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Sample records for processed 6061-t6 aluminum

  1. Laser shock processing to improve residual stresses with and without paint layer on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rosas, G.; Rubio-Gonzalez, C.; Ocaña, J. L.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Casillas, F. J.; Mora-Gonzalez, M.; Chi-Moreno, W.

    2007-03-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) or laser shock peening has been proposed as a competitive alternative technology to classical treatments for improving fatigue and wear resistance of metals. This process induces a compressive residual stress field which increases fatigue crack initiation life and reduce fatigue crack growth rate. We present a configuration and results in the LSP concept for metal surface treatments in underwater laser irradiation at 1064 nm with and without a thin surface paint layer. A convergent lens is used to deliver 1, 2 J/cm2 with a 8 ns laser FWHM pulse produced by a 10 Hz, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a spot diameter of a 1,5 mm moving forward along the workpiece. A LSP configuration with experimental results using a pulse density of 5000 pulses/cm2 in 6061-T6 aluminum samples are presented.

  2. Effects of Applied Load on 6061-T6 Aluminum Joined Employing a Novel Friction Bonding Process

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas E. Burkes; Neil P. Hallinan; Karen L. Shropshire; Peter B. Wells

    2008-12-01

    Friction bonding is under consideration for use in mass production of plate-type nuclear fuels for research reactors. This article discusses the effects of applied load (the most important process parameter for fabrication of these fuels) on temperature distribution, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Friction bonding experiments showed that tool geometry caused temperature gradients across the tool surface. Temperatures at the joint interface suggested the advancing side of the tool produced a majority of the frictional heat, while the retreating side of the tool mainly forged the plasticized material while bonding increased with applied load. The microstructure across the tool surface was also altered and, as a function of applied load, affected the mechanical properties. The 6061 aluminum alloy had mechanical properties close to a T4 temper after processing. Results documented in this article will aid in continual enhancement of friction bonding for nuclear fuel plate fabrication, and will hopefully contribute to continued advancement of friction stir welding (FSW) state of the art.

  3. Mechanical shielding reduces weld surface cracking in 6061 T6 aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, J. E.

    1968-01-01

    Mechanical shield of high melting point material protects 6061-T6 aluminum welded with high frequency ac tungsten arc equipment. It is held in place around the weld bead area and eliminates heat check cracks.

  4. Experiments and simulation for 6061-T6 aluminum alloy resistance spot welded lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Radu Stefanel

    This comprehensive study is the first to quantify the fatigue performance, failure loads, and microstructure of resistance spot welding (RSW) in 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) alloy according to welding parameters and process sensitivity. The extensive experimental, theoretical and simulated analyses will provide a framework to optimize the welding of lightweight structures for more fuel-efficient automotive and military applications. The research was executed in four primary components. The first section involved using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning, tensile testing, laser beam profilometry (LBP) measurements, and optical microscopy(OM) images to experimentally investigate failure loads and deformation of the Al-alloy resistance spot welded joints. Three welding conditions, as well as nugget and microstructure characteristics, were quantified according to predefined process parameters. Quasi-static tensile tests were used to characterize the failure loads in specimens based upon these same process parameters. Profilometer results showed that increasing the applied welding current deepened the weld imprints. The EBSD scans revealed the strong dependency between the grain sizes and orientation function on the process parameters. For the second section, the fatigue behavior of the RSW'ed joints was experimentally investigated. The process optimization included consideration of the forces, currents, and times for both the main weld and post-heating. Load control cyclic tests were conducted on single weld lap-shear joint coupons to characterize the fatigue behavior in spot welded specimens. Results demonstrate that welding parameters do indeed significantly affect the microstructure and fatigue performance for these welds. The third section comprised residual strains of resistance spot welded joints measured in three different directions, denoted as in-plane longitudinal, in-plane transversal, and normal, and captured on the fusion zone, heat affected zone

  5. CO2 laser beam welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy thin plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.; Todaka, Hirotaka

    1997-12-01

    Laser beam welding is an attractive welding process for age-hardened aluminum alloys, because its low heat input minimizes the width of weld fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs). In the present work, 1-mm-thick age-hardened Al-Mg-Si alloy, 6061-T6, plates were welded with full penetration using a 2.5-kW CO2 laser. Fractions of porosity in the fusion zones were less than 0.05 pct in bead-on-plate welding and less than 0.2 pct in butt welding with polishing the groove surface before welding. The width of a softened region in the-laser beam welds was less than 1/4 times that of a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld. The softened region is caused by reversion of strengthening β″ (Mg2Si) precipitates due to weld heat input. The hardness values of the softened region in the laser beam welds were almost fully recovered to that of the base metal after an artificial aging treatment at 448 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing, whereas those in the TIG weld were not recovered in a partly reverted region. Both the bead-on-plate weld and the butt weld after the postweld artificial aging treatment had almost equivalent tensile strengths to that of the base plate.

  6. High strength and high ductility behavior of 6061-T6 alloy after laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Saklakoglu, Nursen

    2016-02-01

    The plastic deformation behavior of 6061-T6 alloy which was subjected to severe plastic deformation (SPD) at high strain rates during laser shock processing (LSP) was researched. In LSP-treated materials, the near surface microstructural change was examined by TEM and fracture surfaces after tensile testing were examined by SEM. An increase in strength of metallic materials brings about the decrease in ductility. In this study, the results showed that LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy exhibited both high strength and high ductility. TEM observation showed that stacking fault (SF) ribbon enlarged, deformation twins formed and twin boundary increased in LSP-treated 6061-T6 alloy. This observation was an indication of stacking fault energy (SFE) decrease. Work hardening capability was recovered after LSP impacts.

  7. Cavitation pitting and erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation erosion studies of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil and in ordinary tap water are presented. The maximum erosion rate (MDPR, or mean depth of penetration rate) in mineral oil was about four times that in water. The MDPR in mineral oil decreased continuously with time, but the MDPR in water remained approximately constant. The cavitation pits in mineral oil were of smaller diameter and depth than the pits in water. Treating the pits as spherical segments, we computed the radius r of the sphere. The logarithm of h/a, where h is the pit depth and 2a is the top width of the pit, was linear when plotted against the logarithm of 2r/h - 1.

  8. The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 aluminum by a polyurethane-sealed anodized coat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion protection of 6061-T6 anodized aluminum afforded by a newly patented polyurethane seal was studied using the ac impedance technique. Values of the average corrosion rates over a 27-day exposure period in 3.5 percent NaCl solutions at pH 5.2 and pH 9.5 compared very favorably for Lockheed-prepared polyurethane-sealed and dichromate-sealed coats of the same thickness. Average corrosion rates for both specimens over the first 7 days of exposure compared well with those for a hard anodized, dichromate-sealed coat, but rose well above those for the hard anodized coat over the entire 27-day period. This is attributed both to the greater thickness of the hard anodized coat, and possibly to its inherently better corrosion protective capability.

  9. Characteristics of laser beam welds of age-hardenable 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2003-03-01

    Laser beam welding is attractive for joining age-hardenable aluminum alloys, because its low over-all heat input results in a narrow weld heat affected zone (HAZ), where softening caused by dissolution of age precipitates occurs. In the present work, 1mm-thick 6061-T6 aluminum alloy plates were welded using a 2.5 kW CO2 laser and it was experimentally proved that the width of the softened region in the laser beam weld was less than 1/7 that of a TIG weld. Moreover the hardness in the softened region of the laser beam weld was found to be almost fully recovered to the base metal hardness by applying a post-weld aging treatment at 443 K for 28.8 ks without solution annealing unlike the TIG weld. These results characterize the advantage of laser beam welding in joining of the age-hardenable aluminum alloy as compared with the conventional arc welding. The hardness distributions in the HAZ were theoretically evaluated based on kinetic equations describing the dissolution of hardening β' (Mg2Si) precipitates and the precipitation of non-hardening β' (Mg2Si) precipitates during the weld thermal cycles to quantitatively prove above mentioned advantageous characteristics of laser beam welding.

  10. Effect of laser peening with different energies on fatigue fracture evolution of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Huang, S.; Zhou, J. Z.; Lu, J. Z.; Xu, S. Q.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-03-01

    To deeply understand the effect of laser peening (LP) with different laser pulse energies on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, the fatigue fracture morphologies evolution process at various fatigue crack growth (FCG) stages and the corresponding strengthen mechanism were investigated. At the initial stage of FCG, more fatigue micro-cliffs were found after LP, while the fatigue striation spacing simultaneously reduced. A "stop-continue" phenomenon of crack propagation was discovered for laser peened samples. The fatigue striation spacing at the middle stage of FCG increased significantly while compared with that at the initial stage, in addition, the fatigue striation spacing decreased with an increase in laser pulse energy. Fracture morphologies in transition region of laser peened samples exhibit a mixing fracture characteristic of striations and dimples. The laser peened sample with laser pulse energy of 7 J presents more circuitous growing paths. Due to the complex stress state induced by LP, dimples with different sizes appeared in the final fracture region.

  11. Erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in distilled water, ordinary tap water and a viscous mineral oil are presented. The mean depth of penetration for the mineral oil was about 40 percent of that for water at the end of a 40 min test. The mean depth of penetration and its rate did not differ significantly for distilled and tap water. The mean depth of penetration rate for both distilled and tap water increased to a maximum and then decreased with test duration, while that for mineral oil had a maximum during the initial period. The ratio h/2a of the pit depth h to the pit diameter 2a varied from 0.04 to 0.13 in water and from 0.06 to 0.20 in mineral oil. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the pits are initially formed over the grain boundaries and precipitates while the surface grains are deformed under cavitation attack.

  12. Low-temperature densification of ultrafine grained aluminum 6061-T6 by polymer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Boumseock

    Ultrafine grained and nanocrytalline materials have many beneficial properties such as higher hardness, strength and wear resistance. A machining process has been developed as a new method to make nanostructured metals or alloys. Through the process, severe plastic deformation can be applied to metals or alloys and they become ultrafine grain and nanocrystalline in their structures. Because ultrafine grained alloys made by machining are made up to small chips, not bulk, to make bulk material, the alloy chips must be densified through processes such as sintering. Unfortunately, during the conventional sintering, the ultrafine grained alloys show grain growth at high rate and lose their hardness and strength. Therefore, low-temperature densification of ultrafine grained alloys has been pursued. In this thesis, ultrafine-grained (UFG) Al 6061-T6 particulate produced from machining chips have been consolidated and bonded using liquid epoxies that cure at 100?, below the coarsening temperature of the UFG structure. Two routes were explored---die-pressing premixed alloy particulate and epoxy and pressure infiltration of pre-pressed alloy particulate preforms. The effects of pressing pressure and epoxy viscosity were investigated. In order to reduce porosity and contamination, three treatments---application of pressure during curing of epoxy, the cleaning of the alloy powder with NaOH solution and degassing epoxy before pressing---were tried. In order to overcome limitation of diepressing, infiltration method was compared with die-pressing and the resulting properties of the composite discussed. Bond thickness between the alloy particles increases with the viscosity of the epoxies. In the hardness results by micro-indentor, the value of composite with more than 80% volume fraction of Al alloy chip (Va) was more than 120 kg/mm2. In those measurements, the hardness of the composite depends mainly on the volume fraction of Al alloy and was clearly influenced by the boundary

  13. Laser peening without coating on aluminum alloy Al-6061-T6 using low energy Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathyajith, S.; Kalainathan, S.; Swaroop, S.

    2013-02-01

    The present study investigates the effect of laser peening without coating on aluminum alloy Al-6061-T6 with a 300 mJ infrared laser. The surface topography, microstructure, surface topography, surface residual stress and micro-hardness of peened and unpeened surfaces were studied. The study shows that laser peening without coating can significantly improve surface compressive stress and micro-hardness with trivial increase in surface roughness. Microstructure evaluation confirmed there was no near surface solidification after LPwC.

  14. Recovery of Mechanical Properties of a 6061-T6 Aluminum Weld by Heat Treatment After Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Javier Serrano; Ambriz, Ricardo Rafael; López, Francisco Fernando Curiel; Vigueras, David Jaramillo

    2016-07-01

    The dilution effects in welds of a 6061-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy obtained by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA), using an ER4043 filler metal (Al-Si), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) were analyzed. The soft zone (55 to 70 HV0.1) formed by the microstructural transformation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was eliminated. The hardness measurements were presented on a traditional microhardness profile and mapping representation. A hardening effect of the fusion zone was observed; the hardness values were above 120 HV0.1 and tended to be uniform. This behavior could be attributed to the chemical composition of the filler metal, the Mg migration from the base to the weld metal, and the reversible process of the PWHT, which promotes precipitation hardening. Improvement for yield (260 MPa) and tensile strength (310 MPa) of the MIEA joints was observed; these values were similar to those obtained for the base metal. However, the presence of porosity in the fusion zone limits the ductility of the joints (4.3 pct). Even though the yield and tensile strengths of the base metal and welded joints were similar, the stress concentration due to porosity in the weld metal generated data dispersion in fatigue life. As a consequence, the high-cycle fatigue life decreases with respect to the base metal. In contrast, when the crack propagates under elastic conditions, the crack-tip singularity is affected by the porosity in the weld metal (stress liberator). This aspect, in conjunction with the hardening effect in joints subjected to PWHT, improves the fatigue crack growth rate when compared to the as-welded condition.

  15. Recovery of Mechanical Properties of a 6061-T6 Aluminum Weld by Heat Treatment After Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Javier Serrano; Ambriz, Ricardo Rafael; López, Francisco Fernando Curiel; Vigueras, David Jaramillo

    2016-05-01

    The dilution effects in welds of a 6061-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) alloy obtained by the modified indirect electric arc (MIEA), using an ER4043 filler metal (Al-Si), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) were analyzed. The soft zone (55 to 70 HV0.1) formed by the microstructural transformation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was eliminated. The hardness measurements were presented on a traditional microhardness profile and mapping representation. A hardening effect of the fusion zone was observed; the hardness values were above 120 HV0.1 and tended to be uniform. This behavior could be attributed to the chemical composition of the filler metal, the Mg migration from the base to the weld metal, and the reversible process of the PWHT, which promotes precipitation hardening. Improvement for yield (260 MPa) and tensile strength (310 MPa) of the MIEA joints was observed; these values were similar to those obtained for the base metal. However, the presence of porosity in the fusion zone limits the ductility of the joints (4.3 pct). Even though the yield and tensile strengths of the base metal and welded joints were similar, the stress concentration due to porosity in the weld metal generated data dispersion in fatigue life. As a consequence, the high-cycle fatigue life decreases with respect to the base metal. In contrast, when the crack propagates under elastic conditions, the crack-tip singularity is affected by the porosity in the weld metal (stress liberator). This aspect, in conjunction with the hardening effect in joints subjected to PWHT, improves the fatigue crack growth rate when compared to the as-welded condition.

  16. On Residual Stresses in Resistance Spot-Welded Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6: Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, D.; Sedighi, M.; Karimi, M. R.; Barsoum, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, an electro-thermal-structural-coupled finite element (FE) model and x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements have been utilized to analyze distribution of residual stresses in an aluminum alloy 6061-T6 resistance spot-welded joint with 2-mm-thickness sheet. Increasing the aluminum sheet thickness to more than 1 mm leads to creating difficulty in spot-welding process and increases the complexity of the FE model. The electrical and thermal contact conductances, as mandatory factors are applied in contact areas of electrode-workpiece and workpiece-workpiece to resolve the complexity of the FE model. The physical and mechanical properties of the material are defined as thermal dependent to improve the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, the electrodes are removed after the holding cycle using the birth-and-death elements method. The results have a good agreement with experimental data obtained from x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements. However, the highest internal tensile residual stress occurs in the center of the nugget zone and decreases toward nugget edge; surface residual stress increases toward the edge of the welding zone and afterward, the area decreases slightly.

  17. Ballistic limit of 6061 T6 aluminum and threat to surface coatings for use with orbiting space station space suit materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, D.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years orbiting satellites, spent components, collisions and explosions have populated the near earth orbit with debris potentially more hazardous than the average meteoroid debris. This new debris has an average density of aluminum (2.78 g/cc) and an average encounter velocity of 10 km/sec. The space station will require many hours of work in this environment and there is concern over hazard to the assembly personnel. A proposed hard suit design utilizes 6061-T6 Aluminum for most of its exposed area. The aluminum surface will be treated for thermal and radiation control. The basic thickness of this suit will be on the order of 1.78 mm (0.070 inches). The selection of 6061-T6 Aluminum for space suits for use on the space station would appear to be worthwhile. The relatively ductile behavior of 6061-T6 aluminum is better than a choice of a more brittle material.

  18. Barrier anodic coatings formed on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy in electrolytes containing different ethanol to water ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Sharp, D.J.; Martinez, F.E.; Merrill, R.M.; Ward, K.J.

    1988-12-01

    We have studied barrier anodic film formation on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy substrates as a function of electrolyte composition for five mixtures of ammonium tartrate dissolved in water and diluted with different amounts of ethanol. The effects of electrolyte temperatures within the range of 18/degree/C to 38/degree/C were explored. The results of this study indicate that the best dielectric coatings and the shortest processing times occur for the 100% water-ammonium tartrate electrolyte. The second best coatings and processing times occur in conjunction with the use of 98% ethanol, 2% water plus ammonium tartrate electrolyte. In general, visibly flawed coatings, scintillation events at cell voltages in excess of approximately 750-800 volts and/or abnormally long processing times occur in conjunction with the use of electrolyte mixtures containing 20%, 60%, and 90% water. We analysed samples of electrolyte as a function of usage, and evaluated the composition of the coatings using Fourier Transform Infrared Analysis to better understand the mechanisms which contribute to anodic coating growth that result in the observed variations in the dielectric properties. All of the coatings exhibited similar compositions except with regard to the amount of CO2 that was physisorbed in the coatings. The dielectrically inferior coatings that were typically produced by the electrolytes containing ethanol contain substantially more CO2 than the coatings grown in the 100% water-based electrolyte. These results strongly suggest that the ethanol in the electrolyte oxidizes and forms CO2 which is incorporated in the coatings and results in inferior dielectric properties. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Effect of Welding Speeds on Mechanical Properties of Level Compensation Friction Stir Welded 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Quan; Yue, Yumei; Ji, Shude; Li, Zhengwei; Gao, Shuangsheng

    2016-04-01

    In order to eliminate the flash, arc corrugation and concave in weld zone, level compensation friction stir welding (LCFSW) was put forward and successfully applied to weld 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with varied welding speed at a constant tool rotational speed of 1,800 rpm in the present study. The glossy joint with equal thickness of base material can be attained, and the shoulder affected zone (SAZ) was obviously reduced. The results of transverse tensile test indicate that the tensile strength and elongation reach the maximum values of 248 MPa and 7.1% when the welding speed is 600 mm/min. The microhardness of weld nugget (WN) is lower than that of base material. The tensile fracture position locates at the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the advancing side (AS), where the microhardness is the minimum. The fracture surface morphology represents the typical ductile fracture.

  20. Full Field Measurement of The Dynamic Response of AA6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy under High Strain Rate Compression and Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odoh, Daniel Oghenekewhe Oluwatobi

    The dynamic response of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy under high strain rate loading in compression and torsion loading conditions was studied using the split Hopkinson pressure bar, the Kolsky torsion bar, and the high speed digital image correlation system. AA6061-T6 alloy, the most widely used in the AA6000 series, is a multi-purpose Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy containing about 0.4 % wt. of Cu and other alloying additives. The properties of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy including medium to high strength, good fracture toughness, and high corrosion resistance make it to find application in high performance structures such as the automotive parts, panels, and armored carriers. In this work, the effect of strain rate during dynamic test on formation of adiabatic shear bands in AA6061-T6 alloy was investigated. A post deformation analysis of the tested specimen was performed in order to determine the damage evolution and strain localization along the narrow adiabatic shear bands within the specimen. The formation of an adiabatic shear band in the aluminum alloy tested was found to depend on the strain rate at which the test was conducted. Stress, strain, and strain rate data obtained from the elastic waves in the compression and torsion bar tests were also compared with those obtained using the high speed digital cameras. Results show good agreement between both measurement techniques with the 3D digital image correlation technique giving a slightly lower result. Scanning and electron microscopy results show that both deformed and transformed bands can be formed in AA6061-T6 alloy during dynamic loading. The type of adiabatic shear band formed depends on the strain rate at which test was performed.

  1. Quench sensitivity of hot extruded 6061-T6 and 6069-T6 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsma, S C; Kassner, M E; Li, X; Rosen, R S

    2000-08-08

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the quench sensitivity of mechanical properties of hot extruded 6061 and 6069 aluminum alloys. The relationship between mechanical properties and quench delzty time at various temperatures between 200-500 C was determined. It was concluded that the 6069-T6 was somewhat more quench sensitive than 6061, which may be consistent with the composition difference.

  2. A Micro-Electrochemical Study of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum 6061-T6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.; Calle, Luz M.

    2005-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of friction stir welded Aluminum alloy 606 1-T6 was studied using a micro-electrochemical cell. The micro-electrochemical cell has a measurement area of about 0.25 square mm which allows for measurement of corrosion properties at a very small scale. The corrosion and breakdown potentials were measured at many points inside and outside the weld along lines perpendicular to the weld. The breakdown potential is approximately equal inside and outside the weld; however, it is lower in the narrow border between the weld and base material. The results of electrochemical measurements were correlated to micro-structural analysis. The corrosion behavior of the friction stir welded samples was compared to tungsten inert gas (TIG) welded samples of the same material.

  3. Modeling of Residual Stresses and Property Distributions in Friction Stir Welds of Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A; Wang, Xun-Li; Sklad, Philip S

    2007-01-01

    An integrated thermal-metallurgical-mechanical model is used to analyze and provide insights into the formation of the residual stress and the changes in microstructure and property of Al6061-T6 friction stir welds. The simulations were conducted by means of a three-dimensional finite element model that accounts for the phenomena of frictional heating, weld microstructure and strength changes due to dissolution and reprecipitation of the hardening precipitate particles, and the mechanical workpiece/tool contact during the friction stir welding (FSW) process. The model predictions were confirmed by experimental measurement data from previous studies. For the friction stir welds investigated, it was found that the residual stress distribution is strongly dependent on the welding process parameters and the degree of material softening caused by welding. The recovery of material strength from natural aging does not increase the residual stress in the weld. The failure of friction stir weld under tensile load is controlled by the combination of the reduction in strength and the residual stresses in the heat affected zone (HAZ).

  4. Galvanic coupling between D6AC steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, Inconel 718 and graphite-epoxy composite material: Corrosion occurrence and prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.; Higgins, R. H.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of galvanic coupling between D6AC steel, 6061-T6 aluminum, Inconel 718, and graphite-epoxy composite material (G/E) in 3.5% NaCl were studied. Measurements of corrosion potentials, galvanic currents and corrosion rates of the bare metals using weight-loss methods served to establish the need for corrosion protection in cases where D6AC steel and 6061-T6 aluminum are galvanically coupled to G/E in salt water while Inconel 718 was shown to be compatible with G/E. Six tests were made to study corrosion protective methods for eliminating galvanic corrosion in the cases of D6AC steel and 6061-T6 aluminum coupled to G/E. These results indicate that, when the G/E is completely coated with paint or a paint/polyurethane resin combination, satisfactory protection of the D6AC steel is achieved with either a coat of zinc-rich primer or a primer/topcoat combination. Likewise, satisfactory corrosion protection of the aluminum is achieved by coating it with an epoxy coating system.

  5. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements of temperature and stresses during friction stir welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; David, Stan A; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R; Woo, Wan Chuck; Brown, D. W.; Clausen, B; An, Ke

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and thermal stresses during friction stir welding of Al6061-T6 was investigated by means of in situ, time resolved neutron diffraction technique. A method was developed to deconvolute the temperature and stress from the lattice spacing changes measured by neutron diffraction. The deep penetration capability of neutrons made it possible for the first time to obtain the temperature and thermal stresses inside a friction stir weld.

  6. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements of temperature and stresses during friction stir welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; Brown, D. W.; Clausen, B; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R; David, Stan A

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and thermal stresses during friction stir welding of Al6061-T6 was investigated by means of in-situ, time-resolved neutron diffraction technique. A method is developed to deconvolute the temperature and stress from the lattice spacing changes measured by neutron diffraction. The deep penetration capability of neutrons made it possible for the first time to obtain the temperature and thermal stresses inside a friction stir weld.

  7. Prediction of hardness minimum locations during natural aging in an aluminum alloy 6061-T6 friction stir weld

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Choo, Hahn; Feng, Zhili; Withers, Prof Philip

    2009-01-01

    This study describes a simple model that can predict the evolution of hardness distribution as a function of natural aging time in a heat-treatable 6061-T6 Al alloy plate subjected to friction stir welding (FSW). First, two dimensional thermal distributions were simulated as a function of time in the FSW plate by finite element modeling. Second, the hardness changes during natural aging were measured as a function of aging time for a number of Al specimens that had been previously isothermally heat-treated to different hold temperatures in order to determine the natural aging kinetics. Finally, the simulated temperature profiles and the natural aging kinetics were correlated to predict the hardness profiles in the FSW plate. The predicted hardness variations are consistent with measured hardness profiles in that the location of minimum hardness moves away from the centerline as the aging time and/or heat input increases. The hardness variation was also related to the location of failure in cross-weld tensile samples.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of twin-wire arc sprayed Ni-Al composite coatings on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-xiao; Liu, Jing-shun; Zhang, Lun-yong; Sun, Jian-fei; Wang, Zhi-ping

    2014-05-01

    We have systematically studied the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ni-5wt%Al and Ni-20wt%Al composite coatings fabricated on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy sheet by twin-wire arc spraying under different experimental conditions. The abrasive wear behavior and interface diffusion behavior of the composite coatings were evaluated by dry/wet rubber wheel abrasive wear tests and heat treatment, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the composite coatings exhibit features of adhesive wear. Besides, the Vickers microhardness of NiAl and Ni3Al intermetallic compounds is relatively larger than that of the substrate, which is beneficial for enhancing the wear resistance. With the increase of annealing temperature and time, the interface diffusion area between the Ni-Al coating and the substrate gradually expands with the formation of NiAl3 and Ni2Al3 phases, and is controlled by diffusion of aluminum atoms. The grain growth exponent n of diffusion kinetics of the Ni-Al coating, calculated via a high-temperature diffusion model at 400, 480, and 550°C, is between 0.28 and 0.38. This satisfies the cubic law, which is consistent with the general theoretical relationship of high-temperature diffusion.

  9. The Young's modulus of 1018 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum measured from quasi-static to elastic precursor strain-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip; Trujillo, Carl; Gray, Rusty

    2009-06-01

    It is commonly assumed in engineering and physics that the elastic moduli of metals is independent of strain-rate, but is a weak function of temperature. An extensive literature search however has failed to find any citable reference in which the Young's modulus of any pedigreed metal was measured over a wide variety of strain-rates. To rectify this, samples of pedigreed 1018 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum have been tested at strain-rates from 10-4 s-1 to 10^6 s-1. Low strain-rate data (10-4-10-2 s-1)was obtained from commercial bonded strain gauges. Intermediate rate data ( 10-4 s-1) was obtained from time of flight ultrasonic measurements. Shock rate data was obtained by examining the elastic precursor using shock pins and PDV (photonic Doppler velocimetry). Correction for the adiabatic versus thermal nature of the disparate strain-rate regimes have been made. Additionally, the implications of the uniaxial strain nature of the shock elastic precursor are examined with respect to comparison with uniaxial stress lower rate data.

  10. Parametric studies on tensile strength in joining AA6061- T6 and AA7075-T6 by gas metal arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, M.; Noordin, N. F. M.; Shah, L. H.

    2015-12-01

    Proper selection of the welding parameters can result in better joining. In this study, the effects of various welding parameters on tensile strength in joining dissimilar aluminum alloys AA6061-T6 and AA7075-T6 were investigated. 2 mm thick samples of both base metals were welded by semi-automatic gas metal arc welding (GMAW) using filler wire ER5356. The welding current, arc voltage and welding speed were chosen as variables parameters. The strength of each specimen after the welding operations were tested and the effects of these parameters on tensile strength were identified by using Taguchi method. The range of parameter for welding current were chosen from 100 to 115 A, arc voltage from 17 to 20 V and welding speed from 2 to 5 mm/s. L16 orthogonal array was used to obtained 16 runs of experiments. It was found that the highest tensile strength (194.34 MPa) was obtained with the combination of a welding current of 115 A, welding voltage of 18 V and welding speed of 4 mm/s. Through analysis of variance (ANOVA), the welding voltage was the most effected parameter on tensile strength with percentage of contribution at 41.30%.

  11. Microscopic Observation of the Side Surface of Dynamically-Tensile-Fractured 6061-T6 and 2219-T87 Aluminum Alloys with Pre-Fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itabashi, Masaaki; Nakajima, Shigeru; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    After unexpected failure of metallic structure, microscopic investigation will be performed. Generally, such an investigation is limited to search striation pattern with a SEM (scanning electron microscope). But, when the cause of the failure was not severe repeated stress, this investigation is ineffective. In this paper, new microscopic observation technique is proposed to detect low cycle fatigue-impact tensile loading history. Al alloys, 6061-T6 and 2219-T87, were fractured in dynamic tension, after severe pre-fatigue. The side surface of the fractured specimens was observed with a SEM. Neighboring fractured surface, many opened cracks on the side surface have been generated. For each specimen, the number of the cracks was counted together with information of individual sizes and geometric features. For 6061-T6 alloy specimen with the pre-fatigue, the number of the cracks is greater than that for the specimen without the pre-fatigue. For 2219-T87 alloy, the same tendency can be found after a certain screening of the crack counting. Therefore, the crack counting technique may be useful to detect the existence of the pre-fatigue from the dynamically fractured specimen surface.

  12. In-situ Time-Resolved Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Microstructure Variations during Friction Stir Welding in a 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Wang, Xun-Li; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A; Clausen, B; Hubbard, Camden R

    2008-01-01

    The microstructure change is one of the most important research areas in the friction stir welding (FSW). However, direct observation of microstructure changes during FSW has been extremely challenging because many measurement techniques are inapplicable. Recently developed in-situ time-resolved neutron diffraction methodology, which drastically improves the temporal resolution of neutron diffraction, enables to observe the transient microstructure changes during FSW. We installed a portable FSW system in the Spectrometer for MAterials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and the FSW was made on 6.35mm-thickness 6061-T6 Al alloy plate. At the same time, the neutron beam was centered on the mid-plane of the Al plate at 8 mm from the tool center (underneath the tool shoulder) and the diffraction peak was continuously measured during welding. The peak broadening analysis has been performed using the Williamson-Hall Method. The result shows that the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10^15 m-2 duing FSW, which is the significant increse compared to the before (4.5 x 10^14 m-2) and after (4.0 x 10^14 m-2) the FSW. The quantitatively analysis of the grain structure can provide an insight to understand the transient variation of the microstructure during FSW.

  13. Evaluation of Dissimilar Welds of 5083-H12 and 6061-T6 Produced by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarpour, Morteza; Kolahgar, Sina; Dariani, Bijan Mollaei; Dehghani, Kamran

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, the dissimilar aluminum alloys of 5083-H12 and 6061-T6 were joined by friction stir welding (FSW). Then, the design of experiments (DOE), the Box-Benken method, and the response surface methodology (RSM) were used to optimize the effective parameters of the FSW process. The optimized parameters that led to the maximum tensile strength in dissimilar friction stir welded sheets were determined. The predicted results were then compared with those measured experimentally. The results show that there is good agreement between the predicted and measured amounts. By applying the limit dome height (LDH) test, the formability of friction stir welded sheets was studied. During the LDH test, the minimum formability occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of the 6061-T6 side. The results of microhardness and tensile tests confirm the results of the LDH tests.

  14. Quasi-steady state principle and in-situ real-time investigation of transient strains in 6061-T6 Al alloy using neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Brown, D. W.; Choo, Hahn; Clausen, B; David, Stan A; Feng, Zhili; Hubbard, Camden R; Wang, Xun-Li

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction research has been limited to the "static" behavior of materials since the number of collected neutrons is insufficient to reach the adequate neutron counts in rapid changes of material state. In order to achieve the desired precision for the study of the transient material behavior, we propose an in-situ neutron-diffraction measurement method based on the quasi-steady state (QSS) phenomenon. The QSS principle was applied for the measurement of transient lattice spacing changes in a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy plate during thermo-mechanical processing.

  15. Effects of select parameters on electron beam welding of AL6061-T6 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Thomas E.

    Electron beam welding was used for joining Al6061-T6, precision machined, cylindrical sections. The welded assembly exhibited a minimum amount of distortion, but a better understanding of the effects of several key welding parameters on the structural integrity of the weld was required. The contents of this document describe the relative importance and interaction between welding speed, volume of filler, and beam pattern on the microstructural and mechanical properties of the welded joint. Understanding of the relationship between welding parameters and weld properties was accomplished by macrophotography and microstructural examination, microhardness testing, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX), and mechanical tensile testing of weld coupons. The results of this study will help quantify the robustness of the EBW process for this common aerospace material and joint geometry and will help determine the impacts of process deviations on weld fidelity in the production environment.

  16. Effect of Fatigue Crack on Static Strength: 2014-T6, 2024-T4, 6061-T6, 7075-T6 Open-Hole Monobloc Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordmark, Glenn E.; Eaton, Ian D.

    1957-01-01

    Static tensile test results are presented for specimens of 2014-T6, 2024-T4, 6061-T6, and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy containing fatigue cracks. The results are found to be in good agreement with the results reported for similar tests from other sources. The results indicate that the presence of a fatigue crack reduced the static strength, in all cases, by an amount larger than the corresponding reduction in net area; the 6061-T6 alloy specimens were least susceptible to the crack and the 7075-T6 alloy specimens were most susceptible. It is indicated that a 7075-T6 specimen may develop as little as one-third of the expected static tensile strength when the fatigue crack was consumed only one-fourth of the original area. It was found that the static strength was substantially higher for specimens which had stop holes drilled at the end of the fatigue crack.

  17. Cavitation pitting and erosion of Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors are currently carrying out a study of the cavitation erosion of different bearing metals and alloys in mineral oils were studied. The variations of weight loss, the pit diameter and depth due to cavitation erosion on Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water are presented.

  18. Effects of Intermittent Versus Continuous Heating upon the Tensile Properties of 2024-T4, 6061-T6 and 7075-T6 Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickley, G. W.; Anerson, H. L.

    1956-01-01

    In some applications, aluminum alloys are subjected to intermittent heating at elevated temperature. It is generally considered that the effects of such intermittent heating are cumulative, and therefore are the same as if the heating had been continuous for the same total length of time. The object of these tests was to determine the effects of intermittent and continuous heating at 300 and 400 F, for total periods of 100 and 200 hr, upon the tensile properties of 2024-T4 and 6061-T6 alloy rolled-and-drawn rod and 7075-T6 alloy extrusions, at room temperature and at the temperature of heating.

  19. Near surface modification of aluminum alloy induced by laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saklakoglu, Nursen; Gencalp Irizalp, Simge; Akman, Erhan; Demir, Arif

    2014-12-01

    This paper investigates the influences of near surface modification induced in 6061-T6 aluminum alloy by laser shock processing (LSP). The present study evaluates LSP with a Q-switched Nd:YAG low power laser using water confinement medium and absorbent overlay on the workpiece. The near surface microstructural change of 6061-T6 alloy after LSP was studied. The residual stress variation throughout the depth of the workpiece was determined. The results showed an improvement of the material resistance to pit formation. This improvement may be attributed to compressive residual stress and work-hardening. The size and number of pits revealed by immersion in an NaOH-HCl solution decreased in comparison with the untreated material.

  20. Effect of Laser Shock Peening on surface properties and residual stress of Al6061-T6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimianrizi, A.; Foroozmehr, E.; Badrossamay, M.; Farrokhpour, H.

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Laser Shock Peening (LSP) on Al 6061-T6. The confined LSP regime using Nd: YAG laser with 1200 mJ of energy per pulse and 8 ns of pulse width were applied. The treated specimens were evaluated by means of surface integrity with optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope, microhardness, surface roughness and induced residual stress using an X-ray diffraction method. Results showed that by the use of LSP, compressive residual stress could effectively be induced on the surface of treated material. It was also revealed that the hardened depth of the material, up to a maximum depth of 1875 μm, could be achieved due to work hardening and grain refinement. In addition, surface roughness measurements showed that the LSP could deteriorate surface quality depending on the LSP parameters. The influences of beam overlap rates, number of laser shots and scanning pattern on microhardness as well as surface roughness are discussed.

  1. Structure/property relations of aluminum under varying rates and stress states

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Matthew T; Horstemeyer, Mark F; Whittington, Wilburn R; Solanki, Kiran N

    2010-11-19

    In this work we analyze the plasticity, damage, and fracture characteristics of three different processed aluminum alloys (rolled 5083-H13, cast A356-T6, and extruded 6061-T6) under varying stress states (tension, compression, and torsion) and strain rates (0.001/, 1/s., and 1000/s). The stress state difference had more of a flow stress effect than the applied strain rates for those given in this study (0.001/sec up to 1000/sec). The stress state and strain rate also had a profound effect on the damage evolution of each aluminum alloy. Tension and torsional straining gave much greater damage nucleation rates than compression. Although the damage of all three alloys was found to be void nucleation dominated, the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys incurred void damage via micron scale particles where the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy incurred void damage from two scales, micron-scale particles and nanoscale precipitates. Having two length scales of particles that participated in the damage evolution made the 6061-T6 incur a strain rate sensitive damage rate that was different than the other two aluminum alloys. Under tension, as the strain rate increased, the 6061-T6 aluminum alloy's void nucleation rate decreased, but the A356-T6 and 5083-H131 aluminum alloys void nucleation rate increased.

  2. Structural-phase changes in Al6061-T6 alloy during high-dose N-2(+) implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukieh, M.

    2004-02-01

    N 2 + nitrogen ions with an energy of 50 keV were implanted into Al6061-T6 alloy with high dose (10(16) - 2 x 10(17) ions/cm(2)) at room temperature in order to form thin aluminium nitride (AlN) layers. The structural-phase changes in implanted Al 6061-T6 alloy were investigated using Rutherford back-scattering and transmission electron microscopic techniques. The results indicate that nitrogen implantation led to the formation of nitride phases (AlN, Al7N C-3(3)) which improved the surface hardness by 80% and increased the electrical resistance up to 1800% at maximum dose (2 x 10(17) ions/cm(2)).

  3. Effects of aging treatment and heat input on the microstructures and mechanical properties of TIG-welded 6061-T6 alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong; Shen, Jun; Tang, Qin; Wu, Cui-ping; Zhou, Yan-bing

    2013-03-01

    Aging treatment and various heat input conditions were adopted to investigate the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of TIG welded 6061-T6 alloy joints by microstructural observations, microhardness tests, and tensile tests. With an increase in heat input, the width of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) increases and grains in the fusion zone (FZ) coarsen. Moreover, the hardness of the HAZ decreases, whereas that of the FZ decreases initially and then increases with an increase in heat input. Low heat input results in the low ultimate tensile strength of the welded joints due to the presence of partial penetrations and pores in the welded joints. After a simple artificial aging treatment at 175°C for 8 h, the microstructure of the welded joints changes slightly. The mechanical properties of the welded joints enhance significantly after the aging process as few precipitates distribute in the welded seam.

  4. A study on ultra-precision machining technique for Al6061-T6 to fabricate space infrared optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Geun-man; Lee, Gil-jae; Hyun, Sang-won; Sung, Ha-yeong; Chung, Euisik; Kim, Geon-hee

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, analysis of variance on designed experiments with full factorial design was applied to determine the optimized machining parameters for ultra-precision fabrication of the secondary aspheric mirror, which is one of the key elements of the space cryogenic infrared optics. A single point diamond turning machine (SPDTM, Nanotech 4μpL Moore) was adopted to fabricate the material, AL6061-T6, and the three machining parameters of cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut were selected. With several randomly assigned experimental conditions, surface roughness of each condition was measured by a non-contact optical profiler (NT2000; Vecco). As a result of analysis using Minitab, the optimum cutting condition was determined as following; cutting speed: 122 m/min, feed rate: 3 mm/min and depth of cut: 1 μm. Finally, a 120 mm diameter aspheric secondary mirror was attached to a particularly designed jig by using mixture of paraffin and wax and successfully fabricated under the optimum machining parameters. The profile of machined surface was measured by a high-accuracy 3-D profilometer(UA3P; Panasonic) and we obtained the geometrical errors of 30.6 nm(RMS) and 262.4 nm(PV), which satisfy the requirements of the space cryogenic infrared optics.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum-Based Dissimilar Alloy Joints by Power Beams, Arc and FSW Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Michinori; Kon, Tomokuni; Abe, Nobuyuki

    Dissimilar smart joints are useful. In this research, welded quality of dissimilar aluminum alloys of 3 mm thickness by various welding processes and process parameters have been investigated by hardness and tensile tests, and observation of imperfection and microstructure. Base metals used in this study are A1050-H24, A2017-T3, A5083-O, A6061-T6 and A7075-T651. Welding processes used are YAG laser beam, electron beam, metal inert gas arc, tungsten inert gas arc and friction stir welding. The properties of weld zones are affected by welding processes, welding parameters and combination of base metals. Properties of high strength aluminum alloy joints are improved by friction stir welding.

  6. The effects of maintaining temperature in annealing heat treatment for an FSWed 6061-T6 Al alloy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Han, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2013-08-01

    The technological development of all kinds of lightweight transportation devices including vehicles, aircraft, ships, etc. has progressed markedly with the demand for energy saving and environmental protection. Aluminum alloy is in the spotlight as it is a suitable environmentally friendly material. However, deformation is a major problem during the welding process because aluminum alloy has a large thermal expansion coefficient. In addition, it is known that its corrosion resistance is excellent; nevertheless, in practice, considerable corrosion is generated and this is a major problem. To solve this problem, the friction stir welding (FSW) technology is applied extensively at various industrial fields as a new welding technique. This method involves a process in which materials are joined by frictional heat and physical force. Therefore, we evaluated improvements in mechanical properties and corrosion resistance through annealing heat treatment after FSW. The electrochemical experiment did not show a significant difference. However, the microstructure observation showed defectless, fine crystal particles, indicating excellent properties at 200-225°C. PMID:23920178

  7. Aluminum alloy welding and stress-corrosion testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.G.; Jimenez, E.

    1981-04-01

    The weldability, strength, and corrosion resistance of four 5XXX aluminum alloys electron beam welded to 6061-T6 aluminum alloy without a filler metal were evaluated. Adding filler metal raises weld energy requirements and makes the process more difficult to control. In this study, instead of using a filler metal, a high-magnesium 5XXX alloy was welded to the 6061 alloy. The four 5XXX alloys used (5456-H321, 5052-H34, 5086-H323, and 5083-H32) were selected for their high magnesium content which reduces weld crack sensitivity.

  8. Effect of an absorbent overlay on the residual stress field induced by laser shock processing on aluminum samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-González, C.; Gomez-Rosas, G.; Ocaña, J. L.; Molpeceres, C.; Banderas, A.; Porro, J.; Morales, M.

    2006-07-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) or laser shock peening is a new technique for strengthening metals. This process induces a compressive residual stress field, which increases fatigue crack initiation life and reduces fatigue crack growth rate. Specimens of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy are used in this investigation. A convergent lens is used to deliver 2.5 J, 8 ns laser pulses by a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser, operating at 10 Hz. The pulses are focused to a diameter of 1.5 mm onto aluminum samples. Density of 2500 pulses/cm 2 with infrared (1064 nm) radiation was used. The effect of an absorbent overlay on the residual stress field using this LSP setup and this energy level is evaluated. Residual stress distribution as a function of depth is assessed by the hole drilling method. It is observed that the overlay makes the compressive residual stress profile move to the surface. This effect is explained on the basis of the vaporization of the coat layer suppressing thermal effects on the metallic substrate. The effect of coating the specimen surface before LSP treatment may have advantages on improving wear and contact fatigue properties of this aluminum alloy.

  9. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  10. An ultra-low surface finish process for 6061-Al mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamboldt, Leonard; Roy, Brian; Crifasi, Joseph; Stephens, Shane; Hanninen, Derek; Woodard, Kenneth; Felock, Robert; Cunha-Vasconcelos, Sofia; Polczwartek, Stephen; Parenteau, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    An ultra-low surface finishing process for 6061 T6 type aluminum has been developed by Corning Incorporated, Specialty Materials Division, and has been successfully applied to mirrors up to 13 inches in diameter. This paper presents finish and figure data achieved from the mirror finishing process. Mirror stability is demonstrated through Pre and post thermal cycle surface figure measurements; temperature range of cycle -55°C to +70°C. As an added benefit, the process enables the use of deterministic finishing and enhances the reflective optics resistance to corrosion. Survivability of the reflective optic is evaluated through extended humidity testing.

  11. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flumerfelt, Joel Fredrick

    In recent years, the aluminum powder industry has expanded into non-aerospace applications. However, the alumina and aluminum hydroxide in the surface oxide film on aluminum powder require high cost powder processing routes. A driving force for this research is to broaden the knowledge base about aluminum powder metallurgy to provide ideas for fabricating low cost aluminum powder components. The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization commercial inert gas atomization and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). The commercial atomization methods are bench marks of current aluminum powder technology. The GARS process is a laboratory scale inert gas atomization facility. A benefit of using pure aluminum powders is an unambiguous interpretation of the results without considering the effects of alloy elements. A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a

  12. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  13. The aluminum smelting process.

    PubMed

    Kvande, Halvor

    2014-05-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  14. The Aluminum Smelting Process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This introduction to the industrial primary aluminum production process presents a short description of the electrolytic reduction technology, the history of aluminum, and the importance of this metal and its production process to modern society. Aluminum's special qualities have enabled advances in technologies coupled with energy and cost savings. Aircraft capabilities have been greatly enhanced, and increases in size and capacity are made possible by advances in aluminum technology. The metal's flexibility for shaping and extruding has led to architectural advances in energy-saving building construction. The high strength-to-weight ratio has meant a substantial reduction in energy consumption for trucks and other vehicles. The aluminum industry is therefore a pivotal one for ecological sustainability and strategic for technological development. PMID:24806722

  15. Tests Of Polyurethane And Dichromate Coats On Aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine relative effectiveness of new polyurethane and more-conventional dichromate coat in helping to retard corrosion of anodized 6061-T6 aluminum. Concludes by suggesting greater protection against corrosion achieved by combining polyurethane-sealing method with hard-anodizing method and by increasing thickness of coat.

  16. Tribological Properties of Aluminum Alloy treated by Fine Particle Peening/DLC Hybrid Surface Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Y.; Nanbu, H.; Kameyama, Y.; Komotori, J.

    2010-06-01

    In order to improve the adhesiveness of the DLC coating, Fine Particle Peening (FPP) treatment was employed as pre-treatment of the DLC coating process. FPP treatment was performed using SiC shot particles, and then AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy was DLC-coated. A SiC-rich layer was formed around the surface of the aluminum alloy by the FPP treatment because small chips of shot particles were embedded into the substrate surface. Reciprocating sliding tests were conducted to measure the friction coefficients. While the DLC coated specimen without FPP treatment showed a sudden increase in friction coefficient at the early stage of the wear cycles, the FPP/DLC hybrid treated specimen maintained a low friction coefficient value during the test period. Further investigation revealed that the tribological properties of the substrate after the DLC coating were improved with an increase in the amount of Si at the surface.

  17. The corrosion protection of several aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion protection afforded 7075-T6, 7075-T3, 6061-T6, and 2024-T3 aluminum alloys by chromic acid and sulfuric acid anodizing was examined using electrochemical techniques. From these studies, it is concluded that sulfuric acid anodizing provides superior corrosion protection compared to chromic acid anodizing.

  18. PROCESS FOR REMOVING ALUMINUM COATINGS

    DOEpatents

    Flox, J.

    1959-07-01

    A process is presented for removing aluminum jackets or cans from uranium slugs. This is accomplished by immersing the aluminum coated uranium slugs in an aqueous solution of 9 to 20% sodium hydroxide and 35 to 12% sodium nitrate to selectively dissolve the aluminum coating, the amount of solution being such as to obtain a molar ratio of sodium hydroxide to aluminum of at least

  19. Initial Subdivision of Genesis Early Science Polished Aluminum Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.; Meshik, A.; See, T. H.; Bastien, R.

    2005-01-01

    A large surface, about 245 square centimeters, of highly polished aluminum 6061 T6 alloy was attached to the science canister thermal panel for the purpose of collecting solar wind noble gases. The analysis of this collector will be part of the Genesis Early Science results. The pre-launch configuration of the collector is shown. The collector sustained some damage during the recovery impact in Utah, September 8, 2004.

  20. Evaluation of Johnson-Cook model constants for aluminum based particulate metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfi, H.; Brar, N. S.

    1996-05-01

    High strain rate and high temperature response of three types of aluminum based particulate metal matrix ceramic composites is investigated by performing split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. The composites are: NGP-2014 (15% SiC), NGT-6061 (15% SiC), and NGU-6061 (15% Al2O3), in which all the reinforcement materials are percentage by volume. Johnson-Cook constitutive model constants are evaluated from the high strain rate/high temperature data and implemented in a two dimensional finite element computer code (EPIC-2D) to simulate the penetration of an ogive nose tungsten projectile (23 grams) at a velocity 1.17 km/sec into the base 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and the composite NGU-6061. The simulated penetrations in the composite and in 6061-T6 aluminum agree with in 2%, in both materials, with the measured values.

  1. Joining of Cast ZE41A Mg to Wrought 6061 Al by the Cold Spray Process and Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, Victor Kenneth; West, Michael K.; Reza Rokni, M.; Curtis, Todd; Champagne, Victor; McNally, Baillie

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for joining cast ZE41A-T5 Mg to wrought 6061-T6 Al, without forming deleterious, coarse intermetallic compounds, which is not currently possible with conventional technologies. The novel aspect of the process includes the development of a joint design using cold spray (CS) as the enabling technology, to produce a transitional layer onto which a conventional welding technique can be employed to join the two dissimilar materials. The emphasis in this study will be on the CS transitional layer (T-layer) which enables the joining of cast ZE41A-T5 magnesium (Mg) and wrought 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) by friction-stir welding and the subsequent materials characterization to show the structural integrity of the entire joint. In order to join Mg and Al plates by this method, a transitional layer of CS Al is first deposited along the edge of cast ZE41A Mg plate. The CS Al T-layer enables the Mg to be friction stir welded to a plate of wrought 6061 Al, thereby completing the Mg plate to Al plate joint. Friction stir welding was chosen in this study to join the CS Al T-layer to the wrought Al plate; however, other conventional welding techniques could also be employed for joining Mg to Al in this manner. The CS Al T-layer is compatible to the wrought 6061 Al plate and serves as an insulating layer that prevents heat generated during the friction stir welding process from extending into the magnesium, thus preventing the formation of intermetallics. In this study, two sets of samples were produced joining cast ZE41A-T5 magnesium (Mg) and wrought 6061-T6 aluminum: one set using CS 6061 Al as the transition material between the ZE41A Mg plate and 6061 Al plate and the other set using CS 5056 Al as the transition material. Microstructural analysis by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy, along with mechanical test results including triple lug shear, tension, and micro hardness will be presented. Comparisons will be

  2. Galvanic corrosion of aluminum-matrix composites. Technical report No. 2, 1 Mar-31 Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Hihara, L.H.; Latanision, R.M.

    1991-02-01

    Galvanic-corrosion rates of Al-matrix composites were high in aerated chloride-containing solutions. Oxygen reduction was found to be the primary cathodic reaction. Aluminum corroded by pitting. The type of noble constituent (i.e., graphite, SiC, or TiB{sub 2}) also affected galvanic-corrosion rates. For example, results indicated that the galvanic-corrosion rate of Al should be about 30 times greater when coupled to graphite than when coupled to SiC or TiB{sub 2}. In dearated solutions, galvanic corrosion was negligible even if chlorides were present. The galvanic-corrosion rates were determined using the zero-resistance ammeter technique and from potentiodynamic polarization diagrams of ultrapure Al, 6061-T6 Al, graphite fiber, SiC, TiB2, and a commercial graphite fiber/6061-T6 Al metal-matrix composite.

  3. Manufacturing of an aluminum alloy mold for micro-hot embossing of polymeric micro-devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, N. K.; Lam, Y. C.; Yue, C. Y.; Tan, M. J.

    2010-05-01

    In micro-hot embossing of polymeric micro-devices, e.g. microfluidic devices, the quality of the mold plays an important role in determining not only the product quality but also the overall production cost. Often the mold is made of silicon, which is brittle and fails after producing a limited number of parts. Metallic molds produced by micro-machining have a much longer life; however, the surface finish of the mold is not ideal for producing polymeric devices that require good surface finish. The metallic glass mold produced by micro-hot embossing with a silicon master is a recent development, which could produce high quality and high strength molds with long life span. However, metallic glasses are rather costly. In an attempt to reduce the production cost of the mold with acceptable quality, strength and life span, we explore here the manufacture of an aluminum alloy (AA6061-T6) mold by hot embossing using a silicon master. Using a set of channels to be produced on the aluminum alloy as the benchmark, we examine the orientation effect of the channels on the AA6061-T6 mold produced by hot embossing. Finally, to examine the effectiveness of the AA6061-T6 mold, it is employed for the hot embossing of polymeric (TOPAS 8007) substrates.

  4. Characterization of an Effective Cleaning Procedure for Aluminum Alloys: Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Zeta Potential Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Shen, T H; Esposito, A P; Tillotson, T M

    2004-06-02

    We have developed a cleaning procedure for aluminum alloys for effective minimization of surface-adsorbed sub-micron particles and non-volatile residue. The procedure consists of a phosphoric acid etch followed by an alkaline detergent wash. To better understand the mechanism whereby this procedure reduces surface contaminants, we characterized the aluminum surface as a function of cleaning step using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). SERS indicates that phosphoric acid etching re-establishes a surface oxide of different characteristics, including deposition of phosphate and increased hydration, while the subsequent alkaline detergent wash appears to remove the phosphate and modify the new surface oxide, possibly leading to a more compact surface oxide. We also studied the zeta potential of <5 micron pure aluminum and aluminum alloy 6061-T6 particles to determine how surface electrostatics may be affected during the cleaning process. The particles show a decrease in the magnitude of their zeta potential in the presence of detergent, and this effect is most pronounced for particles that have been etched with phosphoric acid. This reduction in magnitude of the surface attractive potential is in agreement with our observation that the phosphoric acid etch followed by detergent wash results in a decrease in surface-adsorbed sub-micron particulates.

  5. Process for anodizing aluminum foil

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.A.; Scott, J.W.

    1984-11-06

    In an integrated process for the anodization of aluminum foil for electrolytic capacitors including the formation of a hydrous oxide layer on the foil prior to anodization and stabilization of the foil in alkaline borax baths during anodization, the foil is electrochemically anodized in an aqueous solution of boric acid and 2 to 50 ppm phosphate having a pH of 4.0 to 6.0. The anodization is interrupted for stabilization by passing the foil through a bath containing the borax solution having a pH of 8.5 to 9.5 and a temperature above 80/sup 0/ C. and then reanodizing the foil. The process is useful in anodizing foil to a voltage of up to 760 V.

  6. PROCESS OF ELECTROPLATING METALS WITH ALUMINUM

    DOEpatents

    Schickner, W.C.

    1960-04-26

    A process of electroplating aluminum on metals from a nonaqueous bath and a novel method of pretreating or conditioning the metal prior to electrodeposition of the aluminum are given. The process of this invention, as applied by way of example to the plating of uranium, comprises the steps of plating the uranium with the barrier inetal, immersing the barrier-coated uranium in fatty acid, and electrolyzing a water-free diethyl ether solution of aluminum chloride and lithium hydride while making the uranium the cathode until an aluminum deposit of the desired thickness has been formed. According to another preferred embodiment the barrier-coated uranium is immersed in an isopropyl alcohol solution of sterato chromic chloride prior to the fatty acid treatment of this invention.

  7. Impact Welding of Aluminum to Copper and Stainless Steel by Vaporizing Foil Actuator: Effect of Heat Treatment Cycles on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, Anupam; Hansen, Steven; Benzing, Jake; He, Mei; Daehn, Glenn

    2015-10-01

    This work studies the mechanical property effect of microstructure on impact welds of aluminum alloy AA6061 with both copper alloy Cu 110 and stainless steel AISI 304. AA6061-T6 and T4 temper aluminum sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched toward copper and stainless steel targets using the vaporizing foil actuator technique. Flyer plate velocities, measured via photonic Doppler velocimetry, were observed to be approximately 800 m/s. The welded aluminum-copper samples were subjected to instrumented peel testing, microhardness testing, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The welded joints exhibited cracks through their continuous intermetallic layers. The cracks were impeded upon encountering a ductile metallic wave. The welds created with T6 temper flyer sheets were found to have smaller intermetallic-free and wavy interface regions as compared to those created with T4 temper flyer sheets. Peel strength tests of the two weld combinations resulted in failure along the interface in the case of the T6 flyer welds, while the failure generally occurred in the parent aluminum for the T4 temper flyer welds. Half of the T4 flyer welds were subjected to aging for 18 h at 433 K (160 °C) to convert the aluminum sheet to the T6 condition. Although the aged flyer material did not attain the hardness of the as-received T6 material, it was found to be significantly stronger than the T4 material. These welds retained their strength after the aging process, and diffusion across the interface was minimal. The welded aluminum-stainless steel samples were analyzed on a more basic level than aluminum-copper samples, but were found to exhibit similar results.

  8. NEUTRON DIFFRACTION MEASUREMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN FRICTION STIR PROCESSED NANOCOMPOSITE SURFACE LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hanbing; Hubbard, Camden R; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Feng, Zhili; Qu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was successfully used to stir and mix nano-sized Al2O3 particles into a Al6061-T6 aluminum plate to form a nanocomposite layer up to 3 mm thick. This nanocomposite surface has demonstrated significantly improved surface hardness, yield strength, and wear-resistance without sacrificing the substrate ductility and conductivity. Neutron diffraction analysis was conducted to determine the residual stress distribution in the nanocomposite surface layer. For comparison, the residual stress of the aluminum surface that was processed similarly but had no particle involved was also measured. Results showed that the macro-level residual stresses in the FSP zone without particles are low due to the annealing effect induced by the long heating time and large heat input. The macro-level residual stresses in the FSP-processed Al-Al2O3 nanocomposite zone are tensile up to 100 MPa in all three directions. The details of the results will be further discussed in the paper.

  9. Process simulation of aluminum reduction cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tabsh, I.; Dupuis, M.; Gomes, A.

    1996-10-01

    A program was developed to model the dynamic behavior of an aluminum reduction cell. The program simulates the physical process by solving the heat and mass balance equations that characterize the behavior of eleven chemical species in the system. It also models operational events (such as metal tapping, anode change, etc.) and the process control logic including various alumina feeding policies and anode effect quenching. The program is a PC based Windows{reg_sign} application that takes full advantage of the Windows user interface. This paper describes the implementation of the process model and the control logic. Various results using the simulation are compared to measured data.

  10. Anodization process produces opaque, reflective coatings on aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Opaque, reflective coatings are produced on aluminum articles by an anodizing process wherein the anodizing bath contains an aqueous dispersion of finely divided insoluble inorganic compounds. These particles appear as uniformly distributed occlusions in the anodic deposit on the aluminum.

  11. Processing of boron carbide-aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, D.C. ); Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Snowden, W.E. )

    1989-05-01

    The processing problems associated with boron carbide and the limitations of its mechanical properties can be significantly reduced when a metal phase (e.g., aluminum) is added. Lower densification temperatures and higher fracture toughness will result. Based on fundamental capillarity thermodynamics, reaction thermodynamics, and densification kinetics, we have established reliable criteria for fabricating B{sub 4}C-Al particulate composites. Because chemical reactions cannot be eliminated, it is necessary to process B{sub 4}C-Al by rapidly heating to near 1200{degrees} C (to ensure wetting) and subsequently heat-treating below 1200{degrees} C (for microstructural development).

  12. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-03-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  13. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  14. Internal Heterogeneous Processes in Aluminum Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, E. L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the aluminum particle combustion mechanism which has been expanded by inclusion of gas dissolution processes and ensuing internal phase transformations. This mechanism is proposed based on recent normal and microgravity experiments with particles formed and ignited in a pulsed micro-arc. Recent experimental findings on the three stages observed in Al particle combustion in air and shows the burning particle radiation, trajectory (streak), smoke cloud shapes, and quenched particle interiors are summarized. During stage I, the radiation trace is smooth and the particle flame is spherically symmetric. The temperature measured using a three-color pyrometer is close to 3000 K. Because it exceeds the aluminum boiling point (2730 K), this temperature most likely characterizes the vapor phase flame zone rather than the aluminum surface. The dissolved oxygen content within particles quenched during stage I was below the detection sensitivity (about 1 atomic %) for Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS). After an increase in the radiation intensity (and simultaneous decrease in the measured color temperature from about 3000 to 2800 K) indicative of the transition to stage II combustion, the internal compositions of the quenched particles change. Both oxygen-rich (approx. 10 atomic %) and oxygen-lean (< 1 %) regions are identified within the particles using back-scattered electron imaging and WDS. During stage II, oscillations are observed in particle radiation and the flame and smoke cloud are distorted from their original spherically-symmetric shape. In stage III, particle radiation continues to exhibit oscillations, but its radiation intensity drops and remains at a nearly constant level. The measured temperature decreases to about 2300 K. Also, larger changes in particle velocities are observed, and oxide caps are found on quenched particle surfaces. While these results showed the correlation between the aluminum particle combustion behavior and the

  15. Tool design in friction stir processing: dynamic forces and material flow

    SciTech Connect

    D. E. Clark; K. S. Miller; C. R. Tolle

    2006-08-01

    Friction stir processing involves severe plastic flow within the material; the nature of this flow determines the final morphology of the weld, the resulting microstructures, and the presence or absence of defects such as internal cavities or "wormholes." The forces causing this plastic flow are a function of process parameters, including spindle speed, travel speed, and tool design and angle. Some of these forces are directly applied or a result of the mechanical constraints and compliance of the apparatus, while others are resolved forces resulting from an interaction of these applied forces and tool forces governed by processing parameters, and can be diminished or even reversed in sign with appropriate choices of process parameters. The present investigation is concerned mostly with the friction stir processing of 6061-T6 aluminum plates in a low-cost apparatus built from a commercial milling machine. A rotating dynamometer allows in-process measurement of actual spindle speed, torque, and forces in the x-, y-, and z-directions, as well as force control on these axes. Two main types of tool, both unthreaded, were used. The first had a pin about 4 mm in diameter and 4 mm in length, with a shoulder about 10 mm in diameter, and produced wormhole defects; the second, with a tapered pin about 5 mm long, a base diameter of about 6 mm, a tip diameter of about 4 mm, and a shoulder diameter (flat or dished) of about 19 mm, produced sound welds over a wide range of parameters.

  16. Decarbonization process for carbothermically produced aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Bruno, Marshall J.; Carkin, Gerald E.; DeYoung, David H.; Dunlap, Sr., Ronald M.

    2015-06-30

    A method of recovering aluminum is provided. An alloy melt having Al.sub.4C.sub.3 and aluminum is provided. This mixture is cooled and then a sufficient amount of a finely dispersed gas is added to the alloy melt at a temperature of about 700.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. The aluminum recovered is a decarbonized carbothermically produced aluminum where the step of adding a sufficient amount of the finely dispersed gas effects separation of the aluminum from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates by flotation, resulting in two phases with the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates being the upper layer and the decarbonized aluminum being the lower layer. The aluminum is then recovered from the Al.sub.4C.sub.3 precipitates through decanting.

  17. Application of Laser Shock Processing System by Underwater Irradiation (1064 nm) in Metal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Rosas, G.; Rubio-González, C.; Ocaña, J. L.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Casillas, F. J.; Mora-Gonzalez, M.; Peña-Lecona, F. G.

    2008-04-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) is a technique for strengthening metals. This process induces a compressive residual stress field which increases fatigue crack initiation life, reduces fatigue crack growth rate and increases wear resistance of metals. We present a configuration and results in the LSP concept for metal surfaces treatments in underwater layer with constant thickness using laser irradiation at 1064 nm. A convergent lens is used to deliver 2, 5 J/cm2 in a 8 ns laser FWHM pulse produced by a Q-switch Nd:YAG Laser. Experimental results using a pulse density of 5 000 pulses/cm2 and spots of 0, 8 mm to 1, 5 mm in diameter on AISI 1040 steel surfaces, Ti6A14V surfaces, 304 Stainless Steel surface and 6061-T6 Aluminum surfaces are presented. A compressive residual stress distribution as a function of depth is assessed by the hole drilling method. High level compressive residual stresses are produced using a 1064 nm wavelength. This method can be applied for surface treatment of final metal products.

  18. Ductile fracture processes in 7075 aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    You, C.P. ); Thompson, A.W. ); Bernstein, I.M. )

    1995-02-01

    The ductile fracture of 7075 aluminum was examined as a function of aging condition, from underaged to overaged. Notched specimens allowed the triaxiality of stress to be varied. Increasing triaxiality, which was due to increasing notch acuity, decreased ductility and increased nucleation of voids, in accord with expectations from ductile fracture models. Overaged material, which is generally resistant to environmental damage, was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement even with high triaxiality, but void sizes were increased by hydrogen. That increase suggested that void growth rates may be assisted by hydrogen in overaged 7075 aluminum.

  19. Aluminum foam, ALPORAS: The production process, properties and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, T.; Itoh, M.; Akiyama, S.; Kitahara, A.

    1998-12-31

    The production of foamed aluminum has long been considered difficult to realize because of such problems as the low foamability of molten metal, the varying size of cellular structures, solidification shrinkage and so on. Recently these problems have been solved by a number of researchers and some manufacturers produce foamed aluminum by their own methods. The authors have been employing a batch casting process and manufacturing foamed aluminum under the tradename ALPORAS{reg_sign} since 1986. This paper presents the manufacturing process, physical properties and some typical applications of ALPORAS.

  20. New Process for Grain Refinement of Aluminum. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Joseph A. Megy

    2000-09-22

    A new method of grain refining aluminum involving in-situ formation of boride nuclei in molten aluminum just prior to casting has been developed in the subject DOE program over the last thirty months by a team consisting of JDC, Inc., Alcoa Technical Center, GRAS, Inc., Touchstone Labs, and GKS Engineering Services. The Manufacturing process to make boron trichloride for grain refining is much simpler than preparing conventional grain refiners, with attendant environmental, capital, and energy savings. The manufacture of boride grain refining nuclei using the fy-Gem process avoids clusters, salt and oxide inclusions that cause quality problems in aluminum today.

  1. Extreme ultraviolet reflection efficiencies of diamond-turned aluminum, polished nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces. [for telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malina, R. F.; Cash, W.

    1978-01-01

    Measured reflection efficiencies are presented for flat samples of diamond-turned aluminum, nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces fabricated by techniques suited for EUV telescopes. The aluminum samples were 6.2-cm-diameter disks of 6061-T6, the electroless nickel samples were formed by plating beryllium disks with 7.5-microns of Kanigen. Gold samples were produced by coating the aluminum and nickel samples with 5 strips of evaporated gold. Reflection efficiencies are given for grazing angles in the 5-75 degree range. The results indicate that for wavelengths over about 100 A, the gold-coated nickel samples yield highest efficiencies. For shorter wavelengths, the nickel samples yield better efficiencies. 500 A is found to be the optimal gold thickness.

  2. Microstructural and Hardness Study of Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Surface Alloyed Aluminum with Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad; Soltani, Reza; Heydarzadeh Sohi, Mahmoud; Valefi, Zia

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the feasibility of the formation of surface layers containing hard iron aluminides on AA6061-T6 aluminum via pre-plasma spraying with iron and subsequently double surface melting by pulsed Nd:YAG laser is studied. The effects of single and double laser surface melting on microstructure, phase formation, and hardness of the treated layers are examined. Single-step laser treatment resulted in the presence of undissolved iron particles surrounded by lump-like Al5Fe2 and needle-like Al3Fe intermetallic compounds. Double laser surface melting dissolved the retained undissolved irons and resulted in the formation of Al-Al3Fe eutectic structure. Microhardness profiles along cross section and top surface of the treated layers indicated that laser surface alloying with iron enhanced the hardness of the aluminum to more than twice of that of the base material.

  3. Process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics and material

    DOEpatents

    Moorhead, Arthur J.; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2000-01-01

    A process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics is provided. A gaseous atmosphere consisting essentially of silicon monoxide gas is formed by exposing a source of silicon to an atmosphere consisting essentially of hydrogen and a sufficient amount of water vapor. The aluminum based ceramic is exposed to the gaseous silicon monoxide atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to produce a continuous, stable silicon-containing film on the surface of the aluminum based ceramic that increases the strength of the ceramic.

  4. Study on the Inter-electrode Process of Aluminum Electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Youjian; Gao, Bingliang; Wang, Zhaowen; Shi, Zhongning; Hu, Xianwei

    2016-02-01

    The voltage distribution between carbon anode and aluminum cathode in cryolite electrolyte saturated with alumina was determined using a scanning reference electrode to investigate the inter-electrode process during aluminum electrolysis. The results showed that the anode-cathode-distance (ACD) is consisted of three parts: a relatively stable cathode boundary layer, bubble-free electrolyte layer, and gas-liquid layer near the anode. The aluminum diffusion layer with high electronic conductivity as well as the crystallization of cryolite was observed at the cathode boundary layer. The thickness of the aluminum diffusion layer varied with current density, which further determined the critical ACD. The thickness, coverage, and releasing frequency of the bubbles on both laboratory and industrial prebaked cells were derived, and it is found that the average bubble coverage decreases with current density, and the average coverage at 0.8 A cm-2 is approximately 50 pct.

  5. Friction stir welding process to repair voids in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Charles D. (Inventor); Litwinski, Edward (Inventor); Valdez, Juan M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides an in-process method to repair voids in an aluminum alloy, particularly a friction stir weld in an aluminum alloy. For repairing a circular void or an in-process exit hole in a weld, the method includes the steps of fabricating filler material of the same composition or compatible with the parent material into a plug form to be fitted into the void, positioning the plug in the void, and friction stir welding over and through the plug. For repairing a longitudinal void (30), the method includes machining the void area to provide a trough (34) that subsumes the void, fabricating filler metal into a strip form (36) to be fitted into the trough, positioning the strip in the trough, and rewelding the void area by traversing a friction stir welding tool longitudinally through the strip. The method is also applicable for repairing welds made by a fusing welding process or voids in aluminum alloy workpieces themselves.

  6. The Aluminum Smelting Process and Innovative Alternative Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Drabløs, Per Arne

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The industrial aluminum production process is addressed. The purpose is to give a short but comprehensive description of the electrolysis cell technology, the raw materials used, and the health and safety relevance of the process. Methods: This article is based on a study of the extensive chemical and medical literature on primary aluminum production. Results: At present, there are two main technological challenges for the process—to reduce energy consumption and to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. A future step may be carbon dioxide gas capture and sequestration related to the electric power generation from fossil sources. Conclusions: Workers' health and safety have now become an integrated part of the aluminum business. Work-related injuries and illnesses are preventable, and the ultimate goal to eliminate accidents with lost-time injuries may hopefully be approached in the future. PMID:24806723

  7. The development of an aluminum toroidal shell-type impact limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, R.M.; Wilson, W.K.; Nair, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The impact limiters on a Type B transportation cask are designed to absorb the impact energy for the 9-meter (30 foot) drop accident conditions without bottoming out in order to limit deceleration loadings on the cask. Toroidal shell-type impact limiters made from stainless steel have been investigated in the past for transportation cask service in Japan (Y. Sugita and S. Mochizuki) and by the General Electric Company (R.J. Pomares, et al.). These designs were relatively heavy and quite rigid causing high deceleration loads on the cask. This paper presents the results of an investigation to determine the feasibility of an aluminum Alloy 6061-T6 toroidal shell impact limiter for a Legal Weight Truck (LWT) cask being developed by the Westinghouse Corporation for the United States Department of Energy. The incentives for the study were the potential advantages such as a compact configuration, lightweight, durability, and essentially maintenance-free operation. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Material failure and inertial instabilities in a shocked imploded cylindrical aluminum sample

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, E.A.; Egan, P.; Stokes, J.

    1998-12-31

    The authors have used the LANL Pegasus Z-pinch facility to drive a thin cylindrically-convergent Al liner to {approximately}3 km/s to launch {approximately}30 GPa shocks in a 3-mm thick 10-mm-i.d. aluminum cylinder whose interior is filled with 1 atm Xe gas. The subsequent material motion of the metal and gas is diagnosed with both radial and axial flash x-rays and with optical framing cameras. Instabilities are seeded by implanting wires of assorted higher density metal parallel to the cylinder axis. The authors have done two shots, varying the target from Al 1100-O to Al 6061-T6 to explore the effect of changing material strength. The images show the spallation failure of the metal-gas interface on shock release and the effect of the seeded instabilities.

  9. Cavitation Erosion of Copper, Brass, Aluminum and Titanium Alloys in Mineral Oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The variations of the mean depth of penetration, the mean depth rate of penetration, MDRP, the pit diameter 2a and depth h due to cavitation attack on Al 6061-T6, Cu, brass of composition Cu-35Zn-3Pb and Ti-5A1-2.5Sn are presented. The experiments are conducted in a mineral oil of viscosity 110 CS using a magnetostrictive oscillator of 20 kHz frequency. Based on MDRP on the materials, it is found that Ti-5Al-2.5Sn exhibits cavitation erosion resistance which is two orders of magnitude higher than the other three materials. The values of h/a are the largest for copper and decreased with brass, titanium, and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope studies show that extensive slip and cross slip occurred on the surface prior to pitting and erosion. Twinning is also observed on copper and brass.

  10. Secondary Aluminum Processing Waste: Salt Cake Characterization and Reactivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirty-nine salt cake samples were collected from 10 SAP facilities across the U.S. The facilities were identified by the Aluminum Association to cover a wide range of processes. Results suggest that while the percent metal leached from the salt cake was relatively low, the leac...

  11. Electrochemistry of the Hall-Heroult Process for Aluminum Smelting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haupin, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    Nearly all aluminum is produced by the electrolysis of alumina dissolved in a molten cryolite-based electrolyte, the Hall-Heroult Process. Various aspects of the procedure are discussed, focusing on electrolyte chemistry, dissolution of alumina, electrode reactions, current efficiency, and cell voltage. Suggestions for graduate study related to…

  12. In-situ processing of aluminum nitride particle reinforced aluminum alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qingjun

    Discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy composites (DRACs) have potential applications in automotive, electronic packaging, and recreation industries. Conventional processing of DRACs is by incorporation of ceramic particles/whiskers/fibers into matrix alloys. Because of the high cost of ceramic particles, DRACs are expensive. The goal of this work was to develop a low-cost route of AlN-Al DRACs processing through bubbling and reacting nitrogen and ammonia gases with aluminum alloy melt in the temperature range of 1373--1523 K. Thermodynamic analysis of AlN-Al alloy system was performed based on Gibbs energy minimization theory. AlN is stable in aluminum, Al-Mg, Al-Si, Al-Zn, and Al-Li alloys over the whole temperature range for application and processing of DRACs. Experiments were carried out to form AlN by bubbling nitrogen and ammonia gases through aluminum, Al-Mg, and Al-Si alloy melts. Products were characterized with XRD, SEM, and EDX. The results showed that in-situ processing of AlN reinforced DRACs is technically feasible. Significant AlN was synthesized by bubbling deoxidized nitrogen and ammonia gases. When nitrogen gas was used as the nitrogen precursor, the AlN particles formed in-situ are small in size, (<10 mum). The formation of AlN is strongly affected by the trace oxygen impurities in the nitrogen gas. The deleterious effect of oxygen impurities is due to their inhibition to the chemisorption of nitrogen gas at the interface. In comparison with nitrogen gas, bubbling ammonia led to formation of AlN particles in smaller size (about 2 mum or less) at a significantly higher rate. Ammonia is not stable and dissociated into nitrogen and hydrogen at reaction temperatures. The hydrogen functions as oxygen-getter at the interface and benefits chemisorption of nitrogen, thereby promoting the formation of AlN. The overall process of AlN formation was modeled using two-film model. For nitrogen bubbling gas, the whole process is controlled by chemisorption

  13. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition and process for electrolysis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vandegrift, George F.; Krumpelt, Michael; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1983-01-01

    A process for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  14. One step process for producing dense aluminum nitride and composites thereof

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J. Birch; Kingman, Donald D.; Bianchini, Gregory M.

    1989-01-01

    A one step combustion process for the synthesis of dense aluminum nitride compositions is disclosed. The process comprises igniting pure aluminum powder in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of about 1000 atmospheres or higher. The process enables the production of aluminum nitride bodies to be formed directly in a mold of any desired shape.

  15. One step process for producing dense aluminum nitride and composites thereof

    DOEpatents

    Holt, J.B.; Kingman, D.D.; Bianchini, G.M.

    1989-10-31

    A one step combustion process for the synthesis of dense aluminum nitride compositions is disclosed. The process comprises igniting pure aluminum powder in a nitrogen atmosphere at a pressure of about 1,000 atmospheres or higher. The process enables the production of aluminum nitride bodies to be formed directly in a mold of any desired shape.

  16. Effect of processing on structural features of anodic aluminum oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdogan, Pembe; Birol, Yucel

    2012-09-01

    Morphological features of the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates fabricated by electrochemical oxidation under different processing conditions were investigated. The selection of the polishing parameters does not appear to be critical as long as the aluminum substrate is polished adequately prior to the anodization process. AAO layers with a highly ordered pore distribution are obtained after anodizing in 0.6 M oxalic acid at 20 °C under 40 V for 5 minutes suggesting that the desired pore features are attained once an oxide layer develops on the surface. While the pore features are not affected much, the thickness of the AAO template increases with increasing anodization treatment time. Pore features are better and the AAO growth rate is higher at 20 °C than at 5 °C; higher under 45 V than under 40 V; higher with 0.6 M than with 0.3 M oxalic acid.

  17. Grain structure and dislocation density measurements in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy using x-ray peak profile analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Balogh, Levente; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Choo, Hahn; Feng, Zhili

    2008-01-01

    The dislocation density and grain structure of a friction stir welded 6061-T6 aluminum alloy was determined as a function of distance from the weld centerline using high-resolution micro-beam x-ray diffraction. The results of the x-ray peak profile analysis show that the dislocation density is about 1.2 x 10^14 m-2 inside and 4.8 x 10^14 m-2 outside of the weld region. The average subgrain size is about 180 nm in both regions. Compared to the base material, the dislocation density was significantly decreased in the dynamic recrystallized zone of the friction stir welds, which is a good correlation with the TEM observations. The influence of the dislocation density on the strain hardening behavior during tensile deformation is also discussed.

  18. Boron-doped back-surface fields using an aluminum-alloy process

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, J.M.; Bode, M.D.; Silva, B.L.

    1997-10-01

    Boron-doped back-surface fields (BSF`s) have potentially superior performance compared to aluminum-doped BSF`s due to the higher solid solubility of boron compared to aluminum. However, conventional boron diffusions require a long, high temperature step that is both costly and incompatible with many photovoltaic-grade crystalline-silicon materials. We examined a process that uses a relatively low-temperature aluminum-alloy process to obtain a boron-doped BSF by doping the aluminum with boron. In agreement with theoretical expectations, we found that thicker aluminum layers and higher boron doping levels improved the performance of aluminum-alloyed BSF`s.

  19. Shock-wave compression and release of aluminum/ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Gray, G.T. III )

    1994-11-15

    Several composite materials consisting of ceramic particles embedded in a 6061-T6 aluminum matrix have been studied under conditions of shock-wave compression and release, including spallation. The 6061-T6 matrix represents a material for which high-rate shock-wave response has been extremely well characterized for thermoelastic-plastic deformation. The ceramic particles (alumina and mullite) are also well characterized, particularly in the elastic regime. Experimental tests consist of quasistatic, uniaxial-stress compression of both virgin and shock-recovered samples as well as time-resolved velocity interferometer measurements under conditions of flat-plate impact. The latter tests were performed with lithium fluoride windows for transmitted wave studies and free surfaces for spallation measurement. Theoretical analysis of the data is carried out with a pseudodissipation model originated by Barker [J. Composite Mat. [bold 5], 140 (1971)] for application to elastic deformation of layered composites and generalized here to include thermoelastic-plastic properties of the constituents. For a pseudodissipative model to apply to composite material response, significant geometrical randomization must be present in the composite structure; this is something that all commercially produced composites naturally possess. Randomization produces mechanical energy traps, which convert some fraction of regular, directed motion into random elastic vibrations behind the shock front. Within a few microseconds (depending on the pinned dislocation segment density) this macroscale, continuum vibrational energy is converted to heat by means of the anelastic properties of the metal matrix. The use of pseudodissipation as a means of representing dispersive composite material behavior is thus placed on a more secure physical foundation.

  20. EVALUATION OF PROCESS SYSTEMS FOR EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF ALUMINUM FINISHING WASTEWATERS AND SLUDGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Innovative processes for use in treatment of wastewaters and sludges produced in anodizing, etching and painting extruded aluminum were investigated. Results of the research can be immediately implemented at many aluminum-finishing plants where sludge disposal restrictions and co...

  1. Effects of fabrication and joining processes on compressive strength of boron/aluminum and borsic/aluminum structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Wiant, H. R.; Mcwithey, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    Processes for forming and joining boron/aluminum and borsic/aluminum to themselves and to titanium alloys were studied. Composite skin and titanium skin panels were joined to composite stringers by high strength bolts, by spotwelding, by diffusion bonding, by adhesive bonding, or by brazing. The effects of the fabrication and joining processes on panel compressive strengths were discussed. Predicted buckling loads were compared with experimental data.

  2. Microstructural and superplastic characteristics of friction stir processed aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charit, Indrajit

    Friction stir processing (FSP) is an adapted version of friction stir welding (FSW), which was invented at The Welding Institute (TWI), 1991. It is a promising solid state processing tool for microstructural modification at localized scale. Dynamic recrystallization occurs during FSP resulting in fine grained microstructure. The main goal of this research was to establish microstructure/superplasticity relationships in FSP aluminum alloys. Different aluminum alloys (5083 Al, 2024 Al, and Al-8.9Zn-2.6Mg-0.09Sc) were friction stir processed for investigating the effect of alloy chemistry on resulting superplasticity. Tool rotation rate and traverse speeds were controlled as the prime FSP parameters to produce different microstructures. In another study, lap joints of 7475 Al plates were also studied to explore the possibility of developing FSW/superplastic forming route. Microstructures were evaluated using optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, orientation imaging microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical properties were evaluated using tensile testing. FSP 2024 Al (3.9 mum grain size) exhibited an optimum ductility of 525% at a strain rate of 10-2 s-1 and 430°C. Grain boundary sliding mechanism was found to be the dominant mode of deformation in this alloy. In 5083 Al alloy, it was found that changing the process parameters, grain sizes in the range of 3.5--8.5 mum grain size could be obtained. Material processed with colder processing parameters showed a decrease in ductility due to microstructural instability, and followed solute drag dislocation glide mechanism. On the other hand, materials processed with hotter parameter combinations showed mode of deformation related to grain boundary sliding mechanism. FSP of as-cast Al-Zn-Mg-Sc alloy resulted in ultrafine grains (0.68 mum) with attractive combination of high strain rate and low temperature superplasticity. This also demonstrated that superplastic microstructures could be

  3. Influence of sorption processes on aluminum determinations in acidic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Goenaga, X.; Bryant, R.; Williams, D.J.A.

    1987-11-15

    Progressive removal of particles from freshwater samples by filtration using various pore diameter polycarbonate capillary membranes (0.4, 0.1, 0.05, and 0.015 ..mu..m) caused a reduction in the levels of labile aluminum (0-23%), as detected with pyrocatechol violet (PCV), in the filtrates. Removal of aluminum adsorbed onto suspended solids and aluminum losses through adsorption onto the membranes are thought to be responsible for these observations. Losses of aluminum during filtration of freshwater samples were evaluated by filtration of particle-free synthetic solutions and found to be <10%. Experiments with a sample of Na-illite showed that aluminum adsorbed thereon is partially labile and detectable with PCV in synthetic and natural solutions. It appears that for freshwater samples with high solid surface to aluminum ratios, a significant fraction of the experimentally determined monomeric or inorganic monomeric aluminum may actually be adsorbed aluminum.

  4. The Effect of Impurities on the Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zi-Kui Liu; Shengjun Zhang; Qingyou Han; Vinod Sikka

    2007-04-23

    For this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project, the effect of impurities on the processing of aluminum alloys was systematically investigated. The work was carried out as a collaborative effort between the Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Industrial support was provided by ALCOA and ThermoCalc, Inc. The achievements described below were made. A method that combines first-principles calculation and calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) was used to develop the multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na. This method was extensively used in this project for the development of a thermodynamic database. The first-principles approach provided some thermodynamic property data that are not available in the open literature. These calculated results were used in the thermodynamic modeling as experimental data. Some of the thermodynamic property data are difficult, if not impossible, to measure. The method developed and used in this project allows the estimation of these data for thermodynamic database development. The multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na was developed. Elements such as Ca, Li, Na, and K are impurities that strongly affect the formability and corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys. However, these impurity elements are not included in the commercial aluminum alloy database. The process of thermodynamic modeling began from Al-Na, Ca-Li, Li-Na, K-Na, and Li-K sub-binary systems. Then ternary and higher systems were extrapolated because of the lack of experimental information. Databases for five binary alloy systems and two ternary systems were developed. Along with other existing binary and ternary databases, the full database of the multicomponent Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na system was completed in this project. The methodology in integrating with commercial or other aluminum alloy databases can be developed. The mechanism of sodium-induced high-temperature embrittlement (HTE) of Al-Mg is now understood. Using the thermodynamic

  5. Aluminum base alloy powder metallurgy process and product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A metallurgical method including cooling molten aluminum particles and consolidating resulting solidified particles into a multiparticle body, wherein the improvement comprises the provision of greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn. Aluminum containing greater than 0.15% of a metal which diffuses in the aluminum solid state at a rate less than that of Mn.

  6. Process of electrolysis and fractional crystallization for aluminum purification

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; Bowman, Kenneth A.; Mazgaj, Robert M.; Cochran, C. Norman

    1983-10-25

    A method for purifying aluminum that contains impurities, the method including the step of introducing such aluminum containing impurities to a charging and melting chamber located in an electrolytic cell of the type having a porous diaphragm permeable by the electrolyte of the cell and impermeable to molten aluminum. The method includes further the steps of supplying impure aluminum from the chamber to the anode area of the cell and electrolytically transferring aluminum from the anode area to the cathode through the diaphragm while leaving impurities in the anode area, thereby purifying the aluminum introduced into the chamber. The method includes the further steps of collecting the purified aluminum at the cathode, and lowering the level of impurities concentrated in the anode area by subjecting molten aluminum and impurities in said chamber to a fractional crystallization treatment wherein eutectic-type impurities crystallize and precipitate out of the aluminum. The eutectic impurities that have crystallized are physically removed from the chamber. The aluminum in the chamber is now suited for further purification as provided in the above step of electrolytically transferring aluminum through the diaphragm.

  7. Process of electrolysis and fractional crystallization for aluminum purification

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, R.K.; Bowman, K.A.; Mazgaj, R.M.; Cochran, C.N.

    1983-10-25

    A method is described for purifying aluminum that contains impurities, the method including the step of introducing such aluminum containing impurities to a charging and melting chamber located in an electrolytic cell of the type having a porous diaphragm permeable by the electrolyte of the cell and impermeable to molten aluminum. The method includes further the steps of supplying impure aluminum from the chamber to the anode area of the cell and electrolytically transferring aluminum from the anode area to the cathode through the diaphragm while leaving impurities in the anode area, thereby purifying the aluminum introduced into the chamber. The method includes the further steps of collecting the purified aluminum at the cathode, and lowering the level of impurities concentrated in the anode area by subjecting molten aluminum and impurities in said chamber to a fractional crystallization treatment wherein eutectic-type impurities crystallize and precipitate out of the aluminum. The eutectic impurities that have crystallized are physically removed from the chamber. The aluminum in the chamber is now suited for further purification as provided in the above step of electrolytically transferring aluminum through the diaphragm. 2 figs.

  8. Impact Delamination and Fracture in Aluminum/Acrylic Sandwich Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Benjamin; Zeichner, Glenn; Liu, Yanxiong; Bowles, Kenneth J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Impact-induced delamination and fracture in 6061-T6 aluminum/cast acrylic sandwich plates adhered by epoxy were generated in an instrumented drop-weight impact machine. Although only a small dent was produced on the aluminum side when a hemispherical penetrator tup was dropped onto it from a couple of inches, a large ring of delamination at the interface was observed. The delamination damage was often accompanied by severe shattering in the acrylic substratum. Damage patterns in the acrylic layer include radial and ring cracks and, together with delamination at the interface, may cause peeling-off of acrylic material from the sandwich plate. Theory of stress-wave propagation can be used to explain these damage patterns. The impact tests were conducted at various temperatures. The results also show clearly that temperature effect is very important in impact damage. For pure cast acrylic nil-ductile transition (NDT) occurs between 185-195 F. Excessive impact energy was dissipated into fracture energy when tested at temperature below this range or through plastic deformation when tested at temperature above the NDT temperature. Results from this study will be used as baseline data for studying fiber-metal laminates, such as GLARE and ARALL for advanced aeronautical and astronautical applications.

  9. Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ preparation and use in electrolysis process for aluminum production

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, C.C.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    A continuous process for producing aluminum sulfide and for electrolyzing the aluminum sulfide to form metallic aluminum in which the aluminum sulfide is produced from aluminum oxide and COS or CS/sub 2/ in the presence of a chloride melt which also serves as the electrolysis bath. Circulation between the reactor and electrolysis cell is carried out to maintain the desired concentration of aluminum sulfide in the bath.

  10. Researches regarding the hydroforming process of aluminum components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunoiu, V.; Teodor, V.; Susac, F.

    2015-11-01

    The lightweighting with aluminum offers the potential for using unconventional fabrication technologies such as sheet hydroforming. Triform process is an unconventional sheet forming technology where the blank sheet is placed under a flexible rubber pad and is deformed under the action of the hydraulic pressure applied from the top of the equipment. The part shape is given by the shape of the die located at the bottom of the equipment. In the paper are presented the experimental results, regarding the influence of the fluid pressure towards the parts properties. The parts quality is evaluated in terms of springback variation. The results could lead to the implementation of the designed procedure for triform die and equipment.

  11. Degradation Modeling of 2024 Aluminum Alloy During Corrosion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidaparti, Ramana M.; Aghazadeh, Babak Seyed

    2011-04-01

    Corrosion is one of the most damaging mechanisms in aluminum alloys used in aerospace engineering structures. In this article, the degradation behavior of AA 2024-T3 as a function of time under corrosive conditions is studied through experiments and modeling. Corrosion experiments were conducted on AA 2024-T3 specimens under controlled electrochemical conditions. The chemical element alloy map was investigated through EDS technique for evaluation purposes. Based on the experimental data, an analytical model is developed relating the material loss to the degradation during the corrosion process. The analytical model uses genetic algorithms (GAs) to map the relationship through optimization. The results obtained from GAs were compared with a standard non-linear regression model. The results obtained indicate that a quadratic relationship exists in time between the material loss due to corrosion and the degradation behavior of the alloy. Based on the good results obtained, the present approach of degradation modeling can be extended to other metals.

  12. Process for producing gallium-containing solution from the aluminum smelting dust

    SciTech Connect

    Era, A.; Matsui, S.; Ikeda, H.

    1988-03-01

    A process is described for producing a gallium-containing solution from aluminum smelting dust comprising leaching aluminum smelting dust with a mineral acid selected from the group consisting of sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid and nitric acid, and adding an oxidizing agent to the aluminum smelting dust at the time of leaching to preferentially leach and extract gallium from the aluminum smelting dust without extracting aluminum from the aluminum smelting dust. The oxidizing agent is selected from the group consisting of potassium permanganate, manganese dioxide, hydrogen peroxide, ozone, potassium chromate, potassium dichromate, ammonium persulfate, sodium hydrochlorite, sodium chlorite and sodium chlorate. The leached aluminum smelting dust is filtered to obtain a gallium-containing solution of dissolved gallium.

  13. A method for studying weld fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kostrivas, A.; Lippold, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Aluminum alloys may exhibit a variety of microstructures within the fusion zone adjacent to the fusion boundary. Under conventional weld solidification conditions, epitaxial nucleation occurs off grains in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and solidification proceeds along preferred growth directions. In some aluminum alloys, such as those containing Li and Zr, a nondendritic equiaxed grain zone (EQZ) has been observed along the fusion boundary that does not nucleate epitaxially from the HAZ substrate. The EQZ has been the subject of considerable study because of its susceptibility to cracking during initial fabrication and repair. The motivation of this investigation was to develop a technique that would allow the nature and evolution of the fusion boundary to be studied under controlled thermal conditions. A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the Gleeble{reg{underscore}sign} thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples wee heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In Alloy 2195, a 4Cu-1Li alloy, an EQZ could be formed by heating in the temperature range approximately from 630--640 C. At temperatures above 640 C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in Alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6 and 2219-T8. Nucleation in these alloys was observed to be epitaxial. Details of the technique and its effectiveness for performing controlled melting experiments at incremental temperatures above the solidus are described.

  14. Measurement of the thermal contact conductance and thermal conductivity of anodized aluminum coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, G.P.; Fletcher, L.S. )

    1990-08-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the thermal contact conductance and effective thermal conductivity of anodized coatings. One chemically polished Aluminum 6061-T6 test specimen and seven specimens with anodized coatings varying in thickness from 60.9 {mu}m to 163.8 {mu}m were tested while in contact with a single unanodized aluminum surface. Measurements of the overall joint conductance, composed of the thermal contact conductance between the anodized coating and the bare aluminum surface and the bulk conductance of the coating material, indicated that the overall joint conductance decreased with increasing thickness of the anodized coating and increased with increasing interfacial load. Using the experimental data, a dimensionless expression was developed that related the overall joint conductance to the coating thickness, the surface roughness, the interfacial pressure, and the properties of the aluminum substrate. By subtracting the thermal contact conductance from the measured overall joint conductance, estimations of the effective thermal conductivity of the anodized coating as a function of pressure were obtained for each of the seven anodized specimens. At an extrapolated pressure of zero, the effective thermal conductivity was found to be approximately 0.02 W/m-K. In addition to this extrapolated value, a single expression for predicting the effective thermal conductivity as a function of both the interface pressure and the anodized coating thickness was developed and shown to be within {plus minus}5 percent of the experimental data over a pressure range of 0 to 14 MPa.

  15. The New Alusuisse Process for Producing Coarse Aluminum Hydrate in the Bayer Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschamper, Otto

    1982-04-01

    The liquor productivity in the American Bayer process, with a maximum of about 55 g Al2O3 per liter, compares very unfavorably with that obtained in the European process of up to 80 g Al2O3 per liter. By the new Alusuisse process a liquor productivity can be obtained nearing that of the European process, but consisting of a coarse aluminum hydroxide typical of the American process. The process has been used for the conversion from floury to sandy aluminas at the Gove Alumina Plant with a nominal capacity of 1.0 million tons per year. The modified plant has been running since November 1979 at the increased nominal capacity of 1.1 million tons per year, producing an aluminum hydrate of about 5% smaller than 45µm.

  16. Ballistic Experiments with Titanium and Aluminum Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gogolewski, R.; Morgan, B.R.

    1999-11-23

    During the course of the project we conducted two sets of fundamental experiments in penetration mechanics in the LLNL Terminal Ballistics Laboratory of the Physics Directorate. The first set of full-scale experiments was conducted with a 14.5mm air propelled launcher. The object of the experiments was to determine the ballistic limit speed of 6Al-4V-alloy titanium, low fineness ratio projectiles centrally impacting 2024-T3 alloy aluminum flat plates and the failure modes of the projectiles and the targets. The second set of one-third scale experiments was conducted with a 14.5mm powder launcher. The object of these experiments was to determine the ballistic limit speed of 6Al-4V alloy titanium high fineness ratio projectiles centrally impacting 6Al-4V alloy titanium flat plates and the failure modes of the projectiles and the target. We employed radiography to observe a projectile just before and after interaction with a target plate. Early on, we employed a non-damaging ''soft-catch'' technique to capture projectiles after they perforated targets. Once we realized that a projectile was not damaged during interaction with a target, we used a 4-inch thick 6061-T6-alloy aluminum witness block with a 6.0-inch x 6.0-inch cross-section to measure projectile residual penetration. We have recorded and tabulated below projectile impact speed, projectile residual (post-impact) speed, projectile failure mode, target failure mode, and pertinent comments for the experiments. The ballistic techniques employed for the experiments are similar to those employed in an earlier study.

  17. Compressive strength, plastic flow properties, and surface frictional effects of 1100, 3003 and 6061 aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkerton, G.W.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to find aluminum alloys that are effective for use as wire vacuum seals in the 800MeV particle accelerator located at the Louis Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in Los Alamos, NM. Three alloys, Al 1100, Al 3003, and Al 6061, are investigated under uniaxial compression to determine stresses for a given height reduction from 0 to 70 percent, and to find plastic flow and surface interaction effects. Right-circular cylindrical specimens are compressed on-end (cylindrically) and radially (for modeling as compressed wire). Aluminum 1100 and 3003 alloys are compared for length to diameter ratios of 1 and 2 for both compression types, and are then compared to results of radial compression of annealed small diameter Al 1100 wire currently used at LAMPE. The specimens are also compressed between three different platen surfaces, polished steel, etched steel, and aluminum 6061-T6, to determine effects of friction. The Al 3003 alloy exhibits 20 to 25% lower stresses at all height reductions than Al 1100 for both cylindrical and radial compression.

  18. High quality optically polished aluminum mirror and process for producing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, III, James J. (Inventor); Zaniewski, John J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A new technical advancement in the field of precision aluminum optics permits high quality optical polishing of aluminum monolith, which, in the field of optics, offers numerous benefits because of its machinability, lightweight, and low cost. This invention combines diamond turning and conventional polishing along with india ink, a newly adopted material, for the polishing to accomplish a significant improvement in surface precision of aluminum monolith for optical purposes. This invention guarantees the precise optical polishing of typical bare aluminum monolith to surface roughness of less than about 30 angstroms rms and preferably about 5 angstroms rms while maintaining a surface figure accuracy in terms of surface figure error of not more than one-fifteenth of wave peak-to-valley.

  19. High quality optically polished aluminum mirror and process for producing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, III, James J. (Inventor); Zaniewski, John J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new technical advancement in the field of precision aluminum optics permits high quality optical polishing of aluminum monolith, which, in the field of optics, offers numerous benefits because of its machinability, lightweight, and low cost. This invention combines diamond turning and conventional polishing along with india ink, a newly adopted material, for the polishing to accomplish a significant improvement in surface precision of aluminum monolith for optical purposes. This invention guarantees the precise optical polishing of typical bare aluminum monolith to surface roughness of less than about 30 angstroms rms and preferably about 5 angstroms rms while maintaining a surface figure accuracy in terms of surface figure error of not more than one-fifteenth of wave peak-to-valley.

  20. Modelling hypervelocity impacts into aluminum structures based on LDEF data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, C. R.; Atkinson, D. R.; Watts, A. J.; Wagner, J. R.; Allbrooks, M. K.; Hennessy, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Realizing and understanding the effects of the near-Earth space environment on a spacecraft during its mission lifetime is becoming more important with the regeneration of America's space program. Included among these potential effects are the following: erosion and surface degradation due to atomic oxygen impingement; ultraviolet exposure embrittlement; and delamination, pitting, cratering, and ring formation due to micrometeoroid and debris impacts. These effects may occur synergistically and may alter the spacecraft materials enough to modify the resultant crater, star crack, and/or perforation. This study concentrates on modelling the effects of micrometeoroid and debris hypervelocity impacts into aluminum materials (6061-T6). Space debris exists in all sizes, and has the possibility of growing into a potentially catastrophic problem, particularly since self-collisions between particles can rapidly escalate the number of small impactors. We have examined the morphologies of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) impact craters and the relationship between the observed impact damage on LDEF versus the existing models for both the natural (micrometeoroid) and manmade (debris) environments in order to better define these environments.

  1. The corrosion protection of aluminum by various anodizing treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danford, Merlin D.

    1989-01-01

    Corrosion protection to 6061-T6 aluminum, afforded by both teflon-impregnated anodized coats (Polylube and Tufram) and hard-anodized coats (water sealed and dichromate sealed), was studied at both pH 5.5 and pH 9.5, with an exposure period of 28 days in 3.5 percent NaCl solution (25 C) for each specimen. In general, corrosion protection for all specimens was better at pH 9.5 than at pH 5.5. Protection by a Tufram coat proved superior to that afforded by Polylube at each pH, with corrosion protection by the hard-anodized, water-sealed coat at pH 9.5 providing the best protection. Electrochemical work in each case was corroborated by microscopic examination of the coats after exposure. Corrosion protection by Tufram at pH 9.5 was most comparable to that of the hard-anodized samples, although pitting and some cracking of the coat did occur.

  2. Process Development for Stamping Á-Pillar Covers with Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Rohatgi, Aashish; Smith, Mark T.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2015-02-20

    In this work, performed in close collaboration with PACCAR and Magna International, a 6XXX series aluminum alloy was used for the development of A-Pillar cover for the cab of a typical heavy-duty Class-8 truck. The use of Al alloy for the A-pillar cover represents an approximately 40% weight savings over its steel or molded fiberglass composite counterpart. For the selected Al alloy, a small amount of cold work (5% tensile strain), following prior hot-forming, was found to significantly improve the subsequent age-hardening response. The role of solutionizing temperature and rate of cooling on the age-hardening response after paint-bake treatment were investigated. For the temperature range selected in this work, higher solutionizing temperature correlated with greater subsequent age-hardening and vice-versa. However, the age-hardening response was insensitive to the mode of cooling (water quench vs. air cooling). Finally, a two-step forming process was developed where, in the first step, the blank was heated to solutionizing temperature, quenched, and then partially formed at room temperature. For the second step, the pre-form was re-heated and quenched as in the first step, and the forming was completed at room temperature. The resulting A-pillars had sufficient residual ductility to be compatible with hemming and riveting

  3. Fabrication process scale-up and optimization for a boron-aluminum composite radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1973-01-01

    Design approaches to a practical utilization of a boron-aluminum radiator for the space shuttle orbiter are presented. The program includes studies of laboratory composite material processes to determine the feasibility of a structural and functional composite radiator panel, and to estimate the cost of its fabrication. The objective is the incorporation of boron-aluminum modulator radiator on the space shuttle.

  4. Optimization study of the femtosecond laser-induced forward-transfer process with thin aluminum films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sudipta; Sabbah, A. J.; Yarbrough, J. M.; Allen, C. G.; Winters, Beau; Durfee, Charles G.; Squier, Jeff A.

    2007-07-01

    The parameters for an effective laser-induced forward-transfer (LIFT) process of aluminum thin films using a femtosecond laser are studied. Deposited feature size as a function of laser fluence, donor film thickness, quality of focus, and the pulse duration are varied, providing a metric of the most desirable conditions for femtosecond LIFT with thin aluminum films.

  5. Ultrasonic Real-Time Quality Monitoring Of Aluminum Spot Weld Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Regalado, Waldo Josue

    The real-time ultrasonic spot weld monitoring system, introduced by our research group, has been designed for the unsupervised quality characterization of the spot welding process. It comprises the ultrasonic transducer (probe) built into one of the welding electrodes and an electronics hardware unit which gathers information from the transducer, performs real-time weld quality characterization and communicates with the robot programmable logic controller (PLC). The system has been fully developed for the inspection of spot welds manufactured in steel alloys, and has been mainly applied in the automotive industry. In recent years, a variety of materials have been introduced to the automotive industry. These include high strength steels, magnesium alloys, and aluminum alloys. Aluminum alloys have been of particular interest due to their high strength-to-weight ratio. Resistance spot welding requirements for aluminum vary greatly from those of steel. Additionally, the oxide film formed on the aluminum surface increases the heat generation between the copper electrodes and the aluminum plates leading to accelerated electrode deterioration. Preliminary studies showed that the real-time quality inspection system was not able to monitor spot welds manufactured with aluminum. The extensive experimental research, finite element modelling of the aluminum welding process and finite difference modeling of the acoustic wave propagation through the aluminum spot welds presented in this dissertation, revealed that the thermodynamics and hence the acoustic wave propagation through an aluminum and a steel spot weld differ significantly. For this reason, the hardware requirements and the algorithms developed to determine the welds quality from the ultrasonic data used on steel, no longer apply on aluminum spot welds. After updating the system and designing the required algorithms, parameters such as liquid nugget penetration and nugget diameter were available in the ultrasonic data

  6. Processing of Aluminum Dross: The Birth of a Closed Industrial Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingason, Helgi Thor; Sigfusson, Thorsteinn I.

    2014-11-01

    This is the history of a modern aluminum dross recycling company, from its beginnings in the last years of the twentieth century to the present day. The vision of the founders was to build a local recycling plant and take full responsibility for sensitive environmental issues by recycling aluminum dross locally rather than shipping it abroad. The paper tells the history of the company from the environmental perspective, and gives an overview of some of the challenges and the decisions that followed from this vision, for instance the selection of technology. The company developed a closed industrial process for the recycling of aluminum dross, and the paper discusses some of their laboratory experiments and industrial trials. An important milestone has now been reached as the process in its present form is recognized by the environmental authorities in the country. Furthermore, it seems realistic that in the near future the final product from this process will be comparable to the product delivered in the processing of salt cake in specialized chemical plants, but at a fraction of the cost.

  7. Processing of Aluminum Dross: The Birth of a Closed Industrial Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingason, Helgi Thor; Sigfusson, Thorsteinn I.

    2014-09-01

    This is the history of a modern aluminum dross recycling company, from its beginnings in the last years of the twentieth century to the present day. The vision of the founders was to build a local recycling plant and take full responsibility for sensitive environmental issues by recycling aluminum dross locally rather than shipping it abroad. The paper tells the history of the company from the environmental perspective, and gives an overview of some of the challenges and the decisions that followed from this vision, for instance the selection of technology. The company developed a closed industrial process for the recycling of aluminum dross, and the paper discusses some of their laboratory experiments and industrial trials. An important milestone has now been reached as the process in its present form is recognized by the environmental authorities in the country. Furthermore, it seems realistic that in the near future the final product from this process will be comparable to the product delivered in the processing of salt cake in specialized chemical plants, but at a fraction of the cost.

  8. Effect of low-velocity or ballistic impact damage on the strength of thin composite and aluminum shear panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Impact tests were conducted on shear panels fabricated from 6061-T6 aluminum and from woven fabric prepreg of Du Pont Kevlara fiber/epoxy resin and graphite fiber/epoxy resin. The shear panels consisted of three different composite laminates and one aluminum material configuration. Three panel aspect ratios were evaluated for each material configuration. Composite panels were impacted with a 1.27-cm (0.05-in) diameter aluminum sphere at low velocities of 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) and 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec). Ballistic impact conditions consisted of a tumbled 0.50-caliber projectile impacting loaded composite and aluminum shear panels. The results of these tests indicate that ballistic threshold load (the lowest load which will result in immediate failure upon penetration by the projectile) varied between 0.44 and 0.61 of the average failure load of undamaged panels. The residual strengths of the panels after ballistic impact varied between 0.55 and 0.75 of the average failure strength of the undamaged panels. The low velocity impacts at 67 m/sec (220 ft/sec) caused a 15 to 20 percent reduction in strength, whereas the impacts at 46 m/sec (150 ft/sec) resulted in negligible strength loss. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental failure strengths and the predicted strength with the point stress failure criterion.

  9. Development of plasma MIG brazing process for dissimilar metal joining of aluminum to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to develop a new brazing process employing plasma MIG. Because the energy density of the plasma produced by the plasma electrode is low, the base metal can be heated extensively without melting of the base metal, consequently improving the wettability of bead. This paper discussed the dissimilar metal joining of aluminum to steel by plasma MIG brazing process. Fracture occurred at the HAZ in the aluminum plate at 80 MPa.

  10. Process for the synthesis of nanophase dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy

    DOEpatents

    Barbour, John C.; Knapp, James Arthur; Follstaedt, David Martin; Myers, Samuel Maxwell

    1998-12-15

    A process for fabricating dispersion-strengthened ceramic-metal composites is claimed. The process comprises in-situ interaction and chemical reaction of a metal in gaseous form with a ceramic producer in plasma form. Such composites can be fabricated with macroscopic dimensions. Special emphasis is placed on fabrication of dispersion-strengthened aluminum oxide-aluminum composites, which can exhibit flow stresses more characteristic of high strength steel.

  11. The processing and properties of discontinuously reinforced aluminum composites

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, A.L.; Walker, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Discontinuously-reinforced aluminum (DRA) SiC whisker or particle-reinforced Al-alloy matrix composites produced by P/M methods have progressed toward commercial applications, supported by growing data bases and large-scale production facilities. Attention is presently given to the elastic modulus, plastic, ductile, and toughness characteristics of representative DRA formulations, as well as to the DRAs commercially available in the forms of sheets, extrusions, and optical and instrument grade structures able to supplant beryllium. 36 refs.

  12. Continuous Severe Plastic Deformation Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan Srinivasan; Prabir K. Chaudhury; Balakrishna Cherukuri; Qingyou Han; David Swenson; Percy Gros

    2006-06-30

    by SPD techniques. This combination of properties makes UFG metals produced by SPD very attractive as machining, forging or extrusion stock, both from the point of view of formability as well as energy and cost saving. However, prior to this work there had been no attempt to transfer these potential benefits observed in the laboratory scale to industrial shop floor. The primary reason for this was that the laboratory scale studies had been conducted to develop a scientific understanding of the processes that result in grain refinement during SPD. Samples that had been prepared in the laboratory scale were typically only about 10-mm diameter and 50-mm long (about 0.5-inch diameter and 2-inches long). The thrust of this project was three-fold: (i) to show that the ECAE/P process can be scaled up to produce long samples, i.e., a continuous severe plastic deformation (CSPD) process, (ii) show the process can be scaled up to produce large cross section samples that could be used as forging stock, and (iii) use the large cross-section samples to produce industrial size forgings and demonstrate the potential energy and cost savings that can be realized if SPD processed stock is adopted by the forging industry. Aluminum alloy AA-6061 was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach used. The CSPD process developed using the principles of chamber-less extrusion and drawing, and was demonstrated using rolling and wire drawing equipment that was available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In a parallel effort, ECAE/P dies were developed for producing 100-mm square cross section SPD billets for subsequent forging. This work was carried out at Intercontinental Manufacturing Co. (IMCO), Garland TX. Forging studies conducted with the ECAE/P billets showed that many of the potential benefits of using UFG material can be realized. In particular, the material yield can be increased, and the amount of material that is lost as scrap can be reduced by as much as 50%. Forging

  13. Investigation of rapidly solidified aluminum by using diamond turning and a magnetorheological finishing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Otieno, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    The metal mirror has been widely used in optical application for a longtime. Especially the aluminum 6061 is often considered the preferred material for manufacturing optical components for ground-based astronomical applications. One reason for using this material is its high specific stiffness and excellent thermal properties. However, a large amount of data exists for this material and commercially available aluminum 6061 using single point diamond turning (SPDT) and polishing process can achieve surface roughness values of approximately 2 to 4 nm, which is adequate for applications that involve the infrared spectral range, but not for the shorter spectral range. A novel aluminum material, fabricated using a rapid solidification process that is equivalent to the conventional aluminum 6061 alloy grade has been used in optical applications in recent years because of its smaller grain size. In this study, the surface quality of the rapid solidification aluminum after single point diamond turning and followed by magnetorheological finish (MRF) process is investigated and compared with conventional aluminum 6061. Both the surface roughness Ra was evaluated using white light interferometers. Finally, indicators such as optimal fabrication parameter combination and optical performance are discussed.

  14. Characterization of aluminum processed by equal channel angular extrusion: Effect of processing route

    SciTech Connect

    Rebhi, Atef; Makhlouf, Thabet; Njah, Nabil; Champion, Yannick; Couzinie, Jean-Philippe

    2009-12-15

    Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) of aluminum alloys leads to enhanced strength. However, the effects of processing route on the resulting properties were not extensively investigated, and sometimes neglected. In the present work, an aluminum was processed by ECAE via routes B{sub C} and C using a die formed by two channels connected at an angle {phi} = 90 deg. Coherency lengths D calculated from X-ray diffraction peaks were 85 nm after the first passage. For route B{sub C}, it was kept constant when the number of passages N was increased. For route C, an increase of D was observed when increasing N. The remaining densities of dislocations {rho} were calculated using a recently published formula. A decrease of {rho} was observed during ECAE in route C but not in route B{sub C}. Mechanical tests allowed us to relate the increase of D and the decrease of {rho} to an enhanced recovery during ECAE via route C.

  15. Monotonic and cyclic fatigue properties of automotive aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, W.A.

    1984-01-01

    Monotonic and strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on 2014-T6, 6061-T6 and 7175-T73 hand-forgings, 5052-H32 and 6061-T6 sheet, and a 1983/84 production Chevrolet Corvette upper-control-arm-pivot shaft (UCAPS) cold-forged from 5454-H12 and 6061-T4 rolled rod (the 6061 UCAPS was artificially-aged to the -T6 temper, after forging). Various monotonic and cyclic fatigue stress-strain material properties are presented. The responses of the various alloys and product-forms in terms of cyclic hardening or softening are described.

  16. Method of thermally processing superplastically formed aluminum-lithium alloys to obtain optimum strengthening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton, Claire E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Optimum strengthening of a superplastically formed aluminum-lithium alloy structure is achieved via a thermal processing technique which eliminates the conventional step of solution heat-treating immediately following the step of superplastic forming of the structure. The thermal processing technique involves quenching of the superplastically formed structure using static air, forced air or water quenching.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS OF SELECTED ENERGY CONSERVING MANUFACTURING PROCESS OPTIONS: VOLUME VIII. ALUMINA/ALUMINUM INDUSTRY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assesses the likelihood of new process technology and new practices being introduced by energy intensive industries and explores the environmental impacts of such changes. Volume 8 deals with the alumina/aluminum industry. The report examines three new process developm...

  18. Structural Damage Prediction and Analysis for Hypervelocity Impact: Properties of Largest Fragment Produced by Hypervelocity Impact of Aluminum Spheres with Thin Aluminum Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piekutowski, Andrew J.

    1995-01-01

    Results of a series of hypervelocity impact tests are presented. In these tests, 1.275-g, 9.53-mm-diameter, 2017-T4 aluminum spheres were fired at normal incidence at eight thicknesses of 6061-T6 aluminum sheet. Bumper thickness to projectile diameter (t/D) ratio ranged from 0.026 to 0.424. Nominal impact velocity was 6.7 km/s. Results of five tests using 6.35, 9.53, and 12.70-mm-diameter aluminum spheres and other aluminum alloy bumpers are also given. A large chunky fragment of projectile was observed at the center of the debris clouds produced by the impacts. The equivalent diameter of this large fragment ranged from 5.5 mm for the lowest t/D ratio to a minimum of 0.6 mm for the case where maximum breakup of the projectile occurred (t/D approximately 0.2 to 0.3). When the t/D ratio was 0.42, numerous large flaky fragments were evenly distributed in the external bubble of bumper debris. Velocity of the large central fragments decreased continuously with increasing t/D ratio, ranging from about 99 percent to less than 80 percent of the impact velocity. The change in the velocity of small fragments spalling from the rear of the projectile was used to obtain a relationship showing a linear increase in the size of the central projectile fragment with decrease in the shock-induced stress in the projectile.

  19. Numerical investigation for formability of aluminum 6016 alloy under non-isothermal warm forming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, P.; Dai, M. H.; Ying, L.; Shi, D. Y.; Zhao, K. M.; Lu, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The warm forming technology of aluminum alloy has attracted attention from worldwide automotive engineering sector in recent years, with which the complex geometry parts can be realized at elevated temperature. A non-isothermal warm forming process for the heat treatable aluminum can quickly carry out its application on traditional production line by adding a furnace to heat up the aluminum alloy sheet. The 6000 aluminum alloy was investigated by numerical simulation and experiment using the Nakajima test model in this paper. A modified Fields-Backofen model was introduced into numerical simulation process to describe the thermo-mechanical flow behavior of a 6000 series aluminum alloy. The experimental data was obtained by conducting thermal-mechanical uniaxial tensile experiment in temperatures range of 25˜400°C to guarantee the numerical simulation more accurate. The numerical simulation was implemented with LS_DYNA software in terms of coupled dynamic explicit method for investigating the effect of initial forming temperature and the Binder Holder Force (BHF), which are critical process parameters in non-isothermal warm forming. The results showed that the optimal initial forming temperature range was 300°C˜350°C. By means of conducting numerical simulation in deep drawing box model, the forming window of BHF and temperature around the optimal initial forming temperature (275°, 300° and 325°) are investigated, which can provide guidance to actual experiment.

  20. Modelling the growth process of porous aluminum oxide film during anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryslanova, E. M.; Alfimov, A. V.; Chivilikhin, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Currently it has become important for the development of metamaterials and nanotechnology to obtain regular self-assembled structures. One such structure is porous anodic alumina film that consists of hexagonally packed cylindrical pores. In this work we consider the anodization process, our model takes into account the influence of layers of aluminum and electrolyte on the rate of growth of aluminum oxide, as well as the effect of surface diffusion. In present work we consider those effects. And as a result of our model we obtain the minimum distance between centers of alumina pores in the beginning of anodizing process.

  1. The Development of 6061-Aluminum Windows for the MICE LiquidAbsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Swanson, J.

    2005-08-24

    The thin windows for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid Absorber will be fabricated from 6061-T6-aluminum. The absorber and vacuum vessel thin windows are 300-mm in diameter and are 180 mm thick at the center. The windows are designed for an internal burst pressure of 0.68 MPa (100 psig) when warm. The MICE experiment design calls for changeable windows on the absorber, so a bolted window design was adopted. Welded windows offer some potential advantages over bolted windows when they are on the absorber itself. This report describes the bolted window and its seal. This report also describes an alternate window that is welded directly to the absorber body. The welded window design presented permits the weld to be ground off and re-welded. This report presents a thermal FEA analysis of the window seal-weld, while the window is being welded. Finally, the results of a test of a welded-window are presented.

  2. Investigation of surface topography effects on metal flow under lubricated hot compression of aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurk, Justin Irvin

    An investigation was conducted to study the effects of die surface topography, specifically surface roughness and lay, on metal flow and the friction factor under lubricated hot compression. 6061-T6 aluminum rings and square bar stock specimens were compressed on H-13 tool steel platens machined with a unidirectional lay pattern to six different roughnesses between a R 0 10 and 240 muin. A lab based hydraulic press mounted with an experimental die set was used for all testing. Repeated trials were conducted using high temperature vegetable oil and boron nitride lubricants. Metal flow was quantified as a function of surface roughness, lay orientation, and die temperature. Approximate plane strain cigar test specimens were compressed at platen temperatures of 300 °F and 400 °F and at orientations of 0°, 45°, and 90° between the longitudinal axis and unidirectional platen surface lay. The friction factor was assessed using the ring compression test under varying platen roughness conditions and die temperatures between 250 °F and 400 °F. Results indicate metal flow is optimized at low platen roughnesses and orientations parallel to the surface lay of the platen. Die temperature was not found to influence metal flow within the temperature range investigated. The friction factor was observed to be minimized at lower die temperatures and platen roughnesses.

  3. A chrome-free conversion coating and sealant for aluminum and its alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bibber, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    For over fifty years, chromates have been the standard against which other conversion coatings and/or sealants have been judged. Due to current environmental and safety concerns, they are being removed from use. This paper presents neutral salt-spray, filiform primer adhesion and electrical conductivity data on a commercial chromate-free, inorganic and non-toxic conversion coating used with a new and unique sealing emulsion. The seal is an organic water based emulsion which when dried on a permanganate based conversion coated aluminum surface will be polymerized, or cured, when heated to 250--300 F for 20 seconds or longer. The higher the temperature, or period of time, the greater the degree of polymerization. The polymerized film is as electrically conductive as chromate films and easily accepts and bonds to applied primers. For in-service repair a conventional heat-gun maybe used. For large surfaces, any other conventional heat source may be used. The 6061-T6, 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 series wrought alloys were tested and directly compared to current chromate based conversion coatings. The tests showed equivalent or superior results in all cases.

  4. Ni-coated SiC{sub p} reinforced aluminum composites processed by vacuum infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, W.S.; Lin, S.J.

    1996-12-01

    A vacuum infiltration process has been developed to process aluminum-base composites reinforced with particulate SiC{sub p}. Electroless nickel coating of SiC{sub p} was used to improve wetting by molten aluminum. Experimental results showed that composites of aluminum with 5.9 wt % Si and 0.23 wt % Mg containing about 50 vol % Ni-coated SiC{sub p} were completely infiltrated at a temperature above 700 C. The effects of nickel coating thickness and infiltration temperature on infiltration behavior were investigated. The infiltration rate increased and the infiltration incubation time decreased with increasing infiltration temperature or nickel coating thickness. The microstructure, nickel distribution, bending strength and fracture were also examined. Nonuniformity bending strength and fracture morphology were attributed to nickel macrosegregation.

  5. Effects of thermomechanical processing on the resulting mechanical properties of 6101 aluminum foam

    SciTech Connect

    Margevicius, R.W.; Stanek, P.W.; Jacobson, L.A.

    1998-12-01

    Porous materials represent a tremendous weight savings for light-weight structural applications. The fabrication path can play a critical role in the resulting properties. High porosity aluminum was fabricated in a number of ways. The starting material was a cast 6101 aluminum that had a relative density of 9.8%. The cast aluminum block was compressed by uniaxial, biaxial, and triaxial densification. Uniaxial compression was done at room temperature and 200 C. Biaxial compression was achieved by unidirectional rolling at room temperature and 200 C. Triaxial compression was done by cold isostatic pressing at 3.4, 6.7, and 34 MPa (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0 ksi). Metallography and mechanical test specimens were machines from the processed bars. The mechanical properties showed that the relative yield strength depended both on relative density and processing temperature.

  6. Industrial process models of electricity demand. Volume 4. The aluminum industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.L.; Coward, H.; Sparrow, F.T.; Pilati, D.A.

    1984-05-01

    The National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems at Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a process model of the US aluminum industry. The model consists of the major process steps in the manufacture of milled and cast aluminum products and is designed to select modes of operation and energy consumption characteristics that minimize the cost of meeting projected demands for the industry's products. Domestic refineries and primary smelters are represented individually in the model. Industry structure in terms of plant ownership and allowed transfers of aluminum-bearing materials is explicitly modeled. With a growth in product demand of 4.2% per year, model results show a decline in electricity intensity of primary production.

  7. Superhydrophobic aluminum alloy surfaces by a novel one-step process.

    PubMed

    Saleema, N; Sarkar, D K; Paynter, R W; Chen, X-G

    2010-09-01

    A simple one-step process has been developed to render aluminum alloy surfaces superhydrophobic by immersing the aluminum alloy substrates in a solution containing NaOH and fluoroalkyl-silane (FAS-17) molecules. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurements have been performed to characterize the morphological features, chemical composition and superhydrophobicity of the surfaces. The resulting surfaces provided a water contact angle as high as ∼162° and a contact angle hysteresis as low as ∼4°. The study indicates that it is possible to fabricate superhydrophobic aluminum surfaces easily and effectively without involving the traditional two-step processes. PMID:20812666

  8. Process Modeling of Low-Pressure Die Casting of Aluminum Alloy Automotive Wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, C.; Duan, J.; Yao, L.; Maijer, D. M.; Cockcroft, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    Although on initial inspection, the aluminum alloy automotive wheel seems to be a relatively simple component to cast based on its shape, further insight reveals that this is not the case. Automotive wheels are in a select group of cast components that have strict specifications for both mechanical and aesthetic characteristics due to their important structural requirements and their visibility on a vehicle. The modern aluminum alloy automotive wheel continues to experience tightened tolerances relating to defects to improve mechanical performance and/or the physical appearance. Automotive aluminum alloy wheels are assessed against three main criteria: wheel cosmetics, mechanical performance, and air tightness. Failure to achieve the required standards in any one of these categories will lead to the wheel either requiring costly repair or being rejected and remelted. Manufacturers are becoming more reliant on computational process modeling as a design tool for the wheel casting process. This article discusses and details examples of the use of computational process modeling as a predictive tool to optimize the casting process from the standpoint of defect minimization with the emphasis on those defects that lead to failure of aluminum automotive wheels, namely, macroporosity, microporosity, and oxide films. The current state of applied computational process modeling and its limitations with regard to wheel casting are discussed.

  9. Processing and microstructural evolution of alumina/aluminum alloy and aluminum nitride/aluminum alloy composites by directed melt oxidation. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Crudele, S.D.

    1994-12-31

    An experimental investigation on the directed oxidation of aluminum-zinc alloys to produce alumina/aluminum alloy composites with and without alumina preforms has been conducted. It has been suggested in the literature that Al-Mg alloys grow composites by the dissolution of a magnesia surface layer and reprecipitation of alumina in the composite. The intent of this investigation is to reveal relevant distinctions in the proposed dissolution-reprecipitation process as they apply to a more commercially interesting Zn containing alloy with a reinforcing preform. The TGA behavior and microstructural observations on the oxidation of Al-10Zn-8Si alloys were coupled with a thermodynamic and kinetic analysis to develop a composite growth model. Experiments were carried out in air at 1000-1200 C. At the higher temperatures (greater than 1100 C), Al2O3/Al composites grow by dissolving a ZnAl2O4 (spinel) surface layer. The dissolution process releases oxygen that reprecipitates in the form of Al2O3 on the existing composite, and also releases Zn and Al which migrate upward through the spinel to regenerate the surface oxide. Composite growth may only occur when the surface regenerates at a rate comparable with that of the dissolution process. At the lower temperatures, 1000 C, the composite growth is limited by the spinel regeneration process, and becomes intermittent. The addition of Mg to this alloy allows normal composite growth by the dissolution of a surface (Zn,Mg)Al2O4 layer at the lower temperatures, 980-1060 C, but leads to heterogeneous microstructures with voids as the temperature increases above approximately 1060 C. The directed oxidation of an Al-Zn alloy into porous alumina preforms yields an Al2O3/Al composite matrix which fills the preform interstices. Al-10Zn-8Si-0.25Mg alloys that are oxidized from 960-1100 C, and Al-10Zn-8Si alloys that are oxidized at 800-1000 C climb up the preform particle.

  10. Penetration experiments in aluminum 1100 targets using soda-lime glass projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark J.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William E.; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas H.; Winkler, Jerry L.

    1995-01-01

    The cratering and penetration behavior of annealed aluminum 1100 targets, with thickness varied from several centimeters to ultra-thin foils less than 1 micrometer thick, were experimentally investigated using 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at velocities from 1 to 7 km/s. The objective was to establish quantitative, dimensional relationships between initial impact conditions (impact velocity, projectile diameter, and target thickness) and the diameter of the resulting crater or penetration hole. Such dimensional relationships and calibration experiments are needed to extract the diameters and fluxes of hypervelocity particles from space-exposed surfaces and to predict the performance of certain collisional shields. The cratering behavior of aluminum 1100 is fairly well predicted. However, crater depth is modestly deeper for our silicate impactors than the canonical value based on aluminum projectiles and aluminum 6061-T6 targets. The ballistic-limit thickness was also different. These differences attest to the great sensitivity of detailed crater geometry and penetration behavior on the physical properties of both the target and impactor. Each penetration experiment was equipped with a witness plate to monitor the nature of the debris plume emanating from the rear of the target. This plume consists of both projectile fragments and target debris. Both penetration hole and witness-plate spray patterns systematically evolve in response to projectile diameter/target thickness. The relative dimensions of the projectile and target totally dominate the experimental products documented in this report; impact velocity is an important contributor as well to the evolution of penetration holes, but is of subordinate significance for the witness-plate spray patterns.

  11. In-flight oxidation of aluminum in the twin-wire electric arc process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Donna Post; Williams, Brian G.

    2006-03-01

    This paper examines the in-flight oxidation of aluminum sprayed in air using the twin-wire electric arc (TWEA) thermal spray process. Aerodynamic shear at the droplet surface increases the amount of in-flight oxidation by promoting entrainment of the surface oxides within the molten droplet and continually exposing fresh fluid available for oxidation. Mathematical predictions herein confirm experimental measurements that reveal an elevated, nearly constant surface temperature (˜2273 K) of the droplets during flight. The calculated oxide volume fraction of a “typical” droplet with internal circulation compares favorably to the experimentally determined oxide content (3.3 12.7%) for a typical TWEA-sprayed aluminum coating sprayed onto a room temperature substrate. It is concluded that internal circulation within the molten aluminum droplet is a significant source of oxidation. This effect produces an oxide content nearly two orders of magnitude larger than that of a droplet without continual oxidation.

  12. Formation and emission of brominated dioxins and furans during secondary aluminum smelting processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Liu, Guorui; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Li, Sumei; Liu, Wenbin; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-03-01

    Secondary aluminum smelting (SAl) processes have previously been found to be important sources of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs). It is crucial that the key factors that influence the formation and emission of PBDD/Fs are identified to allow techniques for decreasing PBDD/F emissions during SAl processes to be developed. In this study, stack gas samples were collected from four typical secondary aluminum smelters that used different raw materials, and the samples were analyzed to allow differences between PBDD/F emissions from different SAl plants to be assessed. The composition of the raw materials was found to be one of the key factors influencing the amounts of PBDD/Fs emitted. The PBDD/F emission factors (per tonne of aluminum produced) for the plants using 100% (Plant1), 80% (Plant2), and 50% (Plant3) dirty aluminum scrap in the raw material feed were 180, 86, and 14 μg t(-1), respectively. The amounts of PBDD/Fs emitted at different stages of the smelting process (feeding-fusion, refining, and casting) were compared, and the feeding-fusion stage was found to be the main stage in which PBDD/Fs were formed and emitted. Effective aluminum scrap pretreatments could significantly decrease PBDD/F emissions. Much higher polybrominated dibenzofuran concentrations than polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxin concentrations were found throughout the SAl process. The more-brominated congeners (including octabromodibenzo-p-dioxin, octabromodibenzofuran, heptabromodibenzo-p-dioxins, and heptabromodibenzofurans) were the dominant contributors to the total PBDD/F concentrations. The results could help in the development of techniques and strategies for controlling PBDD/F emissions during metallurgical processes. PMID:26706932

  13. Cleaning process for corrugated aluminum electrical transmission line enclosure

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Gary K.

    1984-07-24

    A process for preparing the interior of a corrugated pipe or sheath comprises the steps of placing a predetermined amount of a tumbling abrasive material into the sheath, and then rotating the sheath.

  14. Development and Processing Improvement of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. Barry; Bales, Thomas T.

    2007-01-01

    This final report, in multiple presentation format, describes a comprehensive multi-tasked contract study to improve the overall property response of selected aerospace alloys, explore further a newly-developed and registered alloy, and correlate the processing, metallurgical structure, and subsequent properties achieved with particular emphasis on the crystallographic orientation texture developed. Modifications to plate processing, specifically hot rolling practices, were evaluated for Al-Li alloys 2195 and 2297, for the recently registered Al-Cu-Ag alloy, 2139, and for the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy, 7050. For all of the alloys evaluated, the processing modifications resulted in significant improvements in mechanical properties. Analyses also resulted in an enhanced understanding of the correlation of processing, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties.

  15. Processing of aluminum 7075-T73 components after prolonged storage

    SciTech Connect

    Guilinger, T.R.; Stevenson, J.O.; Yang, R.G.; Buchheit, R.G.; Schmale, D.T.; Shin, K.; Martinez, F.E.; Webb, L.; Stimetz, C.J.

    1996-06-01

    Three years ago, production requirements for a T73-tempered aluminium 7075 (Al 7075-T73) component were curtailed and the ``in-process`` parts were stored. During recent attempts to complete processing, visible defects were discovered in this component. Defects at such an early stage in the 20+ year lifetime of the component pose reliability concerns. Chemical and microstructural analysis, mechanical testing, and corrosion evaluation were performed to determine the impact of the defects on material properties.

  16. Fusion boundary microstructure evolution in aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrivas, Anastasios Dimitrios

    2000-10-01

    A melting technique was developed to simulate the fusion boundary of aluminum alloys using the GleebleRTM thermal simulator. Using a steel sleeve to contain the aluminum, samples were heated to incremental temperatures above the solidus temperature of a number of alloys. In alloy 2195, a 4wt%Cu-1wt%Li alloy, an equiaxed non-dendritic zone (EQZ) could be formed by heating in the temperature range from approximately 630 to 640°C. At temperatures above 640°C, solidification occurred by the normal epitaxial nucleation and growth mechanism. Fusion boundary behavior was also studied in alloys 5454-H34, 6061-T6, and 2219-T8. Additionally, experimental alloy compositions were produced by making bead on plate welds using an alloy 5454-H32 base metal and 5025 or 5087 filler metals. These filler metals contain zirconium and scandium additions, respectively, and were expected to influence nucleation and growth behavior. Both as-welded and welded/heat treated (540°C and 300°C) substrates were tested by melting simulation, resulting in dendritic and EQZ structures depending on composition and substrate condition. Orientation imaging microscopy (OIM(TM)) was employed to study the crystallographic character of the microstructures produced and to verify the mechanism responsible for EQZ formation. OIM(TM) proved that grains within the EQZ have random orientation. In all other cases, where the simulated microstructures were dendritic in nature, it was shown that epitaxy was the dominant mode of nucleation. The lack of any preferred crystallographic orientation relationship in the EQZ supports a theory proposed by Lippold et al that the EQZ is the result of heterogeneous nucleation within the weld unmixed zone. EDS analysis of the 2195 on STEM revealed particles with ternary composition consisted of Zr, Cu and Al and a tetragonal type crystallographic lattice. Microdiffraction line scans on EQZ grains in the alloy 2195 showed very good agreement between the measured Cu

  17. NBS: Nondestructive evaluation of nonuniformities in 2219 aluminum alloy plate: Relationship to processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartzendruber, L.; Boettinger, W.; Ives, L.; Coriell, S.; Ballard, D.; Laughlin, D.; Clough, R.; Biancanieilo, F.; Blau, P.; Cahn, J.

    1980-01-01

    The compositional homogeneity, microstructure, hardness, electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of 2219 aluminum alloy plates are influenced by the process variables during casting, rolling and thermomechanical treatment. The details of these relationships wre investigated for correctly processed 2219 plate as well as for deviations caused by improper quenching after solution heat treatment. Primary emphasis was been placed on the reliability of eddy current electrical conductivity and hardness as NDE tools to detect variations in mechanical properties.

  18. A Process for Producing Highly Wettable Aluminum 6061 Surfaces Compatible with Hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, N. R.; Ferraro, N. W.; Yue, A. F.; Estes, R. H.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an ongoing Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) project whose basic objective is to improve global precipitation measurements. The space-based portion of the mission architecture consists of a primary or core spacecraft and a constellation of NASA and contributed spacecrafts. The efforts described in this paper refer to the core spacecraft (hereafter referred to as simply GPM) which is to be fabricated at GSFC. It has been decided that the GPM spacecraft is to be a "design-for-demise-spacecraft." This requirement resulted in the need for a propellant tank that would also demise or ablate to an appropriate degree upon re-entry. Composite overwrapped aluminum lined propellant tanks with aluminum propellant management devices (PMD) were shown by analyses to demise and thus became the baseline configuration for GPM. As part of the GPM tank development effort, long term compatibility and wettability testing with hydrazine was performed on Al6061 and 2219 coupons fabricated and cleaned by conventional processes. Long term compatibility was confirmed. However, the wettability of the aluminum as measured by contact angle produced higher than desired angles (greater than 30 deg.) with excessive scatter. The availability of PMD materials exhibiting consistently low contact angles aids in the design of simple PMDs. Two efforts performed by Angeles Crest Engineering and funded by GSFC were undertaken to reduce the risk of using aluminum for the GPM PMD. The goal of the first effort was to develop a cleaning or treatment process to produce consistently low contact angles. The goal of the second effort was to prove via testing that the processed aluminum would retain compatibility with hydrazine and retain low contact angle after long term exposure to hydrazine. Both goals were achieved. This paper describes both efforts and the results achieved.

  19. Fatigue properties of an 1421 aluminum alloy processed by ECAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogucheva, A.; Kaibyshev, R.

    2010-07-01

    Fatigue properties and fatigue crack growth rate were examined in an Al-Mg-Li-Sc-Zr allow subjected to equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) with rectangular shape of channels up to a total strain of ~4 at a temperature of 325°C followed by solution treatment with subsequent oil quenching with aging. After this processing the fraction recrystallized was ~80pct; the deformed microstructure remains essentially unchanged under solution treatment due to high density of Al3Sc coherent dispersoids playing a role of effective pinning agents. It was shown that the fatigue limit of this material attained a value of ~185 MPa. Thermomechanical processing provided a decrease in fatigue crack propagation growth rate and an increase in the stress intensity factor, K1c, in comparison with extruded bar. However, characteristics of crack propagation resistance did not attain values suitable for application of this alloy for critical aircraft components.

  20. Optimization of chlorine fluxing process for magnesium removal from molten aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Qian

    High-throughput and low operational cost are the keys to a successful industrial process. Much aluminum is now recycled in the form of used beverage cans and this aluminum is of alloys that contain high levels of magnesium. It is common practice to "demag" the metal by injecting chlorine that preferentially reacts with the magnesium. In the conventional chlorine fluxing processes, low reaction efficiency results in excessive reactive gas emissions. In this study, through an experimental investigation of the reaction kinetics involved in this process, a mathematical model is set up for the purpose of process optimization. A feedback controlled chlorine reduction process strategy is suggested for demagging the molten aluminum to the desired magnesium level without significant gas emissions. This strategy also needs the least modification of the existing process facility. The suggested process time will only be slightly longer than conventional methods and chlorine usage and emissions will be reduced. In order to achieve process optimization through novel designs in any fluxing process, a system is necessary for measuring the bubble distribution in liquid metals. An electro-resistivity probe described in the literature has low accuracy and its capability to measure bubble distribution has not yet been fully demonstrated. A capacitance bubble probe was designed for bubble measurements in molten metals. The probe signal was collected and processed digitally. Higher accuracy was obtained by higher discrimination against corrupted signals. A single-size bubble experiment in Belmont metal was designed to reveal the characteristic response of the capacitance probe. This characteristic response fits well with a theoretical model. It is suggested that using a properly designed deconvolution process, the actual bubble size distribution can be calculated. The capacitance probe was used to study some practical bubble generation devices. Preliminary results on bubble distribution

  1. X-ray and neutron diffraction measurements of dislocation density and subgrain size in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Claussen, Bjorn; Woo, Wanchuck; Zhili, Feng; Edward, Kenik; Ungar, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10{sup 14} m{sup 02} and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  2. Salt Spray Test to Determine Galvanic Corrosion Levels of Electroless Nickel Connectors Mounted on an Aluminum Bracket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolin, T. D.; Hodge, R. E.; Torres, P. D.; Jones, D. D.; Laird, K. R.

    2014-01-01

    During preliminary vehicle design reviews, requests were made to change flight termination systems from an electroless nickel (EN) connector coating to a zinc-nickel (ZN) plating. The reason for these changes was due to a new NASA-STD-6012 corrosion requirement where connectors must meet the performance requirement of 168 hr of exposure to salt spray. The specification for class F connectors, MIL-DTL-38999, certifies the EN coating will meet a 48-hr salt spray test, whereas the ZN is certified to meet a 168-hr salt spray test. The ZN finish is a concern because Marshall Space Flight Center has no flight experience with ZN-finished connectors, and MSFC-STD-3012 indicates that zinc and zinc alloys should not be used. The purpose of this test was to run a 168-hr salt spray test to verify the electrical and mechanical integrity of the EN connectors and officially document the results. The salt spray test was conducted per ASTM B117 on several MIL-DTL-38999 flight-like connectors mounted to an aluminum 6061-T6 bracket that was alodined. The configuration, mounting techniques, electrical checks, and materials used were typical of flight and ground support equipment.

  3. Porous aluminum room temperature anodizing process in a fluorinated-oxalic acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhahri, S.; Fazio, E.; Barreca, F.; Neri, F.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2016-08-01

    Anodizing of aluminum is used for producing porous insulating films suitable for different applications in electronics and microelectronics. Porous-type aluminum films are most simply realized by galvanostatic anodizing in aqueous acidic solutions. The improvement in application of anodizing technique is associated with a substantial reduction of the anodizing voltage at appropriate current densities as well as to the possibility to carry out the synthesis process at room temperature in order to obtain a self-planarizing dielectric material incorporated in array of super-narrow metal lines. In this work, the anodizing of aluminum to obtain porous oxide was carried out, at room temperature, on three different substrates (glass, stainless steel and aluminum), using an oxalic acid-based electrolyte with the addition of a relatively low amount of 0.4 % of HF. Different surface morphologies, from nearly spherical to larger porous nanostructures with smooth edges, were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy. These evidences are explained by considering the formation, transport and adsorption of the fluorine species which react with the Al3+ ions. The behavior is also influenced by the nature of the original substrate.

  4. Conical shaped charge pressed powder, metal liner jet characterization and penetration in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.G.

    1997-05-01

    This work was conducted as part of a Near-wellbore Mechanics program at Sandia National Laboratories. An understanding of the interaction of the perforator jet from an explosive shaped charge with the fluid filled porous sandstone media is of basic importance to the completion of oil wells. Tests were conducted using the five-head Flash X-ray Test Site to measure the jet tip velocities and jet geometry for the OMNI and CAPSULE Conical Shaped Charge (CSC) oil well perforator jets fired into air. These tests were conducted to generate jet velocity and geometry information to be used in validating the CTH hydrocode modeling/simulation development of pressed powder, metal liner jets in air. Ten tests were conducted to determine the CSC jet penetration into 6061-T6 aluminum targets. Five tests were conducted with the OMNI CSC at 0.25, 6.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. Five tests were conducted with the CAPSULE CSC at 0.60, 5.0, 10.0, and 19 inch standoffs from the target. These tests were conducted to generate jet penetration into homogeneous target information for use in validating the CTH code modeling/simulation of pressed powder, metal liner jets penetrating aluminum targets. The Flash X-ray radiographs, jet velocities, jet diameters, and jet lengths data for jets fired into air are presented in this report. The jet penetration into aluminum and penetration hole profile data are also presented for the OMNI and CAPSULE perforators. Least Squares fits are presented for the measured jet velocity and jet penetration data.

  5. Effects of Forging Process Parameters on Microstructure Evolution of Aluminum Alloy 7050

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Youping; Shi Yan; Yang Jihui; Lin Yongcheng

    2007-04-07

    The objective of this work is to investigate the behavior of microstructure evolution of aluminum alloy 7050 under the condition of different forging process parameters by means of combining materials physical model with finite element code. For the purpose of establishing constitutive equation and physical model of microstructure evolution, the isothermal compression test were performed by machine Gleeble 1500 on the condition of temperatures ranging from 250 deg. C to 450 deg. C and constant strain rates of 0.01s-1, 0.1s-1, 1s-1 and 10s-1. The behaviors of microstructure evolutions of aluminum alloy 7050 under difference process parameters were studied by metallographic observations. The experiment results showed that recrystallization during forming process occurred at the critical strain and the volume fraction of recrystallization changed with the temperature and strain rate. According to the results of isothermal compression test, a constitutive equation and an empirical model of DRX were obtained. A finite element code DEFORM 3D was used to analyze the influence of different forging process parameters on the behavior of microstructure evolution in details. The present model and simulation method can be served as a useful tool to predict and control the properties and shape of aluminum alloy 7050 components during forging.

  6. Metallurgical Evaluations of Depainting Processes on Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Preston

    1999-01-01

    In December 1993, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Emission Standards Division and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) signed an Interagency Agreement (IA) initiating a task force for the technical assessment of alternative technologies for aerospace depainting operations. The United States Air Force (USAF) joined the task force in 1994. The mandates of the task force were: (1) To identify available alternative depainting systems that do not rely on methylene chloride or other ozone-depleting, chlorinated, and volatile organic carbon solvents. (2) To determine the viability, applicability, and pollution prevention potential of each identified alternative. (3) To address issues of safety, environmental impact, reliability, and maintainability. Through a Technical Implementation Committee (TIC), the task force selected and evaluated eight alternative paint stripping technologies: chemical stripping, carbon dioxide (CO2) blasting, xenon flashlamp and CO2 coatings removal (FLASHJET(R)), CO2 laser stripping, plastic media blasting (PMB), sodium bicarbonate wet stripping, high-pressure water blasting (WaterJet), and wheat starch abrasive blasting (Enviro-Strip(R)). (The CO2 blasting study was discontinued after the first depainting sequence.) This final report presents the results of the Joint EPA/NASA/USAF Interagency Depainting Study. Significant topics include: (1) Final depainting sequence data for the chemical stripping, PMB, sodium bicarbonate wet stripping, and WaterJet processes. (2) Strip rates for all eight technologies. (3) Sequential comparisons of surface roughness measurements for the seven viable depainting technologies. (4) Chronological reviews of and lessons learned in the conduct of all eight technologies. (5) An analysis of the surface roughness trends for each of the seven technologies. (6) Metallurgic evaluations of panels Summaries of corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement

  7. Chemical and Electrochemical Processing of Aluminum Dross Using Molten Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiao Y.

    2008-04-01

    A novel molten salt process was investigated, where Al, as metal or contained in Al2O3 and AlN, was recovered from Al dross by chemical or direct electrochemical reduction in electrolytic cells. Electrolysis experiments were carried out under argon at temperatures from 1123 to 1243 K. In order to better understand the reduction behavior, the as-received Al dross was simulated using simplified systems, including pure Al2O3, pure AlN, an Al2O3/AlN binary mixture, and an Al2O3/AlN/Al ternary mixture. The reduction of the as-received dross was also studied experimentally. The studies showed that solid Al2O3 was chemically reduced by the Ca in a Ca-saturated Ca-CaCl2 melt to form Al2Ca or electrochemically reduced to Al-rich Al-Ca alloys and that the Al value in the Al2O3 was easily recovered from the Al drosses. It was found experimentally that solid AlN in the drosses could not be calciothermically reduced to any extent, consistent with thermodynamic evaluations. It was also found that the direct electrochemical reduction of the AlN in the drosses was confined to three phase boundaries (3PBs) between the AlN, the electrolyte, and the current collector and could not be enhanced by using the LiCl-containing chloride melt or the chloride-fluoride melts studied. The presence of Al powder in the Al2O3/AlN mixture facilitated the direct electrochemical reduction of both Al2O3 and AlN. The reduction mechanisms are discussed based upon the present experimental observations. Flow sheets for recovering the metallic Al and the Al in the Al2O3 and AlN from Al dross are finally proposed.

  8. Production of Gas-Solid Structures in Aluminum and Nickel Alloys by Gasar Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Apprill, J.M.; Baldwin, M.D.; Maguire, M.C.; Miszkiel, M.E.; Shapovalov, V.I.

    1999-01-06

    Experimental data on directional and bulk solidification of hydrogen-charged samples of aluminum alloy A356 and nickel alloy Inconel 718 are discussed. The solidification structure of the porous zone is shown to be dependent on many process variables. Of these variables, hydrogen content in the melt prior to solidification, and furnace atmospheric pressure during solidification play the decisive role. Also important are the furnace atmosphere composition, the solidification velocity, and the temperature distribution of the liquid metal inside the mold.

  9. DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION ON DWPF PROCESSING OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE - 9382

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

    2009-01-14

    The SRS sludge that was to become a major fraction of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) contained a large fraction of H-Modified PUREX (HM) sludge, containing a large fraction of aluminum compounds that could adversely impact the processing and increase the vitrified waste volume. It is beneficial to reduce the non-radioactive fraction of the sludge to minimize the number of glass waste canisters that must be sent to a Federal Repository. Removal of aluminum compounds, such as boehmite and gibbsite, from sludge can be performed with the addition of NaOH solution and heating the sludge for several days. Preparation of SB5 involved adding sodium hydroxide directly to the waste tank and heating the contents to a moderate temperature through slurry pump operation to remove a fraction of this aluminum. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with demonstrating this process on actual tank waste sludge in our Shielded Cells Facility. This paper evaluates some of the impacts of aluminum dissolution on sludge washing and DWPF processing by comparing sludge processing with and without aluminum dissolution. It was necessary to demonstrate these steps to ensure that the aluminum removal process would not adversely impact the chemical and physical properties of the sludge which could result in slower processing or process upsets in the DWPF.

  10. Development and Processing of Novel Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Materials for Heat Sink Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. J. B.; Corbin, S. F.; Hexemer, R. L.; Donaldson, I. W.; Bishop, Donald Paul

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this research was to design aluminum powder metallurgy (PM) alloys and processing strategies that yielded sintered products with thermal properties that rivaled those of the cast and wrought aluminum alloys traditionally employed in heat sink manufacturing. Research has emphasized PM alloys within the Al-Mg-Sn system. In one sub-theme of research, the general processing response of each PM alloy was investigated through a combination of sintering trials, sintered density measurements, and microstructural assessments. In the second, the thermal properties of sintered products were studied in detail. Thermal conductivity was first determined using a calculated approach through discrete measurements of specific heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and density and subsequently verified using a transient plane source technique on larger specimens. Experimental PM alloys achieved >99 pct theoretical density and exhibited thermal conductivity that ranged from 179 to 225 W/m K. Thermal performance was largely dominated by the amount of magnesium present within the aluminum grains and, in turn, bulk alloy chemistry. Data confirmed that the novel PM alloys were highly competitive with even the most advanced heat sink materials such as wrought 6063 and 6061.

  11. Defluoridation of groundwater using aluminum-coated bauxite: Optimization of synthesis process conditions and equilibrium study.

    PubMed

    Salifu, Abdulai; Petrusevski, Branislav; Mwampashi, Emmanuel S; Pazi, Iddi A; Ghebremichael, Kebreab; Buamah, Richard; Aubry, Cyril; Amy, Gary L; Kenedy, Maria D

    2016-10-01

    There is no known effective treatment for fluoride-related health disorders, hence prevention through water defluoridation is necessary. This study explored the possibility of modifying the physico-chemical properties of bauxite, a locally available material in many countries including Ghana, by thermal treatment and an aluminum coating, for water defluoridation. The study mainly focused on investigating the effects of varying synthesis process conditions on the defluoridation efficiency of Granular Aluminum Coated Bauxite (GACB). GACB performed better than raw bauxite (RB) and was able to reduce fluoride concentration in groundwater from 5 ± 0.2 mg/L to ≤ 1.5 mg/L, World Health Organization (WHO) guideline. Based on nonlinear Chi-square (χ(2)) analysis, the best-fitting isotherm model for the fluoride-GACB system was in the order: Freundlich > Redlich-Perterson ≈ Langmuir > Temkin. The fluoride adsorption capacity of GACB (qmax = 12.29 mg/g) based on the Langmuir model was found to be either comparable or higher than the capacities of some reported fluoride adsorbents. Aluminum (Al) coating procedures optimized in this study could therefore be a useful approach for synthesizing an effective fluoride adsorbent using bauxite, a locally available material. Kinetic and isotherm analysis, thermodynamic calculations, as well as FTIR and Raman analysis suggested the mechanism of fluoride adsorption onto GACB was complex and involved both physical adsorption and chemisorption processes. PMID:27327859

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 11H AND TANK 51H POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION PROCESS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

    2008-05-16

    A dip sample of the liquid phase from Tank 11H and a 3-L slurry sample from Tank 51H were obtained and sent to Savannah River National Laboratory for characterization. These samples provide data to verify the amount of aluminum dissolved from the sludge as a result of the low temperature aluminum dissolution process conducted in Tank 51H. The characterization results for the as-received Tank 11H and Tank 51H supernate samples and the total dried solids of the Tank 51H sludge slurry sample appear quite good with respect to the precision of the sample replicates and minimal contamination present in the blank. The two supernate samples show similar concentrations for the major components as expected.

  13. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode ARC furnace

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, Gerald W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spent aluminum pot liner is crushed iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine and CO.

  14. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode arc furnace

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, G.W.

    2002-12-24

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spend aluminum pot liner is crushed, iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine, and CO.

  15. Process for producing gallium-containing solution from aluminum smelting dust

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, H.; Matsui, S.; Era, A.

    1988-02-16

    A process for producing a gallium-containing solution from aluminum smelting dust is described comprising mixing aluminum smelting dust with 5 to 50% by weight of an alkaline flux selected from the group consisting of sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide, potassium carbonate, potassium hydroxide and mixtures thereof, heating the mixture to a temperature sufficient to roast the mixture without fusing the mixture, leaching the roasted mixture at a temperature of 80/sup 0/C. to 100/sup 0/C. with a mineral acid selected from the group consisting of sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, nitric acid and mixtures thereof to preferentially solubilize gallium from other material in the roasted mixture, and filtering the leached mixture to separate the solubilized gallium solution therefrom.

  16. Recrystallization Phenomena During Friction Stir Processing of Hypereutectic Aluminum-Silicon Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, A. G.; Ravi, K. R.; Ramakrishnarao, B.; Deshmukh, V. P.; Sharma, A.; Prabhu, N.; Kashyap, B. P.

    2013-03-01

    Microstructural evolution and related dynamic recrystallization phenomena were investigated in overlapping multipass friction stir processing (FSP) of hypereutectic Al-30 pct Si alloy. FSP resulted in the elimination of porosities along with the refinement of primary silicon particles and alpha aluminum grains. These alpha aluminum grains predominantly exhibit high angle boundaries with various degrees of recovered substructure and dislocation densities. The substructure and grain formation during FSP take place primarily by annihilation and reorganization of dislocations in the grain interior and at low angle grain boundary. During multipass overlap FSP, small second phase particles were observed to form, which are accountable for pinning the grain boundaries and thus restricting their growth. During the multipass overlap FSP, the microstructure undergoes continuous dynamic recrystallization by formation of the subgrain boundary and subgrain growth to the grain structure comprising of mostly high angle grain boundaries.

  17. Design, process development, manufacture, test and evaluation of boron-aluminum for space shuttle components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, R. A.; Niemann, J. T.; Otto, O. R.; Brown, N. M.; Heinrich, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A multi phase boron-aluminum design and evaluation program for space shuttle components was conducted, culminating in the fabrication of a 1.22 m (48 inch) x 1.83 m (72 inch) boron-aluminum compression panel capable of distributing a point load of 1555 kN (350,000 lbs) into a uniform running load at a temperature of 589 K (600 F). This panel was of the skin-stringer construction with two intermediate frame supports; seven unidirectional stringers varied in thickness from 5 plies to 52 plies and the skin was contoured to thicknesses ranging from 10 plies to 62 plies. Both the stringers and the skin incorporated Ti-6Al-4V titanium interleaves to increase bearing and in-plane shear strength. The discrete program phases were materials evaluation, design studies, process technology development, fabrication and assembly, and test and evaluation.

  18. An investigation on diffusion bonding of aluminum to copper using equal channel angular extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Eslami, P; Taheri, A Karimi

    2011-06-30

    A new method for production of bimetallic rods, utilizing the equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) process has been introduced before by previous researchers, but no attempt has been made to assess the effect of different temperatures and holding times in order to achieve a diffusional bond between the mating surfaces. In present research copper sheathed aluminum rods have been ECAEed at room temperature and subsequently held at a constant ECAE pressure, at different temperatures and holding times to produce a diffusional bond between the copper sheath and the aluminum core. The bonding quality of the joints was examined by shear strength test and a sound bonding interface was achieved. Based on the results, a bonding temperature of 200 °C and holding time of 60-80 min yielded the highest shear strength value. PMID:21760654

  19. Welding Phenomenon and Removal Mechanism of Aluminum-Oxide Films by Space GHTA Welding Process in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Ekuni, Tomohide; Kamei, Misa; Tsukuda, Yoshiyuki; Terajima, Noboru; Yamashita, Masahiro; Imagawa, Kichiro; Masubuchi, Koichi

    Aluminum alloys have been widely used in constructing various space structures including the ISS (International Space Station) and launch vehicles. In order to apply the welding technology in space, welding experiments on aluminum alloy were performed using by the GHTA (Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc) welding processes using an inverter controlled DC/AC GTA welding machine in vacuum. We observed the removal mechanism of aluminum-oxide films on molten metal in detail during the welding using a high-speed video camera. As a result, it is clarified that the impact arc pressure produced by pulsed current mechanically crushes and removes aluminum-oxide films on the molten pool. This removal mechanism of aluminum-oxide films is completely different from a removal mechanism by cleaning action.

  20. Determination of Ideal Broth Formulations Needed to Prepare Hydrous Aluminum Oxide Microspheres via the Internal Gelation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack Lee; Pye, S. L.

    2009-02-01

    A simple test-tube methodology was used to determine optimum process parameters for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide microspheres by the internal gelation process. Broth formulations of aluminum, hexamethylenetetramine, and urea were found that can be used to prepare hydrous aluminum oxide gel spheres in the temperature range of 60-90 C. A few gel-forming runs were made in which microspheres were prepared with some of these formulations in order to equate the test-tube gelation times with actual gelation times. These preparations confirmed that the test-tube methodology is reliable for determining the ideal broths.

  1. Processing and characterization of in-situ aluminum bronze titanium carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Balathandan S.

    The present study was carried out to develop a process for manufacturing in-situ aluminum bronze titanium carbide (TiC) friction drums using the centrifugal casting method and to characterize the material under optimum performance. The in-situ method of manufacturing is based on the reactive gas injection technique (RGI). The gas used in this study is high purity methane (CH 4). It was found that the methane gas injection time into the molten bath of aluminum bronze alloyed with titanium promotes the formation of titanium carbide (TiC) in the bronze matrix. The maximum amount of TiC incorporated in the matrix was 3.1 wt.%. This lead to 11.5 wt.% incorporation of TiC in the inner diameter of centrifugal castings as carbide particles drifted towards this region due to the centrifugal forces and their relatively low density. The hardness and strength of these composites when compared with the as cast condition was improved by heat treatment. However, the alloy ductility was decreased at the expense of the strength. It was found that the wear resistance properties of the composites were superior to those of pure cast and heat treated aluminum bronze currently in use. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy indicated that the composite surfaces did not scratch deeply when wearing against a hardened 4340 steel. The wear resistance of the as cast aluminum bronze was inferior to that of heat treated one. Moreover, the heat treated aluminum bronze showed a lack of high abrasion resistance. The frictional coefficient was relatively low for the as cast aluminum bronze as a result of adhesive wear behavior for the load and speed chosen in this present investigation. The corrosion studies showed that these composites do not lead to improved corrosion resistance in marine water environments. Apparently, there is a galvanic corrosion of TiC to bronze. In addition, pitting was observed on the corroded surfaces and increased with the volume fraction of TiC. Model validation was

  2. Properties of Aluminum Deposited by a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fueled Process

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Decker, T A; Gansert, R V; Gansert, D; Lee, D

    2001-06-12

    Aluminum coatings deposited by a HVOF process have been demonstrated and relevant coating properties evaluated according to two deposition parameters, the spray distance and the oxygen-to-fuel flow ratio. The coating porosity, surface roughness, and microhardness are measured. The coating properties are fairly insensitive to spray distance, the distance between the nozzle and the workpiece, and fuel ratios, the oxygen-to-fuel flow. Increasing the fuel content does appear to improve the process productivity in terms of surface roughness. Minimization of nozzle loading is discussed.

  3. Growth process of nanosized aluminum thin films by pulsed laser deposition for fluorescence enhancement.

    PubMed

    Abdellaoui, N; Pillonnet, A; Berndt, J; Boulmer-Leborgne, C; Kovacevic, E; Moine, B; Penuelas, J; Pereira, A

    2015-03-20

    Pulsed laser deposition was used to deposit aluminum thin films of various thicknesses (tAl) ranging from 5 to 40 nm and to investigate their growth process when they are deposited onto SiO2 and Y2O3. Atomic force microscopy and x-ray reflectivity measurements show that the structure of the Al films are related to the wettability properties of the underlaying layer. Onto SiO2, ultra-smooth layers of aluminum are obtained, due to a perfect wetting of SiO2 by Al. In contrast when deposited onto Y2O3, percolated Al layers are observed with apparent pore size decreasing from 200 to 82 nm as t(Al) is increased from 5 to 40 nm, respectively. This particular morphology is related to partial dewetting of Al on Y2O3. These two different growth mechanisms of aluminum depend therefore on the surface properties of SiO2 and Y2O3. The plasmon resonance of such Al nanostructures in the UV region was then analyzed by studying the coupling between Eu(3+) rare earth emitters and Al. PMID:25712708

  4. Annealing of chromium oxycarbide coatings deposited by plasma immersion ion processing (PIIP) for aluminum die casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, A. M.; He, X. M.; Trkula, M.; Nastasi, M.

    2001-04-01

    Chromium oxycarbide coatings have been investigated for use as non-wetting coatings for aluminum die casting. This paper examines Cr-C-O coating stability and non-wetability at elevated temperatures for extended periods. Coatings were deposited onto 304 stainless steel from chromium carbonyl [Cr(CO) 6] by plasma immersion ion processing. The coatings were annealed in air at an aluminum die casting temperature of 700°C up to 8 h. Coatings were analyzed using resonant ion backscattering spectroscopy, nanoindentation and pin-on-disk tribometry. Molten aluminum was used to determine coating wetting and contact angle. Results indicate that the surface oxide layer reaches a maximum thickness of 900 nm. Oxygen concentrations in the coatings increased from 24% to 34%, while the surface concentration rose to almost 45%. Hardness values ranged from 22.1 to 6.7 GPa, wear coefficients ranged from 21 to 8×10 -6 mm3/ Nm and contact angles ranged from 156° to 127°.

  5. Characterization of ultrafine-grained aluminum tubes processed by Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression (TCEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Babaei, A. Mashhadi, M.M.

    2014-09-15

    Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression as a novel severe plastic deformation technique for tubes was utilized for processing ultrafine grained 1050 aluminum alloy for the first time. In this method, aluminum tube is fully constrained and deformed between mandrel and chamber with a small neck zone. The material deformation during Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression processing analyzed and the grain refinement mechanism were described. The capability of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression in grain refinement of the aluminum alloy was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy observations and X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. The micrographs of the evolved microstructure show grain size of 850 nm and 550 nm after the first and second processing cycles of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression, respectively. Mechanical properties of the initial and processed specimens were extracted from ring-hoop tensile tests. The documented results confirm grain refinement by showing remarkable increase in the yield and ultimate strengths. The main increase in strength and decrease in elongation take place after the first cycle. The microhardness assessments illustrate increase from the initial value of 29 Hv to 44 and 49 Hv respectively after the first and second cycles of Tube Cyclic Extrusion–Compression. There is a good homogeneity in peripheral microhardness and microhardness across the tube thickness. - Highlights: • Tubes of AA1050 for the first time were successfully SPD processed by TCEC. • The grain size was refined to 550 nm after two cycles of TCEC. • Notable increase in the strength and decrease in the elongation were documented. • The microhardness increased to 49 Hv from the initial value of 29 Hv. • Good homogeneity in the microhardness distribution was recorded.

  6. Computer-assisted Rheo-forging Processing of A356 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2010-06-01

    Die casting process has been used widely for complex automotive products such as the knuckle, arm and etc. Generally, a part fabricated by casting has limited strength due to manufacturing defects by origin such as the dendrite structure and segregation. As an attempt to offer a solution to these problems, forging has been used as an alternative process. However, the forging process provides limited formability for complex shape products. Rheo-forging of metal offers not only superior mechanical strength but also requires significantly lower machine loads than solid forming processes. In order to produce semi-solid materials of the desired microstructure, a stirring process is applied during solidification of A356 aluminum molten state. This paper presents the results of an A356 aluminum alloy sample, which were obtained by experiment and by simulation using DEFORM 3D V6.1. Samples of metal parts were subsequently fabricated by using hydraulic press machinery. In order to compare the influence of loading method, two types of samples were fabricated: (1) samples fabricated under direct loading die sets (2) those fabricated under indirect loading die sets. The formability and defects, which were predicted by FEM simulation, were similar to those of samples used in practice.

  7. Computer-assisted Rheo-forging Processing of A356 Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H. H.; Kang, C. G.

    2010-06-15

    Die casting process has been used widely for complex automotive products such as the knuckle, arm and etc. Generally, a part fabricated by casting has limited strength due to manufacturing defects by origin such as the dendrite structure and segregation. As an attempt to offer a solution to these problems, forging has been used as an alternative process. However, the forging process provides limited formability for complex shape products. Rheo-forging of metal offers not only superior mechanical strength but also requires significantly lower machine loads than solid forming processes. In order to produce semi-solid materials of the desired microstructure, a stirring process is applied during solidification of A356 aluminum molten state. This paper presents the results of an A356 aluminum alloy sample, which were obtained by experiment and by simulation using DEFORM 3D V6.1. Samples of metal parts were subsequently fabricated by using hydraulic press machinery. In order to compare the influence of loading method, two types of samples were fabricated: (1) samples fabricated under direct loading die sets (2) those fabricated under indirect loading die sets. The formability and defects, which were predicted by FEM simulation, were similar to those of samples used in practice.

  8. Use of aluminum phosphate as the dehydration catalyst in single step dimethyl ether process

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Xiang-Dong; Parris, Gene E.; Toseland, Bernard A.; Battavio, Paula J.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a process for the coproduction of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) directly from a synthesis gas in a single step (hereafter, the "single step DME process"). In this process, the synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon oxides is contacted with a dual catalyst system comprising a physical mixture of a methanol synthesis catalyst and a methanol dehydration catalyst. The present invention is an improvement to this process for providing an active and stable catalyst system. The improvement comprises the use of an aluminum phosphate based catalyst as the methanol dehydration catalyst. Due to its moderate acidity, such a catalyst avoids the coke formation and catalyst interaction problems associated with the conventional dual catalyst systems taught for the single step DME process.

  9. X-Ray and Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Dislocation Density and Subgrain Size in a Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Ungar, Prof Tomas; Feng, Zhili; Kenik, Edward A; Clausen, B

    2009-01-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 x 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 x 10{sup 15} m{sup -2} and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  10. X-Ray and Neutron Diffraction Measurements of Dislocation Density and Subgrain Size in a Friction-Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Wanchuck; Ungár, Tamás; Feng, Zhili; Kenik, Edward; Clausen, Bjørn

    2010-05-01

    The dislocation density and subgrain size were determined in the base material and friction-stir welds of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction measurement was performed in the base material. The result of the line profile analysis of the X-ray diffraction peak shows that the dislocation density is about 4.5 × 1014 m-2 and the subgrain size is about 200 nm. Meanwhile, neutron diffraction measurements have been performed to observe the diffraction peaks during friction-stir welding (FSW). The deep penetration capability of the neutron enables us to measure the peaks from the midplane of the Al plate underneath the tool shoulder of the friction-stir welds. The peak broadening analysis result using the Williamson-Hall method shows the dislocation density of about 3.2 × 1015 m-2 and subgrain size of about 160 nm. The significant increase of the dislocation density is likely due to the severe plastic deformation during FSW. This study provides an insight into understanding the transient behavior of the microstructure under severe thermomechanical deformation.

  11. Optimization of magnetically accelerated, ultra-high velocity aluminum flyer plates for use in plate impact, shock wave experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Knudson, Marcus D.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Lemke, Raymond William; Davis, J. P.; Harjes, Henry Charles III; Giunta, Anthony Andrew; Bliss, David Emery

    2005-05-01

    The intense magnetic field produced by the 20 MA Z accelerator is used as an impulsive pressure source to accelerate metal flyer plates to high velocity for the purpose of performing plate impact, shock wave experiments. This capability has been significantly enhanced by the recently developed pulse shaping capability of Z, which enables tailoring the rise time to peak current for a specific material and drive pressure to avoid shock formation within the flyer plate during acceleration. Consequently, full advantage can be taken of the available current to achieve the maximum possible magnetic drive pressure. In this way, peak magnetic drive pressures up to 490 GPa have been produced, which shocklessly accelerated 850 {micro}m aluminum (6061-T6) flyer plates to peak velocities of 34 km/s. We discuss magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that are used to optimize the magnetic pressure for a given flyer load and to determine the shape of the current rise time that precludes shock formation within the flyer during acceleration to peak velocity. In addition, we present results pertaining to plate impact, shock wave experiments in which the aluminum flyer plates were magnetically accelerated across a vacuum gap and impacted z-cut, {alpha}-quartz targets. Accurate measurements of resulting quartz shock velocities are presented and analyzed through high-fidelity MHD simulations enhanced using optimization techniques. Results show that a fraction of the flyer remains at solid density at impact, that the fraction of material at solid density decreases with increasing magnetic pressure, and that the observed abrupt decrease in the quartz shock velocity is well correlated with the melt transition in the aluminum flyer.

  12. Simulation of the Process of Grain-Boundary Melting in Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckman, A. V.; Demyanov, B. F.; Dragunov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    An MD-simulation of the process of grain-boundary (GB) melting in aluminum is performed. General- and special-type GBs with the [100]-, [110]- and [111]-misorientations are investigated. It is shown that most GBs have lower melting temperatures than that of the single crystal. Grain-boundary melting occurs within the temperature interval from 0.75 Tmelt to 0.95 Tmelt. Low-angle boundaries and a special Σ11(113) boundary are found to be high-melting.

  13. The NBS: Processing/Microstructure/Property Relationships in 2024 Aluminum Alloy Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ives, L. K.; Swartzendruber, W. J.; Boettinger, W. J.; Rosen, M.; Ridder, S. D.

    1983-01-01

    As received plates of 2024 aluminum alloy were examined. Topics covered include: solidification segregation studies; microsegregation and macrosegregation in laboratory and commercially cast ingots; C-curves and nondestructive evaluation; time-temperature precipitation diagrams and the relationships between mechanical properties and NDE measurements; transmission electron microscopy studies; the relationship between microstructure and properties; ultrasonic characterization; eddy-current conductivity characterization; the study of aging process by means of dynamic eddy current measurements; and Heat flow-property predictions, property degradations due to improve quench from the solution heat treatment temperature.

  14. Simulation of the Process of Grain-Boundary Melting in Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weckman, A. V.; Demyanov, B. F.; Dragunov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    An MD-simulation of the process of grain-boundary (GB) melting in aluminum is performed. General- and special-type GBs with the [100]-, [110]- and [111]-misorientations are investigated. It is shown that most GBs have lower melting temperatures than that of the single crystal. Grain-boundary melting occurs within the temperature interval from 0.75Tmelt to 0.95Tmelt. Low-angle boundaries and a special Σ11(113) boundary are found to be high-melting.

  15. Effect of Process Variables on the Formation of Streak Defects on Anodized Aluminum Extrusions: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang; Couper, Malcolm J.; Dahle, Arne K.

    2012-04-01

    Streak defects are often present on anodized extrusions of 6xxx series aluminum alloys, increasing the fabrication cost of these products. Moreover, streaking often only becomes visible after etching and anodizing treatments, rather than in the as-extruded condition, making it difficult to identify the original causes and influencing factors of these defects. In this paper, various process variables that influence the formation of streak defects on anodized aluminium extrusions are reviewed on the basis of a literature review, industrial practice and experimental results. The influencing factors involved in various processing steps such as billet quality, extrusion process, die design and etching process are considered. Effective measures for preventing the formation of streak defects in industrial extrusion products are discussed.

  16. Tribocorrosion Behavior of Aluminum/Alumina Composite Manufactured by Anodizing and ARB Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamaati, Roohollah; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza; Szpunar, Jerzy A.; Li, Duanjie

    2011-12-01

    In the present work, tribocorrosion behavior of Al/Al2O3 composite strips manufactured by anodizing and accumulative roll bonding (ARB) processes was investigated. The alumina quantity was 0.48, 1.13, and 3.55 vol.% in the aluminum matrix. Tribocorrosion experiments were conducted using a ball-on-plate tribometer, where the sliding contact was fully immersed in 1 wt.% NaCl solution. The composite sample served as a working electrode and its open circuit potential (OCP) was monitored before, during, and after sliding. In order to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the surface before and after sliding electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used and wear was also measured. Furthermore, the influence of quantity and distribution of reinforcement particles in the matrix on OCP and EIS was evaluated. It was found that the quantity, shape, size, and dispersion of alumina particles in the aluminum matrix strongly affected the measured tribocorrosion characteristics. The results showed that inhomogeneous, lower quantity, fine, and acicular-shape alumina particles cause serious materials loss in tribocorrosion process.

  17. Effect of temperature on the anodizing process of aluminum alloy AA 5052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theohari, S.; Kontogeorgou, Ch.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of temperature (10-40 °C) during the anodizing process of AA 5052 for 40 min in 175 g/L sulfuric acid solution at constant voltage (15 V) was studied in comparison with pure aluminum. The incorporated magnesium species in the barrier layer result in the further increase of the minimum current density passed during anodizing, as the temperature increases, by about 42% up to 30 °C and then by 12% up to 40 °C. Then during the anodizing process for 40 min a blocking effect on oxide film growth was gradually observed as the temperature increased until 30 °C. The results of EDAX analysis on thick films reveal that the mean amount of the magnesium species inside the film is about 50-70% less than that in the bulk alloy, while it is higher at certain locations adjacent to the film surface at 30 °C. The increase of anodizing temperature does not influence the porosity of thin films (formed for short times) on pure aluminum, while it reduces it on the alloy. At 40 °C the above mentioned blocking effects disappear. It means that the presence of magnesium species causes an impediment to the effect of temperature on iss, on the film thickness and on the porosity of thin films, only under conditions where film growth takes place without significant loss of the anodizing charge to side reactions.

  18. Selection of thermodynamic data for a novel carbothermic smelting process for aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayad-Yaghoubi, Y.

    2011-05-01

    For the carbothermic production of aluminum, thermodynamic data are required for the condensed compounds and gas phase involved in the Al2O3-C or Al2O3-Al4C3 systems. The data for Al2O3(s, l), Al4C3(s), CO(g), C(s, g), Al(s, l, g), Al2O(g) and AlO(g) in different databases is in accord. For a novel carbothermic aluminum smelting process, currently in development, the published JANAF Thermochemical Tables were selected for calculations. However, the JANAF Tables do not include data for oxycarbides. Thus a literature review was conducted. Data from different sources was collated and found to be in accord for Al4O4C over the 1,600-2,200 K temperature range. These data, together with the data from JANAF Tables, agree very well with the experimental results obtained during the carbothermic process. However, a commercially available computational thermodynamic software package called HSC provides results which contradict the experimental results obtained, while its thermodynamics data is also significantly different from other data available in the literature.

  19. Effects of chloride ions on electro-coagulation-flotation process with aluminum electrodes for algae removal.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shanshan; Du, Maoan; Tian, Jiayu; Yang, Jianyu; Yang, Jixian; Ma, Fang; Nan, Jun

    2010-10-15

    Electro-coagulation-flotation (ECF) is one of the most promising technologies that offers an attractive alternative to conventional coagulation and flotation. In this study, the effectiveness and mechanisms of algae removal by ECF process using aluminum electrodes was investigated in the presence of Cl(-) ions. The results showed that the addition of Cl(-) ions (1.0, 3.0, 5.0 and 8.0 mM) had a promoting effect on the algae removal in terms of both the cell density and chlorophyll-a, which could be attributed to the following two reasons. Firstly, active chlorine could be generated in the ECF when Cl(-) ions were present. The electrochemically generated active chlorine was demonstrated to be effective for the inactivation of algae cells with the aid of the electric field in the ECF. Secondly, the Cl(-) ions in the algae solution could enhance the release of Al(3+) from the aluminum electrodes in the ECF. Through SEM-EDX analysis, pitting corrosion and alleviated formation of oxide film by Cl(-) ions were observed on the anode surface. When considering that Cl(-) ions are universally present in natural waters, the effects of Cl(-) on ECF process for algae removal are of great significance. PMID:20667652

  20. Copper-Carbon and Aluminum-Carbon Composites Fabricated by Powder Metallurgy Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvain, Jean-François; Veillère, Amélie; Lu, Yongfeng

    2014-07-01

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials, with high thermal conductivity and thermal- expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. In this context, metal matrix composites: carbon fibers and diamond-reinforced copper and aluminum matrix composites among them are considered very promising as a next generation of thermal-management materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties compared to pure copper combined with lower density. This article presents the fabrication techniques of copper/carbon fibers and copper/diamond and aluminum/carbon fibers composite films by powder metallurgy and hot pressing. The thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermomechanical properties. Interfaces (through novel chemical and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly will form the right chemical/mechanical link between metal and carbon, enhancing all the desired thermal properties while minimizing the deleterious effect.

  1. Processing, Dynamic Deformation and Fragmentation of Heterogeneous Materials (Aluminum-Tungsten Composites and Aluminum-Nickel Laminates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Po-Hsun

    Two types of heterogeneous reactive materials, Aluminum-Tungsten composites and Aluminum-Nickel laminates were investigated. The current interest in these materials is their ability to combine the high strength and energy output under critical condition of the mechanical deformation which may include their fragmentation. Mesoscale properties of reactive materials are very important for the generation of local hot spots to ignite reactions and generate critical size of debris suitable for fast oxidation kinetics. Samples with different mesostructures (e.g., coarse vs. fine W particles, bonded vs. non-bonded Al particles, W particles vs. W wires and concentric vs. corrugated Al-Ni laminates) were prepared by Cold Isostatic Pressing, Hot Isostatic Pressing and Swaging. Several dynamic tests were utilized including Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, Drop Weight Test, Explosively Driven Fragmentation Test, and Thick-Walled Cylinder Method. A high speed camera was used to record images of the in situ behavior of materials under dynamic loading. Pre- and post-experiment analyses and characterization were done using Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Powder Diffraction, and Laser Diffraction. The numerical simulations were conducted to monitor the in situ dynamic behavior of materials and elucidate the mesoscale mechanisms of the plastic strain accommodation under high-strain, high-strain-rate conditions in investigated heterogeneous m aterials. Several interesting results should be specifically mentioned. They include observation that the fracture and dynamic properties of the Al-W composites are sensitive to porosity of samples, particles sizes of rigid inclusions (W particles or wires), and bonding strength between Al particles in the matrix. Soft Al particles were heavily deformed between the rigid W particles/wires during dynamic tests. Three plastic strain accommodation mechanisms are observed in Al-Ni laminates. They depend on the initial

  2. The development of a fluidized bed process for the heat treatment of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keist, Jay

    2005-04-01

    Heat treating of aluminum alloys is often necessary to achieve the mechanical properties required for a part. With conventional furnaces, though, the heat-treating process requires several hours and manufacturers have traditionally utilized off-line, batch heat-treating operations. The long cycle times required for heat treating with conventional systems go contrary to lean manufacturing where the goal is to reduce the time a part spends in the factory. The fluidized bed technology offers rapid heating rates and excellent temperature control that allows one to significantly reduce the time required for heat treating by an order of magnitude. Technomics developed a fluidized bed conveying system that allows the manufacturer to bring the heat-treating system in-line with the casting or forging operation, obtaining a true lean manufacturing process.

  3. Butt Welding Joint of Aluminum Alloy by Space GHTA Welding Process in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Shinike, Shuhei; Ekuni, Tomohide; Terajima, Noboru; Tsukuda, Yoshiyuki; Imagawa, Kichiro

    Aluminum alloys have been used widely in constructing various space structures including the International Space Station (ISS) and launch vehicles. For space applications, welding experiments on aluminum alloy were performed using the GHTA (Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc) welding process using a filler wire feeder in a vacuum. We investigated the melting phenomenon of the base metal and filler wire, bead formation, and the effects of wire feed speed on melting characteristics. The melting mechanism in the base metal during the bead on a plate with wire feed was similar to that for the melt run without wire feed. We clarified the effects of wire feed speed on bead sizes and configurations. Furthermore, the butt welded joint welded using the optimum wire feed speed, and the joint tensile strengths were evaluated. The tensile strength of the square butt joint welded by the pulsed DC GHTA welding with wire feed in a vacuum is nearly equal to that of the same joint welded by conventional GTA (Gas Tungsten Arc) welding in air.

  4. Effect of Processing Parameters on Pore Structure and Thickness of Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) Tubular Membranes.

    PubMed

    Belwalkar, A; Grasing, E; Van Geertruyden, W; Huang, Z; Misiolek, W Z

    2008-07-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) tubular membranes were fabricated from aluminum alloy tubes in sulfuric and oxalic acid electrolytes using a two-step anodization process. The membranes were investigated for characteristics such as pore size, interpore distance and thickness by varying applied voltage and electrolyte concentration. Morphology of the membranes was examined using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and characterized using ImageJ software. Results showed that membranes having narrow pore size and uniform pore distribution with parallel channel arrays were obtained. The pore sizes were ranging from 14 to 24 nm and the wall thicknesses as high as 76 microm. It was found that the pore size increased in direct proportion with the applied voltage and inversely with the electrolyte concentration while the interpore distance increased linearly with the applied voltage. It was also observed that increase in acid concentration increased tubular membrane wall thickness that improved mechanical handling. By using anodic alumina technology, robust ceramic tubes with uniformly distributed pore-structure and parallel nano-channels of lengths and sizes practical for industrial applications were reliably produced in quantity. PMID:19578471

  5. Effect of Processing Parameters on Pore Structure and Thickness of Anodic Aluminum Oxide (AAO) Tubular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Belwalkar, A.; Grasing, E.; Huang, Z.; Misiolek, W.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) tubular membranes were fabricated from aluminum alloy tubes in sulfuric and oxalic acid electrolytes using a two-step anodization process. The membranes were investigated for characteristics such as pore size, interpore distance and thickness by varying applied voltage and electrolyte concentration. Morphology of the membranes was examined using light optical and scanning electron microscopy and characterized using ImageJ software. Results showed that membranes having narrow pore size and uniform pore distribution with parallel channel arrays were obtained. The pore sizes were ranging from 14 to 24 nm and the wall thicknesses as high as 76 µm. It was found that the pore size increased in direct proportion with the applied voltage and inversely with the electrolyte concentration while the interpore distance increased linearly with the applied voltage. It was also observed that increase in acid concentration increased tubular membrane wall thickness that improved mechanical handling. By using anodic alumina technology, robust ceramic tubes with uniformly distributed pore-structure and parallel nano-channels of lengths and sizes practical for industrial applications were reliably produced in quantity. PMID:19578471

  6. Effects of Processing Parameters on the Fabrication of Copper Cladding Aluminum Rods by Horizontal Core-Filling Continuous Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ya-Jun; Liu, Xin-Hua; Huang, Hai-You; Wu, Chun-Jing; Liu, Xue-Feng; Xie, Jian-Xin

    2011-02-01

    Copper cladding aluminum (CCA) rods with a diameter of 30 mm and a sheath thickness of 3 mm were fabricated by horizontal core-filling continuous casting (HCFC) technology. The effects of key processing parameters, such as the length of the mandrel tube of composite mold, aluminum casting temperature, flux of the secondary cooling water, and mean withdrawing speed were optimized based on some quality criteria, including the uniformity of the sheath thickness, integrality of the rods, and thickness of the interface. The causes of internal flaws formation of CCA rods were also discussed. The results showed that the continuity of the liquid aluminum core-filling process and the interface reaction control between solid copper and liquid aluminum were two key problems that strongly affected the stability of the casting process and the product quality. Our research indicated that for the CCA rod with the previously mentioned size, the optimal length of mandrel tube was 210 mm. A shorter mandrel tube allowed of easier erosion at the interface, which led to a nonuniform sheath thickness. Conversely, it tended to result in a discontinuous filling process of liquid aluminum, which causes shrinkage or cold shuts. The optimal casting temperatures of copper and aluminum were 1503 K (1230 °C) and 1043 K to 1123 K (770 °C to 850 °C), respectively. When the casting temperature of aluminum was below 1043 K (770 °C), the casting process would be discontinuous, resulting in shrinkages or cold shuts. Nevertheless, when the casting temperature of aluminum was higher than 1123 K (850 °C), a severe interface reaction between solid copper and liquid aluminum would occur. The proper flux of the secondary cooling water and the mean withdrawing speed were determined as 600 to 800 L/h and 60 to 87 mm/min, respectively. In the previously mentioned proper ranges of processing parameters, the interfacial shear strengths of CCA rods were 40.5 to 67.9 MPa.

  7. Processing and Characterizing Alumina/Aluminum Composites with Tailored Microstructures Formed by Reactive Metal Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, E.; Ellerby, D.; Ewsuk, K.; Fahrenholtz, B.; Loehman, R.

    1999-01-28

    In industry, the need to maximize energy efficiency depends on the availability of suitable advanced materials. Ceramic composites are exemplary materials for many advanced engineering applications because they exhibit good thermal stability, oxidation resistance and enhanced toughness. Presently, ceramic composite fabrication processes are costly, often requiring high temperatures and pressures to achieve reasonable densities. Our research is focused on developing a processing technique, that will allow production of alumina/aluminum composites using relatively low temperatures and without the application of an external force, thus reducing the processing costs. Our composites were formed using Reactive Metal Penetration (RMP), which is a process involving the reaction of molten Al with a dense ceramic preform. The result is a near net shape ceramic/metal composite with interpenetrating phases. The volume fraction of metal in the composites was varied by doping an aluminosilicate ceramic preform with silica. For this study we fabricated composites using pure mullite and mullite doped with 23 and 42 weight percent silica, yielding 18, 25, and 30 volume percent metal in the composites, respectively. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to characterize the homogeneity and scale of the microstructure. The scale of the microstructure varied with preform composition, the reaction temperature and with secondary heat treatments. Four-point bend testing was used to evaluate the influence of microstructure on strength and reliability. During these studies a gradient in the microstructure was observed, which we further characterized using microhardness testing. Alumina/aluminum composites formed by RMP show higher toughness then monolithic alumina and have the potential for improved reliability when compared to monolithic ceramics.

  8. Characterization of aluminum hydroxide particles from the Bayer process using neural network and Bayesian classifiers.

    PubMed

    Zaknich, A

    1997-01-01

    An automatic process of isolating and characterizing individual aluminum hydroxide particles from the Bayer process in scanning electron microscope gray-scale images of samples is described. It uses image processing algorithms, neural nets and Bayesian classifiers. As the particles are amorphous and different greatly, there were complex nonlinear decisions and anomalies. The process is in two stages; isolation of particles, and classification of each particle. The isolation process correctly identifies 96.9% of the objects as complete and single particles after a 15.5% rejection of questionable objects. The sample set had a possible 2455 particles taken from 384 256x256-pixel images. Of the 15.5%, 14.2% were correctly rejected. With no rejection the accuracy drops to 91.8% which represents the accuracy of the isolation process alone. The isolated particles are classified by shape, single crystal protrusions, texture, crystal size, and agglomeration. The particle samples were preclassified by a human expert and the data were used to train the five classifiers to embody the expert knowledge. The system was designed to be used as a research tool to determine and study relationships between particle properties and plant parameters in the production of smelting grade alumina by the Bayer process. PMID:18255695

  9. Development of Aluminum-Lithium 2195 Gores by the Stretch Forming Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Chen, P. S.; Gorti, S.; Salvail, P.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum-Lithium alloy 2195 exhibits higher mechanical properties and lower density than aluminum alloy 2219, which is the current baseline material for Space Launch System (SLS) cryogenic tank components. Replacement of Al 2219 with Al-Li 2195 would result in substantial weight savings, as was the case when this replacement was made on the shuttle external tank. A key component of cryogenic tanks are the gores, which are welded together to make the rounded ends of the tanks. The required thicknesses of these gores depend on the specific SLS configuration and may exceed the current experience base in the manufacture of such gores by the stretch forming process. Here we describe the steps taken to enhance the formability of Al-Li 2195 by optimizing the heat treatment and stretch forming processes for gore thicknesses up to 0.75", which envelopes the maximum expected gore thicknesses for SLS tanks. An annealing treatment, developed at Marshall Space Flight Center, increased the forming range and strain hardening exponent of Al-Li 2195 plates. Using this annealing treatment, one 0.525" thick and two 0.75" thick gores were manufactured by the stretch forming process. The annealing treatment enabled the stretch forming of the largest ever cross sectional area (thickness x width) of an Al-Li 2195 plate achieved by the manufacturer. Mechanical testing of the gores showed greater than expected ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, modulus, and elongation values. The gores also exhibited acceptable fracture toughness at room and LN2 temperatures. All of the measured data indicate that the stretch formed gores have sufficient material properties to be used in flight domes.

  10. Investigation of Aluminum Site Changes of Dehydrated Zeolite H-Beta during a Rehydration Process by High Field Solid State NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhenchao; Xu, Suochang; Hu, Mary Y.; Bao, Xinhe; Peden, Charles HF; Hu, Jian Z.

    2015-01-22

    Aluminum site changes for dehydrated H-Beta zeolite during rehydration process are systematically investigated by ²⁷Al MAS and MQ MAS NMR at high magnetic fields up to 19.9 T. Benefiting from the high magnetic field, more detailed information is obtained from the considerably broadened and overlapped spectra of dehydrated H-beta zeolite. Dynamic changes of aluminum sites are demonstrated during rehydration process. In completely dehydrated H-Beta, invisible aluminum can reach 29%. The strength of quadrupole interactions for framework aluminum sites decreases gradually during water adsorption processes. The number of extra-framework aluminum (EFAL) species, i.e., penta- (34 ppm) and octa- (4 ppm) coordinated aluminum atoms rises initially with increasing water adsorption, and finally change into either tetra-coordinated framework or extra-framework aluminum in saturated water adsorption samples, with the remaining octa-coordinated aluminum lying at 0 and -4 ppm, respectively. Quantitative ²⁷Al MAS NMR analysis combined with ¹H MAS NMR indicates that some active EFAL species formed during calcination can reinsert into the framework during this hydration process. The assignment of aluminum at 0 ppm to EFAL cation and -4 ppm to framework aluminum is clarified for H-Beta zeolite.

  11. Microstructure characterization of the stir zone of submerged friction stir processed aluminum alloy 2219

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiuli; Liu, Huijie; Lippold, John C.

    2013-08-15

    Aluminum alloy 2219-T6 was friction stir processed using a novel submerged processing technique to facilitate cooling. Processing was conducted at a constant tool traverse speed of 200 mm/min and spindle rotation speeds in the range from 600 to 800 rpm. The microstructural characteristics of the base metal and processed zone, including grain structure and precipitation behavior, were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness maps were constructed on polished cross sections of as-processed samples. The effect of tool rotation speed on the microstructure and hardness of the stir zone was investigated. The average grain size of the stir zone was much smaller than that of the base metal, but the hardness was also lower due to the formation of equilibrium θ precipitates from the base metal θ′ precipitates. Stir zone hardness was found to decrease with increasing rotation speed (heat input). The effect of processing conditions on strength (hardness) was rationalized based on the competition between grain refinement strengthening and softening due to precipitate overaging. - Highlights: • SZ grain size (∼ 1 μm) is reduced by over one order of magnitude relative to the BM. • Hardness in the SZ is lower than that of the precipitation strengthened BM. • Metastable θ′ in the base metal transforms to equilibrium θ in the stir zone. • Softening in the SZ results from a decrease of precipitation strengthening.

  12. Tension-Compression Asymmetry of Creep and Unilateral Creep Damage in Aluminum for Isothermal and Nonisothermal Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolochevsky, Alexander; Obataya, Yoichi

    A constitutive model is proposed to describe the damage development in aluminum alloys under creep conditions for both isothermal and nonisothermal processes. Special emphasis is laid on four specific phenomena: tension-compression asymmetry of creep, damage induced anisotropy, unilateral creep damage and damage deactivation. Within the framework of the phenomenological approach in the Continuum Damage Mechanics, the nonlinear tensor constitutive equation for creep deformation and damage evolution equation are proposed to account for different orientation of microcracks in aluminum alloys under tensile and compressive loading types. After a determination of the material parameters in the obtained constitutive equation and damage growth equation, the proposed model is applied to the describing creep behavior of the aluminum alloy under uniaxial nonproportional and multiaxial nonproportional loading for both isothermal and nonisothermal processes.

  13. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Characterization of a Binary Aluminum Alloy Spray - Application to the Spray Rolling Process

    SciTech Connect

    S. B. Johnson; J.-P. Delplanque; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia; K. M. McHugh

    2005-02-01

    A stochastic, droplet-resolved model has been developed to describe the behavior of a binary aluminum alloy spray during the spray-rolling process. In this process, a molten aluminum alloy is atomized and the resulting spray is depostied on the rolls of a twin-roll caster to produce aluminum strip. The one-way coupled spray model allows the prediction of spray characteristics such as enthalph and solid fraction, and their distribution between the nozzle and the depostion surface. This paper outlines the model development and compares the predicted spray dynamics to PDI measurements performed in a controlled configuration. Predicted and measured droplet velocity and size distributions are presented for two points along the spray centerline along with predicted spray averaged specific enthalph and solid fraction curves.

  14. Processing and properties of chromate-free conversion coatings on aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Drewien, C.A.; Martinez, M.A.; Stoner, G.E.

    1994-12-31

    A conversion coating method has been developed based on precipitation of Li{sub 2}[Al{sub 2}(OH){sub 6}]{sub 2}{center_dot}CO{sub 3}{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O from alkaline lithium salt solutions. The process is procedurally similar to chromate conversion coating but does not use or produce hazardous chemicals. The coating that forms is polycrystalline, continuous and conformal. The coating meets the MIL-C-5541E corrosion resistance, electrical contact resistance and paint adhesion requirements for certain aluminum alloys, but does not match the levels of performance exhibited by chromate conversion coatings. In this paper, methods for producing the coating are described. Corrosion resistance has been characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and salt spray exposure. The structural, compositional and property changes attending post-coating thermal exposure are discussed. Performance in standardized corrosion, electrical and paint adhesion tests is also presented.

  15. Experimental and analytical investigation of the fracture processes of boron/aluminum laminates containing notches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.; Bahei-El-din, Y. A.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental results for five laminate orientations of boron/aluminum composites containing either circular holes or crack-like slits are presented. Specimen stress-strain behavior, stress at first fiber failure, and ultimate strength were determined. Radiographs were used to monitor the fracture process. The specimens were analyzed with a three-dimensional elastic-elastic finite-element model. The first fiber failures in notched specimens with laminate orientation occurred at or very near the specimen ultimate strength. For notched unidirectional specimens, the first fiber failure occurred at approximately one-half of the specimen ultimate strength. Acoustic emission events correlated with fiber breaks in unidirectional composites, but did not for other laminates. Circular holes and crack-like slits of the same characteristic length were found to produce approximately the same strength reduction. The predicted stress-strain responses and stress at first fiber failure compared very well with test data for laminates containing 0 deg fibers.

  16. Structure and Hardness of 01570 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir Welds Processed Under Different Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yasov, R. R.; Avtokratova, E. V.; Markushev, M. V.; Predko, P. Yu.; Konkevich, V. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Structure and hardness of the 01570 aluminum alloy joints processed by friction stir welding at various speeds are investigated. It is shown that increasing the traverse tool speed lowers the probability of macrodefect formation in the nugget zone; however, this can lead to anomalous grain growth in the zone of contact with the tool shoulder. Typical "onion-like" structure of the weld consisting of rings that differ by optical contrast is formed for all examined welding regimes. It is demonstrated that this contrast is caused by the difference in the grain sizes in the rings rather than by their chemical or phase composition. Mechanisms of transformation of the alloy structure during friction stir welding are discussed.

  17. How to avoid the `invisible gorilla' in aluminum smelting process control: Visual guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yashuang; Taylor, Mark P.; Chen, John J. J.; Hautus, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    Over the last three decades, process control in aluminum smelters has improved significantly as it is the biggest leverage for cost and energy reduction in production and product quality improvement, as well as for meeting environmental compliance. The implementation of computerized automatic control systems two decades ago was a step change in improvement in the state of the art of process control. However, the complex and dynamic nature of the process requires human monitoring, diagnosis, and intervention from time to time. This study investigates the use of the supervisory screen of the control system of a smelter, as well as the effectiveness of visual guidelines to help the operators to identify process abnormalities. The results show that visual guidelines such as voltage patterns which are used as a reference improve the performance of the operators. Detection time and falsealarm rates were reduced in addition to increasing detection sensitivities. It is proposed that a higher level of human and system interaction would improve the overall performance process control.

  18. A Highly Controllable Electrochemical Anodization Process to Fabricate Porous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuanjing; Lin, Qingfeng; Liu, Xue; Gao, Yuan; He, Jin; Wang, Wenli; Fan, Zhiyong

    2015-12-01

    Due to the broad applications of porous alumina nanostructures, research on fabrication of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with nanoporous structure has triggered enormous attention. While fabrication of highly ordered nanoporous AAO with tunable geometric features has been widely reported, it is known that its growth rate can be easily affected by the fluctuation of process conditions such as acid concentration and temperature during electrochemical anodization process. To fabricate AAO with various geometric parameters, particularly, to realize precise control over pore depth for scientific research and commercial applications, a controllable fabrication process is essential. In this work, we revealed a linear correlation between the integrated electric charge flow throughout the circuit in the stable anodization process and the growth thickness of AAO membranes. With this understanding, we developed a facile approach to precisely control the growth process of the membranes. It was found that this approach is applicable in a large voltage range, and it may be extended to anodization of other metal materials such as Ti as well.

  19. A Highly Controllable Electrochemical Anodization Process to Fabricate Porous Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuanjing; Lin, Qingfeng; Liu, Xue; Gao, Yuan; He, Jin; Wang, Wenli; Fan, Zhiyong

    2015-12-01

    Due to the broad applications of porous alumina nanostructures, research on fabrication of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) with nanoporous structure has triggered enormous attention. While fabrication of highly ordered nanoporous AAO with tunable geometric features has been widely reported, it is known that its growth rate can be easily affected by the fluctuation of process conditions such as acid concentration and temperature during electrochemical anodization process. To fabricate AAO with various geometric parameters, particularly, to realize precise control over pore depth for scientific research and commercial applications, a controllable fabrication process is essential. In this work, we revealed a linear correlation between the integrated electric charge flow throughout the circuit in the stable anodization process and the growth thickness of AAO membranes. With this understanding, we developed a facile approach to precisely control the growth process of the membranes. It was found that this approach is applicable in a large voltage range, and it may be extended to anodization of other metal materials such as Ti as well. PMID:26706687

  20. Wear characteristics of severely deformed aluminum sheets by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process

    SciTech Connect

    Talachi, A. Kazemi; Eizadjou, M. Manesh, H. Danesh; Janghorban, K.

    2011-01-15

    Wear behavior of severely deformed aluminum sheets by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) process was characterized using a pin on disc wear machine at different conditions. The sheets were processed up to eight ARB cycles in order to induce a high strain ({approx} 6.4) to the samples. EBSD results showed that after eight cycles of ARB, sheets were found to contain ultrafine grains with high fraction of high angle grain boundaries. Wear experiments were conducted under different loading and operating conditions, including dry and immersion lubrication, and rotation speeds. Wear was continuously monitored by measuring the wear rates and morphologies of worn surfaces by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Contrary to expectation, the wear resistance of the ARBed Al sheets was less than the non-processed sheets. Wear rates of the ARBed Al sheets increased by increasing wear load and rotation speed, while, immersion lubrication decreased the wear rate significantly. Based on the observation and results, a model for the wear of the ARBed Al was proposed. - Research Highlights: {yields}The wear rate of the ARBed Al was higher than that of the non-processed alloy. {yields}This unexpected behavior was related to the low strain hardening capability and evolution of the ARB subsurface microstructure during the wear process. {yields}Sliding wear of the ARBed Al proceeded by surface deformation, and progressed by delamination of the deformed surface layer. {yields}The wear rate of ARBed Al increased by increasing applied load and sliding speed.

  1. Development of an Optimization Methodology for the Aluminum Alloy Wheel Casting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jianglan; Reilly, Carl; Maijer, Daan M.; Cockcroft, Steve L.; Phillion, Andre B.

    2015-08-01

    An optimization methodology has been developed for the aluminum alloy wheel casting process. The methodology is focused on improving the timing of cooling processes in a die to achieve improved casting quality. This methodology utilizes (1) a casting process model, which was developed within the commercial finite element package, ABAQUS™—ABAQUS is a trademark of Dassault Systèms; (2) a Python-based results extraction procedure; and (3) a numerical optimization module from the open-source Python library, Scipy. To achieve optimal casting quality, a set of constraints have been defined to ensure directional solidification, and an objective function, based on the solidification cooling rates, has been defined to either maximize, or target a specific, cooling rate. The methodology has been applied to a series of casting and die geometries with different cooling system configurations, including a 2-D axisymmetric wheel and die assembly generated from a full-scale prototype wheel. The results show that, with properly defined constraint and objective functions, solidification conditions can be improved and optimal cooling conditions can be achieved leading to process productivity and product quality improvements.

  2. Advanced Process Heater for the Steel, Aluminum and Chemical Industries of the Future

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas D. Briselden

    2007-10-31

    The Roadmap for Process Heating Technology (March 16, 2001), identified the following priority R&D needs: “Improved performance of high temperature materials; improved methods for stabilizing low emission flames; heating technologies that simultaneously reduce emissions, increase efficiency, and increase heat transfer”. Radiant tubes are used in almost every industry of the future. Examples include Aluminum re-heat furnaces; Steel strip annealing furnaces, Petroleum cracking/ refining furnaces, Metal Casting/Heat Treating in atmosphere and fluidized bed furnaces, Glass lair annealing furnaces, Forest Products infrared paper driers, Chemical heat exchangers and immersion heaters, and the indirect grain driers in the Agriculture Industry. Several common needs among the industries are evident: (1) Energy Reductions, (2) Productivity Improvements, (3) Zero Emissions, and (4) Increased Component Life. The Category I award entitled “Proof of Concept of an Advanced Process Heater (APH) for Steel, Aluminum, and Petroleum Industries of the Future” met the technical feasibility goals of: (1) doubling the heat transfer rates (2) improving thermal efficiencies by 20%, (3) improving temperature uniformity by 100oF (38 oC) and (4) simultaneously reducing NOx and CO2 emissions. The APH addresses EERE’s primary mission of increasing efficiency/reducing fuel usage in energy intensive industries. The primary goal of this project was to design, manufacture and test a commercial APH prototype by integrating three components: (1) Helical Heat Exchanger, (2) Shared Wall Radiant U-tube, and (3) Helical Flame Stabilization Element. To accomplish the above, a near net shape powder ceramic Si-SiC low-cost forming process was used to manufacture the components. The project defined the methods for making an Advanced Process Heater that produced an efficiency between 70% to 80% with temperature uniformities of less than 5oF/ft (9oC/m). Three spin-off products resulted from this

  3. Process for Producing a Cast Article from a Hypereutectic Aluminum-Silicon Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jonathan A. (Inventor); Chen, Po-Shou (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A process for making a cast article from an aluminum alloy includes first casting an article from an alloy having the following composition, in weight percent: Silicon (Si) 14.0-25.0, Copper (CU) 5.5-8.0, Iron (Fe) 0-0.8, Magnesium (Mg) 0.5-1.5, Nickel (Ni) 0.05-1.2, Manganese (Mn) 0-1.0, Titanium (Ti) 0.05-1.2, Zirconium (Zr) 0.12-1.2, Vanadium (V) 0.05-1.2, Zinc (Zn) 0-0.9, Phosphorus (P) 0.001-0.1, Aluminum, balance. In this alloy the ration of Si:Mg is 15-35, and the ratio of Cu:Mg is 4-15. After an article is cast from the alloy, the cast article is aged at a temperature within the range of 400 F to 500 F for a time period within the range of four to 16 hours. It has been found especially advantageous if the cast article is first exposed to a solutionizing step prior to the aging step. This solutionizing step is carried out by exposing the cast article to a temperature within the range of 875 F to 1025 F for a time period of fifteen minutes to four hours. It has also been found to be especially advantageous if the solutionizing step is followed directly with a quenching step, wherein the cast article is quenched in a quenching medium such as water at a temperature within the range of 120 F to 300 F. The resulting cast article is highly suitable in a number of high temperature applications, such as heavy-duty pistons for internal combustion engines.

  4. Self-supported aluminum thin films produced by vacuum deposition process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, J. E.; Timme, R. W.

    1966-01-01

    Self-supported aluminum thin film is produced by vacuum depositing the film on a polyvinyl formal resin film and then removing the resin by radiant heating in the vacuum. The aluminum film can be used as soon as the resin is eliminated.

  5. Effect of processing parameters on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed AA 2219 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surekha, K.; Murty, B. S.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of processing parameters (rotation speed and traverse speed) on the corrosion behaviour of friction stir processed high strength precipitation hardenable AA 2219-T87 alloy was investigated. The results indicate that the rotation speed has a major influence in determining the rate of corrosion, which is attributed to the breaking down and dissolution of the intermetallic particles. Corrosion resistance of friction stir processed alloy was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, salt spray and immersion tests.

  6. Fluxless Tin and␣Silver-Indium Bonding Processes for␣Silicon onto␣Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin C.; Hsu, Shou-Jen; Wu, Yuan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The high thermal conductivity, light weight, and low cost of aluminum (Al) make it a promising material for use in high-power electronic packaging. The challenges are its high coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of 23 × 10-6/°C and difficulty in soldering. In this research, we surmounted these challenges by bonding large Si chips to Al boards using fluxless Sn and Ag-In processes, respectively. Despite the large CTE mismatch, the bonded structures were strong as determined by fracture force measured by shear test machine. The reference is the fracture force specified in MIL-STD-883H method 2019.8. The microstructure and composition of the joints were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis. The resulting Sn joint is almost pure Sn with thin intermetallic layer. The Ag-In joint consists of Ag/(Ag)/Ag2In/(Ag)/Ag that has a melting temperature higher than 695°C even though the bonding process was performed at 180°C. These bonding processes are entirely fluxless. The fluxless feature greatly helps reduce voids in the joints, which in turn increases the joint strength. These preliminary but encouraging results should open up new applications of Al boards in electronic packaging where Al was avoided because of its high CTE and difficulty in bonding.

  7. Microstructure Analysis on 6061 Aluminum Alloy after Casting and Diffuses Annealing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. Q.; Sun, W. L.; Xing, Y. Q.

    One factory using semi-continuous casting process produce the ф200×6000 mm 6061 aluminium alloy barstock, and then rotary forged for car wheels. 6061 distorting aluminium alloy is an forged aluminum alloy, and mainly containing Mg, Si, Cu and other alloying elements. The main strengthening phase is Mg2Si, and also has few phase of (FeMn) 3Si2Al15. In order to eliminate the segregation and separation which present in the crystal boundary, and make the distortion to be uniform, and does not present ear and fracture defects after the forging. So the 6061 distorting aluminium alloy adopt the diffusion annealing heat treatment before the forging process.According to the current conditions, we use the diffusion annealing which have the different heating temperature and different holding time.The best process we can obtain from the test which can improve the production efficiency and reduce the material waste, improve the mechanical properties, and eliminate the overheated film on the surface.Then,we using OM,SEM and EDS to analyse the microstructure and the chemical composition of compound between the surface and centre. The result shows that the amount of segregation were different in the surface and in the center, and the different diffusion annealing can cause the phase change in the surface and the center.

  8. Functionally Graded Aluminum Foam Fabricated by Friction Powder Sintering Process with Traversing Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Morita, Tomoaki; Koyama, Shinji; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Functionally graded aluminum foam (FG Al foam) is a new class of Al foam in which the pore structure varies over the foam, resulting in corresponding variations in the mechanical properties of the foam. In this study, FG Al foam plates were fabricated by a friction powder sintering (FPS) process with a traversing tool that is based on a previously developed sintering and dissolution process. The variation of the mechanical properties was realized by setting the volume fraction φ of NaCl in the mixture to 60, 70, and 80%. Long FG Al foam plates were fabricated with a length equal to the tool traversing length with φ varying in the tool traversing direction. From x-ray computed tomography observation, it was shown that the density of the Al foam decreased with increasing φ. In contrast, almost uniform pore structures were obtained in each area. According to the results of compression tests on each area, the plateau stress and energy absorption tended to decrease with increasing φ. Therefore, it was shown that FG Al foam plates with varying mechanical properties can be fabricated by the FPS process with the traversing tool.

  9. Characterization of ironing in the hole-flanging process of an aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacem, A.; Krichen, A.; Manach, P. Y.

    2011-08-01

    Hole-flanging is a sheet metal forming process which is often used to produce a flange around holes. Many industrial applications require a longer flange that can be used for example to increase bearing surface or to increase the number of threads that will fit in a tapped hole. Ironing is usually used during such process to increase the flange height. Due to the thinning of the flange caused by edge stretching, some difficulties arise when trying to set a clearance value for which the process is performed with ironing. Therefore, the occurrence of ironing needs to be more clarified. It is also important to quantify the effect of ironing intensity in the flange geometry. In the present work, FE simulations and experiments are performed to investigate hole-flanging with and without ironing. For this purpose, hole-flanging is carried out by varying the clearance between the punch and the die while keeping constant the other parameters. The aim is to identify the occurrence of ironing by the determination of a limit between the hole-flanging with ironing and the hole-flanging without ironing. Attention is focused on studying the effect of the hole-flanging conditions on the punch load, the forming kinematics and the final shape. The experiments are carried out to check the FE results on an aluminum alloy.

  10. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOEpatents

    LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-11-05

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  11. Processing and response of aluminum-lithium alloy composites reinforced with copper-coated silicon carbide particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Khor, K.A.; Cao, Y.; Boey, F.Y.C.; Hanada, K.; Murakoshi, Y.; Sudarshan, T.S.; Srivatsan, T.S.

    1998-02-01

    Lithium-containing aluminum alloys have shown promise for demanding aerospace applications because of their light weight, high strength, and good damage tolerance characteristics. Additions of ceramic reinforcements to an aluminum-lithium alloy can significantly enhance specific strength, and specific modulus while concurrently offering acceptable performance at elevated temperatures. The processing and fabrication of aluminum-lithium alloy-based composites are hampered by particulate agglomeration or clustering and the existence of poor interfacial relationships between the reinforcing phase and the matrix. The problem of distribution of the reinforcing phase in the metal matrix can be alleviated by mechanical alloying. This article presents the results of a study aimed at addressing and improving the interfacial relationship between the host matrix and the reinforcing phase. Copper-coated silicon carbide particulates are introduced as the particulate reinforcing phase, and the resultant composite mixture is processed by conventional milling followed by hot pressing and hot extrusion. The influence of extrusion ration and extrusion temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties was established. Post extrusion processing by hot isostatic pressing was also examined. Results reveal the increase in elastic modulus of the aluminum-lithium alloy matrix reinforced with copper-coated SiC to be significantly more than the mechanically alloyed Al-Li/SiC counterpart. This suggests the possible contributions of interfacial strengthening on mechanical response in direct comparison with a uniform distribution of the reinforcing ceramic particulates.

  12. Ultrasonic Spot and Torsion Welding of Aluminum to Titanium Alloys: Process, Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balle, Frank; Magin, Jens

    Hybrid lightweight structures shape the development of future vehicles in traffic engineering and the aerospace industry. For multi-material concepts made out of aluminum and titanium alloys, the ultrasonic welding technique is an alternative effective joining technology. The overlapped structures can be welded in the solid state, even without gas shielding. In this paper the conventional ultrasonic spot welding with longitudinal oscillation mode is compared to the recent ultrasonic torsion welding with a torsional mode at 20 kHz working frequency. For each technique the process parameters welding force, welding energy and oscillation amplitude were optimized for the hybrid joints using design of experiments. Relationships between the process parameters, mechanical properties and related welding zone should be understood. Central aspects of the research project are microscopic studies of the joining zone in cross section and extensive fracture surface analysis. Detailed electron microscopy and spectroscopy of the hybrid interface help to understand the interfacial formation during ultrasonic welding as well as to transfer the gained knowledge for further multi-metal joints.

  13. Characteristics of aluminum and magnesium based nanocomposites processed using hybrid microwave sintering.

    PubMed

    Eugene, Wong Wai Leong; Gupta, Manoj

    2010-01-01

    Powder metallurgy is one of the highly established methods to synthesize metals, alloys and composites. Sintering is one of the important steps in powder metallurgy methodology and is usually realized through conventional resistance furnaces. The sintering usually takes a few hours to realize density in excess of 90%. The present study highlights the use of energy efficient and environment friendly microwave sintering route to synthesize pure aluminum, magnesium and magnesium based nanocomposites. Three reinforcements were targeted: a) silicon carbide, a microwave susceptor, b) alumina, a microwave transparent material and c) copper, a conducting material. Composites were prepared using blend - compact - microwave sintering - extrusion methodology. Process evaluation revealed that microwave assisted sintering can lead to a reduction of 86% in sintering time and energy savings of 96% when compared to conventional sintering. Moreover, microwave assisted sintering of metal compacts in this study was carried out in air, in the absence of any protective atmosphere, without compromising the mechanical properties of the materials. Results revealed that properties of magnesium can be convincingly enhanced using the said processing methodology and the materials formulations selected. Most importantly, the study established the viability of microwave sintering approach used in place of conventional sintering for magnesium based formulations. PMID:21721326

  14. Aluminum phosphide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Aluminum phosphide ; CASRN 20859 - 73 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  15. Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Seeley, Forest G.

    1981-01-01

    A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to a temperature in the range 700.degree.-900.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acid-soluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

  16. Process development and fabrication of space station type aluminum-clad graphite epoxy struts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, L. R.

    1990-01-01

    The manufacture of aluminum-clad graphite epoxy struts, designed for application to the Space Station truss structure, is described. The strut requirements are identified, and the strut material selection rationale is discussed. The manufacturing procedure is described, and shop documents describing the details are included. Dry graphite fiber, Pitch-75, is pulled between two concentric aluminum tubes. Epoxy resin is then injected and cured. After reduction of the aluminum wall thickness by chemical milling the end fittings are bonded on the tubes. A discussion of the characteristics of the manufactured struts, i.e., geometry, weight, and any anomalies of the individual struts is included.

  17. Salt-soda sinter process for recovering aluminum from fly ash

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, W.J.; Seeley, F.G.

    A method for recovering aluminum values from fly ash comprises sintering the fly ash with a mixture of NaCl and Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ to a temperature in the range 700/sup 0/ to 900/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to convert greater than 90% of the aluminum content of the fly ash into an acidsoluble fraction and then contacting the thus-treated fraction with an aqueous solution of nitric or sulfuric acid to effect dissolution of aluminum and other metal values in said solution.

  18. Processing of Silver-Implanted Aluminum Nitride for Energy Harvesting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alleyne, Fatima Sierre

    One of the more attractive sources of green energy has roots in the popular recycling theme of other green technologies, now known by the term "energy scavenging." In its most promising conformation, energy scavenging converts cyclic mechanical vibrations in the environment or random mechanical pressure pulses, caused by sources ranging from operating machinery to human footfalls, into electrical energy via piezoelectric transducers. While commercial piezoelectrics have evolved to favor lead zirconate titanate (PZT) for its combination of superior properties, the presence of lead in these ceramic compounds raises resistance to their application in anything "green" due to potential health implications during their manufacturing, recycling, or in-service application, if leaching occurs. Therefore in this study we have pursued the application of aluminum nitride (AlN) as a non-toxic alternative to PZT, seeking processing pathways to augment the modest piezoelectric performance of AlN and exploit its compatibility with complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) manufacturing. Such piezoelectric transducers have been categorized as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), which despite more than a decade of research in this field, is plagued by delamination at the electrode/piezoelectric interface. Consequently the electric field essential to generate and sustain the piezoelectric response of these devices is lost, resulting in device failure. Working on the hypothesis that buried conducting layers can both mitigate the delamination problem and generate sufficient electric field to engage the operation of resonator devices, we have undertaken a study of silver ion implantation to experimentally assess its feasibility. As with most ion implantation procedures employed in semiconductor fabrication, the implanted sample is subjected to a thermal treatment, encouraging diffusion-assisted precipitation of the implanted species at high enough concentrations. The objective

  19. Processing of Silver-Implanted Aluminum Nitride for Energy Harvesting Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alleyne, Fatima Sierre

    One of the more attractive sources of green energy has roots in the popular recycling theme of other green technologies, now known by the term "energy scavenging." In its most promising conformation, energy scavenging converts cyclic mechanical vibrations in the environment or random mechanical pressure pulses, caused by sources ranging from operating machinery to human footfalls, into electrical energy via piezoelectric transducers. While commercial piezoelectrics have evolved to favor lead zirconate titanate (PZT) for its combination of superior properties, the presence of lead in these ceramic compounds raises resistance to their application in anything "green" due to potential health implications during their manufacturing, recycling, or in-service application, if leaching occurs. Therefore in this study we have pursued the application of aluminum nitride (AlN) as a non-toxic alternative to PZT, seeking processing pathways to augment the modest piezoelectric performance of AlN and exploit its compatibility with complementary-metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) manufacturing. Such piezoelectric transducers have been categorized as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), which despite more than a decade of research in this field, is plagued by delamination at the electrode/piezoelectric interface. Consequently the electric field essential to generate and sustain the piezoelectric response of these devices is lost, resulting in device failure. Working on the hypothesis that buried conducting layers can both mitigate the delamination problem and generate sufficient electric field to engage the operation of resonator devices, we have undertaken a study of silver ion implantation to experimentally assess its feasibility. As with most ion implantation procedures employed in semiconductor fabrication, the implanted sample is subjected to a thermal treatment, encouraging diffusion-assisted precipitation of the implanted species at high enough concentrations. The objective

  20. Finite Element Simulation of Plastic Joining Processes of Steel and Aluminum Alloy Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, K.; Abe, Y.; Kato, T.

    2007-05-17

    Various high tensile strength steel sheets and an aluminum alloy sheet were joined with a self-piercing rivet. It is not easy to weld the aluminum alloy sheet and high tensile strength sheets by means of conventional resistance welding because of very different melting points. To obtain optimum joining conditions, joining defects were categorized into separation of the sheets and an inner fracture. The joining range of ultra high tensile strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was extended by means of dies optimized by finite element simulation. The joint strength is greatly influenced by not only the strength of the sheets and rivets but also the ratio of the thickness of the lower sheet to the total thickness. In addition, mechanical clinching of high strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was simulated.

  1. Finite Element Simulation of Plastic Joining Processes of Steel and Aluminum Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Abe, Y.; Kato, T.

    2007-05-01

    Various high tensile strength steel sheets and an aluminum alloy sheet were joined with a self-piercing rivet. It is not easy to weld the aluminum alloy sheet and high tensile strength sheets by means of conventional resistance welding because of very different melting points. To obtain optimum joining conditions, joining defects were categorized into separation of the sheets and an inner fracture. The joining range of ultra high tensile strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was extended by means of dies optimized by finite element simulation. The joint strength is greatly influenced by not only the strength of the sheets and rivets but also the ratio of the thickness of the lower sheet to the total thickness. In addition, mechanical clinching of high strength steel and aluminum alloy sheets was simulated.

  2. In-process oxidation protection in fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding of aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.; Featherston, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    Aluminum is cleaned of its oxide coating and is sealed immediately with polymeric material which makes it suitable for fluxless brazing or diffusion bonding. Time involved between cleaning and brazing is no longer critical factor.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Damage Processes in Aluminum Alloys: Grain-Scale Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochhalter, J. D.; Veilleux, M. G.; Bozek, J. E.; Glaessgen, E. H.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper has two goals related to the development of a physically-grounded methodology for modeling the initial stages of fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy. The aluminum alloy, AA 7075-T651, is susceptible to fatigue cracking that nucleates from cracked second phase iron-bearing particles. Thus, the first goal of the paper is to validate an existing framework for the prediction of the conditions under which the particles crack. The observed statistics of particle cracking (defined as incubation for this alloy) must be accurately predicted to simulate the stochastic nature of microstructurally small fatigue crack (MSFC) formation. Also, only by simulating incubation of damage in a statistically accurate manner can subsequent stages of crack growth be accurately predicted. To maintain fidelity and computational efficiency, a filtering procedure was developed to eliminate particles that were unlikely to crack. The particle filter considers the distributions of particle sizes and shapes, grain texture, and the configuration of the surrounding grains. This filter helps substantially reduce the number of particles that need to be included in the microstructural models and forms the basis of the future work on the subsequent stages of MSFC, crack nucleation and microstructurally small crack propagation. A physics-based approach to simulating fracture should ultimately begin at nanometer length scale, in which atomistic simulation is used to predict the fundamental damage mechanisms of MSFC. These mechanisms include dislocation formation and interaction, interstitial void formation, and atomic diffusion. However, atomistic simulations quickly become computationally intractable as the system size increases, especially when directly linking to the already large microstructural models. Therefore, the second goal of this paper is to propose a method that will incorporate atomistic simulation and small-scale experimental characterization into the existing multiscale

  4. A correlation between salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy test results for conversion-coated aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Cunningham, M.; Jensen, H.; Kendig, M.W.; Martinez, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of 33 inorganic conversion coatings applied to five aluminum alloys was tested by salt spray exposure and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Results were evaluated to determine if a relationship existed. Individual salt spray test panels, with an area of 30 in.{sup 2} (194 cm{sup 2}), were inspected visually at regular intervals up to 168 h of exposure. At each inspection interval, panels were assigned a pass rank if <5 pits were observed, or a fail rank if >5 pits were observed. EIS data were analyzed using a simple equivalent circuit which yielded a coating resistance (R{sub c}), which was used as a figure of merit to assess coating performance. Examination of the data showed both tests could be sensitive discriminators of corrosion protection, but that EIS was more discriminating in the extremes of coating performance. Analysis showed the probability of achieving a passing salt spray result increased as R{sub c} increased. In the regimes where both tests were sensitive, regression analysis showed a linear relationship existed for each alloy substrate between the log of R{sub c} and the probability of a coating meeting the pass/fail criterion in salt spray. Based upon these relationships, threshold R{sub c} values were proposed to define the minimum value for which a given coating can be expected to attain a passing result in a 168-h salt spray test. These values were 2 {times} 10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} to 5 {times} 10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} for Al 356 (UNS A13560), Al 2024-T3 (UNS A92024), and Al 6061-T6 (UNS A96061); 1.5 {times} 10{sup 7} for Al 7075-T6 (UNS A97075); and 2.3 {times} 10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm{sup 2} for Al 3003 (UNS A93003).

  5. Fatigue-crack propagation in aluminum-lithium alloys processed by power and ingot metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O. ); Kim, N.J. ); Pizzo, P.P. )

    1990-04-01

    Fatigue-crack propagation behavior in powder-metallurgy (P/M) aluminum-lithium alloys, namely, mechanically-alloyed (MA) Al-4.0Mg-1.5Li-1.1C-0.80{sub 2} (Inco 905-XL) and rapid-solidification-processed (RSP) Al-2.6Li-1.0Cu-0.5Mg-0.5Zr (Allied 644-B) extrusions, has been studied, and results compared with data on an equivalent ingot-metallurgy (I/M) Al-Li alloy, 2090-T81 plate. Fatigue-crack growth resistance of the RSP Al-Li alloy is found to be comparable to the I/M Al-Li alloy; in contrast, crack velocities in MA 905-XL extrusions are nearly three orders of magnitude faster. Growth-rate response in both P/M Al-Li alloys, however, is high anisotropic. Results are interpreted in terms of the microstructural influence of strengthening mechanism, slip mode, grain morphology and texture on the development of crack-tip shielding from crack-path deflection and crack closure. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Effect of Orifice Diameter on Bubble Generation Process in Melt Gas Injection to Prepare Aluminum Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jianyu; Li, Yanxiang; Wang, Ningzhen; Cheng, Ying; Chen, Xiang

    2016-06-01

    The bubble generation process in conditioned A356 alloy melt through submerged spiry orifices with a wide diameter range (from 0.07 to 1.0 mm) is investigated in order to prepare aluminum foams with fine pores. The gas flow rate and chamber pressure relationship for each orifice is first determined when blowing gas in atmospheric environment. The effects of chamber pressure ( P c) and orifice diameter ( D o) on bubble size are then analyzed separately when blowing gas in melt. A three-dimensional fitting curve is obtained illustrating both the influences of orifice diameter and chamber pressure on bubble size based on the experimental data. It is found that the bubble size has a V-shaped relationship with orifice diameter and chamber pressure neighboring the optimized parameter ( D o = 0.25 mm, P c = 0.4 MPa). The bubble generation mechanism is proposed based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. It is found that the bubbles will not be generated until a threshold pressure difference is reached. The threshold pressure difference is dependent on the orifice diameter, which determines the time span of pre-formation stage and bubble growth stage.

  7. Substrate-dependent thermal conductivity of aluminum nitride thin-films processed at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Belkerk, B. E.; Bensalem, S.; Soussou, A.; Carette, M.; Djouadi, M. A.; Scudeller, Y.; Al Brithen, H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report on investigation concerning the substrate-dependent thermal conductivity (k) of Aluminum Nitride (AlN) thin-films processed at low temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity of AlN films grown at low temperature (<200 °C) on single-crystal silicon (Si) and amorphous silicon nitride (SiN) with thicknesses ranging from 100 nm to 4000 nm was measured with the transient hot-strip technique. The k values for AlN films on SiN were found significantly lower than those on Silicon consistently with their microstructures revealed by X-ray diffraction, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The change in k was due to the thermal boundary resistance found to be equal to 10 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on SiN against 3.5 × 10{sup −9} Km{sup 2}W{sup −1} on Si. However, the intrinsic thermal conductivity was determined with a value as high as 200 Wm{sup −1}K{sup −1} whatever the substrate.

  8. The effect of process parameters on the internal quality of an aluminum die casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewit, M. C. A. J.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of process parameters on the porosity of an aluminum die casting was investigated. Two types of die one of which had an interchangeable gate and two alloys, AlSi8Cu3 and AlSi7, were used. During the solidification phase of a die casting, air entrapment can occur; the air remains in the die casting under high pressure after solidification. The Rayleigh number which contains the velocity in the gate, the gate diameter, and the liquid metal surface tension, determines the air entrapment. It appears that there are two types of filling: solid front filling at low velocities, and standard spray filling at high velocities. With the former type, the castings contain no air, but the shrinkage is concentrated in big holes; with the latter type the castings contain much air, and the shrinkage is distributed over fine holes. The first phase velocity has no significant influence on the porosity; a decrease of the third phase velocity increases the porosity. Variations of the changeover point between the first and second phase have little influence.

  9. Low-resolution FTIR continuous monitoring/process control system to minimize HCl emissions in aluminum casting operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunder, Thomas A.

    1999-12-01

    In a Department of Energy funded project, a low resolution Fourier Transform IR Continuous Emissions Monitoring (FTIR CEM) and Process Control system was developed and evaluated for use in minimizing HCl emissions during aluminum casting operations. In the casting process, molten aluminum is treated by fluxing with chlorine to remove alkali and hydrogen impurities. The industry has traditionally used a stoichiometric excess of chlorine to ensure metal quality, with resulting atmospheric emissions of HCl. The FTIR system can potentially be used to reduce emission when employed as a closed-loop process control device to monitor the HCl concentration and thereby reduce chlorine usage while maintaining product quality. In the initial project phase, tests were conducted under varying process conditions at a pilot-scale casting facility. The goals of these test included demonstrating that the FTIR monitor could provide closed-loop control of chlorine use, correlating HCl emission with metal quality, and verifying that the instrumentation could operate under harsh casting facility conditions. The system will subsequently be tested at two aluminum production facilities. This paper summarizes the results from the initial evaluation of the FTIR CEM/Process Control system.

  10. Purifying Aluminum by Vacuum Distillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du Fresne, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    Proposed method for purifying aluminum employs one-step vacuum distillation. Raw material for process impure aluminum produced in electrolysis of aluminum ore. Impure metal melted in vacuum. Since aluminum has much higher vapor pressure than other constituents, boils off and condenses on nearby cold surfaces in proportions much greater than those of other constituents.