) anisotropies in the CR arrival directions that might bear on important clues of their transport between the source and observer. The overarching goal is to improve our understanding of all aspects of the CR's source escape and ensuing propagation through the galaxy to the level at which their sources can be identified observationally.

  15. Kinetic studies of wave-particle interactions in cosmic-ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Martin; Niemiec, Jacek; Stroman, Thomas; Bret, Antoine; Roeken, Christian

    Shock acceleration relies on the presence of magnetic-field fluctuations that can scatter rela-tivistic charged particles in both the upstream and downstream regions of the shock. We report on kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of the non-linear evolution of magnetic turbulence that arises upstream of the shock as well as at the shock itself. We will in particular address the relation between modes seen in the simulations and waves expected on the grounds of a linear instability analysis, the efficiency of small-scale turbulence in scattering relativistic particles, and the influence of accelerated particles on the formation of the shock itself.

  16. Magnetic field amplification in nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration including resonant and non-resonant cosmic-ray driven instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, Andrei M.; Osipov, Sergei M.; Ellison, Donald C.; Vladimirov, Andrey E. E-mail: osm2004@mail.ru E-mail: avenovo@gmail.com

    2014-07-10

    We present a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of efficient diffusive shock acceleration where the magnetic turbulence responsible for particle diffusion is calculated self-consistently from the resonant cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instability, together with non-resonant short- and long-wavelength CR-current-driven instabilities. We include the backpressure from CRs interacting with the strongly amplified magnetic turbulence which decelerates and heats the super-Alfvénic flow in the extended shock precursor. Uniquely, in our plane-parallel, steady-state, multi-scale model, the full range of particles, from thermal (∼eV) injected at the viscous subshock to the escape of the highest energy CRs (∼PeV) from the shock precursor, are calculated consistently with the shock structure, precursor heating, magnetic field amplification, and scattering center drift relative to the background plasma. In addition, we show how the cascade of turbulence to shorter wavelengths influences the total shock compression, the downstream proton temperature, the magnetic fluctuation spectra, and accelerated particle spectra. A parameter survey is included where we vary shock parameters, the mode of magnetic turbulence generation, and turbulence cascading. From our survey results, we obtain scaling relations for the maximum particle momentum and amplified magnetic field as functions of shock speed, ambient density, and shock size.

  17. Complete cosmic scenario from inflation to late time acceleration: Nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subenoy; Saha, Subhajit

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with the mechanism of particle creation in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The second order nonequilibrium thermodynamical prescription of Israel and Stewart has been presented with particle creation rate, treated as the dissipative effect. In the background of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model, we assume the nonequilibrium thermodynamical process to be isentropic so that the entropy per particle does not change and consequently the dissipative pressure can be expressed linearly in terms of the particle creation rate. Here the dissipative pressure behaves as a dynamical variable having a nonlinear inhomogeneous evolution equation and the entropy flow vector satisfies the second law of thermodynamics. Further, using the Friedmann equations and by proper choice of the particle creation rate as a function of the Hubble parameter, it is possible to show (separately) a transition from the inflationary phase to the radiation era and also from the matter dominated era to late time acceleration. Also, in analogy to analytic continuation, it is possible to show a continuous cosmic evolution from inflation to late time acceleration by adjusting the parameters. It is found that in the de Sitter phase, the comoving entropy increases exponentially with time, keeping entropy per particle unchanged. Subsequently, the above cosmological scenarios have been described from a field theoretic point of view by introducing a scalar field having self-interacting potential. Finally, we make an attempt to show the cosmological phenomenon of particle creation as Hawking radiation, particularly during the inflationary era.

  18. Cosmic accelerated expansion and the entropy-corrected holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, H. Mohseni; Jamil, Mubasher

    2011-06-01

    By considering the logarithmic correction to the energy density, we study the behavior of Hubble parameter in the holographic dark energy model. We assume that the universe is dominated by interacting dark energy and matter and the accelerated expansion of the universe, which may be occurred in the early universe or late time, is studied.

  19. Probing the Dark Flow Signal in WMAP 9 -Year and Planck Cosmic Microwave Background Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A.; Ebeling, H.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kocevski, D.

    2015-09-01

    The “dark flow” dipole is a statistically significant dipole found at the position of galaxy clusters in filtered maps of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. The dipole measured in WMAP 3-, 5-, and 7- year data releases was (1) mutually consistent, (2) roughly aligned with the all-sky CMB dipole, and (3) correlated with clusters’ X-ray luminosities. We analyzed WMAP 9 -year and Planck 1st- year data releases using a catalog of 980 clusters outside of the Kp0 mask to test our earlier findings. The dipoles measured on these new data sets are fully compatible with our earlier estimates, are similar in amplitude and direction to our previous results, and are in disagreement with the results of an earlier study by the Planck Collaboration. Furthermore, in the Planck data sets dipoles are found to be independent of frequency, ruling out the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich as the source of the effect. In the data of both WMAP and Planck we find a clear correlation between the dipole measured at the cluster location in filtered maps and the average anisotropy on the original maps, further proving that the dipole is associated with clusters. The dipole signal is dominated by the most massive clusters, with a statistical significance that is better than 99%, slightly larger than in WMAP. Since both data sets differ in foreground contributions, instrumental noise, and other systematics, the agreement between the WMAP and Planck dipoles argues against them being due to systematic effects in either of the experiments.

  20. 21 cm line bispectrum as a method to probe cosmic dawn and epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimabukuro, Hayato; Yoshiura, Shintaro; Takahashi, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2016-05-01

    Redshifted 21 cm signal is a promising tool to investigate the state of intergalactic medium (IGM) in the cosmic dawn (CD) and epoch of reionization (EoR). In our previous work, we studied the variance and skewness of the 21 cm fluctuations to give a clear interpretation of the 21 cm power spectrum and found that skewness is a good indicator of the epoch when X-ray heating becomes effective. Thus, the non-Gaussian feature of the spatial distribution of the 21 cm signal is expected to be useful to investigate the astrophysical effects in the CD and EoR. In this paper, in order to investigate such a non-Gaussian feature in more detail, we focus on the bispectrum of the 21 cm signal. It is expected that the 21 cm brightness temperature bispectrum is produced by non-Gaussianity due to the various astrophysical effects such as the Wouthuysen-Field effect, X-ray heating and reionization. We study the various properties of 21 cm bispectrum such as scale dependence, shape dependence and redshift evolution. And also we study the contribution from each component of 21 cm bispectrum. We find that the contribution from each component has characteristic scale-dependent feature. In particular, we find that the bulk of the 21 cm bispectrum at z = 20 comes from the matter fluctuations, while in other epochs it is mainly determined by the spin and/or neutral fraction fluctuations and it is expected that we could obtain more detailed information on the IGM in the CD and EoR by using the 21 cm bispectrum in the future experiments, combined with the power spectrum and skewness.

  1. Lyman-tomography of Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations with Euclid: Probing Emissions and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations at z ≳ 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R. G.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Helgason, K.

    2015-11-01

    The Euclid space mission, designed to probe evolution of the Dark Energy (DE), will map a large area of the sky at three adjacent near-IR filters, Y, J, and H. This coverage will also enable mapping source-subtracted cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations with unprecedented accuracy on sub-degree angular scales. Here, we propose methodology, using the Lyman-break tomography applied to the Euclid-based CIB maps, to accurately isolate the history of CIB emissions as a function of redshift from 10 ≲ z ≲ 20 and to identify the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) at those epochs. To identify the BAO signature, we would assemble individual CIB maps over conservatively large contiguous areas of ≳400 deg2. The method can isolate the CIB spatial spectrum by z to sub-percent statistical accuracy. We illustrate this with a specific model of CIB production at high z normalized to reproduce the measured Spitzer-based CIB fluctuation. We show that even if the latter contains only a small component from high-z sources, the amplitude of that component can be accurately isolated with the methodology proposed here and the BAO signatures at z ≳ 10 are recovered well from the CIB fluctuation spatial spectrum. Probing the BAO at those redshifts will be an important test of the underlying cosmological paradigm and would narrow the overall uncertainties on the evolution of cosmological parameters, including the DE. Similar methodology is applicable to the planned WFIRST mission, where we show that a possible fourth near-IR channel at ≥2 μm would be beneficial.

  2. CHILES Con Pol: Probing galaxy evolution, the dark Universe, and cosmic magnetism with a deep 1000 hour Jansky VLA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Chiles Con Pol Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We recently started a 1000 hour campaign to observe 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz with the Jansky VLA, as part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an unprecedented SKA-era sensitivity of 0.7 uJy per 4 arcsecond FWHM beam. Here we present the key goals of CHILES Con Pol, which are to (i) produce a source catalog of legacy value to the astronomical community, (ii) measure differential source counts in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization in order to constrain the redshift and luminosity distributions of source populations, (iii) perform a novel weak lensing study using radio polarization as an indicator of intrinsic alignment to better study dark energy and dark matter, and (iv) probe the unknown origin of cosmic magnetism by measuring the strength and structure of intergalactic magnetic fields in the filaments of large scale structure. The CHILES Con Pol source catalog will be a useful resource for upcoming wide-field surveys by acting as a training set for machine learning algorithms, which can then be used to identify and classify radio sources in regions lacking deep multiwavelength coverage.

  3. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND IRON AND TITANIUM LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lind, Karin; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: klind@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2012-06-01

    Detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for red supergiant (RSG) stars are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of atomic iron and titanium lines in the J band. With their enormous brightness at J band RSG stars are ideal probes of cosmic abundances. Recent LTE studies have found that metallicities accurate to 0.15 dex can be determined from medium-resolution spectroscopy of individual RSGs in galaxies as distant as 10 Mpc. The NLTE results obtained in this investigation support these findings. NLTE abundance corrections for iron are smaller than 0.05 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4200 K and 0.1 dex at 4400 K. For titanium the NLTE abundance corrections vary smoothly between -0.4 dex and +0.2 dex as a function of effective temperature. For both elements, the corrections also depend on stellar gravity and metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE corrections and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  4. Unveiling the Origin of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinto, Angela V.

    2015-04-01

    The origin of cosmic rays, relativistic particles that range from below GeVs to hundreds of EeVs, is a century old mystery. Extremely energetic phenomena occurring over a wide range of scales, from the Solar System to distant galaxies, are needed to explain the non-thermal particle spectrum that covers over 12 orders of magnitude. Space Missions are the most effective platforms to study the origin and history of these cosmic particles. Current missions probe particle acceleration and propagation in the Solar System and in our Galaxy. This year ISS-CREAM and CALET join AMS in establishing the International Space Station as the most active site for studying the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. These missions will study astrophysical cosmic ray accelerators as well as other possible sources of energetic particles such as dark matter annihilation or decay. In the future, the ISS may also be the site for studying extremely high-energy extragalactic cosmic rays with JEM-EUSO. We review recent results in the quest for unveiling the sources of energetic particles with balloons and space payloads and report on activities of the Cosmic ray Science Interest Group (CosmicSIG) under the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG).

  5. PREFACE: Technology development for a cosmic microwave background probe of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, S.; Irwin, K.

    2009-07-01

    In late 2007 NASA called for proposals to fund Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Studies. The goal was to generate concept studies for key future missions, which would be forwarded to the Astro2010 astrophysics decadal review committee for prioritization. Under the guidance and orchestration of the Primordial Polarization Program Definition Team, a NASA committee chartered to coordinate the activities of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) community, a CMB proposal aiming to represent the consensus of the entire community was submitted. A CMBPol Mission Concept Study grant was awarded in early 2008. Under the grant we reviewed the entire activities of the CMB community and proposed a path for the next decade. We also assessed the case and recommended a path for a future CMB polarization satellite. The grant funded three community-wide workshops that were held over the summer of 2008. The goal of the first workshop, held at Fermilab, was to discuss the theoretical foundation of inflation and its signature on the CMB, as well as the theoretical aspects of other polarimetric signatures observable at millimeter wavelengths. Volume 1141 of the American Institute of Physics conference proceedings summarizes the results of this workshop. The second workshop, held at Annapolis, Maryland, centered on expected systematic effects in polarimetric experiments and their potential mitigation. The third workshop, held at the NIST facility at Boulder, Colorado, focused on the technology requirements necessary to make incisive CMB polarization measurements and what was needed to advance the technology to the readiness level required for a start of a space-borne mission. The electronic proceedings presented here are the result of this third workshop. In preparing for the workshop the organizers assigned topical-editors for each technology topic. Each of them solicited white paper contributions from experts in their respective areas. The white papers were distributed to all

  6. The Role of Cosmic-Ray Pressure in Accelerating Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-08-01

    We study the formation of galactic outflows from supernova (SN) explosions with the moving-mesh code AREPO in a stratified column of gas with a surface density similar to the Milky Way disk at the solar circle. We compare different simulation models for SN placement and energy feedback, including cosmic rays (CRs), and find that models that place SNe in dense gas and account for CR diffusion are able to drive outflows with similar mass loading as obtained from a random placement of SNe with no CRs. Despite this similarity, CR-driven outflows differ in several other key properties including their overall clumpiness and velocity. Moreover, the forces driving these outflows originate in different sources of pressure, with the CR diffusion model relying on non-thermal pressure gradients to create an outflow driven by internal pressure and the random-placement model depending on kinetic pressure gradients to propel a ballistic outflow. CRs therefore appear to be non-negligible physics in the formation of outflows from the interstellar medium.

  7. BLAZAR HALOS AS PROBE FOR EXTRAGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MAXIMAL ACCELERATION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Dolag, K.; Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Tomas, R.

    2009-09-20

    High-energy photons from blazars interact within tens of kpc with the extragalactic photon background, initiating electromagnetic pair cascades. The charged component of such cascades is deflected by extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs), leading to halos even around initially point-like sources. We calculate the intensity profile of the resulting secondary high-energy photons for different assumptions on the initial source spectrum and the strength of the EGMF, employing also fields found earlier in a constrained simulation of structure formation including magnetohydrodynamics processes. We find that the observation of halos around blazars like Mrk 180 probes an interesting range of EGMF strengths and acceleration models: in particular, blazar halos test if the photon energy spectrum at the source extends beyond {approx}100 TeV and how anisotropic this high-energy component is emitted.

  8. Testing flatness of the universe with probes of cosmic distances and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mortonson, Michael J.

    2009-12-15

    When using distance measurements to probe spatial curvature, the geometric degeneracy between curvature and dark energy in the distance-redshift relation typically requires either making strong assumptions about the dark energy evolution or sacrificing precision in a more model-independent approach. Measurements of the redshift evolution of the linear growth of perturbations can break the geometric degeneracy, providing curvature constraints that are both precise and model independent. Future supernova, CMB, and cluster data have the potential to measure the curvature with an accuracy of {sigma}({omega}{sub K})=0.002, without specifying a particular dark energy phenomenology. In combination with distance measurements, the evolution of the growth function at low redshifts provides the strongest curvature constraint if the high-redshift universe is well approximated as being purely matter dominated. However, in the presence of early dark energy or massive neutrinos, the precision in curvature is reduced due to additional degeneracies, and precise normalization of the growth function relative to recombination is important for obtaining accurate constraints. Curvature limits from distances and growth compare favorably to other approaches to curvature estimation proposed in the literature, providing either greater accuracy or greater freedom from dark energy modeling assumptions, and are complementary due to the use of independent data sets. Model-independent estimates of curvature are critical both for testing inflation and for obtaining unbiased constraints on dark energy parameters.

  9. Testing flatness of the universe with probes of cosmic distances and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortonson, Michael J.

    2009-06-01

    When using distance measurements to probe spatial curvature, the geometric degeneracy between curvature and dark energy in the distance-redshift relation typically requires either making strong assumptions about the dark energy evolution or sacrificing precision in a more model-independent approach. Measurements of the redshift evolution of the linear growth of perturbations can break the geometric degeneracy, providing curvature constraints that are both precise and model-independent. Future supernova, CMB, and cluster data have the potential to measure the curvature with an accuracy of s(O K ) 0.002, without specifying a particular dark energy phenomenology. In combination with distance measurements, the evolution of the growth function at low redshifts provides the strongest curvature constraint if the high-redshift universe is well approximated as being purely matter dominated. However, in the presence of early dark energy or massive neutrinos, the precision in curvature is reduced due to additional degeneracies, and precise normalization of the growth function relative to recombination is important for obtaining accurate constraints. Curvature limits from distances and growth compare favorably to other approaches to curvature estimation proposed in the literature, providing either greater accuracy or greater freedom from dark energy modeling assumptions, and are complementary due to the use of independent data sets. Model-independent estimates of curvature are critical for both testing inflation and obtaining unbiased constraints on dark energy parameters.

  10. Cosmic Microwave Background Fluctuations from the Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect as a Cosmological Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunbae; Shapiro, P.; Komatsu, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a calculation of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect on of the Comic Microwave Background fluctuation. We focus on the scale at the multipole moment of l = 3000 10000 that is currently being probed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. For the post-reionization contribution of the total signal, we use the 3rd order perturbation theory (3PT) to model non-linearity of post-reionization epoch. We evaluate a non-linear expression for momentum powerspectrum in Ma and Fry (2002) with the 3PT density and velocity powerspectrum. And, we use the 3PT momentum powerspectrum to calculate the kSZ signal. We show that the 3PT is a reasonable approximation by comparing our result with previous work by Zhang, Pen and Trac (2004). For reionization contribution, we use our N-body radiative transfer simulations to take patchiness of ionization of intergalactic medium in reionization epoch into account. Using ionized fraction field in the simulation, we calculate the momentum field of the ionized gas. And, we correct for the missing power in finite size boxes of simulations. Finally, we show the kSZ calculation for different simulations with reionization scenarios. With contributions from each epoch, we predict total kSZ signal for different reionization history and put constraint on reionization scenario using an upper bound of the signal from recent SPT measurement.