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Sample records for probing cosmic accelerators

  1. Observational probes of cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, David H.; Mortonson, Michael J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hirata, Christopher; Riess, Adam G.; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades, implying that the universe is dominated by some form of “dark energy” with exotic physical properties, or that Einstein’s theory of gravity breaks down on cosmological scales. The profound implications of cosmic acceleration have inspired ambitious efforts to understand its origin, with experiments that aim to measure the history of expansion and growth of structure with percent-level precision or higher. We review in detail the four most well established methods for making such measurements: Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), weak gravitational lensing, and the abundance of galaxy clusters. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties in these techniques and to strategies for controlling them at the level needed to exploit “Stage IV” dark energy facilities such as BigBOSS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. We briefly review a number of other approaches including redshift-space distortions, the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and direct measurements of the Hubble constant H0. We present extensive forecasts for constraints on the dark energy equation of state and parameterized deviations from General Relativity, achievable with Stage III and Stage IV experimental programs that incorporate supernovae, BAO, weak lensing, and cosmic microwave background data. We also show the level of precision required for clusters or other methods to provide constraints competitive with those of these fiducial programs. We emphasize the value of a balanced program that employs several of the most powerful methods in combination, both to cross-check systematic uncertainties and to take advantage of complementary information. Surveys to probe cosmic acceleration produce data sets that support a wide range of scientific investigations, and they continue the longstanding astronomical tradition of mapping the universe in ever greater detail over ever

  2. Probing cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation with H{sub 3}{sup +} observations

    SciTech Connect

    Indriolo, Nick; Fields, Brian D.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-22

    As cosmic rays traverse the interstellar medium (ISM) they interact with the ambient gas in various ways. These include ionization of atoms and molecules, spallation of nuclei, excitation of nuclear states, and production of pions among others. All of these interactions produce potential observables which may be used to trace the flux of cosmic rays. One such observable is the molecular ion H{sub 3}{sup +}-produced via the ionization of an H{sub 2} molecule and its subsequent collision with another H{sub 2}-which can be identified by absorption lines in the 3.5-4 μm spectral region. We have detected H{sub 3}{sup +} in several Galactic diffuse cloud sight lines and used the derived column densities to infer ζ{sub 2}, the cosmic-ray ionization rate of H{sub 2}. Ionization rates determined in this way vary from about 7×10{sup −17} s{sup −1} to about 8×10{sup −16} s{sup −1}, and suggest the possibility of discrete sources producing high local fluxes of low-energy cosmic rays. Theoretical calculations of the ionization rate from postulated cosmic-ray spectra also support this possibility. Our recent observations of H{sub 3}{sup +} near the supernova remnant IC 443 (a likely site of cosmic-ray acceleration) point to even higher ionization rates, on the order of 10{sup −15} s{sup −1}. Together, all of these results can further our understanding of the cosmic-ray spectrum both near the acceleration source and in the general Galactic ISM.

  3. Cosmic Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pisin; Tajima, Toshiki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2002-10-01

    A cosmic acceleration mechanism is introduced which is based on the wakefields excited by the Alfven shocks in a relativistically flowing plasma. We show that there exists a threshold condition for transparency below which the accelerating particle is collision-free and suffers little energy loss in the plasma medium. The stochastic encounters of the random accelerating-decelerating phases results in a power-law energy spectrum: f([epsilon]) [is proportional to] 1/[epsilon]2. As an example, we discuss the possible production of super-GZK ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) in the atmosphere of gamma ray bursts. The estimated event rate in our model agrees with that from UHECR observations. [copyright] 2002 American Institute of Physics

  4. Cosmic ray antiprotons from nearby cosmic accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Jagdish C.; Gupta, Nayantara

    2015-05-01

    The antiproton flux measured by PAMELA experiment might have originated from Galactic sources of cosmic rays. These antiprotons are expected to be produced in the interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei with cold protons. Gamma rays are also produced in similar interactions inside some of the cosmic accelerators. We consider a few nearby supernova remnants observed by Fermi LAT. Many of them are associated with molecular clouds. Gamma rays have been detected from these sources which most likely originate in decay of neutral pions produced in hadronic interactions. The observed gamma ray fluxes from these SNRs are used to find out their contributions to the observed diffuse cosmic ray antiproton flux near the earth.

  5. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  6. Cosmic ray studies with an Interstellar Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    1990-01-01

    Among the NASA mission concepts that have been suggested for the 21st century is an Interstellar Probe that might be accelerated to a velocity of about 10 to 20 AU/yr, allowing it to leave the heliosphere, ultimately reaching a radial distance of about 500 to 1000 AU in about 50 years. Previous studies of such a mission, and its potential significance for cosmic ray studies, both within the heliosphere, and beyond, in interstellar space are discussed.

  7. Is cosmic acceleration slowing down?

    SciTech Connect

    Shafieloo, Arman; Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A.

    2009-11-15

    We investigate the course of cosmic expansion in its recent past using the Constitution SN Ia sample, along with baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Allowing the equation of state of dark energy (DE) to vary, we find that a coasting model of the universe (q{sub 0}=0) fits the data about as well as Lambda cold dark matter. This effect, which is most clearly seen using the recently introduced Om diagnostic, corresponds to an increase of Om and q at redshifts z < or approx. 0.3. This suggests that cosmic acceleration may have already peaked and that we are currently witnessing its slowing down. The case for evolving DE strengthens if a subsample of the Constitution set consisting of SNLS+ESSENCE+CfA SN Ia data is analyzed in combination with BAO+CMB data. The effect we observe could correspond to DE decaying into dark matter (or something else)

  8. The cosmic-ray pathlength distribution at low energy - A new probe of the source/acceleration regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.; Wefel, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Compiled measurements of secondary to primary ratios covering the charge range Z = 3-26 and the energy range 0.05 - 50 GeV/nucleon are analyzed in energy dependent galactic propagation plus solar modulation calculations. The cosmic ray pathlength distribution is shown to consist of two energy dependent components interpreted as representing confinement in the galaxy and confinement in the 'source' regions.

  9. Matter creation and cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Rudnei O.; Vargas dos Santos, Marcelo; Waga, Ioav

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the creation of cold dark matter (CCDM) cosmology as an alternative to explain the cosmic acceleration. Particular attention is given to the evolution of density perturbations and constraints coming from recent observations. By assuming negligible effective sound speed we compare CCDM predictions with redshift-space-distortion based f(z)σ8(z) measurements. We identify a subtle issue associated with which contribution in the density contrast should be used in this test and then show that the CCDM results are the same as those obtained with ΛCDM. These results are then contrasted with the ones obtained at the background level. For the background tests we have used type Ia supernovae data (Union 2.1 compilation) in combination with baryonic acoustic oscillations and cosmic microwave background observations and also measurements of the Hubble parameter at different redshifts. As a consequence of the studies we have performed at both the background and perturbation levels, we explicitly show that CCDM is observationally degenerate with respect to ΛCDM (dark degeneracy). The need to overcome the lack of a fundamental microscopic basis for the CCDM is the major challenge for this kind of model.

  10. When did cosmic acceleration start?

    SciTech Connect

    Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Pandolfi, Stefania

    2007-08-15

    A precise determination, and comparison, of the epoch of the onset of cosmic acceleration, at redshift z{sub acc}, and of dark energy domination, at z{sub eq}, provides an interesting measure with which to parametrize dark energy models. By combining several cosmological data sets, we place constraints on the redshift and age of cosmological acceleration. For a {lambda}CDM model, we find the constraint z{sub acc}=0.76{+-}0.10 at 95% C.L., occurring 6.7{+-}0.4 Gyr ago. Allowing a constant equation of state but different from -1 changes the constraint to z{sub acc}=0.81{+-}0.12 (6.9{+-}0.5 Gyr ago), while dynamical models markedly increase the error on the constraint z{sub acc}=0.81{+-}0.30 (6.8{+-}1.4 Gyr ago). Unified dark energy models such as silent quartessence yield z{sub acc}=0.8{+-}0.16 (6.8{+-}0.6 Gyr ago). Interestingly, we find that the best fit z{sub acc} and z{sub eq} are remarkably insensitive to both the cosmological data sets and theoretical dark energy models considered.

  11. Ion acceleration to cosmic ray energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Martin A.

    1990-01-01

    The acceleration and transport environment of the outer heliosphere is described schematically. Acceleration occurs where the divergence of the solar-wind flow is negative, that is at shocks, and where second-order Fermi acceleration is possible in the solar-wind turbulence. Acceleration at the solar-wind termination shock is presented by reviewing the spherically-symmetric calculation of Webb et al. (1985). Reacceleration of galactic cosmic rays at the termination shock is not expected to be important in modifying the cosmic ray spectrum, but acceleration of ions injected at the shock up to energies not greater than 300 MeV/charge is expected to occur and to create the anomalous cosmic ray component. Acceleration of energetic particles by solar wind turbulence is expected to play almost no role in the outer heliosphere. The one exception is the energization of interstellar pickup ions beyond the threshold for acceleration at the quasi-perpendicular termination shock.

  12. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anze; Van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2014-03-15

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.

  13. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; et al

    2014-03-15

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansionmore » such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.« less

  14. A Simplified Model for the Acceleration of Cosmic Ray Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gron, Oyvind

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions concerning cosmic rays are: Why are electrons in the cosmic rays less efficiently accelerated than nuclei? How are particles accelerated to great energies in ultra-high energy cosmic rays? In order to answer these questions we construct a simple model of the acceleration of a charged particle in the cosmic ray. It is not…

  15. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E.; Becker Tjus, Julia

    2013-12-20

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  16. Does electromagnetic radiation accelerate galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.

    1977-01-01

    The 'reactor' theories of Tsytovich and collaborators (1973) of cosmic-ray acceleration by electromagnetic radiation are examined in the context of galactic cosmic rays. It is shown that any isotropic synchrotron or Compton reactors with reasonable astrophysical parameters can yield particles with a maximum relativistic factor of only about 10,000. If they are to produce particles with higher relativistic factors, the losses due to inverse Compton scattering of the electromagnetic radiation in them outweigh the acceleration, and this violates the assumptions of the theory. This is a critical restriction in the context of galactic cosmic rays, which have a power-law spectrum extending up to a relativistic factor of 1 million.

  17. Cosmic Ray Origin, Acceleration and Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baring, Matthew G.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes highlights of the OG3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 sessions of the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference in Salt Lake City, which were devoted to issues of origin/composition, acceleration and propagation.

  18. Cosmic acceleration and Brans-Dicke theory

    SciTech Connect

    Sharif, M. Waheed, S.

    2012-10-15

    We study the accelerated expansion of the universe by exploring the Brans-Dicke parameter in different eras. For this, we take the FRW universe model with a viscous fluid (without potential) and the Bianchi type-I universe model with a barotropic fluid (with and without a potential). We evaluate the deceleration parameter and the Brans-Dicke parameter to explore cosmic acceleration. It is concluded that accelerated expansion of the universe can also be achieved for higher values of the Brans-Dicke parameter in some cases.

  19. Acceleration of cosmic rays in Tycho's SNR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlino, G.; Caprioli, D.

    We apply the non-linear diffusive shock acceleration theory in order to describe the properties of SN 1572 (G120.1+1.4, hereafter simply Tycho). By analyzing its multi-wavelength spectrum, we show how Tycho's forward shock (FS) is accelerating protons up to ˜ 500 TeV, channeling into cosmic rays more than 10 per cent of its kinetic energy. We find that the streaming instability induced by cosmic rays is consistent with all the observational evidences indicating a very efficient magnetic field amplification (up to ˜ 300 mu G), in particular the X-ray morphology of the remnant. We are able to explain the gamma-ray spectrum from the GeV up to the TeV band, recently measured respectively by Fermi-LAT and VERITAS, as due to pion decay produced in nuclear collisions by accelerated nuclei scattering against the background gas. We also show that emission due to the accelerated electrons does not play a relevant role in the observed gamma-ray spectrum.

  20. Superdiffusion of cosmic rays: Implications for cosmic ray acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Yan, Huirong

    2014-03-20

    Diffusion of cosmic rays (CRs) is the key process for understanding their propagation and acceleration. We employ the description of spatial separation of magnetic field lines in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in Lazarian and Vishniac to quantify the divergence of the magnetic field on scales less than the injection scale of turbulence and show that this divergence induces superdiffusion of CR in the direction perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. The perpendicular displacement squared increases, not as the distance x along the magnetic field, which is the case for a regular diffusion, but as the x {sup 3} for freely streaming CRs. The dependence changes to x {sup 3/2} for the CRs propagating diffusively along the magnetic field. In the latter case, we show that it is important to distinguish the perpendicular displacement with respect to the mean field and to the local magnetic field. We consider how superdiffusion changes the acceleration of CRs in shocks and show how it decreases efficiency of the CRs acceleration in perpendicular shocks. We also demonstrate that in the case when the small-scale magnetic field is generated in the pre-shock region, an efficient acceleration can take place for the CRs streaming without collisions along the magnetic loops.

  1. New cosmic accelerating scenario without dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Basilakos, S.; Costa, F. E. M.

    2012-11-01

    We propose an alternative, nonsingular, cosmic scenario based on gravitationally induced particle production. The model is an attempt to evade the coincidence and cosmological constant problems of the standard model (ΛCDM) and also to connect the early and late time accelerating stages of the Universe. Our space-time emerges from a pure initial de Sitter stage thereby providing a natural solution to the horizon problem. Subsequently, due to an instability provoked by the production of massless particles, the Universe evolves smoothly to the standard radiation dominated era thereby ending the production of radiation as required by the conformal invariance. Next, the radiation becomes subdominant with the Universe entering in the cold dark matter dominated era. Finally, the negative pressure associated with the creation of cold dark matter (CCDM model) particles accelerates the expansion and drives the Universe to a final de Sitter stage. The late time cosmic expansion history of the CCDM model is exactly like in the standard ΛCDM model; however, there is no dark energy. The model evolves between two limiting (early and late time) de Sitter regimes. All the stages are also discussed in terms of a scalar field description. This complete scenario is fully determined by two extreme energy densities, or equivalently, the associated de Sitter Hubble scales connected by ρI/ρf=(HI/Hf)2˜10122, a result that has no correlation with the cosmological constant problem. We also study the linear growth of matter perturbations at the final accelerating stage. It is found that the CCDM growth index can be written as a function of the Λ growth index, γΛ≃6/11. In this framework, we also compare the observed growth rate of clustering with that predicted by the current CCDM model. Performing a χ2 statistical test we show that the CCDM model provides growth rates that match sufficiently well with the observed growth rate of structure.

  2. New Kinematical Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steve W.; Amin, Mustafa A.; Blandford, Roger; /-KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-05-25

    We present and employ a new kinematical approach to ''dark energy'' studies. We construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q{sub 0} and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). An elegant feature of this parameterization is that all {Lambda}CDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the {Lambda}CDM paradigm. Applying our model to redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements, we obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk, j(t)=j, we measure q{sub 0}=-0.81 {+-} 0.14 and j=2.16 +0.81 -0.75, results that are consistent with {Lambda}CDM at about the 1{sigma} confidence level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. The results obtained with this new approach therefore provide important additional information and we argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible.

  3. PROBING THE UNIVERSE'S TILT WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND DIPOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov

    2011-06-10

    Conventional interpretation of the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole is that all of it is produced by local peculiar motions. Alternative explanations requiring part of the dipole to be primordial have received support from measurements of large-scale bulk flows. A test of the two hypotheses is whether other cosmic dipoles produced by collapsed structures later than the last scattering coincide with the CMB dipole. One background is the cosmic infrared background (CIB) whose absolute spectrum was measured to {approx}30% by the COBE satellite. Over the 100-500 {mu}m wavelength range its spectral energy distribution can provide a probe of its alignment with the CMB. This is tested with the COBE FIRAS data set which is available for such a measurement because of its low noise and frequency resolution which are important for Galaxy subtraction. Although the FIRAS instrument noise is in principle low enough to determine the CIB dipole, the Galactic foreground is sufficiently close spectrally to keep the CIB dipole hidden. A similar analysis is performed with DIRBE, which-because of the limited frequency coverage-provides a poorer data set. We discuss strategies for measuring the CIB dipole with future instruments to probe the tilt and apply it to the Planck, Herschel, and the proposed Pixie missions. We demonstrate that a future FIRAS-like instrument with instrument noise a factor of {approx}10 lower than FIRAS would make a statistically significant measurement of the CIB dipole. We find that the Planck and Herschel data sets will not allow a robust CIB dipole measurement. The Pixie instrument promises a determination of the CIB dipole and its alignment with either the CMB dipole or the dipole galaxy acceleration vector.

  4. Growth of cosmic structure: Probing dark energy beyond expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; Mandelbaum, Rachel; May, Morgan; Raccanelli, Alvise; Reid, Beth; Rozo, Eduardo; Schmidt, Fabian; Sehgal, Neelima; Slosar, Anže; van Engelen, Alex; Wu, Hao-Yi; Zhao, Gongbo

    2015-03-01

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe. One way to explain the acceleration of the Universe is invoke dark energy parameterized by an equation of state w. Distance measurements provide one set of constraints on w, but dark energy also affects how rapidly structure grows; the greater the acceleration, the more suppressed the growth of structure. Upcoming surveys are therefore designed to probe w with direct observations of the distance scale and the growth of structure, each complementing the other on systematic errors and constraints on dark energy. A consistent set of results will greatly increase the reliability of the final answer. Another possibility is that there is no dark energy, but that General Relativity does not describe the laws of physics accurately on large scales. While the properties of gravity have been measured with exquisite precision at stellar system scales and densities, within our solar system and by binary pulsar systems, its properties in different environments are poorly constrained. To fully understand if General Relativity is the complete theory of gravity we must test gravity across a spectrum of scales and densities. Rapid developments in gravitational wave astronomy and numerical relativity are directed at testing gravity in the high

  5. Solar Cosmic Ray Acceleration and Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    The GOES data for emission of flare protons with the energies of 10 - 100 MeV are analyzed. Proton fluxes of ~1032 accelerated particles take place at the current sheet decay. Proton acceleration in a flare occurs along a singular line of the current sheet by the Lorentz electric field, as in the pinch gas discharge. The duration of proton flux measured on the Earth orbit is by 2 - 3 orders of magnitude longer than the duration of flares. The high energy proton flux from the flares that appear on the western part of the solar disk arrives to Earth with the time of flight. These particles propagate along magnetic lines of the Archimedes spiral connecting the flare with the Earth. Protons from the flare on the eastern part of the solar disk begin to register with a delay of several hours. Such particles cannot get on the magnetic field line connecting the flare with the Earth. These protons reach the Earth, moving across the interplanetary magnetic field. The particles captured by the magnetic field in the solar wind are transported with solar wind and due to diffusion across the magnetic field. The patterns of solar cosmic rays generation demonstrated in this paper are not always observed in the small ('1 cm-2 s-1 ster-1) proton events.

  6. Cosmic ray sources, acceleration and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ptuskin, V. S.

    1986-01-01

    A review is given of selected papers on the theory of cosmic ray (CR) propagation and acceleration. The high isotropy and a comparatively large age of galactic CR are explained by the effective interaction of relativistic particles with random and regular electromagnetic fields in interstellar medium. The kinetic theory of CR propagation in the Galaxy is formulated similarly to the elaborate theory of CR propagation in heliosphere. The substantial difference between these theories is explained by the necessity to take into account in some cases the collective effects due to a rather high density of relativisitc particles. In particular, the kinetic CR stream instability and the hydrodynamic Parker instability is studied. The interaction of relativistic particles with an ensemble of given weak random magnetic fields is calculated by perturbation theory. The theory of CR transfer is considered to be basically completed for this case. The main problem consists in poor information about the structure of the regular and the random galactic magnetic fields. An account is given of CR transfer in a turbulent medium.

  7. Stellar black holes and the origin of cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Afshordi, Niayesh; Balogh, Michael L.

    2009-08-15

    The discovery of cosmic acceleration has presented a unique challenge for cosmologists. As observational cosmology forges ahead, theorists have struggled to make sense of a standard model that requires extreme fine-tuning. This challenge is known as the cosmological constant problem. The theory of gravitational aether is an alternative to general relativity that does not suffer from this fine-tuning problem, as it decouples the quantum field theory vacuum from geometry, while remaining consistent with other tests of gravity. In this paper, we study static black hole solutions in this theory and show that it manifests a UV-IR coupling: Aether couples the space-time metric close to the black hole horizon, to metric at infinity. We then show that using the trans-Planckian ansatz (as a quantum gravity effect) close to the black hole horizon, leads to an accelerating cosmological solution, far from the horizon. Interestingly, this acceleration matches current observations for stellar-mass black holes. Based on our current understanding of the black hole accretion history in the Universe, we then make a prediction for how the effective dark energy density should evolve with redshift, which can be tested with future dark energy probes.

  8. Ionisation as indicator for cosmic ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuppan, F.; Röken, C.; Fedrau, N.; Becker Tjus, J.

    2014-06-01

    Astrospheres and wind bubbles of massive stars are believed to be sources of cosmic rays with energies E ≲ 1 TeV. These particles are not directly detectable, but their impact on surrounding matter, in particular ionisation of atomic and molecular hydrogen, can lead to observable signatures. A correlation study of both gamma ray emission, induced by proton-proton interactions of cosmic ray protons with kinetic energies Ep ≥ 280 MeV with ambient hydrogen, and ionisation induced by cosmic ray protons of kinetic energies Ep < 280 MeV can be performed in order to study potential sources of (sub)TeV cosmic rays.

  9. Particle acceleration in cosmic sites. Astrophysics issues in our understanding of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, R. L.

    2009-11-01

    Particles are accelerated in cosmic sites probably under conditions very different from those at terrestrial particle accelerator laboratories. Nevertheless, specific experiments which explore plasma conditions and stimulate particle acceleration carry significant potential to illuminate some aspects of the cosmic particle acceleration process. Here we summarize our understanding of cosmic particle acceleration, as derived from observations of the properties of cosmic ray particles, and through astronomical signatures caused by these near their sources or throughout their journey in interstellar space. We discuss the candidate-source object variety, and what has been learned about their particle-acceleration characteristics. We conclude identifying open issues as they are discussed among astrophysicists. - The cosmic ray differential intensity spectrum across energies from 1010 eV to 1021 eV reveals a rather smooth power-law spectrum. Two kinks occur at the “knee” (≃1015 eV) and at the “ankle” (≃ 3×1018 eV). It is unclear if these kinks are related to boundaries between different dominating sources, or rather related to characteristics of cosmic-ray propagation. Currently we believe that galactic sources dominate up to 1017 eV or even above, and the extragalactic origin of cosmic rays at highest energies merges rather smoothly with galactic contributions throughout the 1015-1018 eV range. Pulsars and supernova remnants are among the prime candidates for galactic cosmic-ray production, while nuclei of active galaxies are considered best candidates to produce ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays of extragalactic origin. The acceleration processes are probably related to shocks formed when matter is ejected into surrounding space from energetic sources such as supernova explosions or matter accreting onto black holes. Details of shock acceleration are complex, as relativistic particles modify the structure of the shock, and simple approximations or perturbation

  10. Cosmic-ray acceleration at stellar wind terminal shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Axford, W. I.; Forman, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Steady-state spherically symmetric analytic solutions of the cosmic-ray transport equations, applicable to the problem of acceleration of cosmic rays at the terminal shock to a stellar wind, are studied. The spectra, graidents, and flow patterns of particles modulated and accelerated by the stellar wind and shock are investigated by means of monoenergetic-source solutions at finite radius, as well as solutions with monoenergetic and power-law galactic spectra. On the basis of calculations given, early-type stars could supply a significant fraction of the 3 x 10 to the 40th ergs/sec required by galactic cosmic rays.

  11. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-19

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10^{-7}  GeV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ-ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (pγ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ-ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments. PMID:26943524

  12. Hidden Cosmic-Ray Accelerators as an Origin of TeV-PeV Cosmic Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Guetta, Dafne; Ahlers, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The latest IceCube data suggest that the all-flavor cosmic neutrino flux may be as large as 10-7 GeV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 around 30 TeV. We show that, if sources of the TeV-PeV neutrinos are transparent to γ rays with respect to two-photon annihilation, strong tensions with the isotropic diffuse γ -ray background measured by Fermi are unavoidable, independently of the production mechanism. We further show that, if the IceCube neutrinos have a photohadronic (p γ ) origin, the sources are expected to be opaque to 1-100 GeV γ rays. With these general multimessenger arguments, we find that the latest data suggest a population of cosmic-ray accelerators hidden in GeV-TeV γ rays as a neutrino origin. Searches for x-ray and MeV γ -ray counterparts are encouraged, and TeV-PeV neutrinos themselves will serve as special probes of dense source environments.

  13. Secondary antiprotons - A valuable cosmic-ray probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1977-01-01

    Even in the absence of antiprotons in the primary cosmic rays, a flux of secondary antiprotons will be produced in collisions between cosmic rays and interstellar gas. The predicted antiproton fraction increases with increasing cosmic-ray confinement, so that observations of antiprotons will provide a probe of models of cosmic-ray confinement. It is shown that the expected antiproton fraction (for energies of at least about 10 GeV) ranges between 0.00023 for the 'leaky box' model and 0.0018 for the 'closed box' model. In addition, attention is called to the fact that a detection of cosmic-ray antiprotons at or above a level of 0.0002 will provide a valuable lower limit to the antiproton lifetime.

  14. Xenia: A Probe of Cosmic Chemical Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Piro, L.

    2008-01-01

    Xenia is a concept study for a medium-size astrophysical cosmology mission addressing the Cosmic Origins key objective of NASA's Science Plan. The fundamental goal of this objective is to understand the formation and evolution of structures on various scales from the early Universe to the present time (stars, galaxies and the cosmic web). Xenia will use X-and y-ray monitoring and wide field X-ray imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy to collect essential information from three major tracers of these cosmic structures: the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), Galaxy Clusters and Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). Our goal is to trace the chemo-dynamical history of the ubiquitous warm hot diffuse baryon component in the Universe residing in cosmic filaments and clusters of galaxies up to its formation epoch (at z =0-2) and to map star formation and galaxy metal enrichment into the re-ionization era beyond z 6. The concept of Xenia (Greek for "hospitality") evolved in parallel with the Explorer of Diffuse Emission and GRB Explosions (EDGE), a mission proposed by a multinational collaboration to the ESA Cosmic Vision 2015. Xenia incorporates the European and Japanese collaborators into a U.S. led mission that builds on the scientific objectives and technological readiness of EDGE.

  15. Cosmic microwave background probes models of inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Richard L.; Hodges, Hardy M.; Smoot, George F.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    Inflation creates both scalar (density) and tensor (gravity wave) metric perturbations. We find that the tensor-mode contribution to the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on large-angular scales can only exceed that of the scalar mode in models where the spectrum of perturbations deviates significantly from scale invariance. If the tensor mode dominates at large-angular scales, then the value of DeltaT/T predicted on 1 deg is less than if the scalar mode dominates, and, for cold-dark-matter models, bias factors greater than 1 can be made consistent with Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) DMR results.

  16. Cosmic-ray shock acceleration in oblique MHD shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.; Drury, L. OC.; Volk, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional, steady-state hydrodynamical model of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique MHD shocks is presented. Upstream of the shock the incoming thermal plasma is subject to the adverse pressure gradient of the accelerated particles, the J x B force, as well as the thermal gas pressure gradient. The efficiency of the acceleration of cosmic-rays at the shock as a function of the upstream magnetic field obliquity and upstream plasma beta is investigated. Astrophysical applications of the results are briefly discussed.

  17. Angular Anisotropies in the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background as a Probe of Its Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    Notwithstanding the advent of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, theoretical models predict that a significant fraction of the cosmic γ-ray background (CGB), at a level of 20% of the currently measured value, will remain unresolved. The angular power spectrum of intensity fluctuations of the CGB contains information on its origin. We show that probing the latter on scales from a few tens of arcminutes to several degrees, together with complementary GLAST observations of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters and the blazar luminosity function, can discriminate between a background that originates from unresolved blazars or cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks.

  18. A cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays detected by Fermi in the Cygnus superbubble.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, M; Ajello, M; Allafort, A; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Bastieri, D; Belfiore, A; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonamente, E; Borgland, A W; Bottacini, E; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Buehler, R; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Cecchi, C; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C C; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, J; de Angelis, A; de Palma, F; Dermer, C D; do Couto E Silva, E; Drell, P S; Dumora, D; Favuzzi, C; Fegan, S J; Focke, W B; Fortin, P; Fukazawa, Y; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Germani, S; Giglietto, N; Giordano, F; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Godfrey, G; Grenier, I A; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Harding, A K; Hayashida, M; Hayashi, K; Hays, E; Jóhannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Kamae, T; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kerr, M; Knödlseder, J; Kuss, M; Lande, J; Latronico, L; Lee, S-H; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, P; Martin, P; Mazziotta, M N; McEnery, J E; Mehault, J; Michelson, P F; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Murgia, S; Naumann-Godo, M; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohsugi, T; Okumura, A; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paneque, D; Parent, D; Pesce-Rollins, M; Pierbattista, M; Piron, F; Pohl, M; Prokhorov, D; Rainò, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Reposeur, T; Ritz, S; Parkinson, P M Saz; Sgrò, C; Siskind, E J; Smith, P D; Spinelli, P; Strong, A W; Takahashi, H; Tanaka, T; Thayer, J G; Thayer, J B; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, D F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vandenbroucke, J; Vasileiou, V; Vianello, G; Vitale, V; Waite, A P; Wang, P; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Yang, Z; Zimmer, S; Bontemps, S

    2011-11-25

    The origin of Galactic cosmic rays is a century-long puzzle. Indirect evidence points to their acceleration by supernova shockwaves, but we know little of their escape from the shock and their evolution through the turbulent medium surrounding massive stars. Gamma rays can probe their spreading through the ambient gas and radiation fields. The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has observed the star-forming region of Cygnus X. The 1- to 100-gigaelectronvolt images reveal a 50-parsec-wide cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays that flood the cavities carved by the stellar winds and ionization fronts from young stellar clusters. It provides an example to study the youth of cosmic rays in a superbubble environment before they merge into the older Galactic population. PMID:22116880

  19. Strangelets accelerated by pulsars in galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K. S.; Usov, V. V.

    2006-12-15

    It is shown that nuggets of strange quark matter may be extracted from the surface of pulsars and accelerated by strong electric fields to high energies if pulsars are strange stars with the crusts, comprised of nuggets embedded in a uniform electron background. Such high energy nuggets called usually strangelets give an observable contribution into galactic cosmic rays and may be detected by the upcoming cosmic ray experiment Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer AMS-02 on the International Space Station.

  20. Intergalactic shock acceleration and the cosmic gamma-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2002-11-01

    We investigate numerically the contribution to the cosmic gamma-ray background from cosmic-ray ions and electrons accelerated at intergalactic shocks associated with cosmological structure formation. We show that the kinetic energy of accretion flows in the low-redshift intergalactic medium is thermalized primarily through moderately strong shocks, which allow for an efficient conversion of shock ram pressure into cosmic-ray pressure. Cosmic rays accelerated at these shocks produce a diffuse gamma-ray flux which is dominated by inverse Compton emission from electrons scattering off cosmic microwave background photons. Decay of neutral π mesons generated in p-p inelastic collisions of the ionic cosmic-ray component with the thermal gas contribute about 30 per cent of the computed emission. Based on experimental upper limits on the photon flux above 100 MeV from nearby clusters we constrain the efficiency of conversion of shock ram pressure into relativistic CR electrons to <~1 per cent. Thus, we find that cosmic rays of cosmological origin can generate an overall significant fraction of order 20 per cent and no more than 30 per cent of the measured gamma-ray background.

  1. X-ray Observations of Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of cosmic rays, detection of their sources has remained elusive. A major breakthrough has come through the identification of synchrotron X-rays from the shocks of supernova remnants through imaging and spectroscopic observations by the most recent generation of X-ray observatories. This radiation is most likely produced by electrons accelerated to relativistic energy, and thus has offered the first, albeit indirect, observational evidence that diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants produces cosmic rays to TeV energies, possibly as high as the "knee" in the cosmic ray spectrum. X-ray observations have provided information about the maximum energy to which these shOCks accelerate electrons, as well as indirect evidence of proton acceleration. Shock morphologies measured in X-rays have indicated that a substantial fraction of the shock energy can be diverted into particle acceleration. This presentation will summarize what we have learned about cosmic ray acceleration from X-ray observations of supernova remnants over the past two decades.

  2. Multiwavelength Signatures of Cosmic Ray Acceleration by Young Supernova Remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2008-12-24

    An overview is given of multiwavelength observations of young supernova remnants, with a focus on the observational signatures of efficient cosmic ray acceleration. Some of the effects that may be attributed to efficient cosmic ray acceleration are the radial magnetic fields in young supernova remnants, magnetic field amplification as determined with X-ray imaging spectroscopy, evidence for large post-shock compression factors, and low plasma temperatures, as measured with high resolution optical/UV/X-ray spectroscopy. Special emphasis is given to spectroscopy of post-shock plasma's, which offers an opportunity to directly measure the post-shock temperature. In the presence of efficient cosmic ray acceleration the post-shock temperatures are expected to be lower than according to standard equations for a strong shock. For a number of supernova remnants this seems indeed to be the case.

  3. Constraint on electromagnetic acceleration of highest energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Mikhail V

    2003-04-01

    The energetics of electromagnetic acceleration of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is constrained both by confinement of a particle within an acceleration site and by radiative energy losses of the particle in the confining magnetic fields. We demonstrate that the detection of approximately 3 x 10(20) eV events is inconsistent with the hypothesis that compact cosmic accelerators with high magnetic fields can be the sources of UHECRs. This rules out the most popular candidates, namely spinning neutron stars, active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Galaxy clusters and, perhaps, AGN radio lobes and gamma-ray burst blast waves remain the only possible (although not very strong) candidates for UHECR acceleration sites. Our analysis places no limit on linear accelerators. With the data from the future Auger experiment one should be able to answer whether a conventional theory works or some new physics is required to explain the origin of UHECRs. PMID:12786427

  4. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  5. Probing cosmic strings with satellite CMB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, E.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Smoot, G.F. E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2010-09-01

    We study the problem of searching for cosmic string signal patterns in the present high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This article discusses a technique capable of recognizing Kaiser-Stebbins effect signatures in total intensity anisotropy maps from isolated strings. We derive the statistical distributions of null detections from purely Gaussian fluctuations and instrumental performances of the operating satellites, and show that the biggest factor that produces confusion is represented by the acoustic oscillation features of the scale comparable to the size of horizon at recombination. Simulations show that the distribution of null detections converges to a χ{sup 2} distribution, with detectability threshold at 99% confidence level corresponding to a string induced step signal with an amplitude of about 100 μK which corresponds to a limit of roughly Gμ ∼ 1.5 × 10{sup −6}. We implement simulations for deriving the statistics of spurious detections caused by extra-Galactic and Galactic foregrounds. For diffuse Galactic foregrounds, which represents the dominant source of contamination, we construct sky masks outlining the available region of the sky where the Galactic confusion is sub-dominant, specializing our analysis to the case represented by the frequency coverage and nominal sensitivity and resolution of the Planck experiment. As for other CMB measurements, the maximum available area, corresponding to 7%, is reached where the foreground emission is expected to be minimum, in the 70–100 GHz interval.

  6. Constraining the Cosmic-ray Acceleration Efficiency in the Supernova Remnant IC 443

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Adam Michael; Federman, Steven R.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Caprioli, Damiano; Wallerstein, George

    2015-08-01

    Supernova remnants are widely believed to be the sources responsible for the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays. Over the last several years, observations made with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed that cosmic-ray nuclei are indeed accelerated in some supernova remnants, including IC 443, which is a prototype for supernova remnants interacting with molecular clouds. However, the details concerning the particle acceleration processes in middle aged remnants are not fully understood, in part because the basic model parameters are not always well constrained. Here, we present preliminary results of a Hubble Space Telescope investigation into the physical conditions in diffuse molecular gas interacting with IC 443. We examine high-resolution FUV spectra of two stars, one that probes the interior region of the supernova remnant, and the other located just outside the visible edge of IC 443. With this arrangement, we are able to evaluate the densities and temperatures in neutral gas clumps positioned both ahead of and behind the supernova shock front. From these measurements, we obtain estimates for the post-shock temperature and the shock velocity in the interclump medium. We discuss the efficacy of these results for constraining both the age of IC 443, and also the cosmic-ray acceleration efficiency. Finally, we report the first detection of boron in a supernova remnant, and discuss the usefulness of the B/O ratio in constraining the cosmic-ray content of the gas interacting with IC 443.

  7. On cosmic acceleration without dark energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W.; Matarrese, S.; Riotto, A.; ,

    2005-06-01

    We elaborate on the proposal that the observed acceleration of the Universe is the result of the backreaction of cosmological perturbations, rather than the effect of a negative-pressure dark energy fluid or a modification of general relativity. Through the effective Friedmann equations describing an inhomogeneous Universe after smoothing, we demonstrate that acceleration in our local Hubble patch is possible even if fluid elements do not individually undergo accelerated expansion. This invalidates the no-go theorem that there can be no acceleration in our local Hubble patch if the Universe only contains irrotational dust. We then study perturbatively the time behavior of general-relativistic cosmological perturbations, applying, where possible, the renormalization group to regularize the dynamics. We show that an instability occurs in the perturbative expansion involving sub-Hubble modes, which indicates that acceleration in our Hubble patch may originate from the backreaction of cosmological perturbations on observable scales.

  8. Probing exotic physics with cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Traditionally, collider experiments have been the primary tool used in searching for particle physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk, I will discuss alternative approaches for exploring exotic physics scenarios using high energy and ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos. Such neutrinos can be used to study interactions at energies higher, and over baselines longer, than those accessible to colliders. In this way, neutrino astronomy can provide a window into fundamental physics which is highly complementary to collider techniques. I will discuss the role of neutrino astronomy in fundamental physics, considering the use of such techniques in studying several specific scenarios including low scale gravity models, Standard Model electroweak instanton induced interactions, decaying neutrinos and quantum decoherence.

  9. Characterizing the Sites of Hadronic Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pihlstrom, Ylva; Mesler, R.; Sjouwerman, L.; Frail, D.; Claussen, M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued that supernova remnant (SNRs) shocks are the acceleration sites for galactic cosmic rays. While this has been established for electrons, solid evidence for hadrons constituting the bulk of the cosmic rays have been lacking. Models of hadronic cosmic ray acceleration in SNRs predict a gamma-ray flux density depending on parameters like the environment density and distance. Few reliable estimates of those parameters exist. SNRs with cosmic rays interacting with molecular clouds are expected to be bright gamma-ray sources, and these sites can be traced using 1720 MHz OH masers. The masers give information about the density and kinematical distance estimates. Only 10% of galactic SNRs harbor OH masers, and we have therefore searched for a more frequently occurring SNR/cloud interaction tracer. We have detected 36 GHz and 44 GHz methanol masers associated with a few SNRs. Here we report on the result of a search for methanol masers in 21 SNRs, and in particular the details of our detections in Sgr A East. Combining observations and modeling of methanol masers in SNRs, we aim to better constrain the density and distance to SNRs with TeV emission. The goal is to test the hadronic cosmic ray models and to understand the mechanisms of particle acceleration in SNRs. This project is supported under NASA-Fermi grant NNX10A055G.

  10. Acceleration and propagation of solar cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Podgorny, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the solar cosmic ray measurements on the Geostationary Orbital Environmental Satellite (GOES) spacecraft indicated that the duration of solar flare relativistic proton large pulses is comparable with the solar wind propagation duration from the Sun to the Earth. The front of the proton flux from flares on the western solar disk approaches the Earth with a flight time along the Archimedean spiral magnetic field line of 15-20 min. The proton flux from eastern flares is registered in the Earth's orbit 3-5 h after the flare onset. These particles apparently propagate across IMF owing to diffusion.

  11. Probing Inflation via Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2008-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has been a rich source of information about the early Universe. Detailed measurements of its spectrum and spatial distribution have helped solidify the Standard Model of Cosmology. However, many questions still remain. Standard Cosmology does not explain why the early Universe is geometrically flat, expanding, homogenous across the horizon, and riddled with a small anisotropy that provides the seed for structure formation. Inflation has been proposed as a mechanism that naturally solves these problems. In addition to solving these problems, inflation is expected to produce a spectrum of gravitational waves that will create a particular polarization pattern on the CMB. Detection of this polarized signal is a key test of inflation and will give a direct measurement of the energy scale at which inflation takes place. This polarized signature of inflation is expected to be -9 orders of magnitude below the 2.7 K monopole level of the CMB. This measurement will require good control of systematic errors, an array of many detectors having the requisite sensitivity, and a reliable method for removing polarized foregrounds, and nearly complete sky coverage. Ultimately, this measurement is likely to require a space mission. To this effect, technology and mission concept development are currently underway.

  12. Cosmic Accelerators: Engines of the Extreme Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, Stefan

    2009-06-23

    The universe is home to numerous exotic and beautiful phenomena, some of which can generate almost inconceivable amounts of energy. While the night sky appears calm, it is populated by colossal explosions, jets from supermassive black holes, rapidly rotating neutron stars, and shock waves of gas moving at supersonic speeds. These accelerators in the sky boost particles to energies far beyond those we can produce on earth. New types of telescopes, including the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope orbiting in space, are now discovering a host of new and more powerful accelerators. Please come and see how these observations are revising our picture of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  13. Cosmic parallax as a probe of late time anisotropic expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Quercellini, Claudia; Cabella, Paolo; Balbi, Amedeo; Amendola, Luca

    2009-09-15

    Cosmic parallax is the change of angular separation between a pair of sources at cosmological distances induced by an anisotropic expansion. An accurate astrometric experiment like Gaia could observe or put constraints on cosmic parallax. Examples of anisotropic cosmological models are Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi void models for off-center observers (introduced to explain the observed acceleration without the need for dark energy) and Bianchi metrics. If dark energy has an anisotropic equation of state, as suggested recently, then a substantial anisotropy could arise at z < or approx. 1 and escape the stringent constraints from the cosmic microwave background. In this paper we show that such models could be constrained by the Gaia satellite or by an upgraded future mission.

  14. Constraining the efficiency of cosmic ray acceleration by cluster shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazza, F.; Brüggen, M.; Wittor, D.; Gheller, C.; Eckert, D.; Stubbe, M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the acceleration of cosmic rays by collisionless structure formation shocks with ENZO grid simulations. Data from the Fermi satellite enable the use of galaxy clusters as a testbed for particle acceleration models. Based on advanced cosmological simulations that include different prescriptions for gas and cosmic rays physics, we use the predicted γ-ray emission to constrain the shock acceleration efficiency. We infer that the efficiency must be on average ≤10-3 for cosmic shocks, particularly for the M ˜ 2-5 merger shocks that are mostly responsible for the thermalization of the intracluster medium (ICM). These results emerge, both, from non-radiative and radiative runs including feedback from active galactic nuclei, as well as from zoomed resimulations of a cluster resembling MACSJ1752.0+0440. The limit on the acceleration efficiency we report is lower than what has been assumed in the literature so far. Combined with the information from radio emission in clusters, it appears that a revision of the present understanding of shock acceleration in the ICM is unavoidable.

  15. Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard

    2009-03-20

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{21} eV) is possible. PMID:19392185

  16. An overview of cosmic ray research - Composition, acceleration and propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of cosmic ray (CR) research and its relationship to other areas of high-energy astrophysics is presented. Research being conducted on the composition of cosmic rays (CRs) is examined, including the study of the solar system 'template' for CRs, CR abundances at earth, solar energetic particles, the CR elements beyond zinc, and the study of electrons, positrons, antinuclei, and of isotopic composition of CRs. Research on the CR energy spectrum and anisotropy is briefly reviewed. The study of acceleration processes, particle confinement, and propagation of CRs is addressed. Finally, the investigation of source abundances in CRs is discussed.

  17. Holographic dark energy and late cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón, Diego

    2007-06-01

    It has been persuasively argued that the number of effective degrees of freedom of a macroscopic system is proportional to its area rather than to its volume. This entails interesting consequences for cosmology. Here we present a model based on this 'holographic principle' that accounts for the present stage of accelerated expansion of the Universe and significantly alleviates the coincidence problem also for non-spatially flat cosmologies. Likewise, we comment on a recently proposed late transition to a fresh decelerated phase.

  18. Cosmic acceleration and the helicity-0 graviton

    SciTech Connect

    Rham, Claudia de; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Gabadadze, Gregory; Pirtskhalava, David

    2011-05-15

    We explore cosmology in the decoupling limit of a nonlinear covariant extension of Fierz-Pauli massive gravity obtained recently in arXiv:1007.0443. In this limit the theory is a scalar-tensor model of a unique form defined by symmetries. We find that it admits a self-accelerated solution, with the Hubble parameter set by the graviton mass. The negative pressure causing the acceleration is due to a condensate of the helicity-0 component of the massive graviton, and the background evolution, in the approximation used, is indistinguishable from the {Lambda}CDM model. Fluctuations about the self-accelerated background are stable for a certain range of parameters involved. Most surprisingly, the fluctuation of the helicity-0 field above its background decouples from an arbitrary source in the linearized theory. We also show how massive gravity can remarkably screen an arbitrarily large cosmological constant in the decoupling limit, while evading issues with ghosts. The obtained static solution is stable against small perturbations, suggesting that the degravitation of the vacuum energy is possible in the full theory. Interestingly, however, this mechanism postpones the Vainshtein effect to shorter distance scales. Hence, fifth force measurements severely constrain the value of the cosmological constant that can be neutralized, making this scheme phenomenologically not viable for solving the old cosmological constant problem. We briefly speculate on a possible way out of this issue.

  19. Cosmic bullets as particle accelerators and radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung; Tregillis, I. L.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated in two dimensions the dynamical evolution of dense gas clouds(`cosmic bullets') moving supersonically through a uniform low-density medium. The diffusive shock acceleration of relativistic protons (cosmic rays) and their dynamical feedback on the background flow are included by the two-fluid model for this process. The acceleration of relativistic electrons is approximated by a test-particle model, and a passive magnetic field is followed by a simple advection scheme. Strong bow shocks, with Mach numbers similar to that of a bullet's motion, are the most important particle accelerators in the flow, while tail shocks and shocks inside the bullets do not play generally significant roles in this regard. For our simulation parameters, approximately greater than 10% of the initial bullet kinetic energy is converted to a combination of internal energy of gas and cosmic-ray protons by the time the bullets begin to be disrupted. Characteristically, the cosmic rays gain several percent of the available kinetic energy. Bullet destruction on timescales only a little larger than the ram pressure bullet crushing time begins in response to Kelvin-Helmholtz and especially to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities along the forward bullet surface. For dense bullets this happens before the bullet is stopped by ram pressure. According to our simple model for synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons accelerated and transported within the flows, that emission increases rapidly as the bullet begins to fragment, when it is strongly dominated by field enhancement in sheared flows. Synchrotron emission from the acceleration region within the bow shock is, by contrast, much weaker.

  20. Cosmic ray acceleration by spiral shocks in the galactic wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Völk, H. J.; Zirakashvili, V. N.

    2004-04-01

    Cosmic ray acceleration by shocks related with Slipping Interaction Regions (SIRs) in the Galactic Wind is considered. SIRs are similar to Solar Wind Corotating Interaction Regions. The spiral structure of our Galaxy results in a strong nonuniformity of the Galactic Wind flow and in SIR formation at distances of 50 to 100 kpc. SIRs are not corotating with the gas and magnetic field because the angular velocity of the spiral pattern differs from that of the Galactic rotation. It is shown that the collective reacceleration of the cosmic ray particles with charge Ze in the resulting shock ensemble can explain the observable cosmic ray spectrum beyond the ``knee'' up to energies of the order of 1017 Z eV. For the reaccelerated particles the Galactic Wind termination shock acts as a reflecting boundary.

  1. Cosmic Ray Acceleration in Force Free Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgate, Stirling; Li, Hui; Kronberg, Philipp

    2002-11-01

    Galactic, extragalactic, and cluster magnetic fields are in apparent pressure equilibrium with the in-fall pressure of matter from the external medium, IGM, onto the Galaxies and clusters, and from the voids onto the galaxy sheets, (walls), implying fields of 5 , 0.5, & 20 μG respectively. Equipartition or minimum energy, implies β_CR=n_CRm_pc^2/(B^2/8π)˜= 1. The total energy in field and CRs is then ˜= 10^55 ergs Galactic and ˜= 4 ot 10^60 ergs per galaxy in the IGM and less within clusters, e.g., radio lobes, synchrotron "glow" in the IGM (Kronberg), and the UHECRs spectrum, Γ =-2.6. CRs escape from the Galaxy to the IGM, τ˜=10^7y, and similarly from the walls to the voids, ˜=10^8y, less than the GZK cut-off time provided B_galaxy>B_IGM>B_voids. The free energy of black hole formation, The Los Alamos model, is just sufficient. The lack of shocks at the boundaries of over pressured radio lobes and the need for high acceleration efficiency suggests eE_allel˜= eη_reconJ_allel, acceleration by reconnection of these force-free fields.

  2. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, J.A.S.; Graef, L.L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros E-mail: leilagraef@usp.br E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons–Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current 'quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  3. Cosmic acceleration without dark energy: background tests and thermodynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, J. A. S.; Graef, L. L.; Pavón, D.; Basilakos, Spyros

    2014-10-01

    A cosmic scenario with gravitationally induced particle creation is proposed. In this model the Universe evolves from an early to a late time de Sitter era, with the recent accelerating phase driven only by the negative creation pressure associated with the cold dark matter component. The model can be interpreted as an attempt to reduce the so-called cosmic sector (dark matter plus dark energy) and relate the two cosmic accelerating phases (early and late time de Sitter expansions). A detailed thermodynamic analysis including possible quantum corrections is also carried out. For a very wide range of the free parameters, it is found that the model presents the expected behavior of an ordinary macroscopic system in the sense that it approaches thermodynamic equilibrium in the long run (i.e., as it nears the second de Sitter phase). Moreover, an upper bound is found for the Gibbons-Hawking temperature of the primordial de Sitter phase. Finally, when confronted with the recent observational data, the current `quasi'-de Sitter era, as predicted by the model, is seen to pass very comfortably the cosmic background tests.

  4. Connecting inflation with late cosmic acceleration by particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Rafael C.

    2016-04-01

    A continuous process of creation of particles is investigated as a possible connection between the inflationary stage with late cosmic acceleration. In this model, the inflationary era occurs due to a continuous and fast process of creation of relativistic particles, and the recent accelerating phase is driven by the nonrelativistic matter creation from the gravitational field acting on the quantum vacuum, which finally results in an effective equation of state (EoS) less than ‑ 1. Thus, explaining recent results in favor of a phantom dynamics without the need of any modifications in the gravity theory has been proposed. Finally, we confront the model with recent observational data of type Ia Supernova, history of the Hubble parameter, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB).

  5. Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    Our piece of cosmic real-estate, the heliosphere, is the domain of all human existence - an astrophysical case-history of the successful evolution of life in a habitable system. By exploring our global heliosphere and its myriad interactions, we develop key physical knowledge of the interstellar interactions that influence exoplanetary habitability as well as the distant history and destiny of our solar system and world. IBEX was the first mission to explore the global heliosphere and in concert with Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 is discovering a fundamentally new and uncharted physical domain of the outer heliosphere. In parallel, Cassini/INCA maps the global heliosphere at energies (~5-55 KeV) above those measured by IBEX. The enigmatic IBEX ribbon and the INCA belt were unanticipated discoveries demonstrating that much of what we know or think we understand about the outer heliosphere needs to be revised. The next quantum leap enabled by IMAP will open new windows on the frontier of Heliophysics at a time when the space environment is rapidly evolving. IMAP with 100 times the combined resolution and sensitivity of IBEX and INCA will discover the substructure of the IBEX ribbon and will reveal in unprecedented resolution global maps of our heliosphere. The remarkable synergy between IMAP, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will remain for at least the next decade as Voyager 1 pushes further into the interstellar domain and Voyager 2 moves through the heliosheath. The "A" in IMAP refers to acceleration of energetic particles. With its combination of highly sensitive pickup and suprathermal ion sensors, IMAP will provide the species and spectral coverage as well as unprecedented temporal resolution to associate emerging suprathermal tails with interplanetary structures and discover underlying physical acceleration processes. These key measurements will provide what has been a critical missing piece of suprathermal seed particles in our understanding of particle acceleration to high

  6. SPECTRUM OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS ACCELERATED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ptuskin, Vladimir; Zirakashvili, Vladimir; Seo, Eun-Suk

    2010-07-20

    The spectra of high-energy protons and nuclei accelerated by supernova remnant (SNR) shocks are calculated, taking into account magnetic field amplification and Alfvenic drift both upstream and downstream of the shock for different types of SNRs during their evolution. The maximum energy of accelerated particles may reach 5 x 10{sup 18} eV for Fe ions in Type IIb SNRs. The calculated energy spectrum of cosmic rays after propagation through the Galaxy is in good agreement with the spectrum measured at the Earth.

  7. Is Cosmic Acceleration Telling Us Something About Gravity?

    ScienceCinema

    Trodden, Mark [Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, United States

    2009-09-01

    Among the possible explanations for the observed acceleration of the universe, perhaps the boldest is the idea that new gravitational physics might be the culprit. In this colloquium I will discuss some of the challenges of constructing a sensible phenomenological extension of General Relativity, give examples of some candidate models of modified gravity and survey existing observational constraints on this approach. I will conclude by discussing how we might hope to distinguish between modifications of General Relativity and dark energy as competing hypotheses to explain cosmic acceleration.

  8. Dark matter and cosmic acceleration from Wesson's IMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelit, Mark

    2009-12-01

    In the present work a procedure is build up, that allows obtaining dark matter (DM) and cosmic acceleration in our 4D universe embedded in a 5D manifold. Both, DM and the factor causing cosmic acceleration, as well ordinary matter are induced in the 4D space-time by a warped, but empty from matter, 5D bulk. The procedure is carried out in the framework of the Weyl-Dirac version (Israelit, Found Phys 35:1725, 2005; Israelit, Found Phys 35:1769, 2005) of Paul Wesson’s Induced Matter Theory (Wesson, Space-time matter, 1999) enriched by Rosen’s approach (Found Phys 12:213, 1982). Considering chaotically oriented Weyl vector fields, which exist in microscopic cells, we obtain cold dark matter (CDM) consisting of weylons, massive bosons having spin 1. Assuming homogeneity and isotropy at large scale we derive cosmological equations in which luminous matter, CDM and dark energy may be considered separately. Making in the given procedure use of present observational data one can develop a model of the Universe with conventional matter, DM and cosmic acceleration, induced by the 5D bulk.

  9. Cosmic ray drift, shock wave acceleration and the anomalous component of cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesses, M. E.; Jokipii, J. R.; Eichler, D.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the anomalous component of the quiet-time cosmic ray flux is presented in which ex-interstellar neutral particles are accelerated continuously in the polar regions of the solar-wind termination shock, and then drift into the equatorial regions of the inner heliosphere. The observed solar-cycle variations, radial gradient, and apparent latitude gradient of the anomalous component are a natural consequence of this model.

  10. Cosmic acceleration of Earth and the Moon by dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordtvedt, Kenneth L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that the gravitational interaction between our Galaxy's dark matter and the ordinary matter in Earth and the Moon might not fulfill the equivalence principle (universality of free fall), we consider the pertinent perturbation of the lunar orbit -- a sidereal month period range oscillation resulting from a spatially fixed polarization of the orbit. Lunar laser ranging (LLR) data can measure this sidereal perturbation to an accuracy equal to or better than its existing measurement of the synodic month period range oscillation amplitude (+/- 3 cm) which has been used for testing whether Earth and the Moon accelerate at equal rates toward the Sun. Because of the slow precession rate of the Moon's perigree (8.9 yr period), the lunar orbit is particularly sensitive to a cosmic acceleration; the LLR fit of the orbit places an upper limit of 10(exp -13) cm/sq. s for any cosmic differential acceleration between Earth (Fe) and the Moon (silicates). This is 10(exp -5) of the total galactic acceleration of the solar system, of which, it has been suggested, a large portion is produced by dark matter.

  11. Cosmic acceleration in a model of fourth order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shreya; Jayswal, Nilesh; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate a fourth order model of gravity, having a free length parameter, and no cosmological constant or dark energy. We consider cosmological evolution of a flat Friedmann universe in this model for the case that the length parameter is of the order of the present Hubble radius. By making a suitable choice for the present value of the Hubble parameter, and the value of the third derivative of the scale factor (the jerk), we find that the model can explain cosmic acceleration to the same degree of accuracy as the standard concordance model. If the free length parameter is assumed to be time dependent, and of the order of the Hubble parameter of the corresponding epoch, the model can still explain cosmic acceleration, and provides a possible resolution of the cosmic coincidence problem. We work out the effective equation of state, and its time evolution, in our model. The fourth order correction terms are proportional to the metric, and hence mimic the cosmological constant. We also compare redshift drift in our model, with that in the standard model. The equation of state and the redshift drift serve to discriminate our model from the standard model.

  12. Cosmic Shear as a Probe of Galaxy Formation Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, Simon; Becker, Matthew R.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2016-09-01

    We evaluate the potential for current and future cosmic shear measurements from large galaxy surveys to constrain the impact of baryonic physics on the matter power spectrum. We do so using a model-independent parameterization that describes deviations of the matter power spectrum from the dark-matter-only case as a set of principal components that are localized in wavenumber and redshift. We perform forecasts for a variety of current and future datasets, and find that at least ˜90% of the constraining power of these datasets is contained in no more than nine principal components. The constraining power of different surveys can be quantified using a figure of merit defined relative to currently available surveys. With this metric, we find that the final Dark Energy Survey dataset (DES Y5) and the Hyper Suprime Cam Survey will be roughly an order of magnitude more powerful than existing data in constraining baryonic effects. Upcoming Stage IV surveys (LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST) will improve upon this by a further factor of a few. We show that this conclusion is robust to marginalization over several key systematics. The ultimate power of cosmic shear to constrain galaxy formation is dependent on understanding systematics in the shear measurements at small (sub-arcminute) scales. If these systematics can be sufficiently controlled, cosmic shear measurements from DES Y5 and other future surveys have the potential to provide a very clean probe of galaxy formation and to strongly constrain a wide range of predictions from modern hydrodynamical simulations.

  13. Toward a Direct Measurement of the Cosmic Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, Jeremiah K.

    2013-01-01

    We present precise redshift measurements and place model-free constraints on cosmic acceleration and the acceleration of the Solar System in a universal context. HI 21 cm absorption lines observed over multiple epochs can constrain the secular redshift drift or the proper acceleration, Δv/Δto, with high precision. A comparison of literature analog spectra to contemporary digital spectra shows significant acceleration almost certainly attributable to systematic instrumental or calibration errors. However, robust constraints have been obtained by using digital data from a single telescope, the Green Bank Telescope. An ensemble of 10 objects spanning z = 0.09-0.69 observed over 13.5 years show Δz/Δto = (-1.8 ± 1.2) × 10-8 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = -4.0 ± 3.0 m s-1 yr-1. The best constraint from a single object, 3C286 at = 0.692153275(85), is dz/dto = (1.5 ± 4.7) × 10-8 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = 2.7 ± 8.4 m s-1 yr-1. These measurements are three orders of magnitude larger than the expected acceleration in the concordance dark energy cosmology at z=0.5, Δz/Δto = 2 × 10-11 yr-1 or Δv/Δto = 0.3 cm s-1 yr-1, but they demonstrate a lack of secular redshift drift in absorption line systems and the long-term frequency stability of modern radio telescopes. This measurement likewise constrains the barycentric proper acceleration in a cosmological reference frame (as opposed to the Galactic pulsar-defined reference frame), but currently lacks the precision of quasar proper motion observations. A comparison of rest-frame UV metal absorption lines to the HI 21 cm line places improved constraints on the cosmic variation of physical constants: Δ(α2 gp μ)/(α2 gp μ) = (-3.5 ± 1.4) × 10-6 in the redshift range z=0.24-2.04, consistent with no variation. We estimate that the cosmic acceleration could be directly measured with this technique in about 300 years using modern telescopes or in about 12 years using a Square Kilometer Array, provided that new systematic effects do

  14. ACCELERATION OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, L. A.; Gloeckler, G.

    2012-01-10

    Challenges have arisen to diffusive shock acceleration as the primary means to accelerate galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the interstellar medium. Diffusive shock acceleration is also under challenge in the heliosphere, where at least the simple application of diffusive shock acceleration cannot account for observations. In the heliosphere, a new acceleration mechanism has been invented-a pump mechanism, driven by ambient turbulence, in which particles are pumped up in energy out of a low-energy core particle population through a series of adiabatic compressions and expansions-that can account for observations not only at shocks but in quiet conditions in the solar wind and throughout the heliosheath. In this paper, the pump mechanism is applied to the acceleration of GCRs in the interstellar medium. With relatively straightforward assumptions about the magnetic field in the interstellar medium, and how GCRs propagate in this field, the pump mechanism yields (1) the overall shape of the GCR spectrum, a power law in particle kinetic energy, with a break at the so-called knee in the GCR spectrum to a slightly steeper power-law spectrum. (2) The rigidity dependence of the H/He ratio observed from the PAMELA satellite instrument.

  15. Nuclear Fusion Drives Present-Day Accelerated Cosmic Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, Leong

    2010-09-30

    The widely accepted model of our cosmos is that it began from a Big Bang event some 13.7 billion years ago from a single point source. From a twin universe perspective, the standard stellar model of nuclear fusion can account for the Dark Energy needed to explain the mechanism for our present-day accelerated expansion. The same theories can also be used to account for the rapid inflationary expansion at the earliest time of creation, and predict the future cosmic expansion rate.

  16. TOWARD A DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE COSMIC ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, Jeremy

    2012-12-20

    We present precise H I 21 cm absorption line redshifts observed in multiple epochs to directly constrain the secular redshift drift z-dot or the cosmic acceleration, {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle}. A comparison of literature analog spectra to contemporary digital spectra shows significant acceleration likely attributable to systematic instrumental errors. However, we obtain robust constraints using primarily Green Bank Telescope digital data. Ten objects spanning z = 0.09-0.69 observed over 13.5 years show z-dot = (-2.3 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = -5.5 {+-} 2.2 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. The best constraint from a single object, 3C 286 at (z) = 0.692153275(85), is z-dot = (1.6 {+-} 4.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = 2.8 {+-} 8.4 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. These measurements are three orders of magnitude larger than the theoretically expected acceleration at z = 0.5, z-dot = 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} yr{sup -1} or {Delta}v/{Delta}t{sub circle} = 0.3 cm s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, but they demonstrate the lack of peculiar acceleration in absorption line systems and the long-term frequency stability of modern radio telescopes. A comparison of UV metal absorption lines to the 21 cm line improves constraints on the cosmic variation of physical constants: {Delta}({alpha}{sup 2} g{sub p} {mu})/{alpha}{sup 2} g{sub p} {mu} = (- 1.2 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} in the redshift range z = 0.24-2.04. The linear evolution over the last 10.4 Gyr is (- 0.2 {+-} 2.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -16} yr{sup -1}, consistent with no variation. The cosmic acceleration could be directly measured in {approx}125 years using current telescopes or in {approx}5 years using a Square Kilometer Array, but systematic effects will arise at the 1 cm s{sup -1} yr{sup -1} level.

  17. Acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova-remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorfi, E. A.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that supernova-explosions are the dominant source of cosmic rays up to an energy of 10 to the 14th power eV/nucleon. Moreover, these high energy particles provide a major contribution to the energy density of the interstellar medium (ISM) and should therefore be included in calculations of interstellar dynamic phenomena. For the following the first order Fermi mechanism in shock waves are considered to be the main acceleration mechanism. The influence of this process is twofold; first, if the process is efficient (and in fact this is the cas) it will modify the dynamics and evolution of a supernova-remnant (SNR), and secondly, the existence of a significant high energy component changes the overall picture of the ISM. The complexity of the underlying physics prevented detailed investigations of the full non-linear selfconsistent problem. For example, in the context of the energy balance of the ISM it has not been investigated how much energy of a SN-explosion can be transfered to cosmic rays in a time-dependent selfconsistent model. Nevertheless, a lot of progress was made on many aspects of the acceleration mechanism.

  18. Cosmic rays as probes of atmospheric electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, O.; Trinh, G. T. N.; Schellart, P.; Ebert, U.; Rutjes, C.; Nelles, A.; Buitink, S.; ter Veen, S.; Horandel, J.; Corstanje, A.; Rachen, J. P.; Thoudam, S.; Falcke, H.; Koehn, C. C.; van den Berg, A. A. M.; de Vries, K. K. D.; Rossetto, L.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called an extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate radio waves which have been detected with LOFAR, a large and dense array of simple antennas primarily developed for radio-astronomy observations.LOFAR has observed air showers under fair-weather conditions as well as under atmospheric conditions where thunderstorms occur. For air showers under fair-weather conditions the intensity as well as the polarization of the radio emission can be understood rather accurately from the present models.For air showers measured under thunderstorm conditions we observe large differences in the intensity and polarization patterns from the fair weather models. We will show that the linear as well as the circular polarization of the radio waves carry clear information on the orientation of the electric fields at different heights in the thunderstorm clouds. We will show for the first time that the circular polarization of the radio waves tells about the change of orientation of the fields with altitude. We will show that from the measured data at LOFAR the thunderstorm electric fields can be reconstructed.We thus have established the measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays as a new tool to probe the atmospheric electric fields present in thunderclouds in a non-intrusive way.

  19. Nuclear Effects of Supernova-Accelerated Cosmic Rays on Early Solar System Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, B. S.; The, L.-S.; Johnson, J.

    2008-03-01

    The solar system apparently formed in the neighborhood of massive stars. Supernova explosions of these stars accelerate cosmic rays to 100s of TeVs. These cosmic rays could accelerate the beta decay of certain radioactive species in meteorite parent bodies.

  20. "Espresso" Acceleration of Ultra-high-energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2015-10-01

    We propose that ultra-high-energy (UHE) cosmic rays (CRs) above 1018 eV are produced in relativistic jets of powerful active galactic nuclei via an original mechanism, which we dub “espresso” acceleration: “seed” galactic CRs with energies ≲1017 eV that penetrate the jet sideways receive a “one-shot” boost of a factor of ∼Γ2 in energy, where Γ is the Lorentz factor of the relativistic flow. For typical jet parameters, a few percent of the CRs in the host galaxy can undergo this process, and powerful blazars with Γ ≳ 30 may accelerate UHECRs up to more than 1020 eV. The chemical composition of espresso-accelerated UHECRs is determined by that at the Galactic CR knee and is expected to be proton-dominated at 1018 eV and increasingly heavy at higher energies, in agreement with recent observations made at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  1. A Comprehensive Investigation on the Slowing Down of Cosmic Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; Hu, Yazhou; Li, Miao; Li, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Shafieloo et al. first proposed the possibility that the current cosmic acceleration (CA) is slowing down. However, this is rather counterintuitive because a slowing down CA cannot be accommodated in most mainstream cosmological models. In this work, by exploring the evolutionary trajectories of the dark energy equation of state w(z) and deceleration parameter q(z), we present a comprehensive investigation on the slowing down of CA from both the theoretical and the observational sides. For the theoretical side, we study the impact of different w(z) using six parametrization models, and then we discuss the effects of spatial curvature. For the observational side, we investigate the effects of different type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We find that (1) the evolution of CA is insensitive to the specific form of w(z); in contrast, a non-flat universe favors a slowing down CA more than a flat universe. (2) SNLS3 SNe Ia data sets favor a slowing down CA at a 1σ confidence level, while JLA SNe Ia samples prefer an eternal CA; in contrast, the effects of different BAO data are negligible. (3) Compared with CMB distance prior data, full CMB data favor a slowing down CA more. (4) Due to the low significance, the slowing down of CA is still a theoretical possibility that cannot be confirmed by the current observations.

  2. Ringlike inelastic events in cosmic rays and accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dremin, I. M.; Orlov, A. M.; Tretyakova, M. I.

    1985-01-01

    In cosmic rays and in accelerators there were observed single inelastic processes with densely produced (azimuthally isotropic) groups of particles exhibiting spikes in the pseudorapidity plot of an individual event (i.e. ringlike events). Theoretically the existence of such processes was predicted as a consequence of Cerenkov gluon radiation or, more generally, of deconfinement radiation. Nowadays some tens of such events have been accumulated at 400 GeV and at 150 TeV. Analyzing ringlike events in proton-nucleon interactions at 400 GeV/c it is shown that they exhibit striking irregularity in the positions of pseudorapidity spikes' centers which tend to lie mostly at 55,90 and 125 deg in cms. It implies rather small deconfinement lengths of the order of some fermi.

  3. Cosmic slowing down of acceleration for several dark energy parametrizations

    SciTech Connect

    Magaña, Juan; Cárdenas, Víctor H.; Motta, Verónica E-mail: victor.cardenas@uv.cl

    2014-10-01

    We further investigate slowing down of acceleration of the universe scenario for five parametrizations of the equation of state of dark energy using four sets of Type Ia supernovae data. In a maximal probability analysis we also use the baryon acoustic oscillation and cosmic microwave background observations. We found the low redshift transition of the deceleration parameter appears, independently of the parametrization, using supernovae data alone except for the Union 2.1 sample. This feature disappears once we combine the Type Ia supernovae data with high redshift data. We conclude that the rapid variation of the deceleration parameter is independent of the parametrization. We also found more evidence for a tension among the supernovae samples, as well as for the low and high redshift data.

  4. Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) - Its Time Has Come!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N.; Kasper, J. C.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moebius, E.; Opher, M.; Spence, H. E.; Zurbuchen, T.

    2014-12-01

    Our piece of cosmic real-estate, the heliosphere, is the domain of all human existence -- an astrophysical case-history of the successful evolution of life in a habitable system. By exploring our global heliosphere and its myriad interactions, we develop key physical knowledge of the interstellar interactions that influence exoplanetary habitability as well as the distant history and destiny of our solar system and world. IBEX was the first mission to explore the global heliosphere and in concert with Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 is discovering a fundamentally new and uncharted physical domain of the outer heliosphere. The enigmatic IBEX ribbon is an unanticipated discovery demonstrating that much of what we know or think we understand about the outer heliosphere needs to be revised. The next quantum leap enabled by IMAP will open new windows on the frontier of Heliophysics at a time when the space environment is rapidly evolving. IMAP with 100 times the combined resolution and sensitivity of IBEX will discover the substructure of the IBEX ribbon and will reveal in unprecedented resolution global maps of our heliosphere. The remarkable synergy between IMAP, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will remain for at least the next decade as Voyager 1 pushes further into the interstellar domain and Voyager 2 moves through the heliosheath. Voyager 2 moves outward in the vicinity of the IBEX ribbon and its plasma measurements will create singular opportunities for discovery in the context of IMAP's global measurements. IMAP, like ACE before it, will be a keystone of the Heliophysics System Observatory by providing comprehensive cosmic ray, energetic particle, pickup ion, suprathermal ion, neutral atom, solar wind, solar wind heavy ion, and magnetic field observations to diagnose the changing space environment and understand the fundamental origins of particle acceleration. Thus, IMAP is a mission whose time has come. IMAP is the highest ranked next Solar Terrestrial Probe in the Decadal

  5. Estimating field scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, A. M.; Helgason, W. D.; Ireson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to "field scale", integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a two year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 5002 m2 area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field scale surface soil moisture, but accounted for less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (1) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time stable neutron probe monitoring location, (2) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (3) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.004 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.012 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. It is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  6. Estimating field-scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Amber M.; Helgason, Warren D.; Ireson, Andrew M.

    2016-04-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological, and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to field scale, integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field-scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth-scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a 2-year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 500 m × 500 m study area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field-scale surface soil moisture, but measurements represented less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (a) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time-stable neutron probe monitoring location, (b) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (c) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.005 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.014 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. Based upon its observed performance and its minimal data requirements, it is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  7. Effects of cosmic acceleration on black hole thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Abhijit

    2016-07-01

    Direct local impacts of cosmic acceleration upon a black hole are matters of interest. Babichev et. al. had published before that the Friedmann equations which are prevailing the part of fluid filled up in the universe to lead (or to be very specific, `dominate') the other constituents of universe and are forcing the universe to undergo present-day accelerating phase (or to lead to violate the strong energy condition and latter the week energy condition), will themselves tell that the rate of change of mass of the central black hole due to such exotic fluid's accretion will essentially shrink the mass of the black hole. But this is a global impact indeed. The local changes in the space time geometry next to the black hole can be analysed from a modified metric governing the surrounding space time of a black hole. A charged deSitter black hole solution encircled by quintessence field is chosen for this purpose. Different thermodynamic parameters are analysed for different values of quintessence equation of state parameter, ω_q. Specific jumps in the nature of the thermodynamic space near to the quintessence or phantom barrier are noted and physically interpreted as far as possible. Nature of phase transitions and the situations at which these transitions are taking place are also explored. It is determined that before quintessence starts to work (ω_q=-0.33>-1/3) it was preferable to have a small unstable black hole followed by a large stable one. But in quintessence (-1/3>ω_q>-1), black holes are destined to be unstable large ones pre-quelled by stable/ unstable small/ intermediate mass black holes.

  8. A class of effective field theory models of cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Flanagan, Éanna É.

    2012-10-01

    We explore a class of effective field theory models of cosmic acceleration involving a metric and a single scalar field. These models can be obtained by starting with a set of ultralight pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone bosons whose couplings to matter satisfy the weak equivalence principle, assuming that one boson is lighter than all the others, and integrating out the heavier fields. The result is a quintessence model with matter coupling, together with a series of correction terms in the action in a covariant derivative expansion, with specific scalings for the coefficients. After eliminating higher derivative terms and exploiting the field redefinition freedom, we show that the resulting theory contains nine independent free functions of the scalar field when truncated at four derivatives. This is in contrast to the four free functions found in similar theories of single-field inflation, where matter is not present. We discuss several different representations of the theory that can be obtained using the field redefinition freedom. For perturbations to the quintessence field today on subhorizon lengthscales larger than the Compton wavelength of the heavy fields, the theory is weakly coupled and natural in the sense of t'Hooft. The theory admits a regime where the perturbations become modestly nonlinear, but very strong nonlinearities lie outside its domain of validity.

  9. The acceleration rate of cosmic rays at cosmic ray modified shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tatsuhiko; Hoshino, Masahiro; Amano, Takanobu

    It is a still controversial matter whether the production efficiency of cosmic rays (CRs) is relatively efficient or inefficient (e.g. Helder et al. 2009; Hughes et al. 2000; Fukui 2013). In upstream region of SNR shocks (the interstellar medium), the energy density of CRs is comparable to a substantial fraction of that of the thermal plasma (e.g. Ferriere 2001). In such a situation, CRs can possibly exert a back-reaction to the shocks and modify the global shock structure. These shocks are called cosmic ray modified shocks (CRMSs). In CRMSs, as a result of the nonlinear feedback, there are almost always up to three steady-state solutions for given upstream parameters, which are characterized by CR production efficiencies (efficient, intermediate and inefficient branch). We evaluate qualitatively the efficiency of the CR production in SNR shocks by considering the stability of CRMS, under the effects of i) magnetic fields and ii) injection, which play significant roles in efficiency of acceleration. By adopting two-fluid model (Drury & Voelk, 1981), we investigate the stability of CRMSs by means of time-dependent numerical simulations. As a result, we show explicitly the bi-stable feature of these multiple solutions, i.e., the efficient and inefficient branches are stable and the intermediate branch is unstable, and the intermediate branch transit to the inefficient one. This feature is independent of the effects of i) shock angles and ii) injection. Furthermore, we investigate the evolution from a hydrodynamic shock to CRMS in a self-consistent manner. From the results, we suggest qualitatively that the CR production efficiency at SNR shocks may be the least efficient.

  10. Cosmic-Ray Accelerators in Milky Way studied with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Kamae, Tuneyoshi; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2012-05-04

    High-energy gamma-ray astrophysics is now situated at a confluence of particle physics, plasma physics and traditional astrophysics. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) and upgraded Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) have been invigorating this interdisciplinary area of research. Among many new developments, I focus on two types of cosmic accelerators in the Milky-Way galaxy (pulsar, pulsar wind nebula, and supernova remnants) and explain discoveries related to cosmic-ray acceleration.

  11. Probing gravitation, dark energy, and acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.

    2004-02-20

    The acceleration of the expansion of the universe arises from unknown physical processes involving either new fields in high energy physics or modifications of gravitation theory. It is crucial for our understanding to characterize the properties of the dark energy or gravity through cosmological observations and compare and distinguish between them. In fact, close consistencies exist between a dark energy equation of state function w(z) and changes to the framework of the Friedmann cosmological equations as well as direct spacetime geometry quantities involving the acceleration, such as ''geometric dark energy'' from the Ricci scalar. We investigate these interrelationships, including for the case of super acceleration or phantom energy where the fate of the universe may be more gentle than the Big Rip.

  12. Probing Cosmic Gas Accretion with RESOLVE and ECO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannappan, Sheila; Eckert, Kathleen D.; Stark, David; Lagos, Claudia; Nasipak, Zachary; Moffett, Amanda J.; Baker, Ashley; Berlind, Andreas A.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Norris, Mark A.; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    We review results bearing on the existence, controlling factors, and mechanisms of cosmic gas accretion in the RESOLVE and ECO surveys. Volume-limited analysis of RESOLVE's complete census of HI-to-stellar mass ratios and star formation histories for ~1500 galaxies points to the necessity of an "open box" model of galaxy fueling, with the most gas-dominated galaxies doubling their stellar masses on ~Gyr timescales in a regime of rapid accretion. Transitions in gas richness and disk-building activity for isolated or central galaxies with halo masses near ~10^11.5 Msun and ~10^12 Msun plausibly correspond to the endpoints of a theoretically predicted transition in halo gas temperature that slows accretion across this range. The same mass range is associated with the initial grouping of isolated galaxies into common halos, where "isolated" is defined relative to the survey baryonic mass limits of >~10^9 Msun. Above 10^11.5 Msun, patterns in central vs. satellite gas richness as a function of group halo mass suggest that galaxy refueling is valved off from the inside out as the halo grows, with total quenching beyond the virial radius for halo masses >~10^13-13.5 Msun. Within the transition range from ~10^11.5-10^12 Msun, theoretical models predict >3 dex dispersion in ratios of uncooled halo gas to cold gas in galaxies (or more generally gas and stars). In RESOLVE and ECO, the baryonic mass function of galaxies in this transitional halo mass range displays signs of stripping or destruction of satellites, leading us to investigate a possible connection with halo gas heating using central galaxy color and group dynamics to probe group evolutionary state. Finally, we take a first look at how internal variations in metallicity, dynamics, and star formation constrain accretion mechanisms such as cold streams, induced extraplanar gas cooling, isotropic halo gas cooling, and gas-rich merging in different mass and environment regimes. The RESOLVE and ECO surveys have been

  13. Late time cosmic acceleration from natural infrared cutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, inspired by the ultraviolet deformation of the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker geometry in loop quantum cosmology, we formulate an infrared-modified cosmological model. We obtain the associated deformed Friedmann and Raychaudhuri equations and we show that the late time cosmic acceleration can be addressed by the infrared corrections. As a particular example, we applied the setup to the case of matter dominated universe. This model has the same number of parameters as ΛCDM, but a dynamical dark energy generates in the matter dominated era at the late time. According to our model, as the universe expands, the energy density of the cold dark matter dilutes and when the Hubble parameter approaches to its minimum, the infrared effects dominate such that the effective equation of state parameter smoothly changes from weff = 0 to weff = - 2. Interestingly and nontrivially, the unstable de Sitter phase with weff = - 1 is corresponding to Ωm =Ωd = 0.5 and the universe crosses the phantom divide from the quintessence phase with weff > - 1 and Ωm >Ωd to the phantom phase with weff < - 1 and Ωm <Ωd which shows that the model is observationally viable. The results show that the universe finally ends up in a big rip singularity for a finite time proportional to the inverse of the minimum of the Hubble parameter. Moreover, we consider the dynamical stability of the model and we show that the universe starts from the matter dominated era at the past attractor with weff = 0 and ends up in a future attractor at the big rip with weff = - 2.

  14. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Malka, V.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S.

    2013-06-15

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  15. Probing electron acceleration and x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Corde, S.; Brijesh, P.; Lambert, G.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Bloom, M. S.; Kneip, S.; Malka, V.

    2013-06-01

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam, is focused on the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion, which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  16. SUPERNOVA REMNANT KES 17: AN EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATOR INSIDE A MOLECULAR CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, Joseph D.; Castro, Daniel; Slane, Patrick O.; Temim, Tea; Hughes, John P.; Rakowski, Cara E-mail: cara.rakowski@gmail.com

    2013-11-10

    The supernova remnant Kes 17 (SNR G304.6+0.1) is one of a few but growing number of remnants detected across the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we analyze recent radio, X-ray, and γ-ray observations of this object, determining that efficient cosmic ray acceleration is required to explain its broadband non-thermal spectrum. These observations also suggest that Kes 17 is expanding inside a molecular cloud, though our determination of its age depends on whether thermal conduction or clump evaporation is primarily responsible for its center-filled thermal X-ray morphology. Evidence for efficient cosmic ray acceleration in Kes 17 supports recent theoretical work concluding that the strong magnetic field, turbulence, and clumpy nature of molecular clouds enhance cosmic ray production in supernova remnants. While additional observations are needed to confirm this interpretation, further study of Kes 17 is important for understanding how cosmic rays are accelerated in supernova remnants.

  17. Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as a Probe of Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacinti, Gwenael; Kirk, John

    2016-07-01

    IceTop and IceCube have observed a mysterious cold spot in the angular distribution of high energy (≳ 100 TeV) cosmic rays, thereby placing interesting constraints on their transport properties. In this paper we examine these constraints by comparing the observations with the predictions of pitch-angle diffusion in various kinds of turbulence. In the case of incompressible Alfvénic turbulence with a Goldreich-Sridhar power-spectrum, we show that pseudo-Alfvén modes produce a signature that is compatible with the observations, although they fail to provide enough scattering to confine cosmic rays in the galaxy. We confirm that adding fast magnetosonic modes can alleviate this problem, and further show that for physically relevant values of the turbulence parameters, this model can still match the observations. Finally, we study the imprint on the cosmic-ray anistropy of anistropic damping of the fast modes.

  18. Cascaded Gamma Rays as a Probe of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta

    2014-06-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE) and ultra-high-energy (UHE) gamma rays from extragalactic sources experience electromagnetic cascades during their propagation in intergalactic space. Recent gamma-ray data on TeV blazars and the diffuse gamma-ray background may have hints of the cascade emission, which are especially interesting if it comes from UHE cosmic rays. I show that cosmic-ray-induced cascades can be discriminated from gamma-ray-induced cascades with detailed gamma-ray spectra. I also discuss roles of structured magnetic fields, which suppress inverse-Compton pair halos/echoes but lead to guaranteed signals - synchrotron pair halos/echoes.

  19. Pointlike gamma ray sources as signatures of distant accelerators of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Gabici, Stefano; Aharonian, Felix A

    2005-12-16

    We discuss the possibility of observing distant accelerators of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in synchrotron gamma rays. Protons propagating away from their acceleration sites produce extremely energetic electrons during photopion interactions with cosmic microwave background photons. If the accelerator is embedded in a magnetized region, these electrons will emit high energy synchrotron radiation. The resulting synchrotron source is expected to be pointlike, steady, and detectable in the GeV-TeV energy range if the magnetic field is at the nanoGauss level. PMID:16384444

  20. The COBE cosmic 3 K anisotropy experiment: A gravity wave and cosmic string probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Charles L.; Smoot, George F.

    1989-01-01

    Among the experiments to be carried into orbit next year, by the COBE satellite, are differential microwave radiometers. They will make sensitive all-sky maps of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation at three frequencies, giving dipole, quadrupole, and higher order multipole measurements of the background radiation. The experiment will either detect, or place significant constraints on, the existence of cosmic strings and long wavelength gravity waves.

  1. High energy neutrinos from astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; Hooper, Dan; Sarkar, Subir; Taylor, Andrew M.

    2008-02-01

    Ongoing experimental efforts to detect cosmic sources of high energy neutrinos are guided by the expectation that astrophysical accelerators of cosmic ray protons would also generate neutrinos through interactions with ambient matter and/or photons. However, there will be a reduction in the predicted neutrino flux if cosmic ray sources accelerate not only protons but also significant numbers of heavier nuclei, as is indicated by recent air shower data. We consider plausible extragalactic sources such as active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and starburst galaxies and demand consistency with the observed cosmic ray composition and energy spectrum at Earth after allowing for propagation through intergalactic radiation fields. This allows us to calculate the expected neutrino fluxes from the sources, normalized to the observed cosmic ray spectrum. We find that the likely signals are still within reach of next generation neutrino telescopes such as IceCube.PACS95.85.Ry98.70.Rz98.54.Cm98.54.EpReferencesFor a review, see:F.HalzenD.HooperRep. Prog. Phys.6520021025A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.972006221101A.AchterbergIceCube CollaborationAstropart. Phys.262006282arXiv:astro-ph/0611063arXiv:astro-ph/0702265V.NiessANTARES CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8672006217I.KravchenkoPhys. Rev. D732006082002S.W.BarwickANITA CollaborationPhys. Rev. Lett.962006171101V.Van ElewyckPierre Auger CollaborationAIP Conf. Proc.8092006187For a survey of possible sources and event rates in km3 detectors see e.g.,W.BednarekG.F.BurgioT.MontaruliNew Astron. Rev.4920051M.D.KistlerJ.F.BeacomPhys. Rev. D742006063007A. Kappes, J. Hinton, C. Stegmann, F.A. Aharonian, arXiv:astro-ph/0607286.A.LevinsonE.WaxmanPhys. Rev. Lett.872001171101C.DistefanoD.GuettaE.WaxmanA.LevinsonAstrophys. J.5752002378F.A.AharonianL.A.AnchordoquiD.KhangulyanT.MontaruliJ. Phys. Conf. Ser.392006408J.Alvarez-MunizF.HalzenAstrophys. J.5762002L33F.VissaniAstropart. Phys.262006310F.W

  2. The cosmic microwave background - A probe of particle physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The current status of spectral distortions and angular anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background is reviewed, with emphasis on the role played by weakly interacting particle dark matter. Theoretical predictions and recent observational results are described, and prospects for future progress are summarized.

  3. Stochastic Acceleration of Galactic Cosmic Rays by Compressible Plasma Fluctuations in Supernova Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    A theory of 2-stage acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays in supernova remnants is proposed. The first stage is accomplished by the supernova shock front, where a power-law spectrum is established up to a certain cutoff energy. It is followed by stochastic acceleration with compressible waves/turbulence in the downstream medium. With a broad \\propto {k}-2 spectrum for the compressible plasma fluctuations, the rate of stochastic acceleration is constant over a wide range of particle momentum. In this case, the stochastic acceleration process extends the power-law spectrum cutoff energy of Galactic cosmic rays to the knee without changing the spectral slope. This situation happens as long as the rate of stochastic acceleration is faster than 1/5 of the adiabatic cooling rate. A steeper spectrum of compressible plasma fluctuations that concentrate their power in long wavelengths will accelerate cosmic rays to the knee with a small bump before its cutoff in the comic-ray energy spectrum. This theory does not require a strong amplification of the magnetic field in the upstream interstellar medium in order to accelerate cosmic rays to the knee energy.

  4. An absence of neutrinos associated with cosmic-ray acceleration in γ-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    2012-04-19

    Very energetic astrophysical events are required to accelerate cosmic rays to above 10(18) electronvolts. GRBs (γ-ray bursts) have been proposed as possible candidate sources. In the GRB 'fireball' model, cosmic-ray acceleration should be accompanied by neutrinos produced in the decay of charged pions created in interactions between the high-energy cosmic-ray protons and γ-rays. Previous searches for such neutrinos found none, but the constraints were weak because the sensitivity was at best approximately equal to the predicted flux. Here we report an upper limit on the flux of energetic neutrinos associated with GRBs that is at least a factor of 3.7 below the predictions. This implies either that GRBs are not the only sources of cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10(18) electronvolts or that the efficiency of neutrino production is much lower than has been predicted. PMID:22517161

  5. Laboratory laser acceleration and high energy astrophysics: {gamma}-ray bursts and cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.

    1998-08-20

    Recent experimental progress in laser acceleration of charged particles (electrons) and its associated processes has shown that intense electromagnetic pulses can promptly accelerate charged particles to high energies and that their energy spectrum is quite hard. On the other hand some of the high energy astrophysical phenomena such as extremely high energy cosmic rays and energetic components of {gamma}-ray bursts cry for new physical mechanisms for promptly accelerating particles to high energies. The authors suggest that the basic physics involved in laser acceleration experiments sheds light on some of the underlying mechanisms and their energy spectral characteristics of the promptly accelerated particles in these high energy astrophysical phenomena.

  6. Super-TIGER: A Balloon-Borne Instrument to Probe Galactic Cosmic Ray Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Super-TIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is a balloon-borne instrument under construction for a long-duration flight from Antarctica in 2012. It is designed to measure the relative abundances of the ultra-heavy (UH) Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with individual-element resolution from _{30}Zn to _{42}Mo and make exploratory measurements through _{56}Ba, as well as the energy spectra of the GCR from _{10}Ne to _{29}Cu between 0.8 and 10 GeV/nucleon. The UH measurements will test the OB association origin model of the GCR, as well as the model of preferential acceleration of refractory elements. The GCR spectrum measurements will probe for microquasars or other sources that could superpose spectral features. Super-TIGER is a ˜ 4 × larger evolution of the preceding TIGER instrument, and is comprised of two independent modules with a total area of 5.4 m^{2}. A combination of plastic scintillation detectors, acrylic and silica-aerogel Cherenkov detectors, and scintillating fiber hodoscopes are used to resolve particle charge, kinetic energy per nucleon, and trajectory. Refinements in the Super-TIGER design over TIGER, including reduced material in the beam, give it a collecting power that is ˜ 6.4× larger. This paper will report on the instrument development status, the expected flight performance, and the scientific impact of the anticipated Super-TIGER GCR measurements. This research was supported by NASA under Grant NNX09AC17G

  7. Calibration of a catchment scale cosmic-ray probe network: A comparison of three parameterization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatz, R.; Bogena, H. R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Huisman, J. A.; Qu, W.; Montzka, C.; Vereecken, H.

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the accuracy of soil water content determination from neutron flux measured by cosmic-ray probes under humid climate conditions. Ten cosmic-ray probes were set up in the Rur catchment located in western Germany, and calibrated by gravimetric soil sampling campaigns. Aboveground biomass was estimated at the sites to investigate the role of vegetation cover on the neutron flux and the calibration procedure. Three parameterization methods were used to generate site-specific neutron flux - soil water content calibration curves: (i) the N0-method, (ii) the hydrogen molar fraction method (hmf-method), and (iii) the COSMIC-method. At five locations, calibration measurements were repeated to evaluate site-specific calibration parameters obtained in two different sampling campaigns. At two locations, soil water content determined by cosmic-ray probes was evaluated with horizontally and vertically weighted soil water content measurements of two distributed in situ soil water content sensor networks. All three methods were successfully calibrated to determine field scale soil water content continuously at the ten sites. The hmf-method and the COSMIC-method had more similar calibration curves than the N0-method. The three methods performed similarly well in the validation and errors were within the uncertainty of neutron flux measurements despite observed differences in the calibration curves and variable model complexity. In addition, we found that the obtained calibration parameters NCOSMIC, N0 and NS showed a strong correlation with aboveground biomass.

  8. Visual phenomena induced by cosmic rays and accelerated particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, C. A.; Budinger, T. F.; Leith, J. T.; Mamoon, A.; Chapman, P. K.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments, conducted at cyclotrons together with observations by Apollo astronauts, suggest with little doubt that cosmic nuclei interacting with the visual apparatus cause the phenomenon of light flashes seen on translunar and transearth coast over the past four Apollo missions. Other experiments with high and low energy neutrons and a helium ion beam suggest that slow protons and helium ions with a stopping power greater than 10 to the 8th power eV/gram sq cm can cause the phenomenon in the dark adapted eye. It was demonstrated that charged particles induced by neutrons and helium ions can stimulate the visual apparatus. Some approaches to understanding the long term mission effects of galactic cosmic nuclei interacting with man and his nervous system are outlined.

  9. Integration of cosmic-ray neutron probes into production agriculture: Lessons from the Platte River cosmic-ray neutron probe monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, W. A.; Finkenbiner, C. E.; Franz, T. E.; Nguy-Robertson, A. L.; Munoz-Arriola, F.; Suyker, A.; Arkebauer, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Projected increases in global population will put enormous pressure on fresh water resources in the coming decades. Approximately 70 percent of human water use is allocated to agriculture with 40 percent of global food production originating from irrigated lands. Growing demand for food will only worsen the strain placed on many irrigated agricultural systems resulting in an unsustainable reliance on groundwater. This work presents an overview of the Platte River Cosmic-ray Neutron Probe Monitoring Network, which consists of 10 fixed probes and 3 mobile probes located across the Platte River Basin. The network was installed in 2014 and is part of the larger US COSMOS (70+ probes) and global COSMOS networks (200+ probes). Here we will present an overview of the network, comparison of fixed neutron probe results across the basin, spatial mapping results of the mobile sensors at various sites and spatial scales, and lessons learned by working with various producers and water stakeholder groups. With the continued development of this technique, its incorporation for soil moisture management in large producer operations has the potential to increase irrigation water use efficiency in the Platte River Basin and beyond.

  10. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    ScienceCinema

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  11. Los Alamos, Toshiba probing Fukushima with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher

    2014-06-16

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has announced an impending partnership with Toshiba Corporation to use a Los Alamos technique called muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors and create high-resolution images of the damaged nuclear material inside without ever breaching the cores themselves. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade and greatly reduce radiation exposure to personnel working at the plant. Muon radiography (also called cosmic-ray radiography) uses secondary particles generated when cosmic rays collide with upper regions of Earth's atmosphere to create images of the objects that the particles, called muons, penetrate. The process is analogous to an X-ray image, except muons are produced naturally and do not damage the materials they contact. Muon radiography has been used before in imaginative applications such as mapping the interior of the Great Pyramid at Giza, but Los Alamos's muon tomography technique represents a vast improvement over earlier technology.

  12. A MODEL OF ACCELERATION OF ANOMALOUS COSMIC RAYS BY RECONNECTION IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Opher, M. E-mail: mopher@gmu.ed

    2009-09-20

    We discuss a model of cosmic ray acceleration that accounts for the observations of anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) by Voyager 1 and 2. The model appeals to fast magnetic reconnection rather than shocks as the driver of acceleration. The ultimate source of energy is associated with magnetic field reversals that occur in the heliosheath. It is expected that the magnetic field reversals will occur throughout the heliosheath, but especially near the heliopause where the flows slow down and diverge with respect to the interstellar wind and also in the boundary sector in the heliospheric current sheet. While the first-order Fermi acceleration theory within reconnection layers is in its infancy, the predictions do not contradict the available data on ACR spectra measured by the spacecraft. We argue that the Voyager data are one of the first pieces of evidence favoring the acceleration within regions of fast magnetic reconnection, which we believe to be a widely spread astrophysical process.

  13. Generation of mesoscale magnetic fields and the dynamics of Cosmic Ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    The problem of the cosmic ray origin is discussed in connection with their acceleration in supernova remnant shocks. The diffusive shock acceleration mechanism is reviewed and its potential to accelerate particles to the maximum energy of (presumably) galactic cosmic rays (1018eV ) is considered. It is argued that to reach such energies, a strong magnetic field at scales larger than the particle gyroradius must be created as a result of the acceleration process, itself. One specific mechanism suggested here is based on the generation of Alfven wave at the gyroradius scale with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven waves. The generation mechanism is modulational instability of CR generated Alfven wave packets induced, in turn, by scattering off acoustic fluctuations in the shock precursor which are generated by Drury instability.

  14. Photon damping in cosmic-ray acceleration in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-04-07

    The usual assumption of the acceleration of ultra high energy cosmic rays, greater than or equal to 10/sup 18/ eV in quasars, Seyfert galaxies and other active galactic nuclei is challenged on the basis of the photon interactions with the accelerated nucleons. This is similar to the effect of the black body radiation on particles > 10/sup 20/ eV for times of the age of the universe except that the photon spectrum is harder and the energy density greater by approx. = 10/sup 15/. Hence, a single traversal, radial or circumferential, of radiation whose energy density is no greater than the emitted flux will damp an ultra high energy. Hence, it is unlikely that any reasonable configuration of acceleration can void disastrous photon energy loss. A different site for ultra high energy cosmic ray acceleration must be found.

  15. An empirical vegetation correction for soil water content quantification using cosmic ray probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatz, R.; Bogena, H. R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Huisman, J. A.; Montzka, C.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-04-01

    Cosmic ray probes are an emerging technology to continuously monitor soil water content at a scale significant to land surface processes. However, the application of this method is hampered by its susceptibility to the presence of aboveground biomass. Here we present a simple empirical framework to account for moderation of fast neutrons by aboveground biomass in the calibration. The method extends the N0-calibration function and was developed using an extensive data set from a network of 10 cosmic ray probes located in the Rur catchment, Germany. The results suggest a 0.9% reduction in fast neutron intensity per 1 kg of dry aboveground biomass per m2 or per 2 kg of biomass water equivalent per m2. We successfully tested the novel vegetation correction using temporary cosmic ray probe measurements along a strong gradient in biomass due to deforestation, and using the COSMIC, and the hmf method as independent soil water content retrieval algorithms. The extended N0-calibration function was able to explain 95% of the overall variability in fast neutron intensity.

  16. Particle acceleration in cosmic plasmas – paradigm change?

    SciTech Connect

    Lytikov, Maxim; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    The presentation begins by considering the requirements on the acceleration mechanism. It is found that at least some particles in high-energy sources are accelerated by magnetic reconnection (and not by shocks). The two paradigms can be distinguished by the hardness of the spectra. Shocks typically produce spectra with p > 2 (relativistic shocks have p ~ 2.2); non-linear shocks & drift acceleration may give p < 2, e.g. p=1.5; B-field dissipation can give p = 1. Then collapse of stressed magnetic X-point in force-free plasma and collapse of a system of magnetic islands are taken up, including Island merger: forced reconnection. Spectra as functions of sigma are shown, and gamma ~ 109 is addressed. It is concluded that reconnection in magnetically-dominated plasma can proceed explosively, is an efficient means of particle acceleration, and is an important (perhaps dominant for some phenomena) mechanism of particle acceleration in high energy sources.

  17. Probing Turbulence and Acceleration at Relativistic Shocks in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Boettcher, Markus; Summerlin, Errol J.

    2016-04-01

    Acceleration at relativistic shocks is likely to be important in various astrophysical jet sources, including blazars and other radio-loud active galaxies. An important recent development for blazar science is the ability of Fermi-LAT data to pin down the power-law index of the high energy portion of emission in these sources, and therefore also the index of the underlying non-thermal particle population. This paper highlights how multiwavelength spectra including X-ray band and Fermi data can be used to probe diffusive acceleration in relativistic, oblique, MHD shocks in blazar jets. The spectral index of the non-thermal particle distributions resulting from Monte Carlo simulations of shock acceleration, and the fraction of thermal particles accelerated to non-thermal energies, depend sensitively on the particles' mean free path scale, and also on the mean magnetic field obliquity to the shock normal. We investigate the radiative synchrotron/Compton signatures of thermal and non-thermal particle distributions generated from the acceleration simulations. Important constraints on the frequency of particle scattering and the level of field turbulence are identified for the jet sources Mrk 501, AO 0235+164 and Bl Lacertae. Results suggest the interpretation that turbulence levels decline with remoteness from jet shocks, with a significant role for non-gyroresonant diffusion.

  18. X-Ray Probes of Cosmic Star-Formation History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Pranab; White, Nicholas E.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper we point out that the X-ray luminosity L(sub x) of a galaxy is driven by the evolution of its X-ray binary population and that the profile of L(sub x) with redshift can both serve as a diagnostic probe of the Star Formation Rate (SFR) profile and constrain evolutionary models for X-ray binaries. We update our previous work using a suite of more recently developed SFR profiles that span the currently plausible range. The first Chandra deep imaging results on L(sub x)-evolution are beginning to probe the SFR profile of bright spirals and the early results are consistent with predictions based on current SFR models. Using these new SFR profiles the resolution of the "birthrate problem" of lowmass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and recycled, millisecond pulsars in terms of an evolving global SFR is more complete. We also discuss the possible impact of the variations in the SFR profile of individual galaxies.

  19. Cosmic microwave background anisotropy from nonlinear structures in accelerating universes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-09-15

    We study the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy due to spherically symmetric nonlinear structures in flat universes with dust and a cosmological constant. By modeling a time-evolving spherical compensated void/lump by Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetimes, we numerically solve the null geodesic equations with the Einstein equations. We find that a nonlinear void redshifts the CMB photons that pass through it regardless of the distance to it. In contrast, a nonlinear lump blueshifts (or redshifts) the CMB photons if it is located near (or sufficiently far from) us. The present analysis comprehensively covers previous works based on a thin-shell approximation and a linear/second-order perturbation method and the effects of shell thickness and full nonlinearity. Our results indicate that, if quasilinear and large (> or approx.100 Mpc) voids/lumps would exist, they could be observed as cold or hot spots with temperature variance > or approx. 10{sup -5} K in the CMB sky.

  20. Magnetowave Induced Plasma Wakefield Acceleration for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Feng-Yin; Chen, Pisin; Lin, Guey-Lin; Noble, Robert; Sydora, Richard; /Alberta U.

    2009-10-17

    Magnetowave induced plasma wakefield acceleration (MPWA) in a relativistic astrophysical outflow has been proposed as a viable mechanism for the acceleration of cosmic particles to ultrahigh energies. Here we present simulation results that clearly demonstrate the viability of this mechanism for the first time. We invoke the high frequency and high speed whistler mode for the driving pulse. The plasma wakefield obtained in the simulations compares favorably with our newly developed relativistic theory of the MPWA. We show that, under appropriate conditions, the plasma wakefield maintains very high coherence and can sustain high-gradient acceleration over hundreds of plasma skin depths. Invoking active galactic nuclei as the site, we show that MPWA production of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays beyond ZeV (10{sup 21} eV) is possible.

  1. Spontaneous excitation of a uniformly accelerated atom in the cosmic string spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenting; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    We study, in the cosmic string spacetime, the average rate of change of energy for an atom coupled to massless scalar fields and uniformly accelerated in a direction parallel to the string in vacuum. We find that both the noninertial motion and the nontrivial global spacetime topology affect the atomic transition rates, so an accelerated atom (an Unruh detector) does feel the string contrary to claims in the literature. We demonstrate that the equivalence between the effect of uniform acceleration and that of thermal radiation on the transition rates of the atom, which is valid in the Minkowski spacetime, holds only on the string.

  2. Cosmic-ray acceleration during the impact of shocks on dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. W.; Kang, Hyesung

    1993-01-01

    In order to elucidate the properties of diffusive shock acceleration in nonuniform environments, an extensive set of simulations of the dynamical interactions between plane nonradiative shocks and dense gas clouds was carried out initially in static equilibrium with their environments. These time-dependent calculations are based on the two-fluid model for diffusive cosmic ray transport, and include the dynamically active energetic proton component of the cosmic rays as well as passive electron and magnetic field components. Except when the incident shock is itself already dominated by cosmic ray pressure, it is found that the presence of the cloud adds little to the net acceleration efficiency of the original shock and can, in fact, reduce slightly the net amount of energy transferred to cosmic rays after a given time. It is found that, in 2D cloud simulations, the always-weak bow shock and the shock inside the cloud are less important to acceleration during the interaction than the tail shock.

  3. Clusters of Galaxies as a Probe of the Cosmic Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richstone, Douglas

    1994-05-01

    We focus on the influence of cosmological model on the process of formation of clusters of galaxies. Richstone, Loeb and Turner (1992 ApJ 393, 477) have shown that under the assumptions of hierarchical formation and a Gaussian random field of perturbations, the rate at which matter is currently being added to the most massive virialized structures is a strong function of Omega_0 , and suggested that the observed frequency of substructure in clusters might be a probe of Omega . Evrard, Mohr, Fabricant and Geller (1993 ApJ Letters 419, L9) have shown that it is possible to compare SPH simulations of clusters to X-ray images of clusters using a test measuring the skewness of the image, to explore this effect. We report on calculations done in collaboration with Crone and Evrard, which explore the cosmological dependence of the cluster density profile and various tests of substructure in N-body simulations.

  4. Global universe anisotropy probed by the alignment of structures in the cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Wiaux, Y; Vielva, P; Martínez-González, E; Vandergheynst, P

    2006-04-21

    We question the global universe isotropy by probing the alignment of local structures in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. The original method proposed relies on a steerable wavelet decomposition of the CMB signal on the sphere. The analysis of the first-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data identifies a mean preferred plane with a normal direction close to the CMB dipole axis, and a mean preferred direction in this plane, very close to the ecliptic poles axis. Previous statistical anisotropy results are thereby synthesized, but further analyses are still required to establish their origin. PMID:16712146

  5. Black holes are neither particle accelerators nor dark matter probes.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Sean T

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that maximally spinning black holes can serve as particle accelerators, reaching arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. Despite several objections regarding the practical achievability of such high energies, and demonstrations past and present that such large energies could never reach a distant observer, interest in this problem has remained substantial. We show that, unfortunately, a maximally spinning black hole can never serve as a probe of high energy collisions, even in principle and despite the correctness of the original diverging energy calculation. Black holes can indeed facilitate dark matter annihilation, but the most energetic photons can carry little more than the rest energy of the dark matter particles to a distant observer, and those photons are actually generated relatively far from the black hole where relativistic effects are negligible. Therefore, any strong gravitational potential could probe dark matter equally well, and an appeal to black holes for facilitating such collisions is unnecessary. PMID:23383773

  6. Fab 5: noncanonical kinetic gravity, self tuning, and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, Stephen A.; Linder, Eric V.; Felice, Antonio De E-mail: adefelic@gmail.com

    2012-10-01

    We investigate circumstances under which one can generalize Horndeski's most general scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Specifically we demonstrate that a nonlinear combination of purely kinetic gravity terms can give rise to an accelerating universe without the addition of extra propagating degrees of freedom on cosmological backgrounds, and exhibit self tuning to bring a large cosmological constant under control. This nonlinear approach leads to new properties that may be instructive for exploring the behaviors of gravity.

  7. Cosmic ray acceleration at perpendicular shocks in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrand, Gilles; Danos, Rebecca J.; Shalchi, Andreas; Safi-Harb, Samar; Edmon, Paul; Mendygral, Peter

    2014-09-10

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) are believed to accelerate particles up to high energies through the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Except for direct plasma simulations, all modeling efforts must rely on a given form of the diffusion coefficient, a key parameter that embodies the interactions of energetic charged particles with magnetic turbulence. The so-called Bohm limit is commonly employed. In this paper, we revisit the question of acceleration at perpendicular shocks, by employing a realistic model of perpendicular diffusion. Our coefficient reduces to a power law in momentum for low momenta (of index α), but becomes independent of the particle momentum at high momenta (reaching a constant value κ{sub ∞} above some characteristic momentum p {sub c}). We first provide simple analytical expressions of the maximum momentum that can be reached at a given time with this coefficient. Then we perform time-dependent numerical simulations to investigate the shape of the particle distribution that can be obtained when the particle pressure back-reacts on the flow. We observe that for a given index α and injection level, the shock modifications are similar for different possible values of p {sub c}, whereas the particle spectra differ markedly. Of particular interest, low values of p {sub c} tend to remove the concavity once thought to be typical of non-linear DSA, and result in steep spectra, as required by recent high-energy observations of Galactic SNRs.

  8. New accelerators for femtosecond beam pump-and-probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Sakumi, Akira; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Yamaoka, Nobuaki; Zhidkov, Alexei; Ohkubo, Takeru; Ueda, Toru; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke; Iijima, Hokuto; Tomizawa, Hiromitsu; Kumagai, Noritaka

    2005-12-01

    Femtosecond electron beams are novel tool for pump-probe analysis of condensed matter. Progress in developing femtosecond electron beams with the use of both conventional accelerators and laser-plasma accelerators is discussed. In conventional accelerators, the critical issue is timing jitter and drift of the linac-laser synchronization system. Sophisticated electronic devices are developed to reduce the jitter to 330 fs (rms); the precise control of temperature at several parts of the accelerator lessens the drift to 1 ps (rms). We also report on a full-optical X-ray and e-beam system based on the laser-plasma cathode by using a 12 TW 50 fs laser, which enables 40 MeV (at maximum), 40 fs (cal.), 100 pC and quasi-monochromatic single electron bunches. Since the synchronization is done by a passive optical beam-splitter, this system intrinsically has no jitter and drift. It could achieve tens of femtoseconds time-resolved analysis in the near future.

  9. Cosmic gamma-ray propagation as a probe for intergalactic media and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Hao

    2012-05-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE) gamma rays beyond 100 GeV, coming from galactic and extragalactic sources, reflect the most energetic non-thermal processes in the universe. The emission of these photons indicates the acceleration of charged particles to very high energies or the existence of exotic particles that annihilate or decay to photons. Observations of VHE gamma rays probing this highest energy window of electromagnetic waves thus can reveal the underlying acceleration processes or new astrophysical particles. The fluxes tend to be power-law spectra and this poses a difficulty for direct observation due to the low flux at the high-energy end and to the limited effective area of space-borne instruments. Ground-based VHE gamma-ray observatories therefore take advantage of the earth atmosphere as a calorimeter and observe the gamma rays indirectly via the electromagnetic cascade shower particles they produce. The shower particles are detected either directly or via the Cherenkov radiation they emit while propagating through the air. The current-generation telescopes adopting this ground-based methodology have confirmed several source categories and are starting to answer various physical and astronomical questions, e.g., the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, the black hole accretion processes, etc. Together with multi-wavelength observations covering the full electromagnetic spectrum and astrophysical observatories of other particles (cosmic rays, neutrinos, etc.) VHE gamma-ray astronomy contributes as an indispensable part of the recently emerging field of multi-messenger particle astrophysics. When emitted by extragalactic sources, the VHE gamma rays undergo various interactions in the intergalactic medium as they propagate toward the earth. There is a guaranteed interaction, where the VHE gamma-ray photons are absorbed by the extragalactic background light (EBL), an isotropic background of optical-to-infrared photons coming from starlight or dust re

  10. The Evolution of the Acceleration Mechanisms of Cosmic Rays and Relativistic Electrons in Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvyk, N.

    There are estimated an efficacy for different acceleration mechanisms of e- and p-cosmic rays (CRs) in radio galaxies, using an evolution model for jet gaps and shock fronts with a turbulence. It is shown that diffusion shock acceleration of the CRs is the most efficient mechanism in the FR II radio galaxies (RGs). At the same time, there are a break-pinch mechanism (for a short-term at a jet gap moment), and a stochastic turbulent mechanism (for an all time when RG exist), that to play a grate part in acceleration of the CRs (give to 10-50 % of the all acceleration efficiency). It is predicted what properties of radio emission spectra give us to recognize a type of acceleration mechanisms of e-CR in the RG.

  11. Method for direct measurement of cosmic acceleration by 21-cm absorption systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li

    2014-07-25

    So far there is only indirect evidence that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21-cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the same objects separated by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a ΛCDM universe with 5σ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing and cannot be recovered retroactively. PMID:25105607

  12. A Global Probe of Cosmic Magnetic Fields to High Redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronberg, P. P.; Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J.; Short, M. B.; Higdon, D. M.

    2008-03-01

    Faraday rotation (rotation measure [RM]) probes of magnetic fields in the universe are sensitive to cosmological and evolutionary effects as z increases beyond ~1 because of the scalings of electron density and magnetic fields, and the growth in the number of expected intersections with galaxy-scale intervenors, dN/dz. In this new global analysis of an unprecedented large sample of RMs of high-latitude quasars extending out to z ~ 3.7, we find that the distribution of RM broadens with redshift in the 20-80 rad m-2 range, despite the (1 + z)-2 wavelength dilution expected in the observed Faraday rotation. Our results indicate that the universe becomes increasingly "Faraday-opaque" to sources beyond z ~ 2; that is, as z increases, progressively fewer sources are found with a "small" RM in the observer's frame. This is in contrast to sources at zlesssim 1. They suggest that the environments of galaxies were significantly magnetized at high redshifts, with magnetic field strengths that were at least as strong within a few Gyr of the big bang as at the current epoch. We separately investigate a simple unevolving toy model in which the RM is produced by Mg II absorber systems, and find that it can approximately reproduce the observed trend with redshift. An additional possibility is that the intrinsic RM associated with the radio sources was much higher in the past, and we show that this is not a trivial consequence of the higher radio luminosities of the high-redshift sources.

  13. Radio emission and nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration of cosmic rays in the supernova SN 1993J

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatischeff, V.

    2009-05-01

    Aims: The extensive observations of the supernova SN 1993J at radio wavelengths make this object a unique target for the study of particle acceleration in a supernova shock. Methods: To describe the radio synchrotron emission we use a model that couples a semianalytic description of nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration with self-similar solutions for the hydrodynamics of the supernova expansion. The synchrotron emission, which is assumed to be produced by relativistic electrons propagating in the postshock plasma, is worked out from radiative transfer calculations that include the process of synchrotron self-absorption. The model is applied to explain the morphology of the radio emission deduced from high-resolution VLBI imaging observations and the measured time evolution of the total flux density at six frequencies. Results: Both the light curves and the morphology of the radio emission indicate that the magnetic field was strongly amplified in the blast wave region shortly after the explosion, possibly via the nonresonant regime of the cosmic-ray streaming instability operating in the shock precursor. The amplified magnetic field immediately upstream from the subshock is determined to be Bu ≈ 50 (t/1 { day})-1 G. The turbulent magnetic field was not damped behind the shock but carried along by the plasma flow in the downstream region. Cosmic-ray protons were efficiently produced by diffusive shock acceleration at the blast wave. We find that during the first 8.5 years after the explosion, about 19% of the total energy processed by the forward shock was converted to cosmic-ray energy. However, the shock remained weakly modified by the cosmic-ray pressure. The high magnetic field amplification implies that protons were rapidly accelerated to energies well above 1015 eV. The results obtained for this supernova support the scenario that massive stars exploding into their former stellar wind are a major source of Galactic cosmic-rays of energies above 1015 eV. We

  14. A cocoon of freshly accelerated cosmic rays detected by Fermi in the Cygnus superbubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, Isabelle A.; Tibaldo, Luigi; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    Conspicuous stellar clusters, with high densities of massive stars, powerful stellar winds, and intense UV flux, have formed over the past few million years in the large molecular clouds of the Cygnus X region, 1.4 kpc away from the Sun. By capturing the gamma-ray signal of young cosmic rays spreading in the interstellar medium surrounding the clusters, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has confirmed the long-standing hypothesis that massive-star forming regions host cosmic-ray factories. The 50-pc wide cocoon of energetic particles appears to fill the interstellar cavities carved by the stellar activity. The cocoon provides a first test case to study the impact of wind-powered turbulence on the early phases of cosmic-ray diffusion (between the sources and the Galaxy at large) and to study the acceleration potential of this type of superbubble environment for in-situ cosmic-ray production or to energize Galactic cosmic rays passing by.

  15. Late decaying dark matter, bulk viscosity, and the cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G. J.; Kolda, C.; Lan, N. Q.

    2008-08-15

    We discuss a cosmology in which cold dark matter begins to decay into relativistic particles at a recent epoch (z<1). We show that the large entropy production and associated bulk viscosity from such decays leads to an accelerating cosmology as required by observations. We investigate the effects of decaying cold dark matter in a {lambda}=0, flat, initially matter dominated cosmology. We show that this model satisfies the cosmological constraint from the redshift-distance relation for type Ia supernovae. The age in such models is also consistent with the constraints from the oldest stars and globular clusters. Possible candidates for this late decaying dark matter are suggested along with additional observational tests of this cosmological paradigm.

  16. Acceleration of cosmic rays by turbulence during reconnection events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Jim

    2007-05-01

    A Fermi-like model for energetic electron production during magnetic reconnection is described that converts a substantial fraction of released magnetic energy into energetic electrons [1]. Magnetic reconnection with a guide field leads to the growth and dynamics of multiple magnetic islands rather than a single large x-line. Electrons trapped within islands gain energy as they reflect from ends of contracting magnetic islands. The resulting rate of energy gain dominates that from parallel electric fields. The pressure from energetic electrons rises rapidly until the rate of electron energy gain balances the rate of magnetic energy release, establishing for the first time a link between the energy gain of electrons and the released magnetic energy. The energetic particle pressure therefore throttles the rate of reconnection. A transport equation for the distribution of energetic particles, including their feedback on island contraction, is obtained by averaging over the particle interaction with many islands. The steady state solutions in reconnection geometry result from convective losses balancing the Fermi drive. At high energy distribution functions take the form of a powerlaw whose spectral index depends only on the initial electron β, lower (higher) β producing harder (softer) spectra. The spectral index matches that seen in recent Wind spacecraft observations in the Earth's magnetotail. Harder spectra are predicted for the low β conditions of the solar corona or other astrophysical systems. Ions can be similarly accelerated if they are above an energy threshold. 1. J. F. Drake, M. Swisdak, H. Che and M. Shay, Nature 443, 553, 2006.

  17. Power requirements for cosmic ray propagation models involving re-acceleration and a comment on second-order Fermi acceleration theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornbury, Andrew; Drury, Luke O'C.

    2014-08-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the power transferred from interstellar turbulence to the Galactic cosmic rays in propagation models which include re-acceleration. This is used to estimate the power required in such models and the relative importance of the primary acceleration as against re-acceleration. The analysis provides a formal mathematical justification for Fermi's heuristic account of second-order acceleration in his classic 1949 paper.

  18. VERITAS observations of supernova remnants for studies of cosmic ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nahee

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have been suggested as the main sites for acceleration of cosmic rays (CRs) with energies up to the knee region ( 10(15) eV). Gamma-ray emission from SNRs can provide a unique window to observe the cosmic ray acceleration and to test existing acceleration models in these objects. The Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) is an array of atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes that measures gamma rays with energies higher than 100 GeV. Located in Arizona, USA, VERITAS has observed several SNRs in the northern hemisphere since the beginning of operations in 2007. These include two young SNRs of different types (Cassiopeia A and Tycho), as well as middle- to old-aged remnants with nearby target material such as molecular clouds. Gamma-ray data from different types of SNRs in different evolutionary stages are important to study SNRs as CR accelerators. Here we present a summary of VERITAS results on Galactic SNRs including Tycho, and discuss what these observations have taught us.

  19. Stochastic acceleration of solar cosmic rays in an expanding coronal magnetic bottle

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, D.J.

    1980-04-01

    Several key features of the coronal propagation of solar cosmic rays have previously been explained by a ''magnetic bottle'' model proposed by Schatten and Mullan. The major apparent difficulty with that model is that expansion of the closed bottle might have a severe cooling effect on the cosmic rays trapped inside. In the present paper, we examine this difficulty by applying the equation for stochastic acceleration to an expanding bottle. Following our earlier suggestion, the scattering centers are taken to be small-scale magnetic inhomogeneities which are present in the corona prior to the flare, and which are set into turbulent motion when a flare-induced shock passes by. We identify the inhomogeneities with the collapsing magnetic neutral sheets discussed by Levine in the context of normal coronal heating. We find that the acceleration efficiencies can indeed be high enough to offset expansive cooling: within the time intervals that are typically available for closed bottle evolution (1000--3000 s), protons can be accelerated from 1 keV to 100 MeV and more. Our results indicate that the flux of particles which are accelerated to (say) 100 MeV is very sensitive to shock speed if this speed is less than about 10/sup 3/ km s/sup -1/.

  20. Probing the gravitational wave signature from cosmic phase transitions at different scales

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Lawrence M.; Dent, James; Jones-Smith, Katherine; Mathur, Harsh

    2010-08-15

    We present a new signature by which one could potentially discriminate between a spectrum of gravitational radiation generated by a self-ordering scalar field vs that of inflation, specifically a comparison of the magnitude of a flat spectrum at frequencies probed by future direct detection experiments to the magnitude of a possible polarization signal in the cosmic microwave background radiation. In the process we clarify several issues related to the proper calculation of such modes, focusing on the effect of post-horizon-crossing evolution.

  1. Cosmic far-ultraviolet background radiation - Probe of a dense hot intergalactic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, R. D.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    Line and continuum radiation fluxes have been computed for a wide range of enriched intergalactic medium (IGM) models. Observations of the diffuse extragalactic light at optical and far-ultraviolet wavelengths are found to provide a potentially important probe of a dense hot intergalactic medium. If the diffuse X-ray background is produced by this gas, the models constrain the cosmological density parameter (Omega) to be less than 0.4. The associated Compton distortions of the cosmic blackbody background radiation and the optical depths to distant quasars at X-ray wavelengths are also evaluated.

  2. Overview of the SuperNova/Acceleration probe (SNAP)

    SciTech Connect

    galdering@lbl.gov

    2002-07-29

    The SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a space-based experiment to measure the expansion history of the Universe and study both its dark energy and the dark matter. The experiment is motivated by the startling discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating. A 0.7 square-degree imager comprised of 36 large format fully-depleted n-type CCD's sharing a focal plane with 36 HgCdTe detectors forms the heart of SNAP, allowing discovery and lightcurve measurements simultaneously for many supernovae. The imager and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph are coupled to a 2-m three mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope, which will be placed in a high-earth orbit. The SNAP mission can obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for over 2000 Type Ia supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7. The resulting data set can not only determine the amount of dark energy with high precision, but test the nature of the dark energy by examining its equation of state. In particular, dark energy due to a cosmological constant can be differentiated from alternatives such as ''quintessence'', by measuring the dark energy's equation of state to an accuracy of {+-} 0.05, and by studying its time dependence.

  3. Acceleration of High Energy Cosmic Rays in the Nonlinear Shock Precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzhinsky, F.; Diamond, P. H.; Malkov, M. A.

    2006-10-01

    The problem of understanding acceleration of very energetic cosmic rays to energies above the 'knee' in the spectrum at 10^15-10^16eV remains one of the great challenges in modern physics. Recently, we have proposed a new approach to understanding high energy acceleration, based on exploiting scattering of cosmic rays by inhomogenities in the compressive nonlinear shock precursor, rather than by scattering across the main shock, as is conventionally assumed. We extend that theory by proposing a mechanism for the generation of mesoscale magnetic fields (krg<1, where rg is the cosmic ray gyroradius). The mechanism is the decay or modulational instability of resonantly generated Alfven waves scattering off ambient density perturbations in the precursors. Such perturbations can be produced by Drury instability. This mechanism leads to the generation of longer wavelength Alfven waves, thus enabling the confinement of higher energy particles. A simplified version of the theory, cast in the form of a Fokker-Planck equation for the Alfven population, will also be presented. This process also limits field generation on rg scales.

  4. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. III. EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Morlino, G.; Blasi, P.; Bandiera, R.; Amato, E.; Caprioli, D.

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we present the first formulation of the theory of nonlinear particle acceleration in collisionless shocks in the presence of neutral hydrogen in the acceleration region. The dynamical reaction of the accelerated particles, the magnetic field amplification, and the magnetic dynamical effects on the shock are also included. The main new aspect of this study, however, consists of accounting for charge exchange and the ionization of a neutral hydrogen, which profoundly change the structure of the shock, as discussed in our previous work. This important dynamical effect of neutrals is mainly associated with the so-called neutral return flux, namely the return of hot neutrals from the downstream region to upstream, where they deposit energy and momentum through charge exchange and ionization. We also present the self-consistent calculation of Balmer line emission from the shock region and discuss how to use measurements of the anomalous width of the different components of the Balmer line to infer cosmic ray acceleration efficiency in supernova remnants showing Balmer emission: the broad Balmer line, which is due to charge exchange of hydrogen atoms with hot ions downstream of the shock, is shown to become narrower as a result of the energy drainage into cosmic rays, while the narrow Balmer line, due to charge exchange in the cosmic-ray-induced precursor, is shown to become broader. In addition to these two well-known components, the neutral return flux leads to the formation of a third component with an intermediate width: this too contains information on ongoing processes at the shock.

  5. Probing the inner structure of blast furnaces by cosmic-ray muon radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamine, K.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Nakamura, S. N.; Ishida, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Shinotake, A.; Naito, M.; Hatanaka, A.

    By using the detection system of the near-horizontal cosmic-ray radiography originally developed for probing inner structure of volcanic mountains, a measurement was conducted to probe the inner structure and its time-dependent change of the blast furnace for iron-making. Precise determination (+/-5 cm) of the thickness of brick used for both base-plate and side-wall was made in 45 days; a crucial information to predict a life-time of the furnace. Also, the local density of iron-rich part was determined in +/-0.2 g/cm2 in 45 days; static structure as well as time-dependent behavior can be monitored for the iron-rich part of the furnace during operation.

  6. The difference PDF of 21-cm fluctuations: a powerful statistical tool for probing cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Rennan; Loeb, Abraham

    2008-03-01

    A new generation of radio telescopes are currently being built with the goal of tracing the cosmic distribution of atomic hydrogen at redshifts 6-15 through its 21-cm line. The observations will probe the large-scale brightness fluctuations sourced by ionization fluctuations during cosmic reionization. Since detailed maps will be difficult to extract due to noise and foreground emission, efforts have focused on a statistical detection of the 21-cm fluctuations. During cosmic reionization, these fluctuations are highly non-Gaussian and thus more information can be extracted than just the one-dimensional function that is usually considered, i.e. the correlation function. We calculate a two-dimensional function that if measured observationally would allow a more thorough investigation of the properties of the underlying ionizing sources. This function is the probability distribution function (PDF) of the difference in the 21-cm brightness temperature between two points, as a function of the separation between the points. While the standard correlation function is determined by a complicated mixture of contributions from density and ionization fluctuations, we show that the difference PDF holds the key to separately measuring the statistical properties of the ionized regions.

  7. Particle acceleration and turbulence in cosmic Ray shocks: possible pathways beyond the Bohm limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H.

    2007-08-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration is discussed in terms of its potential to accelerate cosmic rays (CR) to 1018 eV (beyond the ``knee,'' as observations suggest) and in terms of the related observational signatures (spectral features). One idea to reach this energy is to resonantly generate a turbulent magnetic field via accelerated particles much in excess of the background field. We identify difficulties with this scenario and suggest two separate mechanisms that can work in concert with one another leading to a significant acceleration enhancement. The first mechanism is based on a nonlinear modification of the flow ahead of the shock supported by particles already accelerated to some specific (knee) momentum. The particles gain energy by bouncing off converging magnetic irregularities frozen into the flow in the shock precursor and not so much by re-crossing the shock itself. The acceleration rate is determined by the gradient of the flow velocity and turns out to be formally independent of the particle mean free path. The velocity gradient is set by the knee-particles. The acceleration rate of particles above the knee does not decrease with energy, unlike in the linear acceleration regime. The knee (spectrum steepening) forms because particles above it are effectively confined to the shock only if they are within limited domains in the momentum space, while other particles fall into ``loss-islands'', similar to the ``loss-cone'' of magnetic traps. This also maintains the steep velocity gradient and high acceleration rate. The second mechanism is based on the generation of Alfven waves at the gyroradius scale at the background field level, with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven (A) waves.

  8. Origin of cosmic rays. II. The cosmic-ray distribution and the spiral structure of NGC 3310. III. Particle acceleration by global spiral shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Duric, N.

    1986-05-01

    The optical and radio continuum properties of the spiral arms of NGC 3310 are analyzed and intercompared. The likely presence of a strong density wave in NGC 3310 is demonstrated, and a number of observational results constraining the relationship between synchrotron emission, emission line radiation, and starlight are developed. The role of supernova remnants in the production of relativistic particles is investigated and found to be inconsistent with the constraints. The generation of cosmic rays by global spiral shocks via a Fermi-type shock acceleration process is shown to agree with all the major constraints, suggesting that the rotation of the galaxy powers the acceleration of particles to cosmic ray energies. A medium with temperature of 10,000 K, partially to fully ionized, is shown to support the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. 57 references.

  9. Cosmic Rays Across the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould Zweibel, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic rays play an important role in the dynamics, energetics, and chemisry of gas inside and outside galaxies. It has long been recognized that gamma ray astronomy is a powerful probe of cosmic ray acceleration and propagation, and that gamma ray data, combined with other observations of cosmic rays and of the host medium and with modeling, can provide an integrated picture of cosmic rays and their environments. I will discuss the plasma physics underlying this picture, where it has been successful, and where issues remain.

  10. Relativistic cosmic ray spectra in the full non-linear theory of shock acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichler, D.; Ellison, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    The non-linear theory of shock acceleration was generalized to include wave dynamics. In the limit of rapid wave damping, it is found that a finite ave velocity tempers the acceleration of high Mach number shocks and limits the maximum compression ratio even when energy loss is important. For a given spectrum, the efficiency of relativistic particle production is essentially independent of v sub Ph. For the three families shown, the percentage of kinetic energy flux going into relativistic particles is (1) 72%, 2) 44%, and (3) 26% (this includes the energy loss at the upper energy cuttoff). Even small v sub ph, typical of the HISM, produce quasi-universal spectra that depend only weakly on the acoustic Mach number. These spectra should be close enough to e(-2) to satisfy cosmic ray source requirements.

  11. Acceleration and propagation of high Z cosmic rays in a pulsar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Ormes, J. F.; Ryan, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The survival of high Z nuclei in the X-ray photon field of a pulsar is investigated. For heavy nuclei with energies greater than or equal to 100 GeV/nucleon, 100 keV X-ray photons have sufficient energy to cause photodisintegration with cross sections of approximately 10 to the minus 25th power sq cm. Using the observed properties of the Crab pulsar, extrapolation back to epochs when the pulsar was more active indicates that the photon field is sufficiently dense to prevent the acceleration of heavy nuclei within the velocity of light cylinder. On this model, the upper limit on the energy of the escaping nuclei varies with time. The models for cosmic ray acceleration in supernova explosions or by pulsars will be related to experimental observations.

  12. The solar wind structures associated with cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Vonrosenvinge, T. T.

    1992-01-01

    The time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at times of all greater than 3 percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978 to 1982 are studied. Essentially all 59 of the decreases commenced at or before the passages of interplanetary shocks, the majority of which accelerated energetic particles. We use the intensity-time profiles of the energetic particles to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which we subsequently associate with four types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) can be associated with shocks which are driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events the ejecta is detected at 1 AU whereas this is not the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the depression of cosmic rays in class 2 events. In all class 1 and 2 events (which comprise 69 percent of the total) the departure time of the ejection from the sun (and hence the location) can be determined from the rapid onset of energetic particles several days before the shock passage at Earth. The class 1 events originate from within 50 deg of central meridian. Class 3 events (10 decreases) can be attributed to less energetic ejections which are directed towards the Earth. In these events the ejecta is more important than the shock in causing a depression in the cosmic ray intensity. The remaining events (14 percent of the total) can be attributed to corotating streams which have ejecta material embedded in them.

  13. Cosmic-ray acceleration in supernova remnants: non-linear theory revised

    SciTech Connect

    Caprioli, Damiano

    2012-07-01

    A rapidly growing amount of evidences, mostly coming from the recent gamma-ray observations of Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs), is seriously challenging our understanding of how particles are accelerated at fast shocks. The cosmic-ray (CR) spectra required to account for the observed phenomenology are in fact as steep as E{sup −2.2}–E{sup −2.4}, i.e., steeper than the test-particle prediction of first-order Fermi acceleration, and significantly steeper than what expected in a more refined non-linear theory of diffusive shock acceleration. By accounting for the dynamical back-reaction of the non-thermal particles, such a theory in fact predicts that the more efficient the particle acceleration, the flatter the CR spectrum. In this work we put forward a self-consistent scenario in which the account for the magnetic field amplification induced by CR streaming produces the conditions for reversing such a trend, allowing — at the same time — for rather steep spectra and CR acceleration efficiencies (about 20%) consistent with the hypothesis that SNRs are the sources of Galactic CRs. In particular, we quantitatively work out the details of instantaneous and cumulative CR spectra during the evolution of a typical SNR, also stressing the implications of the observed levels of magnetization on both the expected maximum energy and the predicted CR acceleration efficiency. The latter naturally turns out to saturate around 10-30%, almost independently of the fraction of particles injected into the acceleration process as long as this fraction is larger than about 10{sup −4}.

  14. Current and Prospective Constraints on Cosmic Acceleration using X-ray Galaxy Clusters and Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapetti, David A.; Allen, S. W.; Amin, M. A.; Blandford, R. D.

    2006-09-01

    We employ both a standard dynamical approach and a new kinematical approach to constrain cosmic acceleration using the three best available sets of redshift-independent distance measurements, from type Ia supernovae and X-ray cluster gas mass fraction measurements. The standard `dynamical' analysis employs the Friedmann equations and models dark energy as a fluid with an equation of state parameter, w. From a purely kinematical point of view, however, we can also construct models in terms of the dimensionless second and third derivatives of the scale factor a(t) with respect to cosmic time t, namely the present-day value of the deceleration parameter q_0 and the cosmic jerk parameter, j(t). A convenient feature of this parameterization is that all LambdaCDM models have j(t)=1 (constant), which facilitates simple tests for departures from the LambdaCDM paradigm. We obtain clear statistical evidence for a late time transition from a decelerating to an accelerating phase. For a flat model with constant jerk j(t)=j, we measure q_0=-0.81+-0.14 and j=2.16+0.81-0.75. For a dynamical model with constant w we measure Omega_m=0.306+0.042-0.040 and w=-1.15+0.14-0.18. Both kinematical and dynamical results are consistent with LambdaCDM at the 1sigma level. In comparison to dynamical analyses, the kinematical approach uses a different model set and employs a minimum of prior information, being independent of any particular gravity theory. We argue that both kinematical and dynamical techniques should be employed in future dark energy studies, where possible. Finally, we discuss the potential for future experiments including Constellation-X, which will constrain dark energy with comparable accuracy and in a beautifully complementary manner to the best other techniques available circa 2018.

  15. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    The Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) will use Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) as distance indicators to measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion history of the Universe. (SNAP's weak-lensing program is described in a separate White Paper.) The experiment exploits supernova distance measurements up to their fundamental systematic limit; strict requirements on the monitoring of each supernova's properties leads to the need for a space-based mission. Results from pre-SNAP experiments, which characterize fundamental SN Ia properties, will be used to optimize the SNAP observing strategy to yield data, which minimize both systematic and statistical uncertainties. With early R&D funding, we have achieved technological readiness and the collaboration is poised to begin construction. Pre-JDEM AO R&D support will further reduce technical and cost risk. Specific details on the SNAP mission can be found in Aldering et al. (2004, 2005). The primary goal of the SNAP supernova program is to provide a dataset which gives tight constraints on parameters which characterize the dark-energy, e.g. w{sub 0} and w{sub a} where w(a) = w{sub 0} + w{sub a}(1-a). SNAP data can also be used to directly test and discriminate among specific dark energy models. We will do so by building the Hubble diagram of high-redshift supernovae, the same methodology used in the original discovery of the acceleration of the expansion of the Universe that established the existence of dark energy (Perlmutter et al. 1998; Garnavich et al. 1998; Riess et al. 1998; Perlmutter et al. 1999). The SNAP SN Ia program focuses on minimizing the systematic floor of the supernova method through the use of characterized supernovae that can be sorted into subsets based on subtle signatures of heterogeneity. Subsets may be defined based on host-galaxy morphology, spectral-feature strength and velocity, early-time behavior, inter alia. Independent cosmological analysis of each subset of ''like'' supernovae can be

  16. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia; Buitink, Stijn; Corstanje, Arthur; Ebert, Ute; Enriquez, Emilio; Falcke, Heino; Hoerandel, Joerg; Nelles, Anna; Schellart, Pim; Rachen, Joerg; Rutjes, Casper; ter Veen, Sander; Rossetto, Laura; Thoudam, Satyendra

    2016-04-01

    Energetic cosmic rays impinging on the atmosphere create a particle avalanche called an extensive air shower. In the leading plasma of this shower electric currents are induced that generate coherent radio wave emission that has been detected with LOFAR, a large and dense array of simple radio antennas primarily developed for radio-astronomy observations. Our measurements are performed in the 30-80 MHz frequency band. For fair weather conditions the observations are in excellent agreement with model calculations. However, for air showers measured under thunderstorm conditions we observe large differences in the intensity and polarization patterns from the predictions of fair weather models. We will show that the linear as well as the circular polarization of the radio waves carry clear information on the magnitude and orientation of the electric fields at different heights in the thunderstorm clouds. We will show that from the measured data at LOFAR the thunderstorm electric fields can be reconstructed. We thus have established the measurement of radio emission from extensive air showers induced by cosmic rays as a new tool to probe the atmospheric electric fields present in thunderclouds in a non-intrusive way. In part this presentation is based on the work: P. Schellart et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 165001 (2015).

  17. EVIDENCE FOR PARTICLE ACCELERATION TO THE KNEE OF THE COSMIC RAY SPECTRUM IN TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Fesen, Robert; Ghavamian, Parviz; Moffett, David; Plucinksy, Paul P.; Slane, Patrick; Rakowski, Cara E.; Reynoso, Estela M.

    2011-02-20

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been assumed to be the source of cosmic rays (CRs) up to the 'knee' of the CR spectrum at 10{sup 15} eV, accelerating particles to relativistic energies in their blast waves by the process of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Since CR nuclei do not radiate efficiently, their presence must be inferred indirectly. Previous theoretical calculations and X-ray observations show that CR acceleration significantly modifies the structure of the SNR and greatly amplifies the interstellar magnetic field. We present new, deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572, henceforth Tycho), which reveal a previously unknown, strikingly ordered pattern of non-thermal high-emissivity stripes in the projected interior of the remnant, with spacing that corresponds to the gyroradii of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} eV protons. Spectroscopy of the stripes shows the plasma to be highly turbulent on the (smaller) scale of the Larmor radii of TeV energy electrons. Models of the shock amplification of magnetic fields produce structure on the scale of the gyroradius of the highest energy CRs present, but they do not predict the highly ordered pattern we observe. We interpret the stripes as evidence for acceleration of particles to near the knee of the CR spectrum in regions of enhanced magnetic turbulence, while the observed highly ordered pattern of these features provides a new challenge to models of DSA.

  18. ENTROPY AT THE OUTSKIRTS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AS IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMOLOGICAL COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Yutaka; Ohira, Yutaka; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-04-10

    Recently, gas entropy at the outskirts of galaxy clusters has attracted much attention. We propose that the entropy profiles could be used to study cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration around the clusters. If the CRs are effectively accelerated at the formation of clusters, the kinetic energy of infalling gas is consumed by the acceleration and the gas entropy should decrease. As a result, the entropy profiles become flat at the outskirts. If the acceleration is not efficient, the entropy should continue to increase outward. By comparing model predictions with X-ray observations with Suzaku, which show flat entropy profiles, we find that the CRs have carried {approx}< 7% of the kinetic energy of the gas away from the clusters. Moreover, the CR pressure at the outskirts can be {approx}< 40% of the total pressure. On the other hand, if the entropy profiles are not flat at the outskirts, as indicated by combined Plank and ROSAT observations, the carried energy and the CR pressure should be much smaller than the above estimations.

  19. Simulation of Cosmic Ray Acceleration, Propagation And Interaction in SNR Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Kamae, T.; Ellison, D.C.; /North Carolina State U.

    2007-10-15

    Recent studies of young supernova remnants (SNRs) with Chandra, XMM, Suzaku and HESS have revealed complex morphologies and spectral features of the emission sites. The critical question of the relative importance of the two competing gamma-ray emission mechanisms in SNRs; inverse-Compton scattering by high-energy electrons and pion production by energetic protons, may be resolved by GLAST-LAT. To keep pace with the improved observations, we are developing a 3D model of particle acceleration, diffusion, and interaction in a SNR where broad-band emission from radio to multi-TeV energies, produced by shock accelerated electrons and ions, can be simulated for a given topology of shock fronts, magnetic field, and ISM densities. The 3D model takes as input, the particle spectra predicted by a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution where nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration is coupled to the remnant dynamics. We will present preliminary models of the Galactic Ridge SNR RX J1713-3946 for selected choices of SNR parameters, magnetic field topology, and ISM density distributions. When constrained by broad-band observations, our models should predict the extent of coupling between spectral shape and morphology and provide direct information on the acceleration efficiency of cosmic-ray electrons and ions in SNRs.

  20. Simulation of Cosmic Ray Acceleration, Propagation and Interaction in SNR Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. H.; Kamae, T.; Ellison, D. C.

    2007-07-01

    Recent studies of young supernova remnants (SNRs) with Chandra, XMM, Suzaku and HESS have revealed complex morphologies and spectral features of the emission sites. The critical question of the relative importance of the two competing gamma-ray emission mechanisms in SNRs; inverse-Compton scattering by high-energy electrons and pion production by energetic protons, may be resolved by GLAST-LAT. To keep pace with the improved observations, we are developing a 3D model of particle acceleration, diffusion, and interaction in a SNR where broad-band emission from radio to multi-TeV energies, produced by shock accelerated electrons and ions, can be simulated for a given topology of shock fronts, magnetic field, and ISM densities. The 3D model takes as input, the particle spectra predicted by a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution where nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration is coupled to the remnant dynamics (e.g., Ellison, Decourchelle & Ballet; Ellison & Cassam-Chenai Ellison, Berezhko & Baring). We will present preliminary models of the Galactic Ridge SNR RX J1713-3946 for selected choices of SNR parameters, magnetic field topology, and ISM density distributions. When constrained by broad-band observations, our models should predict the extent of coupling between spectral shape and morphology and provide direct information on the acceleration efficiency of cosmic-ray electrons and ions in SNRs.

  1. Evidence for Particle Acceleration to the Knee of the Cosmic Ray Spectrum in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Kristoffer A.; Hughes, John P.; Badenes, Carles; Fesen, Robert; Ghavamian, Parviz; Moffett, David; Plucinksy, Paul P.; Rakowski, Cara E.; Reynoso, Estela M.; Slane, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been assumed to be the source of cosmic rays (CRs) up to the "knee" of the CR spectrum at 1015 eV, accelerating particles to relativistic energies in their blast waves by the process of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). Since CR nuclei do not radiate efficiently, their presence must be inferred indirectly. Previous theoretical calculations and X-ray observations show that CR acceleration significantly modifies the structure of the SNR and greatly amplifies the interstellar magnetic field. We present new, deep X-ray observations of the remnant of Tycho's supernova (SN 1572, henceforth Tycho), which reveal a previously unknown, strikingly ordered pattern of non-thermal high-emissivity stripes in the projected interior of the remnant, with spacing that corresponds to the gyroradii of 1014-1015 eV protons. Spectroscopy of the stripes shows the plasma to be highly turbulent on the (smaller) scale of the Larmor radii of TeV energy electrons. Models of the shock amplification of magnetic fields produce structure on the scale of the gyroradius of the highest energy CRs present, but they do not predict the highly ordered pattern we observe. We interpret the stripes as evidence for acceleration of particles to near the knee of the CR spectrum in regions of enhanced magnetic turbulence, while the observed highly ordered pattern of these features provides a new challenge to models of DSA.

  2. Probing the effective number of neutrino species with the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

    2008-10-15

    We discuss how much we can probe the effective number of neutrino species N{sub {nu}} with the cosmic microwave background alone. Using the data of the WMAP, ACBAR, CBI, and BOOMERANG experiments, we obtain a constraint on the effective number of neutrino species as 0.96

  3. Calibration and correction procedures for cosmic-ray neutron soil moisture probes located across Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawdon, Aaron; McJannet, David; Wallace, Jim

    2014-06-01

    The cosmic-ray probe (CRP) provides continuous estimates of soil moisture over an area of ˜30 ha by counting fast neutrons produced from cosmic rays which are predominantly moderated by water molecules in the soil. This paper describes the setup, measurement correction procedures, and field calibration of CRPs at nine locations across Australia with contrasting soil type, climate, and land cover. These probes form the inaugural Australian CRP network, which is known as CosmOz. CRP measurements require neutron count rates to be corrected for effects of atmospheric pressure, water vapor pressure changes, and variations in incoming neutron intensity. We assess the magnitude and importance of these corrections and present standardized approaches for network-wide analysis. In particular, we present a new approach to correct for incoming neutron intensity variations and test its performance against existing procedures used in other studies. Our field calibration results indicate that a generalized calibration function for relating neutron counts to soil moisture is suitable for all soil types, with the possible exception of very sandy soils with low water content. Using multiple calibration data sets, we demonstrate that the generalized calibration function only applies after accounting for persistent sources of hydrogen in the soil profile. Finally, we demonstrate that by following standardized correction procedures and scaling neutron counting rates of all CRPs to a single reference location, differences in calibrations between sites are related to site biomass. This observation provides a means for estimating biomass at a given location or for deriving coefficients for the calibration function in the absence of field calibration data.

  4. Ongoing cosmic ray acceleration in the supernova remnant W51C revealed with the MAGIC telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, J.; Reichardt, I.; Carmona, E.; Gozzini, S. R.; Jankowski, F.; MAGIC Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The supernova remnant (SNR) W51C interacts with the molecular clouds of the star-forming region W51B, making the W51 complex one of the most promising targets to study cosmic ray acceleration. Gamma-ray emission from this region was discovered by Fermi/LAT and H.E.S.S., although its location was compatible with the SNR shell, the molecular cloud (MC) and a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) candidate. The modeling of the spectral energy distribution presented by the Fermi/LAT collaboration suggests a hadronic emission mechanism. Furthermore indications of an enhanced flux of low energy cosmic rays in the interaction region between SNR and MC have been reported based on ionization measurements in the mm regime. MAGIC conducted deep observations of W51, yielding a detection of an extended emission with more than 11 standard deviations. We extend the spectrum from the highest Fermi/LAT energies to ~5 TeV and find that it follows a single power law with an index of 2.58+/-0.07stat+/-0.22syst. We restrict the main part of the emission region to the zone where the SNR interacts with the molecular clouds. We also find a tail extending towards the PWN candidate CXO J192318.5+140305, possibly contributing up to 20% of the total flux. The broad band spectral energy distribution can be explained with a hadronic model that implies proton acceleration at least up to 50 TeV. This result, together with the morphology of the source, suggests that we observe ongoing acceleration of ions in the interaction zone between the SNR and the cloud.

  5. Origin of high energy Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    The flux of cosmic ray antiprotons and the chemical composition in the region of the 'knee' of the cosmic ray energy spectrum are discussed. The importance of a direct determination of the energy spectrum of each major component of cosmic radiation through the knee region is stressed, and the necessary kinds of experiments are described. It is emphasized that antiprotons are a unique probe of acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in the galaxy because of the high threshold for their production.

  6. Dodging the cosmic curvature to probe the constancy of the speed of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Yang, Tao

    2016-08-01

    We develop a new model-independent method to probe the constancy of the speed of light c. In our method, the degeneracy between the cosmic curvature and the speed of light can be eliminated, which makes the test more natural and general. Combining the independent observations of Hubble parameter H(z) and luminosity distance dL(z), we use the model-independent smoothing technique, Gaussian processes, to reconstruct them and then detect variation of the speed of light. We find no signal of deviation from the present value of the speed of light c0. Moreover, to demonstrate the improvement in probing the constancy of the speed of light from future experiments, we produce a series of simulated data. The Dark Energy Survey will be able to detect Δc/c0 ~ 1% at ~ 1.5σ confidence level and Δc/c0 ~ 2% at ~ 3σ confidence level. If the errors are reduced to one-tenth of the expected DES ones, it can detect a Δc/c0 ~ 0.1% variation at ~ 2σ confidence level.

  7. Is the acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays affected by the geometry of the termination shock?

    SciTech Connect

    Senanayake, U. K.; Florinski, V. E-mail: vaf0001@uah.edu

    2013-12-01

    Historically, anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) were thought to be accelerated at the solar-wind termination shock (TS) by the diffusive shock acceleration process. When Voyager 1 crossed the TS in 2004, the measured ACR spectra did not match the theoretical prediction of a continuous power law, and the source of the high-energy ACRs was not observed. When the Voyager 2 crossed the TS in 2007, it produced similar results. Several possible explanations have since appeared in the literature, but we follow the suggestion that ACRs are still accelerated at the shock, only away from the Voyager crossing points. To investigate this hypothesis closer, we study ACR acceleration using a three-dimensional, non-spherical model of the heliosphere that is axisymmetric with respect to the interstellar flow direction. We then compare the results with those obtained for a spherical TS. A semi-analytic model of the plasma and magnetic field backgrounds is developed to permit an investigation over a wide range of parameters under controlled conditions. The model is applied to helium ACRs, whose phase-space trajectories are stochastically integrated backward in time until a pre-specified, low-energy boundary, taken to be 0.5 MeV n{sup –1} (the so-called injection energy), is reached. Our results show that ACR acceleration is quite efficient on the heliotail-facing part of the TS. For small values of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, our model yields a positive intensity gradient between the TS and about midway through the heliosheath, in agreement with the Voyager observations.

  8. On ultra-high energy cosmic ray acceleration at the termination shock of young pulsar winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Martin; Kotera, Kumiko; Pétri, Jérôme

    2015-07-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are outstanding accelerators in Nature, in the sense that they accelerate electrons up to the radiation reaction limit. Motivated by this observation, this paper examines the possibility that young pulsar wind nebulae can accelerate ions to ultra-high energies at the termination shock of the pulsar wind. We consider here powerful PWNe, fed by pulsars born with ~ millisecond periods. Assuming that such pulsars exist, at least during a few years after the birth of the neutron star, and that they inject ions into the wind, we find that protons could be accelerated up to energies of the order of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off, for a fiducial rotation period P ~ 1 msec and a pulsar magnetic field Bstar ~ 1013 G, implying a fiducial wind luminosity Lp ~ 1045 erg/s and a spin-down time tsd ~ 3× 107 s. The main limiting factor is set by synchrotron losses in the nebula and by the size of the termination shock; ions with Z>= 1 may therefore be accelerated to even higher energies. We derive an associated neutrino flux produced by interactions in the source region. For a proton-dominated composition, our maximum flux lies slightly below the 5-year sensitivity of IceCube-86 and above the 3-year sensitivity of the projected Askaryan Radio Array. It might thus become detectable in the next decade, depending on the exact level of contribution of these millisecond pulsar wind nebulae to the ultra-high energy cosmic ray flux.

  9. Shock waves and cosmic ray acceleration in the outskirts of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sungwook E.; Ryu, Dongsu; Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr E-mail: cen@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-04-20

    The outskirts of galaxy clusters are continuously disturbed by mergers and gas infall along filaments, which in turn induce turbulent flow motions and shock waves. We examine the properties of shocks that form within r {sub 200} in sample galaxy clusters from structure formation simulations. While most of these shocks are weak and inefficient accelerators of cosmic rays (CRs), there are a number of strong, energetic shocks which can produce large amounts of CR protons via diffusive shock acceleration. We show that the energetic shocks reside mostly in the outskirts and a substantial fraction of them are induced by infall of the warm-hot intergalactic medium from filaments. As a result, the radial profile of the CR pressure in the intracluster medium is expected to be broad, dropping off more slowly than that of the gas pressure, and might be even temporarily inverted, peaking in the outskirts. The volume-integrated momentum spectrum of CR protons inside r {sub 200} has the power-law slope of 4.25-4.5, indicating that the average Mach number of the shocks of main CR production is in the range of {sub CR} ≈ 3-4. We suggest that some radio relics with relatively flat radio spectrum could be explained by primary electrons accelerated by energetic infall shocks with M{sub s} ≳ 3 induced in the cluster outskirts.

  10. Dynamics of rising magnetized cavities and ultrahigh energy cosmic ray acceleration in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos N.; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2012-02-01

    We study the expansion of low-density cavities produced by active galactic nucleus jets in clusters of galaxies. The long-term stability of these cavities requires the presence of linked magnetic fields. We find solutions describing the self-similar expansion of structures containing large-scale electromagnetic fields. Unlike the force-free spheromak-like configurations, these solutions have no surface currents and, thus, are less susceptible to resistive decay. The cavities are internally confined by external pressure, with zero gradient at the surface. If the adiabatic index of the plasma within the cavity is Γ > 4/3, the expansion ultimately leads to the formation of large-scale current sheets. The resulting dissipation of the magnetic field can only partially offset the adiabatic and radiative losses of radio-emitting electrons. We demonstrate that if the formation of large-scale current sheets is accompanied by explosive reconnection of the magnetic field, the resulting reconnection layer can accelerate cosmic rays to ultrahigh energies. We speculate that the enhanced flux of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays towards Centaurus A originates at the cavities due to magnetic reconnection.

  11. High energy neutrinos from primary cosmic rays accelerated in the cores of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectra and high-energy neutrino fluxes are calculated from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) such as quasars and Seyfert galaxies using recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays in the AGN. Collectively AGN should produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10 exp 4 and 10 exp 10 GeV. Measurement of this background could be critical in determining the energy-generation mechanism, evolution, and distribution of AGN. High-energy background spectra and spectra from bright AGN such as NGC4151 and 3C273 are predicted which should be observable with present detectors. High energy AGN nus should produce a sphere of stellar disruption around their cores which could explain their observed broad-line emission regions.

  12. A test of the nature of cosmic acceleration using galaxy redshift distortions.

    PubMed

    Guzzo, L; Pierleoni, M; Meneux, B; Branchini, E; Le Fèvre, O; Marinoni, C; Garilli, B; Blaizot, J; De Lucia, G; Pollo, A; McCracken, H J; Bottini, D; Le Brun, V; Maccagni, D; Picat, J P; Scaramella, R; Scodeggio, M; Tresse, L; Vettolani, G; Zanichelli, A; Adami, C; Arnouts, S; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Bongiorno, A; Cappi, A; Charlot, S; Ciliegi, P; Contini, T; Cucciati, O; de la Torre, S; Dolag, K; Foucaud, S; Franzetti, P; Gavignaud, I; Ilbert, O; Iovino, A; Lamareille, F; Marano, B; Mazure, A; Memeo, P; Merighi, R; Moscardini, L; Paltani, S; Pellò, R; Perez-Montero, E; Pozzetti, L; Radovich, M; Vergani, D; Zamorani, G; Zucca, E

    2008-01-31

    Observations of distant supernovae indicate that the Universe is now in a phase of accelerated expansion the physical cause of which is a mystery. Formally, this requires the inclusion of a term acting as a negative pressure in the equations of cosmic expansion, accounting for about 75 per cent of the total energy density in the Universe. The simplest option for this 'dark energy' corresponds to a 'cosmological constant', perhaps related to the quantum vacuum energy. Physically viable alternatives invoke either the presence of a scalar field with an evolving equation of state, or extensions of general relativity involving higher-order curvature terms or extra dimensions. Although they produce similar expansion rates, different models predict measurable differences in the growth rate of large-scale structure with cosmic time. A fingerprint of this growth is provided by coherent galaxy motions, which introduce a radial anisotropy in the clustering pattern reconstructed by galaxy redshift surveys. Here we report a measurement of this effect at a redshift of 0.8. Using a new survey of more than 10,000 faint galaxies, we measure the anisotropy parameter beta = 0.70 +/- 0.26, which corresponds to a growth rate of structure at that time of f = 0.91 +/- 0.36. This is consistent with the standard cosmological-constant model with low matter density and flat geometry, although the error bars are still too large to distinguish among alternative origins for the accelerated expansion. The correct origin could be determined with a further factor-of-ten increase in the sampled volume at similar redshift. PMID:18235494

  13. Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe Soil Water Measurements over Complex Terrain in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreugdenhil, Mariette; Weltin, Georg; Kheng Heng, Lee; Wahbi, Ammar; Oismueller, Markus; Dercon, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    The importance of surface soil water (rooting zone) has become evident with climate change affecting rainfall patterns and crop production. The use of Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe (CRNP) for measuring surface soil water has become increasingly popular. The advantage of CRNP is that it is a non-invasive technique for measuring soil water content at an area-wide scale, in contrast to more conventional, techniques which measure mainly at field scale (point level). The CRNP integrates over a circular area of ca. 600 meters in diameter, to a depth of 70 cm, giving an average value for soil water content. Cosmic radiation interacting with the Earth's atmosphere continuously generates neutrons. At Earth's surface, these neutrons interact with surface water, and are slowed down. At sub-micrometer geometrics, these neutrons affect semiconductor devices, so they can be counted, slow and fast ones separately. From the difference in numbers between fast and slow neutrons, soil water content is calculated. As first in Austria, a CRNP (CRS 1000/B model) consisting of two neutron counters (one tuned for slow, the other one for fast neutrons), data logger and an Iridium modem, has been installed at Petzenkirchen research station of the Doctoral Programme for Water Resource Systems (TU Vienna) at 48.14 latitude and 15.17 longitude, 100 km west of Vienna, in late autumn 2013. The research station is located in an undulating agricultural landscape, characterized by heavy Cambisols and Planosols, and winter wheat and barley as main crops in winter, and maize and sunflower in summer. In addition, an in-situ soil moisture network consisting of 32 stations of Time Domain Transmissivity (TDT) sensors measuring soil water at 4 depths (0.05, 0.10,0.20 and 0.50 m) over an area of 64 ha has been established. This TDT network is currently being used to validate the use of the innovative CRNP technique. First results will be shown at the EGU 2014.

  14. The Super-TIGER Instrument to Probe Galactic Cosmic Ray Origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, John W.; Binns, W. R.; Bose, R, G.; Braun, D. L.; Christian, E. R.; Daniels, W. M; DeNolfo, G. A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Hahne, D. J.; Hams, T.; Israel, M. H.; Klemic, J.; Labrador, A. W.; Link, J. T.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Moore, P. R.; Murphy, R. P.; Olevitch, M. A.; Rauch, B. F.; SanSebastian, F.; Sasaki, M.; Simburger, G. E.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Super-TIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is under construction for the first of two planned Antarctic long-duration balloon flights in December 2012. This new instrument will measure the abundances of ultra-heavy elements (30Zn and heavier), with individual element resolution, to provide sensitive tests of the emerging model of cosmic-ray origins in OB associations and models of the mechanism for selection of nuclei for acceleration. Super-TIGER builds on the techniques of TIGER, which produced the first well-resolved measurements of elemental abundances of the elements 31Ga, 32Ge, and 34Se. Plastic scintillators together with acrylic and silica-aerogel Cherenkov detectors measure particle charge. Scintillating-fiber hodoscopes track particle trajectories. Super-TIGER has an active area of 5.4 sq m, divided into two independent modules. With reduced material thickness to decrease interactions, its effective geometry factor is approx.6.4 times larger than TIGER, allowing it to measure elements up to 42Mo with high statistical precision, and make exploratory measurements up to 56Ba. Super-TIGER will also accurately determine the energy spectra of the more abundant elements from l0Ne to 28Ni between 0.8 and 10 GeV/nucleon to test the hypothesis that microquasars or other sources could superpose spectral features. We will discuss the implications of Super-TIGER measurements for the study of cosmic-ray origins and will present the measurement technique, design, status, and expected performance, including numbers of events and resolution. Details of the hodoscopes, scintillators, and Cherenkov detectors will be given in other presentations at this conference.

  15. Model experiment of cosmic ray acceleration due to an incoherent wakefield induced by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Takeda, K.; Tampo, M.; Takabe, H.; Nakanii, N.; Kondo, K.; Tsuji, K.; Kimura, K.; Fukumochi, S.; Kashihara, M.; Tanimoto, T.; Nakamura, H.; Ishikura, T.; Kodama, R.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.; Mori, Y.; Miura, E.; Kitagawa, Y.

    2011-01-15

    The first report on a model experiment of cosmic ray acceleration by using intense laser pulses is presented. Large amplitude light waves are considered to be excited in the upstream regions of relativistic astrophysical shocks and the wakefield acceleration of cosmic rays can take place. By substituting an intense laser pulse for the large amplitude light waves, such shock environments were modeled in a laboratory plasma. A plasma tube, which is created by imploding a hollow polystyrene cylinder, was irradiated by an intense laser pulse. Nonthermal electrons were generated by the wakefield acceleration and the energy distribution functions of the electrons have a power-law component with an index of {approx}2. The maximum attainable energy of the electrons in the experiment is discussed by a simple analytic model. In the incoherent wakefield the maximum energy can be much larger than one in the coherent field due to the momentum space diffusion or the energy diffusion of electrons.

  16. Probing 'Parent Universe' in Loop Quantum Cosmology with B-mode Polarization in Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucky Chang, Wen-Hsuan; Proty Wu, Jiun-Huei

    2016-06-01

    We aim to use the observations of B-mode polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to probe the ‘parent universe’ under the context of Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC). In particular, we investigate the possibility for the gravitational waves (GW) such as those from the stellar binary systems in the parent universe to survive the big bounce and thus to be still observable today. Our study is based on the background dynamics with the zeroth-order holonomy correction using the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) formalism. We propose a new framework in which transfer functions are invoked to bring the GWs in the parent universe through the big bounce, inflation, and big bang to reach today. This transparent and intuitive formalism allows us to accurately discuss the influence of the GWs from the parent universe on the B-mode polarization in the CMB today under backgrounds of different LQC parameters. These features can soon be tested by the forth-coming CMB observations and we note that the LQC backgrounds with symmetric bouncing scenarios are ruled out by the latest observational results from Planck and BICEP2/Keck experiments.

  17. Anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background after Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year data

    SciTech Connect

    De Bernardis, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha E-mail: luca.pagano@roma1.infn.it E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it

    2008-06-15

    We search for the presence of cosmological neutrino background (CNB) anisotropies in recent Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year data using their signature imprinted on modifications to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. By parameterizing the neutrino background anisotropies with the speed viscosity parameter c{sub vis}, we find that the WMAP five-year data alone provide only a weak indication for CNB anisotropies with c{sub vis}{sup 2}>0.06 at the 95% confidence level. When we combine CMB anisotropy data with measurements of galaxy clustering, the SN-Ia Hubble diagram, and other cosmological information, the detection increases to c{sub vis}{sup 2}>0.16 at the same 95% confidence level. Future data from Planck, combined with a weak lensing survey such as the one expected with DUNE from space, will be able to measure the CNB anisotropy parameter at about 10% accuracy. We discuss the degeneracy between neutrino background anisotropies and other cosmological parameters such as the number of effective neutrinos species and the dark energy equation of state.

  18. Radius of influence for a cosmic-ray soil moisture probe : theory and Monte Carlo simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Desilets, Darin

    2011-02-01

    The lateral footprint of a cosmic-ray soil moisture probe was determined using diffusion theory and neutron transport simulations. The footprint is radial and can be described by a single parameter, an e-folding length that is closely related to the slowing down length in air. In our work the slowing down length is defined as the crow-flight distance traveled by a neutron from nuclear emission as a fast neutron to detection at a lower energy threshold defined by the detector. Here the footprint is defined as the area encompassed by two e-fold distances, i.e. the area from which 86% of the recorded neutrons originate. The slowing down length is approximately 150 m at sea level for neutrons detected over a wide range of energies - from 10{sup 0} to 10{sup 5} eV. Both theory and simulations indicate that the slowing down length is inversely proportional to air density and linearly proportional to the height of the sensor above the ground for heights up to 100 m. Simulations suggest that the radius of influence for neutrons >1 eV is only slightly influenced by soil moisture content, and depends weakly on the energy sensitivity of the neutron detector. Good agreement between the theoretical slowing down length in air and the simulated slowing down length near the air/ground interface support the conclusion that the footprint is determined mainly by the neutron scattering properties of air.

  19. Studying Star and Planet Formation with the Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS) is a far- infrared/submillimeter (40-640 micrometers) spaceborne interferometry concept, studied through the NASA Vision Missions program. SPECS is envisioned as a 1-km baseline Michelson interferometer with two 4- meter collecting mirrors. To maximize science return, SPECS will have three operational modes: a photometric imaging mode, an intermediate spectral resolution mode (R approximately equal to 1000-3000), and a high spectral resolution mode (R approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 5)). The first two of these modes will provide information on all sources within a 1 arcminute field-of-view (FOV), while the the third will include sources in a small (approximately equal to 5 arcsec) FOV. With this design, SPECS will have angular resolution comparable to the Hubble Space Telescope (50 mas) and sensitivity more than two orders of magnitude better than Spitzer (5sigma in 10ks of approximately equal to 3 x 10(exp 7) Jy Hz). We present here some of the results of the recently-completed Vision Mission Study for SPECS, and discuss the application of this mission to future studies of star and planet formation.

  20. GRB time profiles as cosmic probes: Is time dilation extrinsic or intrinsic?

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, J. P.; Nemiroff, R. J.

    1998-05-16

    Recent detections of gamma-ray burst (GRB) counterparts confirm their great distances and consequent potential use as cosmic probes. However, GRB diversity may thwart this idea. The scatter of intrinsic GRB properties could easily mask the extrinsic effect of cosmological time dilation. Current investigations examine the question of temporal self-similarity: Extrinsic time dilation must be manifest with the same factor on all GRB timescales as a function of distance. Here we show that time-reversal-independent analysis of GRB time profiles using a peak alignment methodology reveals average profiles with approximately equal rise and decay timescales, per peak-flux group, except for the dimmest group. This departure from self-similarity is consistent with a selection effect: At sufficiently low peak fluxes, the BATSE causal trigger misses dim, slowly rising bursts. Interestingly, for GRB970508, the redshift-corrected time-dilation factor inferred for its peak flux is consistent with the measured redshift, z=0.835, if bright bursts lie at redshifts of a few tenths.

  1. Probing The Cosmic History of Light With High-Energy Gamma Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) holds answers to many questions of moderrn cosmology. The origin of the CMB lies in the early universe, and when it was released during the recombination phase the conditions were not yet right for new sources of light. But the first generation of stars born in a mostly neutral universe quickly re-ionized their surroubding baryonic environments, and dust was produced which allowed reprocessing of some star light into the infrared specral region. Black holes and other compact objects were born and the emissions from their accretion processes and relativistic jetted outflws contributed new light. Today, we observe this evolving radiation field as the Extragalactic Backgroud Light (EBL), ranging from the radio- to the gamma-ray band. The evolution of the diffuse electromagnetic energy content of the universe is the focus of this special session, and I will discuss its importance within the context of modern cosmology. I will emphasize the role of gamma-ray astronomy, which probes the EBL and the CMB through the opacity created by photon-photon pair production.

  2. Probing the neutrino mass hierarchy with cosmic microwave background weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex C.; Challinor, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    We forecast constraints on cosmological parameters with primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy information and weak lensing reconstruction with a future post-Planck CMB experiment, the Cosmic Origins Explorer (COrE), using oscillation data on the neutrino mass splittings as prior information. Our Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations in flat models with a non-evolving equation of state of dark energy w give typical 68 per cent upper bounds on the total neutrino mass of 0.136 and 0.098 eV for the inverted and normal hierarchies, respectively, assuming the total summed mass is close to the minimum allowed by the oscillation data for the respective hierarchies (0.10 and 0.06 eV). Including geometric information from future baryon acoustic oscillation measurements with the complete Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, Type Ia supernovae distance moduli from Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) and a realistic prior on the Hubble constant, these upper limits shrink to 0.118 and 0.080 eV for the inverted and normal hierarchies, respectively. Addition of these distance priors also yields per cent-level constraints on w. We find tension between our MCMC results and the results of a Fisher matrix analysis, most likely due to a strong geometric degeneracy between the total neutrino mass, the Hubble constant and w in the unlensed CMB power spectra. If the minimal-mass, normal hierarchy were realized in nature, the inverted hierarchy should be disfavoured by the full data combination at typically greater than the 2σ level. For the minimal-mass inverted hierarchy, we compute the Bayes factor between the two hierarchies for various combinations of our forecast data sets, and find that the future cosmological probes considered here should be able to provide 'strong' evidence (odds ratio 12:1) for the inverted hierarchy. Finally, we consider potential biases of the other cosmological parameters from assuming the wrong hierarchy and find that all

  3. A new limit on the time between the nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays in supernova remnants using the Co/Ni ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webber, W. R.; Gupta, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using new cross section measurements of Ni into Co, data on the Co/Ni ratio in cosmic rays from the HEAO C spacecraft have been reinterpreted in terms of the time between nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays, delta t. The observed Co/Ni ratio is now consistent with interstellar fragmentation only, leading to a small or zero source abundance. In terms of the decay of e-process nucleosynthesis nuclides into Co after a supernova explosion, this permits an estimate of delta t = 4-30,000 yr for the time between nucleosynthesis and the acceleration of cosmic rays if supernovae are the direct progenitors of cosmic rays. These age limits are used in conjunction with models of the expansion of supernova remnants (SNRs), to estimate that cosmic rays are accelerated when the radius of these remnants is between 0.1 and 25 pc.

  4. A 6% measurement of the Hubble parameter at z~0.45: direct evidence of the epoch of cosmic re-acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moresco, Michele; Pozzetti, Lucia; Cimatti, Andrea; Jimenez, Raul; Maraston, Claudia; Verde, Licia; Thomas, Daniel; Citro, Annalisa; Tojeiro, Rita; Wilkinson, David

    2016-05-01

    Deriving the expansion history of the Universe is a major goal of modern cosmology. To date, the most accurate measurements have been obtained with Type Ia Supernovae (SNe) and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO), providing evidence for the existence of a transition epoch at which the expansion rate changes from decelerated to accelerated. However, these results have been obtained within the framework of specific cosmological models that must be implicitly or explicitly assumed in the measurement. It is therefore crucial to obtain measurements of the accelerated expansion of the Universe independently of assumptions on cosmological models. Here we exploit the unprecedented statistics provided by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS, [1-3]) Data Release 9 to provide new constraints on the Hubble parameter H(z) using the cosmic chronometers approach. We extract a sample of more than 130000 of the most massive and passively evolving galaxies, obtaining five new cosmology-independent H(z) measurements in the redshift range 0.3 < z < 0.5, with an accuracy of ~11–16% incorporating both statistical and systematic errors. Once combined, these measurements yield a 6% accuracy constraint of H(z = 0.4293) = 91.8 ± 5.3 km/s/Mpc. The new data are crucial to provide the first cosmology-independent determination of the transition redshift at high statistical significance, measuring zt = 0.4 ± 0.1, and to significantly disfavor the null hypothesis of no transition between decelerated and accelerated expansion at 99.9% confidence level. This analysis highlights the wide potential of the cosmic chronometers approach: it permits to derive constraints on the expansion history of the Universe with results competitive with standard probes, and most importantly, being the estimates independent of the cosmological model, it can constrain cosmologies beyond—and including—the ΛCDM model.

  5. Diffusive Cosmic-ray Acceleration at Relativistic Shock Waves with Magnetostatic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2015-08-01

    The analytical theory of diffusive cosmic-ray acceleration at parallel stationary shock waves with magnetostatic turbulence is generalized to arbitrary shock speeds {V}{{s}}={β }1c, including, in particular, relativistic speeds. This is achieved by applying the diffusion approximation to the relevant Fokker-Planck particle transport equation formulated in the mixed comoving coordinate system. In this coordinate system, the particle's momentum coordinates p and μ ={p}\\parallel /p are taken in the rest frame of the streaming plasma, whereas the time and space coordinates are taken in the observer's system. For magnetostatic slab turbulence, the diffusion-convection transport equation for the isotropic (in the rest frame of the streaming plasma) part of the particle's phase space density is derived. For a step-wise shock velocity profile, the steady-state diffusion-convection transport equation is solved. For a symmetric pitch-angle scattering Fokker-Planck coefficient, {D}μ μ (-μ )={D}μ μ (μ ), the steady-state solution is independent of the microphysical scattering details. For nonrelativistic mono-momentum particle injection at the shock, the differential number density of accelerated particles is a Lorentzian-type distribution function, which at large momenta approaches a power-law distribution function N(p≥slant {p}c)\\propto {p}-ξ with the spectral index ξ ({β }1)=1+[3/({{{Γ }}}1\\sqrt{{r}2-{β }12}-1)(1+3{β }12)]. For nonrelativistic ({β }1\\ll 1) shock speeds, this spectral index agrees with the known result ξ ({β }1\\ll 1)≃ (r+2)/(r-1), whereas for ultrarelativistic ({{{Γ }}}1\\gg 1) shock speeds the spectral index value is close to unity.

  6. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and (4)He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  7. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground-Based Accelerators

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2015-01-01

    For radiobiology research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) ground-based accelerators have been used with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE) particles. In this paper, we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model) to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam–energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However, a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation, with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving knowledge of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology research. PMID:26090339

  8. ASSESSING THE FEASIBILITY OF COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION BY MAGNETIC TURBULENCE AT THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Fatuzzo, M.; Melia, F. E-mail: fmelia@email.arizona.edu

    2012-05-01

    The presence of relativistic particles at the center of our Galaxy is evidenced by the diffuse TeV emission detected from the inner {approx}2 Degree-Sign of the Galaxy. Although it is not yet entirely clear whether the origin of the TeV photons is due to hadronic or leptonic interactions, the tight correlation of the intensity distribution with the distribution of molecular gas along the Galactic ridge strongly points to a pionic-decay process involving relativistic protons. In previous work, we concluded that point-source candidates, such as the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (identified with the High-Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) source J1745-290) or the pulsar wind nebulae dispersed along the Galactic plane, could not account for the observed diffuse TeV emission from this region. Motivated by this result, we consider here the feasibility that the cosmic rays populating the Galactic center region are accelerated in situ by magnetic turbulence. Our results indicate that even in a highly conductive environment, this mechanism is efficient enough to energize protons within the intercloud medium to the {approx}>TeV energies required to produce the HESS emission.

  9. Aromatic units from the macromolecular material in meteorites: Molecular probes of cosmic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sephton, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Ancient meteorites contain several percent of organic matter that represents a chronicle of chemical evolution in the early solar system. Aromatic hydrocarbon units make up the majority of meteorite organic matter but reading their record of organic evolution is not straightforward and their formation mechanisms have remained elusive. Most aromatic units reside in a macromolecular material and new perceptions of its structure have been provided by a novel on-line hydrogenation approach. When applied to the Orgueil (CI1) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites the technique releases a range of aromatic hydrocarbons along with some oxygen, sulphur and nitrogen-containing aromatic units. When on-line hydrogenation is compared to conventional pyrolysis, more high molecular weight units and a wider range of liberated entities are evident. Comparisons of results from Orgueil and Murchison reveal variations that are most likely related to differing levels of parent body alteration. The enhancement of straight-chain hydrocarbons (n-alkanes) in the hydrogenation products imply a source of these common contaminants from straight-chain carboxylic acid (n-alkanoic acid) precursors, perhaps from bacterial contributions on Earth. The on-line hydrogenation data also highlight a long-standing but unexplained observation related to the relative preference for specific isomers in methyl-substituted benzenes (meta-, ortho- and para-xylenes). The new hydrogenation approach appears to release and transform macromolecular material meta-structures (benzenes with substituents separated by single carbon atoms) into their free hydrocarbon counterparts. Their release characteristics suggest that the meta-structures are bound by oxygen-linkages. The meta-structures may be molecular probes of specific ancient cosmic environments. Parent body processing may have performed a similar function as hydrogenation to produce the most common meta configuration for free substituted benzenes. Notably, this

  10. Narrowband Gyrosynchrotron Bursts: Probing Electron Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-07-01

    Recently, in a few case studies we demonstrated that gyrosynchrotron microwave emission can be detected directly from the acceleration region when the trapped electron component is insignificant. For the statistical study reported here, we have identified events with steep (narrowband) microwave spectra that do not show a significant trapped component and, at the same time, show evidence of source uniformity, which simplifies the data analysis greatly. Initially, we identified a subset of more than 20 radio bursts with such narrow spectra, having low- and high-frequency spectral indices larger than three in absolute value. A steep low-frequency spectrum implies that the emission is nonthermal (for optically thick thermal emission, the spectral index cannot be steeper than two), and the source is reasonably dense and uniform. A steep high-frequency spectrum implies that no significant electron trapping occurs, otherwise a progressive spectral flattening would be observed. Roughly half of these radio bursts have RHESSI data, which allow for detailed, joint diagnostics of the source parameters and evolution. Based on an analysis of radio-to-X-ray spatial relationships, timing, and spectral fits, we conclude that the microwave emission in these narrowband bursts originates directly from the acceleration regions, which have a relatively strong magnetic field, high density, and low temperature. In contrast, the thermal X-ray emission comes from a distinct loop with a smaller magnetic field, lower density, but higher temperature. Therefore, these flares likely occurred due to interaction between two (or more) magnetic loops.

  11. Cosmology of a Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker 3-brane, late-time cosmic acceleration, and the cosmic coincidence.

    PubMed

    Doolin, Ciaran; Neupane, Ishwaree P

    2013-04-01

    A late epoch cosmic acceleration may be naturally entangled with cosmic coincidence--the observation that at the onset of acceleration the vacuum energy density fraction nearly coincides with the matter density fraction. In this Letter we show that this is indeed the case with the cosmology of a Friedmann-Lamaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) 3-brane in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter spacetime. We derive the four-dimensional effective action on a FLRW 3-brane, from which we obtain a mass-reduction formula, namely, M(P)(2) = ρ(b)/|Λ(5)|, where M(P) is the effective (normalized) Planck mass, Λ(5) is the five-dimensional cosmological constant, and ρ(b) is the sum of the 3-brane tension V and the matter density ρ. Although the range of variation in ρ(b) is strongly constrained, the big bang nucleosynthesis bound on the time variation of the effective Newton constant G(N) = (8πM(P)(2))(-1) is satisfied when the ratio V/ρ ≳ O(10(2)) on cosmological scales. The same bound leads to an effective equation of state close to -1 at late epochs in accordance with astrophysical and cosmological observations. PMID:25166976

  12. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. H.; Yang, X. Y.; Lin, C. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. G.; Xiao, C. J. E-mail: cjxiao@pku.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Xu, M.

    2014-11-15

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed.

  13. Influence of total biomass and rainfall interception on soil moisture measurements using cosmic-ray neutron probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Hannah; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Cosmic-ray neutron probes are an emerging technology to continuously monitor soil water content at a scale significant to land surface processes. This method relies on the negative correlation between near-surface fast neutron counts and soil moisture content since hydrogen atoms in the soil, which are mainly present as water, moderate the secondary neutrons on the way back to the surface. Any application of this method needs to consider the sensitivity of the neutron counts to additional sources of hydrogen (e.g. above- and below-ground biomass, humidity of the lower atmosphere, lattice water of the soil minerals, organic matter and water in the litter layer, intercepted water in the canopy, and soil organic matter). In this study, we analyzed the effects of changing above- and below-ground biomass and intercepted water in the canopy on the cosmic-ray neutron counts and calibration parameters. For this, the arable field test site Selhausen, which is part of the TERENO and ICOS observation networks, was cropped with winter wheat and additionally instrumented with cosmic-ray neutron probes and a wireless sensor network with 108 soil moisture sensors. In order to increase the sensitivity of the cosmic-ray neutron measurements, we used seven neutron detectors simultaneously. In addition, we measured rainfall interception in the wheat canopy at several locations in the field. In order to track the changes in above and below-ground biomass of the winter wheat, roots and plants were sampled approximately every four weeks and LAI was measured weekly during the growing season. Weekly biomass changes were derived by relating LAI to total biomass. As expected, we found an increasing discrepancy between cosmic-ray-derived and in-situ measured soil moisture during the growing season and a sharp decrease in discrepancy after the harvest. In order to quantify the effect of hydrogen stored in the vegetation on fast neutron intensity, we derived a daily and weekly time series of

  14. Accuracy of the cosmic-ray soil water content probe in humid forest ecosystems: The worst case scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogena, H. R.; Huisman, J. A.; Baatz, R.; Hendricks Franssen, H.-J.; Vereecken, H.

    2013-09-01

    Soil water content is one of the key state variables in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum due to its important role in the exchange of water and energy at the soil surface. A new promising method to measure integral soil water content at the field or small catchment scale is the cosmic-ray probe (CRP). Recent studies of CRP measurements have mainly presented results from test sites located in very dry areas and from agricultural fields with sandy soils. In this study, distributed continuous soil water content measurements from a wireless sensor network (SoilNet) were used to investigate the accuracy of CRP measurements for soil water content determination in a humid forest ecosystem. Such ecosystems are less favorable for CRP applications due to the presence of a litter layer. In addition, lattice water and carbohydrates of soil organic matter and belowground biomass reduce the effective sensor depth and thus were accounted for in the calibration of the CRP. The hydrogen located in the biomass decreased the level of neutron count rates and thus also decreased the sensitivity of the cosmic-ray probe, which in turn resulted in an increase of the measurement uncertainty. This uncertainty was compensated by using longer integration times (e.g., 24 h). For the Wüstebach forest site, the cosmic-ray probe enabled the assessment of integral daily soil water content dynamics with a RMSE of about 0.03 cm3/cm3 without explicitly considering the litter layer. By including simulated water contents of the litter layer in the calibration, a better accuracy could be achieved.

  15. ANALYTIC SOLUTION FOR SELF-REGULATED COLLECTIVE ESCAPE OF COSMIC RAYS FROM THEIR ACCELERATION SITES

    SciTech Connect

    Malkov, M. A.; Diamond, P. H.; Sagdeev, R. Z.; Aharonian, F. A.; Moskalenko, I. V. E-mail: pdiamond@ucsd.edu

    2013-05-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs), as the major contributors to the galactic cosmic rays (CRs), are believed to maintain an average CR spectrum by diffusive shock acceleration regardless of the way they release CRs into the interstellar medium (ISM). However, the interaction of the CRs with nearby gas clouds crucially depends on the release mechanism. We call into question two aspects of a popular paradigm of the CR injection into the ISM, according to which they passively and isotropically diffuse in the prescribed magnetic fluctuations as test particles. First, we treat the escaping CR and the Alfven waves excited by them on an equal footing. Second, we adopt field-aligned CR escape outside the source, where the waves become weak. An exact analytic self-similar solution for a CR ''cloud'' released by a dimmed accelerator strongly deviates from the test-particle result. The normalized CR partial pressure may be approximated as P(p,z,t)=2[|z|{sup 5/3}+z{sub dif}{sup 5/3}(p,t)]{sup -3/5} exp[-z{sup 2}/4D{sub ISM}(p)t], where p is the momentum of CR particle, and z is directed along the field. The core of the cloud expands as z{sub dif}{proportional_to}{radical}(D{sub NL}(p)t) and decays in time as p{proportional_to}2z{sup -1}{sub dif}(t). The diffusion coefficient D{sub NL} is strongly suppressed compared to its background ISM value D{sub ISM}: D{sub NL} {approx} D{sub ISM}exp (- {Pi}) << D{sub ISM} for sufficiently high field-line-integrated CR partial pressure, {Pi}. When {Pi} >> 1, the CRs drive Alfven waves efficiently enough to build a transport barrier (p Almost-Equal-To 2/ Divides z Divides -{sup p}edestal{sup )} that strongly reduces the leakage. The solution has a spectral break at p = p{sub br}, where p{sub br} satisfies the equation D{sub NL}(p{sub br}) {approx_equal} z {sup 2}/t.

  16. Cosmic-ray antiprotons as a probe of a photino-dominated universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.; Srednicki, M.

    1984-01-01

    Observational tests of the hypothesis that the universe is flat and dominated by dark matter in the form of massive photinos include the production of significant fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays in our galactic halo. Specification of the cosmological photino density and the masses of scalar quarks and leptons determines the present annihilation rate. The predicted number of low-energy cosmic-ray antiprotons is comparable to the observed flux.

  17. Non Parametric Determination of Acceleration Characteristics in Supernova Shocks Based on Spectra of Cosmic Rays and Remnant Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an inversion method for determination of the characteristics of the acceleration mechanism directly and non-parametrically from observations, in contrast to the usual forward fitting of parametric model variables to observations. This is done in the frame work of the so-called leaky box model of acceleration, valid for isotropic momentum distribution and for volume integrated characteristics in a finite acceleration site. We consider both acceleration by shocks and stochastic acceleration where turbulence plays the primary role to determine the acceleration, scattering and escape rates. Assuming a knowledge of the background plasma the model has essentially two unknown parameters, namely the momentum and pitch angle scattering diffusion coefficients, which can be evaluated given two independent spectral observations. These coefficients are obtained directly from the spectrum of radiation from the supernova remnants (SNRs), which gives the spectrum of accelerated particles, and the observed spectrum of cosmic rays (CRs), which are related to the spectrum of particles escaping the SNRs. The results obtained from application of this method will be presented.

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in Type Ia supernova remnants undergoing cosmic ray particle acceleration - low adiabatic index solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Yueh

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates the evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities in Type Ia supernova remnants that are associated with a low adiabatic index γ, where γ < 5/3, which reflects the expected change in the supernova shock structure as a result of cosmic ray particle acceleration. Extreme cases, such as the case with the maximum compression ratio that corresponds to γ= 1.1, are examined. As γ decreases, the shock compression ratio rises, and an increasingly narrow intershock region with a more pronounced initial mixture of R-T unstable gas is produced. Consequently, the remnant outline may be perturbed by small-amplitude, small-wavelength bumps. However, as the instability decays over time, the extent of convective mixing in terms of the ratio of the radius of the R-T fingers to the blast wave does not strongly depend on the value of γ for γ≥ 1.2. As a result of the age of the remnant, the unstable gas cannot extend sufficiently far to form metal-enriched filaments of ejecta material close to the periphery of Tycho's supernova remnant. The consistency of the dynamic properties of Tycho's remnant with the adiabatic model γ= 5/3 reveals that the injection of cosmic rays is too weak to alter the shock structure. Even with very efficient acceleration of cosmic rays at the shock, significantly enhanced mixing is not expected in Type Ia supernova remnants.

  19. Studies into the nature of cosmic acceleration: Dark energy or a modification to gravity on cosmological scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dossett, Jason Nicholas

    Since its discovery more than a decade ago, the problem of cosmic acceleration has become one of the largest in cosmology and physics as a whole. An unknown dark energy component of the universe is often invoked to explain this observation. Mathematically, this works because inserting a cosmic fluid with a negative equation of state into Einstein's equations provides an accelerated expansion. There are, however, alternative explanations for the observed cosmic acceleration. Perhaps the most promising of the alternatives is that, on the very largest cosmological scales, general relativity needs to be extended or a new, modified gravity theory must be used. Indeed, many modified gravity models are not only able to replicate the observed accelerated expansion without dark energy, but are also more compatible with a unified theory of physics. Thus it is the goal of this dissertation to develop and study robust tests that will be able to distinguish between these alternative theories of gravity and the need for a dark energy component of the universe. We will study multiple approaches using the growth history of large-scale structure in the universe as a way to accomplish this task. These approaches include studying what is known as the growth index parameter, a parameter that describes the logarithmic growth rate of structure in the universe, which describes the rate of formation of clusters and superclusters of galaxies over the entire age of the universe. We will explore the effectiveness of this parameter to distinguish between general relativity and modifications to gravity physics given realistic expectations of results from future experiments. Next, we will explore the modified growth formalism wherein deviations from the growth expected in general relativity are parameterized via changes to the growth equations, i.e. the perturbed Einstein's equations. We will also explore the impact of spatial curvature on these tests. Finally, we will study how dark energy

  20. Probing new physics with underground accelerators and radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Eder; Krnjaic, Gordan; Pospelov, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    New light, weakly coupled particles can be efficiently produced at existing and future high-intensity accelerators and radioactive sources in deep underground laboratories. Once produced, these particles can scatter or decay in large neutrino detectors (e.g. Super-K and Borexino) housed in the same facilities. We discuss the production of weakly coupled scalars ϕ via nuclear de-excitation of an excited element into the ground state in two viable concrete reactions: the decay of the 0+ excited state of 16O populated via a (p , α) reaction on fluorine and from radioactive 144Ce decay where the scalar is produced in the de-excitation of 144Nd*, which occurs along the decay chain. Subsequent scattering on electrons, e (ϕ , γ) e, yields a mono-energetic signal that is observable in neutrino detectors. We show that this proposed experimental setup can cover new territory for masses 250 keV ≤mϕ ≤ 2me and couplings to protons and electrons, 10-11 ≤gegp ≤10-7. This parameter space is motivated by explanations of the 'proton charge radius puzzle', thus this strategy adds a viable new physics component to the neutrino and nuclear astrophysics programs at underground facilities. For the LUNA-type setup, we show that such light particles can be efficiently produced by populating the first excited 6.05 MeV 0+ state of 16O in (p , α) reactions on fluorine. For the SOX-type setup we find similarly powerful sensitivity from the 144Ce-144Pr (νbare) radioactive source, which can produce a scalar with 2.19 or 1.49 MeV energies from the Nd144* de-excitation that occurs along the decay chain. The subsequent detection of a mono-energetic release in a Borexino-type detector with 6.05, 2.19, or 1.49 MeV will be free from substantial environmental backgrounds. The strategy proposed in this Letter is capable of advancing the sensitivity to such states by many orders of magnitude, completely covering the parameter space relevant for the rp puzzle.

  1. ON THE e{sup +}e{sup -} EXCESSES AND THE KNEE OF THE COSMIC RAY SPECTRA-HINTS OF COSMIC RAY ACCELERATION IN YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hongbo; Yuan Qiang; Wang Bo; Fan Chao; Zhang Jianli; Bi Xiaojun

    2009-08-01

    Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been regarded as sources of the Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) up to petaelectronvolts, but convincing evidence is still lacking. In this work we explore the common origin of the subtle features of the CR spectra, such as the knee of CR spectra and the excesses of electron/positron fluxes recently observed by ATIC, H.E.S.S., Fermi-LAT, and PAMELA. Numerical calculation shows that those features of CR spectra can be well reproduced in a scenario with e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production by interactions between high-energy CRs and background photons in an environment similar to the young SNR. The success of such a coherent explanation serves in turn as evidence that at least a portion of CRs might be accelerated in young SNRs.

  2. Cosmic Rays: "A Thin Rain of Charged Particles."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are balloons and electroscopes, understanding cosmic rays, cosmic ray paths, isotopes and cosmic-ray travel, sources of cosmic rays, and accelerating cosmic rays. Some of the history of the discovery and study of cosmic rays is presented. (CW)

  3. Spatiotemporal characterization of soil moisture fields in agricultural areas using cosmic-ray neutron probes and data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Trenton; Wang, Tiejun

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 40% of global food production comes from irrigated agriculture. With the increasing demand for food even greater pressures will be placed on water resources within these systems. In this work we aimed to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture at the field-scale (~500 m) using the newly developed cosmic-ray neutron rover near Waco, NE USA. Here we mapped soil moisture of 144 quarter section fields (a mix of maize, soybean, and natural areas) each week during the 2014 growing season (May to September). The 12 by 12 km study domain also contained three stationary cosmic-ray neutron probes for independent validation of the rover surveys. Basic statistical analysis of the domain indicated a strong relationship between the mean and variance of soil moisture at several averaging scales. The relationships between the mean and higher order moments were not significant. Scaling analysis indicated strong power law behavior between the variance of soil moisture and averaging area with minimal dependence of mean soil moisture on the slope of the power law function. In addition, we combined the data from the three stationary cosmic-ray neutron probes and mobile surveys using linear regression to derive a daily soil moisture product at 1, 3, and 12 km spatial resolutions for the entire growing season. The statistical relationships derived from the rover dataset offer a novel set of observations that will be useful in: 1) calibrating and validating land surface models, 2) calibrating and validating crop models, 3) soil moisture covariance estimates for statistical downscaling of remote sensing products such as SMOS and SMAP, and 4) provide daily center-pivot scale mean soil moisture data for optimal irrigation timing and volume amounts.

  4. TWO-STEP ACCELERATION MODEL OF COSMIC RAYS AT MIDDLE-AGED SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: UNIVERSALITY IN SECONDARY SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations of middle-aged supernova remnants revealed a mysterious broken power-law spectrum. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that the interaction between a supernova blast wave and interstellar clouds formed by thermal instability generates multiple reflected shocks. The typical Mach numbers of the reflected shocks are shown to be M{approx_equal} 2 depending on the density contrast between the diffuse intercloud gas and clouds. These secondary shocks can further energize cosmic-ray particles originally accelerated at the blast-wave shock. This 'two-step' acceleration scenario reproduces the observed gamma-ray spectrum and predicts the high-energy spectral index ranging approximately from 3 to 4.

  5. (Re-)Constraining the Cosmic-Ray Acceleration Efficiency and Magnetic Field Strength in the Northeast Rims of RCW 86

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2014-09-01

    Accurate determination of SNR's shock velocity and magnetic filed is essential to reveal the mechanism of cosmic-ray acceleration. A previous velocity measurement with Chandra for the SNR RCW 86 northeast rim revealed that a substantial fraction of the postshock pressure is produced by the accelerated particles. However, there are disagreement with a H-alpha-measured velocity, and large uncertainty in the X-ray measurement itself, since the observation dates of the two Chandra datasets that were used for the proper motion measurement were not well separated with each other. We thus propose an additional observation of this region to measure the expansion velocity accurately. We will also constrain the magnetic field by searching for short-time variability in the synchrotron X-ray flux.

  6. Coronal and interplanetary propagation, interplanetary acceleration, cosmic-ray observations by deep space network and anomalous component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, C. K.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to provide an overview of the contributions presented in sessions SH3, SH1.5, SH4.6 and SH4.7 of the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference. These contributed papers indicate that steady progress continues to be made in both the observational and the theoretical aspects of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere. Studies of solar and interplanetary particles have placed emphasis on particle directional distributions in relation to pitch-angle scattering and magnetic focusing, on the rigidity and spatial dependence of the mean free path, and on new propagation regimes in the inner and outer heliosphere. Coronal propagation appears in need of correlative multi-spacecraft studies in association with detailed observation of the flare process and coronal magnetic structures. Interplanetary acceleration has now gone into a consolidation phase, with theories being worked out in detail and checked against observation.

  7. Two-step Acceleration Model of Cosmic Rays at Middle-aged Supernova Remnants: Universality in Secondary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Recent gamma-ray observations of middle-aged supernova remnants revealed a mysterious broken power-law spectrum. Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we show that the interaction between a supernova blast wave and interstellar clouds formed by thermal instability generates multiple reflected shocks. The typical Mach numbers of the reflected shocks are shown to be Msime 2 depending on the density contrast between the diffuse intercloud gas and clouds. These secondary shocks can further energize cosmic-ray particles originally accelerated at the blast-wave shock. This "two-step" acceleration scenario reproduces the observed gamma-ray spectrum and predicts the high-energy spectral index ranging approximately from 3 to 4.

  8. Probing Dark Energy via Weak Gravitational Lensing with the Supernova Acceleration Probe (SNAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    SNAP is a candidate for the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM) that seeks to place constraints on the dark energy using two distinct methods. The first, Type Ia SN, is discussed in a separate white paper. The second method is weak gravitational lensing, which relies on the coherent distortions in the shapes of background galaxies by foreground mass structures. The excellent spatial resolution and photometric accuracy afforded by a 2-meter space-based observatory are crucial for achieving the high surface density of resolved galaxies, the tight control of systematic errors in the telescope's Point Spread Function (PSF), and the exquisite redshift accuracy and depth required by this project. These are achieved by the elimination of atmospheric distortion and much of the thermal and gravity loads on the telescope. The SN and WL methods for probing dark energy are highly complementary and the error contours from the two methods are largely orthogonal. The nominal SNAP weak lensing survey covers 1000 square degrees per year of operation in six optical and three near infrared filters (NIR) spanning the range 350 nm to 1.7 {micro}m. This survey will reach a depth of 26.6 AB magnitude in each of the nine filters and allow for approximately 100 resolved galaxies per square arcminute, {approx} 3 times that available from the best ground-based surveys. Photometric redshifts will be measured with statistical accuracy that enables scientific applications for even the faint, high redshift end of the sample. Ongoing work aims to meet the requirements on systematics in galaxy shape measurement, photometric redshift biases, and theoretical predictions.

  9. Probe of the solar magnetic field using the "cosmic-ray shadow" of the sun.

    PubMed

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Chen, T L; Chen, W Y; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; Hakamada, K; He, H H; He, Z T; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H J; Li, W J; Liu, C; Liu, J S; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Munakata, K; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ozawa, S; Qian, X L; Qu, X B; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shao, J; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, H; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yang, Z; Yasue, S; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhai, L M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2013-07-01

    We report on a clear solar-cycle variation of the Sun’s shadow in the 10 TeV cosmic-ray flux observed by the Tibet air shower array during a full solar cycle from 1996 to 2009. In order to clarify the physical implications of the observed solar cycle variation, we develop numerical simulations of the Sun’s shadow, using the potential field source surface model and the current sheet source surface (CSSS) model for the coronal magnetic field. We find that the intensity deficit in the simulated Sun’s shadow is very sensitive to the coronal magnetic field structure, and the observed variation of the Sun’s shadow is better reproduced by the CSSS model. This is the first successful attempt to evaluate the coronal magnetic field models by using the Sun’s shadow observed in the TeV cosmic-ray flux. PMID:24027782

  10. Cosmic Mach Number: a sensitive probe for the growth of structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Zhao, Gong-Bo E-mail: ostriker@princeton.edu

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the potential power of the Cosmic Mach Number (CMN), which is the ratio between the mean velocity and the velocity dispersion of galaxies as a function of cosmic scales, to constrain cosmologies. We first measure the CMN from 4 catalogs of galaxy peculiar velocity surveys at low redshift (z element of [0.002,0.03]), and use them to contrast cosmological models. Overall, current data is consistent with the WMAP7 ΛCDM model. We find that the CMN is highly sensitive to the growth of structure on scales k element of [0.01,0.1] h/Mpc in Fourier space. Therefore, modified gravity models, and models with massive neutrinos, in which the structure growth generically deviates from that of the ΛCDM model in a scale-dependent way, can be well differentiated from the ΛCDM model by using future CMN data.

  11. Combined analysis of soil moisture measurements from roving and fixed cosmic ray neutron probes for multiscale real-time monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Trenton E.; Wang, Tiejun; Avery, William; Finkenbiner, Catherine; Brocca, Luca

    2015-05-01

    Soil moisture partly controls land-atmosphere mass and energy exchanges and ecohydrological processes in natural and agricultural systems. Thus, many models and remote sensing products continue to improve their spatiotemporal resolution of soil moisture, with some land surface models reaching 1 km resolution. However, the reliability and accuracy of both modeled and remotely sensed soil moisture require comparison with ground measurements at the appropriate spatiotemporal scales. One promising technique is the cosmic ray neutron probe. Here we further assess the suitability of this technique for real-time monitoring across a large area by combining data from three fixed probes and roving surveys over a 12 km × 12 km area in eastern Nebraska. Regression analyses indicated linear relationships between the fixed probe averages and roving estimates of soil moisture for each grid cell, allowing us to derive an 8 h product at spatial resolutions of 1, 3, and 12 km, with root-mean-square error of 3%, 1.8%, and 0.9%.

  12. Diffuse cosmic gamma-ray background as a probe of cosmological gravitino regeneration and decay

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, K.A.; Silk, J.

    1985-11-18

    We predict the presence of a spectral feature in the isotropic cosmic gamma-ray background associated with gravitino decays at high red shifts. With a gravitino abundance that falls in the relatively narrow range expected for thermally regenerated gravitinos following an inflationary epoc in the very early universe, gravitinos of mass several gigaelectronvolts are found to yield an appreciable flux of 1--10-MeV diffuse gamma rays.

  13. Probing Atmospheric Electric Fields in Thunderstorms through Radio Emission from Cosmic-Ray-Induced Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Schellart, P; Trinh, T N G; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Scholten, O; Ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Ebert, U; Koehn, C; Rutjes, C; Alexov, A; Anderson, J M; Avruch, I M; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J W; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; de Geus, E; de Vos, M; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H A; Juette, E; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Mevius, M; Moldon, J; Norden, M J; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D J; Serylak, M; Smirnov, O; Steinmetz, M; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Wise, M W; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-04-24

    We present measurements of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers that took place during thunderstorms. The intensity and polarization patterns of these air showers are radically different from those measured during fair-weather conditions. With the use of a simple two-layer model for the atmospheric electric field, these patterns can be well reproduced by state-of-the-art simulation codes. This in turn provides a novel way to study atmospheric electric fields. PMID:25955053

  14. Cosmic ray decreases and particle acceleration in 1978-1982 and the associated solar wind structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a study of the time histories of particles in the energy range 1 MeV to 1 GeV at the times of greater than 3-percent cosmic ray decreases in the years 1978-1982 are presented. The intensity-time profiles of the particles are used to separate the cosmic ray decreases into four classes which are subsequently associated with three types of solar wind structures. Decreases in class 1 (15 events) and class 2 (26 events) are associated with shocks driven by energetic coronal mass ejections. For class 1 events, the ejecta are detected at 1 AU, whereas this is not usually the case for class 2 events. The shock must therefore play a dominant role in producing the cosmic ray depression in class 2 events. It is argued that since energetic particles (from MEV to GeV energies) seen at earth may respond to solar wind structures which are not detected at earth, consideration of particle observations over a wide range of energies is necessary for a full understanding of cosmic ray decreases.

  15. A New Mechanism of Magnetic Field Generation in Supernova Shock Waves and its Implication for Cosmic Ray Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamond, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    SNR shocks are the most probable source of galactic cosmic rays. We discuss the diffusive acceleration mechanism in terms of its potential to accelerate CRs to 10^18 eV, as observations imply. One possibility, currently discussed in the literature, is to resonantly generate a turbulent magnetic field via accelerated particles in excess of the background field. We indicate some difficulties of this scenario and suggest a different possibility, which is based on the generation of Alfven waves at the gyroradius scale at the background field level, with a subsequent transfer to longer scales via interaction with strong acoustic turbulence in the shock precursor. The acoustic turbulence in turn, may be generated by Drury instability or by parametric instability of the Alfven (A) waves. The essential idea is an A-->A+S decay instability process, where one of the interacting scatterers (i.e. the sound, or S-waves) are driven by the Drury instability process. This rapidly generates longer wavelength Alfven waves, which in turn resonate with high energy CRs thus binding them to the shock and enabling their further acceleration.

  16. PROBING THE EPOCH OF PRE-REIONIZATION BY CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC MICROWAVE AND INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A. E-mail: Alexander.Kashlinsky@nasa.gov

    2014-12-20

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from Euclid, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies, can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined, CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space- and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky Euclid CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales ∼5'-60' with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of up to S/N ∼ 4-8 depending on the contribution to the Thomson optical depth during those pre-reionization epochs (Δτ ≅ 0.05) and the temperature of the IGM (up to ∼10{sup 4} K). Such a measurement would offer a new window to explore the emergence and physical properties of these first light sources.

  17. DIFFUSE EMISSION MEASUREMENT WITH THE SPECTROMETER ON INTEGRAL AS AN INDIRECT PROBE OF COSMIC-RAY ELECTRONS AND POSITRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, Laurent; Jourdain, Elisabeth; Roques, Jean-Pierre; Strong, Andrew W.; Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.

    2011-09-20

    Significant advances have been made in the understanding of the diffuse Galactic hard X-ray continuum emission using data from the INTEGRAL observatory. The diffuse hard power-law component seen with the SPectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) has been identified with inverse-Compton emission from relativistic (GeV) electrons on the cosmic microwave background and Galactic interstellar radiation field. In the present analysis, SPI data from 2003 to 2009, with a total exposure time of {approx}10{sup 8} s, are used to derive the Galactic ridge hard X-ray spatial distribution and spectrum between 20 keV and 2.4 MeV. Both are consistent with predictions from the GALPROP code. The good agreement between measured and predicted emission from keV to GeV energies suggests that the correct production mechanisms have been identified. We discuss the potential of the SPI data to provide an indirect probe of the interstellar cosmic-ray electron distribution, in particular for energies below a few GeV.

  18. Direct Acceleration of Pickup Ions at The Solar Wind Termination Shock: The Production of Anomalous Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Jones, Frank C.; Baring, Matthew G.

    1998-01-01

    We have modeled the injection and acceleration of pickup ions at the solar wind termination shock and investigated the parameters needed to produce the observed Anomalous Cosmic Ray (ACR) fluxes. A non-linear Monte Carlo technique was employed, which in effect solves the Boltzmann equation and is not restricted to near-isotropic particle distribution functions. This technique models the injection of thermal and pickup ions, the acceleration of these ions, and the determination of the shock structure under the influence of the accelerated ions. The essential effects of injection are treated in a mostly self-consistent manner, including effects from shock obliquity, cross- field diffusion, and pitch-angle scattering. Using recent determinations of pickup ion densities, we are able to match the absolute flux of hydrogen in the ACRs by assuming that pickup ion scattering mean free paths, at the termination shock, are much less than an AU and that modestly strong cross-field diffusion occurs. Simultaneously, we match the flux ratios He(+)/H(+) or O(+)/H(+) to within a factor approx. 5. If the conditions of strong scattering apply, no pre-termination-shock injection phase is required and the injection and acceleration of pickup ions at the termination shock is totally analogous to the injection and acceleration of ions at highly oblique interplanetary shocks recently observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. The fact that ACR fluxes can be modeled with standard shock assumptions suggests that the much-discussed "injection problem" for highly oblique shocks stems from incomplete (either mathematical or computer) modeling of these shocks rather than from any actual difficulty shocks may have in injecting and accelerating thermal or quasi-thermal particles.

  19. Probing the Light Speed Anisotropy with Respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Kashin, A.; Margarian, A.; Bartalini, O.; Bellini, V.; Castoldi, M.; D'Angelo, A.; Didelez, J.-P.; di Salvo, R.; Fantini, A.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Giusa, A.; Guidal, M.; Hourany, E.; Knyazyan, S.; Kouznetsov, V.; Kunne, R.; Lapik, A.; Levi Sandri, P.; Lleres, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Moricciani, D.; Nedorezov, V.; Perrin, C.; Rebreyend, D.; Russo, G.; Rudnev, N.; Schaerf, C.; Sperduto, M.-L.; Sutera, M.-C.; Turinge, A.

    We have studied the angular fluctuations in the speed of light with respect to the apex of the dipole of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using the experimental data obtained with GRAAL facility, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The measurements were based on the stability of the Compton edge of laser photons scattered on the 6 GeV monochromatic electron beam. The results enable one to obtain a conservative constraint on the anisotropy in the light speed variations Δc(θ)/c<3×10-12, i.e. with higher precision than from previous experiments.

  20. A new probe of the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Greiner, Maksim; Ensslin, Torsten A.

    2015-08-01

    Establishing the properties of magnetic fields on scales larger than galaxy clusters is critical for resolving the unknown origin and evolution of galactic and cluster magnetism. More generally, observations of magnetic fields on cosmic scales are needed for assessing the impacts of magnetism on cosmology, particle physics, and structure formation over the full history of the Universe. However, firm observational evidence for magnetic fields in large scale structure remains elusive. In an effort to address this problem, we have developed a novel statistical method to infer the magnetic field power spectrum in cosmic web filaments using observation of the two-point correlation of Faraday rotation measures from a dense grid of extragalactic radio sources. Here we describe our approach, which embeds and extends the pioneering work of Kolatt (1998) within the context of Information Field Theory (a statistical theory for Bayesian inference on spatially distributed signals; Enfllin et al., 2009). We describe prospects for observation, for example with forthcoming data from the ultra-deep JVLA CHILES Con Pol survey and future surveys with the SKA.

  1. Modeling Focused Acceleration of Cosmic-Ray Particles by Stochastic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, C. K.; Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Craig, I. J. D.

    2012-10-01

    Schlickeiser & Shalchi suggested that a first-order Fermi mechanism of focused particle acceleration could be important in several astrophysical applications. In order to investigate focused acceleration, we express the Fokker-Planck equation as an equivalent system of stochastic differential equations. We simplify the system for a set of physically motivated parameters, extend the analytical theory, and determine the evolving particle distribution numerically. While our numerical results agree with the focused acceleration rate of Schlickeiser & Shalchi for a weakly anisotropic particle distribution, we establish significant limitations of the analytical approach. Momentum diffusion is found to be more significant than focused acceleration at early times. Most critically, the particle distribution rapidly becomes anisotropic, leading to a much slower momentum gain rate. We discuss the consequences of our results for the role of focused acceleration in astrophysics.

  2. Yang-Mills Gravity in Flat Space-Time II:. Gravitational Radiations and Lee-Yang Force for Accelerated Cosmic Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jong-Ping

    Within Yang-Mills gravity with translation group T(4) in flat space-time, the invariant action involving quadratic translation gauge-curvature leads to quadrupole radiations, which are shown to be consistent with experiments. The radiation power turns out to be the same as that in Einstein's gravity to the second-order approximation. We also discuss an interesting physical reason for the accelerated cosmic expansion based on the long-range Lee-Yang force of Ub(1) gauge field associated with the established conservation law of baryon number. We show that the Lee-Yang force can be related to a linear potential ∝ r, provided the gauge field satisfies a fourth-order differential equation in flat space-time. Furthermore, we consider an experimental test of the Lee-Yang force related to the accelerated cosmic expansion. The necessity of generalizing Lorentz transformations for accelerated frames of reference and accelerated Wu-Doppler effects are briefly discussed.

  3. Generation of the cosmic rays flux variations due to surfatron acceleration of charges by electromagnetic waves in space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhin, Nikolay; Loznikov, Vladimir; Shkevov, Rumen; Zolnikova, Nadezhda; Mikhailovskaya, Ludmila

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of experimental data on the spectra of cosmic rays (CR) has shown their variability on time scales of a few years, in particular, CR variations observed in E / Z range from TeV to 10000 TeV, where E is the energy of the particle, Z is its charge number. Consequently, the source of these variations must be located at a distance of no more than 1 parsec from the sun in the closest local interstellar clouds. As a mechanism of such variations appearance it is considered the surfatron acceleration of CR particles by electromagnetic wave in a relatively quiet space plasma. On the basis of developed model the numerical calculations were performed for particle capture dynamics (electrons, protons, helium and iron nuclei) in the wave effective potential well with a following growth their energy by 3-6 orders of magnitude. Optimal conditions for the implementation of charged particles surfatron acceleration in space plasma, the rate of trapped particles energy growth, the dynamics of wave phase on the captured particle trajectory, a temporal dynamics of components for charge impulse momentum and speed were studied. It is indicated that the capture of a small fraction of particles by wave for energies about TeV and less followed by their surfatron acceleration to an energy of about 10000 TeV will lead to a significant increase in the CR flux at such high energies. Thus CL flow variations are conditioned by changes in the space weather parameters

  4. Data acquisition, storage and control architecture for the SuperNova Acceleration Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Prosser, Alan; Cardoso, Guilherme; Chramowicz, John; Marriner, John; Rivera, Ryan; Turqueti, Marcos; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    The SuperNova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) instrument is being designed to collect image and spectroscopic data for the study of dark energy in the universe. In this paper, we describe a distributed architecture for the data acquisition system which interfaces to visible light and infrared imaging detectors. The architecture includes the use of NAND flash memory for the storage of exposures in a file system. Also described is an FPGA-based lossless data compression algorithm with a configurable pre-scaler based on a novel square root data compression method to improve compression performance. The required interactions of the distributed elements with an instrument control unit will be described as well.

  5. Multi-probing of the auroral acceleration region by Cluster (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G. T.; Sadeghi, S.; Karlsson, R.; Lindqvist, P.; Nilsson, H.; Pickett, J.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Forsyth, C.; Masson, A.

    2010-12-01

    Multi-probe in situ measurements in the auroral acceleration region became a reality in November 2008, when the orbit of the European Space Agency Cluster satellites, was lowered to cover this region, typically located between 5000 and 12000 km altitude above the polar atmosphere. Results are presented from Cluster crossings of this region, at different altitudes and with time separations of a few minutes between the spacecraft. The unique observations allow us to address the spatial and temporal properties of this region, such as the morphology and stability in space and time of the associated quasi-static electric potential structures. The formation of such acceleration structures is a fundamental and ubiquitous space plasma process, taking place not only around Earth, but around many other solar system planets, such as Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn.

  6. Small-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropies as probe of the geometry of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We perform detailed calculations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in a cold dark matter (CDM)-dominated open universe with primordial adiabatic density perturbations for a variety of reionization histories. The CMB anisotropies depend primarily on the geometry of the universe, which in a matter-dominated universe is determined by Omega and the optical depth to the surface of last scattering. In particular, the location on the primary Doppler peak depends primarily on Omega and is fairly insensitive to the other unknown parameters, such as Omega(sub b), h, Lambda, and the shape of the power spectrum. Therefore, if the primordial density perturbations are adiabatic, measurements of CMB anisotropies on small scales may be used to determine Omega.

  7. Late time cosmic acceleration from vacuum Brans-Dicke theory in 5D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, J.

    2010-05-01

    We show that the scalar-vacuum Brans-Dicke equations in 5D are equivalent to Brans-Dicke theory in 4D with a self-interacting potential and an effective matter field. The cosmological implication, in the context of FRW models, is that the observed accelerated expansion of the universe comes naturally from the condition that the scalar field is not a ghost, i.e. ω > -3/2. We find an effective matter-dominated 4D universe which shows accelerated expansion if -3/2 < ω < -1. We study the question of whether accelerated expansion can be made compatible with large values of ω, within the framework of a 5D scalar-vacuum Brans-Dicke theory with variable, instead of constant, parameter ω. In this framework, and based on a general class of solutions of the field equations, we demonstrate that accelerated expansion is incompatible with large values of ω.

  8. Mass entrainment and turbulence-driven acceleration of ultra-high energy cosmic rays in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wykes, Sarka; Croston, Judith H.; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Eilek, Jean A.; Biermann, Peter L.; Achterberg, Abraham; Bray, Justin D.; Lazarian, Alex; Haverkorn, Marijke; Protheroe, Ray J.; Bromberg, Omer

    2013-10-01

    Observations of the FR I radio galaxy Centaurus A in radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray bands provide evidence for lepton acceleration up to several TeV and clues about hadron acceleration to tens of EeV. Synthesising the available observational constraints on the physical conditions and particle content in the jets, inner lobes and giant lobes of Centaurus A, we aim to evaluate its feasibility as an ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray source. We apply several methods of determining jet power and affirm the consistency of various power estimates of ~1 × 1043 erg s-1. Employing scaling relations based on previous results for 3C 31, we estimate particle number densities in the jets, encompassing available radio through X-ray observations. Our model is compatible with the jets ingesting ~3 × 1021 g s-1 of matter via external entrainment from hot gas and ~7 × 1022 g s-1 via internal entrainment from jet-contained stars. This leads to an imbalance between the internal lobe pressure available from radiating particles and magnetic field, and our derived external pressure. Based on knowledge of the external environments of other FR I sources, we estimate the thermal pressure in the giant lobes as 1.5 × 10-12 dyn cm-2, from which we deduce a lower limit to the temperature of ~1.6 × 108 K. Using dynamical and buoyancy arguments, we infer ~440-645 Myr and ~560 Myr as the sound-crossing and buoyancy ages of the giant lobes respectively, inconsistent with their spectral ages. We re-investigate the feasibility of particle acceleration via stochastic processes in the lobes, placing new constraints on the energetics and on turbulent input to the lobes. The same "very hot" temperatures that allow self-consistency between the entrainment calculations and the missing pressure also allow stochastic UHECR acceleration models to work.

  9. Onion-shell model of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Volk, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    A method is devised to approximate the spatially averaged momentum distribution function for the accelerated particles at the end of the active lifetime of a supernova remnant. The analysis is confined to the test particle approximation and adiabatic losses are oversimplified, but unsteady shock motion, evolving shock strength, and non-uniform gas flow effects on the accelerated particle spectrum are included. Monoenergetic protons are injected at the shock front. It is found that the dominant effect on the resultant accelerated particle spectrum is a changing spectral index with shock strength. High energy particles are produced in early phases, and the resultant distribution function is a slowly varying power law over several orders of magnitude, independent of the specific details of the supernova remnant.

  10. Kinetic studies of wave-particle interactions in cosmic-ray acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Martin; Niemiec, Jacek; Stroman, Thomas; Bret, Antoine; Roeken, Christian

    Shock acceleration relies on the presence of magnetic-field fluctuations that can scatter rela-tivistic charged particles in both the upstream and downstream regions of the shock. We report on kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of the non-linear evolution of magnetic turbulence that arises upstream of the shock as well as at the shock itself. We will in particular address the relation between modes seen in the simulations and waves expected on the grounds of a linear instability analysis, the efficiency of small-scale turbulence in scattering relativistic particles, and the influence of accelerated particles on the formation of the shock itself.

  11. ANISOTROPY AS A PROBE OF THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY PROPAGATION AND HALO MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Xiao-bo; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Cheng; Hu, Hong-bo; Xue, Liang

    2012-05-01

    The anisotropy of cosmic rays (CRs) in the solar vicinity is generally attributed to CR streaming due to the discrete distribution of CR sources or local magnetic field modulation. Recently, the two-dimensional large-scale CR anisotropy has been measured by many experiments in the TeV-PeV energy range in both hemispheres. The tail-in excess along the tangential direction of the local spiral arm and the loss cone deficit pointing to the north Galactic pole direction agree with what have been obtained in tens to hundreds of GeV. The persistence of the two large-scale anisotropy structures in such a wide energy range suggests that the anisotropy might be due to global streaming of the Galactic CRs (GCRs). This work tries to extend the observed CR anisotropy picture from the solar system to the whole galaxy. In such a case, we can find a new interesting signature, a loop of GCR streaming, of the GCR propagation. We further calculate the overall GCR streaming induced magnetic field, and find a qualitative consistency with the observed structure of the halo magnetic field.

  12. Probing the cosmic distance duality with strong gravitational lensing and supernovae Ia data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Busti, V. C.; Alcaniz, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    We propose and perform a new test of the cosmic distance-duality relation (CDDR), DL(z) / DA(z) (1 + z)2 = 1, where DA is the angular diameter distance and DL is the luminosity distance to a given source at redshift z, using strong gravitational lensing (SGL) and type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) data. We show that the ratio D=DA12/DA2 and D*=DL12/DL2, where the subscripts 1 and 2 correspond, respectively, to redshifts z1 and z2, are linked by D/D*=(1+z1)2 if the CDDR is valid. We allow departures from the CDDR by defining two functions for η(z1), which equals unity when the CDDR is valid. We find that combination of SGL and SNe Ia data favours no violation of the CDDR at 1σ confidence level (η(z) simeq 1), in complete agreement with other tests and reinforcing the theoretical pillars of the CDDR.

  13. Cosmic ray confinement and transport models for probing their putative sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Recent efforts in cosmic ray (CR) confinement and transport theory are discussed. Three problems are addressed as being crucial for understanding the present day observations and their possible telltale signs of the CR origin. The first problem concerns CR behavior right after their release from a source, such as a supernova remnant. At this phase, the CRs are confined near the source by self-emitted Alfven waves. The second is the problem of diffusive propagation of CRs through the turbulent interstellar medium. This is a seemingly straightforward and long-resolved problem, but it remains controversial and reveals paradoxes. A resolution based on the Chapman-Enskog asymptotic CR transport analysis, that also includes magnetic focusing, is suggested. The third problem is about a puzzling sharp ( ˜10 ° ) anisotropies in the CR arrival directions that might bear on important clues of their transport between the source and observer. The overarching goal is to improve our understanding of all aspects of the CR's source escape and ensuing propagation through the galaxy to the level at which their sources can be identified observationally.

  14. Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray probes of large scale structure and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigl, Günter; Miniati, Francesco; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2004-08-01

    We study signatures of a structured universe in the multi-pole moments, auto-correlation function, and cluster statistics of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays above 1019 eV. We compare scenarios where the sources are distributed homogeneously or according to the baryon density distribution obtained from a cosmological large scale structure simulation. The influence of extragalactic magnetic fields is studied by comparing the case of negligible fields with fields expected to be produced along large scale shocks with a maximal strength consistent with observations. We confirm that strongly magnetized observers would predict considerable anisotropy on large scales, which is already in conflict with current data. In the best fit scenario only the sources are strongly magnetized, although deflection can still be considerable, of order 20° up to 1020 eV, and a pronounced GZK cutoff is predicted. We then discuss signatures for future large scale full-sky detectors such as the Pierre Auger and EUSO projects. Auto-correlations are sensitive to the source density only if magnetic fields do not significantly affect propagation. In contrast, for a weakly magnetized observer, degree scale auto-correlations below a certain level indicate magnetized discrete sources. It may be difficult even for next generation experiments to distinguish between structured and unstructured source distributions.

  15. Three-dimensional electron density along the WSA and MSNA latitudes probed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F. Y.; Liu, J. Y.; Chang, L. C.; Lin, C. H.; Chen, C. H.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we employ electron density profiles derived by the GPS radio occultation experiment aboard the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellites to examine the electron density on geographic latitudes of 40° to 80° in the Southern hemisphere and 30° to 60° in the Northern hemisphere at various global fixed local times from February 2009 to January 2010. The results reveal that an eastward shift of a single-peak plasma density feature occurs along the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA) latitudes, while a double-peak plasma density feature appears along the northern Mid-latitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly (MSNA) latitudes. A cross-comparison between three-dimensional F3/C electron density and HWM93 simulation confirms that the magnetic meridional effect and vertical effect caused by neutral winds exhibit the eastward shifts. Furthermore, we find that the eastward shift of the peaks when viewed as a function of local time suggests that they could be interpreted as being comprised of different tidal components with distinct zonal phase velocities in local time.

  16. Magnetic field amplification in nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration including resonant and non-resonant cosmic-ray driven instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, Andrei M.; Osipov, Sergei M.; Ellison, Donald C.; Vladimirov, Andrey E. E-mail: osm2004@mail.ru E-mail: avenovo@gmail.com

    2014-07-10

    We present a nonlinear Monte Carlo model of efficient diffusive shock acceleration where the magnetic turbulence responsible for particle diffusion is calculated self-consistently from the resonant cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instability, together with non-resonant short- and long-wavelength CR-current-driven instabilities. We include the backpressure from CRs interacting with the strongly amplified magnetic turbulence which decelerates and heats the super-Alfvénic flow in the extended shock precursor. Uniquely, in our plane-parallel, steady-state, multi-scale model, the full range of particles, from thermal (∼eV) injected at the viscous subshock to the escape of the highest energy CRs (∼PeV) from the shock precursor, are calculated consistently with the shock structure, precursor heating, magnetic field amplification, and scattering center drift relative to the background plasma. In addition, we show how the cascade of turbulence to shorter wavelengths influences the total shock compression, the downstream proton temperature, the magnetic fluctuation spectra, and accelerated particle spectra. A parameter survey is included where we vary shock parameters, the mode of magnetic turbulence generation, and turbulence cascading. From our survey results, we obtain scaling relations for the maximum particle momentum and amplified magnetic field as functions of shock speed, ambient density, and shock size.

  17. Complete cosmic scenario from inflation to late time acceleration: Nonequilibrium thermodynamics in the context of particle creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subenoy; Saha, Subhajit

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with the mechanism of particle creation in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The second order nonequilibrium thermodynamical prescription of Israel and Stewart has been presented with particle creation rate, treated as the dissipative effect. In the background of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) model, we assume the nonequilibrium thermodynamical process to be isentropic so that the entropy per particle does not change and consequently the dissipative pressure can be expressed linearly in terms of the particle creation rate. Here the dissipative pressure behaves as a dynamical variable having a nonlinear inhomogeneous evolution equation and the entropy flow vector satisfies the second law of thermodynamics. Further, using the Friedmann equations and by proper choice of the particle creation rate as a function of the Hubble parameter, it is possible to show (separately) a transition from the inflationary phase to the radiation era and also from the matter dominated era to late time acceleration. Also, in analogy to analytic continuation, it is possible to show a continuous cosmic evolution from inflation to late time acceleration by adjusting the parameters. It is found that in the de Sitter phase, the comoving entropy increases exponentially with time, keeping entropy per particle unchanged. Subsequently, the above cosmological scenarios have been described from a field theoretic point of view by introducing a scalar field having self-interacting potential. Finally, we make an attempt to show the cosmological phenomenon of particle creation as Hawking radiation, particularly during the inflationary era.

  18. Cosmic accelerated expansion and the entropy-corrected holographic dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, H. Mohseni; Jamil, Mubasher

    2011-06-01

    By considering the logarithmic correction to the energy density, we study the behavior of Hubble parameter in the holographic dark energy model. We assume that the universe is dominated by interacting dark energy and matter and the accelerated expansion of the universe, which may be occurred in the early universe or late time, is studied.

  19. 21 cm line bispectrum as a method to probe cosmic dawn and epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimabukuro, Hayato; Yoshiura, Shintaro; Takahashi, Keitaro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2016-05-01

    Redshifted 21 cm signal is a promising tool to investigate the state of intergalactic medium (IGM) in the cosmic dawn (CD) and epoch of reionization (EoR). In our previous work, we studied the variance and skewness of the 21 cm fluctuations to give a clear interpretation of the 21 cm power spectrum and found that skewness is a good indicator of the epoch when X-ray heating becomes effective. Thus, the non-Gaussian feature of the spatial distribution of the 21 cm signal is expected to be useful to investigate the astrophysical effects in the CD and EoR. In this paper, in order to investigate such a non-Gaussian feature in more detail, we focus on the bispectrum of the 21 cm signal. It is expected that the 21 cm brightness temperature bispectrum is produced by non-Gaussianity due to the various astrophysical effects such as the Wouthuysen-Field effect, X-ray heating and reionization. We study the various properties of 21 cm bispectrum such as scale dependence, shape dependence and redshift evolution. And also we study the contribution from each component of 21 cm bispectrum. We find that the contribution from each component has characteristic scale-dependent feature. In particular, we find that the bulk of the 21 cm bispectrum at z = 20 comes from the matter fluctuations, while in other epochs it is mainly determined by the spin and/or neutral fraction fluctuations and it is expected that we could obtain more detailed information on the IGM in the CD and EoR by using the 21 cm bispectrum in the future experiments, combined with the power spectrum and skewness.

  20. Probing the Dark Flow Signal in WMAP 9 -Year and Planck Cosmic Microwave Background Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrio-Barandela, F.; Kashlinsky, A.; Ebeling, H.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kocevski, D.

    2015-09-01

    The “dark flow” dipole is a statistically significant dipole found at the position of galaxy clusters in filtered maps of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. The dipole measured in WMAP 3-, 5-, and 7- year data releases was (1) mutually consistent, (2) roughly aligned with the all-sky CMB dipole, and (3) correlated with clusters’ X-ray luminosities. We analyzed WMAP 9 -year and Planck 1st- year data releases using a catalog of 980 clusters outside of the Kp0 mask to test our earlier findings. The dipoles measured on these new data sets are fully compatible with our earlier estimates, are similar in amplitude and direction to our previous results, and are in disagreement with the results of an earlier study by the Planck Collaboration. Furthermore, in the Planck data sets dipoles are found to be independent of frequency, ruling out the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich as the source of the effect. In the data of both WMAP and Planck we find a clear correlation between the dipole measured at the cluster location in filtered maps and the average anisotropy on the original maps, further proving that the dipole is associated with clusters. The dipole signal is dominated by the most massive clusters, with a statistical significance that is better than 99%, slightly larger than in WMAP. Since both data sets differ in foreground contributions, instrumental noise, and other systematics, the agreement between the WMAP and Planck dipoles argues against them being due to systematic effects in either of the experiments.

  1. Lyman-tomography of Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations with Euclid: Probing Emissions and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations at z ≳ 10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R. G.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Helgason, K.

    2015-11-01

    The Euclid space mission, designed to probe evolution of the Dark Energy (DE), will map a large area of the sky at three adjacent near-IR filters, Y, J, and H. This coverage will also enable mapping source-subtracted cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations with unprecedented accuracy on sub-degree angular scales. Here, we propose methodology, using the Lyman-break tomography applied to the Euclid-based CIB maps, to accurately isolate the history of CIB emissions as a function of redshift from 10 ≲ z ≲ 20 and to identify the baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAOs) at those epochs. To identify the BAO signature, we would assemble individual CIB maps over conservatively large contiguous areas of ≳400 deg2. The method can isolate the CIB spatial spectrum by z to sub-percent statistical accuracy. We illustrate this with a specific model of CIB production at high z normalized to reproduce the measured Spitzer-based CIB fluctuation. We show that even if the latter contains only a small component from high-z sources, the amplitude of that component can be accurately isolated with the methodology proposed here and the BAO signatures at z ≳ 10 are recovered well from the CIB fluctuation spatial spectrum. Probing the BAO at those redshifts will be an important test of the underlying cosmological paradigm and would narrow the overall uncertainties on the evolution of cosmological parameters, including the DE. Similar methodology is applicable to the planned WFIRST mission, where we show that a possible fourth near-IR channel at ≥2 μm would be beneficial.

  2. CHILES Con Pol: Probing galaxy evolution, the dark Universe, and cosmic magnetism with a deep 1000 hour Jansky VLA survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, Christopher A.; Chiles Con Pol Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We recently started a 1000 hour campaign to observe 0.2 square degrees of the COSMOS field in full polarization continuum at 1.4 GHz with the Jansky VLA, as part of a joint program with the spectral line COSMOS HI Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES). When complete, we expect our CHILES Continuum Polarization (CHILES Con Pol) survey to reach an unprecedented SKA-era sensitivity of 0.7 uJy per 4 arcsecond FWHM beam. Here we present the key goals of CHILES Con Pol, which are to (i) produce a source catalog of legacy value to the astronomical community, (ii) measure differential source counts in total intensity, linear polarization, and circular polarization in order to constrain the redshift and luminosity distributions of source populations, (iii) perform a novel weak lensing study using radio polarization as an indicator of intrinsic alignment to better study dark energy and dark matter, and (iv) probe the unknown origin of cosmic magnetism by measuring the strength and structure of intergalactic magnetic fields in the filaments of large scale structure. The CHILES Con Pol source catalog will be a useful resource for upcoming wide-field surveys by acting as a training set for machine learning algorithms, which can then be used to identify and classify radio sources in regions lacking deep multiwavelength coverage.

  3. RED SUPERGIANT STARS AS COSMIC ABUNDANCE PROBES: NLTE EFFECTS IN J-BAND IRON AND TITANIUM LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Bergemann, Maria; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Lind, Karin; Plez, Bertrand; Davies, Ben; Gazak, Zach E-mail: klind@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: zgazak@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: bdavies@ast.cam.ac.uk

    2012-06-01

    Detailed non-LTE (NLTE) calculations for red supergiant (RSG) stars are presented to investigate the influence of NLTE on the formation of atomic iron and titanium lines in the J band. With their enormous brightness at J band RSG stars are ideal probes of cosmic abundances. Recent LTE studies have found that metallicities accurate to 0.15 dex can be determined from medium-resolution spectroscopy of individual RSGs in galaxies as distant as 10 Mpc. The NLTE results obtained in this investigation support these findings. NLTE abundance corrections for iron are smaller than 0.05 dex for effective temperatures between 3400 K and 4200 K and 0.1 dex at 4400 K. For titanium the NLTE abundance corrections vary smoothly between -0.4 dex and +0.2 dex as a function of effective temperature. For both elements, the corrections also depend on stellar gravity and metallicity. The physical reasons behind the NLTE corrections and the consequences for extragalactic J-band abundance studies are discussed.

  4. Unveiling the Origin of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olinto, Angela V.

    2015-04-01

    The origin of cosmic rays, relativistic particles that range from below GeVs to hundreds of EeVs, is a century old mystery. Extremely energetic phenomena occurring over a wide range of scales, from the Solar System to distant galaxies, are needed to explain the non-thermal particle spectrum that covers over 12 orders of magnitude. Space Missions are the most effective platforms to study the origin and history of these cosmic particles. Current missions probe particle acceleration and propagation in the Solar System and in our Galaxy. This year ISS-CREAM and CALET join AMS in establishing the International Space Station as the most active site for studying the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. These missions will study astrophysical cosmic ray accelerators as well as other possible sources of energetic particles such as dark matter annihilation or decay. In the future, the ISS may also be the site for studying extremely high-energy extragalactic cosmic rays with JEM-EUSO. We review recent results in the quest for unveiling the sources of energetic particles with balloons and space payloads and report on activities of the Cosmic ray Science Interest Group (CosmicSIG) under the Physics of the Cosmos Program Analysis Group (PhysPAG).

  5. PREFACE: Technology development for a cosmic microwave background probe of inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, S.; Irwin, K.

    2009-07-01

    In late 2007 NASA called for proposals to fund Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Studies. The goal was to generate concept studies for key future missions, which would be forwarded to the Astro2010 astrophysics decadal review committee for prioritization. Under the guidance and orchestration of the Primordial Polarization Program Definition Team, a NASA committee chartered to coordinate the activities of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) community, a CMB proposal aiming to represent the consensus of the entire community was submitted. A CMBPol Mission Concept Study grant was awarded in early 2008. Under the grant we reviewed the entire activities of the CMB community and proposed a path for the next decade. We also assessed the case and recommended a path for a future CMB polarization satellite. The grant funded three community-wide workshops that were held over the summer of 2008. The goal of the first workshop, held at Fermilab, was to discuss the theoretical foundation of inflation and its signature on the CMB, as well as the theoretical aspects of other polarimetric signatures observable at millimeter wavelengths. Volume 1141 of the American Institute of Physics conference proceedings summarizes the results of this workshop. The second workshop, held at Annapolis, Maryland, centered on expected systematic effects in polarimetric experiments and their potential mitigation. The third workshop, held at the NIST facility at Boulder, Colorado, focused on the technology requirements necessary to make incisive CMB polarization measurements and what was needed to advance the technology to the readiness level required for a start of a space-borne mission. The electronic proceedings presented here are the result of this third workshop. In preparing for the workshop the organizers assigned topical-editors for each technology topic. Each of them solicited white paper contributions from experts in their respective areas. The white papers were distributed to all

  6. The Role of Cosmic-Ray Pressure in Accelerating Galactic Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Christine M.; Pakmor, Rüdiger; Marinacci, Federico; Pfrommer, Christoph; Springel, Volker; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Smith, Rowan J.

    2016-08-01

    We study the formation of galactic outflows from supernova (SN) explosions with the moving-mesh code AREPO in a stratified column of gas with a surface density similar to the Milky Way disk at the solar circle. We compare different simulation models for SN placement and energy feedback, including cosmic rays (CRs), and find that models that place SNe in dense gas and account for CR diffusion are able to drive outflows with similar mass loading as obtained from a random placement of SNe with no CRs. Despite this similarity, CR-driven outflows differ in several other key properties including their overall clumpiness and velocity. Moreover, the forces driving these outflows originate in different sources of pressure, with the CR diffusion model relying on non-thermal pressure gradients to create an outflow driven by internal pressure and the random-placement model depending on kinetic pressure gradients to propel a ballistic outflow. CRs therefore appear to be non-negligible physics in the formation of outflows from the interstellar medium.

  7. BLAZAR HALOS AS PROBE FOR EXTRAGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MAXIMAL ACCELERATION ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Dolag, K.; Kachelriess, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Tomas, R.

    2009-09-20

    High-energy photons from blazars interact within tens of kpc with the extragalactic photon background, initiating electromagnetic pair cascades. The charged component of such cascades is deflected by extragalactic magnetic fields (EGMFs), leading to halos even around initially point-like sources. We calculate the intensity profile of the resulting secondary high-energy photons for different assumptions on the initial source spectrum and the strength of the EGMF, employing also fields found earlier in a constrained simulation of structure formation including magnetohydrodynamics processes. We find that the observation of halos around blazars like Mrk 180 probes an interesting range of EGMF strengths and acceleration models: in particular, blazar halos test if the photon energy spectrum at the source extends beyond {approx}100 TeV and how anisotropic this high-energy component is emitted.

  8. Motion of a Probe Ball in the Fluid under Centrifugal Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyrkova, I. A.; Semenov, A. N.; Khokhlov, A. R.; Linliu, K.; Chu, B.

    1997-11-01

    The viscosity of a fluid can be measured by observing the motion of a probe sphere (or ball) in a centrifuge tube filled with this fluid. The hydrodynamic behavior of the probe ball moving in the centrifuge tube has been solved theoretically. We have got the universal relationship (for balls of a given material andsize in a given tube) between the terminal ball velocity, the fluid viscosity and the centrifuge acceleration using the only adjustable parameter — the rotational friction coefficient between the ball and the tube. The rotation of the centrifuge tube in the horizontal plane induces an inertia force which is counterbalanced by the friction force acting on the ball. As a result, the ball moves along the tube with some characteristic speed, which is a measure of the viscosity of the fluid. This speed was calculated in the lubrication approximation. The gravitational acceleration causes the ball to move very close to the bottom of the centrifuge tube. In this situation, the gravity is balanced by a “levitation” force introduced and calculated in the present paper. The origin of this force is the formation of the “bubble” behind and below the moving ball. The theoretical development on the terminal velocity for the ball moving very near the bottom of the horizontal centrifuge tube is tested by using a specially designed centrifuge for two types of balls and a wide set of viscosity standards. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment suggests that we have developed a new approach to measure high viscosities of fluids at low shear rates which might be especially useful for the investigation of polymer melts.

  9. Testing flatness of the universe with probes of cosmic distances and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortonson, Michael J.

    2009-06-01

    When using distance measurements to probe spatial curvature, the geometric degeneracy between curvature and dark energy in the distance-redshift relation typically requires either making strong assumptions about the dark energy evolution or sacrificing precision in a more model-independent approach. Measurements of the redshift evolution of the linear growth of perturbations can break the geometric degeneracy, providing curvature constraints that are both precise and model-independent. Future supernova, CMB, and cluster data have the potential to measure the curvature with an accuracy of s(O K ) 0.002, without specifying a particular dark energy phenomenology. In combination with distance measurements, the evolution of the growth function at low redshifts provides the strongest curvature constraint if the high-redshift universe is well approximated as being purely matter dominated. However, in the presence of early dark energy or massive neutrinos, the precision in curvature is reduced due to additional degeneracies, and precise normalization of the growth function relative to recombination is important for obtaining accurate constraints. Curvature limits from distances and growth compare favorably to other approaches to curvature estimation proposed in the literature, providing either greater accuracy or greater freedom from dark energy modeling assumptions, and are complementary due to the use of independent data sets. Model-independent estimates of curvature are critical for both testing inflation and obtaining unbiased constraints on dark energy parameters.

  10. Cosmic Microwave Background Fluctuations from the Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect as a Cosmological Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunbae; Shapiro, P.; Komatsu, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a calculation of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect on of the Comic Microwave Background fluctuation. We focus on the scale at the multipole moment of l = 3000 10000 that is currently being probed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. For the post-reionization contribution of the total signal, we use the 3rd order perturbation theory (3PT) to model non-linearity of post-reionization epoch. We evaluate a non-linear expression for momentum powerspectrum in Ma and Fry (2002) with the 3PT density and velocity powerspectrum. And, we use the 3PT momentum powerspectrum to calculate the kSZ signal. We show that the 3PT is a reasonable approximation by comparing our result with previous work by Zhang, Pen and Trac (2004). For reionization contribution, we use our N-body radiative transfer simulations to take patchiness of ionization of intergalactic medium in reionization epoch into account. Using ionized fraction field in the simulation, we calculate the momentum field of the ionized gas. And, we correct for the missing power in finite size boxes of simulations. Finally, we show the kSZ calculation for different simulations with reionization scenarios. With contributions from each epoch, we predict total kSZ signal for different reionization history and put constraint on reionization scenario using an upper bound of the signal from recent SPT measurement.

  11. Testing flatness of the universe with probes of cosmic distances and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mortonson, Michael J.

    2009-12-15

    When using distance measurements to probe spatial curvature, the geometric degeneracy between curvature and dark energy in the distance-redshift relation typically requires either making strong assumptions about the dark energy evolution or sacrificing precision in a more model-independent approach. Measurements of the redshift evolution of the linear growth of perturbations can break the geometric degeneracy, providing curvature constraints that are both precise and model independent. Future supernova, CMB, and cluster data have the potential to measure the curvature with an accuracy of {sigma}({omega}{sub K})=0.002, without specifying a particular dark energy phenomenology. In combination with distance measurements, the evolution of the growth function at low redshifts provides the strongest curvature constraint if the high-redshift universe is well approximated as being purely matter dominated. However, in the presence of early dark energy or massive neutrinos, the precision in curvature is reduced due to additional degeneracies, and precise normalization of the growth function relative to recombination is important for obtaining accurate constraints. Curvature limits from distances and growth compare favorably to other approaches to curvature estimation proposed in the literature, providing either greater accuracy or greater freedom from dark energy modeling assumptions, and are complementary due to the use of independent data sets. Model-independent estimates of curvature are critical both for testing inflation and for obtaining unbiased constraints on dark energy parameters.

  12. Dark Energy Models and Cosmic Acceleration with Anisotropic Universe in f(T) Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M.; Sehrish, Azeem

    2014-04-01

    This paper is devoted to studing the accelerated expansion of the universe in context of f(T) theory of gravity. For this purpose, we construct different f(T) models and investigate their cosmological behavior through equation of state parameter by using holographic, new agegraphic and their power-law entropy corrected dark energy models. We discuss the graphical behavior of this parameter versus redshift for particular values of constant parameters in Bianchi type I universe model. It is shown that the universe lies in different forms of dark energy, namely quintessence, phantom, and quintom corresponding to the chosen scale factors, which depend upon the constant parameters of the models.

  13. A no-go for no-go theorems prohibiting cosmic acceleration in extra dimensional models

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, Rik; Postma, Marieke E-mail: mpostma@nikhef.nl

    2011-12-01

    A four-dimensional effective theory that arises as the low-energy limit of some extra-dimensional model is constrained by the higher dimensional Einstein equations. Steinhardt and Wesley use this to show that accelerated expansion in our four large dimensions can only be transient in a large class of Kaluza-Klein models that satisfy the (higher dimensional) null energy condition [1]. We point out that these no-go theorems are based on a rather ad-hoc assumption on the metric, without which no strong statements can be made.

  14. Seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Are There Cosmic Microwave Background Anomalies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Hill, R. S.; Hinshaw, G.; Larson, D.; Smith, K. M.; Dunkley, J.; Gold, B.; Halpern, M.; Jarosik, N.; Kogut, A.; Komatsu, E.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Nolta, M. R.; Odegard, N.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Tucker, G. S.; Weiland, J. L.; Wollack, E.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-02-01

    A simple six-parameter ΛCDM model provides a successful fit to WMAP data. This holds both when the WMAP data are analyzed alone or in combination with other cosmological data. Even so, it is appropriate to examine the data carefully to search for hints of deviations from the now standard model of cosmology, which includes inflation, dark energy, dark matter, baryons, and neutrinos. The cosmological community has subjected the WMAP data to extensive and varied analyses. While there is widespread agreement as to the overall success of the six-parameter ΛCDM model, various "anomalies" have been reported relative to that model. In this paper we examine potential anomalies and present analyses and assessments of their significance. In most cases we find that claimed anomalies depend on posterior selection of some aspect or subset of the data. Compared with sky simulations based on the best-fit model, one can select for low probability features of the WMAP data. Low probability features are expected, but it is not usually straightforward to determine whether any particular low probability feature is the result of the a posteriori selection or non-standard cosmology. Hypothesis testing could, of course, always reveal an alternative model that is statistically favored, but there is currently no model that is more compelling. We find that two cold spots in the map are statistically consistent with random cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations. We also find that the amplitude of the quadrupole is well within the expected 95% confidence range and therefore is not anomalously low. We find no significant anomaly with a lack of large angular scale CMB power for the best-fit ΛCDM model. We examine in detail the properties of the power spectrum data with respect to the ΛCDM model and find no significant anomalies. The quadrupole and octupole components of the CMB sky are remarkably aligned, but we find that this is not due to any single map feature; it results from the

  15. Using Betatron Emissions from Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electrons to Probe Ultra-fast Warm Dense Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotick, Jordan; Schumaker, Will; Condamine, Florian; Albert, Felicie; Barbrel, Benjamin; Galtier, Eric; Granados, Eduardo; Ravasio, Alessandra; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been shown to produce short X-ray pulses from betatron oscillations of electrons within the plasma wake. These betatron X-rays pulses have a broad, synchrotron-like energy spectrum and a duration on the order of the driving laser pulse, thereby enabling probing of ultrafast interactions. Using the 1 J, 40fs short-pulse laser at the Matter in Extreme Conditions experimental station at LCLS, we have implemented LWFA to generate and subsequently characterized betatron X-rays. Notch filtering and single photon counting techniques were used to measure the betatron X-ray spectrum while the spatial profile was measured using X-ray CCDs and image plates. We used an ellipsoidal mirror to focus the soft betatron X-rays for pump-probe studies on various targets in conjunction with LCLS X-ray and optical laser pulses. This experimental platform provides the conditions necessary to do a detailed study of warm-dense matter dynamics on the ultrafast time-scale.

  16. Calibration of a non-invasive cosmic-ray probe for wide area snow water equivalent measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigouin, Mark J. P.; Si, Bing C.

    2016-06-01

    Measuring snow water equivalent (SWE) is important for many hydrological purposes such as modelling and flood forecasting. Measurements of SWE are also crucial for agricultural production in areas where snowmelt runoff dominates spring soil water recharge. Typical methods for measuring SWE include point measurements (snow tubes) and large-scale measurements (remote sensing). We explored the potential of using the cosmic-ray soil moisture probe (CRP) to measure average SWE at a spatial scale between those provided by snow tubes and remote sensing. The CRP measures above-ground moderated neutron intensity within a radius of approximately 300 m. Using snow tubes, surveys were performed over two winters (2013/2014 and 2014/2015) in an area surrounding a CRP in an agricultural field in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. The raw moderated neutron intensity counts were corrected for atmospheric pressure, water vapour, and temporal variability of incoming cosmic-ray flux. The mean SWE from manually measured snow surveys was adjusted for differences in soil water storage before snowfall between both winters because the CRP reading appeared to be affected by soil water below the snowpack. The SWE from the snow surveys was negatively correlated with the CRP-measured moderated neutron intensity, giving Pearson correlation coefficients of -0.90 (2013/2014) and -0.87 (2014/2015). A linear regression performed on the manually measured SWE and moderated neutron intensity counts for 2013/2014 yielded an r2 of 0.81. Linear regression lines from the 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 manually measured SWE and moderated neutron counts were similar; thus differences in antecedent soil water storage did not appear to affect the slope of the SWE vs. neutron relationship. The regression equation obtained from 2013/2014 was used to model SWE using the moderated neutron intensity data for 2014/2015. The CRP-estimated SWE for 2014/2015 was similar to that of the snow survey, with an root

  17. Acceleration of solar cosmic rays in a flare current sheet and their propagation in interplanetary space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, A. I.; Podgorny, I. M.

    2015-09-01

    Analyses of GOES spacecraft data show that the prompt component of high-energy protons arrive at the Earth after a time corresponding to their generation in flares in the western part of the solar disk, while the delayed component is detected several hours later. All protons in flares are accelerated by a single mechanism. The particles of the prompt component propagate along magnetic lines of the Archimedean spiral connectng the flare with the Earth. The prompt component generated by flares in the eastern part of the solar disk is not observed at the Earth, since particles accelerated by these flares do not intersect magnetic-field lines connecting the flare with the Earth. These particles arrive at the Earth via their motion across the interplanetary magnetic field. These particles are trapped by the magnetic field and transported by the solar wind, since the interplanetary magnetic field is frozen in the wind plasma, and these particles also diffuse across the field. The duration of the delay reaches several days.

  18. Using Supra-Arcade Downflows as Probes of Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Extracting information from coronal features above flares has become more reliable with the availability of increasingly higher spatial- and temporal-resolution data in recent decades. We are now able to sufficiently probe the region high above long-duration flaring active regions where reconnection is expected to be continually occurring. Flows in the supra-arcade region, first observed with Yohkoh/SXT, have been theorized to be associated with newly-reconnected outflowing loops. High resolution data appears to confirm these assertions. Assuming that these flows are indeed reconnection outflows, then the detection of those directed toward the solar surface (i.e. downflowing) should be associated with particle acceleration between the current sheet and the loop footpoints rooted in the chromosphere. RHESSI observations of highly energetic particles with respect to downflow detections could potentially constrain electron acceleration models. We provide measurements of these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in relation to reconnection model parameters and present preliminary findings comparing the downflow timings with high-energy RHESSI lightcurves.

  19. Using Supra-Arcade Downflows as Probes of Electron Acceleration During Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina L.

    2011-01-01

    Extracting information from coronal features above flares has become more reliable with the availability of increasingly higher spatial and temporal-resolution data in recent decades. We are now able to sufficiently probe the region high above long-duration flaring active regions where reconnection is expected to be continually occurring. Flows in the supra-arcade region, first observed with Yohkoh/SXT, have been theorized to be associated with newly-reconnected outflowing loops. High resolution data appears to confirm these assertions. Assuming that these flows are indeed reconnection outflows, then the detection of those directed toward the solar surface (i.e. downflowing) should be associated with particle acceleration between the current sheet and the loop footpoints rooted in the chromosphere. RHESSI observations of highly energetic particles with respect to downflow detections could potentially constrain electron acceleration models. I will discuss measurements of these supra-arcade downflows (SADs) in relation to reconnection model parameters and present preliminary findings comparing the downflow timings with high-energy RHESSI lightcurves.

  20. Using Dark Matter Haloes to Learn about Cosmic Acceleration: A New Proposal for a Universal Mass Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prescod-Weinstein, Chanda; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2011-01-01

    Structure formation provides a strong test of any cosmic acceleration model because a successful dark energy model must not inhibit or overpredict the development of observed large-scale structures. Traditional approaches to studies of structure formation in the presence of dark energy or a modified gravity implement a modified Press-Schechter formalism, which relates the linear overdensities to the abundance of dark matter haloes at the same time. We critically examine the universality of the Press-Schechter formalism for different cosmologies, and show that the halo abundance is best correlated with spherical linear overdensity at 94% of collapse (or observation) time. We then extend this argument to ellipsoidal collapse (which decreases the fractional time of best correlation for small haloes), and show that our results agree with deviations from modified Press-Schechter formalism seen in simulated mass functions. This provides a novel universal prescription to measure linear density evolution, based on current and future observations of cluster (or dark matter) halo mass function. In particular, even observations of cluster abundance in a single epoch will constrain the entire history of linear growth of cosmological of perturbations.

  1. K-essence model from the mechanical approach point of view: coupled scalar field and the late cosmic acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Sravan Kumar, K.; Marto, João; Morais, João; Zhuk, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the Universe at the late stage of its evolution and deep inside the cell of uniformity. At these scales, we can consider the Universe to be filled with dust-like matter in the form of discretely distributed galaxies, a K-essence scalar field, playing the role of dark energy, and radiation as matter sources. We investigate such a Universe in the mechanical approach. This means that the peculiar velocities of the inhomogeneities (in the form of galaxies) as well as the fluctuations of the other perfect fluids are non-relativistic. Such fluids are designated as coupled because they are concentrated around the inhomogeneities. In the present paper, we investigate the conditions under which the K-essence scalar field with the most general form for its action can become coupled. We investigate at the background level three particular examples of the K-essence models: (i) the pure kinetic K-essence field, (ii) a K-essence with a constant speed of sound and (iii) the K-essence model with the Lagrangian bX+cX2‑V(phi). We demonstrate that if the K-essence is coupled, all these K-essence models take the form of multicomponent perfect fluids where one of the component is the cosmological constant. Therefore, they can provide the late-time cosmic acceleration and be simultaneously compatible with the mechanical approach.

  2. Probing the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Burst Rate with Trigger Simulations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lien, Amy; Sakamoto, Takanori; Gehrels, Neil; Palmer, David M.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Graziani, Carlo; Cannizzo, John K.

    2013-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies of the GRB rate usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously own GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we develop a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image threshold. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection rate of dim bursts. As a result, our simulations suggest bursts need to be dimmer than previously expected to avoid over-producing the number of detections and to match with Swift observations. Moreover, our results indicate that these dim bursts are more likely to be high redshift events than low-luminosity GRBs. This would imply an even higher cosmic GRB rate at large redshifts than previous expectations based on star-formation rate measurements, unless other factors, such as the luminosity evolution, are taken into account. The GRB rate from our best result gives a total number of 4568 +825 -1429 GRBs per year that are beamed toward us in the whole universe.

  3. Probing the cosmic gamma-ray burst rate with trigger simulations of the swift burst alert telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, Amy; Cannizzo, John K.; Sakamoto, Takanori; Gehrels, Neil; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Palmer, David M.; Graziani, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae, and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies of the GRB rate usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and an additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we develop a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image threshold. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection rate of dim bursts. As a result, our simulations suggest that bursts need to be dimmer than previously expected to avoid overproducing the number of detections and to match with Swift observations. Moreover, our results indicate that these dim bursts are more likely to be high redshift events than low-luminosity GRBs. This would imply an even higher cosmic GRB rate at large redshifts than previous expectations based on star formation rate measurements, unless other factors, such as the luminosity evolution, are taken into account. The GRB rate from our best result gives a total number of 4568{sub −1429}{sup +825} GRBs per year that are beamed toward us in the whole universe.

  4. EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRUM ACROSS WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE DATA RELEASES: A NONPARAMETRIC ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Aghamousa, Amir; Arjunwadkar, Mihir; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: mihir@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2012-02-01

    Using a nonparametric function estimation methodology, we present a comparative analysis of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-year data releases for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular power spectrum with respect to the following key questions. (1) How well is the power spectrum determined by the data alone? (2) How well is the {Lambda}CDM model supported by a model-independent, data-driven analysis? (3) What are the realistic uncertainties on peak/dip locations and heights? Our results show that the height of the power spectrum is well determined by data alone for multipole l approximately less than 546 (1-year), 667 (3-year), 804 (5-year), and 842 (7-year data). We show that parametric fits based on the {Lambda}CDM model are remarkably close to our nonparametric fits in l-regions where data are sufficiently precise. In contrast, the power spectrum for an H{Lambda}CDM model is progressively pushed away from our nonparametric fit as data quality improves with successive data realizations, suggesting incompatibility of this particular cosmological model with respect to the WMAP data sets. We present uncertainties on peak/dip locations and heights at the 95% (2{sigma}) level of confidence and show how these uncertainties translate into hyperbolic 'bands' on the acoustic scale (l{sub A} ) and peak shift ({phi}{sub m}) parameters. Based on the confidence set for the 7-year data, we argue that the low-l upturn in the CMB power spectrum cannot be ruled out at any confidence level in excess of about 10% ( Almost-Equal-To 0.12{sigma}). Additional outcomes of this work are a numerical formulation for minimization of a noise-weighted risk function subject to monotonicity constraints, a prescription for obtaining nonparametric fits that are closer to cosmological expectations on smoothness, and a method for sampling cosmologically meaningful power spectrum variations from the confidence set of a nonparametric fit.

  5. Real space tests of the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmic microwave background data

    SciTech Connect

    Lew, Bartosz

    2008-08-15

    We introduce and analyze a method for testing statistical isotropy and Gaussianity and apply it to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) cosmic microwave background (CMB) foreground reduced temperature maps. We also test cross-channel difference maps to constrain levels of residual foreground contamination and systematic uncertainties. We divide the sky into regions of varying size and shape and measure the first four moments of the one-point distribution within these regions, and using their simulated spatial distributions we test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity hypotheses. By randomly varying orientations of these regions, we sample the underlying CMB field in a new manner, that offers a richer exploration of the data content, and avoids possible biasing due to a single choice of sky division. In our analysis we account for all two-point correlations between different regions and also show the impact on the results when these correlations are neglected. The statistical significance is assessed via comparison with realistic Monte Carlo simulations. We find the three-year WMAP maps to agree well with the isotropic, Gaussian random field simulations as probed by regions corresponding to the angular scales ranging from 6 Degree-Sign to 30 Degree-Sign at 68% confidence level (CL). We report a strong, anomalous (99.8% CL) dipole 'excess' in the V band of the three-year WMAP data and also in the V band of the WMAP five-year data (99.3% CL). Using our statistics, we notice large scale hemispherical power asymmetry, and find that it is not highly statistically significant in the WMAP three-year data ( Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 97%) at scales l{<=}40. The significance is even smaller if multipoles up to l=1024 are considered ({approx}90% CL). We give constraints on the amplitude of the previously proposed CMB dipole modulation field parameter. We find some hints of foreground contamination in the form of a locally strong, anomalous kurtosis excess in

  6. Late cosmic acceleration in a vector-Gauss-Bonnet gravity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveros, A.; Solis, Enzo L.; Acero, Mario A.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we study a general vector-tensor model of dark energy (DE) with a Gauss-Bonnet term coupled to a vector field and without explicit potential terms. Considering a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) type universe and a vector field without spatial components, the cosmological evolution is analyzed from the field equations of this model considering two sets of parameters. In this context, we have shown that it is possible to obtain an accelerated expansion phase of the universe since the equation state parameter w satisfies the restriction - 1 < w < -1/3 (for suitable values of model parameters). Further, analytical expressions for the Hubble parameter H, equation state parameter w and the invariant scalar ϕ are obtained. We also find that the square of the speed of sound is negative for all values of redshift, therefore, the model presented here shows a sign of instability under small perturbations. We finally perform an analysis using H(z) observational data and we find that for the free parameter ξ in the interval (-23.9,-3.46) × 10-5, at 99.73% C.L. (and fixing η = -1 and ω = 1/4), the model has a good fit to the data.

  7. Constraining the cosmic deceleration-acceleration transition with type Ia supernova, BAO/CMB and H(z) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas dos Santos, M.; Reis, R. R. R.; Waga, I.

    2016-02-01

    We revisit the kink-like parametrization of the deceleration parameter q(z) [1], which considers a transition, at redshift zt, from cosmic deceleration to acceleration. In this parametrization the initial, at z gg zt, value of the q-parameter is qi, its final, z=-1, value is qf and the duration of the transition is parametrized by τ. By assuming a flat space geometry we obtain constraints on the free parameters of the model using recent data from type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the Hubble parameter H(z). The use of H(z) data introduces an explicit dependence of the combined likelihood on the present value of the Hubble parameter H0, allowing us to explore the influence of different priors when marginalizing over this parameter. We also study the importance of the CMB information in the results by considering data from WMAP7, WMAP9 (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe—7 and 9 years) and Planck 2015. We show that the contours and best fit do not depend much on the different CMB data used and that the considered new BAO data is responsible for most of the improvement in the results. Assuming a flat space geometry, qi=1/2 and expressing the present value of the deceleration parameter q0 as a function of the other three free parameters, we obtain zt=0.67+0.10-0.08, τ=0.26+0.14-0.10 and q0=-0.48+0.11-0.13, at 68% of confidence level, with an uniform prior over H0. If in addition we fix qf=-1, as in flat ΛCDM, DGP and Chaplygin quartessence that are special models described by our parametrization, we get zt=0.66+0.03-0.04, τ=0.33+0.04-0.04 and q0=-0.54+0.05-0.07, in excellent agreement with flat ΛCDM for which τ=1/3. We also obtain for flat wCDM, another dark energy model described by our parametrization, the constraint on the equation of state parameter -1.22 < w < -0.78 at more than 99% confidence level.

  8. Cosmology with cosmic shear observations: a review.

    PubMed

    Kilbinger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Cosmic shear is the distortion of images of distant galaxies due to weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Universe. Such images are coherently deformed by the tidal field of matter inhomogeneities along the line of sight. By measuring galaxy shape correlations, we can study the properties and evolution of structure on large scales as well as the geometry of the Universe. Thus, cosmic shear has become a powerful probe into the nature of dark matter and the origin of the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. Over the last years, cosmic shear has evolved into a reliable and robust cosmological probe, providing measurements of the expansion history of the Universe and the growth of its structure. We review here the principles of weak gravitational lensing and show how cosmic shear is interpreted in a cosmological context. Then we give an overview of weak-lensing measurements, and present the main observational cosmic-shear results since it was discovered 15 years ago, as well as the implications for cosmology. We then conclude with an outlook on the various future surveys and missions, for which cosmic shear is one of the main science drivers, and discuss promising new weak cosmological lensing techniques for future observations. PMID:26181770

  9. First-order Fermi acceleration in the two-stream limit. [for cosmic rays at relativistic and non-relativistic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdan, T. J.; Webb, G. M.

    1987-01-01

    A study of the first-order Fermi mechanism for accelerating cosmic-rays at relativistic and nonrelativistic shocks is carried out by using the two-stream approximation. Exact steady-state analytic solutions illustrating the shock acceleration process in the test-particle limit in which monoenergetic (relativistic) seed particles enter the shock through an upstream free-escape boundary are obtained. The momentum spectrum of the shock accelerated particles consists of a series of Dirac delta distributions corresponding to particles that have undergone an integral number of acceleration cycles. Since particles in the model have a finite fixed escape probability from the shock and the particle momenta p are equally spaced in log p, the envelope of the delta functions series is a power law in momentum. The solutions are used to discuss time-dependent aspects of the shock acceleration process in terms of the finite cycle time, escape probability, and momentum change per cycle that can be deduced from the steady-state model. The length-scale over which the accelerated particles extend upstream of the shock is shown to depend upon the particle energy, with the higher energy particles extending further upstream. This effect is shown to be intimately related to the kinematic threshold requirement that the particle speed exceed the fluid speed in order for particles to swim upstream of the shock and participate in the shock acceleration process.

  10. Probing the climatological impact of a cosmic ray-cloud connection through low-frequency radio observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Nathan; Kavic, Michael

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that cosmic ray events could have a causal relationship with cloud formation rates. Given the weak constraints on the role that cloud formation plays in climate forcing it is essential to understand the role such a relationship could have in shaping the Earth's climate. This issue has been previously investigated in the context of the long-term effect of cosmic ray events on climate. However, in order to establish whether or not such a relationship exists, measurements of short-timescale solar events, individual cosmic ray events, and spatially correlated cloud parameters could be of great significance. Here we propose such a comparison using observations from a pair of radio telescopes arrays, the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA). These low-frequency radio arrays have a unique ability to simultaneously conduct solar, ionospheric and cosmic rays observations and are thus ideal for such a comparison. We will outline plans for a comparison using data from these instruments, satellite images of cloud formation as well as expected cloud formation rates from numerical models. We present some preliminary results illustrating the efficacy of this type of comparison and discuss future plans to carryout this program.

  11. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  12. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Kohta; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  13. Supernova / Acceleration Probe: a Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Fermilab /Paris U., VI-VII /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Marseille, CPPM /Indiana U. /American Astron. Society /Caltech /Case Western Reserve U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-15

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy

  14. Supernova/Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, C.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Craig, W.; Day, C.; DeJongh, F.; Deustua, S.; Diehl, T.; Dodelson, S.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmet, W.; Fouchez, D.; Frieman, J.; Fruchter, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Hoff, M.; Holland, S.; Huffer, M.; Hui, L.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jelinsky, P.; Karcher, A.; Kent, S.; Kahn, S.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Levi, M.; Limon, P.; Lin, H.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Lorenzon, W.; Malina, R.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, P.; Massey, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Peoples, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Roe, N.; Rusin, D.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Samdja, G.; Smith, R.M.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Stebbine, A.; Stoughton, C.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Tucker, D.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.; Wester, W.

    2004-05-12

    The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universes expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy

  15. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, K.; Mulrey, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Wissel, S. A.; Zilles, A.; Bechtol, K.; Borch, K.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.; Gorham, P. W.; Hast, C.; Huege, T.; Hyneman, R.; Jobe, K.; Kuwatani, K.; Lam, J.; Liu, T. C.; Nam, J.; Naudet, C.; Nichol, R. J.; Rauch, B. F.; Rotter, B.; Saltzberg, D.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Seckel, D.; Strutt, B.; Vieregg, A. G.; Williams, C.; T-510 Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties.

  16. Accelerator Measurements of Magnetically Induced Radio Emission from Particle Cascades with Applications to Cosmic-Ray Air Showers.

    PubMed

    Belov, K; Mulrey, K; Romero-Wolf, A; Wissel, S A; Zilles, A; Bechtol, K; Borch, K; Chen, P; Clem, J; Gorham, P W; Hast, C; Huege, T; Hyneman, R; Jobe, K; Kuwatani, K; Lam, J; Liu, T C; Nam, J; Naudet, C; Nichol, R J; Rauch, B F; Rotter, B; Saltzberg, D; Schoorlemmer, H; Seckel, D; Strutt, B; Vieregg, A G; Williams, C

    2016-04-01

    For 50 years, cosmic-ray air showers have been detected by their radio emission. We present the first laboratory measurements that validate electrodynamics simulations used in air shower modeling. An experiment at SLAC provides a beam test of radio-frequency (rf) radiation from charged particle cascades in the presence of a magnetic field, a model system of a cosmic-ray air shower. This experiment provides a suite of controlled laboratory measurements to compare to particle-level simulations of rf emission, which are relied upon in ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray air shower detection. We compare simulations to data for intensity, linearity with magnetic field, angular distribution, polarization, and spectral content. In particular, we confirm modern predictions that the magnetically induced emission in a dielectric forms a cone that peaks at the Cherenkov angle and show that the simulations reproduce the data within systematic uncertainties. PMID:27104694

  17. Getting around cosmic variance

    SciTech Connect

    Kamionkowski, M.; Loeb, A.

    1997-10-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies probe the primordial density field at the edge of the observable Universe. There is a limiting precision ({open_quotes}cosmic variance{close_quotes}) with which anisotropies can determine the amplitude of primordial mass fluctuations. This arises because the surface of last scatter (SLS) probes only a finite two-dimensional slice of the Universe. Probing other SLS{close_quote}s observed from different locations in the Universe would reduce the cosmic variance. In particular, the polarization of CMB photons scattered by the electron gas in a cluster of galaxies provides a measurement of the CMB quadrupole moment seen by the cluster. Therefore, CMB polarization measurements toward many clusters would probe the anisotropy on a variety of SLS{close_quote}s within the observable Universe, and hence reduce the cosmic-variance uncertainty. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Requirements on Atmospheric Entry of Small Probes for Several Planets: Venus, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus in Preparation for the Future ESA Cosmic Vision Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomuta, D.; Rebuffat, D.; Larranaga, J.; Erd, C.; Bavdaz, M.; Falkner, P.

    2011-02-01

    In preparation for the ESA Cosmic Vision new call for medium class missions, a set of entry probes for inner and outer planets have been preliminary investigated by ESA using its Concurrent Design Facility. These Entry Probe missions are hypothetically assumed for launching time 2020-2035. A preliminary design of the probes arrived at a mass of about 300kg. In the following, the study is focused on the entry conditions for each of the planets Venus, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus with the aim to define the conditions for the Entry and Descent System (EDS) and its required technologies. For Venus case, two scenarios where considered: one where the entry probe is released during a typical gravity assist by a large interplanetary mission and another scenario featuring a stand alone mission targeted to Venus. During the entry in Venus atmosphere (mainly composed of CO2 (96.5%) and N2 (3.5%)), the probes are subjected to maximum heat fluxes of 60MW/m2, which is highly demanding in both scenarios. For the outer planet missions, only flyby scenarios with a targeted release of the probe were considered. The entry probes for the outer planets are subjected to heat fluxes above 100MW/m2, which is even more challenging the Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) and therefore requiring the use of special high temperature protection technology to prevent the destruction during the entry. ESA efforts for future missions are directed towards the development of an European Light Ablative Material (ELAM), though used in PEP study only for the Back Cover of the Entry Module. The TPS as well as both radiative and convective heat fluxes need simulations and verification by means of ground facility experiments. Based on the lessons learned from previous mission studies (mission to a near-Earth objects c.f. Marco Polo, Deimos Sample return), an Atmospheric Mars Sample Return is now under study. For sample return missions on return to Earth, a passive re-entry capsule delivering the sample

  19. Overview of North Ecliptic Pole Deep Multi-wavelength Survey as a Probe of the Cosmic Noon Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Oi, Nagisa

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the North Ecliptic Pole deep (0.5 deg2, NEP-Deep) multi-wavelength survey covering from X-ray to radio-wave is presented. The NEP-Deep provides us with several thousands of 15 μm or 18 μm selected sample of galaxies, which is the largest sample ever made at these wavelengths. A continuous filter coverage in the mid-infrared wavelength (7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and 24 μm) is unique and vital to diagnose the contributions from starbursts and AGNs in the galaxies out to z=2. The goal of the project is to resolve the nature of the cosmic star formation history at the cosmic noon era (e.g. z=1--2), and to find a clue to understand its decline from z=1 to present universe by utilizing the unique power of the multiwavelength survey. To achieve the goal we use a few diagnostic physical parameters unique to the NEP dataset: specific star-formation rate, dust attenuation, and obscured AGN fraction, etc.It is also noteworthy that the NEP is the legacy field thanks to its high visibility by the space observatories, such as eROSITA, Euclid, JWST, and SPICA. SPICA, the next generation large cooled space telescope is extremely powerful to study the rise and fall of the cosmic star-formation history in the universe.

  20. A critical shock mach number for particle acceleration in the absence of pre-existing cosmic rays: M=√5

    SciTech Connect

    Vink, Jacco

    2014-01-10

    It is shown that, under some generic assumptions, shocks cannot accelerate particles unless the overall shock Mach number exceeds a critical value M>√5. The reason is that for M≤√5 the work done to compress the flow in a particle precursor requires more enthalpy flux than the system can sustain. This lower limit applies to situations without significant magnetic field pressure. In case that the magnetic field pressure dominates the pressure in the unshocked medium, i.e., for low plasma beta, the resistivity of the magnetic field makes it even more difficult to fulfill the energetic requirements for the formation of shock with an accelerated particle precursor and associated compression of the upstream plasma. We illustrate the effects of magnetic fields for the extreme situation of a purely perpendicular magnetic field configuration with plasma beta β = 0, which gives a minimum Mach number of M = 5/2. The situation becomes more complex, if we incorporate the effects of pre-existing cosmic rays, indicating that the additional degree of freedom allows for less strict Mach number limits on acceleration. We discuss the implications of this result for low Mach number shock acceleration as found in solar system shocks, and shocks in clusters of galaxies.

  1. On the level of the cosmic ray sea flux

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, S.; Aharonian, F. A.; Gabici, S.; Torii, K.; Fukui, Y.; Onishi, T.; Yamamoto, H.; Kawamura, A.

    2009-04-08

    The study of Galactic diffuse {gamma} radiation combined with the knowledge of the distribution of the molecular hydrogen in the Galaxy offers a unique tool to probe the cosmic ray flux in the Galaxy. A methodology to study the level of the cosmic ray 'sea' and to unveil target-accelerator systems in the Galaxy, which makes use of the data from the high resolution survey of the Galactic molecular clouds performed with the NANTEN telescope and of the data from {gamma}-ray instruments, has been developed. Some predictions concerning the level of the cosmic ray 'sea' and the {gamma}-ray emission close to cosmic ray sources for instruments such as Fermi and Cherenkov Telescope Array are presented.

  2. Evaluation of a Wake Vortex Upset Model Based on Simultaneous Measurements of Wake Velocities and Probe-Aircraft Accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, B. J.; Jacobsen, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the upset responses experienced and the wake velocities encountered by an instrumented Learjet probe aircraft behind a Boeing 747 vortex-generating aircraft. The vortex-induced angular accelerations experienced could be predicted within 30% by a mathematical upset response model when the characteristics of the wake were well represented by the vortex model. The vortex model used in the present study adequately represented the wake flow field when the vortices dissipated symmetrically and only one vortex pair existed in the wake.

  3. Genesis and propagation of cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, M.M.; Wefel, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    This book presents a panorama of contemporary state-of-the-art knowledge on the origin of cosmic rays and how they propagate through space. Twenty-eight articles cover such topics as objects which generate cosmic rays, processes which accelerate particles to cosmic ray energies, the interaction of cosmic rays with their environment, elementary particles in cosmic rays, how to detect cosmic rays and future experiments to measure highly energetic particles.

  4. Data processing for a cosmic ray experiment onboard the solar probes Helios 1 and 2: Experiment 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller-Mellin, R.; Green, G.; Iwers, B.; Kunow, H.; Wibberenz, G.; Fuckner, J.; Hempe, H.; Witte, M.

    1982-01-01

    The data processing system for the Helios experiment 6, measuring energetic charged particles of solar, planetary and galactic origin in the inner solar system, is described. The aim of this experiment is to extend knowledge on origin and propagation of cosmic rays. The different programs for data reduction, analysis, presentation, and scientific evaluation are described as well as hardware and software of the data processing equipment. A chronological presentation of the data processing operation is given. Procedures and methods for data analysis which were developed can be used with minor modifications for analysis of other space research experiments.

  5. Cosmic Evolution of X-ray Binary Populations: Probes of Changing Chemistry and Aging Stellar Populations in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmer, Bret; Basu-Zych, Antara; Mineo, Stefano; Brandt, W. Niel; Eufrasio, Rafael T.; Fragos, Tassos; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Luo, Bin; Xue, Yongquan; Bauer, Franz E.; Gilfanov, Marat; Kalogera, Vassiliki; Ranalli, Piero; Schneider, Donald P.; Shemmer, Ohad; Tozzi, Paolo; Trump, Jonathan; Vignali, Cristian; Wang, JunXian; Yukita, Mihoko; Zezas, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The 2-10 keV emission from normal galaxies is dominated by X-ray binary (XRB) populations. The formation of XRBs is sensitive to galaxy properties like stellar age and metallicity---properties that have evolved significantly in the broader galaxy population throughout cosmic history. The 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) allows us to study how XRB emission has evolved over a significant fraction of cosmic history (since z ~ 4), without significant contamination from AGN. Using constraints from the CDF-S, I will show that the X-ray emission from normal galaxies from z = 0-7 depends not only on star-formation rate (SFR), but also on stellar mass (M) and redshift. Our analysis shows the that low-mass X-ray binary emission scales with stellar mass and evolves as LX(LMXB)/M ~ (1+z)^3, and high-mass X-ray binaries scale with SFR and evolve as LX(HMXB)/SFR ~ (1+z), consistent with predictions from population synthesis models, which attribute the increase in LMXB and HMXB scaling relations with redshift as being due to declining host galaxy stellar ages and metallicities, respectively. These findings have important implications for the X-ray emission from young, low-metallicity galaxies at high redshift, which are likely to be more X-ray luminous per SFR and play a significant role in the heating of the intergalactic medium.

  6. Noninvasive Laser Probing of Ultrashort Single Electron Bunches for Accelerator And Light Source Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, P.R.; /SLAC

    2007-06-11

    Companion development of ultrafast electron beam diagnostics capable of noninvasively resolving single bunch detail is essential for the development of high energy, high brightness accelerator facilities and associated beam-based light source applications. Existing conventional accelerators can exhibit timing-jitter down to the 100 femtosecond level which exceeds their single bunch duration capability. At the other extreme, in relatively jitterless environments, laser-plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can generate single electron bunches of duration estimated to be of order 10 femtoseconds making this setting a valuable testbed for development of broadband electron bunch diagnostics. Characteristics of electro-optic schemes and laser-induced reflectance are discussed with emphasis on temporal resolution.

  7. INTEGRAL IGR J18135-1751 = HESS J1813-178: A New Cosmic High-Energy Accelerator from keV to TeV Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, P.; Bassani, L.; Malizia, A.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Dean, A. J.; De Rosa, A.; Lebrun, F.; Moran, L.; Renaud, M.; Stephen, J. B.; Terrier, R.; Walter, R.

    2005-08-01

    We report the discovery of a soft gamma-ray source, namely, IGR J18135-1751, detected with IBIS, the Imager on Board the INTEGRAL Satellite. The source is persistent and has a 20-100 keV luminosity of ~5.7× 1034 ergs s-1 (assuming a distance of 4 kpc). This source is coincident with one of the eight unidentified objects recently reported by the HESS collaboration as part of the first TeV survey of the inner part of the Galaxy. Two of these new sources found along the Galactic plane, HESS J1813-178 and HESS J1614-518, have no obvious lower energy counterparts, a fact that motivated the suggestion that they might be dark cosmic ray accelerators. HESS J1813-178 has a strongly absorbed X-ray counterpart, the ASCA source AGPS 273.4-17.8, showing a power-law spectrum with photon index ~1.8 and a total (Galactic plus intrinsic) absorption corresponding to NH~5×1022 cm-2. We hypothesize that the source is a pulsar wind nebula embedded in its supernova remnant. The lack of X-ray or gamma-ray variability, the radio morphology, and the ASCA spectrum are all compatible with this interpretation. In any case we rule out the hypothesis that HESS J1813-178 belongs to a new class of TeV objects or that it is a cosmic ``dark particle'' accelerator. Based on observations with INTEGRAL, an ESA project with instruments and science data center funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, Spain), the Czech Republic, and Poland and with the participation of Russia and the US.

  8. Acceleration of ions and electrons to near-cosmic ray energies in a perpendicular shock: The January 6, 1978 event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Sarris, E. T.

    1985-01-01

    Acceleration of energetic ions to approx 200 MeV and electrons to approx 2 MeV were detected by the Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instrument on Voyager 2 in association with a quasiperpendicular shock of theta sub Bn - 87.5 deg at 1.9 AU. The measurments, obtained at a time resolution of approx. 1.2 sec, reveal structure of the energetic particle intensity enhancements down to a scale of the order of the particle gyroradius, and suggest that acceleration takes place within a gyrodiameter of the shock. The observations are consistent with the prediction of the shock drift acceleration (SDA) mechanism. The absence of any fluctuations in the magnetic field during the shock passage suggest that turbulence is not essential to the shock acceleration process in the interplanetary medium.

  9. Magnetic and Pressure Probes on the HyperV Contoured Coaxial Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, S.; Case, A.; Brockington, S.; Bomgardner, R.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Elton, R.

    2008-11-01

    Magnetic and pressure data from several contoured-gap coaxial railguns is presented. These plasma guns use an injected plasma annulus and shaped inner and outer electrodes to mitigate the blow-by instability. Passive magnetic probes and photodiodes search for evidence of the blow-by instability and azimuthal asymmetries. Stagnation pressure and velocity are compared for different size guns and for different driving voltages and currents.

  10. Evading the pulsar constraints on the cosmic string tension in supergravity inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Kohei; Miyamoto, Yuhei; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi E-mail: miyamoto@resceu.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-10-01

    The cosmic string is a useful probe of the early Universe and may give us a clue to physics at high energy scales which particle accelerators cannot reach. Although the most promising tool to observe it is the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the constraint from gravitational waves is becoming so stringent that detecting its signatures in CMB may be impossible. In this paper, we construct a scenario that contains cosmic strings observable in the cosmic microwave background while evading the constraint imposed by the recent pulsar timing data. We argue that cosmic strings with relatively large tension are allowed by diluting loops contributing to the relevant frequency range of the gravitational wave background. We also present a particle physics model to realize such dilution in the context of chaotic inflation in supergravity, where the phase transition occurs during inflation due to the time-dependence of the Hubble induced mass.

  11. Probing the limits to muscle-powered accelerations: lessons from jumping bullfrogs.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas J; Marsh, Richard L

    2003-08-01

    The function of many muscles during natural movements is to accelerate a mass. We used a simple model containing the essential elements of this functional system to investigate which musculoskeletal features are important for increasing the mechanical work done in a muscle-powered acceleration. The muscle model consisted of a muscle-like actuator with frog hindlimb muscle properties, operating across a lever to accelerate a load. We tested this model in configurations with and without a series elastic element and with and without a variable mechanical advantage. When total muscle shortening was held constant at 30%, the model produced the most work when the muscle operated with a series elastic element and an effective mechanical advantage that increased throughout the contraction (31 J kg(-1) muscle vs 26.6 J kg(-1) muscle for the non-compliant, constant mechanical advantage configuration). We also compared the model output with the dynamics of jumping bullfrogs, measured by high-speed video analysis, and the length changes of the plantaris muscle, measured by sonomicrometry. This comparison revealed that the length, force and power trajectory of the body of jumping frogs could be accurately replicated by a model of a fully active muscle operating against an inertial load, but only if the model muscle included a series elastic element. Sonomicrometer measurements of the plantaris muscle revealed an unusual, biphasic pattern of shortening, with high muscle velocities early and late in the contraction, separated by a period of slow contraction. The model muscle produced this pattern of shortening only when an elastic element was included. These results demonstrate that an elastic element can increase the work output in a muscle-powered acceleration. Elastic elements uncouple muscle fiber shortening velocity from body movement to allow the muscle fibers to operate at slower shortening velocities and higher force outputs. A variable muscle mechanical advantage

  12. Accelerated expansion of the Universe as the most powerful source of the energy release in cosmic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunian, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    The available data on the expansion effects in the shorter scales are considered. It is mentioned that the prevailing opinion on the gravitationally bound states of the short-scale physical systems like solar system or galaxies is not provable but results from the a priori accepted ideas of their formation due to condensation. On the contrary, a lot of observational data speaks in favor of existence of Hubble expansion for all the scales. Some estimates of gravitational energy accumulation in cosmic objects owing to dark energy physical work are done. These estimates show that a cluster of galaxies could be formed from a pre-cluster via matter ejection during the Hubble time.

  13. Variations of the relative abundances of He, (C,N,O) and Fe-group nuclei in solar cosmic rays and their relationship to solar particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertsch, D. L.; Biswas, S.; Fichtel, C. E.; Pellerin, C. J.; Reames, D. V.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the flux of helium nuclei in the 24 January 1971 event and of helium and (C,N,O) nuclei in the 1 September 1971 event are combined with previous measurements to obtain the relative abundances of helium, (C,N,O), and Fe-group nuclei in these events. These data are then summarized together with previously reported results to show that, even when the same detector system using a dE/dx plus range technique is used, differences in the He/(C,N,O) value in the same energy/nucleon interval are observed in solar cosmic ray events. Further, when the He/(C,N,O) value is lower the He/(Fe-group nuclei) value is also systematically lower in these large events. When solar particle acceleration theory is analyzed, it is seen that the results suggest that, for large events, Coulomb energy loss probably does not play a major role in determining solar particle composition at higher energies (10 MeV). The variations in multicharged nuclei composition are more likely due to partial ionization during the acceleration phase.

  14. Bulk Comptonization of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Extragalactic Jets as a Probe of their Matter Content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georganopoulos, Markos; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Perlman, Eric; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a method for estimating the composition, i.e. the relative amounts of leptons and protons, of extragalactic jets which exhibit Chandra - detected knots in their kpc scale jets. The method relies on measuring, or setting upper limits on, the component of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation that is bulk-Comptonized by the cold electrons in the relativistically flowing jet. These measurements, along with modeling of the broadband knot emission that constrain the bulk Lorentz factor GAMMA of the jets, can yield estimates of the jet power carried by protons and leptons. We provide an explicit calculation of the spectrum of the bulk-Comptonized (BC) CMB component and apply these results to PKS 0637 - 752 and 3C 273, two superluminal quasars with Chandra - detected large scale jets. What makes these sources particularly suited for such a procedure is the absence of significant non-thermal jet emission in the 'bridge', the region between the core and the first bright jet knot, which guarantees that most of the electrons are cold there, leaving the BC scattered CMB radiation as the only significant source of photons in this region. At lambda = 3.6 - 8.0 microns, the most likely band to observe the BC scattered CMB emission, the Spitzer angular resolution (approximately 1" - 3") is considerably smaller than the the 'bridges' of these jets (approximately 10"), making it possible to both measure and resolve this emission.

  15. Protostars: Forges of cosmic rays?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovani, M.; Marcowith, A.; Hennebelle, P.; Ferrière, K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Galactic cosmic rays are particles presumably accelerated in supernova remnant shocks that propagate in the interstellar medium up to the densest parts of molecular clouds, losing energy and their ionisation efficiency because of the presence of magnetic fields and collisions with molecular hydrogen. Recent observations hint at high levels of ionisation and at the presence of synchrotron emission in protostellar systems, which leads to an apparent contradiction. Aims: We want to explain the origin of these cosmic rays accelerated within young protostars as suggested by observations. Methods: Our modelling consists of a set of conditions that has to be satisfied in order to have an efficient cosmic-ray acceleration through diffusive shock acceleration. We analyse three main acceleration sites (shocks in accretion flows, along the jets, and on protostellar surfaces), then we follow the propagation of these particles through the protostellar system up to the hot spot region. Results: We find that jet shocks can be strong accelerators of cosmic-ray protons, which can be boosted up to relativistic energies. Other promising acceleration sites are protostellar surfaces, where shocks caused by impacting material during the collapse phase are strong enough to accelerate cosmic-ray protons. In contrast, accretion flow shocks are too weak to efficiently accelerate cosmic rays. Though cosmic-ray electrons are weakly accelerated, they can gain a strong boost to relativistic energies through re-acceleration in successive shocks. Conclusions: We suggest a mechanism able to accelerate both cosmic-ray protons and electrons through the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism, which can be used to explain the high ionisation rate and the synchrotron emission observed towards protostellar sources. The existence of an internal source of energetic particles can have a strong and unforeseen impact on the ionisation of the protostellar disc, on the star and planet formation

  16. SOFIA-EXES: Probing the Thermal Structure of M Supergiant Wind Acceleration Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Graham M.; O'Gorman, Eamon; Guinan, Edward F.; EXES Instrument Team, EXES Science Team

    2016-01-01

    There is no standard model for mass loss from cool evolved stars, particularly for non-pulsating giants and supergiants. For the early-M supergiants, radiation pressure, convective ejections, magnetic fields, and Alfven waves have all been put forward as potential mass loss mechanisms. A potential discriminator between these ideas is the thermal structure resulting from the heating-cooling balance in the acceleration zone - the most important region to study mass loss physics.We present mid-IR [Fe II] emission line profiles of Betelgeuse and Antares obtained with NASA-DLR SOFIA-EXES and NASA IRTF-TEXES that were obtained as part of a GO program (Harper: Cycle 2-0004) and EXES instrument commissioning observations. The intra-term transitions sample a range of excitation conditions, Texc=540K, 3,400K, and 11,700K, i.e., from the warm chromospheric plasma, that also emits in the cm-radio and ultraviolet, to the cold inner circumstellar envelope. The spectrally-resolved profiles, when combined with VLA cm-radio observations, provide new constraints on the temperature and flow velocity in the outflow accelerating region. The semi-empirical energy balance can be used to test theoretical predictions of wind heating.

  17. PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-10-20

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates {mu}- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k {approx}< 10{sup 4} Mpc{sup -1}. Here, we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of {mu} and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  18. A celestial gamma-ray foreground due to the albedo of small solar system bodies and a remote probe of the interstellar cosmic ray spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; Porter, Troy A.; Digel, Seth W.; Michelson, Peter F.; Ormes, Jonathan F.

    2007-12-17

    We calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo flux from cosmic-ray (CR) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt asteroids and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) using the Moon as a template. We show that the {gamma}-ray albedo for the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt strongly depends on the small-body mass spectrum of each system and may be detectable by the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). The orbits of the Main Belt asteroids and KBOs are distributed near the ecliptic, which passes through the Galactic center and high Galactic latitudes. If detected, the {gamma}-ray emission by the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt has to be taken into account when analyzing weak {gamma}-ray sources close to the ecliptic, especially near the Galactic center and for signals at high Galactic latitudes, such as the extragalactic {gamma}-ray emission. Additionally, it can be used to probe the spectrum of CR nuclei at close-to-interstellar conditions, and the mass spectrum of small bodies in the Main Belt and Kuiper Belt. The asteroid albedo spectrum also exhibits a 511 keV line due to secondary positrons annihilating in the rock. This may be an important and previously unrecognized celestial foreground for the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) observations of the Galactic 511 keV line emission including the direction of the Galactic center.

  19. GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST GALAXY SURVEYS AT REDSHIFT z {approx}> 4: PROBES OF STAR FORMATION RATE AND COSMIC REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Trenti, Michele; Perna, Rosalba; Levesque, Emily M.; Shull, J. Michael; Stocke, John T.

    2012-04-20

    Measuring the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift is crucial for understanding cosmic reionization and galaxy formation. Two common complementary approaches are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) surveys for large samples and gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations for sensitivity to SFR in small galaxies. The z {approx}> 4 GRB-inferred SFR is higher than the LBG rate, but this difference is difficult to understand, as both methods rely on several modeling assumptions. Using a physically motivated galaxy luminosity function model, with star formation in dark matter halos with virial temperature T{sub vir} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} K (M{sub DM} {approx}> 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }), we show that GRB- and LBG-derived SFRs are consistent if GRBs extend to faint galaxies (M{sub AB} {approx}< -11). To test star formation below the detection limit L{sub lim} {approx} 0.05L*{sub z=3} of LBG surveys, we propose to measure the fraction f{sub det}(L > L{sub lim}, z) of GRB hosts with L > L{sub lim}. This fraction quantifies the missing star formation fraction in LBG surveys, constraining the mass-suppression scale for galaxy formation, with weak dependence on modeling assumptions. Because f{sub det}(L > L{sub lim}, z) corresponds to the ratio of SFRs derived from LBG and GRB surveys, if these estimators are unbiased, measuring f{sub det}(L > L{sub lim}, z) also constrains the redshift evolution of the GRB production rate per unit mass of star formation. Our analysis predicts significant success for GRB host detections at z {approx} 5 with f{sub det}(L > L{sub lim}, z) {approx} 0.4, but rarer detections at z > 6. By analyzing the upper limits on host galaxy luminosities of six z > 5 GRBs from literature data, we infer that galaxies with M{sub AB} > -15 were present at z > 5 at 95% confidence, demonstrating the key role played by very faint galaxies during reionization.

  20. Femtosecond probing around the K-edge of a laser heated plasma using X-rays from betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Keegan; Zhao, Tony; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Yanovsky, Victor; Nees, John; Mangles, Stuart; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team; Plasmas Group Team

    2015-11-01

    Presented here are data from a two-beam pump-probe experiment. We used synchrotron-like X-rays created by betatron oscillations to probe a thin metal foil that is pumped by the secondary laser beam. The Hercules Ti:Sapph laser facility was operated with a pulse duration of 34 fs and a power of 65 TW split to drive a laser wakefield accelerator and heat the secondary target. We observed opacity changes around the K-edge of thin foils as they were heated by an ultrafast pump laser. To understand how the opacity is changing with heating and expansion of the plasma, the delay between the two laser paths was adjusted on a fs and ps time scale. Experimental data for polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC) and aluminum show variations in opacity around the Cl and Al K-edges with changes in the probe delay. The transmitted synchrotron-like spectrum was measured using single photon counting on an X-ray CCD camera and was available on a shot-by-shot basis. The success of this work demonstrates a practical application for X-rays produced from betatron oscillations in a wakefield accelerator. The compact size of these ``table-top'' accelerators and the ultrashort nature of the generated X-ray pulses allows pump-probe experiments that can probe events that occur on the femtosecond time scale.

  1. Probing the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Burst Rate with Trigger Simulations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Amy Y.; Sakamoto, Takanori; Gehrels, Neil; Palmer, David; Barthelmy, Scott Douglas; Graziani, Carlo; Cannizzo, John K.

    2014-08-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae and stellar evolution. Additionally, the long GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to Swift’s complex trigger algorithm. Current studies usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we developed a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image trigger threshold. We use this program to search for the intrinsic GRB rate. Our simulations show that adopting the Swift’s complex trigger algorithm increases the detection rate of dim bursts. Therefore, GRBs need to be intrinsically dimmer than previously expected to avoid over-producing the number of detections and to match with Swift observations. As a result, we find that either the GRB rate is much higher at large redshift than previous expectations, or the luminosity evolution is non-negligible.

  2. Separable projection integrals for higher-order correlators of the cosmic microwave sky: Acceleration by factors exceeding 100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, J. P.; Pennycook, S. J.; Fergusson, J. R.; Jäykkä, J.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2016-04-01

    We present a case study describing efforts to optimise and modernise "Modal", the simulation and analysis pipeline used by the Planck satellite experiment for constraining general non-Gaussian models of the early universe via the bispectrum (or three-point correlator) of the cosmic microwave background radiation. We focus on one particular element of the code: the projection of bispectra from the end of inflation to the spherical shell at decoupling, which defines the CMB we observe today. This code involves a three-dimensional inner product between two functions, one of which requires an integral, on a non-rectangular domain containing a sparse grid. We show that by employing separable methods this calculation can be reduced to a one-dimensional summation plus two integrations, reducing the overall dimensionality from four to three. The introduction of separable functions also solves the issue of the non-rectangular sparse grid. This separable method can become unstable in certain scenarios and so the slower non-separable integral must be calculated instead. We present a discussion of the optimisation of both approaches. We demonstrate significant speed-ups of ≈100×, arising from a combination of algorithmic improvements and architecture-aware optimisations targeted at improving thread and vectorisation behaviour. The resulting MPI/OpenMP hybrid code is capable of executing on clusters containing processors and/or coprocessors, with strong-scaling efficiency of 98.6% on up to 16 nodes. We find that a single coprocessor outperforms two processor sockets by a factor of 1.3× and that running the same code across a combination of both microarchitectures improves performance-per-node by a factor of 3.38×. By making bispectrum calculations competitive with those for the power spectrum (or two-point correlator) we are now able to consider joint analysis for cosmological science exploitation of new data.

  3. PROBING THE SOLAR WIND ACCELERATION REGION WITH THE SUN-GRAZING COMET C/2002 S2

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, S.; Raymond, J. C.; Lamy, P.; Uzzo, M.; Dobrzycka, D.

    2015-01-01

    Comet C/2002 S2, a member of the Kreutz family of sungrazing comets, was discovered in white-light images of the Large Angle and Spectromeric Coronagraph Experiment coronagraph on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) on 2002 September 18 and observed in H I Lyα emission by the SOHO Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) instrument at four different heights as it approached the Sun. The H I Lyα line profiles detected by UVCS are analyzed to determine the spectral parameters: line intensity, width, and Doppler shift with respect to the coronal background. Two-dimensional comet images of these parameters are reconstructed at the different heights. A novel aspect of the observations of this sungrazing comet data is that, whereas the emission from most of the tail is blueshifted, that along one edge of the tail is redshifted. We attribute these shifts to a combination of solar wind speed and interaction with the magnetic field. In order to use the comet to probe the density, temperature, and speed of the corona and solar wind through which it passes, as well as to determine the outgassing rate of the comet, we develop a Monte Carlo simulation of the H I Lyα emission of a comet moving through a coronal plasma. From the outgassing rate, we estimate a nucleus diameter of about 9 m. This rate steadily increases as the comet approaches the Sun, while the optical brightness decreases by more than a factor of 10 and suddenly recovers. This indicates that the optical brightness is determined by the lifetimes of the grains, sodium atoms, and molecules produced by the comet.

  4. Future evolution and finite-time singularities in F(R) gravity unifying inflation and cosmic acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2008-08-15

    We study the future evolution of quintessence/phantom-dominated epoch in modified F(R) gravity which unifies the early-time inflation with late-time acceleration and which is consistent with observational tests. Using the reconstruction technique it is demonstrated that there are models where any known (big rip, II, III, or IV type) singularity may classically occur. From another side, in Einstein frame (scalar-tensor description) only IV type singularity occurs. Near the singularity the classical description breaks up, and it is demonstrated that quantum effects act against the singularity and may prevent its appearance. The realistic F(R) gravity which is future singularity free is proposed. We point out that additional modification of any F(R) gravity by the terms relevant at the early universe is possible, in such a way that future singularity does not occur even classically.

  5. Analysis of non-Gaussian cosmic microwave background maps based on the N-pdf. Application to Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielva, P.; Sanz, J. L.

    2009-08-01

    We present a new method based on the N-point probability distribution function (N-pdf) to study non-Gaussianity in cosmic microwave background maps. Likelihood and Bayesian estimation are applied to a local non-linear perturbed model up to third order, characterized by a linear term which is described by a Gaussian N-pdf, and a second- and third-order terms which are proportional to the square and the cube of the linear one. We also explore a set of model selection techniques (the Akaike and the Bayesian information criteria, the minimum description length, the Bayesian evidence and the generalized likelihood ratio test) and their application to decide whether a given data set is better described by the proposed local non-Gaussian model, rather than by the standard Gaussian temperature distribution. As an application, we consider the analysis of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data at a resolution of ~2°. At this angular scale (the Sachs-Wolfe regime), the non-Gaussian description proposed in this work defaults (under certain conditions) to an approximative local form of the weak non-linear coupling inflationary model previously addressed in the literature. For this particular case, we obtain an estimation for the non-linear coupling parameter of -94 < fNL < 154 at 95 per cent confidence level. Equally, model selection criteria also indicate that the Gaussian hypothesis is favoured against the particular local non-Gaussian model proposed in this work. This result is in agreement with previous findings obtained for equivalent non-Gaussian models and with different non-Gaussian estimators. However, our estimator based on the N-pdf is more efficient than previous estimators and, therefore, provides tighter constraints on the coupling parameter at degree scale.

  6. A new method of measuring the poloidal magnetic and radial electric fields in a tokamak using a laser-accelerated ion-beam trace probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, X Y; Chen, Y H; Lin, C; Wang, L; Xu, M; Wang, X G; Xiao, C J

    2014-11-01

    Both the poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and radial electric field (Er) are significant in magnetic confinement devices. In this paper, a new method was proposed to diagnose both Bp and Er at the same time, which was named Laser-accelerated Ion-beam Trace Probe (LITP). This method based on the laser-accelerated ion beam, which has three properties: large energy spread, short pulse lengths, and multiple charge states. LITP can provide the 1D profiles, or 2D images of both Bp and Er. In this paper, we present the basic principle and some preliminary theoretical results. PMID:25430336

  7. EFFICIENT COSMIC RAY ACCELERATION, HYDRODYNAMICS, AND SELF-CONSISTENT THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION APPLIED TO SUPERNOVA REMNANT RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Donald C.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Slane, Patrick; Raymond, John

    2010-03-20

    We model the broadband emission from supernova remnant (SNR) RX J1713.7-3946 including, for the first time, a consistent calculation of thermal X-ray emission together with non-thermal emission in a nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration model. Our model tracks the evolution of the SNR including the plasma ionization state between the forward shock and the contact discontinuity. We use a plasma emissivity code to predict the thermal X-ray emission spectrum assuming the initially cold electrons are heated either by Coulomb collisions with the shock-heated protons (the slowest possible heating), or come into instant equilibration with the protons. For either electron heating model, electrons reach {approx}>10{sup 7} K rapidly and the X-ray line emission near 1 keV is more than 10 times as luminous as the underlying thermal bremsstrahlung continuum. Since recent Suzaku observations show no detectable line emission, this places strong constraints on the unshocked ambient medium density and on the relativistic electron-to-proton ratio. For the uniform circumstellar medium (CSM) models that we consider, the low densities and high relativistic electron-to-proton ratios required to match the Suzaku X-ray observations definitively rule out pion decay as the emission process producing GeV-TeV photons. We show that leptonic models, where inverse-Compton scattering against the cosmic background radiation dominates the GeV-TeV emission, produce better fits to the broadband thermal and non-thermal observations in a uniform CSM.

  8. Cosmic Rays above the 2ND Knee from Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Inoue, Susumu; Asano, Katsuaki

    In clusters of galaxies, accretion and merger shocks are potential accelerators of high energy protons, as well as intracluster active galactic nuclei. We discuss the possibility that protons from cluster shocks make a significant contribution to the observed cosmic rays in the energy range between the second knee at ~1017.5 eV and the ankle at ~1018.5 eV. The accompanying neutrino and gamma-ray signals could be detectable by upcoming telescopes such as IceCube/KM3Net and CTA, providing a test of this scenario as well as a probe of cosmic-ray confinement properties in clusters.

  9. The Origin of Cosmic Rays

    ScienceCinema

    Blasi, Pasquale [INAF/Arcetri-Italy and Fermilab, Italy

    2010-01-08

    Cosmic Rays reach the Earth from space with energies of up to more than 1020 eV, carrying information on the most powerful particle accelerators that Nature has been able to assemble. Understanding where and how cosmic rays originate has required almost one century of investigations, and, although the last word is not written yet, recent observations and theory seem now to fit together to provide us with a global picture of the origin of cosmic rays of unprecedented clarity. Here we will describe what we learned from recent observations of astrophysical sources (such as supernova remnants and active galaxies) and we will illustrate what these observations tell us about the physics of particle acceleration and transport. We will also discuss the ?end? of the Galactic cosmic ray spectrum, which bridges out attention towards the so called ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). At ~1020 eV the gyration scale of cosmic rays in cosmic magnetic fields becomes large enough to allow us to point back to their sources, thereby allowing us to perform ?cosmic ray astronomy?, as confirmed by the recent results obtained with the Pierre Auger Observatory. We will discuss the implications of these observations for the understanding of UHECRs, as well as some questions which will likely remain unanswered and will be the target of the next generation of cosmic ray experiments.

  10. Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaldarriaga, Matias

    The following sections are included: * Rapporteur Talk by R. Ellis: Massive Black Holes: Evidence, Demographics and Cosmic Evolution * Rapporteur Talk by S. Furlanetto: The Cosmic Dawn: Theoretical Models and the Future

  11. Insights into the Galactic Cosmic-ray Source from the TIGER Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Link, Jason T.; Barbier, L. M.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, J. R.; Geier, S.; Israel, M. H.; Lodders, K.; Mewaldt,R. A.; Mitchell, J. W.; deNolfo, G. A.; Rauch, B. F.; Schindler, S. M.; Scott, L. M.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Stone, E. C.; Waddington, C. J.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report results from 50 days of data accumulated in two Antarctic flights of the Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER). With a detector system composed of scintillators, Cherenkov detectors, and scintillating optical fibers, TIGER has a geometrical acceptance of 1.7 sq m sr and a charge resolution of 0.23 cu at Iron. TIGER has obtained abundance measurements of some of the rare galactic cosmic rays heavier than iron, including Zn, Ga, Ge, Se, and Sr, as well as the more abundant lighter elements (down to Si). The heavy elements have long been recognized as important probes of the nature of the galactic cosmic-ray source and accelerator. After accounting for fragmentation of cosmic-ray nuclei as they propagate through the Galaxy and the atmosphere above the detector system, the TIGER source abundances are consistent with a source that is a mixture of about 20% ejecta from massive stars and 80% interstellar medium with solar system composition. This result supports a model of cosmic-ray origin in OB associations previously inferred from ACE-CRIS data of more abundant lighter elements. These TIGER data also support a cosmic-ray acceleration model in which elements present in interstellar grains are accelerated preferentially compared with those found in interstellar gas.

  12. TOWARD UNDERSTANDING THE COSMIC-RAY ACCELERATION AT YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS INTERACTING WITH INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS: POSSIBLE APPLICATIONS TO RX J1713.7-3946

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Fukui, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we investigate general properties of a blast wave shock interacting with interstellar clouds. The pre-shock cloudy medium is generated as a natural consequence of the thermal instability that simulates realistic clumpy interstellar clouds and their diffuse surrounding. The shock wave that sweeps the cloudy medium generates a turbulent shell through the vorticity generations that are induced by shock-cloud interactions. In the turbulent shell, the magnetic field is amplified as a result of turbulent dynamo action. The energy density of the amplified magnetic field can locally grow comparable to the thermal energy density, particularly at the transition layers between clouds and the diffuse surrounding. In the case of a young supernova remnant (SNR) with a shock velocity {approx}> 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}, the corresponding strength of the magnetic field is approximately 1 mG. The propagation speed of the shock wave is significantly stalled in the clouds because of the high density, while the shock maintains a high velocity in the diffuse surrounding. In addition, when the shock wave hits the clouds, reflection shock waves are generated that propagate back into the shocked shell. From these simulation results, many observational characteristics of the young SNR RX J1713.7-3946 that is suggested to be interacting with molecular clouds can be explained as follows. The reflection shocks can accelerate particles in the turbulent downstream region where the magnetic field strength reaches 1 mG, which causes short-time variability of synchrotron X-rays. Since the shock velocity is stalled locally in the clouds, the temperature in the shocked cloud is suppressed far below 1 keV. Thus, thermal X-ray line emission would be faint even if the SNR is interacting with molecular clouds. We also find that the photon index of the {pi}{sup 0}-decay gamma rays generated by cosmic-ray protons can be 1.5 (corresponding energy flux

  13. Toward Understanding the Cosmic-Ray Acceleration at Young Supernova Remnants Interacting with Interstellar Clouds: Possible Applications to RX J1713.7-3946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Ryo; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Fukui, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we investigate general properties of a blast wave shock interacting with interstellar clouds. The pre-shock cloudy medium is generated as a natural consequence of the thermal instability that simulates realistic clumpy interstellar clouds and their diffuse surrounding. The shock wave that sweeps the cloudy medium generates a turbulent shell through the vorticity generations that are induced by shock-cloud interactions. In the turbulent shell, the magnetic field is amplified as a result of turbulent dynamo action. The energy density of the amplified magnetic field can locally grow comparable to the thermal energy density, particularly at the transition layers between clouds and the diffuse surrounding. In the case of a young supernova remnant (SNR) with a shock velocity >~ 103 km s-1, the corresponding strength of the magnetic field is approximately 1 mG. The propagation speed of the shock wave is significantly stalled in the clouds because of the high density, while the shock maintains a high velocity in the diffuse surrounding. In addition, when the shock wave hits the clouds, reflection shock waves are generated that propagate back into the shocked shell. From these simulation results, many observational characteristics of the young SNR RX J1713.7-3946 that is suggested to be interacting with molecular clouds can be explained as follows. The reflection shocks can accelerate particles in the turbulent downstream region where the magnetic field strength reaches 1 mG, which causes short-time variability of synchrotron X-rays. Since the shock velocity is stalled locally in the clouds, the temperature in the shocked cloud is suppressed far below 1 keV. Thus, thermal X-ray line emission would be faint even if the SNR is interacting with molecular clouds. We also find that the photon index of the π0-decay gamma rays generated by cosmic-ray protons can be 1.5 (corresponding energy flux is νF νvpropν0.5) because

  14. Supernova and cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A general overview of supernova astronomy is presented, followed by a discussion of the relationship between SN and galactic cosmic rays. Pre-supernova evolution is traced to core collapse, explosion, and mass ejection. The two types of SN light curves are discussed in terms of their causes, and the different nucleosynthetic processes inside SNs are reviewed. Physical events in SN remnants are discussed. The three main connections between cosmic rays and SNs, the energy requirement, the acceleration mechanism, and the detailed composition of CR, are detailed.

  15. Galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2015-12-01

    The multi-facet nature of the origin of cosmic rays is such that some of the problems currently met in our path to describing available data are due to oversimplified models of CR acceleration and transport, and others to lack of knowledge of the physical processes at work in certain conditions. On the other hand, the phenomenology of cosmic rays, as arising from better observations, is getting so rich that it makes sense to try to distinguish the problems that derive from too simple views of Nature and those that are challenging the very foundations of the existing paradigms. Here I will briefly discuss some of these issues.

  16. The Isotopic Composition of Cosmic-Ray Iron and Nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, M.; Binns, W.; Christian, E.; Cummings, A.; George, J.; Hink, P.; Klarmann, J.; Leske, R.; Lijowski, M.; Mewaldt, R.; Stone, E.; Rosenvinge, T. von

    2000-01-01

    Observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) on ACE have been used to derive contraints on the locations, physical conditions, and time scales for cosmic-ray acceleration and transport.

  17. Nineteenth International Cosmic Ray Conference. OG Sessions, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Papers submitted for presentation at the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference are compiled. This volume addresses cosmic ray sources and acceleration, interstellar propagation and nuclear interactions, and detection techniques and instrumentation.

  18. Laser-pump/X-ray-probe experiments with electrons ejected from a Cu(111) target: space-charge acceleration.

    PubMed

    Schiwietz, G; Kühn, D; Föhlisch, A; Holldack, K; Kachel, T; Pontius, N

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the emission characteristics for electrons induced by X-rays of a few hundred eV at grazing-incidence angles on an atomically clean Cu(111) sample during laser excitation is presented. Electron energy spectra due to intense infrared laser irradiation are investigated at the BESSY II slicing facility. Furthermore, the influence of the corresponding high degree of target excitation (high peak current of photoemission) on the properties of Auger and photoelectrons liberated by a probe X-ray beam is investigated in time-resolved pump and probe measurements. Strong electron energy shifts have been found and assigned to space-charge acceleration. The variation of the shift with laser power and electron energy is investigated and discussed on the basis of experimental as well as new theoretical results. PMID:27577771

  19. Cosmic-Rays and Gamma Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, A.

    2013-07-01

    Cosmic-rays are subatomic particles of energies ranging between a few eV to hundreds of TeV. These particles register a power-law spectrum, and it seems that most of them originate from astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The shock acceleration in superalfvenic astrophysical plasmas, is believed to be the main mechanism responsible for the production of the non-thermal cosmic-rays. Especially, the importance of the very high energy cosmic-ray acceleration, with its consequent gamma-ray radiation and neutrino production in the shocks of the relativistic jets of Gamma Ray Bursts, is a favourable theme of study. I will discuss the cosmic-ray shock acceleration mechanism particularly focusing on simulation studies of cosmic-ray acceleration occurring in the relativistic shocks of GRB jets.

  20. Advanced cosmic-ray composition experiment for the space station (ACCESS)

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Martin H.; Streitmatter, Robert E.; Swordy, Simon P.

    1999-01-22

    ACCESS is a large electronic cosmic-ray detector, designed for one of the zenith-pointing external attach points on the International Space Station. ACCESS addresses the fundamental astrophysical question: How do cosmic rays gain their enormous energies? It does this by combining two kinds of measurements. By determining the energy spectra of individual elements with atomic number (Z) in the interval 1{<=}Z{<=}28 up to an energy of 10{sup 15} eV, ACCESS will probe a region of the spectra where theories of supernova acceleration predict changes in the cosmic-ray element composition. By measuring individual element abundances at more moderate energies of every element in the entire periodic table, ACCESS will distinguish between competing theories of how the cosmic-ray nuclei are initially injected into the accelerator that gives them their high energies. ACCESS will identify the atomic number of incident cosmic-ray nuclei using silicon solid-state detectors Cherenkov detectors, and scintillators. It will measure the energy of heavy nuclei (Z{>=}4) with transition radiation detectors, and the energy of light nuclei (Z{<=}8) with an ionization calorimeter.

  1. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedrati, R.; Attallah, R.

    2014-04-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥ 10 GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data.

  2. Li-7 and Be-7 de-excitation lines - Probes for accelerated particle transport models in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Hua, X.-M.; Kozlovsky, B.; Ramaty, R.

    1990-03-01

    The photon energy spectrum of a spectral feature composed of the 429 and 478 keV gamma-ray lines from Be-7 and Li-7 (produced by interactions of flare-accelerated alpha particles with ambient He in the solar atmosphere) depends on the angular distribution of the interacting accelerated particles. This spectrum is calculated for limb and disk-centered flares using a loop model for the transport of the ions. The resulting spectra are compared with data from the April 27, 1981 limb flare obtained with the gamma-ray spectrometer on SMM, providing convincing evidence for the existence of the (Li-7)-(Be-7) feature in this flare. By comparing the fluence of this feature with that of the 511 keV line, it is shown that the accelerated alpha particle abundance or the ambient He abundance, or both, must be enhanced.

  3. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Clark R.; Morrison, David

    1989-01-01

    The discovery of cosmic impacts and their effects on the earth's surface are discussed. The manner in which the object impacts with the earth is described. The formation of crytovolcanic structures by craters is examined. Examples of cosmic debris collisions with earth, in particular the Tunguska explosion of 1908 and the Meteor Crater in Arizona, are provided.

  4. Herschel Survey of Galactic OH+, H2O+, and H3O+: Probing the Molecular Hydrogen Fraction and Cosmic-Ray Ionization Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A.; Gerin, M.; Schilke, P.; Benz, A. O.; Winkel, B.; Menten, K. M.; Chambers, E. T.; Black, John H.; Bruderer, S.; Falgarone, E.; Godard, B.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gupta, H.; Lis, D. C.; Ossenkopf, V.; Persson, C. M.; Sonnentrucker, P.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Wolfire, Mark G.; Wyrowski, F.

    2015-02-01

    In diffuse interstellar clouds the chemistry that leads to the formation of the oxygen-bearing ions OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ begins with the ionization of atomic hydrogen by cosmic rays, and continues through subsequent hydrogen abstraction reactions involving H2. Given these reaction pathways, the observed abundances of these molecules are useful in constraining both the total cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen (ζH) and molecular hydrogen fraction (f_H_2). We present observations targeting transitions of OH+, H2O+, and H3O+ made with the Herschel Space Observatory along 20 Galactic sight lines toward bright submillimeter continuum sources. Both OH+ and H2O+ are detected in absorption in multiple velocity components along every sight line, but H3O+ is only detected along 7 sight lines. From the molecular abundances we compute f_H_2 in multiple distinct components along each line of sight, and find a Gaussian distribution with mean and standard deviation 0.042 ± 0.018. This confirms previous findings that OH+ and H2O+ primarily reside in gas with low H2 fractions. We also infer ζH throughout our sample, and find a lognormal distribution with mean log (ζH) = -15.75 (ζH = 1.78 × 10-16 s-1) and standard deviation 0.29 for gas within the Galactic disk, but outside of the Galactic center. This is in good agreement with the mean and distribution of cosmic-ray ionization rates previously inferred from H_3^+ observations. Ionization rates in the Galactic center tend to be 10-100 times larger than found in the Galactic disk, also in accord with prior studies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  5. A cosmic microwave background feature consistent with a cosmic texture.

    PubMed

    Cruz, M; Turok, N; Vielva, P; Martínez-González, E; Hobson, M

    2007-12-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background provides our most ancient image of the universe and our best tool for studying its early evolution. Theories of high-energy physics predict the formation of various types of topological defects in the very early universe, including cosmic texture, which would generate hot and cold spots in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We show through a Bayesian statistical analysis that the most prominent 5 degrees -radius cold spot observed in all-sky images, which is otherwise hard to explain, is compatible with having being caused by a texture. From this model, we constrain the fundamental symmetry-breaking energy scale to be (0) approximately 8.7 x 10(15) gigaelectron volts. If confirmed, this detection of a cosmic defect will probe physics at energies exceeding any conceivable terrestrial experiment. PMID:17962521

  6. Space science: Cosmic rays beyond the knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    The development of a radio technique for detecting cosmic rays casts fresh light on the origins of some of these accelerated particles, and suggests that they might have travelled much farther than was previously thought. See Letter p.70

  7. A Portable Classroom Cosmic Ray Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matis, Howard

    2012-03-01

    Normally, one has to work at an accelerator to demonstrate the principles of particle physics. We have developed a portable cosmic ray detector, the Berkeley Lab Detector, that can bring high energy physics experimentation into the classroom. The detector, which is powered by either batteries or AC power, consists of two scintillator paddles with a printed circuit board. The printed circuit board takes the analog signals from the paddles, compares them, and determines whether the pulses arrived at the same time. It has a visual display and a computer output. The output is compatible with commonly found probes in high schools and colleges. A bright high school student can assemble it. Teachers and students have used a working detector on six of the world's continents. These activities have included cross country trips, science projects, and classroom demonstrations. A complete description can be found at the web site: cosmic.lbl.gov. Besides, basic particle physics, the detector can be used to teach statistics and also to provide an opportunity where students have to determine how much data are taken. In this presentation, we will demonstrate the detector and describe some of the projects that teachers and students have completed with it.

  8. Cosmic superstrings.

    PubMed

    Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2008-08-28

    Cosmic superstrings are expected to be formed at the end of brane inflation, within the context of brane-world cosmological models inspired from string theory. By studying the properties of cosmic superstring networks and comparing their phenomenological consequences against observational data, we aim to pin down the successful and natural inflationary model and get an insight into the stringy description of our Universe. PMID:18534932

  9. Design of a hard X-ray beamline and end-station for pump and probe experiments at Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeku; Eom, Intae; Kang, Tai-Hee; Rah, Seungyu; Nam, Ki Hyun; Park, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Kwon, Soonam; Park, Sang Han; Kim, Kyung Sook; Hyun, Hyojung; Kim, Seung Nam; Lee, Eun Hee; Shin, Hocheol; Kim, Seonghan; Kim, Myong-jin; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Ahn, Docheon; Lim, Jun; Yu, Chung-Jong; Song, Changyong; Kim, Hyunjung; Noh, Do Young; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Bongsoo; Kim, Kwang-Woo; Ko, In Soo; Cho, Moo-Hyun; Kim, Sunam

    2016-02-01

    The Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser project, a new worldwide-user facility to deliver ultrashort, laser-like x-ray photon pulses, will begin user operation in 2017 after one year of commissioning. Initially, it will provide two beamlines for hard and soft x-rays, respectively, and two experimental end-stations for the hard x-ray beamline will be constructed by the end of 2015. This article introduces one of the two hard x-ray end-stations, which is for hard x-ray pump-probe experiments, and primarily outlines the overall design of this end-station and its critical components. The content of this article will provide useful guidelines for the planning of experiments conducted at the new facility.

  10. Cosmic Rays Astrophysics: The Discipline, Its Scope, and Its Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the discipline surrounding cosmic ray astrophysics. It includes information on recent assertions surrounding cosmic rays, exposure levels, and a short history with specific information on the origin, acceleration, transport, and modulation of cosmic rays.

  11. Gammy-Ray and Hard X-Ray Emission from Pulsar-aided Supernovae as a Probe of Particle Acceleration in Embryonic Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kohta; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Kiuchi, Kenta; Bartos, Imre

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that some classes of luminous supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are driven by newborn magnetars. Fast-rotating proto-neutron stars have also been of interest as potential sources of gravitational waves (GWs). We show that for a range of rotation periods and magnetic fields, hard X-rays and GeV gamma rays provide us with a promising probe of pulsar-aided SNe. It is observationally known that young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) in the Milky Way are very efficient lepton accelerators. We argue that, if embryonic PWNe satisfy similar conditions at early stages of SNe (in ˜1-10 months after the explosion), external inverse-Compton emission via upscatterings of SN photons is naturally expected in the GeV range as well as broadband synchrotron emission. To fully take into account the Klein-Nishina effect and two-photon annihilation process that are important at early times, we perform detailed calculations including electromagnetic cascades. Our results suggest that hard X-ray telescopes such as NuSTAR can observe such early PWN emission by follow-up observations in months to years. GeV gamma-rays may also be detected by Fermi for nearby SNe, which serve as counterparts of these GW sources. Detecting the signals will give us an interesting probe of particle acceleration at early times of PWNe, as well as clues to driving mechanisms of luminous SNe and GRBs. Since the Bethe-Heitler cross section is lower than the Thomson cross section, gamma rays would allow us to study subphotospheric dissipation. We encourage searches for high-energy emission from nearby SNe, especially SNe Ibc including super-luminous objects.

  12. Numerical Cosmic-Ray Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, F.

    2009-04-01

    We present a numerical method for integrating the equations describing a system made of a fluid and cosmic-rays. We work out the modified characteristic equations that include the CR dynamical effects in smooth flows. We model the energy exchange between cosmic-rays and the fluid, due to diffusive processes in configuration and momentum space, with a flux conserving method. For a specified shock acceleration efficiency as a function of the upstream conditions and shock Mach number, we modify the Riemann solver to take into account the cosmic-ray mediation at shocks without resolving the cosmic-ray induced substructure. A self-consistent time-dependent shock solution is obtained by using our modified solver with Glimm's method. Godunov's method is applied in smooth parts of the flow.

  13. Compressive Acceleration of Solar Energetic Particles within Coronal Mass Ejections: Observations and Theory Relevant to the Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    observational technique by which (divV) may be extracted directly from coronograph white-light movies of out-going CMEs, thus offering observational closure of the new theory for SEP acceleration/injection that should be relevant to the Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter missions.

  14. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  15. Cosmic Rays at Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieder, P. K. F.

    In 1912 Victor Franz Hess made the revolutionary discovery that ionizing radiation is incident upon the Earth from outer space. He showed with ground-based and balloon-borne detectors that the intensity of the radiation did not change significantly between day and night. Consequently, the sun could not be regarded as the sources of this radiation and the question of its origin remained unanswered. Today, almost one hundred years later the question of the origin of the cosmic radiation still remains a mystery. Hess' discovery has given an enormous impetus to large areas of science, in particular to physics, and has played a major role in the formation of our current understanding of universal evolution. For example, the development of new fields of research such as elementary particle physics, modern astrophysics and cosmology are direct consequences of this discovery. Over the years the field of cosmic ray research has evolved in various directions: Firstly, the field of particle physics that was initiated by the discovery of many so-called elementary particles in the cosmic radiation. There is a strong trend from the accelerator physics community to reenter the field of cosmic ray physics, now under the name of astroparticle physics. Secondly, an important branch of cosmic ray physics that has rapidly evolved in conjunction with space exploration concerns the low energy portion of the cosmic ray spectrum. Thirdly, the branch of research that is concerned with the origin, acceleration and propagation of the cosmic radiation represents a great challenge for astrophysics, astronomy and cosmology. Presently very popular fields of research have rapidly evolved, such as high-energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy. In addition, high-energy neutrino astronomy may soon initiate as a likely spin-off neutrino tomography of the Earth and thus open a unique new branch of geophysical research of the interior of the Earth. Finally, of considerable interest are the biological

  16. Probing the Peak Epoch of Cosmic Star Formation (1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian D.; Richard, Johan; Rafelski, Marc; Jauzac, Mathilde; Limousin, Marceau; Stark, Daniel; Teplitz, Harry I.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a complete census of cosmic star formation requires an understanding of faint star-forming galaxies that are far below the detection limits of current surveys. To search for the faint galaxies, we use the power of strong gravitational lensing from foreground galaxy clusters to boost the detection limits of HST to much fainter luminosities. Using the WFC3/UVIS on board the HST, we obtain deep UV images of 4 lensing clusters with existing deep optical and near-infrared data (three from Frontier Fields survey). Building multiband photometric catalogs and applying a photometric redshift selection, we uncover a large population of dwarf galaxies (-18.5cosmic star formation (150%) at these redshifts. We use this unique sample to investigate further the various properties of dwarf galaxies as it is claimed to deviate from the trends seen for the more massive galaxies. Recent hydro-dynamical simulations and observations of local dwarfs show that these galaxies have episodic bursts of star formation on short time scales (< 10 Myr). We find that the bursty star formation histories (SFHs) cause a large intrinsic scatter in UV colors (β) at MUV > -16, comparing a sample of low mass galaxies from simulations with bursty SFHs with our comprehensive measurements of the observed β values. As this scatter can also be due to the dust extinction, we distinguish these two effects by measuring the dust attenuation using Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ) ratios from our MOSFIRE/Keck spectroscopy.

  17. High energy physics in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Lawrence W.

    2013-02-07

    In the first half-century of cosmic ray physics, the primary research focus was on elementary particles; the positron, pi-mesons, mu-mesons, and hyperons were discovered in cosmic rays. Much of this research was carried out at mountain elevations; Pic du Midi in the Pyrenees, Mt. Chacaltaya in Bolivia, and Mt. Evans/Echo Lake in Colorado, among other sites. In the 1960s, claims of the observation of free quarks, and satellite measurements of a significant rise in p-p cross sections, plus the delay in initiating accelerator construction programs for energies above 100 GeV, motivated the Michigan-Wisconsin group to undertake a serious cosmic ray program at Echo Lake. Subsequently, with the succession of higher energy accelerators and colliders at CERN and Fermilab, cosmic ray research has increasingly focused on cosmology and astrophysics, although some groups continue to study cosmic ray particle interactions in emulsion chambers.

  18. Cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, David P.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects which are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characterisitc microwave background anisotropy. It was recently discovered that details of cosmic string evolution are very differnt from the so-called standard model that was assumed in most of the string-induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain.

  19. Cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D.P.

    1988-07-01

    Cosmic strings are linear topological defects that are predicted by some grand unified theories to form during a spontaneous symmetry breaking phase transition in the early universe. They are the basis for the only theories of galaxy formation aside from quantum fluctuations from inflation that are based on fundamental physics. In contrast to inflation, they can also be observed directly through gravitational lensing and their characteristic microwave background anistropy. It has recently been discovered by F. Bouchet and myself that details of cosmic string evolution are very different from the so-called ''standard model'' that has been assumed in most of the string induced galaxy formation calculations. Therefore, the details of galaxy formation in the cosmic string models are currently very uncertain. 29 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Plasma characterization of the superconducting proton linear accelerator plasma generator using a 2 MHz compensated Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitzer, C.; Kronberger, M.; Lettry, J.; Sanchez-Arias, J.; Stoeri, H.

    2012-02-15

    The CERN study for a superconducting proton Linac (SPL) investigates the design of a pulsed 5 GeV Linac operating at 50 Hz. As a first step towards a future SPL H{sup -} volume ion source, a plasma generator capable of operating at Linac4 or nominal SPL settings has been developed and operated at a dedicated test stand. The hydrogen plasma is heated by an inductively coupled RF discharge e{sup -} and ions are confined by a magnetic multipole cusp field similar to the currently commissioned Linac4 H{sup -} ion source. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma potential, temperature, and electron energy distribution function obtained by means of a RF compensated Langmuir probe along the axis of the plasma generator are presented. The influence of the main tuning parameters, such as RF power and frequency and the timing scheme is discussed with the aim to correlate them to optimum H{sup -} ion beam parameters measured on an ion source test stand. The effects of hydrogen injection settings which allow operation at 50 Hz repetition rate are discussed.

  1. Plasma characterization of the superconducting proton linear accelerator plasma generator using a 2 MHz compensated Langmuir probe.

    PubMed

    Schmitzer, C; Kronberger, M; Lettry, J; Sanchez-Arias, J; Störi, H

    2012-02-01

    The CERN study for a superconducting proton Linac (SPL) investigates the design of a pulsed 5 GeV Linac operating at 50 Hz. As a first step towards a future SPL H(-) volume ion source, a plasma generator capable of operating at Linac4 or nominal SPL settings has been developed and operated at a dedicated test stand. The hydrogen plasma is heated by an inductively coupled RF discharge e(-) and ions are confined by a magnetic multipole cusp field similar to the currently commissioned Linac4 H(-) ion source. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma potential, temperature, and electron energy distribution function obtained by means of a RF compensated Langmuir probe along the axis of the plasma generator are presented. The influence of the main tuning parameters, such as RF power and frequency and the timing scheme is discussed with the aim to correlate them to optimum H(-) ion beam parameters measured on an ion source test stand. The effects of hydrogen injection settings which allow operation at 50 Hz repetition rate are discussed. PMID:22380224

  2. The Kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect as a Probe of the Physics of Cosmic Reionization: The Effect of Self-regulated Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, H.; Shapiro, P. R.; Komatsu, E.; Iliev, I. T.; Ahn, K.; Mellema, G.

    2013-10-01

    We calculate the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature fluctuations induced by the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel‘dovich (kSZ) effect from the epoch of reionization (EOR). We use detailed N-body simulation with radiative transfer to follow inhomogeneous reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM). For the first time we take into account the “self-regulation” of reionization: star formation in low-mass atomic-cooling halos (LMACH; 10e8 M_solar1e9 M_solar) dominate. While inclusion of self-regulation affects the amplitude of the kSZ power spectrum only modestly (~10%), it can change the duration of reionization by a factor of more than two.

  3. Low-Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.; ACE/CRIS Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic rays with energies below about 10 GeV/nucleon have been measured with high precision as a result of experiments on the HEAO, Ulysses, and ACE spacecrafts. The observations provide energy spectra, elemental abundances, and isotopic composition for elements up through Z=30. They include both stable and radioactive nuclides that are synthesized in stars or are produced by nuclear fragmentation during diffusion at high energies through interstellar medium. From these data one obtains a rather detailed picture of the origin of low-energy cosmic rays. For refractory species, the cosmic-ray source composition closely resembles that of the Sun, suggesting that cosmic rays are accelerated from a well-mixed sample of interstellar matter. A chemical fractionation process has depleted the abundances of volatile elements relative to refractories. Using various radioactive clock isotopes it has been shown that particle acceleration occurs at least 105 years after supernova nucleosynthesis and that the accelerated particles diffuse in the Galaxy for approximately 15 Myr after acceleration. Energy spectra and secondary-to-primary ratios are reasonably well accounted for by models in which particles gain the bulk of their energy in a single encounter with a strong shock. Among the large number of species that have been measured, 22Ne stands out as the only nuclide with an abundance that is clearly much different than solar. To test models proposed to account for this anomaly, the data are being analyzed for predicted smaller effects on abundances of other nuclides. In addition to providing a detailed understanding of the origin and acceleration of low-energy cosmic rays, these data are providing constraints on the chemical evolution of interstellar matter. This work was supported by NASA at Caltech (under grant NAG5-6912), JPL, NASA/GSFC, and Washington U.

  4. Models of Cosmic-Ray Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, M. M.

    2001-08-01

    Two models of cosmic-ray genesis are compared: (a) the author s red-dwarf hypothesis requiring the injection of seed particles from coronal mass ejections (CME) prior to shock acceleration, and (b) the direct acceleration of thermal ions and of grains in the ISM, proposed by Meyer, Drury and Ellison. Both models agree that shocks in the expanding envelopes of supernova remnants are principally responsible for acceleration to cosmic-ray energies. Both are designed to overcome the mismatch between the source composition of the Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and the composition of the thermal ISM gas. Model (a) utilizes the prolific emissions of energetic particles from active dMe and dKe stars via their CME as the agents of seed-particle injection into the ISM. The composition of these seed particles is governed by the FIP (first-ionization potential) selection mechanism that operates for both Galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles. Hence it is consistent with the cosmic-ray source composition. Model (b) relies on the sputtering and acceleration of grains in the ISM (along with acceleration of thermal ions) to provide the known source composition. This model considers the FIP ordering of GCR abundances as purely coincidental, and it attributes the relative source abundances to selection according to volatility. Recent cosmic-ray observations in favor of each model are cited.

  5. Hubble space telescope/cosmic origins spectrograph observations of the quasar Q0302–003: Probing the He II reionization epoch and QSO proximity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, David; Shull, J. Michael

    2014-03-20

    Q0302–003 (z = 3.2860 ± 0.0005) was the first quasar discovered that showed a He II Gunn-Peterson trough, a sign of incomplete helium reionization at z ≳ 2.9. We present its Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph far-UV medium-resolution spectrum, which resolves many spectral features for the first time, allowing study of the quasar itself, the intergalactic medium, and quasar proximity effects. Q0302–003 has a harder intrinsic extreme-UV spectral index than previously claimed, as determined from both a direct fit to the spectrum (yielding α{sub ν} ≈ –0.8) and the helium-to-hydrogen ion ratio in the quasar's line-of-sight proximity zone. Intergalactic absorption along this sightline shows that the helium Gunn-Peterson trough is largely black in the range 2.87 < z < 3.20, apart from ionization due to local sources, indicating that helium reionization has not completed at these redshifts. However, we tentatively report a detection of nonzero flux in the high-redshift trough when looking at low-density regions, but zero flux in higher-density regions. This constrains the He II fraction to be about 1% in the low-density intergalactic medium (IGM) and possibly a factor of a few higher in the IGM as a whole, suggesting helium reionization has progressed substantially by z ∼ 3.1. The Gunn-Peterson trough recovers to a He II Lyα forest at z < 2.87. We confirm a transmission feature due to the ionization zone around a z = 3.05 quasar just off the sightline, and resolve the feature for the first time. We discover a similar such feature possibly caused by a luminous z = 3.23 quasar further from the sightline, which suggests that this quasar has been luminous for >34 Myr.

  6. Cosmic Balloons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    A team of French high-school students sent a weather balloon into the upper atmosphere to recreate Viktor Hess's historical experiment that demonstrated the existence of ionizing radiation from the sky--later called cosmic radiation. This discovery earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1936.

  7. Cosmic balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2014-11-01

    A team of French high-school students sent a weather balloon into the upper atmosphere to recreate Viktor Hess’s historical experiment that demonstrated the existence of ionizing radiation from the sky—later called cosmic radiation. This discovery earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1936.

  8. FAIR - Cosmic Matter in the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöcker, Horst; Stöhlker, Thomas; Sturm, Christian

    2015-06-01

    To explore cosmic matter in the laboratory - this fascinating research prospect becomes available at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, FAIR. The new facility is being constructed within the next five years adjacent to the existing accelerator complex of the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research at Darmstadt/Germany, expanding the research goals and technical possibilities substantially. This includes new insights into the dynamics of supernovae depending on the properties of short-lived neutron-rich nuclei which will be investigated with intense rare isotope beams. New insights will be provided into the interior of stars by exploring dense plasmas with intense heavy-ion beams combined with a high-performance laser - or into neutron star cores by probing the highest baryon densities in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at unprecedented collision rates. To the latter, the properties of hadrons play an important part which will be systematically studied by high precision hadron spectroscopy with antiproton beams at unmatched intensities. The worldwide unique accelerator and experimental facilities of FAIR will open the way for a broad spectrum of unprecedented fore-front research supplying a large variety of experiments in hadron, nuclear, atomic and plasma physics as well as biomedical and material science which will be briefly described in this article. This article is based on the FAIR Green Paper [4] and gives an update of former publications [5] - [12].

  9. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, J.

    2015-12-01

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  10. Aligned interactions in cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kempa, J.

    2015-12-15

    The first clean Centauro was found in cosmic rays years many ago at Mt Chacaltaya experiment. Since that time, many people have tried to find this type of interaction, both in cosmic rays and at accelerators. But no one has found a clean cases of this type of interaction.It happened finally in the last exposure of emulsion at Mt Chacaltaya where the second clean Centauro has been found. The experimental data for both the Centauros and STRANA will be presented and discussed in this paper. We also present our comments to the intriguing question of the existence of a type of nuclear interactions at high energy with alignment.

  11. THE KINETIC SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT AS A PROBE OF THE PHYSICS OF COSMIC REIONIZATION: THE EFFECT OF SELF-REGULATED REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyunbae; Shapiro, Paul R.; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Iliev, Ilian T.; Ahn, Kyungjin; Mellema, Garrelt

    2013-06-01

    We calculate the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations induced by the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect from the epoch of reionization (EOR). We use detailed N-body+radiative-transfer simulations to follow inhomogeneous reionization of the intergalactic medium. For the first time, we take into account the ''self-regulation'' of reionization: star formation in low-mass dwarf galaxies (10{sup 8} M{sub Sun} {approx}< M {approx}< 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }) or minihalos (10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} {approx}< M {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }) is suppressed if these halos form in the regions that were already ionized or Lyman-Werner dissociated. Some previous work suggested that the amplitude of the kSZ power spectrum from the EOR can be described by a two-parameter family: the epoch of half-ionization and the duration of reionization. However, we argue that this picture applies only to simple forms of the reionization history which are roughly symmetric about the half-ionization epoch. In self-regulated reionization, the universe begins to be ionized early, maintains a low level of ionization for an extended period, and then finishes reionization as soon as high-mass atomically cooling halos dominate. While inclusion of self-regulation affects the amplitude of the kSZ power spectrum only modestly ({approx}10%), it can change the duration of reionization by a factor of more than two. We conclude that the simple two-parameter family does not capture the effect of a physical, yet complex, reionization history caused by self-regulation. When added to the post-reionization kSZ contribution, our prediction for the total kSZ power spectrum is below the current upper bound from the South Pole Telescope. Therefore, the current upper bound on the kSZ effect from the EOR is consistent with our understanding of the physics of reionization.

  12. Exploding Stars and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Supernovae are exceptionally interesting astronomical objects: they punctuate the end of stellar evolution, create the heavy elements, and blast the interstellar gas with energetic shock waves. By studying supernovae, we can learn how these important aspects of cosmic evolution take place. Over the decades, we have learned that some supernovae are produced by gravitational collapse, and others by thermonuclear explosions. By understanding what supernovae are, or at least learning how they behave, supernovae explosions have been harnessed for the problem of measuring cosmic distances with some astonishing results. Carefully calibrated supernovae provide the best extragalactic distance indicators to probe the distances to galaxies and to measure the Hubble constant. Even more interesting is the evidence from supernovae that cosmic expansion has been speeding up over the last 5 billion years. We attribute this acceleration to a mysterious dark energy whose effects are clear, but whose nature is obscure. Combining the cosmic expansion history traced by supernovae with clues from galaxy clustering and cosmic geometry from the microwave background has produced today's standard, but peculiar, picture of a universe that is mostly dark energy, braked (with diminishing effect) by dark matter, and illuminated by a pinch of luminous baryons. In this talk, I will show how the attempt to understand supernovae, facilitated by ever-improving instruments, has led to the ability to measure the properties of dark energy. Looking ahead, the properties of supernovae as measured at infrared wavelengths seem to hold the best promise for more precise and accurate distances to help us understand the puzzle of dark energy. My own contribution to this work has been carried out in joyful collaboration with many excellent students, postdocs, and colleagues and with generous support from the places I have worked, the National Science Foundation, and from NASA.

  13. Inflation and late-time cosmic acceleration in non-minimal Maxwell-F(R) gravity and the generation of large-scale magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Odintsov, Sergei D E-mail: odintsov@aliga.ieec.uab.es

    2008-04-15

    We study inflation and late-time acceleration in the expansion of the universe in non-minimal electromagnetism, in which the electromagnetic field couples to the scalar curvature function. It is shown that power-law inflation can be realized due to the non-minimal gravitational coupling of the electromagnetic field, and that large-scale magnetic fields can be generated due to the breaking of the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic field through its non-minimal gravitational coupling. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that both inflation and the late-time acceleration of the universe can be realized in a modified Maxwell-F(R) gravity which is consistent with solar-system tests and cosmological bounds and free of instabilities. At small curvature typical for the current universe the standard Maxwell theory is recovered. We also consider the classically equivalent form of non-minimal Maxwell-F(R) gravity, and propose the origin of the non-minimal gravitational coupling function based on renormalization-group considerations.

  14. Acceleration in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.

    1993-12-31

    The origin of cosmic rays and applicable laboratory experiments are discussed. Some of the problems of shock acceleration for the production of cosmic rays are discussed in the context of astrophysical conditions. These are: The presumed unique explanation of the power law spectrum is shown instead to be a universal property of all lossy accelerators; the extraordinary isotropy of cosmic rays and the limited diffusion distances implied by supernova induced shock acceleration requires a more frequent and space-filling source than supernovae; the near perfect adiabaticity of strong hydromagnetic turbulence necessary for reflecting the accelerated particles each doubling in energy roughly 10{sup 5} to {sup 6} scatterings with negligible energy loss seems most unlikely; the evidence for acceleration due to quasi-parallel heliosphere shocks is weak. There is small evidence for the expected strong hydromagnetic turbulence, and instead, only a small number of particles accelerate after only a few shock traversals; the acceleration of electrons in the same collisionless shock that accelerates ions is difficult to reconcile with the theoretical picture of strong hydromagnetic turbulence that reflects the ions. The hydromagnetic turbulence will appear adiabatic to the electrons at their much higher Larmor frequency and so the electrons should not be scattered incoherently as they must be for acceleration. Therefore the electrons must be accelerated by a different mechanism. This is unsatisfactory, because wherever electrons are accelerated these sites, observed in radio emission, may accelerate ions more favorably. The acceleration is coherent provided the reconnection is coherent, in which case the total flux, as for example of collimated radio sources, predicts single charge accelerated energies much greater than observed.

  15. Cosmic Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Cosmic Topology is the name given to the study of the overall shape of the universe, which involves both global topological features and more local geometrical properties such as curvature. Whether space is finite or infinite, simply-connected or multi-connected like a torus, smaller or greater than the portion of the universe that we can directly observe, are questions that refer to topology rather than curvature. A striking feature of some relativistic, multi-connected "small" universe models is to create multiples images of faraway cosmic sources. While the most recent cosmological data fit the simplest model of a zero-curvature, infinite space model, they are also consistent with compact topologies of the three homogeneous and isotropic geometries of constant curvature, such as, for instance, the spherical Poincaré Dodecahedral Space, the flat hypertorus or the hyperbolic Picard horn. After a "dark age" period, the field of Cosmic Topology has recently become one of the major concerns in cosmology, not only for theorists but also for observational astronomers, leaving open a number of unsolved issues.

  16. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, E.; Bennett, Charles L.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat ? cold dark matter (Lambda Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of > 68, 000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino background, flatness of spatial geometry of the universe, a deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum of initial scalar fluctuations, and that the current universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The WMAP observations provide the strongest ever support for inflation; namely, the structures we see in the universe originate from quantum fluctuations generated during inflation.

  17. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. II

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, C.R.; Morrison, D. NASA, Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA )

    1990-02-01

    The role of extraterrestrial impacts in shaping the earth's history is discussed, arguing that cosmic impacts represent just one example of a general shift in thinking that has made the idea of catastrophes respectable in science. The origins of this view are presented and current catastrophic theory is discussed in the context of modern debate on the geological formation of the earth. Various conflicting theories are reviewed and prominent participants in the ongoing scientific controversy concerning catastrophism are introduced.

  18. Cosmic impacts, cosmic catastrophes. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Clark R.; Morrison, David

    1990-01-01

    The role of extraterrestrial impacts in shaping the earth's history is discussed, arguing that cosmic impacts represent just one example of a general shift in thinking that has made the idea of catastrophes respectable in science. The origins of this view are presented and current catastrophic theory is discussed in the context of modern debate on the geological formation of the earth. Various conflicting theories are reviewed and prominent participants in the ongoing scientific controversy concerning catastrophism are introduced.

  19. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  20. Cosmic Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2012-01-01

    What explains the extraordinary complexity of the observed universe, on all scales from quarks to the accelerating universe? My favorite explanation (which I certainty did not invent) ls that the fundamental laws of physics produce natural instability, energy flows, and chaos. Some call the result the Life Force, some note that the Earth is a living system itself (Gaia, a "tough bitch" according to Margulis), and some conclude that the observed complexity requires a supernatural explanation (of which we have many). But my dad was a statistician (of dairy cows) and he told me about cells and genes and evolution and chance when I was very small. So a scientist must look for me explanation of how nature's laws and statistics brought us into conscious existence. And how is that seemll"!gly Improbable events are actually happening a!1 the time? Well, the physicists have countless examples of natural instability, in which energy is released to power change from simplicity to complexity. One of the most common to see is that cooling water vapor below the freezing point produces snowflakes, no two alike, and all complex and beautiful. We see it often so we are not amazed. But physlc!sts have observed so many kinds of these changes from one structure to another (we call them phase transitions) that the Nobel Prize in 1992 could be awarded for understanding the mathematics of their common features. Now for a few examples of how the laws of nature produce the instabilities that lead to our own existence. First, the Big Bang (what an insufficient name!) apparently came from an instability, in which the "false vacuum" eventually decayed into the ordinary vacuum we have today, plus the most fundamental particles we know, the quarks and leptons. So the universe as a whole started with an instability. Then, a great expansion and cooling happened, and the loose quarks, finding themselves unstable too, bound themselves together into today's less elementary particles like protons and

  1. Elemental advances of ultraheavy cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The elemental composition of the cosmic-ray source is different from that which has been generally taken as the composition of the solar system. No general enrichment of products of either r-process or s-process nucleosynthesis accounts for the differences over the entire range of ultraheavy (Z 30) elements; specific determination of nucleosynthetic contributions to the differences depends upon an understanding of the nature of any acceleration fractionation. Comparison between the cosmic-ray source abundances and the abundances of C1 and C2 chondritic meteorites suggests that differences between the cosmic-ray source and the standard (C1) solar system may not be due to acceleration fractionation of the cosmic rays, but rather to a fractionation of the C1 abundances with respect to the interstellar abundances.

  2. Review of Gravity Probe B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In response to a request by the NASA Administrator, the National Research Council (NRC) has conducted an accelerated scientific review of NASA's Gravity Probe B (GP-B) mission. The review was carried out by the Task Group on Gravity Probe B, under the auspices of the NRC's Space Studies Board and Board on Physics and Astronomy. The specific charge to the task group was to review the GP-B mission with respect to the following terms of reference: (1) scientific importance - including a current assessment of the value of the project in the context of recent progress in gravitational physics and relevant technology; (2) technical feasibility - the technical approach will be evaluated for likelihood of success, both in terms of achievement of flight mission objectives but also in terms of scientific conclusiveness of the various possible outcomes for the measurements to be made; and (3) competitive value - if possible, GP-B science will be assessed qualitatively against the objectives and accomplishments of one or more fundamental physics projects of similar cost (e.g., the Cosmic Background Explorer, COBE).

  3. Cosmic ray transport in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2015-09-01

    Since the development of satellite space technology about 50 years ago the solar heliosphere is explored almost routinely by several spacecrafts carrying detectors for measuring the properties of the interplanetary medium including energetic charged particles (cosmic rays), solar wind particle densities, and electromagnetic fields. In 2012, the Voyager 1 spacecraft has even left what could be described as the heliospheric modulation region, as indicated by the sudden disappearance of low energy heliospheric cosmic ray particles. With the available in-situ measurements of interplanetary turbulent electromagnetic fields and of the momentum spectra of different cosmic ray species in different interplanetary environments, the heliosphere is the best cosmic laboratory to test our understanding of the transport and acceleration of cosmic rays in space plasmas. I review both the historical development and the current state of various cosmic ray transport equations. Similarities and differences to transport theories for terrestrial fusion plasmas are highlighted. Any progress in cosmic ray transport requires a detailed understanding of the electromagnetic turbulence that is responsible for the scattering and acceleration of these particles.

  4. Cosmic ray transport in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schlickeiser, R.

    2015-09-15

    Since the development of satellite space technology about 50 years ago the solar heliosphere is explored almost routinely by several spacecrafts carrying detectors for measuring the properties of the interplanetary medium including energetic charged particles (cosmic rays), solar wind particle densities, and electromagnetic fields. In 2012, the Voyager 1 spacecraft has even left what could be described as the heliospheric modulation region, as indicated by the sudden disappearance of low energy heliospheric cosmic ray particles. With the available in-situ measurements of interplanetary turbulent electromagnetic fields and of the momentum spectra of different cosmic ray species in different interplanetary environments, the heliosphere is the best cosmic laboratory to test our understanding of the transport and acceleration of cosmic rays in space plasmas. I review both the historical development and the current state of various cosmic ray transport equations. Similarities and differences to transport theories for terrestrial fusion plasmas are highlighted. Any progress in cosmic ray transport requires a detailed understanding of the electromagnetic turbulence that is responsible for the scattering and acceleration of these particles.

  5. Cosmic strings and superconducting cosmic strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, Edmund

    1988-01-01

    The possible consequences of forming cosmic strings and superconducting cosmic strings in the early universe are discussed. Lecture 1 describes the group theoretic reasons for and the field theoretic reasons why cosmic strings can form in spontaneously broken gauge theories. Lecture 2 discusses the accretion of matter onto string loops, emphasizing the scenario with a cold dark matter dominated universe. In lecture 3 superconducting cosmic strings are discussed, as is a mechanism which leads to the formation of structure from such strings.

  6. Dark before light: testing the cosmic expansion history through the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, Eric V.; Smith, Tristan L. E-mail: tlsmith@berkeley.edu

    2011-04-01

    The cosmic expansion history proceeds in broad terms from a radiation dominated epoch to matter domination to an accelerated, dark energy dominated epoch. We investigate whether intermittent periods of acceleration (from a canonical, minimally coupled scalar field) are possible in the early universe — between Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and recombination and beyond. We establish that the standard picture is remarkably robust: anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background consistent with ΛCDM will exclude any extra period of accelerated expansion between 1 ≤ z∼<10{sup 5} (corresponding to 5 × 10{sup −4}eV ≤ T∼<25eV)

  7. Testing Cosmic Inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has provided a wealth of information about the history and physics of the early Universe. Much progress has been made on uncovering the emerging Standard Model of Cosmology by such experiments as COBE and WMAP, and ESA's Planck Surveyor will likely increase our knowledge even more. Despite the success of this model, mysteries remain. Currently understood physics does not offer a compelling explanation for the homogeneity, flatness, and the origin of structure in the Universe. Cosmic Inflation, a brief epoch of exponential expansion, has been posted to explain these observations. If inflation is a reality, it is expected to produce a background spectrum of gravitational waves that will leave a small polarized imprint on the CMB. Discovery of this signal would give the first direct evidence for inflation and provide a window into physics at scales beyond those accessible to terrestrial particle accelerators. I will briefly review aspects of the Standard Model of Cosmology and discuss our current efforts to design and deploy experiments to measure the polarization of the CMB with the precision required to test inflation.

  8. Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays: Old Physics or New Physics?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the advantages of and the problems associated with hypotheses to explain the origin of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR: E greater than 10 EeV) and the "trans-GZK" cosmic rays (TGZK: E greater than 100 EeV) both through "old physics" (acceleration in cosmic sources) and "new physics" (new particles, topological defects, fat neutrino cross sections, Lorentz invariance violation).

  9. UHECR ESCAPE MECHANISMS FOR PROTONS AND NEUTRONS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, AND THE COSMIC-RAY-NEUTRINO CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter E-mail: mauricio.bustamante@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2013-05-10

    The paradigm that gamma-ray burst fireballs are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is being probed by neutrino observations. Very stringent bounds can be obtained from the cosmic-ray (proton)-neutrino connection, assuming that the UHECRs escape as neutrons. In this study, we identify three different regimes as a function of the fireball parameters: the standard ''one neutrino per cosmic ray'' case, the optically thick (to neutron escape) case, and the case where leakage of protons from the boundaries of the shells (direct escape) dominates. In the optically thick regime, the photomeson production is very efficient, and more neutrinos will be emitted per cosmic ray than in the standard case, whereas in the direct escape-dominated regime, more cosmic rays than neutrinos will be emitted. We demonstrate that, for efficient proton acceleration, which is required to describe the observed UHECR spectrum, the standard case only applies to a very narrow region of the fireball parameter space. We illustrate with several observed examples that conclusions on the cosmic-ray-neutrino connection will depend on the actual burst parameters. We also show that the definition of the pion production efficiency currently used by the IceCube collaboration underestimates the neutrino production in the optically thick case. Finally, we point out that the direct escape component leads to a spectral break in the cosmic-ray spectrum emitted from a single source. The resulting ''two-component model'' can be used to even more strongly pronounce the spectral features of the observed UHECR spectrum than the dip model.

  10. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, Silvia; Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, ns, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z*=1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: γα<0.39 and γi<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  11. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-09-15

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n{sub s}, and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z{sub *}=1078{+-}11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1{sigma} to R=1.734{+-}0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: {epsilon}{sub {alpha}}<0.39 and {epsilon}{sub i}<0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  12. From cosmic ray source to the Galactic pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schure, K. M.; Bell, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The Galactic cosmic ray spectrum is a remarkably straight power law. Our current understanding is that the dominant sources that accelerate cosmic rays up to the knee (3 × 1015 eV) or perhaps even the ankle (3 × 1018 eV), are young Galactic supernova remnants. In theory, however, there are various reasons why the spectrum may be different for different sources, and may not even be a power law if non-linear shock acceleration applies during the most efficient stages of acceleration. We show how the spectrum at the accelerator translates to the spectrum that makes up the escaping cosmic rays that replenish the Galactic pool of cosmic rays. We assume that cosmic ray confinement, and thus escape, is linked to the level of magnetic field amplification, and that the magnetic field is amplified by streaming cosmic rays according to the non-resonant hybrid or resonant instability. When a fixed fraction of the energy is transferred to cosmic rays, it turns out that a source spectrum that is flatter than E-2 will result in an E-2 escape spectrum, whereas a steeper source spectrum will result in an escape spectrum with equal steepening. This alleviates some of the concern that may arise from expected flat or concave cosmic ray spectra associated with non-linear shock modification.

  13. Origin of the high energy cosmic neutrino background.

    PubMed

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2014-11-01

    The diffuse background of very high energy extraterrestrial neutrinos recently discovered with IceCube is compatible with that expected from cosmic ray interactions in the Galactic interstellar medium plus that expected from hadronic interactions near the source and in the intergalactic medium of the cosmic rays which have been accelerated by the jets that produce gamma ray bursts. PMID:25415894

  14. Ninteenth International Cosmic Ray Conference. SH Sessions, Volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, F. C. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Papers submitted for presentation at the 19th International Cosmic Ray Conference are compiled. This volume covers solar and heliospheric phenomena, specifically, particle acceleration; cosmic ray compsotion, spectra, and anisotropy; propagation of solar and interplanetary energetic particles; solar-cycle modulation; and propagation of galactic particles in the heliosphere.

  15. Cosmic Dawn with WFIRST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, James

    Central objectives: WFIRST-AFTA has tremendous potential for studying the epoch of "Cosmic Dawn" the period encompassing the formation of the first galaxies and quasars, and their impact on the surrounding universe through cosmological reionization. Our goal is to ensure that this potential is realized through the middle stages of mission planning, culminating in designs for both WFIRST and its core surveys that meet the core objectives in dark energy and exoplanet science, while maximizing the complementary Cosmic Dawn science. Methods: We will consider a combined approach to studying Cosmic Dawn using a judicious mixture of guest investigator data analysis of the primary WFIRST surveys, and a specifically designed Guest Observer program to complement those surveys. The Guest Observer program will serve primarily to obtain deep field observations, with particular attention to the capabilities of WFIRST for spectroscopic deep fields using the WFI grism. We will bring to bear our years of experience with slitless spectroscopy on the Hubble Space Telescope, along with an expectation of JWST slitless grism spectroscopy. We will use this experience to examine the implications of WFIRST’s grism resolution and wavelength coverage for deep field observations, and if appropriate, to suggest potential modifications of these parameters to optimize the science return on WFIRST. We have assembled a team of experts specializing in (1) Lyman Break Galaxies at redshifts higher than 7 (2) Quasars at high redshifts (3) Lyman-alpha galaxies as probes of reionization (4) Theoretical simulations of high-redshift galaxies (5) Simulations of grism observations (6) post-processing analysis to find emission line galaxies and high redshift galaxies (7) JWST observations and calibrations. With this team we intend to do end-to-end simulations starting with halo populations and expected spectra of high redshift galaxies and finally extracting what we can learn about (a) reionization

  16. THE TEMPERATURE OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.

    2009-12-20

    The Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer data are independently recalibrated using the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data to obtain a cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature of 2.7260 +- 0.0013. Measurements of the temperature of the CMB are reviewed. The determination from the measurements from the literature is CMB temperature of 2.72548 +- 0.00057 K.

  17. On the origin of high-energy cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kohta

    2015-07-15

    Recently, the IceCube collaboration made a big announcement of the first discovery of high-energy cosmic neutrinos. Their origin is a new interesting mystery in astroparticle physics, but the present data may give us hints of connection to cosmic-ray and/or gamma-ray sources. We will look over possible scenarios for the cosmic neutrino signal, and emphasize the importance of multimessenger approaches in order to identify the PeV neutrino sources and get crucial clues to the cosmic-ray origin. We also discuss some possibilities to study neutrino properties and probe new physics.

  18. BICEP's acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2014-10-01

    The recent Bicep2 [1] detection of, what is claimed to be primordial B-modes, opens up the possibility of constraining not only the energy scale of inflation but also the detailed acceleration history that occurred during inflation. In turn this can be used to determine the shape of the inflaton potential V(φ) for the first time — if a single, scalar inflaton is assumed to be driving the acceleration. We carry out a Monte Carlo exploration of inflationary trajectories given the current data. Using this method we obtain a posterior distribution of possible acceleration profiles ε(N) as a function of e-fold N and derived posterior distributions of the primordial power spectrum P(k) and potential V(φ). We find that the Bicep2 result, in combination with Planck measurements of total intensity Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, induces a significant feature in the scalar primordial spectrum at scales k∼ 10{sup -3} Mpc {sup -1}. This is in agreement with a previous detection of a suppression in the scalar power [2].

  19. Characterising CCDs with cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher-Levine, M.; Nomerotski, A.

    2015-08-06

    The properties of cosmic ray muons make them a useful probe for measuring the properties of thick, fully depleted CCD sensors. The known energy deposition per unit length allows measurement of the gain of the sensor's amplifiers, whilst the straightness of the tracks allows for a crude assessment of the static lateral electric fields at the sensor's edges. The small volume in which the muons deposit their energy allows measurement of the contribution to the PSF from the diffusion of charge as it drifts across the sensor. In this work we present a validation of the cosmic ray gain measurement technique by comparing with radioisotope gain measurments, and calculate the charge diffusion coefficient for prototype LSST sensors.

  20. Characterising CCDs with cosmic rays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fisher-Levine, M.; Nomerotski, A.

    2015-08-06

    The properties of cosmic ray muons make them a useful probe for measuring the properties of thick, fully depleted CCD sensors. The known energy deposition per unit length allows measurement of the gain of the sensor's amplifiers, whilst the straightness of the tracks allows for a crude assessment of the static lateral electric fields at the sensor's edges. The small volume in which the muons deposit their energy allows measurement of the contribution to the PSF from the diffusion of charge as it drifts across the sensor. In this work we present a validation of the cosmic ray gain measurementmore » technique by comparing with radioisotope gain measurments, and calculate the charge diffusion coefficient for prototype LSST sensors.« less

  1. Antiprotons in the Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, Scott

    1999-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration flew in May 1999 a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton/proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates. A description of the instrument, details of the flight and instrument performance, and status of the data analysis will be given.

  2. Characterising CCDs with cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher-Levine, M.; Nomerotski, A.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of cosmic ray muons make them a useful probe for measuring the properties of thick, fully depleted CCD sensors. The known energy deposition per unit length allows measurement of the gain of the sensor's amplifiers, whilst the straightness of the tracks allows for a crude assessment of the static lateral electric fields at the sensor's edges. Furthermore, the small volume in which the muons deposit their energy allows measurement of the contribution to the PSF from the diffusion of charge as it drifts across the sensor. In this work we present a validation of the cosmic ray gain measurement technique by comparing with radioisotope gain measurments, and calculate the charge diffusion coefficient for prototype LSST sensors.

  3. Fun Times with Cosmic Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanjek, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Who would have thought cosmic rays could be so hip? Although discovered 90 years ago on death-defying manned balloon flights hip even by twenty-first-century extremesport standards cosmic rays quickly lost popularity as way-cool telescopes were finding way-too-cool phenomena across the electromagnetic spectrum. Yet cosmic rays are back in vogue, boasting their own set of superlatives. Scientists are tracking them down with new resolve from the Arctic to Antarctica and even on the high western plains of Argentina. Theorists, too, now see cosmic rays as harbingers of funky physics. Cosmic rays are atomic and subatomic particles - the fastest moving bits of matter in the universe and the only sample of matter we have from outside the solar system (with the exception of interstellar dust grains). Lower-energy cosmic rays come from the Sun. Mid-energy particles come from stellar explosions - either spewed directly from the star like shrapnel, or perhaps accelerated to nearly the speed of light by shock waves. The highest-energy cosmic rays, whose unequivocal existence remains one of astronomy's greatest mysteries, clock in at a staggering 10(exp 19) to 10(exp 22) electron volts. This is the energy carried in a baseball pitch; seeing as how there are as many atomic particles in a baseball as there are baseballs in the Moon, that s one powerful toss. No simple stellar explosion could produce them. At a recent conference in Albuquerque, scientists presented the first observational evidence of a possible origin for the highest-energy variety. A team led by Elihu Boldt at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center found that five of these very rare cosmic rays (there are only a few dozen confirmed events) come from the direction of four 'retired' quasar host galaxies just above the arm of the Big Dipper, all visible with backyard telescopes: NGC 3610, NGC 3613, NGC 4589, and NGC 5322. These galaxies are billions of years past their glory days as the brightest beacons in the universe

  4. Cosmic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Blandford, R.D.; Begelman, M.C.; Rees, M.J.

    1982-05-01

    Observations with radio telescopes have revealed that the center of many galaxies is a place of violent activity. This activity is often manifested in the production of cosmic jets. Each jet is a narrow stream of plasma that appears to squirt out of the center of a galaxy emitting radiowaves as it does so. New techniques in radio astronomy have shown how common jets are in the universe. These jets take on many different forms. The discovery of radio jets has helped in the understanding of the double structure of the majority of extragalactic radio sources. The morphology of some jets and explanations of how jets are fueled are discussed. There are many difficulties plaguing the investigation of jets. Some of these difficulties are (1) it is not known how much power the jets are radiating, (2) it is hard to tell whether a jet delieated by radio emission is identical to the region where ionized gas is flowing, and (3) what makes them. (SC)

  5. Cosmic vacuum energy decay and creation of cosmic matter.

    PubMed

    Fahr, Hans-Jörg; Heyl, Michael

    2007-09-01

    In the more recent literature on cosmological evolutions of the universe, the cosmic vacuum energy has become a nonrenouncable ingredient. The cosmological constant Lambda, first invented by Einstein, but later also rejected by him, presently experiences an astonishing revival. Interestingly enough, it acts like a constant vacuum energy density would also do. Namely, it has an accelerating action on cosmic dynamics, without which, as it appears, presently obtained cosmological data cannot be conciliated with theory. As we are going to show in this review, however, the concept of a constant vacuum energy density is unsatisfactory for very basic reasons because it would claim for a physical reality that acts upon spacetime and matter dynamics without itself being acted upon by spacetime or matter. PMID:17457553

  6. Relativistic transport theory for cosmic-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of the transport of cosmic-rays in a relativistically moving magnetized plasma supporting a spectrum of hydromagnetic waves that scatter the cosmic-rays are presented. A local Lorentz frame moving with the waves or turbulence scattering the cosmic-rays is used to specify the individual particle momentum. The comoving frame is in general a noninertial frame in which the observer's volume element is expanding and shearing, geometric energy change terms appear in the cosmic-ray transport equation which consist of the relativistic generalization of the adiabatic deceleration term and a further term involving the acceleration vector of the scatterers. A relativistic version of the pitch angle evolution equation, including the effects of adiabatic focussing, pitch angle scattering, and energy changes is presented.

  7. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Cosmic vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, Artur D.

    2001-11-01

    Recent observational studies of distant supernovae have suggested the existence of cosmic vacuum whose energy density exceeds the total density of all the other energy components in the Universe. The vacuum produces the field of antigravity that causes the cosmological expansion to accelerate. It is this accelerated expansion that has been discovered in the observations. The discovery of cosmic vacuum radically changes our current understanding of the present state of the Universe. It also poses new challenges to both cosmology and fundamental physics. Why is the density of vacuum what it is? Why do the densities of the cosmic energy components differ in exact value but agree in order of magnitude? On the other hand, the discovery made at large cosmological distances of hundreds and thousands Mpc provides new insights into the dynamics of the nearby Universe, the motions of galaxies in the local volume of 10 - 20 Mpc where the cosmological expansion was originally discovered.

  8. Galactic Cosmic Rays and the Light Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parizot, Etienne

    2001-10-01

    The study of the light elements abundances in low metallicity stars offers a unique way to learn about the past content of our Galaxy in energetic particles (EPs). This study teaches us that either the light elements are not produced by cosmic rays interactions in the interstellar medium (ISM), as has been thought for 30 years, or the cosmic rays are not what one usually thinks they are, namely standard interstellar material accelerated by the shock waves generated by supernova explosions. In any case, we have to revise our understanding of the EPs in the Galaxy. Relying on the observational evidence about Li, Be and B Galactic evolution as well as about the distribution of massive stars, we show that most of the EPs responsible for the production of light elements must be accelerated inside superbubbles, as is probably the case for the standard Galactic cosmic rays as well.

  9. Galactic Cosmic Rays: From Earth to Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Theresa J.

    2012-01-01

    For nearly 100 years we have known that cosmic rays come from outer space, yet proof of their origin, as well as a comprehensive understanding of their acceleration, remains elusive. Direct detection of high energy (up to 10(exp 15)eV), charged nuclei with experiments such as the balloon-born, antarctic Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder (TIGER) have provided insight into these mysteries through measurements of cosmic ray abundances. The abundance of these rare elements with respect to certain intrinsic properties suggests that cosmic rays include a component of massive star ejecta. Supernovae and their remnants (SNe & SNRs), often occurring at the end of a massive star's life or in an environment including massive star material, are one of the most likely candidates for sources accelerating galactic comic ray nuclei up to the requisite high energies. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Large Area Detector (Fermi LAT) has improved our understanding of such sources by widening the window of observable energies and thus into potential sources' energetic processes. In combination with multiwavelength observations, we are now better able to constrain particle populations (often hadron-dominated at GeV energies) and environmental conditions, such as the magnetic field strength. The SNR CTB 37A is one such source which could contribute to the observed galactic cosmic rays. By assembling populations of SNRs, we will be able to more definitively define their contribution to the observed galactic cosmic rays, as well as better understand SNRs themselves. Such multimessenger studies will thus illuminate the long-standing cosmic ray mysteries, shedding light on potential sources, acceleration mechanisms, and cosmic ray propagation.

  10. A model for the proton spectrum and cosmic ray anisotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, C.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of the origin of the cosmic rays is still uncertain. As a theory, it should explain the support of particles and energy, the mechanism of acceleration and propagation as well as some important features obtained directly from cosmic ray experiments, such as the power spectrum and the knee. There are two kinds of models for interpreting the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. One is the leaky box model. Another model suggests that the cut-off rigidity of the main sources causes the knee. The present paper studies the spectrum and the anisotropy of cosmic rays in an isotropic diffuse model with explosive discrete sources in an infinite galaxy.

  11. Testing Gravity using Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Though general relativity is well-tested on small (Solar System) scales, the late-time acceleration of the Universe provides strong motivation to test GR on cosmological scales. The difference between the small and large scale behavior of gravity is determined by the screening mechanism in modified gravity theories. Dark matter halos are often screened in these models, especially in models with Vainshtein screening, motivating a search for signatures of modified gravity in cosmic voids. We explore density, force, and velocity profiles of voids found in N-body simulations, using both dark matter particles and dark matter halos to identify the voids. The prospect of testing gravity using cosmic voids may be limited by the sparsity of halos as tracers of the density field.

  12. Cosmic Ray research in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Mirzoyan, R.; Zazyan, M.

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic Ray research on Mt. Aragats began in 1934 with the measurements of East-West anisotropy by the group from Leningrad Physics-Technical Institute and Norair Kocharian from Yerevan State University. Stimulated by the results of their experiments in 1942 Artem and Abraham Alikhanyan brothers organized a scientific expedition to Aragats. Since that time physicists were studying Cosmic Ray fluxes on Mt. Aragats with various particle detectors: mass spectrometers, calorimeters, transition radiation detectors, and huge particle detector arrays detecting protons and nuclei accelerated in most violent explosions in Galaxy. Latest activities at Mt. Aragats include Space Weather research with networks of particle detectors located in Armenia and abroad, and detectors of Space Education center in Yerevan.

  13. PROBING DYNAMICS OF ELECTRON ACCELERATION WITH RADIO AND X-RAY SPECTROSCOPY, IMAGING, AND TIMING IN THE 2002 APRIL 11 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2013-05-10

    Based on detailed analysis of radio and X-ray observations of a flare on 2002 April 11 augmented by realistic three-dimensional modeling, we have identified a radio emission component produced directly at the flare acceleration region. This acceleration region radio component has distinctly different (1) spectrum, (2) light curves, (3) spatial location, and, thus, (4) physical parameters from those of the separately identified trapped or precipitating electron components. To derive evolution of physical parameters of the radio sources we apply forward fitting of the radio spectrum time sequence with the gyrosynchrotron source function with five to six free parameters. At the stage when the contribution from the acceleration region dominates the radio spectrum, the X-ray- and radio-derived electron energy spectral indices agree well with each other. During this time the maximum energy of the accelerated electron spectrum displays a monotonic increase with time from {approx}300 keV to {approx}2 MeV over roughly one minute duration indicative of an acceleration process in the form of growth of the power-law tail; the fast electron residence time in the acceleration region is about 2-4 s, which is much longer than the time of flight and so requires a strong diffusion mode there to inhibit free-streaming propagation. The acceleration region has a relatively strong magnetic field, B {approx} 120 G, and a low thermal density, n{sub e} {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}. These acceleration region properties are consistent with a stochastic acceleration mechanism.

  14. Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baring, Matthew

    2003-04-01

    The process of diffusive acceleration of charged particles in shocked plasmas is widely invoked in astrophysics to account for the ubiquitous presence of signatures of non-thermal relativistic electrons and ions in the universe. This statistical energization mechanism, manifested in turbulent media, was first posited by Enrico Fermi in 1949 to explain the observed cosmic ray population, which exhibits an almost power-law distribution in rigidity. The absence of a momentum scale is a key characteristic of diffusive shock acceleration, and astrophysical systems generally only impose scales at the injection (low energy) and loss (high energy) ends of the particle spectrum. The existence of structure in the cosmic ray spectrum (the "knee") at around 3000 TeV has promoted contentions that there are at least two origins for cosmic rays, a galactic one supplying those up to the knee, and perhaps an extragalactic one that can explain even the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) seen at 1-300 EeV. Accounting for the UHECRs with familiar astrophysical sites of acceleration has historically proven difficult due to the need to assume high magnetic fields in order to reduce the shortest diffusive acceleration timescale, the ion gyroperiod, to meaningful values. Yet active galaxies and gamma-ray bursts remain strong and interesting candidate sources for UHECRs, turning the theoretical focus to relativistic shocks. This review summarizes properties of diffusive shock acceleration that are salient to the issue of UHECR generation. These include spectral indices, anisotropies, acceleration efficencies and timescales, as functions of the shock speed and mean field orientation, and also the degree of field turbulence. Astrophysical sites for UHECR production are also critiqued.

  15. THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Green, James C.; Michael Shull, J.; Snow, Theodore P.; Stocke, John; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Sembach, Kenneth; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Spencer, John; Alan Stern, S.; Welsh, Barry; and others

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F{sub {lambda}} Almost-Equal-To 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Ly{alpha} absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  16. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Snow, Theodore P.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Beland, Stephane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V; Andrews, John; Morse, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  17. Cosmic ray nuclei from extragalactic and galactic pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke

    2013-02-01

    In an extragalactic newly-born pulsar, nuclei striped off the star surface can be accelerated to extreme energies and leave the source through dense supernova surroundings. The escaped ultrahigh energy cosmic rays can explain both UHE energy spectral and atmospheric depth observations. In addition, assuming that Galactic pulsars accelerate cosmic rays with the same injection composition, very high energy cosmic rays from local pulsars can meet the flux measurements from above the knee to the ankle, and at the same time, agree with the detected composition trend.

  18. The cosmic-ray shock structure problem for relativistic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    The time asymptotic behaviour of a relativistic (parallel) shock wave significantly modified by the diffusive acceleration of cosmic-rays is investigated by means of relativistic hydrodynamical equations for both the cosmic-rays and thermal gas. The form of the shock structure equation and the dispersion relation for both long and short wavelength waves in the system are obtained. The dependence of the shock acceleration efficiency on the upstream fluid spped, long wavelength Mach number and the ratio N = P sub co/cP sub co+P sub go)(Psub co and P sub go are the upstream cosmic-ray and thermal gas pressures respectively) are studied.

  19. Cosmic rays and hadronic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipari, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    The study of cosmic rays, and more in general of the "high energy universe" is at the moment a vibrant field that, thanks to the observations by several innovative detectors for relativistic charged particles, gamma-rays, and neutrinos continue to generate surprising and exciting results. The progress in the field is rapid but many fundamental problems remain open. There is an intimate relation between the study of the high energy universe and the study of the properties of hadronic interactions. High energy cosmic rays can only be studied detecting the showers they generate in the atmosphere, and for the interpretation of the data one needs an accurate modeling of the collisions between hadrons. Also the study of cosmic rays inside their sources and in the Galaxy requires a precise description of hadronic interactions. A program of experimental studies at the LHC and at lower energy, designed to address the most pressing problems, could significantly reduce the existing uncertainties and is very desirable. Such an experimental program would also have a strong intrinsic scientific interest, allowing the broadening and deepening of our understanding of Quantum Chromo Dynamics in the non-perturbative regime, the least understood sector of the Standard Model of particle physics. It should also be noted that the cosmic ray spectrum extends to particles with energy E ˜ 1020 eV, or a nucleon-nucleon c.m. energy √s ≃ 430 TeV, 30 times higher than the current LHC energy. Cosmic ray experiments therefore offer the possibility to perform studies on the properties of hadronic interactions that are impossible at accelerators.

  20. Cosmic Rays in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potgieter, M. S.

    The international heliospheric year (IHY) has the purpose to promote research on the Sun-Heliosphere system outward to the local interstellar medium - the new frontier. This includes fostering international scientific cooperation in the study of heliophysical phenomena now and in the future. Part of this process is to communicate research done on the heliosphere, especially to the scientific community in Africa. A short review is given of the numerical modeling of the heliosphere, and of the modulation of cosmic rays and how these particles are used to probe the heliosphere to understand its basic features. Projects of both a theoretical and numerical nature are proposed for the IHY.

  1. ROLE OF LINE-OF-SIGHT COSMIC-RAY INTERACTIONS IN FORMING THE SPECTRA OF DISTANT BLAZARS IN TeV GAMMA RAYS AND HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander; Kalashev, Oleg; Beacom, John F.

    2011-04-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. The observed high-energy gamma-ray signals from distant blazars may be dominated by secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. This explains the surprisingly low attenuation observed for distant blazars, because the production of secondary gamma rays occurs, on average, much closer to Earth than the distance to the source. Thus, the observed spectrum in the TeV range does not depend on the intrinsic gamma-ray spectrum, while it depends on the output of the source in cosmic rays. We apply this hypothesis to a number of sources and, in every case, we obtain an excellent fit, strengthening the interpretation of the observed spectra as being due to secondary gamma rays. We explore the ramifications of this interpretation for limits on the extragalactic background light and for the production of cosmic rays in AGNs. We also make predictions for the neutrino signals, which can help probe the acceleration of cosmic rays in AGNs.

  2. COSMIC program documentation experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalar, M. C.

    1970-01-01

    A brief history of COSMIC as it relates to the handling of program documentation is summarized; the items that are essential for computer program documentation are also discussed. COSMIC documentation and program standards handbook is appended.

  3. A close-up of the sun. [solar probe mission planning conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M. (Editor); Davies, R. W. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    NASA's long-range plan for the study of solar-terrestrial relations includes a Solar Probe Mission in which a spacecraft is put into an eccentric orbit with perihelion near 4 solar radii (0.02 AU). The scientific experiments which might be done with such a mission are discussed. Topics include the distribution of mass within the Sun, solar angular momentum, the fine structure of the solar surface and corona, the acceleration of the solar wind and energetic particles, and the evolution of interplanetary dust. The mission could also contribute to high-accuracy tests of general relativity and the search for cosmic gravitational radiation.

  4. Cosmic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-01-01

    An image based on data taken with ESO's Very Large Telescope reveals a triplet of galaxies intertwined in a cosmic dance. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The three galaxies, catalogued as NGC 7173 (top), 7174 (bottom right) and 7176 (bottom left), are located 106 million light-years away towards the constellation of Piscis Austrinus (the 'Southern Fish'). NGC 7173 and 7176 are elliptical galaxies, while NGC 7174 is a spiral galaxy with quite disturbed dust lanes and a long, twisted tail. This seems to indicate that the two bottom galaxies - whose combined shape bears some resemblance to that of a sleeping baby - are currently interacting, with NGC 7176 providing fresh material to NGC 7174. Matter present in great quantity around the triplet's members also points to the fact that NGC 7176 and NGC 7173 have interacted in the past. Astronomers have suggested that the three galaxies will finally merge into a giant 'island universe', tens to hundreds of times as massive as our own Milky Way. ESO PR Photo 02/08 ESO PR Photo 02b/08 NGC 7173, 7174, and 7176 The triplet is part of a so-called 'Compact Group', as compiled by Canadian astronomer Paul Hickson in the early 1980s. The group, which is the 90th entry in the catalogue and is therefore known as HCG 90, actually contains four major members. One of them - NGC 7192 - lies above the trio, outside of this image, and is another peculiar spiral galaxy. Compact groups are small, relatively isolated, systems of typically four to ten galaxies in close proximity to one another. Another striking example is Robert's Quartet. Compact groups are excellent laboratories for the study of galaxy interactions and their effects, in particular the formation of stars. As the striking image reveals, there are many other galaxies in the field. Some are distant ones, while others seem to be part of the family. Studies made with other telescopes have indeed revealed that the HCG 90 group contains 16 members

  5. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION SIMULATIONS OF RADIO RELICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu; Jones, T. W. E-mail: ryu@canopus.cnu.ac.kr

    2012-09-01

    Recent radio observations have identified a class of structures, so-called radio relics, in clusters of galaxies. The radio emission from these sources is interpreted as synchrotron radiation from GeV electrons gyrating in {mu}G-level magnetic fields. Radio relics, located mostly in the outskirts of clusters, seem to associate with shock waves, especially those developed during mergers. In fact, they seem to be good structures to identify and probe such shocks in intracluster media (ICMs), provided we understand the electron acceleration and re-acceleration at those shocks. In this paper, we describe time-dependent simulations for diffusive shock acceleration at weak shocks that are expected to be found in ICMs. Freshly injected as well as pre-existing populations of cosmic-ray (CR) electrons are considered, and energy losses via synchrotron and inverse Compton are included. We then compare the synchrotron flux and spectral distributions estimated from the simulations with those in two well-observed radio relics in CIZA J2242.8+5301 and ZwCl0008.8+5215. Considering that CR electron injection is expected to be rather inefficient at weak shocks with Mach number M {approx}< a few, the existence of radio relics could indicate the pre-existing population of low-energy CR electrons in ICMs. The implication of our results on the merger shock scenario of radio relics is discussed.

  6. Cosmic rays from cosmic strings with condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2010-02-15

    We revisit the production of cosmic rays by cusps on cosmic strings. If a scalar field ('Higgs') has a linear interaction with the string world sheet, such as would occur if there is a bosonic condensate on the string, cusps on string loops emit narrow beams of very high energy Higgses which then decay to give a flux of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. The ultrahigh energy flux and the gamma to proton ratio agree with observations if the string scale is {approx}10{sup 13} GeV. The diffuse gamma ray and proton fluxes are well below current bounds. Strings that are lighter and have linear interactions with scalars produce an excess of direct and diffuse cosmic rays and are ruled out by observations, while heavier strings ({approx}10{sup 15} GeV) are constrained by their gravitational signatures. This leaves a narrow window of parameter space for the existence of cosmic strings with bosonic condensates.

  7. Cosmic Rays and Their Radiative Processes in Numerical Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryu, Dongsu; Miniati, Francesco; Jones, Tom W.; Kang, Hyesung

    2000-01-01

    A cosmological hydrodynamic code is described, which includes a routine to compute cosmic ray acceleration and transport in a simplified way. The routine was designed to follow explicitly diffusive, acceleration at shocks, and second-order Fermi acceleration and adiabatic loss in smooth flows. Synchrotron cooling of the electron population can also be followed. The updated code is intended to be used to study the properties of nonthermal synchrotron emission and inverse Compton scattering from electron cosmic rays in clusters of galaxies, in addition to the properties of thermal bremsstrahlung emission from hot gas. The results of a test simulation using a grid of 128 (exp 3) cells are presented, where cosmic rays and magnetic field have been treated passively and synchrotron cooling of cosmic ray electrons has not been included.

  8. JUPITER AS A GIANT COSMIC RAY DETECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, P. B.; Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.

    2014-06-01

    We explore the feasibility of using the atmosphere of Jupiter to detect ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). The large surface area of Jupiter allows us to probe cosmic rays of higher energies than previously accessible. Cosmic ray extensive air showers in Jupiter's atmosphere could in principle be detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi observatory. In order to be observed, these air showers would need to be oriented toward the Earth, and would need to occur sufficiently high in the atmosphere that the gamma rays can penetrate. We demonstrate that, under these assumptions, Jupiter provides an effective cosmic ray ''detector'' area of 3.3 × 10{sup 7} km{sup 2}. We predict that Fermi-LAT should be able to detect events of energy >10{sup 21} eV with fluence 10{sup –7} erg cm{sup –2} at a rate of about one per month. The observed number of air showers may provide an indirect measure of the flux of cosmic rays ≳ 10{sup 20} eV. Extensive air showers also produce a synchrotron signature that may be measurable by Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). Simultaneous observations of Jupiter with ALMA and Fermi-LAT could be used to provide broad constraints on the energies of the initiating cosmic rays.

  9. Monopole annihilation and highest energy cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, P. Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 ); Sigl, G. NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 )

    1995-04-15

    Cosmic rays with energies exceeding 10[sup 20] eV have been detected. The origin of these highest energy cosmic rays remains unknown. Established astrophysical acceleration mechanisms encounter severe difficulties in accelerating particles to these energies. Alternative scenarios where these particles are created by the decay of cosmic topological defects have been suggested in the literature. In this paper we study the possibility of producing the highest energy cosmic rays through a process that involves the formation of metastable magnetic monopole-antimonopole bound states and their subsequent collapse. The annihilation of the heavy monopole-antimonopole pairs constituting the monopolonia can produce energetic nucleons, [gamma] rays, and neutrinos whose expected flux we estimate and discuss in relation to experimental data so far available. The monopoles we consider are the ones that could be produced in the early Universe during a phase transition at the grand unification energy scale. We find that observable cosmic ray fluxes can be produced with monopole abundances compatible with present bounds.

  10. Neutrino mass without cosmic variance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LoVerde, Marilena

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the absolute scale of the neutrino masses is one of the most exciting opportunities available with near-term cosmological data sets. Two quantities that are sensitive to neutrino mass, scale-dependent halo bias b (k ) and the linear growth parameter f (k ) inferred from redshift-space distortions, can be measured without cosmic variance. Unlike the amplitude of the matter power spectrum, which always has a finite error, the error on b (k ) and f (k ) continues to decrease as the number density of tracers increases. This paper presents forecasts for statistics of galaxy and lensing fields that are sensitive to neutrino mass via b (k ) and f (k ). The constraints on neutrino mass from the auto- and cross-power spectra of spectroscopic and photometric galaxy samples are weakened by scale-dependent bias unless a very high density of tracers is available. In the high-density limit, using multiple tracers allows cosmic variance to be beaten, and the forecasted errors on neutrino mass shrink dramatically. In practice, beating the cosmic-variance errors on neutrino mass with b (k ) will be a challenge, but this signal is nevertheless a new probe of neutrino effects on structure formation that is interesting in its own right.

  11. Cosmic ray produced isotopes in terrestrial systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, D.

    1998-12-01

    Continuing improvements in the sensitivity of measurement of cosmic ray produced isotopes in environmental samples have progressively broadened the scope of their applications to characterise and quantify a wide variety of processes in Earth and planetary sciences. In this article, the author concentrates on the new developments in the field of nuclear geophysics, based on isotopic changes produced by cosmic rays in the terrestrial systems. This field, which is best described as cosmic ray geophysics, has roots with the discovery of cosmogenic 14C on the Earth by Willard Libby in 1948, and grew rapidly at first, but slowed down during the '60s and '70s. In the '80s, there was a renaissance in cosmic ray produced isotope studies, thanks mainly to the developments of the accelerator mass spectrometry technique capable of measuring minute amounts of radioactivity in terrestrial samples. This technological advance has considerably enhanced the applications of cosmic ray produced isotopes and today one finds them being used to address diverse problems in Earth and planetary sciences. The author discusses the present scope of the field of cosmic ray geophysics with an emphasis on geomorphology. It is stressed that this is the decade in which this field, which has been studied passionately by geographers, geomorphologists and geochemists for more than five decades, has at its service nuclear methods to introduce numeric time controls in the range of centuries to millions of years.

  12. Cosmic ray interactions in starbursting galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoast-Hull, Tova M.

    High quality gamma-ray and radio observations of nearby galaxies offer an unprecedented opportunity to quantitatively study the properties of their cosmic ray populations. Accounting for various interactions and energy losses, I developed a multi-component, single-zone model of the cosmic ray populations in the central molecular zones of star-forming galaxies. Using observational knowledge of the interstellar medium and star formation, I successfully predicted the radio, gamma-ray, and neutrino spectra for nearby starbursts. Using chi-squared tests to compare the models with observational radio and gamma-ray data, I placed constraints on magnetic field strengths, cosmic ray energy densities, and galactic wind (advection) speeds. The initial models were applied to and tested on the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. To further test the model and to explore the differences in environment between starbursts and active galactic nuclei, I studied NGC 253 and NGC 1068, both nearby giant spiral galaxies which have been detected in gamma-rays. Additionally, I demonstrated that the excess GeV energy gamma-ray emission in the Galactic Center is likely not diffuse emission from an additional population of cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants. Lastly, I investigated cosmic ray populations in the starburst nuclei of Arp 220, a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy which displays a high-intensity mode of star formation more common in young galaxies, and I showed that the nuclei are efficient cosmic-ray proton calorimeters.

  13. The origin of galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasi, Pasquale

    2013-11-01

    One century ago Viktor Hess carried out several balloon flights that led him to conclude that the penetrating radiation responsible for the discharge of electroscopes was of extraterrestrial origin. One century from the discovery of this phenomenon seems to be a good time to stop and think about what we have understood about Cosmic Rays. The aim of this review is to illustrate the ideas that have been and are being explored in order to account for the observable quantities related to cosmic rays and to summarize the numerous new pieces of observation that are becoming available. In fact, despite the possible impression that development in this field is somewhat slow, the rate of new discoveries in the last decade or so has been impressive, and mainly driven by beautiful pieces of observation. At the same time scientists in this field have been able to propose new, fascinating ways to investigate particle acceleration inside the sources, making use of multifrequency observations that range from the radio, to the optical, to X-rays and gamma rays. These ideas can now be confronted with data. I will mostly focus on supernova remnants as the most plausible sources of Galactic cosmic rays, and I will review the main aspects of the modern theory of diffusive particle acceleration at supernova remnant shocks, with special attention for the dynamical reaction of accelerated particles on the shock and the phenomenon of magnetic field amplification at the shock. Cosmic-ray escape from the sources is discussed as a necessary step to determine the spectrum of cosmic rays at the Earth. The discussion of these theoretical ideas will always proceed parallel to an account of the data being collected especially in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. In the end of this review I will also discuss the phenomenon of cosmic-ray acceleration at shocks propagating in partially ionized media and the implications of this phenomenon in terms of width of the Balmer line emission. This field of

  14. Early developments: Particle physics aspects of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic rays is the birthplace of elementary particle physics. The 1936 Nobel prize was shared between Victor Hess and Carl Anderson. Anderson discovered the positron in a cloud chamber. The positron was predicted by Dirac several years earlier. In subsequent cloud chamber investigations Anderson and Neddermeyer saw the muon, which for some time was considered to be a candidate for the Yukawa particle responsible for nuclear binding. Measurements with nuclear emulsions by Lattes, Powell, Occhialini and Muirhead clarified the situation by the discovery of the charged pions in cosmic rays. The cloud chamber continued to be a powerful instrument in cosmic ray studies. Rochester and Butler found V's, which turned out to be shortlived neutral kaons decaying into a pair of charged pions. Also Λ's, Σ's, and Ξ's were found in cosmic rays. But after that accelerators and storage rings took over. The unexpected renaissance of cosmic rays started with the search for solar neutrinos and the observation of the supernova 1987A. Cosmic ray neutrino results were best explained by the assumption of neutrino oscillations opening a view beyond the standard model of elementary particles. After 100 years of cosmic ray research we are again at the beginning of a new era, and cosmic rays may contribute to solve the many open questions, like dark matter and dark energy, by providing energies well beyond those of accelerators.

  15. The cosmic mult-messenger background field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Dieter

    2016-04-01

    The cosmic star formation history associated with baryon flows within the large scale structure of the expanding Universe has many important consequences, such as cosmic chemical- and galaxy evolution. Stars and accreting compact objects subsequently produce light, from the radio band to the highest photon energies, and dust within galaxies reprocesses a significant fraction of this light into the IR region. The Universe creates a radiation background that adds to the relic field from the big bang, the CMB. In addition, Cosmic Rays are created on variouys scales, and interact with this diffuse radiation field, and neutrinos are added as well. A multi-messenger field is created whose evolution with redshift contains a tremendous amount of cosmological information. We discuss several aspects of this story, emphasizing the background in the HE regime and the neutrino sector, and disccus the use of gamma-ray sources as probes.

  16. Consistency relation for cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Sloth, Martin S.

    2012-12-01

    If cosmic magnetic fields are indeed produced during inflation, they are likely to be correlated with the scalar metric perturbations that are responsible for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and large scale structure. Within an archetypical model of inflationary magnetogenesis, we show that there exists a new simple consistency relation for the non-Gaussian cross correlation function of the scalar metric perturbation with two powers of the magnetic field in the squeezed limit where the momentum of the metric perturbation vanishes. We emphasize that such a consistency relation turns out to be extremely useful to test some recent calculations in the literature. Apart from primordial non-Gaussianity induced by the curvature perturbations, such a cross correlation might provide a new observational probe of inflation and can in principle reveal the primordial nature of cosmic magnetic fields.

  17. CORONAS-F observation of HXR and gamma-ray emissions from the solar flare X10 on 29 October 2003 as a probe of accelerated proton spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Yushkov, B. Yu.; Kudela, K.; Galkin, V. I.; Kashapova, L. K.

    2015-04-01

    HXR and gamma-ray emissions in the 0.04—150 MeV energy range associated with the solar flare on 29 October 2003 (X10/3B) were observed at 20:38—20:58 UT by the SONG instrument aboard the CORONAS-F mission. We restored consecutive flare gamma-emission spectra from SONG and RHESSI data and found a good agreement of these spectra in the 0.1—10 MeV energy range. Two phases were identified which showed major changes in the spectral shape of flare emission: 20:38:00-20:44:20 UT and 20:44:20-20:58:00 UT. During the second phase an efficiency of proton acceleration increased considerably relatively to the efficiency of acceleration of high energy electrons. The pion-decay component of the flare gamma-emission was elicited statistically significant only during the second phase since 20:47:40 UT. A power law spectrum index of accelerated protons was estimated from the ratio between intensities of the pion-decay and gamma-line components. The hardest spectrum (power law index S=3.7) was at 20:48—20:51 UT when the intensity of the pion-decay emission was maximal. Our subdivision of the flare into two phases is consistent with sharp changes in the structure of the flare found by Ji et al. (2008) and Liu et al. (2009). This flare was accompanied by GLE 66. The time profile of the pion-decay gamma-emission was compared with the GLE onset time. It was shown that both protons interacting at the Sun and the particles responsible for the GLE onset could belong to the same population of accelerated particles.

  18. Revealing the Acceleration and Propagation of SEPs with the Unprecedented and Coordinated Near-Sun Observations from Solar Probe and Solar Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Christian, E. R.; Gorby, M. J.; McComas, D. J.

    2013-05-01

    Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are likely accelerated at the Sun and through interplanetary medium through a host of complex physical processes involving magnetic reconnection, shock-acceleration, and stochastic acceleration through wave-particle interactions. The complex timing of SEPs, SEP composition with enhancements of heavy ions and He3, and the broad longitudinal distributions of SEPs indicate that no single physical mechanism can explain all properties of SEPs. This poses an enormous challenge to Heliophysics of unraveling the complex interplay between physical processes that gives rise to SEP events. Given the significant hazards posed by SEPs, it is essential that we develop an appropriate physical understanding that accounts for the interplay between processes controlling these events. Understanding the timing of SEPs, their sources, and their spatial distribution will require remarkable coordination between in situ and remote observations of SPP and Solar Orbiter. Here, we provide an overview of the key scientific questions, the planning of observations, potential utilization of ground-based assets that will optimize the data returned from joint observations by both missions.

  19. Constraints on cosmic superstrings from Kaluza-Klein emission.

    PubMed

    Dufaux, Jean-François

    2012-07-01

    Cosmic superstrings interact generically with a tower of light and/or strongly coupled Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes associated with the geometry of the internal space. We study the production of KK particles by cosmic superstring loops, and show that it is constrained by big bang nucleosynthesis. We study the resulting constraints in the parameter space of the underlying string theory model and highlight their complementarity with the regions that can be probed by current and upcoming gravitational wave experiments. PMID:23031097

  20. A Detector for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E.; Cao, N.; Chuss, D.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Stevenson, T.; U-yen, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present preliminary design and development work on polarized detectors intended to enable Cosmic Microwave Background polarization measurements that will probe the first moments of the universe. The ultimate measurement will be challenging, requiring background-limited detectors and good control of systematic errors. Toward this end, we are integrating the beam control of HE-11 feedhorns with the sensitivity of transition-edge sensors. The coupling between these two devices is achieved via waveguide probe antennas and superconducting microstrip lines. This implementation allows band-pass filters to be incorporated on the detector chip. We believe that a large collection of single-mode polarized detectors will eventually be required for the reliable detection of the weak polarized signature that is expected to result from gravitational waves produced by cosmic inflation. This focal plane prototype is an important step along the path to this detection, resulting in a capability that will enable various future high performance instrument concepts.

  1. Cosmic (Super)String Constraints from 21 cm Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2008-03-07

    We calculate the contribution of cosmic strings arising from a phase transition in the early Universe, or cosmic superstrings arising from brane inflation, to the cosmic 21 cm power spectrum at redshifts z{>=}30. Future experiments can exploit this effect to constrain the cosmic string tension G{mu} and probe virtually the entire brane inflation model space allowed by current observations. Although current experiments with a collecting area of {approx}1 km{sup 2} will not provide any useful constraints, future experiments with a collecting area of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} km{sup 2} covering the cleanest 10% of the sky can, in principle, constrain cosmic strings with tension G{mu} > or approx. 10{sup -10}-10{sup -12} (superstring/phase transition mass scale >10{sup 13} GeV)

  2. Cosmic (Super)String Constraints from 21 cm Radiation.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2008-03-01

    We calculate the contribution of cosmic strings arising from a phase transition in the early Universe, or cosmic superstrings arising from brane inflation, to the cosmic 21 cm power spectrum at redshifts z > or =30. Future experiments can exploit this effect to constrain the cosmic string tension G mu and probe virtually the entire brane inflation model space allowed by current observations. Although current experiments with a collecting area of approximately 1 km2 will not provide any useful constraints, future experiments with a collecting area of 10(4)-10(6) km2 covering the cleanest 10% of the sky can, in principle, constrain cosmic strings with tension G mu > or = 10(-10)-10(-12) (superstring/phase transition mass scale >10(13) GeV). PMID:18352691

  3. Anomalous isotopic composition of cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-06-20

    Recent measurements of nonsolar isotopic patterns for the elements neon and (perhaps) magnesium in cosmic rays are interpreted within current models of stellar nucleosynthesis. One possible explanation is that the stars currently responsible for cosmic-ray synthesis in the Galaxy are typically super-metal-rich by a factor of two to three. Other possibilities include the selective acceleration of certain zones or masses of supernovas or the enhancement of /sup 22/Ne in the interstellar medium by mass loss from red giant stars and planetary nebulas. Measurements of critical isotopic ratios are suggested to aid in distinguishing among the various possibilities. Some of these explanations place significant constraints on the fraction of cosmic ray nuclei that must be fresh supernova debris and the masses of the supernovas involved. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  4. The structure of cosmic ray shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axford, W. I.; Leer, E.; McKenzie, J. F.

    1982-07-01

    The acceleration of cosmic rays by steady shock waves has been discussed in brief reports by Leer et al. (1976) and Axford et al. (1977). This paper presents a more extended version of this work. The energy transfer and the structure of the shock wave is discussed in detail, and it is shown that even for moderately strong shock waves most of the upstream energy flux in the background gas is transferred to the cosmic rays. This holds also when the upstream cosmic ray pressure is very small. For an intermediate Mach-number regime the overall shock structure is shown to consist of a smooth transition followed by a gas shock (cf. Drury and Voelk, 1980).

  5. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  6. Microphysics of Cosmic Ray Driven Plasma Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, A. M.; Brandenburg, A.; Malkov, M. A.; Osipov, S. M.

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  7. The challenge of turbulent acceleration of relativistic particles in the intra-cluster medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetti, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Acceleration of cosmic-ray electrons (CRe) in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) is probed by radio observations that detect diffuse, megaparsec-scale, synchrotron sources in a fraction of galaxy clusters. Giant radio halos are the most spectacular manifestations of non-thermal activity in the ICM and are currently explained assuming that turbulence, driven during massive cluster–cluster mergers, reaccelerates CRe at several giga-electron volts. This scenario implies a hierarchy of complex mechanisms in the ICM that drain energy from large scales into electromagnetic fluctuations in the plasma and collisionless mechanisms of particle acceleration at much smaller scales. In this paper we focus on the physics of acceleration by compressible turbulence. The spectrum and damping mechanisms of the electromagnetic fluctuations, and the mean free path (mfp) of CRe, are the most relevant ingredients that determine the efficiency of acceleration. These ingredients in the ICM are, however, poorly known, and we show that calculations of turbulent acceleration are also sensitive to these uncertainties. On the other hand this fact implies that the non-thermal properties of galaxy clusters probe the complex microphysics and the weakly collisional nature of the ICM.

  8. Probe assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avera, C.J.

    1981-01-06

    A hand-held probe assembly, suitable for monitoring a radioactive fibrinogen tracer, is disclosed comprising a substantially cylindrically shaped probe handle having an open end. The probe handle is adapted to be interconnected with electrical circuitry for monitoring radioactivity that is sensed or detected by the probe assembly. Mounted within the probe handle is a probe body assembly that includes a cylindrically shaped probe body inserted through the open end of the probe handle. The probe body includes a photomultiplier tube that is electrically connected with a male connector positioned at the rearward end of the probe body. Mounted at the opposite end of the probe body is a probe head which supports an optical coupler therewithin. The probe head is interconnected with a probe cap which supports a detecting crystal. The probe body assembly, which consists of the probe body, the probe head, and the probe cap is supported within the probe handle by means of a pair of compressible o-rings which permit the probe assembly to be freely rotatable, preferably through 360*, within the probe handle and removable therefrom without requiring any disassembly.

  9. Constraining sources of ultra high energy cosmic rays using high energy observations with the Fermi satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Pe'er, Asaf; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-03-01

    We analyze the conditions that enable acceleration of particles to ultra-high energies, ∼ 10{sup 20} eV (UHECRs). We show that broad band photon data recently provided by WMAP, ISOCAM, Swift and Fermi satellites, yield constraints on the ability of active galactic nuclei (AGN) to produce UHECRs. The high energy (MeV–GeV) photons are produced by Compton scattering of the emitted low energy photons and the cosmic microwave background or extra-galactic background light. The ratio of the luminosities at high and low photon energies can therefore be used as a probe of the physical conditions in the acceleration site. We find that existing data excludes core regions of nearby radio-loud AGN as possible acceleration sites of UHECR protons. However, we show that giant radio lobes are not excluded. We apply our method to Cen A, and show that acceleration of protons to ∼ 10{sup 20} eV can only occur at distances ∼>100 kpc from the core.

  10. Cosmic Superstrings Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Polchinski, Joseph

    2004-12-10

    It is possible that superstrings, as well as other one-dimensional branes, could have been produced in the early universe and then expanded to cosmic size today. I discuss the conditions under which this will occur, and the signatures of these strings. Such cosmic superstrings could be the brightest objects visible in gravitational wave astronomy, and might be distinguishable from gauge theory cosmic strings by their network properties.

  11. Cosmic ray gradients in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillius, W.; Wake, B.; Ip, W.-H.; Axford, I.

    1983-01-01

    Launched in 1972 and 1973 respectively, the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft are now probing the outer heliosphere on their final escape from the sun. The data in this paper extend for almost an entire solar cycle from launch to early 1983, when Pioneer 10 was at a heliocentric distance of 29 AU and Pioneer 11, 13 AU. The UCSD instruments on board were used to study the gradient, and to look at the time and spatial variations of the cosmic ray intensities.

  12. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  13. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  14. The COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Interaction Code (COSMIC) for use in data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, J.; Rosolem, R.; Zreda, M.; Franz, T.

    2013-08-01

    Soil moisture status in land surface models (LSMs) can be updated by assimilating cosmic-ray neutron intensity measured in air above the surface. This requires a fast and accurate model to calculate the neutron intensity from the profiles of soil moisture modeled by the LSM. The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) model is sufficiently accurate but too slow to be practical in the context of data assimilation. Consequently an alternative and efficient model is needed which can be calibrated accurately to reproduce the calculations made by MCNPX and used to substitute for MCNPX during data assimilation. This paper describes the construction and calibration of such a model, COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Interaction Code (COSMIC), which is simple, physically based and analytic, and which, because it runs at least 50 000 times faster than MCNPX, is appropriate in data assimilation applications. The model includes simple descriptions of (a) degradation of the incoming high-energy neutron flux with soil depth, (b) creation of fast neutrons at each depth in the soil, and (c) scattering of the resulting fast neutrons before they reach the soil surface, all of which processes may have parameterized dependency on the chemistry and moisture content of the soil. The site-to-site variability in the parameters used in COSMIC is explored for 42 sample sites in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS), and the comparative performance of COSMIC relative to MCNPX when applied to represent interactions between cosmic-ray neutrons and moist soil is explored. At an example site in Arizona, fast-neutron counts calculated by COSMIC from the average soil moisture profile given by an independent network of point measurements in the COSMOS probe footprint are similar to the fast-neutron intensity measured by the COSMOS probe. It was demonstrated that, when used within a data assimilation framework to assimilate COSMOS probe counts into the Noah land surface model at the

  15. Primary cosmic ray positrons and galactic annihilation radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, R. E.; Ramaty, R.

    1980-01-01

    The observation (Leventhal et al, 1978) of positron annihilation radiation at 0.511 MeV from the direction of the Galactic Center is reexamined, suggesting the possibility of a primary positron component of the cosmic rays. The observed 0.511 MeV emission requires a positron production rate nearly two orders of magnitude greater than the production rate of secondary cosmic ray positrons from pion decay produced in cosmic ray interactions. Possible sources of positrons are reviewed with both supernovae and pulsars appearing to be the more likely candidates. If only about 1% of these positrons were accelerated along with the cosmic ray nucleons and electrons to energies not less than 100 MeV, it is believed that these primary positrons would be comparable in intensity to those secondary positrons resulting from pion decay. Some observational evidence for the existence of primary positrons in the cosmic rays is also discussed.

  16. Distinguishing between void models and dark energy with cosmic parallax and redshift drift

    SciTech Connect

    Quartin, Miguel; Amendola, Luca

    2010-02-15

    Two recently proposed techniques, involving the measurement of the cosmic parallax and redshift drift, provide novel ways of directly probing (over a time span of several years) the background metric of the universe and therefore shed light on the dark-energy conundrum. The former makes use of upcoming high-precision astrometry measurements to either observe or put tight constraints on cosmological anisotropy for off-center observers, while the latter employs high-precision spectroscopy to give an independent test of the present acceleration of the universe. In this paper, we show that both methods can break the degeneracy between Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi void models and more traditional dark-energy theories. Using the near-future observational missions Gaia and CODEX we show that this distinction might be made with high confidence levels in the course of a decade.

  17. Maria Montessori's Cosmic Vision, Cosmic Plan, and Cosmic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grazzini, Camillo

    2013-01-01

    This classic position of the breadth of Cosmic Education begins with a way of seeing the human's interaction with the world, continues on to the grandeur in scale of time and space of that vision, then brings the interdependency of life where each growing human becomes a participating adult. Mr. Grazzini confronts the laws of human nature in…

  18. Report of the cosmic and heliospheric panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, Richard A.; Mason, Glenn M.; Barnes, Aaron; Binns, W. Robert; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Cherry, Michael L.; Holzer, Thomas E.; Jokipii, J. R.; Jones, Vernon; Ling, James C.

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic and Heliospheric Branch proposes a bold new program for the years 1995 to 2010 that is centered on the following two themes: (1) the global heliosphere and interstellar space; and (2) cosmic particle acceleration and the evolution of matter. Within these major themes are more specific goals that have been studied and continue to be examined for a better understanding of their processes. These include: origin, structure, and evolution of the solar wind; interaction of the heliosphere, the solar wind, and the interstellar medium; fundamental microscopic and macroscopic plasma processes; acceleration and transport of energetic particles; and the origin and evolution of matter. Finally, the report summarizes a wide variety of proposed small and large space missions.

  19. Cosmic expansion in extended quasidilaton massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Kar, Arjun; Lavrelashvili, George; Agarwal, Nishant; Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Quasidilaton massive gravity offers a physically well-defined gravitational theory with nonzero graviton mass. We present the full set of dynamical equations governing the expansion history of the Universe, valid during radiation domination, matter domination, and a late-time self-accelerating epoch related to the graviton mass. The existence of self-consistent solutions constrains the amplitude of the quasidilaton field and the graviton mass, as well as other model parameters. We point out that the effective mass of gravitational waves can be significantly larger than the graviton mass, opening the possibility that a single theory can explain both the late-time acceleration of cosmic expansion and modifications of structure growth leading to the suppression of large-angle correlations observed in the cosmic microwave background.

  20. Accelerators for Intensity Frontier Research

    SciTech Connect

    Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11

    In 2008, the Particle Physics Project Prioritization Panel identified three frontiers for research in high energy physics, the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. In this paper, I will describe how Fermilab is configuring and upgrading the accelerator complex, prior to the development of Project X, in support of the Intensity Frontier.

  1. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Outflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykov, Andrei; Gehrels, Neil; Krawczynski, Henric; Lemoine, Martin; Pelletier, Guy; Pohl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this review we confront the current theoretical understanding of particle acceleration at relativistic outflows with recent observational results on various source classes thought to involve such outflows, e.g. gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, and pulsar wind nebulae. We highlight the possible contributions of these sources to ultra-high-energy cosmic rays.

  2. Cosmic Concordance and Quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Limin; Caldwell, R. R.; Ostriker, J. P.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2000-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the observational constraints on spatially flat cosmological models containing a mixture of matter and quintessence-a time-varying, spatially inhomogeneous component of the energy density of the universe with negative pressure. Our study also includes the limiting case of a cosmological constant. We classify the observational constraints by redshift: low-redshift constraints include the Hubble parameter, baryon fraction, cluster abundance, the age of the universe, bulk velocity and the shape of the mass power spectrum; intermediate-redshift constraints are due to probes of the redshift-luminosity distance based on Type Ia supernovae, gravitational lensing, the Lyα forest, and the evolution of large-scale structure; high-redshift constraints are based on measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy. Mindful of systematic errors, we adopt a conservative approach in applying these observational constraints. We determine that the range of quintessence models in which the ratio of the matter density to the critical density is 0.2<~Ωm<~0.5, and the effective, density-averaged equation of state is -1<=w<~-0.2, is consistent with the most reliable, current low-redshift and microwave background observations at the 2 σ level. Factoring in the constraint due to the recent measurements of Type Ia supernovae, the range for the equation of state is reduced to -1<=w<~-0.4, where this range represents models consistent with each observational constraint at the 2 σ level or better (concordance analysis). A combined maximum likelihood analysis suggests a smaller range, -1<=w<~-0.6. We find that the best-fit and best-motivated quintessence models lie near Ωm~0.33, h~0.65, and spectral index ns=1, with an effective equation of state w~-0.65 for ``tracker'' quintessence and w=-1 for ``creeper'' quintessence.

  3. The low-energy interstellar spectrum of galactic electrons and implications for their re-acceleration at the heliospheric termination shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinsloo, Phillip; Toit Strauss, Du; Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    Since the diffusive shock acceleration process of particles at any given energy is dependent on the shape of their distribution at lower energies, it becomes essential to specify the interstellar spectrum for electrons below 1 MeV to study the re-acceleration of these particles at the heliospheric termination shock. Informed by the results of both radio data surveys and galactic propagation modelling, a number of illustrative scenarios are considered for this very low-energy local interstellar spectrum. Using a cosmic-ray transport model and assuming rigidity-independent diffusion at the considered energies, the contribution of re-accelerated electrons to intensity levels is probed for each of the aforementioned scenarios. The magnitudes of the resultant intensity increases are concluded to be highly dependent on the spectral shape specified for interstellar spectra at these very low energies, with the softer distributions predictably yielding greater re-acceleration effects.

  4. Heliospheric Energetic Particles and Galactic Cosmic Ray Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malandraki, Olga

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents an overview of the SH ‘Solar and Heliospheric cosmic rays’ session of the 24th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS), Kiel, Germany, 2014. It covers the topics of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) origin, acceleration and transport at the Sun and in the interplanetary medium, also from the aspect of multi-spacecraft observations, as well as the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) short- and long-term variations and the Jovian electron variations in the heliosphere. Relevant instruments and methods presented are also covered by this review. The paper is written from a personal perspective, emphasizing those results that the author found most interesting.

  5. Global modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potgieter, Marius

    2016-07-01

    It is possible, now for the first time, to describe the total, global modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere using Voyager observations from the Earth to the heliopause and from the PAMELA space mission at the Earth, in comparison with comprehensive numerical models. The very local interstellar spectra for several cosmic ray species have become much better known so that together with knowledge of where the heliopause is located, comprehensive modelling has taken a huge step forward. New and exciting observations, with ample challenges to theoretical and modelling approaches to the acceleration, transport and modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere will be reviewed in this presentation.

  6. Time Dependence of the Electron and Positron Components of the Cosmic Radiation Measured by the PAMELA Experiment between July 2006 and December 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Santis, C.; Di Felice, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S. A.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergé, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Potgieter, M. S.; Vos, E. E.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons are a unique probe of the propagation of cosmic rays as well as of the nature and distribution of particle sources in our Galaxy. Recent measurements of these particles are challenging our basic understanding of the mechanisms of production, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. Particularly striking are the differences between the low energy results collected by the space-borne PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments and older measurements pointing to sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation of cosmic-ray spectra. The PAMELA experiment has been measuring the time variation of the positron and electron intensity at Earth from July 2006 to December 2015 covering the period for the minimum of solar cycle 23 (2006-2009) until the middle of the maximum of solar cycle 24, through the polarity reversal of the heliospheric magnetic field which took place between 2013 and 2014. The positron to electron ratio measured in this time period clearly shows a sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation introduced by particle drifts. These results provide the first clear and continuous observation of how drift effects on solar modulation have unfolded with time from solar minimum to solar maximum and their dependence on the particle rigidity and the cyclic polarity of the solar magnetic field.

  7. Time Dependence of the Electron and Positron Components of the Cosmic Radiation Measured by the PAMELA Experiment between July 2006 and December 2015.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Santis, C; Di Felice, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S A; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergé, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Potgieter, M S; Vos, E E

    2016-06-17

    Cosmic-ray electrons and positrons are a unique probe of the propagation of cosmic rays as well as of the nature and distribution of particle sources in our Galaxy. Recent measurements of these particles are challenging our basic understanding of the mechanisms of production, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. Particularly striking are the differences between the low energy results collected by the space-borne PAMELA and AMS-02 experiments and older measurements pointing to sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation of cosmic-ray spectra. The PAMELA experiment has been measuring the time variation of the positron and electron intensity at Earth from July 2006 to December 2015 covering the period for the minimum of solar cycle 23 (2006-2009) until the middle of the maximum of solar cycle 24, through the polarity reversal of the heliospheric magnetic field which took place between 2013 and 2014. The positron to electron ratio measured in this time period clearly shows a sign-charge dependence of the solar modulation introduced by particle drifts. These results provide the first clear and continuous observation of how drift effects on solar modulation have unfolded with time from solar minimum to solar maximum and their dependence on the particle rigidity and the cyclic polarity of the solar magnetic field. PMID:27367381

  8. Cosmic ray isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    The isotopic composition of cosmic rays is studied in order to develop the relationship between cosmic rays and stellar processes. Cross section and model calculations are reported on isotopes of H, He, Be, Al and Fe. Satellite instrument measuring techniques separate only the isotopes of the lighter elements.

  9. Interactions of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Mark G.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We develop methods by which cosmic superstring interactions can be studied in detail. These include the reconnection probability and emission of radiation such as gravitons or small string loops. Loop corrections to these are discussed, as well as relationships to (p; q)-strings. These tools should allow a phenomenological study of string models in anticipation of upcoming experiments sensitive to cosmic string radiation.

  10. Deepening Cosmic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    This article is a special blend of research, theory, and practice, with clear insight into the origins of Cosmic Education and cosmic task, while recalling memories of student explorations in botany, in particular, episodes from Mr. Leonard's teaching. Mr. Leonard speaks of a storytelling curriculum that eloquently puts perspective into dimensions…

  11. A Magnified Glance into the Dark Sector: Probing Cosmological Models with Strong Lensing in A1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magaña, Juan; Cárdenas, V. Motta ´ctor H., Vi; Verdugo, T.; Jullo, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we constrain four alternative models to the late cosmic acceleration in the universe: Chevallier–Polarski–Linder (CPL), interacting dark energy (IDE), Ricci holographic dark energy (HDE), and modified polytropic Cardassian (MPC). Strong lensing (SL) images of background galaxies produced by the galaxy cluster Abell 1689 are used to test these models. To perform this analysis we modify the LENSTOOL lens modeling code. The value added by this probe is compared with other complementary probes: Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We found that the CPL constraints obtained for the SL data are consistent with those estimated using the other probes. The IDE constraints are consistent with the complementary bounds only if large errors in the SL measurements are considered. The Ricci HDE and MPC constraints are weak, but they are similar to the BAO, SN Ia, and CMB estimations. We also compute the figure of merit as a tool to quantify the goodness of fit of the data. Our results suggest that the SL method provides statistically significant constraints on the CPL parameters but is weak for those of the other models. Finally, we show that the use of the SL measurements in galaxy clusters is a promising and powerful technique to constrain cosmological models. The advantage of this method is that cosmological parameters are estimated by modeling the SL features for each underlying cosmology. These estimations could be further improved by SL constraints coming from other galaxy clusters.

  12. Light from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Steer, Daniele A.; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2011-02-15

    The time-dependent metric of a cosmic string leads to an effective interaction between the string and photons--the ''gravitational Aharonov-Bohm'' effect--and causes cosmic strings to emit light. We evaluate the radiation of pairs of photons from cosmic strings and find that the emission from cusps, kinks and kink-kink collisions occurs with a flat spectrum at all frequencies up to the string scale. Further, cusps emit a beam of photons, kinks emit along a curve, and the emission at a kink-kink collision is in all directions. The emission of light from cosmic strings could provide an important new observational signature of cosmic strings that is within reach of current experiments for a range of string tensions.

  13. Our Cosmic Insignificance

    PubMed Central

    Kahane, Guy

    2014-01-01

    The universe that surrounds us is vast, and we are so very small. When we reflect on the vastness of the universe, our humdrum cosmic location, and the inevitable future demise of humanity, our lives can seem utterly insignificant. Many philosophers assume that such worries about our significance reflect a banal metaethical confusion. They dismiss the very idea of cosmic significance. This, I argue, is a mistake. Worries about cosmic insignificance do not express metaethical worries about objectivity or nihilism, and we can make good sense of the idea of cosmic significance and its absence. It is also possible to explain why the vastness of the universe can make us feel insignificant. This impression does turn out to be mistaken, but not for the reasons typically assumed. In fact, we might be of immense cosmic significance—though we cannot, at this point, tell whether this is the case. PMID:25729095

  14. Cosmic Inhomogeneities and Averaged Cosmological Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Singh, T. P.

    2008-10-01

    If general relativity (GR) describes the expansion of the Universe, the observed cosmic acceleration implies the existence of a “dark energy.” However, while the Universe is on average homogeneous on large scales, it is inhomogeneous on smaller scales. While GR governs the dynamics of the inhomogeneous Universe, the averaged homogeneous Universe obeys modified Einstein equations. Can such modifications alone explain the acceleration? For a simple generic model with realistic initial conditions, we show the answer to be “no.” Averaging effects negligibly influence the cosmological dynamics.

  15. Unveiling the Synchrotron Cosmic Web: Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shea; Rudnick, Lawrence; Pfrommer, Christoph; Jones, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    The overall goal of this project is to challenge our current theoretical understanding of the relativistic particle populations in the inter-galactic medium (IGM) through deep 1.4 GHz observations of 13 massive, high-redshift clusters of galaxies. Designed to compliment/extend the GMRT radio halo survey (Venturi et al. 2007), these observations will attempt to detect the peaks of the purported synchrotron cosmic-web, and place serious limits on models of CR acceleration and magnetic field amplification during large-scale structure formation. The primary goals of this survey are: 1) Confirm the bi-modal nature of the radio halo population, which favors turbulent re-acceleration of cosmic-ray electrons (CRe) during cluster mergers as the source of the diffuse radio emission; 2) Directly test hadronic secondary models which predict the presence of cosmic-ray protons (CRp) in the cores of massive X-ray clusters; 3) Search in polarization for shock structures, a potential source of CR acceleration in the IGM.

  16. Unveiling the Synchrotron Cosmic Web: Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Shea; Rudnick, Lawrence; Pfrommer, Christoph; Jones, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The overall goal of this project is to challenge our current theoretical understanding of the relativistic particle populations in the inter-galactic medium (IGM) through deep 1.4 GHz observations of 13 massive, high-redshift clusters of galaxies. Designed to compliment/extend the GMRT radio halo survey (Venturi et al. 2007), these observations will attempt to detect the peaks of the purported synchrotron cosmic-web, and place serious limits on models of CR acceleration and magnetic field amplification during large-scale structure formation. The primary goals of this survey are: 1) Confirm the bi-modal nature of the radio halo population, which favors turbulent re-acceleration of cosmic-ray electrons (CRe) during cluster mergers as the source of the diffuse radio emission; 2) Directly test hadronic secondary models which predict the presence of cosmic-ray protons (CRp) in the cores of massive X-ray clusters; 3) Search in polarization for shock structures, a potential source of CR acceleration in the IGM.

  17. Anomalous Transport of High Energy Cosmic Rays in Galactic Superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, Nasser F.

    2014-01-01

    High-energy cosmic rays may exhibit anomalous transport as they traverse and are accelerated by a collection of supernovae explosions in a galactic superbubble. Signatures of this anomalous transport can show up in the particles' evolution and their spectra. In a continuous-time-random- walk (CTRW) model assuming standard diffusive shock acceleration theory (DSA) for each shock encounter, and where the superbubble (an OB stars association) is idealized as a heterogeneous region of particle sources and sinks, acceleration and transport in the superbubble can be shown to be sub-diffusive. While the sub-diffusive transport can be attributed to the stochastic nature of the acceleration time according to DSA theory, the spectral break appears to be an artifact of transport in a finite medium. These CTRW simulations point to a new and intriguing phenomenon associated with the statistical nature of collective acceleration of high energy cosmic rays in galactic superbubbles.

  18. Using Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing to Constrain the Multiplicative Bias of Cosmic Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the key probes of cosmology. Cosmic shear surveys aimed at measuring the distribution of matter in the universe are currently being carried out (Pan-STARRS) or planned for the coming decade (DES, LSST, EUCLID, WFIRST). Crucial to the success of these surveys is the control of systematics. In this work, a new method to constrain one such family of systematics, known as multiplicative bias, is proposed. This method exploits the cross-correlation between weak-lensing measurements from galaxy surveys and the ones obtained from high-resolution cosmic microwave background experiments. This cross-correlation is shown to have the power to break the degeneracy between the normalization of the matter power spectrum and the multiplicative bias of cosmic shear and to be able to constrain the latter to a few percent.

  19. USING COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING TO CONSTRAIN THE MULTIPLICATIVE BIAS OF COSMIC SHEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the key probes of cosmology. Cosmic shear surveys aimed at measuring the distribution of matter in the universe are currently being carried out (Pan-STARRS) or planned for the coming decade (DES, LSST, EUCLID, WFIRST). Crucial to the success of these surveys is the control of systematics. In this work, a new method to constrain one such family of systematics, known as multiplicative bias, is proposed. This method exploits the cross-correlation between weak-lensing measurements from galaxy surveys and the ones obtained from high-resolution cosmic microwave background experiments. This cross-correlation is shown to have the power to break the degeneracy between the normalization of the matter power spectrum and the multiplicative bias of cosmic shear and to be able to constrain the latter to a few percent.

  20. Cosmic Rays in the Heliosphere: Requirements for Future Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    Since the publication of Cosmic Rays in the Heliosphere in 1998 there has been great progress in understanding how and why cosmic rays vary in space and time. This paper discusses measurements that are needed to continue advances in relating cosmic ray variations to changes in solar and interplanetary activity and variations in the local interstellar environment. Cosmic ray acceleration and transport is an important discipline in space physics and astrophysics, but it also plays a critical role in defining the radiation environment for humans and hardware in space, and is critical to efforts to unravel the history of solar activity. Cosmic rays are measured directly by balloon-borne and space instruments, and indirectly by ground-based neutron, muon and neutrino detectors, and by measurements of cosmogenic isotopes in ice cores, tree-rings, sediments, and meteorites. The topics covered here include: what we can learn from the deep 2008-2009 solar minimum, when cosmic rays reached the highest intensities of the space era; the implications of 10Be and 14C isotope archives for past and future solar activity; the effects of variations in the size of the heliosphere; opportunities provided by the Voyagers for discovering the origin of anomalous cosmic rays and measuring cosmic-ray spectra in interstellar space; and future space missions that can continue the exciting exploration of the heliosphere that has occurred over the past 50 years.

  1. HERSCHEL SURVEY OF GALACTIC OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, AND H{sub 3}O{sup +}: PROBING THE MOLECULAR HYDROGEN FRACTION AND COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A.; Gerin, M.; Falgarone, E.; Schilke, P.; Chambers, E. T.; Ossenkopf, V.; Benz, A. O.; Winkel, B.; Menten, K. M.; Black, John H.; Persson, C. M.; Bruderer, S.; Van Dishoeck, E. F.; Godard, B.; Lis, D. C.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gupta, H.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Van der Tak, F. F. S.; and others

    2015-02-10

    In diffuse interstellar clouds the chemistry that leads to the formation of the oxygen-bearing ions OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} begins with the ionization of atomic hydrogen by cosmic rays, and continues through subsequent hydrogen abstraction reactions involving H{sub 2}. Given these reaction pathways, the observed abundances of these molecules are useful in constraining both the total cosmic-ray ionization rate of atomic hydrogen (ζ{sub H}) and molecular hydrogen fraction (f{sub H{sub 2}}). We present observations targeting transitions of OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 3}O{sup +} made with the Herschel Space Observatory along 20 Galactic sight lines toward bright submillimeter continuum sources. Both OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} are detected in absorption in multiple velocity components along every sight line, but H{sub 3}O{sup +} is only detected along 7 sight lines. From the molecular abundances we compute f{sub H{sub 2}} in multiple distinct components along each line of sight, and find a Gaussian distribution with mean and standard deviation 0.042 ± 0.018. This confirms previous findings that OH{sup +} and H{sub 2}O{sup +} primarily reside in gas with low H{sub 2} fractions. We also infer ζ{sub H} throughout our sample, and find a lognormal distribution with mean log (ζ{sub H}) = –15.75 (ζ{sub H} = 1.78 × 10{sup –16} s{sup –1}) and standard deviation 0.29 for gas within the Galactic disk, but outside of the Galactic center. This is in good agreement with the mean and distribution of cosmic-ray ionization rates previously inferred from H{sub 3}{sup +} observations. Ionization rates in the Galactic center tend to be 10-100 times larger than found in the Galactic disk, also in accord with prior studies.

  2. RELICS of the Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradac, Marusa; Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry; Huang, Kuang-Han; Ryan, Russell; Dawson, Will; Zitrin, Adi; Hoag, Austin; Jones, Christine; Czakon, Nicole; Sharon, Keren; Trenti, Michele; Stark, Daniel; Bouwens, Rychard

    2015-10-01

    When did galaxies start forming stars? What is the role of distant galaxies in galaxy formation models and epoch of reionization? Recent observations indicate at least two critical puzzles in these studies. First galaxies might have started forming stars earlier than previously thought (<400Myr after the Big Bang). Furthermore, it is still unclear what is their star formation history and whether these galaxies can reionize the Universe. Accurate knowledge of stellar masses, ages, and star formation rates at this epoch requires measuring both rest-frame UV and optical light, which only Spitzer and HST can probe at z>7-11 for a large enough sample of typical galaxies. To address this cosmic puzzle, we propose Spitzer imaging of the fields behind 41 powerful cosmic telescopes selected using Planck data from the RELICS program (Reionization Lensing Cluster Survey; 190 HST orbits). This proposal will be a valuable Legacy complement to the existing IRAC deep surveys, and it will open up a new parameter space by probing the ordinary yet magnified population with much improved sample variance. The program will allow us to detect early galaxies with Spitzer and directly study stellar properties of a large number, ~20 galaxies (10 at z~7, 7 at z~8, 3 at z~9, and 1 at z~10). Spitzer data will much improve photometric redshifts of the earliest galaxies and will be crucial to ascertain the nature of any z>~10 candidate galaxies uncovered in the HST data. Spitzer also allows for an efficient selection of likely line emitters (as demonstrated by our recent spectroscopic confirmation of the most distant galaxy to date at z=8.68). Finally this proposal will establish the presence (or absence) of an unusually early established stellar population, as was recently observed in MACS1149JD at z~9. If confirmed in a larger sample, this result will require a paradigm shift in our understanding of the earliest star formation.

  3. Source composition of cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C.H. ); Shapiro, M.M. )

    1990-03-20

    A theory is developed that yields great improvement in deriving the cosmic-ray source abundances for energies below 10{sup 12} eV/u. In addition, based on the acceleration theory of Voelk and Biermann and on nucleosynthesis processes in pre-supernova stars, a theory is presented for the source composition at 10{sup 12}--10{sup 15} eV/u. The strong shock wave of young supernova remnant accelerates the wind particles of the pre-supernova red, blue supergiant stars and Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars to energies up to 10{sup 15} eV/u. They contain the nucleosynthesis products of the CNO cycle and of He-burning. They accelerate the flare particles in interstellar space. The composition below 10{sup 12} eV/u differs from that of the general stellar photosphere by: (1) Suppression of elements with a large FIP ({gt}10 eV) by a factor of 4; (2) The depletion of light nuclei (Z{le}10); (3) A large contribution of WC stars to {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O and {sup 22}Ne, with renormalization of the initial (Z{gt}2)/(Z{le}2) abundances of Prantzos et al., based on general elemental abundances.

  4. Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-01

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  5. Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sidorin, Anatoly

    2010-01-05

    In linear accelerators the particles are accelerated by either electrostatic fields or oscillating Radio Frequency (RF) fields. Accordingly the linear accelerators are divided in three large groups: electrostatic, induction and RF accelerators. Overview of the different types of accelerators is given. Stability of longitudinal and transverse motion in the RF linear accelerators is briefly discussed. The methods of beam focusing in linacs are described.

  6. The Origin of Cosmic Rays: What can GLAST Say?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormes, Jonathan F.; Digel, Seith; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Moiseev, Alexander; Williamson, Roger

    2000-01-01

    Gamma rays in the band from 30 MeV to 300 GeV, used in combination with direct measurements and with data from radio and X-ray bands, provide a powerful tool for studying the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) with its fine 10-20 arcmin angular resolution will be able to map the sites of acceleration of cosmic rays and their interactions with interstellar matter, It will provide information that is necessary to study the acceleration of energetic particles in supernova shocks, their transport in the interstellar medium and penetration into molecular clouds.

  7. Interpretation of Voyager 1 data on low energy cosmic rays in galactic wind model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptuskin, V. S.; Seo, E. S.; Zirakashvili, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The local interstellar energy spectra of galactic cosmic rays down to a few MeV/nucleon were directly measured in the experiment on the board of the Voyager 1 spacecraft. We suggest interpretation of these data based on our models of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants and the diffusion in galactic wind where diffusion coefficient is determined by the cosmic ray streaming instability. The dependence of wind velocity on distance above the Galactic disk is determined.

  8. The History of Cosmic Ray Studies after Hess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus

    2013-06-01

    The discovery of cosmic rays by Victor Hess was confirmed with balloon flights at higher altitudes by Kolhörster. Soon the interest turned into questions about the nature of cosmic rays: gamma rays or particles? Subsequent investigations have established cosmic rays as the birthplace of elementary particle physics. The 1936 Nobel prize was shared between Victor Hess and Carl Anderson. Anderson discovered the positron in a cloud chamber. The positron was predicted by Dirac several years earlier. Many new results came now from studies with cloud chambers and nuclear emulsions. Anderson and Neddermeyer saw the muon, which for some time was considered to be a candidate for the Yukawa particle responsible for nuclear binding. Lattes, Powell, Occhialini and Muirhead clarified the situation by the discovery of the charged pions in cosmic rays. Rochester and Butler found V's, which turned out to be short-lived neutral kaons decaying into a pair of charged pions. Λ's, Σ's and Ξ's were found in cosmic rays using nuclear emulsions. After that period, accelerators and storage rings took over. The unexpected renaissance of cosmic rays started with the search for solar neutrinos and the observation of the supernova 1987A and other accelerators in the sky. With the observation of neutrino oscillations one began to look beyond the standard model of elementary particles. After 100 years of cosmic ray research we are again at the beginning of a new era, and cosmic rays may contribute to solve the many open questions, like dark matter and dark energy, by providing energies well beyond those of earth-bound accelerators.

  9. Globular Clusters as a Test for Gravity in the Weak Acceleration Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Riccardo; Marconi, Gianni; Gilmozzi, Roberto

    2006-03-01

    Non-baryonic Dark Matter (DM) appears in galaxies and other cosmic structures when and only when the acceleration of gravity, as computed considering only baryons, goes below a well defined value a0 = 1.2 × 10-8 cm s-2. This fact is extremely important and suggestive of the possibility of a breakdown of Newton's law of gravity (or inertia) below a0. It is therefore important to verify whether Newton's law of gravity holds in this regime of accelerations. In order to do this, one has to study the dynamics of objects that do not contain significant amounts of DM and therefore should follow Newton's prediction for whatever small accelerations. Globular clusters are believed, even by strong supporters of DM, to contain negligible amounts of DM and therefore are ideal for testing Newtonian dynamics in the low acceleration limit. Here, we discuss the status of an ongoing program aimed to do this test. Compared to other studies of globular clsuters, the novelty is that we trace the velocity dispersion profile of globular clusters far enough from the center to probe gravitational accelerations well below a0. In all three clusters studied so far the velocity dispersion is found to remain constant at large radii rather than follow the Keplerian falloff. On average, the flattening occurs at the radius where the cluster internal acceleration of gravity is 1.8 +/- 0.4 × 10-8 cm s-2, fully consistent with MOND predictions.

  10. Eleventh European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-08-01

    The biannual Symposium includes all aspects of cosmic ray research. The scientific program was organized under three main headings: cosmic rays in the heliosphere, cosmic rays in the interstellar and extragalactic space, and properties of high-energy interactions as studied by cosmic rays. Selected short communications out of 114 contributed papers were indexed separately for the INIS database.

  11. The accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blandford, Roger

    2013-02-01

    From keV electrons in the aurorae to Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays in unidentified "Zevatrons", the cosmos shows a perverse, yet pervasive, proclivity to select a tiny minority of particles and boost them to high energy. The mechanisms involved can be traced back to the ideas of Faraday, Fermi and Alfvén though we are learning that the details are idiosyncratic to the many environments that we have explored. Much can be learned from comparing and contrasting particle acceleration in laboratory, interplanetary, interstellar and intergalactic locations. As it celebrates its centenary, cosmic ray physics, has assumed a new importance in solving one of the greatest problems consuming its illustrious scion - elementary particle physics - namely the nature of dark matter.

  12. Cosmic-ray astrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Indriolo, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J

    2013-10-01

    Gas-phase chemistry in the interstellar medium is driven by fast ion-molecule reactions. This, of course, demands a mechanism for ionization, and cosmic rays are the ideal candidate as they can operate throughout the majority of both diffuse and dense interstellar clouds. Aside from driving interstellar chemistry via ionization, cosmic rays also interact with the interstellar medium in ways that heat the ambient gas, produce gamma rays, and produce light element isotopes. In this paper we review the observables generated by cosmic-ray interactions with the interstellar medium, focusing primarily on the relevance to astrochemistry. PMID:23812538

  13. Supermassive cosmic string compactifications

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Pillado, Jose J.; Reina, Borja; Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon E-mail: borja.reina@ehu.es E-mail: jon.urrestilla@ehu.es

    2014-06-01

    The space-time dimensions transverse to a static straight cosmic string with a sufficiently large tension (supermassive cosmic strings) are compact and typically have a singularity at a finite distance form the core. In this paper, we discuss how the presence of multiple supermassive cosmic strings in the 4d Abelian-Higgs model can induce the spontaneous compactification of the transverse space and explicitly construct solutions where the gravitational background becomes regular everywhere. We discuss the embedding of this model in N = 1 supergravity and show that some of these solutions are half-BPS, in the sense that they leave unbroken half of the supersymmetries of the model.

  14. Testing the Role of Cosmic Ray Reacceleration in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, J. J.; Simpson, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    Cosmic rays constitute a super-thermal gas of charged particles magnetically confined within the Galaxy. While propagating though the interstellar medium (ISM), cosmic ray nuclei undergo nuclear spallation reactions, producing both stable (i.e., Be and B) and unstable secondary nuclei. Consistent cosmic ray confinement times of ~ 20 Myr have been reported from measurements of the radioactive secondary isotopes (10) Be, (26) Al, (36) Cl and (54) Mn using data from the High Energy Telescope (HET) on the Ulysses spacecraft. It is generally accepted that Galactic cosmic rays of energy less than ~ 10(14) eV are accelerated by supernova shocks in the ISM. Reacceleration of existing cosmic rays in the ISM is implicit in interstellar shock acceleration models, but whether reacceleration plays a significant role in cosmic ray production and interstellar propagation is largely unknown. The abundances of secondary electron-capture isotopes provide a crucial test of cosmic ray reacceleration. Electron-capture is suppressed during interstellar propagation because cosmic ray nuclei are essentially stripped of their electrons. If, however, cosmic rays experience significant reacceleration, nuclei will have spent time at lower energies where electron pick-up, and hence electron capture, is more likely than at higher energies. Thus, electron capture secondary isotopes would be less abundant (and their daughters, more abundant) than otherwise predicted. The abundance ratio of (49) V to (51) V is a particularly sensitive test of this effect. The latest Ulysses HET data is used to address this problem. This research was supported in part by NASA/JPL Contract 955432 and NASA Grant NAG5-5179.

  15. Foundations of observing dark energy dynamics with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Corasaniti, P.S.; Kunz, M.; Parkinson, D.; Copeland, E.J.; Bassett, B.A.

    2004-10-15

    Detecting dark energy dynamics is the main quest of current dark energy research. Addressing the issue demands a fully consistent analysis of cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure and SN-Ia data with multiparameter freedom valid for all redshifts. Here we undertake a ten parameter analysis of general dark energy confronted with the first year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, 2dF galaxy survey and latest SN-Ia data. Despite the huge freedom in dark energy dynamics there are no new degeneracies with standard cosmic parameters apart from a mild degeneracy between reionization and the redshift of acceleration, both of which effectively suppress small scale power. Breaking this degeneracy will help significantly in detecting dynamics, if it exists. Our best-fit model to the data has significant late-time evolution at z<1.5. Phantom models are also considered and we find that the best-fit crosses w=-1 which, if confirmed, would be a clear signal for radically new physics. Treatment of such rapidly varying models requires careful integration of the dark energy density usually not implemented in standard codes, leading to crucial errors of up to 5%. Nevertheless cosmic variance means that standard {lambda} cold dark matter models are still a very good fit to the data and evidence for dynamics is currently very weak. Independent tests of reionization or the epoch of acceleration (e.g., integrated Sachs-Wolfe-large scale structure correlations) or reduction of cosmic variance at large scales (e.g., cluster polarization at high redshift) may prove key in the hunt for dynamics.

  16. B-modes from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosian, Levon; Wyman, Mark

    2008-04-15

    Detecting the parity-odd, or B-mode, polarization pattern in the cosmic microwave background radiation due to primordial gravity waves is considered to be the final observational key to confirming the inflationary paradigm. The search for viable models of inflation from particle physics and string theory has (re)discovered another source for B-modes: cosmic strings. Strings naturally generate as much vector-mode perturbation as they do scalar, producing B-mode polarization with a spectrum distinct from that expected from inflation itself. In a large set of models, B-modes arising from cosmic strings are more prominent than those expected from primordial gravity waves. In light of this, we study the physical underpinnings of string-sourced B-modes and the model dependence of the amplitude and shape of the C{sub l}{sup BB} power spectrum. Observational detection of a string-sourced B-mode spectrum would be a direct probe of post-inflationary physics near the grand unified theory (GUT) scale. Conversely, nondetection would put an upper limit on a possible cosmic string tension of G{mu} < or approx. 10{sup -7} within the next three years.

  17. Distance Probes of Dark Energy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D' Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; et al

    2015-03-15

    We present the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). This document summarizes the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  18. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  19. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  20. A COSMIC VARIANCE COOKBOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A. E-mail: rix@mpia.de E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu

    2011-04-20

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg{sup 2}) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by 'cosmic variance'. This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift z-bar and redshift bin size {Delta}z. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, z-bar , {Delta}z, and stellar mass m{sub *}. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates ({delta}{sigma}{sub v}/{sigma}{sub v}) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at z-bar =2 and with {Delta}z = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m{sub *}>10{sup 11} M{sub sun} is {approx}38%, while it is {approx}27% for GEMS and {approx}12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, the relative cosmic variance is {approx}19% for GOODS, {approx}13% for GEMS, and {approx}6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at z

  1. A Cosmic Variance Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moster, Benjamin P.; Somerville, Rachel S.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2011-04-01

    Deep pencil beam surveys (<1 deg2) are of fundamental importance for studying the high-redshift universe. However, inferences about galaxy population properties (e.g., the abundance of objects) are in practice limited by "cosmic variance." This is the uncertainty in observational estimates of the number density of galaxies arising from the underlying large-scale density fluctuations. This source of uncertainty can be significant, especially for surveys which cover only small areas and for massive high-redshift galaxies. Cosmic variance for a given galaxy population can be determined using predictions from cold dark matter theory and the galaxy bias. In this paper, we provide tools for experiment design and interpretation. For a given survey geometry, we present the cosmic variance of dark matter as a function of mean redshift \\bar{z} and redshift bin size Δz. Using a halo occupation model to predict galaxy clustering, we derive the galaxy bias as a function of mean redshift for galaxy samples of a given stellar mass range. In the linear regime, the cosmic variance of these galaxy samples is the product of the galaxy bias and the dark matter cosmic variance. We present a simple recipe using a fitting function to compute cosmic variance as a function of the angular dimensions of the field, \\bar{z}, Δz, and stellar mass m *. We also provide tabulated values and a software tool. The accuracy of the resulting cosmic variance estimates (δσ v /σ v ) is shown to be better than 20%. We find that for GOODS at \\bar{z}=2 and with Δz = 0.5, the relative cosmic variance of galaxies with m *>1011 M sun is ~38%, while it is ~27% for GEMS and ~12% for COSMOS. For galaxies of m * ~ 1010 M sun, the relative cosmic variance is ~19% for GOODS, ~13% for GEMS, and ~6% for COSMOS. This implies that cosmic variance is a significant source of uncertainty at \\bar{z}=2 for small fields and massive galaxies, while for larger fields and intermediate mass galaxies, cosmic variance is

  2. The origin of cosmic rays and TeV gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Gernot

    2013-06-01

    Cosmic rays are accelerated to high energies in Galactic and extragalactic objects like Supernova remnants (SNR) and active galactic nuclei (AGN). How these accelerators work and how efficient they accelerate different types of particles to energies of 1015 eV or beyond, is 100 years after the discovery of cosmic rays by Victor Hess, still unknown. Gamma rays trace cosmic rays at their site of acceleration and give crucial information on the nature and inner workings of these extreme objects. Gamma rays can be used to find the sources of cosmic rays and to determine their type, age and dynamics. We review in these proceedings the observational techniques and recent findings on gamma-ray emission from Supernova remnants.

  3. The Cosmic Labyrinth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, M.

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses the intertwined relationship between the terrestrial and celestial using the labyrinth as a metaphor referencing sources from art, gardens and Australian Indigenous culture. Including the Morning Star with the labyrinthine mortuary ritual in Arnhem Land, the cosmic plan garden at Auschwitz and Marea Atkinson's art project undertaken at the Villa Garzoni garden in Italy to create The Cosmic Labyrinth installation exhibited at Palazzo Franchetti, Venice, during the sixth conference on the Inspiration of Astronomical Phenomena.

  4. Cosmic Ray Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Belkhir, F.; Attallah, R.

    2010-10-01

    Radiation levels at aircraft cruising altitudes are twenty times higher than at sea level. Thus, on average, a typical airline pilot receives a larger annual radiation dose than some one working in nuclear industry. The main source of this radiation is from galactic cosmic radiation, high energy particles generated by exploding stars within our own galaxy. In this work we study cosmic rays dosimetry at various aviation altitudes using the PARMA model.

  5. COSMIC monthly progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of January 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are discussed. Marketing and customer service activities in this period are presented as is the progress report of NASTRAN maintenance and support. Tables of disseminations and budget summary conclude the report.

  6. HD/H{sub 2} AS A PROBE OF THE ROLES OF GAS, DUST, LIGHT, METALLICITY, AND COSMIC RAYS IN PROMOTING THE GROWTH OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN THE DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Liszt, H. S.

    2015-01-20

    We modeled recent observations of UV absorption of HD and H{sub 2} in the Milky Way and toward damped/subdamped Lyα systems at z = 0.18 and z >1.7. N(HD)/N(H{sub 2}) ratios reflect the separate self-shieldings of HD and H{sub 2} and the coupling introduced by deuteration chemistry. Locally, observations are explained by diffuse molecular gas with 16 cm{sup –3} ≲ n(H) ≲ 128 cm{sup –3} if the cosmic-ray ionization rate per H nucleus ζ {sub H} =2 × 10{sup –16} s{sup –1}, as inferred from H{sub 3} {sup +} and OH{sup +}. The dominant influence on N(HD)/N(H{sub 2}) is the cosmic-ray ionization rate with a much weaker downward dependence on n(H) at solar metallicity, but dust extinction can drive N(HD) higher as with N(H{sub 2}). At z > 1.7, N(HD) is comparable to the Galaxy but with 10 times smaller N(H{sub 2}) and somewhat smaller N(H{sub 2})/N(H I). Comparison of our Galaxy with the Magellanic Clouds shows that smaller H{sub 2}/H is expected at subsolar metallicity, and we show by modeling that HD/H{sub 2} increases with density at low metallicity, opposite to the Milky Way. Observations of HD would be explained with higher n(H) at low metallicity, but high-z systems have high HD/H{sub 2} at metallicity 0.04 ≲ Z ≲ 2 solar. In parallel, we trace dust extinction and self-shielding effects. The abrupt H{sub 2} transition to H{sub 2}/H ≈ 1%-10% occurs mostly from self-shielding, although it is assisted by extinction for n(H) ≲ 16 cm{sup –3}. Interior H{sub 2} fractions are substantially increased by dust extinction below ≲ 32 cm{sup –3}. At smaller n(H), ζ {sub H}, small increases in H{sub 2} triggered by dust extinction can trigger abrupt increases in N(HD)

  7. Cosmic Ray Observation for Nuclear Astrophysics:. Corona Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, M. N.

    2003-04-01

    Cosmic Ray Observation for Nuclei Astrophysics (CORONA) program is a large-scaled spacecraft or space station approach for nuclear composition of relativistic cosmic rays 10 ≦ Z ≦ 92 and of low-energy isotopes 1 ≦ Z ≦ 58 in space. A large area Spectrometer for Ultraheavy Nuclear Composition (SUNC) and a Large Isotope Telescope Array (LITA) are proposed in this program. CORONA program focuses on the composition of elements beyond the iron-peak nuclei (Z > 60) and the isotopic composition of ultraheavy particles (Z > 30) in galactic cosmic rays as well as solar and interplanetary particles. The observation of nuclear composition covers a wide range of scientific themes including studies of nucleosynthesis of cosmic ray sources, chemical evolution of galactic material, the characteristic time of cosmic rays, heating and acceleration mechanism of cosmic ray particles. Observation of solar particle events also make clear the physical process of transient solar events emitting wide range of radio, X-ray/gamma-ray, plasma and energetic particle radiation, and particle acceleration mechanism driven by CME.

  8. High Energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos from Newborn Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ke; Kotera, Kumiko; Olinto, Angela

    2013-04-01

    Newborn pulsars offer favorable sites for cosmic ray acceleration and interaction. Particles could be striped off the star surface and accelerated in the pulsar wind up to PeV-100 EeV energies, depending on the pulsar's birth period and magnetic field strength. Once accelerated, the cosmic rays interact with the surrounding supernova ejecta until they escape the source. By assuming a normal distribution of pulsar birth periods centered at 300,ms, we find the combined contribution of extragalactic pulsars produce ultrahigh energy cosmic rays that agree with both the observed energy spectrum and composition trend reported by the Auger Observatory. Meanwhile, we point out their Galactic counterparts naturally give rise to a cosmic ray flux peaked at very high energies (VHE, between 10^16 and 10^18 ,eV), which can bridge the gap between predictions of cosmic rays produced by supernova remnants and the observed spectrum and composition just below the ankle. Young pulsars in the universe would also contribute to a diffuse neutrino background due to the photomeson interactions, whose detectability and typical neutrino energy are discussed. Lastly, we predict a neutrino emission level for the future birth of a nearby pulsar.

  9. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND MAXIMUM ENERGY OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, M.; Katayose, Y.; Huang, J.; Chen, D.

    2010-06-20

    A model of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum is proposed that assumes various acceleration limits at multiple sources. The model describes the broken power-law energy spectrum of cosmic rays by superposition of multiple sources; a diffusive shock acceleration mechanism plays an essential role. The maximum energy of galactic cosmic rays is discussed based on a comparison of experimental data with calculations done using the proposed model. The model can describe the energy spectrum at very high energies of up to several times 10{sup 18} eV, but the observed highest-energy cosmic rays deviate from the model predictions, indicating a different origin, such as an extragalactic source. This model describes the steepening of the power index at the so-called knee. However, it was found that additional assumptions are needed to explain the sharpness of the knee. Two possible explanations for the structure of the knee are discussed in terms of nearby source(s) and the hard energy spectrum suggested by nonlinear effects of cosmic-ray acceleration mechanisms.

  10. Can Accelerators Accelerate Learning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. C. F.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.

    2009-03-01

    The 'Young Talented' education program developed by the Brazilian State Funding Agency (FAPERJ) [1] makes it possible for high-schools students from public high schools to perform activities in scientific laboratories. In the Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory at Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), the students are confronted with modern research tools like the 1.7 MV ion accelerator. Being a user-friendly machine, the accelerator is easily manageable by the students, who can perform simple hands-on activities, stimulating interest in physics, and getting the students close to modern laboratory techniques.

  11. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  12. The HEAT Cosmic Ray Antiproton Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, Scott

    1998-10-01

    The HEAT (High Energy Antimatter Telescope) collaboration is constructing a balloon-borne instrument to measure the relative abundance of antiprotons and protons in the cosmic rays to kinetic energies of 30 GeV. The instrument uses a multiple energy loss technique to measure the Lorentz factor of through-going cosmic rays, a magnet spectrometer to measure momentum, and several scintillation counters to determine particle charge and direction (up or down in the atmosphere). The antiproton to proton abundance ratio as a function of energy is a probe of the propagation environment of protons through the galaxy. Existing measurements indicate a higher than expected value at both high and low energies. A confirming measurement could indicate peculiar antiproton sources, such as WIMPs or supersymmetric darkmatter candidates.

  13. Detection prospects of the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng

    2015-04-01

    The existence of the cosmic neutrino background (CνB) is a fundamental prediction of the standard Big Bang cosmology. Although current cosmological probes provide indirect observational evidence, the direct detection of the CνB in a laboratory experiment is a great challenge to the present experimental techniques. We discuss the future prospects for the direct detection of the CνB, with the emphasis on the method of captures on beta-decaying nuclei and the PTOLEMY project. Other possibilities using the electron-capture (EC) decaying nuclei, the annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos (EHECνs) at the Z-resonance, and the atomic de-excitation method are also discussed in this review (talk given at the International Conference on Massive Neutrinos, Singapore, 9-13 February 2015).

  14. Detection Prospects of the Cosmic Neutrino Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Feng

    The existence of the cosmic neutrino background (CνB) is a fundamental prediction of the standard Big Bang cosmology. Although current cosmological probes provide indirect observational evidence, the direct detection of the CνB in a laboratory experiment is a great challenge to the present experimental techniques. We discuss the future prospects for the direct detection of the CνB, with the emphasis on the method of captures on beta-decaying nuclei and the PTOLEMY project. Other possibilities using the electron-capture (EC) decaying nuclei, the annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos (EHECνs) at the Z-resonance, and the atomic de-excitation method are also discussed in this review.

  15. Super-alfvenic propagation of cosmic rays: The role of streaming modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Scott, J. S.; Holman, G. D.; Ionson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Numerous cosmic ray propagation and acceleration problems require knowledge of the propagation speed of relativistic particles through an ambient plasma. Previous calculations indicated that self-generated turbulence scatters relativistic particles and reduces their bulk streaming velocity to the Alfven speed. This result was incorporated into all currently prominent theories of cosmic ray acceleration and propagation. It is demonstrated that super-Alfvenic propagation is indeed possible for a wide range of physical parameters. This fact dramatically affects the predictions of these models.

  16. Ultra-high energy probes of classicalization

    SciTech Connect

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar E-mail: cesar.gomez@uam.es

    2012-07-01

    Classicalizing theories are characterized by a rapid growth of the scattering cross section. This growth converts these sort of theories in interesting probes for ultra-high energy experiments even at relatively low luminosity, such as cosmic rays or Plasma Wakefield accelerators. The microscopic reason behind this growth is the production of N-particle states, classicalons, that represent self-sustained lumps of soft Bosons. For spin-2 theories this is the quantum portrait of what in the classical limit are known as black holes. We emphasize the importance of this quantum picture which liberates us from the artifacts of the classical geometric limit and allows to scan a much wider landscape of experimentally-interesting quantum theories. We identify a phenomenologically-viable class of spin-2 theories for which the growth of classicalon production cross section can be as efficient as to compete with QCD cross section already at 100TeV energy, signaling production of quantum black holes with graviton occupation number N ∼ 10{sup 4}.

  17. Probing Dark Energy with Constellation-X

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-09-08

    Constellation-X (Con-X) will carry out two powerful and independent sets of tests of dark energy based on X-ray observations of galaxy clusters, providing comparable accuracy to other leading dark energy probes. The first group of tests will measure the absolute distances to clusters, primarily using measurements of the X-ray gas mass fraction in the largest, dynamically relaxed clusters, but with additional constraining power provided by follow-up observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. As with supernovae studies, such data determine the transformation between redshift and true distance, d(z), allowing cosmic acceleration to be measured directly. The second, independent group of tests will use the exquisite spectroscopic capabilities of Con-X to determine scaling relations between X-ray observables and mass. Together with forthcoming X-ray and SZ cluster surveys, these data will help to constrain the growth of structure, which is also a strong function of cosmological parameters.

  18. Nonlinear Transport of Cosmic Rays in Turbulent Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H.; Xu, S.

    2014-09-01

    Recent advances in both the MHD turbulence theory and cosmic ray observations call for revisions in the paradigm of cosmic ray transport. We use the models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence that were tested in numerical simulations, in which turbulence is injected at large scale and cascades to small scales. We shall present the nonlinear results for cosmic ray transport, in particular, the cross field transport of CRs. We demonstrate that the concept of cosmic ray subdiffusion in general does not apply and the perpendicular motion is well described by normal diffusion with M A4 dependence. Moreover, on scales less than the injection scale of turbulence, CRs' transport becomes super-diffusive. Quantitative predictions for both the normal diffusion on large scale and super diffusion on small scale are confirmed with recent numerical simulations. Implication for shock acceleration is briefly discussed.

  19. Plans for Extreme Energy Cosmic Ray Observations from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic rays have been detected at energies beyond 10(exp 20) eV, where Universe is predicted to become opaque to protons. The acceleration of cosmic rays to such extreme energies in known astrophysical objects has also proven difficult to understand, leading to many suggestions that new physics may be required to explain their existence. This has prompted the construction of new experiments designed to detect cosmic rays with fluxes below 1 particle/km/century and follow their spectrum to even higher energies. To detect large numbers of these particles, the next generation of these experiments must be performed on space-based platforms that look on very large detection volumes in the Earth's atmosphere. The talk will review the experimental and theoretical investigations of extreme energy cosmic rays and discuss the present and planned experiments to extend measurements beyond 10(exp 21) eV.

  20. Cosmic rays and the birth of particle physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlander, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Twenty years after the discovery of cosmic rays, the methods of research and resulting discoveries were dramatically changed by the introduction of experimental methods that made visible the passage of individual particles. Between 1932 and 1955, tracks of cosmic rays were found in cloud chambers and special photographic emulsions. From measurements of the ionization produced along these tracks, the mass, charge and energy of a single relativistic particle could be determined. The dynamics of decays and collisions could be analyzed. Positrons and then electron-positron pairs were discovered, followed by muons and pions and then the inhabitants of the 'particle zoo'. Fundamental concepts were challenged. From the mid- 1950s, larger accelerators began to produce many of the 'new' particles, displacing cosmic rays from their prime role in particle studies. But without the initial discoveries in cosmic rays, there might well not be the modern industrial-scale particle physics research.