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Sample records for processing contaminated nak

  1. Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-09-01

    This decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D&D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

  2. Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1986-09-01

    This decontamination and decommissioning (D D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

  3. The effects of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction in a SNCR process.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jiangtao; Yu, Wei; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Yufei; Zhu, Xiuming

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study of Na/K additives and flyash on NO reduction during the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process were carried out in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The effects of reaction temperature (Tr), water vapor, Na/K additives (NaCl, KCl, Na2CO3) and flyash characteristics on NO reduction were analyzed. The results indicated that NO removal efficiency shows a pattern of increasing first and decreasing later with the increase of the temperature at Tr=850-1150°C. Water vapor can improve the performance of NO reduction, and the NO reduction of 70.5% was obtained while the flue gas containing 4% water vapor at 950°C. Na/K additives have a significant promoting effect on NO reduction and widen the SNCR temperature window, the promoting effect of the test additives is ordered as Na2CO3>KCl>NaCl. NO removal efficiency with 125ppm Na2CO3 and 4% water vapor can reach up to 84.9% at the optimal reaction temperature. The additive concentration has no significant effects on NO reduction while its concentration is above 50ppm. Addition of circulating fluidized combustion (CFB) flyash deteriorates NO reduction significantly. However, CFB flyash and Na/K additives will get a coupling effect on NO reduction during the SNCR process, and the best NO reduction can reach 72.3% while feeding Na2CO3-impregnated CFB flyash at 125ppm Na2CO3 and Tr=950°C. PMID:25532766

  4. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

  5. Treatment of EBR-I NaK mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory and subsequent land disposal at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, S. D.; Buzzell, J. A.; Holzemer, M. J.

    1998-02-03

    Sodium/potassium (NaK) liquid metal coolant, contaminated with fission products from the core meltdown of Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) and classified as a mixed waste, has been deactivated and converted to a contact-handled, low-level waste at Argonne's Sodium Component Maintenance Shop and land disposed at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Treatment of the EBR-I NaK involved converting the sodium and potassium to its respective hydroxide via reaction with air and water, followed by conversion to its respective carbonate via reaction with carbon dioxide. The resultant aqueous carbonate solution was solidified in 55-gallon drums. Challenges in the NaK treatment involved processing a mixed waste which was incompletely characterized and difficult to handle. The NaK was highly radioactive, i.e. up to 4.5 R/hr on contact with the mixed waste drums. In addition, the potential existed for plutonium and toxic characteristic metals to be present in the NaK, resultant from the location of the partial core meltdown of EBR-I in 1955. Moreover, the NaK was susceptible to degradation after more than 40 years of storage in unmonitored conditions. Such degradation raised the possibility of energetic exothermic reactions between the liquid NaK and its crust, which could have consisted of potassium superoxide as well as hydrated sodium/potassium hydroxides.

  6. A Conserved Hydrophobic Tetrad near the C Terminus of the Secretory Na+-K+-2Cl- Cotransporter (NKCC1) Is Required for Its Correct Intracellular Processing*

    PubMed Central

    Nezu, Akihiro; Parvin, Most. Nahid; Turner, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the intracellular folding and trafficking of integral membrane proteins. Here we identify a hydrophobic amino acid tetrad (ILLV) close to the C terminus of the secretory Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC1) that is important for the proper intracellular processing of this protein. This tetrad appears in a C-terminal sequence pattern that is conserved across species in a number of members of the NKCC1 gene family (slc12) of electroneutral salt transporters. We studied the effects of various mutations of these amino acids on NKCC1 transiently transfected into HEK-293 cells. Our results show that mutation of two of these residues to alanine leads to a >50% reduction in expression and complex glycosylation levels and that multiple mutations to alanine have cumulative effects. By contrast, scrambling of these amino acids, or mutation of other nearby conserved C-terminal residues, has little effect on these parameters. Mutation of ILLV to AAAA reduces complex glycosylation of NKCC1 by ∼90% and results in a protein that does not form stable dimers and is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum in a highly aggregated state. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that mutation of the hydrophobic tetrad ILLV to AAAA leads to the ab initio misfolding and concomitant aggregation of this NKCC1 mutant, resulting in its retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:19129177

  7. Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R.; Hodgson, K.M.

    2008-01-15

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the

  8. Bacterial adherence and contamination during radiographic processing.

    PubMed

    Bachman, C E; White, J M; Goodis, H E; Rosenquist, J W

    1990-11-01

    Oral fluids are potential contaminants of radiographic processors. This investigation measured bacterial contamination in a radiographic processing room during times of high and low clinical activity and processing effects on five types of microorganisms. Cultures in the clinical setting, during high and low activity, were taken by brain-heart infusion agar plates placed near automatic processors. Site samples were taken of entrance, developer, fixer, water, and exit surfaces. Measurements of processing effects were accomplished by intentional contamination of films run in series through an automatic processor. Site samples were again taken of the processor. In the clinical setting colony-forming units increased with activity. Radiographic processing after intentional contamination decreased colony-forming units on films, but they increased for all processing solutions. Bacteria on radiographic film survived processing. Although processing procedures significantly reduce the number of bacteria on films, the potential for contamination and cross-contamination remains. PMID:2122350

  9. Contamination detection NDE for cleaning process inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marinelli, W. J.; Dicristina, V.; Sonnenfroh, D.; Blair, D.

    1995-01-01

    In the joining of multilayer materials, and in welding, the cleanliness of the joining surface may play a large role in the quality of the resulting bond. No non-intrusive techniques are currently available for the rapid measurement of contamination on large or irregularly shaped structures prior to the joining process. An innovative technique for the measurement of contaminant levels in these structures using laser based imaging is presented. The approach uses an ultraviolet excimer laser to illuminate large and/or irregular surface areas. The UV light induces fluorescence and is scattered from the contaminants. The illuminated area is viewed by an image-intensified CCD (charge coupled device) camera interfaced to a PC-based computer. The camera measures the fluorescence and/or scattering from the contaminants for comparison with established standards. Single shot measurements of contamination levels are possible. Hence, the technique may be used for on-line NDE testing during manufacturing processes.

  10. Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal

    DOEpatents

    Ganguli, Partha S.

    1984-01-01

    Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

  11. Cleaning process for contaminated superalloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anglin, A. E.

    1978-01-01

    A cleaning process for removing interstitial contaminants from superalloy powders after wet grinding is described. Typical analyses of oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen in ball-milled WAZ-20 superalloy samples after hydrogen plus vacuum cleaning are presented. The hydrogen cleaning step involves heating retorts containing superalloy powder twice under flowing hydrogen with a 24-hour hold at each temperature. The vacuum step involves heating cold-pressed billets two hours at an elevated temperature at a pressure of 10 microPa. It is suggested that the hydrogen plus vacuum cleaning procedure can be applied to superalloys contaminated by other substances in other industrial processes.

  12. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP`s off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described.

  13. Particle contamination formation in magnetron sputtering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C.

    1997-07-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique which provides real-time, {ital in situ} imaging of particles {gt}0.3 {mu}m on the target, substrate, or in the plasma. Using this technique, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport, and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes, due to the inherent spatial nonuniformity of magnetically enhanced plasmas. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. There, film redeposition induces filament or nodule growth. Sputter removal of these features is inhibited by the dependence of sputter yield on angle of incidence. These features enhance trapping of plasma particles, which then increases filament growth. Eventually the growths effectively {open_quotes}short-circuit{close_quotes} the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes mechanical failure of the growth resulting in fracture and ejection of the target contaminants into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests it may be universal to many sputter processes. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  14. PROCESS OF DECONTAMINATING MATERIAL CONTAMINATED WITH RADIOACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Overholt, D.C.; Peterson, M.D.; Acken, M.F.

    1958-09-16

    A process is described for decontaminating metallic objects, such as stainless steel equipment, which consists in contacting such objects with nltric acid in a concentration of 35 to 60% to remove the major portion of the contamination; and thereafter contacting the partially decontaminated object with a second solution containing up to 20% of alkali metal hydroxide and up to 20% sodium tartrate to remove the remaining radioactive contaminats.

  15. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  16. Contamination control in hybrid microelectronic modules. Identification of critical process and contaminants, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    Hybrid processes, handling procedures, and materials were examined to identify the critical process steps in which contamination is most likely to occur, to identify the particular contaminants associated with these critical steps, and to propose method for the control of these contaminants.

  17. Process Upsets Involving Trace Contaminant Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John C.; Perry, Jay; Wright, John; Bahr, Jim

    2000-01-01

    Paradoxically, trace contaminant control systems that suffer unexpected upsets and malfunctions can release hazardous gaseous contaminants into a spacecraft cabin atmosphere causing potentially serious toxicological problems. Trace contaminant control systems designed for spaceflight typically employ a combination of adsorption beds and catalytic oxidation reactors to remove organic and inorganic trace contaminants from the cabin atmosphere. Interestingly, the same design features and attributes which make these systems so effective for purifying a spacecraft's atmosphere can also make them susceptible to system upsets. Cabin conditions can be contributing causes of phenomena such as adsorbent "rollover" and catalyst poisoning can alter a systems performance and in some in stances release contamination into the cabin. Evidence of these phenomena has been observed both in flight and during ground-based tests. The following discussion describes specific instances of system upsets found in trace contaminant control systems, groups these specific upsets into general hazard classifications, and recommends ways to minimize these hazards.

  18. Contamination Control in Hybrid Microelectronic Modules. Part 1: Identification of Critical Process and Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    Various hybrid processing steps, handling procedures, and materials are examined in an attempt to identify sources of contamination and to propose methods for the control of these contaminants. It is found that package sealing, assembly, and rework are especially susceptible to contamination. Moisture and loose particles are identified as the worst contaminants. The points at which contaminants are most likely to enter the hybrid package are also identified, and both general and specific methods for their detection and control are developed. In general, the most effective controls for contaminants are: clean working areas, visual inspection at each step of the process, and effective cleaning at critical process steps. Specific methods suggested include the detection of loose particles by a precap visual inspection, by preseal and post-seal electrical testing, and by a particle impact noise test. Moisture is best controlled by sealing all packages in a clean, dry, inert atmosphere after a thorough bake-out of all parts.

  19. {open_quote}Lasagna{close_quote} process treats contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Drennan, D.

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes an integrated in-situ remedial technology for organic or inorganic contaminants in dense soils termed the Lasagna Process. The process, so named for its layers, forces contaminants out of microscopic pores in clay and silt soil regions so they do not leach into groundwater. It introduces in-situ treatment zones in the contaminated area so the waste will not have to be brought to the surface and treats the material within the newly created zones.

  20. Collisional Transfer of Population and Orientation in NaK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, C. M.; Ashman, S.; Huennekens, J.; Beser, B.; Bai, J.; Lyyra, A. M.

    2010-03-01

    We report current work to study transfer of population and orientation in collisions of NaK molecules with argon and potassium atoms using polarization labeling (PL) and laser- induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. In the PL experiment, a circularly polarized pump laser excites a specific NaK A^1&+circ;(v'=16, J') <- X^1&+circ;(v''=0, J'±1) transition, creating an orientation (non-uniform MJ' level distribution) in both levels. The linearly polarized probe laser is scanned over various 3^1π(v, J'±1) <- A^1&+circ;(v'=16, J') transitions. The probe laser passes through a crossed linear polarizer before detection, and signal is recorded if the probe laser polarization has been modified by the vapor (which occurs when it comes into resonance with an oriented level). Using both spectroscopic methods, analysis of weak collisional satellite lines adjacent to these directly populated lines, as a function of argon buffer gas pressure and cell temperature, allows us to discern separately the effects collisions with argon atoms and potassium atoms have on the population and orientation of the molecule. In addition, code has been written which provides a theoretical analysis of the process, through a solution of the density matrix equations of motion for the system.

  1. ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR IN-SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will study electrochemical processes for the in situ treatment of soils contaminated by mixed wastes, i.e., organic and inorganic. Soil samples collected from selected DOE waste sites will be characterized for specific organic and metal contaminants and hydraulic per...

  2. Innovative technology for contamination control in plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1994-10-01

    The causes and contributing factors to wafer contamination during plasma processing are discussed in the context of future technologies for controlling particle contamination by tool and process design and by the development of wafer dry cleaning technology. The importance of these developments is linked with the history of technological innovation and with the continuing evolution of the cleanroom from a highly developed facility for reducing ambient particle levels to an integrated, synergistic approach involving facilities and tooling for impeding the formation and transport of particles while also actively removing particles from sensitive surfaces. The methods, strategy and requirements for innovation in contamination control for plasma processing is discussed from a diachronic viewpoint.

  3. Parallel Processing of a Groundwater Contaminant Code

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, Ronald Chester; Greenwade, Lance Eric

    2000-05-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is conducting a field test of experimental enhanced bioremediation of trichoroethylene (TCE) contaminated groundwater. TCE is a chlorinated organic substance that was used as a solvent in the early years of the INEEL and disposed in some cases to the aquifer. There is an effort underway to enhance the natural bioremediation of TCE by adding a non-toxic substance that serves as a feed material for the bacteria that can biologically degrade the TCE.

  4. 9. VIEW OF CLOSED CARRIER LINES FOR MOVING CONTAMINATED PROCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF CLOSED CARRIER LINES FOR MOVING CONTAMINATED PROCESS FILTERS AND TRANSPORTING SOLID AND LIQUID MATERIAL SAMPLES. (9/10/96) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. Processes of contaminant accumulation in an Arctic beluga whale population

    SciTech Connect

    Hickie, B.E.; Muir, D.; Kingsley, M.

    1995-12-31

    As long-lived top predators in marine food chains, marine mammals accumulate high levels of persistent organic contaminants. While arctic marine mammal contaminant concentrations are lower than those from temperate regions, levels are sufficiently high to be a health concern to people who rely on marine mammals as food. Monitoring programs developed to address this problem and to define spatial and temporal trends often are difficult to interpret since tissue contaminant concentrations vary with species, age, sex, reproductive effort, and condition (ie blubber thickness). It can be difficult to relate contaminant concentrations in other environmental compartments to those in marine mammals since their residues reflect exposure over their entire life, often 20 to 30 years. Contaminant accumulation models for marine mammals enable us to better understand the importance of, and interaction between, factors affecting contaminant accumulation, and can provide a dynamic framework for interpreting contaminant monitoring data. The authors developed two models for the beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas): one provides a detailed view of processes at the individual level, the other examines population-based processes. The models quantify uptake, release and disposition of organic contaminants over their entire lifespan by incorporating all aspects of life-history. These models are used together to examine impact of a variety of factors on patterns and variability of PCBs found in the West Greenland beluga population (sample size: 696, 729). Factors examined include: energetics, growth, birth rate, lactation, contaminant assimilation and clearance rates, and dietary contaminant concentrations. Results are discussed in relation to the use of marine mammals for monitoring contaminant trends.

  6. Experimental Studies of NAK in a Simulated Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, M. A.; Sanzi, J.; Ljubanovic, D.

    Space fission power systems are being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE) with a short term goal of building a full scale, non-nuclear, Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) test at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Due to the geometric constraints, mass restrictions, and fairly high tempera- tures associated with space reactors, liquid metals are typically used as the primary coolant. A eutectic mixture of sodium (22 percent) and potassium (78 percent), or NaK, has been chosen as the coolant for the TDU with a total system capacity of approximately 55L. NaK, like all alkali metals, is very reactive, and warrants certain safety considerations. To adequately examine the risk associated with the personnel, facility, and test hardware during a potential NaK leak in the large scale TDU test, a small scale experiment was performed in which NaK was released in a thermal vacuum chamber under controlled conditions. The study focused on detecting NaK leaks in the vacuum environment as well as the molecular flow of the NaK vapor. This paper reflects the work completed during the NaK experiment and provides results and discussion relative to the findings.

  7. Application of SMIF isolation to lithography processes for contamination control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sheng-Bai

    2001-08-01

    Contamination control is particularly important in lithography processes because pattern defects are converted to wafers after each exposure. Contamination, by definition, is undesired matter or energy, which causes product defects or process instabilities, and, consequently, reduces yield and reliability. In lithography processes, particles, condensable hydrocarbosn, base molecules, moisture, and static electricity are examples of contaminants. Particles are inert minute objects, which interfere with the proper formation of circuit features. Condensable hydrocarbosn may cause optics hazing which reduces image homogeneity and energy transmission. Some Chemically Amplified Resists (CAR) are susceptible to molecular base contamination, resulting in image degradation such as T-topping. Moisture can affect the characteristics of photoresist, destabilizing photo-exposure and development processes. In combination with water, amine containing photoresist strippers can form hydroxyl ions that can attack aluminum and aluminum-copper alloys. Charged surfaces can tract and hold contaminants of opposite polarity. In case the electrical field exceeds the dielectric strength, ESD event occurs, often accompanied with damage of reticles, masks, or wafer circuits. With SMIF isolation technologies, yield loss due to defects and/or instabilities is minimized. Reticles, masks, and wafers are isolated form contamination sources through hermetic seal, in conjunction with particle/chemical filtration, and static shielding. Pressurization, inert gas purge, chemical absorbents, and electric grounding or air ionization are techniques of removing contaminants from the critical areas. For best performance, adequate selection of construction materials is critical. This paper discusses impacts of contamination on lithography processes and the possibility of solving such problems using SMIF isolation techniques. Theoretical models are developed and experimental data are presented.

  8. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-12-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results.

  9. Contaminant Attenuation Processes at Mining Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitored natural attenuation is sometimes used in combination with active treatment technologies to achieve site-specific remediation objectives. The global imprint of acid drainage problems at mining sites, however, is a clear reminder that in most cases natural processes are ...

  10. Method of treating contaminated HEPA filter media in pulp process

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Jian S.; Argyle, Mark D.; Demmer, Ricky L.; Mondok, Emilio P.

    2003-07-29

    A method for reducing contamination of HEPA filters with radioactive and/or hazardous materials is described. The method includes pre-processing of the filter for removing loose particles. Next, the filter medium is removed from the housing, and the housing is decontaminated. Finally, the filter medium is processed as pulp for removing contaminated particles by physical and/or chemical methods, including gravity, flotation, and dissolution of the particles. The decontaminated filter medium is then disposed of as non-RCRA waste; the particles are collected, stabilized, and disposed of according to well known methods of handling such materials; and the liquid medium in which the pulp was processed is recycled.

  11. Feasibility Process for Remediation of the Crude Oil Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, H.; Choi, H.; Heo, H.; Lee, S.; Kang, G.

    2015-12-01

    More than 600 oil wells were destroyed in Kuwait by Iraqi in 1991. During the war, over 300 oil lakes with depth of up to 2m at more than 500 different locations which has been over 49km2. Therefore, approximately 22 million m3was crude oil contaminated. As exposure of more than 20 years under atmospheric conditions of Kuwait, the crude oil has volatile hydrocarbons and covered heavy oily sludge under the crude oil lake. One of crude oil contaminated soil which located Burgan Oilfield area was collected by Kuwait Oil Company and got by H-plus Company. This contaminated soil has about 42% crude oil and could not biodegraded itself due to the extremely high toxicity. This contaminated soil was separated by 2mm sieve for removal oil sludge ball. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) was analysis by GC FID and initial TPH concentration was average 48,783 mg/kg. Ten grams of the contaminated soil replaced in two micro reactors with 20mL of bio surfactant produce microorganism. Reactor 1 was added 0.1g powder hemoglobin and other reactor was not added hemoglobin at time 0 day. Those reactors shake 120 rpm on the shaker for 7 days and CO2 produced about 150mg/L per day. After 7 days under the slurry systems, the rest days operated by hemoglobin as primary carbon source for enhanced biodegradation. The crude oil contaminated soil was degraded from 48,783mg/kg to 20,234mg/kg by slurry process and final TPH concentration degraded 11,324mg/kg for 21days. Therefore, highly contaminated soil by crude oil will be combined bio slurry process and biodegradation process with hemoglobin as bio catalytic source. Keywords: crude-oil contaminated soil, bio slurry, biodegradation, hemoglobin ACKOWLEDGEMENTS This project was supported by the Korea Ministry of Environment (MOE) GAIA Program

  12. Long-length contaminated equipment burial containers fabrication process procedures

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-11

    These special process procedures cover the detailed step-by-step procedures required by the supplier who will manufacture the Long-Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) Burial Container design. Also included are detailed step-by-step procedures required by the disposal process for completion of the LLCE Burial Containers at Hanford.

  13. Treating contaminated organics using the DETOX process

    SciTech Connect

    Elsberry, K.D.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1993-05-01

    Waste matrices containing organics, radionuclides, and metals pose difficult problems in waste treatment and disposal when the organic compounds and/or metals are considered to be hazardous. This paper describes the results of bench-scale studies of DETOX applied to the components of liquid mixed wastes, with the goal of establishing parameters for designing a prototype waste treatment unit. Apparent organic reaction rate orders and the dependence of apparent reaction rate on solution composition and the contact area were measured for vacuum pump oil scintillation fluids, and trichloroethylene. Reaction rate was superior in chloride-based solutions and was proportional to the contact area above about 2% w/w loading of organic. Oxidations in a 4-liter volume, mixed bench-top reactor have given destruction efficiencies of 99.9999 + % for common organics. Reaction rates achieved in the mixed bench-top reactor were one to two orders of magnitude greater than had been achieved in unmixed reactions; a thoroughly mixed reactor should be capable of oxidizing 10 to 100 + grams of organic per liter-hour. Results are also presented on the solvation efficiency of DETOX for mercury, cerium, and neodymium, and for removal/destruction of organics sorbed on vermiculite. The next stage of development will be converting the bench-top unit to continuous processing.

  14. Reducing the potential for processing contaminant formation in cereal products

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Tanya Y.; Postles, Jennifer; Halford, Nigel G.

    2014-01-01

    Processing contaminants may be defined as substances that are produced in a food when it is cooked or processed, are not present or are present at much lower concentrations in the raw, unprocessed food, and are undesirable either because they have an adverse effect on product quality or because they are potentially harmful. The presence of very low levels of processing contaminants in common foods is becoming an increasingly important issue for the food industry, as developments in analytical techniques and equipment bring foods under closer and closer scrutiny. This review considers the formation of lipid oxidation products, hydrogenation of polyunsaturated fatty acids to prevent lipid oxidation and the associated risk of trans fatty acid formation. The formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction is described, as well as the genetic and agronomic approaches being taken to reduce the acrylamide-forming potential of cereal grain. The multiple routes for the formation of furan and associated chemicals, including hydroxymethylfurfuryl, are also described. The evolving regulatory and public perception situations for these processing contaminants and their implications for the cereal supply chain are discussed, emphasising the need for cereal breeders to engage with the contaminants issue. PMID:24882936

  15. Analysis of Zinc 65 Contamination after Vacuum Thermal Process

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, Paul S.; Tosten, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive contamination with a gamma energy emission consistent with {sup 65}Zn was detected in a glovebox following a vacuum thermal process. The contaminated components were removed from the glovebox and subjected to examination. Selected analytical techniques were used to determine the nature of the precursor material, i.e., oxide or metallic, the relative transferability of the deposit and its nature. The deposit was determined to be borne from natural zinc and was further determined to be deposited as a metallic material from vapor.

  16. Preliminary Results of Cleaning Process for Lubricant Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenmann, D.; Brasche, L.; Lopez, R.

    2006-03-01

    Fluorescent penetrant inspection (FPI) is widely used for aviation and other components for surface-breaking crack detection. As with all inspection methods, adherence to the process parameters is critical to the successful detection of defects. Prior to FPI, components are cleaned using a variety of cleaning methods which are selected based on the alloy and the soil types which must be removed. It is also important that the cleaning process not adversely affect the FPI process. There are a variety of lubricants and surface coatings used in the aviation industry which must be removed prior to FPI. To assess the effectiveness of typical cleaning processes on removal of these contaminants, a study was initiated at an airline overhaul facility. Initial results of the cleaning study for lubricant contamination in nickel, titanium and aluminum alloys will be presented.

  17. Particle contamination formation and detection in magnetron sputtering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.; Weiss, C.A.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C.

    1996-10-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination can cause electrical shorting, pin holes, problems with photolithography, adhesion failure, as well as visual and cosmetic defects. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique that provides real-time, {ital in-situ} imaging of particles > 0.3 {mu}m in diameter. Using this technique, the causes, sources and influences on particles in plasma and non-plasma and non-plasma processes may be independently evaluated and corrected. Several studies employing laser light scattering have demonstrated both homogeneous and heterogeneous causes of particle contamination. In this paper, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. In this region, film redeposition is followed by filament or nodule growth and enhanced trapping which increases filament growth. Eventually the filaments effectively ``short circuit`` the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes heating failure of the filament fracturing and ejecting the filaments into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor (IC) fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests that this mechanism may be universal to many sputtering processes.

  18. Electrowinning process with electrode compartment to avoid contamination of electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Poa, D.S.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Johnson, G.K.

    1993-07-06

    A process is described of electrolytically recovering a metal from an oxide of the metal comprising the steps of: (a) providing an electrolytic cell including a molten salt electrolyte containing the metal oxide and one or more halide salts of the metal, a pair of spaced apart electrodes in the electrolyte, and a source of electrical voltage to the electrodes, one of the electrodes being an anode and a source of particulate carbon contamination of the electrolyte during operation of the cell, (b) operating the cell to recover the metal as an element at the other electrode while confining the contaminant to a zone in the electrolyte about the one electrode, and (c) periodically removing the contaminant from the electrolyte zone while interrupting operation of the cell.

  19. Industrial-Scale Processes For Stabilizing Radioactively Contaminated Mercury Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Broderick, T. E.; Grondin, R.

    2003-02-24

    This paper describes two industrial-scaled processes now being used to treat two problematic mercury waste categories: elemental mercury contaminated with radionuclides and radioactive solid wastes containing greater than 260-ppm mercury. The stabilization processes were developed by ADA Technologies, Inc., an environmental control and process development company in Littleton, Colorado. Perma-Fix Environmental Services has licensed the liquid elemental mercury stabilization process to treat radioactive mercury from Los Alamos National Laboratory and other DOE sites. ADA and Perma-Fix also cooperated to apply the >260-ppm mercury treatment technology to a storm sewer sediment waste collected from the Y-12 complex in Oak Ridge, TN.

  20. Process for treating waste water having low concentrations of metallic contaminants

    DOEpatents

    Looney, Brian B; Millings, Margaret R; Nichols, Ralph L; Payne, William L

    2014-12-16

    A process for treating waste water having a low level of metallic contaminants by reducing the toxicity level of metallic contaminants to an acceptable level and subsequently discharging the treated waste water into the environment without removing the treated contaminants.

  1. Processes affecting the remediation of chromium-contaminated sites.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, C D; Wittbrodt, P R

    1991-01-01

    The remediation of chromium-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the processes that control the migration and transformation of chromium. Advection, dispersion, and diffusion are physical processes affecting the rate at which contaminants can migrate in the subsurface. Heterogeneity is an important factor that affects the contribution of each of these mechanisms to the migration of chromium-laden waters. Redox reactions, chemical speciation, adsorption/desorption phenomena, and precipitation/dissolution reactions control the transformation and mobility of chromium. The reduction of CrVI to CrIII can occur in the presence of ferrous iron in solution or in mineral phases, reduced sulfur compounds, or soil organic matter. At neutral to alkaline pH, the CrIII precipitates as amorphous hydroxides or forms complexes with organic matter. CrIII is oxidized by manganese dioxide, a common mineral found in many soils. Solid-phase precipitates of hexavalent chromium such as barium chromate can serve either as sources or sinks for CrVI. Adsorption of CrVI in soils increases with decreasing chromium concentration, making it more difficult to remove the chromium as the concentration decreases during pump-and-treat remediation. Knowledge of these chemical and physical processes is important in developing and selecting effective, cost-efficient remediation designs for chromium-contaminated sites. PMID:1935849

  2. Regulation of cough by neuronal Na(+)-K(+) ATPases.

    PubMed

    Canning, Brendan J; Farmer, David G S

    2015-06-01

    The Na(+)-K(+) ATPases play an essential role in establishing the sodium gradients in excitable cells. Multiple isoforms of the sodium pumps have been identified, with tissue and cell specific expression patterns. Because the vagal afferent nerves regulating cough must be activated at sustained high frequencies of action potential patterning to achieve cough initiation thresholds, it is a certainty that sodium pump function is essential to maintaining cough reflex sensitivities in health and in disease. The mechanisms by which Na(+)-K(+) ATPases regulate bronchopulmonary vagal afferent nerve excitability are reviewed as are potential therapeutic strategies targeting the sodium pumps in cough. PMID:26048736

  3. Characterization of Organic Contamination in Semiconductor Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutsch, A.; Beckhoff, B.; Bedana, G.; Borionetti, G.; Codegoni, D.; Grasso, S.; Guerinoni, G.; Leibold, A.; Müller, M.; Otto, M.; Pfitzner, L.; Polignano, M.-L.; De Simone, D.; Frey, L.

    2009-09-01

    The impact of organic contamination on wafer surfaces on the functionality of nanostructures and advanced microelectronics becomes crucial as the continuously shrinking feature sizes become similar to the dimensions of molecules and clusters of molecules. Especially, manufacturing of highly integrated circuits requires clean surfaces as processes might cause defects involving for example carbon and sulfur. The approach to study organic contamination on wafer samples using different analytical tools enables the detection of the whole range of organic compounds including non-volatile and volatile ones. For the studies the methods used were synchrotron radiation based Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) in the soft X-Ray range at the absorption edges of light elements (e.g. C, N, O, F) combined with reference-free Total-reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) analysis, Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (TD-GCMS), and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). TOF-SIMS analysis of the surfaces of wafers from the lithography process after ashing showed sulfur compounds related to resist residues not identified by TD-GCMS. The source of the sulfur is assumed to be a photo acid generator of the resist. It was proven by TD-GCMS and TXRF-NEXAFS that final clean and packaging were the process steps during which detectable organic contamination was transferred to the wafer surface during wafer manufacturing. Multi-criteria evaluation of the TXRF NEXAFS spectra was used to compare the results with TD-GCMS. The TXRF-NEXAFS results are in good agreement with the TD-GCMS results. The advantage of TXRF-NEXAFS and TOF-SIMS are the sensitivity for organic contaminants that are not detectable by TD-GCMS, due to their high boiling point and low vapor pressures.

  4. Stainless Steel NaK Circuit Integration and Fill Submission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, Anne E.

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has been tasked by the Marshall Space Flight Center Nuclear Systems Office to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped alkali metal flow circuit. The system, which was originally designed to hold a eutectic mixture of sodium potassium (NaK), was redesigned to hold lithium; but due to a shift in focus, it is once again being prepared for use with NaK. Changes made to the actively pumped, high temperature loop include the replacement of the expansion reservoir, addition of remotely operated valves, and modification of the support table. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, NaK to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and a spill reservoir. A 37-pin partial-array core (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in a full design) was selected for fabrication and test. This document summarizes the integration and fill of the pumped liquid metal NaK flow circuit.

  5. Electrowinning process with electrode compartment to avoid contamination of electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Poa, D.S.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.; Johnson, G.K.

    1991-12-31

    An electrolytic process and apparatus for reducing calcium oxide in a molten electrolyte of CaCl{sub 2}-CaF{sub 2} with a graphite anode in which particles or other contamination from the anode is restricted by the use of a porous barrier in the form of a basket surrounding the anode which may be removed from the electrolyte to burn the graphite particles, and wherein the calcium oxide feed is introduced to the anode compartment to increase the oxygen ion concentration at the anode.

  6. Process for minimizing solids contamination of liquids from coal pyrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Wickstrom, Gary H.; Knell, Everett W.; Shaw, Benjamin W.; Wang, Yue G.

    1981-04-21

    In a continuous process for recovery of liquid hydrocarbons from a solid carbonaceous material by pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material in the presence of a particulate source of heat, particulate contamination of the liquid hydrocarbons is minimized. This is accomplished by removing fines from the solid carbonaceous material feed stream before pyrolysis, removing fines from the particulate source of heat before combining it with the carbonaceous material to effect pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material, and providing a coarse fraction of reduced fines content of the carbon containing solid residue resulting from the pyrolysis of the carbonaceous material before oxidizing carbon in the carbon containing solid residue to form the particulate source of heat.

  7. Electrowinning process with electrode compartment to avoid contamination of electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Poa, Davis S.; Pierce, R. Dean; Mulcahey, Thomas P.; Johnson, Gerald K.

    1993-01-01

    An electrolytic process and apparatus for reducing calcium oxide in a molten electrolyte of CaCl.sub.2 -CaF.sub.2 with a graphite anode in which particles or other contamination from the anode is restricted by the use of a porous barrier in the form of a basket surrounding the anode which may be removed from the electrolyte to burn the graphite particles, and wherein the calcium oxide feed is introduced to the anode compartment to increase the oxygen ion concentration at the anode.

  8. Size Distribution of NaK Droplets Released During Rorsat Reactor Core Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Oswald, M.; Stabroth, S.; Klinkrad, H.; Vörsmann, P.

    NaK droplets consist of eutectic sodium-potassium alloy and have been released during RORSAT reactor core ejections mostly on orbits close to 950 km altitude. They contributed to the space debris environment in the centimeter and millimeter size regime. NaK droplets have been modeled before in ESA's MASTER Debris and Meteoroid Environment Model. The approach is currently revised for the MASTER 2005 upgrade. The new NaK model gives estimations of the parameters of the size distribution function, which are based on physical relations only. This physical approach confirms NASA radar observations. The core ejection causes an opening of the primary coolant circuit. The liquid coolant is released into space forming droplets up to a diameter of 5.5 cm. The reactor design is investigated to understand the possible mechanisms that cause the droplets generation. It is likely that the droplet generation process can be both capillary jet breakup and atomization. This paper presents results of the estimation of droplets sizes. A droplet size distribution is introduced, which is scientifically justified. The physical process of atomization resp. liquid jet breakup is considered, to derive the parameters of the size distribution function. The introduction of an improved distribution function is important. So far the cumulative size distribution function was a combination of several fitting curve segments to agree with measured data. The definition of several functions results in a large number of parameters. This drawback is corrected. The droplet size can be defined as function of the orifice diameter. The droplets sizes are related to the parameters of the size distribution function. The size distribution function shall contain only two parameters, which can be derived from the orifice diameter and the atomization conditions. In this way scientifically based estimations of the parameters are introduced. An estimation of the maximum droplet diameter assuming capillary jet

  9. 9 CFR 381.94 - Contamination with Microorganisms; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contamination with Microorganisms... § 381.94 Contamination with Microorganisms; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen... maintaining process controls sufficient to prevent fecal contamination. FSIS shall take further action...

  10. Contamination Revealed by Indicator Microorganism Levels during Veal Processing.

    PubMed

    Bosilevac, Joseph M; Wang, Rong; Luedtke, Brandon E; Wheeler, Tommy L; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    During site visits of veal processors, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has reported processing deficiencies that likely contribute to increased levels of veal contamination. Here, we report the results of measuring aerobic plate count bacteria (APC), Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms (CF), and Escherichia coli during eight sample collections at five veal processors to assess contamination during the harvest of bob veal and formula-fed veal before (n = 5 plants) and after (n = 3 plants) changes to interventions and processing practices. Hides of veal calves at each plant had mean log CFU/100 cm(2) APC, Enterobacteriaceae, CF, and E. coli of 6.02 to 8.07, 2.95 to 5.24, 3.28 to 5.83, and 3.08 to 5.59, respectively. Preintervention carcasses had mean log CFU/100 cm(2) APC, Enterobacteriaceae, CF, and E. coli of 3.08 to 5.22, 1.16 to 3.47, 0.21 to 3.06, and -0.07 to 3.10, respectively, before and 2.72 to 4.50, 0.99 to 2.76, 0.69 to 2.26, and 0.33 to 2.12, respectively, after changes were made to improve sanitary dressing procedures. Final veal carcasses had mean log CFU/100 cm(2) APC, Enterobacteriaceae, CF, and E. coli of 0.36 to 2.84, -0.21 to 1.59, -0.23 to 1.59, and -0.38 to 1.45 before and 0.44 to 2.64, -0.16 to 1.33, -0.42 to 1.20, and 0.48 to 1.09 after changes were made to improve carcass-directed interventions. Whereas the improved dressing procedures resulted in improved carcass cleanliness, the changes to carcass-directed interventions were less successful, and veal processors are urged to use techniques that ensure uniform and consistent delivery of antimicrobials to carcasses. Analysis of results comparing bob veal to formula-fed veal found bob veal hides, preintervention carcasses, and final carcasses to have increased (P < 0.05) APC, Enterobacteriaceae, CF, and E. coli (with the exception of hide Enterobacteriaceae; P > 0.05) relative to formula fed veal. When both veal categories were harvested at the same plant on

  11. Contamination and changes of food factors during processing with modeling applications-safety related issues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemical and microbiological contamination of food during processing and preservation can result in foodborne illness outbreaks and food poisoning. Chemical contaminations can occur through exposure of foods to illegal additives, pesticides and fertilizer residues, toxic compounds formed by microbes...

  12. Contaminated Metal Components in Dismantling by Hot Cutting Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cesari, Franco G.; Conforti, Gianmario; Rogante, Massimo; Giostri, Angelo

    2006-07-01

    During the preparatory dismantling activities of Caorso's Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), an experimental campaign using plasma and oxyacetylene metal cutting processes has been performed and applied to plates and tubes exposed to the coolant steam of the reactor. The plant (Boiling Water Reactor, 870 MWe) was designed and built in the 70's, and it was fully operating by 1981 to 1986 being shut down after 1987 Italy's poll that abrogated nuclear power based on U235 fission. The campaign concerns no activated materials, even if the analyses have been performed of by use contaminated components under the free release level, not yet taking into account radioactivity. In this paper, the parameters related to inhalable aerosol, solid and volatile residuals production have been, studied during hot processes which applies the same characteristics of the cutting in field for the dismantling programs of Caorso NPP. The technical parameters such as cutting time and cutting rate vs. pipe diameter/thickness/schedule or plate thickness for ferritic alloys and the emissions composition coming from the sectioning are also reported. The results underline the sort of trouble that can emerge in the cutting processes, in particular focusing on the effects comparison between the two cutting processes and the chemical composition of powders captured by filtering the gaseous emission. Some preliminary considerations on methodology to be used during the dismantling have been presented. (authors)

  13. Enhanced bioremediation of PAH contaminated soils from coal processing sites

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, M.M.; Lee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are a potential hazard to health due to their carcinogenic, mutagenic nature and acute toxicity and there is an imminent need for remediation of PAH contaminated soils abounding the several coke oven and town gas sites. Aerobic biological degradation of PAHs is an innovative technology and has shown high decontamination efficiencies, complete mineralization of contaminants, and is environmentally safe. The present study investigates the remediation of PAH contaminated soils achieved using Acinetobacter species and fungal strain Phanerochaete Chrysosporium. The soil used for the experiments was an industrially contaminated soil obtained from Alberta Research Council (ARC) primary cleanup facility, Alberta, Canada. Soil characterization was done using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to qualitatively and quantitatively determine the contaminants in the soil. Artificially contaminated soil was also used for some experiments. All the experiments were conducted under completely mixed conditions with suitable oxygen and nutrient amendments. The removal efficiency obtained for various PAHs using the two microorganisms was compared.

  14. 9 CFR 310.25 - Contamination with microorganisms; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contamination with microorganisms... CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.25 Contamination with microorganisms; process control verification... controls sufficient to prevent fecal contamination. FSIS shall take further action as appropriate to...

  15. Contamination by slow diffusers in ion implantation processes: The examples of molybdenum and tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Soncini, V.

    2015-08-01

    A procedure to measure molybdenum and tungsten contamination in implantation processes by DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) is defined and calibrated for the evaluation of molybdenum and tungsten contaminant dose. The obtained calibrations are used to study molybdenum contamination in BF2 implantations and tungsten contamination by sputtering from a previously contaminated wafer holder. In molybdenum-implanted samples, the molybdenum level located 0.3 eV above valence band is revealed only. In tungsten-implanted samples, two levels are revealed. One of these levels is the tungsten-related hole trap located 0.4 eV above valence band. The other level does not correspond to any tungsten-related level, however it is related to the presence of tungsten and to the sample preparation process. The SPV (Surface Photovoltage) measurement sensitivity to tungsten contamination was also tested, and it was found much lower than the DLTS sensitivity, due to the low tungsten diffusivity. This procedure was used to evaluate contamination in implantation processes. In BF2 implantations, in addition to molybdenum, tungsten contamination is found. Molybdenum and tungsten contamination is found in boron implantation too. The tungsten contamination induced by implantation in a previously contaminated implanter was quantified, and the efficiency of arsenic implantation as a decontamination process was tested. Finally, it was shown that TXRF (Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence) is much less sensitive than DLTS for monitoring tungsten contamination.

  16. Social Marketing in Malaysia: Cognitive, Affective, and Normative Mediators of the TAK NAK Antismoking Advertising Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonkyong Beth; Fong, Geoffrey T; Dewhirst, Timothy; Kennedy, Ryan D; Yong, Hua-Hie; Borland, Ron; Awang, Rahmat; Omar, Maizurah

    2015-01-01

    Antismoking mass media campaigns are known to be effective as part of comprehensive tobacco control programs in high-income countries, but such campaigns are relatively new in low- and middle-income countries and there is a need for strong evaluation studies from these regions. This study examines Malaysia's first national antismoking campaign, TAK NAK. The data are from the International Tobacco Control Malaysia Survey, which is an ongoing cohort survey of a nationally representative sample of adult smokers (18 years and older; N = 2,006). The outcome variable was quit intentions of adult smokers, and the authors assessed the extent to which quit intentions may have been strengthened by exposure to the antismoking campaign. The authors also tested whether the impact of the campaign on quit intentions was related to cognitive mechanisms (increasing thoughts about the harm of smoking), affective mechanisms (increasing fear from the campaign), and perceived social norms (increasing perceived social disapproval about smoking). Mediational regression analyses revealed that thoughts about the harm of smoking, fear arousal, and social norms against smoking mediated the relation between TAK NAK impact and quit intentions. Effective campaigns should prompt smokers to engage in both cognitive and affective processes and encourage consideration of social norms about smoking in their society. PMID:26054867

  17. INNOVATIVE PROCESS FOR RECLAMATION OF CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research to better assess the capabilities and limitations of fixed-film bioreactors for removing selected organic contaminants from ground water or from contaminated vapor streams produced by air stripping of polluted ground water and by soil venting operations is described. ork...

  18. INNOVATIVE PROCESSES FOR RECLAMATION OF CONTAMINATED SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research to better assess the capabilities and limitations of fixed-film bioreactors for removing selected organic contaminants from ground water or from contaminated vapor streams produced by air stripping of polluted ground water and by soil venting operations is described. ...

  19. Characterization of Contaminants from a Sanitized Milk Processing Plant

    PubMed Central

    Cleto, Sara; Matos, Sónia; Kluskens, Leon; Vieira, Maria João

    2012-01-01

    Milk processing lines offer a wide variety of microenvironments where a diversity of microorganisms can proliferate. We sampled crevices and junctions where, due to deficient reach by typical sanitizing procedures, bacteria can survive and establish biofilms. The sampling sites were the holding cell, cold storage tank, pasteurizer and storage tank - transfer pump junction. The culturable bacteria that were isolated after the sanitation procedure were predominantly Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp, Staphylococcus sciuri and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. We assayed several phenotypic characteristics such as the ability to secrete enzymes and siderophores, as well as the capacity of the strains to form biofilms that might contribute to their survival in a mixed species environment. The Pseudomonas spp. isolates were found to either produce proteases or lecithinases at high levels. Interestingly, protease production showed an inverse correlation with siderophore production. Furthermore, all of the Serratia spp. isolates were strong biofilm formers and spoilage enzymes producers. The organisms identified were not mere contaminants, but also producers of proteins with the potential to lower the quality and shelf-life of milk. In addition, we found that a considerable number of the Serratia and Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the pasteurizer were capable of secreting compounds with antimicrobial properties. PMID:22761957

  20. Surface photovoltage analysis of iron contamination in silicon processing and the relation to gate oxide integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, Worth B.

    1995-09-01

    Surface photovoltage (SPV), a contactless optical technique for measuring minority carrier lifetime, is used to quantify the relationship between silicon iron contamination level and thin gate oxide integrity. Iron concentration levels in the range of 1 X 1010 cm-3 to 5 X 1013 cm-3 are evaluated for oxide thicknesses of 8 to 20 nm. Ramp voltage electrical breakdown and time dependant dielectric breakdown measurement on the iron contaminated gate oxide capacitors are reported. Distinct iron contamination threshold limits based on defect density and gate oxide integrity evaluate cleaning efficiencies and metallic cross contamination effects during thermal processing contamination. Iron-silicide precipitation kinetics are investigated by the lifetime analysis procedure.

  1. Long and short time variations of the Na/K ratio in the exosphere of Mercury.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Alessandro; Lammer, Helmut; Wurz, Peter; Orsini, Stefano; Milillo, Anna; Mangano, Valeria; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Scherf, Manuel; Khodachenko, Maxim; Pfleger, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Here we present the results of our model for the short-time and yearly variations of the Sodium and Potassium exosphere of Mercury. Such surface-bounded exosphere is produced by release processes occurring at the planetary surface, such as ion sputtering, thermal- or photon-stimulated desorption. The amount of surface Sodium or Potassium that is available for release, however, is limited. Those release processes deplete the surface in Na and K, which is continuously refilled by diffusion from the interior of regolith grains or by chemical sputtering. Ejected particles may either escape the gravity field, assisted by the radiation pressure acceleration, or be photoionized, or fall back onto the surface. Falling particles will stick to the surface. A Montecarlo model, simulating all these processes, is used to obtain the exosphere densities and the Na/K ratio, taking into account the planet's orbit and rotation speed. The influence of variations of the solar wind precipitation (i.e., CMEs) is also included. We compare this model with either ground- and space-based observations of the exosphere and tail to evaluate the effectiveness of each source process. We find that including a source process which effectiveness is proportional to the precipitation of solar wind protons, is necessary to explain most of the available observations in both qualitative and quantitative way. We find that, to reproduce dawn-dusk asymmetries, we need to include the rotation of Mercury's surface in the model. After finding the correct model parameter by calibrating the model with observation, we simulate the short-term and yearly variations of Na/K.

  2. CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FOR THE D&D OF THE 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect

    HOPKINS, A.M.; MINETTE, M.J.; KLOS, D.B.

    2007-01-25

    This paper describes the unique challenges encountered and subsequent resolutions to accomplish the deactivation and decontamination of a plutonium ash contaminated building. The 232-Z Contaminated Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant was used to recover plutonium from process wastes such as rags, gloves, containers and other items by incinerating the items and dissolving the resulting ash. The incineration process resulted in a light-weight plutonium ash residue that was highly mobile in air. This light-weight ash coated the incinerator's process equipment, which included gloveboxes, blowers, filters, furnaces, ducts, and filter boxes. Significant airborne contamination (over 1 million derived air concentration hours [DAC]) was found in the scrubber cell of the facility. Over 1300 grams of plutonium held up in the process equipment and attached to the walls had to be removed, packaged and disposed. This ash had to be removed before demolition of the building could take place.

  3. Design of a Mechanical NaK Pump for Fission Space Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Bradley, David E.; Godfroy, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Alkali liquid metal cooled fission reactor concepts are under development for spaceflight power requirements. One such concept utilizes a sodium-potassium eutectic (NaK) as the primary loop working fluid, which has specific pumping requirements. Traditionally, electromagnetic linear induction pumps have been used to provide the required flow and pressure head conditions for NaK systems but they can be limited in performance, efficiency, and number of available vendors. The objective of the project was to develop a mechanical NaK centrifugal pump that takes advantages of technology advances not available in previous liquid metal mechanical pump designs. This paper details the design, build, and performance test of a mechanical NaK pump developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The pump was designed to meet reactor cooling requirements using commercially available components modified for high temperature NaK service.

  4. Development of a Pulp Process Treating Contaminated HEPA Filters (III)

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. S.; Ramer, J.; Argyle, M. D.; Demmer, R. L.

    2002-02-28

    The Pulp Process (PP) Treatment option was conceived as a replacement for the current Filter Leaching System (FLS). The FLS has operated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1995 to treat radioactive, mixed waste HEPA filters. In recent years, the FLS has exhibited difficulty in removing mercury from the HEPA filters as the concentration of mercury in the spent HEPA filters has increased. The FLS leaches and washes the whole filter without any preparation or modification. The filter media and the trapped calcine particles are confined in a heavy filter housing that contributes to poor mixing zones around the edges of the filter, low media permeability, channeling of the liquid through cracks and tears in the filter media, and liquid retention between leach and rinse cycles. In the PP, the filter media and the trapped calcine particles are separated from the filter housing and treated as a pulp, taking advantage of improved contact with the leach solution that cannot be achieved when the media is still in the HEPA filter housing. In addition to removing the mercury more effectively, the PP generates less volume of liquid waste, requires a shorter leach cycle time, and possesses the versatility for treating filters of different sizes. A series of tests have been performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the advantages of the PP concept. These tests compare the PP with the FLS under controlled conditions that simulate the current operating parameters. A prior study using blended feed, a mixture of shredded clean HEPA filter media and non-radioactive calcine particles, indicated that the PP would significantly increases the calcine dissolution percentages. In this study, hazardous-metal contaminated HEPA filter media was studied. The results of side-by-side tests indicated that the PP increased the mercury removal percentage by 80% and might be a solution to the mercury removal

  5. Collisional transfer of population and orientation in NaK.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, C M; Ashman, S; Bai, J; Beser, B; Ahmed, E H; Lyyra, A M; Huennekens, J

    2011-05-01

    Collisional satellite lines with |ΔJ| ≤ 58 have been identified in recent polarization spectroscopy V-type optical-optical double resonance (OODR) excitation spectra of the Rb(2) molecule [H. Salami et al., Phys. Rev. A 80, 022515 (2009)]. Observation of these satellite lines clearly requires a transfer of population from the rotational level directly excited by the pump laser to a neighboring level in a collision of the molecule with an atomic perturber. However to be observed in polarization spectroscopy, the collision must also partially preserve the angular momentum orientation, which is at least somewhat surprising given the extremely large values of ΔJ that were observed. In the present work, we used the two-step OODR fluorescence and polarization spectroscopy techniques to obtain quantitative information on the transfer of population and orientation in rotationally inelastic collisions of the NaK molecules prepared in the 2(A)(1)Σ(+)(v' = 16, J' = 30) rovibrational level with argon and potassium perturbers. A rate equation model was used to study the intensities of these satellite lines as a function of argon pressure and heat pipe oven temperature, in order to separate the collisional effects of argon and potassium atoms. Using a fit of this rate equation model to the data, we found that collisions of NaK molecules with potassium atoms are more likely to transfer population and destroy orientation than collisions with argon atoms. Collisions with argon atoms show a strong propensity for population transfer with ΔJ = even. Conversely, collisions with potassium atoms do not show this ΔJ = even propensity, but do show a propensity for ΔJ = positive compared to ΔJ = negative, for this particular initial state. The density matrix equations of motion have also been solved numerically in order to test the approximations used in the rate equation model and to calculate fluorescence and polarization spectroscopy line shapes. In addition, we have measured

  6. Scald tank water and foam as sources of carcass contamination during early poultry processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella remains a leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the United States, with poultry consumption associated with forty percent of outbreaks for which vehicles are identified. Identifying sources of Salmonella contamination and cross-contamination within poultry processing is imperat...

  7. A top specified boundary layer (TSBL) approximation approach for the simulation of groundwater contamination processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents improvements in the 'classical boundary layer' (CBL) approximation method to obtain simple but robust initial characterization of aquifer contamination processes. Contaminants are considered to penetrate into the groundwater through the free surface of the aquifer. The improved method developed in this study is termed the 'top specified boundary layer' (TSBL) approach. It involves the specification of the contaminant concentration at the top of the contaminated 'region of interest' (ROI), which is simulated as a boundary layer. the TSBL modification significantly improves the ability of the boundary layer method to predict the development of concentration profiles over both space and time. The TSBL method can be useful for the simulation of cases in which the contaminant concentration is prescribed at the aquifer's free surface as well as for cases in which the contaminant mass flux is prescribed at the surface.

  8. Na/K ATPase inhibition by digitalis-like factors in neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Bottorff, M.B.; Songu-Mize, E.; Hoon, T.J.; Phelps, S.J.; Kamper, C.A.

    1986-03-01

    At the authors institution, 48% of neonates < 1 month of age had false-positive digoxin immunoassay determinations while not receiving digoxin, presumably due to an endogenous digoxin-like immunoreactive substance (DLIS) in the plasma. Plasma from 3 neonates positive for DLIS by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) was evaluated for inhibitory activity on human red blood cell (RBC) Na/K ATPase. Neonatal plasma aliquots containing DLIS concentrations (conc) of 0.24, 0.37, 0.43, 0.49 and 0.61 ng/ml (3.07 - 7.81 x 10/sup -10/M) were incubated with human RBC and /sup 86/Rb in order to measure /sup 86/Rb uptake inhibition with respect to DLIS negative neonatal plasma. /sup 86/Rb uptake inhibition by digoxin-spiked human serum (1.07 x 10/sup -10/ - 4.57 x 10/sup -6/M) was also measured. Percent inhibition vs. log molar conc plots for DLIS and digoxin were compared. DLIS inhibited Na/K ATPase in a linear fashion over the range studied. Comparing the linear portions of the conc-inhibition curves for digoxin and DLIS, the molar conc of digoxin producing 40% inhibition of /sup 86/Rb uptake is 333 times greater than the molar conc of DLIS producing similar inhibition. Therefore, DLIS in neonatal serum as measured by FPIA has approximately 300 times greater inhibitory activity than digoxin. The presence of circulating DLIS may reflect an adaptive or maladaptive response to some, as yet unknown, process early in life.

  9. Role of protein dynamics in ion selectivity and allosteric coupling in the NaK channel

    PubMed Central

    Brettmann, Joshua B.; Urusova, Darya; Tonelli, Marco; Silva, Jonathan R.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Flux-dependent inactivation that arises from functional coupling between the inner gate and the selectivity filter is widespread in ion channels. The structural basis of this coupling has only been well characterized in KcsA. Here we present NMR data demonstrating structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and intracellular constriction point in the bacterial nonselective cation channel, NaK. This transmembrane allosteric communication must be structurally different from KcsA because the NaK selectivity filter does not collapse under low-cation conditions. Comparison of NMR spectra of the nonselective NaK and potassium-selective NaK2K indicates that the number of ion binding sites in the selectivity filter shifts the equilibrium distribution of structural states throughout the channel. This finding was unexpected given the nearly identical crystal structure of NaK and NaK2K outside the immediate vicinity of the selectivity filter. Our results highlight the tight structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and the channel scaffold, which has significant implications for channel function. NaK offers a distinct model to study the physiologically essential connection between ion conduction and channel gating. PMID:26621745

  10. Experimental Studies of NaK in a Simulated Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibons, Marc; Sanzi, James; Ljubanovic, Damir

    2011-01-01

    Space fission power systems are being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Department of Energy (DOE) with a short term goal of building a full scale, non-nuclear, Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) test at NASA's Glenn Research Center. Due to the geometric constraints, mass restrictions, and fairly high temperatures associated with space reactors, liquid metals are typically used as the primary coolant. A eutectic mixture of sodium (22 percent) and potassium (78 percent), or NaK, has been chosen as the coolant for the TDU with a total system capacity of approximately 55 L. NaK, like all alkali metals, is very reactive, and warrants certain safety considerations. To adequately examine the risk associated with the personnel, facility, and test hardware during a potential NaK leak in the large scale TDU test, a small scale experiment was performed in which NaK was released in a thermal vacuum chamber under controlled conditions. The study focused on detecting NaK leaks in the vacuum environment as well as the molecular flow of the NaK vapor. This paper reflects the work completed during the NaK experiment and provides results and discussion relative to the findings.

  11. A review on Insulin plant (Costus igneus Nak).

    PubMed

    Hegde, Prakash K; Rao, Harini A; Rao, Prasanna N

    2014-01-01

    Costus igneus Nak and Costus pictus D. Don, commonly known as Spiral flag, is a member of Costaceae and a newly introduced plant in India from South and Central America. It is a perennial, upright, spreading plant reaching about two feet tall, with spirally arranged leaves and attractive flowers. In southern India, it usually grows as an ornamental plant and its leaves are used as a dietary supplement in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Recently, a number of researches have been carried out to evaluate the anti-diabetic potential of this plant. Besides, it has been proven to possess various pharmacological activities like hypolipidemic, diuretic, antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-cancerous. Further, various phytochemical investigations reveal the presence of carbohydrates, triterpenoids, proteins, alkaloids, tannins, saponins, flavonoids, steroid, and appreciable amounts of trace elements. This work is an attempt to compile and explore the different pharmacological and phytochemical studies reported till date. PMID:24600198

  12. A review on Insulin plant (Costus igneus Nak)

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Prakash K.; Rao, Harini A.; Rao, Prasanna N.

    2014-01-01

    Costus igneus Nak and Costus pictus D. Don, commonly known as Spiral flag, is a member of Costaceae and a newly introduced plant in India from South and Central America. It is a perennial, upright, spreading plant reaching about two feet tall, with spirally arranged leaves and attractive flowers. In southern India, it usually grows as an ornamental plant and its leaves are used as a dietary supplement in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. Recently, a number of researches have been carried out to evaluate the anti-diabetic potential of this plant. Besides, it has been proven to possess various pharmacological activities like hypolipidemic, diuretic, antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-cancerous. Further, various phytochemical investigations reveal the presence of carbohydrates, triterpenoids, proteins, alkaloids, tannins, saponins, flavonoids, steroid, and appreciable amounts of trace elements. This work is an attempt to compile and explore the different pharmacological and phytochemical studies reported till date. PMID:24600198

  13. Bead and Process for Removing Dissolved Metal Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Bobby L., Jr.; Bennett, Karen L.; Foster, Scott A.

    2005-01-18

    A bead is provided which comprises or consists essentially of activated carbon immobilized by crosslinked poly (carboxylic acid) binder, sodium silicate binder, or polyamine binder. The bead is effective to remove metal and other ionic contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions. A method of making metal-ion sorbing beads is provided, comprising combining activated carbon, and binder solution (preferably in a pin mixer where it is whipped), forming wet beads, and heating and drying the beads. The binder solution is preferably poly(acrylic acid) and glycerol dissolved in water and the wet beads formed from such binder solution are preferably heated and crosslinked in a convection oven.

  14. Design of a Mechanical NaK Pump for Fission Space Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mireles, Omar R.; Bradley, David; Godfroy, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Alkali liquid metal cooled fission reactor concepts are under development for mid-range spaceflight power requirements. One such concept utilizes a sodium-potassium eutectic (NaK) as the primary loop working fluid. Traditionally, linear induction pumps have been used to provide the required flow and head conditions for liquid metal systems but can be limited in performance. This paper details the design, build, and check-out test of a mechanical NaK pump. The pump was designed to meet reactor cooling requirements using commercially available components modified for high temperature NaK service.

  15. Overview of processes affecting contaminant release from confined disposal facilities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.L.; McCutcheon, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Confined disposal facilities (CDFs) are widely used for the disposal of dredged material from Corps of Engineers maintenance dredging projects along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts and waterways and harbors in the Great Lakes. CDFs are a less common disposal alternative along the Pacific coast and inland river systems. When contaminated dredged material is placed in the CDF, there is a potential for contaminant mobilization and release from the CDF by a variety of physical, chemical, and biological processes. This report provides an overview of the processes affecting mobilization and release of contaminants from CDFs and the potential applicability of multimedia models for prediction of contaminant release. Processes affecting release from in-water CDFs are emphasized, although many of the processes discussed are applicable to nearshore and upland CDFs. Processes affecting contaminant release are complex, involving a variety of chemicals and operational and design considerations. Many of the important processes are reasonably well known. Laboratory column settling and elutriate techniques have been developed to estimate solids and contaminant concentration in water directly released during hydraulic disposal operations. Predictive techniques for other processes are not as available.

  16. In Situ Vitrification: Recent test results for a contaminated soil melting process

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Timmerman, C.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) is being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Department of Energy and other clients for the stabilization of soils and sludges contaminated with radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes. ISV is a process that immobilizes contaminated soil in place by converting it to a durable glass and crystalline product that is similar to obsidian. In June 1987, a large-scale test of the process was completed at a transuranic- contaminated soil site. This constituted the first full-scale demonstration of the ISV process at an actual site. This paper summarizes the preliminary results of this test and describes the processes' potential adaptation to radioactive and hazardous chemical waste contaminated soils. 10 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Contamination control in hybrid microelectronic modules. Part 3: Specifications for coating material and process controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himmel, R. P.

    1975-01-01

    Resin systems for coating hybrids prior to hermetic sealing are described. The resin systems are a flexible silicone junction resin system and a flexible cycloaliphatic epoxy resin system. The coatings are intended for application to the hybrid after all the chips have been assembled and wire bonded, but prior to hermetic sealing of the package. The purpose of the coating is to control particulate contamination by immobilizing particles and by passivating the hybrid. Recommended process controls for the purpose of minimizing contamination in hybrid microcircuit packages are given. Emphasis is placed on those critical hybrid processing steps in which contamination is most likely to occur.

  18. In situ vitrification: Test results for a contaminated soil-melting process

    SciTech Connect

    Buelt, J.L.; Timmerman, C.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Department of Energy to stabilize soils and sludges that are contaminated with radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes. ISV is a process that immobilizes contaminated soil in place by converting it to a durable glass and crystalline product similar to obsidian and basalt. In June 1987, a large-scale test of the process was completed at a transuranic-contaminated soil site. The test constituted the first full-scale demonstration of ISV at an actual site. This paper summarizes the results of that test and describes the potential adaptation of the process to radioactive and hazardous chemical waste-contaminated soils. 15 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Na and K Dependence of the Na/K Pump in Cystic Fibrosis Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Vivian M.; Schneider, Jerry A.; Mendoza, Stanley A.

    1981-11-01

    The Na and K dependence of the Na/K pump was measured in skin fibroblasts from patients with cystic fibrosis and age/sex-matched controls. Under basal conditions, there was no difference between control and cystic fibrosis cells in protein per cell, intracellular Na and K content, or Na/K pump activity (measured as ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake). There was no difference in the Na dependence of the Na/K pump between cystic fibrosis cells and control cells. In cells from patients with cystic fibrosis, the Na/K pump had a significantly lower affinity for K (Km = 1.6 mM) when compared to normals (Km = 0.9 mM). This difference was demonstrated by using two independent experimental designs.

  20. Unit Process Wetlands for Removal of Trace Organic Contaminants and Pathogens from Municipal Wastewater Effluents

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Justin T.; Nguyen, Mi T.; Jones, Zackary L.; Ismail, Niveen S.; Sedlak, David L.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Luthy, Richard G.; Horne, Alex J.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Treatment wetlands have become an attractive option for the removal of nutrients from municipal wastewater effluents due to their low energy requirements and operational costs, as well as the ancillary benefits they provide, including creating aesthetically appealing spaces and wildlife habitats. Treatment wetlands also hold promise as a means of removing other wastewater-derived contaminants, such as trace organic contaminants and pathogens. However, concerns about variations in treatment efficacy of these pollutants, coupled with an incomplete mechanistic understanding of their removal in wetlands, hinder the widespread adoption of constructed wetlands for these two classes of contaminants. A better understanding is needed so that wetlands as a unit process can be designed for their removal, with individual wetland cells optimized for the removal of specific contaminants, and connected in series or integrated with other engineered or natural treatment processes. In this article, removal mechanisms of trace organic contaminants and pathogens are reviewed, including sorption and sedimentation, biotransformation and predation, photolysis and photoinactivation, and remaining knowledge gaps are identified. In addition, suggestions are provided for how these treatment mechanisms can be enhanced in commonly employed unit process wetland cells or how they might be harnessed in novel unit process cells. It is hoped that application of the unit process concept to a wider range of contaminants will lead to more widespread application of wetland treatment trains as components of urban water infrastructure in the United States and around the globe. PMID:23983451

  1. Electrochemical processes for in-situ treatment of contaminated soils. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.P.

    1998-06-01

    'This research project is to develop electrochemical processes for in-situ treatment of contaminated soils. Specifically, it is to study electrokinetic (EK) and electro-Fento (EF) processes and to integrate these processes for the treatment of soils containing mixed contaminants. The objectives are: (1) To study important parameters controlling the mobilization and the transport of selected organics and metals in soils by the electrokinetic (EK) process. Factors to be studied include field strength, pH, ionic strength, soil washing agents, types of organic and metal contaminants, and soil surface properties such as cation exchange capacity(CEC), soil organic content, soil moisture content, soil composition, and surface charge. (2) To study the important factors governing the oxidation of selected organic contaminants by the electro-Fenton (EF) process. Parameters such as pH, surface area and the configuration of working electrode, oxygen concentration, ferrous ion, and temperature that may affect the performance of the EF process will be investigated. (3) To understand the mechanism of the oxidation of selected organic contaminants by the electro-Fenton oxidation process.'

  2. Functional interaction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Na+/K+ ATPase from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen)

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Xiao, Youxin; Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Zewen; Fang, Jichao; Li, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Associated proteins are important for the correct functioning of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present study, a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column was used to isolate related proteins from a solubilized membrane preparation from the nervous system of Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). 1530 peptides were identified and most of them were involved in the membranous structure, molecular interaction and cellular communication. Among these peptides, Na+/K+ ATPase had the highest MASCOT score and were involved in the molecular interaction, which suggested that Na+/K+ ATPase and nAChRs might have strong and stable interactions in insect central nervous system. In the present study, functional interactions between nAChRs and Na+/K+ ATPase were examined by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. The results showed that the activated nAChRs increased pump currents of Na+/K+ ATPase, which did not require current flow through open nAChRs. In turn, Na+/K+ ATPase significantly increased agonist sensitivities of nAChRs in a pump activity-independent manner and reduced the maximum current (Imax) of nAChRs. These findings provide novel insights concerning the functional interactions between insect nAChRs and Na+/K+ ATPase. PMID:25743085

  3. Evidence for coordinate genetic control of Na,K pump density in erythrocytes and lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuise, M.; Flier, J.S.

    1985-08-01

    The erythrocyte is widely used as a model cell for studies of the Na,K pump in health and disease. However, little is known about the factors that control the number of Na,K pumps expressed on the erythrocytes of a given individual, nor about the extent to which erythrocytes can be used to validly assess the pump density on other cell types. In this report, the authors have compared the interindividual variance of Na,K pump density in erythrocytes of unrelated individuals to that seen with identical twins. Unlike unrelated individuals, in whom pump parameters, i.e., ouabain binding sites, /sup 86/Rb uptake, and cell Na concentration vary widely, identical twin pairs showed no significant intrapair variation for these values. Thus, a role for genetic factors is suggested. In addition, the authors established and validated a method for determining Na,K pump density and pump-mediated /sup 86/Rb uptake in human peripheral lymphocytes. Using this method, they show that whereas Na,K pump density differs markedly between erythrocytes (mean of 285 sites per cell) and lymphocytes (mean 40,600 sites per cell), there is a strong and highly significant correlation (r = 0.79, P less than 0.001) between the pump density in these cell types in any given individual. Taken together, these studies suggest that genetic factors are important determinants of Na,K pump expression, and that pump density appears to be coordinately regulated in two cell types in healthy individuals.

  4. Functional interaction of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Na+/K+ ATPase from Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen).

    PubMed

    Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Xiao, Youxin; Zhang, Yixi; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Zewen; Fang, Jichao; Li, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Associated proteins are important for the correct functioning of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present study, a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column was used to isolate related proteins from a solubilized membrane preparation from the nervous system of Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen). 1530 peptides were identified and most of them were involved in the membranous structure, molecular interaction and cellular communication. Among these peptides, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase had the highest MASCOT score and were involved in the molecular interaction, which suggested that Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and nAChRs might have strong and stable interactions in insect central nervous system. In the present study, functional interactions between nAChRs and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase were examined by heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes. The results showed that the activated nAChRs increased pump currents of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, which did not require current flow through open nAChRs. In turn, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase significantly increased agonist sensitivities of nAChRs in a pump activity-independent manner and reduced the maximum current (Imax) of nAChRs. These findings provide novel insights concerning the functional interactions between insect nAChRs and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase. PMID:25743085

  5. Long-length contaminated equipment disposal process path document

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A.

    1998-09-30

    The first objective of the LLCE Process Path Document is to guide future users of this system on how to accomplish the cradle-to-grave process for the disposal of long-length equipment. Information will be provided describing the function and approach to each step in the process. Pertinent documentation, prerequisites, drawings, procedures, hardware, software, and key interfacing organizations will be identified. The second objective is related to the decision to lay up the program until funding is made available to complete it or until a need arises due to failure of an important component in a waste tank. To this end, the document will identify work remaining to be completed for each step of the process and open items or issues that remain to be resolved.

  6. [Evaluation of microbial contamination of linens in industrial laundry processes].

    PubMed

    Sanna, Adriana; Coroneo, Valentina; Dessì, Sandro; Brandas, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Laundering linens and protecting them from microbiological recontamination are critical issues for the hotel and food industries and especially for hospitals. This study was performed to evaluate a sample of industrial laundries in Sardinia (Italy), to assess their compliance with national hygienic and sanitary regulations, along the complete laundering process. Study results indicate that industrial laundering processes are effective and that better awareness of staff who handle laundered textiles is required to reduce the risk of recontamination. PMID:23903035

  7. Radioactive contamination of the Balchug (Upper Yenisey) floodplain, Russia in relation to sedimentation processes and geomorphology.

    PubMed

    Linnik, V G; Brown, J E; Dowdall, M; Potapov, V N; Surkov, V V; Korobova, E M; Volosov, A G; Vakulovsky, S M; Tertyshnik, E G

    2005-03-01

    The radioactive contamination of a riverine floodplain, heavily influenced by discharges from Krasnoyarsk-26, has been studied with respect to sedimentation processes and the geomorphology of the Upper Yenisey floodplain. The study was effected by implementation of a regime of in situ observations and measurements, sampling, and the interpretation of satellite images. The results of the study indicate that on the Balchug Bypass Floodplain, radionuclide contamination is primarily influenced by the thickness of the deposited sediments, and the area can be considered as two depositional environments. The Balchug floodplain area was contaminated due to sedimentation of radionuclide-contaminated alluvium, whose depositional regime significantly changed after the construction of a hydroelectric power station in 1967. Contamination levels are lower on the upstream part of the floodplain where sediment depth is less than 0.2-0.3 m, and this contamination started to accumulate in 1967, while the downstream part of the floodplain, exhibiting deeper deposits, displays higher levels of radionuclide contamination because radionuclides began to deposit here in 1958 when the Krasnoyarsk-26 Mining and Chemical Combine (KMCC) commenced operation. Radionuclide contamination of the floodplain is also related to the elevation of the floodplain, higher regions of the floodplain typically having lower contamination than low-lying areas, which tend to be frequently inundated with sediments being deposited during such inundations. Local relief, its orientation, and vegetation cover have also combined to form sediment traps with significantly higher radionuclide contamination. Lithological analysis combined with radiometric assay indicates a total 137Cs floodplain inventory of 33.7 GBq. PMID:15740772

  8. Attached Bacterial Cell Contamination of Shell Egg Processing Facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sanitation is vital to providing safe, healthy food to consumers. Understanding the degree to which microorganisms persist on specific equipment or locations contributes to developing effective sanitation programs. Certain microbial populations may be used to determine areas within a processing pl...

  9. Altered erythrocyte Na-K pump in anorectic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquali, R.; Strocchi, E.; Malini, P.; Casimirri, F.; Ambrosioni, E.; Melchionda, N.; Labo, G.

    1985-07-01

    The status of the erythrocyte sodium pump was evaluated in a group of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa and a group of healthy female control subjects. Anorectic patients showed significantly higher mean values of digoxin-binding sites/cell (ie, the number of Na-K-ATPase units) with respect to control subjects while no differences were found in the specific /sup 86/Rb uptake (which reflects the Na-K-ATPase activity) between the two groups. A significant correlation was found between relative weight and the number of Na-K-ATPase pump units (r = -0.66; P less than 0.0001). Anorectic patients showed lower serum T3 concentrations (71.3 +/- 53 ng/dL) with respect to control subjects (100.8 +/- 4.7 ng/dL; P less than 0.0005) and a significant negative correlation between T3 levels and the number of pump units (r = -0.52; P less than 0.003) was found. This study therefore shows that the erythrocyte Na-K pump may be altered in several anorectic patients. The authors suggest that this feature could be interrelated with the degree of underweight and/or malnutrition.

  10. INFLUENCE OF COUPLED PROCESSES ON CONTAMINANT FATE AND TRANSPORT IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, Philip M

    2008-01-01

    The following chapter emphasizes subsurface environmental research investigations over the past 10 to 15 years that couple hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes as related to contaminant fate and transport. An attempt is made to focus on field-scale studies with possible reference to laboratory-scale endeavors. Much of the research discussed reflects investigations of the influence of coupled processes on the fate and transport of inorganic, radionuclide, and organic contaminants in subsurface environments as a result of natural processes or energy and weapons production endeavors that required waste disposal. The chapter provides on overview of the interaction between hydro-bio-geochemical processes in structured, heterogeneous subsurface environments and how these interactions control contaminant fate and transport, followed by experimental and numerical subsurface science research and case studies involving specific classes of inorganic and organic contaminants. Lastly, thought provoking insights are highlighted on why the study of subsurface coupled processes is paramount to understanding potential future contaminant fate and transport issues of global concern.

  11. Evaluation of processing factors for selected organic contaminants during virgin olive oil production: Distribution of BTEXS during olives processing.

    PubMed

    López-Blanco, Rafael; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; Rojas-Jiménez, Rubén; Robles-Molina, José; Ramos-Martos, Natividad; García-Reyes, Juan F; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2016-05-15

    The presence of BTEXS (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and styrene) in virgin olive oils can be attributed to environmental contamination, but also to biological processes during oil lipogenesis (styrene). In this work, the processing factor of BTEXS from olives to olive oil during its production was evaluated at lab-scale with an Abencor system. Benzene showed the lowest processing factor (15%), whereas toluene and xylenes showed an intermediate behavior (with 40-60% efficiency), and ethylbenzene and styrene were completely transferred (100%). In addition, an attempt to examine the contribution of potential sources to olives contamination with BTEXS was carried out for the first time. Two types of olives samples were classified according to their proximity to the contamination source (road). Although higher levels of BTEXS were found in samples close to roads, the concentrations were relatively low and do not constitute a major contribution to BTEXS usually detected in olive oil. PMID:26775971

  12. The human erythrocyte Cl-dependent Na-K cotransport system as a possible model for studying the action of loop diuretics.

    PubMed Central

    Ellory, J. C.; Stewart, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 The recent demonstration of the chloride-dependence of the red cell Na-K cotransport system suggests an analogy between this process and the active Cl- absorption in the ascending loop of Henle, which is the target transport system for loop diuretics. 2 Using red cell K influx, four known loop diuretics, six experimental frusemide analogues, two thiazides, two K-retaining diuretics and one organomercurial were compared for inhibitory potency on the red cell Na-K cotransport system. 3 Except for mersalyl, whose exact mode of action in the kidney is still in doubt, the inhibition of the red cell system by various loop diuretics was consistent with both published whole body diuretic data and isolated perfused tubule studies, while the system did not respond to the thiazides or the K-retaining diuretics. 4 It is concluded that the human red cell Na-K cotransport system is a possible valid model process on which to study the activity of loop diuretics. PMID:7074281

  13. Occurrence of rhodamine B contamination in capsicum caused by agricultural materials during the vegetation process.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wu, Naiying; Du, Jingjing; Zhou, Li; Lian, Yunhe; Wang, Lei; Liu, Dengshuai

    2016-08-15

    This paper reports on the environmental rhodamine B (RhB) contamination in capsicum caused by agricultural materials during the vegetation process. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was applied to detect 64 capsicum samples from China, Peru, India and Burma. Results demonstrated that RhB was found in all samples at low concentrations (0.11-0.98 μg/kg), indicating RhB contamination in capsicums is probably a ubiquitous phenomenon. In addition, studies into soils, roots, stems and leaves in Handan of Hebei province, China showed that the whole ecologic chain had been contaminated with RhB with the highest levels in leaves. The investigation into the agricultural environment in Handan of Hebei province and Korla of Xinjiang province, China demonstrated that the appearances of RhB contamination in the tested capsicums are mainly due to the agricultural materials contamination. The study verified that environmental contamination should be an important origin for the RhB contamination in capsicum fruits. PMID:27006220

  14. 9 CFR 381.94 - Contamination with Microorganisms; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen reduction standards. 381.94 Section 381.94... § 381.94 Contamination with Microorganisms; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen... been complied with and written notice of same has been provided to the establishment. (b)...

  15. 9 CFR 381.94 - Contamination with Microorganisms; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen reduction standards. 381.94 Section 381.94... § 381.94 Contamination with Microorganisms; process control verification criteria and testing; pathogen... been complied with and written notice of same has been provided to the establishment. (b)...

  16. REMOVAL OF PCBS FROM A CONTAMINATED SOIL USING CF-SYSTEMS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA's START team in cooperation with EPA's SITE program evaluated a pilot scale solvent extraction process developed by CF-Systems. This process uses liquified propane to extract organic contaminants from soils, sludges, and sediments. A pilot-scale evaluation was conducte...

  17. EVALUATION OF THE ADA TECHNOLOGIES' ELECTRO-DECON PROCESS TO REMOVE RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pao, Jenn-Hai; Demmer, Rick L.; Argyle, Mark D.; Veatch, Brad D.

    2003-02-27

    A surface decontamination system featuring the use of ADA's electrochemical process was tested and evaluated. The process can be flexibly deployed by using an electrolyte delivery system that has been demonstrated to be reliable and effective. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of this system for the surface decontamination of radiologically contaminated stainless steel.

  18. Adaptive Image Processing Methods for Improving Contaminant Detection Accuracy on Poultry Carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract A real-time multispectral imaging system has demonstrated a science-based tool for fecal and ingesta contaminant detection during poultry processing. In order to implement this imaging system at commercial poultry processing industry, the false positives must be removed. For doi...

  19. High pressure processing as an intervention for raw virus-contaminated shellfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past 7 years, the USDA ARS Seafood Safety Laboratory has evaluated the potential use of high pressure processing (HPP) as a processing strategy for virus-contaminated shellfish. HPP can inactivate hepatitis A virus, (HAV), the human norovirus surrogates feline calicivirus and murine norovi...

  20. Contamination and uniformity control in plasma processing tools

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.; Brackbill, J.; Jones, M.; Winske, D.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We have collaborated with industry to build a laboratory to study plasma processing, a surface-cleaning technique that uses short-lived, gaseous reactants in place of chemical solvents. We have performed experiments and developed computer models to understand how complex substrate geometries affect plasma electrical properties and to demonstrate the feasibility of generating metastable molecular oxygen in a plasma.

  1. Leptin inhibits the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase in Caco-2 cells via PKC and p38MAPK.

    PubMed

    El-Zein, Ola; Usta, Julnar; El Moussawi, Layla; Kreydiyyeh, Sawsan Ibrahim

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrated previously an inhibitory effect of luminal leptin on glucose absorption in differentiated Caco-2 cells. Since this process is dependent on the Na(+) gradient established by the Na(+)/K(+)ATPase this work was undertaken to investigate if the ATPase is one of the hormone's targets. Fully differentiated Caco-2 cells were incubated with 10nM luminal leptin and the activity of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase was assayed by measuring the amount of inorganic phosphate liberated. To elucidate the signaling pathway involved, the suspected mediators, namely PKC, p38MAPK, ERK and PI3K, were inhibited with specific pharmacological inhibitors and their implication was confirmed by determining changes in the protein expression of their active phosphorylated forms by Western blot analysis. Leptin reduced significantly the activity of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, by activating p38MAPK via inhibition of PKC, an upstream inhibitor of the kinase. ERK and PI3K are modulators of the pump and are not along the pathway activated by leptin but cross talk with it at the level of p38MAPK. PMID:25499980

  2. Lattice strain across Na-K interdiffusion fronts in alkali feldspar: an electron back-scatter diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Anne-Kathrin; Jäpel, Tom; Zaefferer, Stefan; Abart, Rainer; Rhede, Dieter

    2014-11-01

    Cation exchange experiments between gem quality sanidine and KCl melt produced chemical alteration of alkali feldspar starting at the grain surface and propagating inwards by highly anisotropic Na-K interdiffusion on the alkali sublattice. Diffusion fronts developing in b-direction are very sharp, while diffusion fronts within the a- c-plane are comparatively broad. Due to the composition dependence of the lattice parameters of alkali feldspar, the diffusion induced compositional heterogeneity induces coherency stress and elastic strain. Electron back-scatter diffraction combined with the cross-correlation technique was employed to determine the lattice strain distribution across the Na-K interdiffusion fronts in partially exchanged single crystals of alkali feldspar. The strain changes gradually across the broad fronts within the a- c-plane, with a successive extension primarily in a-direction conferring to the composition strain in unstressed alkali feldspar. In contrast, lattice strain characterised by pronounced extension in b-direction is localised at the sharp diffusion fronts parallel to b, followed by a slight expansion in a-direction in the orthoclase-rich rim. This strain pattern does not confer with the composition induced lattice strain in a stress-free alkali feldspar. It may rather be explained by the mechanical coupling of the exchanged surface layer and the mechanically strong substratum. The lattice distortion localised at the sharp diffusion front may have an influence on the diffusion process and appears to produce a self-sharpening feedback, leading to a local reduction of component mobilities.

  3. Effect of blocking the Na+/K+ ATPase on Ca2+ extrusion and light adaptation in mammalian retinal rods.

    PubMed Central

    Demontis, G C; Ratto, G M; Bisti, S; Cervetto, L

    1995-01-01

    Membrane current and light response were recorded from rods of monkey and guinea pig by means of suction electrodes. The correlation between adaptation and the Na+/K+ pump was investigated by measuring light-dependent changes in sensitivity with and without inhibition of Na+/K+ ATPase by strophanthidin. Strophanthidin was found to reduce the dark current, to slow the time course of the photoresponse, and to increase light sensitivity. At concentrations between 20 and 500 nM, the pump inhibitor suppressed in a reversible way the current re-activation occurring during prolonged illumination and modified the light-dependent decrease in sensitivity, which in control conditions approximates to a Weber-Fechner function. The effects of the pump inhibitor on the adaptive properties of rods are associated with an increased time constant of the membrane current attributed to the operation of the Na+:Ca2+,K+ exchanger. The effects of rapid application of the pump inhibitor on the current re-activation are consistent with the idea that significant changes in the internal sodium occur in rods of mammals during background illumination and that they play an important role in the process of light adaptation. PMID:8527658

  4. Selectivity of a Singly Permeating Ion in Nonselective NaK Channel: Combined QM and MD Based Investigations.

    PubMed

    Sadhu, Biswajit; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2015-10-01

    Ion channels, such as potassium channels are known to discriminate ions to achieve remarkable selective transportation of K(+) over Na(+) through the membrane. The recently reported NaK ion channel, on the contrary, seems to be an exception, as it is observed to permeate most of the group IA alkali metal cations and hence is suggested to be nonselective in nature. However, does that correspond to a complete annihilation of selectivity inside the selectivity filter (SF) of the channel? What is the origin of such nonselectivity/selectivity, if any? The present computational study is an extensive multiscale modeling approach to find the probable answers to these intriguing questions. Here, we have used density functional theory (DFT) based calculations using a realistic truncated model of SF from the crystal structures of the NaK ion channel to evaluate the binding of various alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) and Cs(+)), free from "contamination" due to the absence any other "rivalry" cations, in its different binding sites. Among all of the possible binding sites, a vestibule is noticed to be nonselective and seen to act as a probable binding site only in the presence of multiple ions. Binding sites S3 and S4 are found to be selective for K(+) and Na(+), respectively. As an important observation, we find that calculations on oversimplified models using an isolated ion binding site may lead to an erroneous selectivity trend as it neglects the synergetics of consecutive binding sites on the final outcome. Energy decomposition analysis revealed ion-dipole electrostatics as the major contributing interaction in metal-bound binding sites. Our investigations find that although NaK is permeable to monovalent alkali metal ions, strongly "site specific" selectivity does exist at the three well-defined noncontiguous binding sites of the SF. Different important physicomechanical parameters (such as ligating environment, synergistic influence of binding sites, and topological

  5. Long-term oil contamination increases deterministic assembly processes in soil microbes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuting; Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Guanghe

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms that drive microbial turnover in time and space have received considerable attention but remain unclear, especially for situations with anthropogenic perturbation. To understand the impact of long-term oil contamination on microbial spatial turnover, 100 soil samples were taken from five oil exploration fields located in different geographic regions across China. The microbial functional diversity was analyzed with a high-throughput functional gene array, GeoChip. Our results indicated that soil microbial α-diversity (richness and Shannon diversity index) decreased significantly with contamination. All contaminated and uncontaminated samples exhibited significant spatial autocorrelation between microbial community similarity and spatial distance, as described by a distance-decay relationship (DDR). However, long-term oil exposure flattened the slopes of the DDRs of all of the functional genes and each functional group involved in C/N/P/S cycling, particularly of those involved in contaminant degradation. The relative importance of deterministic and stochastic processes in microbial assembly was determined. The decrease in microbial spatial turnover with long-term oil contamination was coupled with an increase in the proportion of deterministic processes that structured microbial assembly based on null model analysis. The results indicated long-term oil contamination significantly affects soil microbial community spatial structure by acting as an environmental filter to decrease the regional differences distinguishing soil microbial communities. PMID:26485952

  6. Detection and identification of wild yeast contaminants of the industrial fuel ethanol fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Basílio, A C M; de Araújo, P R L; de Morais, J O F; da Silva Filho, E A; de Morais, M A; Simões, D A

    2008-04-01

    Monitoring for wild yeast contaminants is an essential component of the management of the industrial fuel ethanol manufacturing process. Here we describe the isolation and molecular identification of 24 yeast species present in bioethanol distilleries in northeast Brazil that use sugar cane juice or cane molasses as feeding substrate. Most of the yeast species could be identified readily from their unique amplification-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprint. Yeast of the species Dekkera bruxellensis, Candida tropicalis, Pichia galeiformis, as well as a species of Candida that belongs to the C. intermedia clade, were found to be involved in acute contamination episodes; the remaining 20 species were classified as adventitious. Additional physiologic data confirmed that the presence of these major contaminants cause decreased bioethanol yield. We conclude that PCR fingerprinting can be used in an industrial setting to monitor yeast population dynamics to early identify the presence of the most important contaminant yeasts. PMID:18188645

  7. Effects of natural attenuation processes on groundwater contamination caused by abandoned waste sites in Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerndorff, Helmut; Kühn, Stephan; Minden, Thomas; Orlikowski, Dagmar; Struppe, Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this research project is to identify, characterize and quantify natural attenuation (NA) processes in groundwater affected by emissions of abandoned waste disposal sites in Berlin-Kladow/Gatow, Germany. It is part of the funding priority called KORA established by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF) to explore the extent to which NA can be used for remedial purposes for varied forms of soil and groundwater contamination. Information on the emission behaviour of individual parameters is generated on the basis of hydrogeochemical comparison of 20 years old and new data. Using groundwater-modelling and CFC-analysis, information on the transport and retention of pollutants in groundwater is compiled. The microbial colonization of contaminated aquifers is characterized by molecular biological methods [polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)] to differentiate between contaminated and not contaminated zones.

  8. Hybrid joule heating/electro-osmosis process for extracting contaminants from soil layers

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    2003-06-10

    Joule (ohmic) heating and electro-osmosis are combined in a hybrid process for removal of both water-soluble contaminants and non-aqueous phase liquids from contaminated, low-permeability soil formations that are saturated. Central to this hybrid process is the partial desaturation of the formation or layer using electro-osmosis to remove a portion of the pore fluids by induction of a ground water flow to extraction wells. Joule heating is then performed on a partially desaturated formation. The joule heating and electro-osmosis operations can be carried out simultaneously or sequentially if the desaturation by electro-osmosis occurs initially. Joule heating of the desaturated formation results in a very effective transfer or partitioning of liquid state contaminants to the vapor phase. The heating also substantially increases the vapor phase pressure in the porous formation. As a result, the contaminant laden vapor phase is forced out into soil layers of a higher permeability where other conventional removal processes, such as steam stripping or ground water extraction can be used to capture the contaminants. This hybrid process is more energy efficient than joule heating or steam stripping for cleaning low permeability formations and can share electrodes to minimize facility costs.

  9. Particle contamination control in plasma processing: Building-in reliability for semiconductor fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    Plasma processing is used for {approximately}35% of the process steps required for semiconductor manufacturing. Recent studies have shown that plasma processes create the greatest amount of contaminant dust of all the manufacturing steps required for device fabrication. Often, the level of dust in a plasma process tool exceeds the cleanroom by several orders of magnitude. Particulate contamination generated in a plasma tool can result in reliability problems as well as device failure. Inter-level wiring shorts different levels of metallization on a device is a common result of plasma particulate contamination. We have conducted a thorough study of the physics and chemistry involved in particulate formation and transport in plasma tools. In-situ laser light scattering (LLS) is used for real-time detection of the contaminant dust. The results of this work are highly surprising: all plasmas create dust; the dust can be formed by homogeneous as well as heterogeneous chemistry; this dust is charged and suspended in the plasma; additionally, it is transported to favored regions of the plasma, such as those regions immediately above wafers. Fortunately, this work has also led to a novel means of controlling and eliminating these unwanted contaminants: electrostatic {open_quotes}drainpipes{close_quotes} engineered into the electrode by means of specially designed grooves. These channel the suspended particles out of the plasma and into the pump port before they can fall onto the wafer.

  10. Contaminants of the bismuth phosphate process as signifiers of nuclear reprocessing history.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sweet, Lucas E.

    2012-10-01

    Reagents used in spent nuclear fuel recycling impart unique contaminant patterns into the product stream of the process. Efforts are underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to characterize and understand the relationship between these patterns and the process that created them. A main challenge to this effort, recycling processes that were employed at the Hanford site from 1944-1989 have been retired for decades. This precludes direct measurements of the contaminant patterns that propagate within product streams of these facilities. In the absence of any operating recycling facilities at Hanford, we have taken a multipronged approach to cataloging contaminants of U.S. reprocessing activities using: (1) historical records summarizing contaminants within the final Pu metal button product of these facilities; (2) samples of opportunity that represent intermediate products of these processes; and (3) lab-scale experiments and model simulations designed to replicate contaminant patterns at each stage of nuclear fuel reprocessing. This report provides a summary of the progress and results from Fiscal Year (April 1, 2010-September 30) 2011.

  11. D-glucose Stimulates the Na+/K+ Pump in Mouse Pancreatic Islet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Elmi, Adrian; Idahl, Lars-ÅKe; Sandström, Per-Erik

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of D-glucose on the β-cell Na+/K+ pump, 86Rb+ influx was studied in isolated, -cell-rich islets of Umeå-ob/ob mice in the absence or presence of lmM ouabain. D-glucose (20 mM) stimulated the ouabain-sensitive portion of 86Rb+ influx by 65%, whereas the ouabain-resistant portion was inhibited by 48%. The Na+/K+ ATPase activity in homogenates of islets of Umeå-ob/ob mice or normal mice was determined to search for direct effects of D-glucose. Thus, ouabain-sensitive ATP hydrolysis in islet homogenates was measured in the presence of different D-glucose concentrations. No effect of D-glucose (3–20 mM) was observed in either ob/ob or normal islets at the optimal Na+/K+ ratio for the enzyme (135 mM Na+ and 20 mM K+). Neither D-glucose (3–20 mM) nor L-glucose or 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (20 mM) affected the enzyme activity at a high Na+/K+ ratio (175 mM Na+ and 0.7mM K+). Diphenylhydantoin (150 μM) decreased the enzyme activity at optimal Na+/K+ ratio, whereas 50 μM of the drug had no effect. The results suggest that D-glucose induces a net stimulation the Na+/K+ pump of β-cells in intact islets and that D-glucose does not exert any direct effect on the Na+/K+ ATPase activity. PMID:11469399

  12. RADIOLOGICAL CONTROLS FOR PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATED PROCESS EQUIPMENT REMOVAL FROM 232-Z CONTAMINATED WASTE RECOVERY PROCESS FACILITY AT THE PLUTONIUM FINSHING PLANT (PFP)

    SciTech Connect

    MINETTE, M.J.

    2007-05-30

    The 232-Z facility at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant operated as a plutonium scrap incinerator for 11 years. Its mission was to recover residual plutonium through incinerating and/or leaching contaminated wastes and scrap material. Equipment failures, as well as spills, resulted in the release of radionuclides and other contamination to the building, along with small amounts to external soil. Based on the potential threat posed by the residual plutonium, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued an Action Memorandum to demolish Building 232-2, Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERC1.A) Non-Time Critical Removal Action Memorandum for Removal of the 232-2 Waste Recovery Process Facility at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (04-AMCP-0486).

  13. Identification of risk factors for Campylobacter contamination levels on broiler carcasses during the slaughter process.

    PubMed

    Seliwiorstow, Tomasz; Baré, Julie; Berkvens, Dirk; Van Damme, Inge; Uyttendaele, Mieke; De Zutter, Lieven

    2016-06-01

    Campylobacter carcass contamination was quantified across the slaughter line during processing of Campylobacter positive batches. These quantitative data were combined together with information describing slaughterhouse and batch related characteristics in order to identify risk factors for Campylobacter contamination levels on broiler carcasses. The results revealed that Campylobacter counts are influenced by the contamination of incoming birds (both the initial external carcass contamination and the colonization level of caeca) and the duration of transport and holding time that can be linked with feed withdrawal period. In addition, technical aspects of the slaughter process such as a dump based unloading system, electrical stunning, lower scalding temperature, incorrect setting of plucking, vent cutter and evisceration machines were identified as risk factors associated with increased Campylobacter counts on processed carcasses. As such the study indicates possible improvements of the slaughter process that can result in better control of Campylobacter numbers under routine processing of Campylobacter positive batches without use of chemical or physical decontamination. Moreover, all investigated factors were existing variations of the routine processing practises and therefore proposed interventions are practically and economically achievable. PMID:27016637

  14. Reduced activity of SKC a and Na-K ATPase underlies the accelerated impairment of EDH-type relaxations in mesenteric arteries of aging spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kong, Billy W C; Man, Ricky Y K; Gao, Yuansheng; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Leung, Susan W S

    2015-06-01

    Aging is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction due to reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and/or reduced endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizations (EDH). This study examines the hypothesis that hypertension aggravates the impairment of EDH-type relaxation due to aging. EDH-type relaxations were studied in superior mesenteric arteries isolated from Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats of 12, 36, 60, and 72 weeks of age. EDH-type relaxations in WKY were reduced with aging, and this was associated with an impairment of the function of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SKC a) and sodium-potassium ATPase (Na-K ATPase). EDH-type relaxation in SHR was smaller than that in WKY arteries, and further reduction occurred with aging. Pharmacological experiments suggested a reduced involvement of SKC a and Na-K ATPase and activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and silent information regulator T1 (sirtuin-1; SIRT1) in mesenteric arteries of 12-week-old SHR. These pharmacological findings suggest that in superior mesenteric arteries of the rat, the reduction in EDH-type relaxation occurs with aging and that such a reduction is exacerbated in hypertension. The latter exacerbation appears to involve proteins associated with the process of cellular senescence and is related to impaired function of SKC a and Na-K ATPase, a phenomenon that is also observed in mesenteric arteries of older normotensive rats. PMID:26171229

  15. L. monocytogenes in a cheese processing facility: Learning from contamination scenarios over three years of sampling.

    PubMed

    Rückerl, I; Muhterem-Uyar, M; Muri-Klinger, S; Wagner, K-H; Wagner, M; Stessl, B

    2014-10-17

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changing patterns of Listeria monocytogenes contamination in a cheese processing facility manufacturing a wide range of ready-to-eat products. Characterization of L. monocytogenes isolates included genotyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Disinfectant-susceptibility tests and the assessment of L. monocytogenes survival in fresh cheese were also conducted. During the sampling period between 2010 and 2013, a total of 1284 environmental samples were investigated. Overall occurrence rates of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes were 21.9% and 19.5%, respectively. Identical L. monocytogenes genotypes were found in the food processing environment (FPE), raw materials and in products. Interventions after the sampling events changed contamination scenarios substantially. The high diversity of globally, widely distributed L. monocytogenes genotypes was reduced by identifying the major sources of contamination. Although susceptible to a broad range of disinfectants and cleaners, one dominant L. monocytogenes sequence type (ST) 5 could not be eradicated from drains and floors. Significantly, intense humidity and steam could be observed in all rooms and water residues were visible on floors due to increased cleaning strategies. This could explain the high L. monocytogenes contamination of the FPE (drains, shoes and floors) throughout the study (15.8%). The outcome of a challenge experiment in fresh cheese showed that L. monocytogenes could survive after 14days of storage at insufficient cooling temperatures (8 and 16°C). All efforts to reduce L. monocytogenes environmental contamination eventually led to a transition from dynamic to stable contamination scenarios. Consequently, implementation of systematic environmental monitoring via in-house systems should either aim for total avoidance of FPE colonization, or emphasize a first reduction of L. monocytogenes to sites where

  16. Synchronization modulation increases transepithelial potentials in MDCK monolayers through Na/K pumps.

    PubMed

    Tran, Vu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Cao, Lin; Li, Hanqing; Lee, Benjamin; So, Michelle; Sun, Yaohui; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Transepithelial potential (TEP) is the voltage across a polarized epithelium. In epithelia that have active transport functions, the force for transmembrane flux of an ion is dictated by the electrochemical gradient in which TEP plays an essential role. In epithelial injury, disruption of the epithelial barrier collapses the TEP at the wound edge, resulting in the establishment of an endogenous wound electric field (∼100 mV/mm) that is directed towards the center of the wound. This endogenous electric field is implicated to enhance wound healing by guiding cell migration. We thus seek techniques to enhance the TEP, which may increase the wound electric fields and enhance wound healing. We report a novel technique, termed synchronization modulation (SM) using a train of electric pulses to synchronize the Na/K pump activity, and then modulating the pumping cycles to increase the efficiency of the Na/K pumps. Kidney epithelial monolayers (MDCK cells) maintain a stable TEP and transepithelial resistance (TER). SM significantly increased TEP over four fold. Either ouabain or digoxin, which block Na/K pump, abolished SM-induced TEP increases. In addition to the pump activity, basolateral distribution of Na/K pumps is essential for an increase in TEP. Our study for the first time developed an electrical approach to significantly increase the TEP. This technique targeting the Na/K pump may be used to modulate TEP, and may have implication in wound healing and in diseases where TEP needs to be modulated. PMID:23585907

  17. Mobilisation processes responsible for iron and manganese contamination of groundwater in Central Adriatic Italy.

    PubMed

    Palmucci, William; Rusi, Sergio; Di Curzio, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Iron and manganese are two of the most common contaminants that exceed the threshold imposed by international and national legislation. When these contamination occurs in groundwater, the use of the water resource is forbidden for any purposes. Several studies investigated these two metals in groundwater, but research focused in the Central Adriatic area are still lacking. Thus, the objective of this study is to identify the origin of Fe and Mn contamination in groundwater and the hydrogeochemical processes that can enrich aquifers with these metals. This work is based on hydrogeochemical and multivariate statistical analysis of analytical results undertaken on soils and groundwater. Fe and Mn contamination are widespread in the alluvial aquifers, and their distribution is regulated by local conditions (i.e. long residence time, presence of peat or organic-rich fine sediments or anthropic pollution) that control redox processes in the aquifers and favour the mobilisation of these two metals in groundwater. The concentration of iron and manganese identified within soil indicates that the latter are a concrete source of the two metals. Anthropic impact on Fe and Mn contamination of groundwater is not related to agricultural activities, but on the contrary, the contribution of hydrocarbons (e.g. spills) is evident. PMID:26948970

  18. On-farm and postharvest processing sources of bacterial contamination to melon rinds.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, J V; Millner, P D; Lester, G; Ingram, D

    2003-01-01

    Multistate and international foodborne illness outbreaks, particularly involving cantaloupe and often involving rare Salmonella spp., have increased dramatically over the past 13 years. This study assessed the sources and extent of melon rind contamination in production fields and at processing and packing facilities. In the spring of 1999, cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. [reticulatus group] cv. Cruiser) sampled from two sites in the Rio Grande River Valley showed that postharvest-processed melon rinds often had greater plate counts of bacterial contaminants than field-fresh melons. Cantaloupe in the field had 2.5 to 3.5 log CFU g(-1) rind total coliforms by aerobic plate counts, whereas washed melons had 4.0 to 5.0 log CFU g(-1). In the fall of 1999, coliforms on honeydew melons (C. melo [inodorous group] cv. Honey Brew) ranged from 2.6 to 3.7 log CFU g(-1) after processing, and total and fecal coliforms and enterococci never fell below 2.5 log CFU g(-1). A hydrocooler at another site contaminated cantaloupe rinds with up to 3.4 log CFU g(-1) total and fecal enterococci; a secondary rinse with chlorinated water incompletely removed these bacteria. Sources of coliforms and enterococci were at high levels in melon production soils, especially in furrows that were flood irrigated, in standing water at one field, and in irrigation water at both sites. At one processing facility, wash water pumped from the Rio Grande River may not have been sufficiently disinfected prior to use. Because soil, irrigation water, and process water were potential sources of bacterial contamination, monitoring and management on-farm and at processing and packing facilities should focus on water quality as an important control point for growers and packers to reduce bacterial contamination on melon rinds. PMID:12540185

  19. CONTAMINANT-ORGANIC COMPLEXES: THEIR STRUCTURE AND ENERGETICS IN SURFACE DECONTAMINATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current debate over possible decontamination processes for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities is centered on disparate decontamination problems, but the key contaminants (uranium [U], plutonium [Pu], and neptunium [Np]) are universally important. There is no single d...

  20. NATURAL ARSENIC CONTAMINATION OF HOLOCENE ALLUVIAL AQUIFERS BY LINKED TECTONIC, WEATHERING, AND MICROBIAL PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linked tectonic, geochemical, and biologic processes lead to natural arsenic contamination of groundwater in Holocene alluvial aquifers, which are the main threat to human health around the world. These groundwaters are commonly found a long distance from their ultimate source of...

  1. MOLECULAR-LEVEL PROCESS GOVERNING THE INTERACTION OF CONTAMINANTS WITH IRON AND MANGANESE OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can bealtered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on stru...

  2. In situ treatment of mixed contaminants in groundwater: Review of candidate processes

    SciTech Connect

    Korte, N.E.; Siegrist, R.L.; Ally, M.

    1994-10-01

    This document describes the screening and preliminary evaluation of candidate treatment for use in treating mixed contaminants volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides in groundwater. Treating mixed contaminants presents unusual difficulties. Typically, VOCs are the most abundant contaminants, but the presence of radionuclides results in additional health concerns that must be addressed, usually by a treatment approach different from that used for VOCs. Furthermore, the presence of radionuclides may yield mixed solid wastes if the VOCs are treated by conventional means. These issues were specifically addressed in the evaluation of candidate treatment processes for testing in this program. Moreover, because no research or early development of a particular process would be performed, the technology review also focused on technologies that could be readily adapted and integrated for use with mixed contaminants. The objective is to couple emerging or available processes into treatment modules for use in situ. The three year project, to be completed in September 1996, includes a full-scale field demonstration. The findings reported in this document encompass all activities through the treatment process evaluations.

  3. EPA Treatability Database Digs Deep for Data on Drinking Water Contaminants and Treatment Processes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The TDB is an interactive database that was initially developed in 2006-2007. The TDB currently contains more than 60 regulated and unregulated contaminants and 28 treatment processes that are known to be effective and are commonly employed at drinking water utilities. TDB lite...

  4. MICROBIAL PROCESSES AFFECTING MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CONTAMINANTS IN THE SUBSURFACE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the alternatives considered for the remediation of soil and ground water at hazardous wastes sites are the use of natural processes to reduce or remove the contaminants of concern. Under favorable conditions, the use of natural attenuation can result in significant cost sa...

  5. Research of polishing process to control the iron contamination on the magnetorheological finished KDP crystal surface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaoshan; Li, Shengyi; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Hu, Hao; Tie, Guipeng

    2015-02-20

    A new nonaqueous and abrasive-free magnetorheological finishing (MRF) method is adopted for processing a KDP crystal. MRF polishing is easy to result in the embedding of carbonyl iron (CI) powders; meanwhile, Fe contamination on the KDP crystal surface will affect the laser induced damage threshold seriously. This paper puts forward an appropriate MRF polishing process to avoid the embedding. Polishing results show that the embedding of CI powders can be avoided by controlling the polishing parameters. Furthermore, on the KDP crystal surface, magnetorheological fluids residua inevitably exist after polishing and in which the Fe contamination cannot be removed completely by initial ultrasonic cleaning. To solve this problem, a kind of ion beam figuring (IBF) polishing is introduced to remove the impurity layer. Then the content of Fe element contamination and the depth of impurity elements are measured by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. The measurement results show that there are no CI powders embedding in the MRF polished surface and no Fe contamination after the IBF polishing process, respectively. That verifies the feasibility of MRF polishing-IBF polishing (cleaning) for processing a KDP crystal. PMID:25968216

  6. Rapid evolution of redox processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Lovley, D.R.; O'Neill, K.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2002-01-01

    Ground water chemistry data collected over a six-year period show that the distribution of contaminants and redox processes in a shallow petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer has changed rapidly over time. Shortly after a gasoline release occurred in 1990, high concentrations of benzene were present near the contaminant source area. In this contaminated zone, dissolved oxygen in ground water was depleted, and by 1994 Fe(III) reduction and sulfate reduction were the predominant terminal electron accepting processes. Significantly, dissolved methane was below measurable levels in 1994, indicating the absence of significant methanogenesis. By 1996, however, depletion of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides in aquifer sediments and depletion of dissolved sulfate in ground water resulted in the onset of methanogenesis. Between 1996 and 2000, water-chemistry data indicated that methanogenic metabolism became increasingly prevalent. Molecular analysis of 16S-rDNA extracted from sediments shows the presence of a more diverse methanogenic community inside as opposed to outside the plume core, and is consistent with water-chemistry data indicating a shift toward methanogenesis over time. This rapid evolution of redox processes reflects several factors including the large amounts of contaminants, relatively rapid ground water flow (???0.3 m/day [???1 foot/day]), and low concentrations of microbially reducible Fe(III) oxyhydroxides (???1 ??mol/g) initially present in aquifer sediments. These results illustrate that, under certain hydrologic conditions, redox conditions in petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifers can change rapidly in time and space, and that the availability of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides affects this rate of change.

  7. A complete remediation process for a uranium-contaminated site and application to other sites

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, C.F.V.; Lu, N.; Kitten, H.D.; Williams, M.; Turney, W.R.J.R.

    1998-12-31

    During the summer of 1996 the authors were able to test, at the pilot scale, the concept of leaching uranium (U) from contaminated soils. The results of this pilot scale operation showed that the system they previously had developed at the laboratory scale is applicable at the pilot scale. The paper discusses these results, together with laboratory scale results using soil from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), Ohio. These FEMP results show how, with suitable adaptations, the process is widely applicable to other sites. The purpose of this paper is to describe results that demonstrate remediation of uranium-contaminated soils may be accomplished through a leach scheme using sodium bicarbonate.

  8. Cleaning and sanitation of Salmonella-contaminated peanut butter processing equipment.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Elizabeth M; Grove, Stephen F; Halik, Lindsay A; Arritt, Fletcher; Keller, Susanne E

    2015-04-01

    Microbial contamination of peanut butter by Salmonella poses a significant health risk as Salmonella may remain viable throughout the product shelf life. Effective cleaning and sanitation of processing lines are essential for preventing cross-contamination. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cleaning and sanitation procedure involving hot oil and 60% isopropanol, ± quaternary ammonium compounds, to decontaminate pilot-scale processing equipment harboring Salmonella. Peanut butter inoculated with a cocktail of four Salmonella serovars (∼ 7 log CFU/g) was used to contaminate the equipment (∼ 75 L). The system was then emptied of peanut butter and treated with hot oil (90 °C) for 2 h followed by sanitizer for 1 h. Microbial analysis of food-contact surfaces (7 locations), peanut butter, and oil were conducted. Oil contained ∼ 3.2 log CFU/mL on both trypticase soy agar with yeast extract (TSAYE) and xylose lysine deoxycholate (XLD), indicating hot oil alone was not sufficient to inactivate Salmonella. Environmental sampling found 0.25-1.12 log CFU/cm(2) remaining on processing equipment. After the isopropanol sanitation (± quaternary ammonium compounds), no Salmonella was detected in environmental samples on XLD (<0.16 log CFU/cm(2)). These data suggest that a two-step hot oil clean and isopropanol sanitization treatment may eliminate pathogenic Salmonella from contaminated equipment. PMID:25475272

  9. Decontamination and size reduction of plutonium contaminated process exhaust ductwork and glove boxes

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrate, P.; Elliott, J.; Valasquez, M.

    1996-11-15

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Program has decontaminated and demolished two filter plenum buildings at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). During the project a former hot cell was retrofitted to perform decontamination and size reduction of highly Pu contaminated process exhaust (1,100 ft) and gloveboxes. Pu-238/239 concentrations were as high a 1 Ci per linear foot and averaged approximately 1 mCi/ft. The Project decontamination objective was to reduce the plutonium contamination on surfaces below transuranic levels. If possible, metal surfaces were decontaminated further to meet Science and Ecology Group (SEG) waste classification guidelines to enable the metal to be recycled at their facility in oak Ridge, Tennessee. Project surface contamination acceptance criteria for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), transuranic waste, and SEG waste acceptance criteria will be presented. Ninety percent of all radioactive waste for the project was characterized as LLRW. Twenty percent of this material was shipped to SEG. Process exhaust and glove boxes were brought to the project decontamination area, an old hot cell in Building 4 North. This paper focuses on process exhaust and glovebox decontamination methodology, size reduction techniques, waste characterization, airborne contamination monitoring, engineering controls, worker protection, lessons learned, and waste minimization. Decontamination objectives are discussed in detail.

  10. High-efficiency localization of Na+-K+ ATPases on the cytoplasmic side by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiazhen; Gao, Jing; Qi, Miao; Wang, Jianzhong; Cai, Mingjun; Liu, Shuheng; Hao, Xian; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2013-11-01

    We describe a concise and effective strategy towards precisely mapping Na+-K+ ATPases on the cytoplasmic side of cell membranes by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). We found that most Na+-K+ ATPases are localized in different sizes of clusters on human red blood cell (hRBC) membranes, revealed by Ripley's K-function analysis. Further evidence that cholesterol depletion causes the dispersion of Na+-K+ ATPase clusters indicates that such clusters could be localized in cholesterol-enriched domains. Our results suggest that Na+-K+ ATPases might aggregate within the lipid rafts to fulfill their functions.We describe a concise and effective strategy towards precisely mapping Na+-K+ ATPases on the cytoplasmic side of cell membranes by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM). We found that most Na+-K+ ATPases are localized in different sizes of clusters on human red blood cell (hRBC) membranes, revealed by Ripley's K-function analysis. Further evidence that cholesterol depletion causes the dispersion of Na+-K+ ATPase clusters indicates that such clusters could be localized in cholesterol-enriched domains. Our results suggest that Na+-K+ ATPases might aggregate within the lipid rafts to fulfill their functions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03665k

  11. Ultrasonic process for remediation of organics-contaminated groundwater/wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.M.; Peters, R.W.

    1995-07-01

    A technology is being developed that employs ultrasonic-wave energy for remediation of groundwater/wastewater contaminated with volatile organic compounds such as carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) and trichloroethylene (TCE). This paper presents the updated results of a laboratory investigation of ultrasonic groundwater remediation using synthetic groundwaters prepared with laboratory deionized water. Key process parameters investigated included steady-state temperature, contaminant concentration, solution pH, sonication time, and intensity of the applied ultrasonics-wave energy. High destruction efficiencies of the target contaminants were achieved, and the sonication time required for a given degree of destruction decreased with increasing intensity of the applied ultrasonic energy. The sonication time can be further reduced by adding a chemical oxidant such as hydrogen peroxide.

  12. Evaluation of electrochemical processes for the removal of several target aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Alsalka, Yamen; Karabet, François; Hashem, Shahir

    2011-03-01

    Ground and surface water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products is a serious and growing environmental problem throughout the world. Consequently, a study of the use of electrochemical treatment in the clean-up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination by aromatic pollutants to more acceptable levels. In the experiments described, water contamination by refined petroleum products was simulated under laboratory conditions. Electrochemical treatment, using aluminium electrodes, has been optimised by full factorial design and surface response analysis in term of BTEX and PAHs removal and energy consumption. The optimal conditions of pH, current density, electrolysis time, electrolyte type, and electrolyte concentration have then been applied in the treatment of real water samples which were monitored as petroleum contaminated samples. Treatment results have shown that electrochemical methods could achieve the concentration of these pollutants to undetectable levels in particular groundwater and surface water, hence, they can be highly effective in the remediation of water contaminated by aromatic hydrocarbons, and the use of these processes is therefore recommended. PMID:21243149

  13. Distribution of terminal electron-accepting processes in an aquifer having multiple contaminant sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, P.B.; Bruce, B.W.

    1997-01-01

    Concentrations of electron acceptors, electron donors, and H2 in groundwater were measured to determine the distribution of terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) in an alluvial aquifer having multiple contaminant sources. Upgradient contaminant sources included two separate hydrocarbon point sources, one of which contained the fuel oxygenate methyl tertbutyl ether (MTBE). Infiltrating river water was a source of dissolved NO31 SO4 and organic carbon (DOC) to the downgradient part of the aquifer. Groundwater downgradient from the MTBE source had larger concentrations of electron acceptors (dissolved O2 and SO4) and smaller concentrations of TEAP end products (dissolved inorganic C, Fe2+ and CH4) than groundwater downgradient from the other hydrocarbon source, suggesting that MTBE was not as suitable for supporting TEAPs as the other hydrocarbons. Measurements of dissolved H2 indicated that SO4 reduction predominated in the aquifer during a period of high water levels in the aquifer and river. The predominant TEAP shifted to Fe3+ reduction in upgradient areas after water levels receded but remained SO4 reducing downgradient near the river. This distribution of TEAPs is the opposite of what is commonly observed in aquifers having a single contaminant point source and probably reflects the input of Dec and SO4 to the aquifer from the river. Results of this study indicate that the distribution of TEAPs in aquifers having multiple contaminant sources depends on the composition and location of the contaminants and on the availability of electron acceptors.

  14. Contamination patterns of Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked pork processing.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Aivars; Hellström, Sanna; Siliņš, Indulis; Korkeala, Hannu

    2010-11-01

    Contamination patterns of Listeria monocytogenes were studied in a cold-smoked pork processing plant to identify the sources and possible reasons for the contamination. Environmental sampling combined with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping and serotyping were applied to investigate the genetic diversity of L. monocytogenes in the plant environment and ready-to-eat (RTE) cold-smoked pork products. A total of 183 samples were collected for contamination analyses, including samples of the product at different stages during manufacture (n = 136) and environmental samples (n = 47) in 2009. L. monocytogenes isolates, previously recovered from 73 RTE cold-smoked pork samples and collected from the same meat processing plant in 2004, were included in this study. The brining machine and personnel working with brining procedures were the most contaminated places with L. monocytogenes. The overall prevalence of L. monocytogenes in raw pork (18%) increased to 60% after the brining injections. The brining machine harbored six different PFGE types belonging to serotypes 1/2a, 1/2c, 4b, and 4d, which were found on the feeding teeth, smooth surfaces, and spaces of the machine, thus potentially facilitating dissemination of L. monocytogenes contamination. Two PFGE types (2 and 8) belonging to serotypes 1/2a and 1/2c were recovered from RTE cold-smoked pork collected in 2004, and from surfaces of the brining machine sampled in 2009, and may indicate the presence of persistent L. monocytogenes strains in the plant. Due to poor hygiene design, removal of the brining machine from the production of cold-smoked meat products should be considered to reduce L. monocytogenes contamination in the finished products. PMID:21219726

  15. Activating Na+-K+ ATPase: a potential cardioprotective therapy during early hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijing; Wang, Xuanlin; He, Min; Wang, Chunyan; Qiao, Zhixin; Wang, Qingjun; Ren, Suping; Yu, Qun

    2014-12-01

    Cell volume and resting potential are heavily affected by the activity of Na+-K+ ATPase (NKA, Na+-K+ pump), an essential membrane protein that regulates plasma K+ and Na+ levels. It is generally accepted that the ineffective perfusion of body tissues inhibits NKA activity and that NKA activity and heart failure are closely related. Recently, research has proven that the activation of NKA provides significant cardioprotection against ischemic injury. Based on these data, we propose that NKA stimulation could attenuate the development of heart arrhythmia during the early phase of hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25459134

  16. NaK Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara

    2008-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope power system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling convertor normally provides most of this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system, the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS, but also ending use of that convertor for the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) was designed to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. In the design of the VCHP for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator, the VCHP reservoir temperature can vary between 40 and 120 C. While sodium, potassium, or cesium could be used as the working fluid, their melting temperatures are above the minimum reservoir temperature, allowing working fluid to freeze in the reservoir. In contrast, the melting point of NaK is -12 C, so NaK can't freeze in the reservoir. One potential problem with NaK as a working fluid is that previous tests with NaK heat pipes have shown that NaK heat pipes can develop temperature non-uniformities in the evaporator due to NaK's binary composition. A NaK heat pipe was fabricated to measure the temperature non-uniformities in a scale model of the VCHP for the Stirling Radioisotope system. The temperature profiles in the evaporator and condenser were measured as a function of operating temperature and power. The largest delta T across the condenser was 2S C. However, the condenser delta T decreased to 16 C for the 775 C vapor temperature at the highest heat flux applied, 7.21 W/ square cm. This decrease with increasing heat flux was caused by the increased mixing of the sodium and potassium in the vapor. This temperature differential is similar to the temperature variation in this ASRG heat transfer interface without a heat pipe, so NaK can be used as the VCHP working fluid.

  17. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Mackenzie, P.D.

    1982-09-03

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with stream, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  18. Process for removal of ammonia and acid gases from contaminated waters

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; MacKenzie, Patricia D.

    1985-01-01

    Contaminating basic gases, i.e., ammonia, and acid gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, are removed from process waters or waste waters in a combined extraction and stripping process. Ammonia in the form of ammonium ion is extracted by an immiscible organic phase comprising a liquid cation exchange component, especially an organic phosphoric acid derivative, and preferably di-2-ethyl hexyl phosphoric acid, dissolved in an alkyl hydrocarbon, aryl hydrocarbon, higher alcohol, oxygenated hydrocarbon, halogenated hydrocarbon, and mixtures thereof. Concurrently, the acidic gaseous contaminants are stripped from the process or waste waters by stripping with steam, air, nitrogen, or the like. The liquid cation exchange component has the ammonia stripped therefrom by heating, and the component may be recycled to extract additional amounts of ammonia.

  19. [Contamination with genetically modified maize MON863 of processed foods on the market].

    PubMed

    Ohgiya, Yoko; Sakai, Masaaki; Miyashita, Taeko; Yano, Koichi

    2009-06-01

    Genetically modified maize MON863 (MON863), which has passed a safety examination in Japan, is commercially cultivated in the United States as a food and a resource for fuel. Maize is an anemophilous flower, which easily hybridizes. However, an official method for quantifying the content of MON863 has not been provided yet in Japan. We here examined MON863 contamination in maize-processed foods that had no labeling indicating of the use of genetically modified maize.From March 2006 to July 2008, we purchased 20 frozen maize products, 8 maize powder products, 7 canned maize products and 4 other maize processed foods. Three primer pairs named MON 863 primer, MON863-1, and M3/M4 for MON863-specific integrated cassette were used for qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A primer pair "SSIIb-3" for starch synthase gene was used to confirm the quality of extracted DNA. The starch synthase gene was detected in all samples. In qualitative tests, the MON863-specific fragments were detected in 7 (18%) maize powder products out of the 39 processed foods with all the three primer pairs.We concluded that various maize processed foods on the market were contaminated with MON863. It is important to accumulate further information on MON863 contamination in maize-processed foods that have no label indication of the use of genetically modified maize. PMID:19602862

  20. Evaluation, modelling and optimization of the cleaning process of contaminated plastic food refillables.

    PubMed

    Devlieghere, F; De Meulenaer, B; Sekitoleko, P; Estrella Garcia, A A; Huyghebaert, A

    1997-01-01

    In this study several types of bottle materials (glass, PET (polyethylene terephthalate), PC (polycarbonate), HDPE (high density polyethylene), PP (polypropylene) and PVC (polyvinyl chloride)) were evaluated in order to be used as food refillables, comparing the residual chemical contamination after classical caustic washing. Bottles were contaminated with model chemicals (chloroxylenol and d-limonene) and caustic washed with varied process parameters using a simulated laboratory-scale washing procedure. After washing, the chemical-contaminated bottles were filled with water and stored for 28 days at 37 degrees C. The concentrations of the model chemicals in the water after storage were taken as a measure of chemical contamination. The influence of the cleaning parameters (temperature, caustic and commercial additive concentration) was studied using response surface methodology. Washing temperature showed a significant influence on the removal of absorbed chemicals from surfaces compared with the effect of the caustic and especially the additive concentration. Optimization of caustic cleaning for the cleaning process in question led to better cleaning effectiveness, although none of the different washing conditions were able to remove all absorbed chemicals out of the polymeric resins. Commercially available plastic refillables (PET and PC) showed the best chemical rinsability. Glass bottles, however, had in every case the best rinsing characteristics. PMID:9373531

  1. Contamination Control and Hardware Processing Solutions at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, DeWitt H.; Hampton, Tammy; Huey, LaQuieta; Mitchell, Mark; Norwood, Joey; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    The Contamination Control Team of Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processes Laboratory supports many Programs/ Projects that design, manufacture, and test a wide range of hardware types that are sensitive to contamination and foreign object damage (FOD). Examples where contamination/FOD concerns arise include sensitive structural bondline failure, critical orifice blockage, seal leakage, and reactive fluid compatibility (liquid oxygen, hydrazine) as well as performance degradation of sensitive instruments or spacecraft surfaces such as optical elements and thermal control systems. During the design phase, determination of the sensitivity of a hardware system to different types or levels of contamination/FOD is essential. A contamination control and FOD control plan must then be developed and implemented through all phases of ground processing, and, sometimes, on-orbit use, recovery, and refurbishment. Implementation of proper controls prevents cost and schedule impacts due to hardware damage or rework and helps assure mission success. Current capabilities are being used to support recent and on-going activities for multiple Mission Directorates / Programs such as International Space Station (ISS), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Space Launch System (SLS) elements (tanks, engines, booster), etc. The team also advances Green Technology initiatives and addresses materials obsolescence issues for NASA and external customers, most notably in the area of solvent replacement (e.g. aqueous cleaners containing hexavalent chrome, ozone depleting chemicals (CFC s and HCFC's), suspect carcinogens). The team evaluates new surface cleanliness inspection and cleaning technologies (e.g. plasma cleaning), and maintains databases for processing support materials as well as outgassing and optical compatibility test results for spaceflight environments.

  2. DETECTION OF FECAL/INGESTA CONTAMINANTS ON POULTRY PROCESSING EQUIPMENT SURFACES BY VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectra and samples for laboratory microbial analysis were acquired of fecal contaminants, ingesta contaminants, and bare processing equipment surfaces (rubber and stainless steel) in a commercial poultry processing plant. Spectra were analyzed in the visible region ...

  3. Real-time image processing for rapid contaminant detection on broiler carcasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.; Snead, M. Preston

    2004-11-01

    Recently, the imaging research group at Russell Research Center, ARS in Athens, Georgia has developed a real-time multispectral imaging system for fecal and ingesta contaminant detection on broiler carcasses. The prototype system includes a common aperture camera with three optical trim filters (515.4, 566.4 and 631-nm wavelength), which were selected by visible/NIR spectroscopy and validated by a hyperspectral imaging system. The preliminary results showed that the multispectral imaging technique can be used effectively for detecting feces (from duodenum, ceca, and colon) and ingesta on the surface of poultry carcasses with a processing speed of 140 birds per minute. The accuracy for the detection of fecal and ingesta contaminates was 96%. However, the system contains many false positives including scabs, feathers, and boundaries. This paper demonstrates calibration of common aperture multispectral imaging hardware and real-time multispectral image processing software. The software design, especially the Unified Modeling Language (UML) design approach was used to develop real-time image processing software for on-line application. The UML models including class, object, activity, sequence, and collaboration diagram were discussed. Both hardware and software for a real-time fecal and ingesta contaminant detection were tested at the pilot-scale poultry processing line.

  4. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON AND HEAVY-METAL- CONTAMINATED SOIL - INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The batch steam distillation and metal extraction treatment process is a two-stage system that treats soils contaminated with organics and inorganics. This system uses conventional, readily available process equipment, and does not produce hazardous combustion products. Hazar...

  5. Evaluation of radiation resistance of the bacterial contaminants from femoral heads processed for allogeneic transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer

    2009-09-01

    Femoral heads excised during surgery were obtained from patients who had a fractured neck of the femur and were processed as bone allograft. The bacterial contaminants were isolated from femoral heads at different stages of processing and identified based on morphological characteristics and biochemical tests. Bacterial contaminants on bone were mainly Gram-positive bacilli and cocci (58.3%). Twenty-four isolates from bone samples were screened for resistance to radiation. The D10 values for Gram-negative bacteria isolated from femoral heads ranged from 0.17 to 0.65 kGy. Higher D10 values 0.56-1.04 kGy were observed for Gram-positive bacterial isolates.

  6. A signal processing framework for simultaneous detection of multiple environmental contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subhadeep; Manahan, Michael P.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2013-11-01

    The possibility of large-scale attacks using chemical warfare agents (CWAs) has exposed the critical need for fundamental research enabling the reliable, unambiguous and early detection of trace CWAs and toxic industrial chemicals. This paper presents a unique approach for the identification and classification of simultaneously present multiple environmental contaminants by perturbing an electrochemical (EC) sensor with an oscillating potential for the extraction of statistically rich information from the current response. The dynamic response, being a function of the degree and mechanism of contamination, is then processed with a symbolic dynamic filter for the extraction of representative patterns, which are then classified using a trained neural network. The approach presented in this paper promises to extend the sensing power and sensitivity of these EC sensors by augmenting and complementing sensor technology with state-of-the-art embedded real-time signal processing capabilities.

  7. Recharge processes drive sulfate reduction in an alluvial aquifer contaminated with landfill leachate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Christenson, S.C.

    2006-01-01

    present in the root zone, and SO42- reduction may be coupled to methane oxidation. The results show that sulfur (and possibly nitrogen) redox processes within the top 2??m of the aquifer are directly related to recharge timing and seasonal water level changes in the aquifer. The results suggest that SO42- reduction associated with the infiltration of recharge may be a significant factor affecting natural attenuation of contaminants in alluvial aquifers. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. NaK loop testing of thermoelectric converter modules (SNAP program)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The history of testing of compact tubular modules in flowing NaK loops is summarized. Test procedures, data handling, and instrument calibration are discussed. Also included is descriptive information of the test facilities, operational problems encountered, and some recommendations for testing.

  9. Characterization of Queso Fresco made with Na/K salt blends and stored for 12 weeks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Health-conscious consumers are looking for ways to reduce dietary sodium yet want their cheeses to have the flavor, texture, and shelf-life of full-salt cheese. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of different Na-K salt blends and storage on the compositional, sensorial, micro...

  10. 36. ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS OF ELEVATOR HOUSING, NaK HEATER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ARCHITECTURAL AND STRUCTURAL DETAILS OF ELEVATOR HOUSING, NaK HEATER STACK ROOF FLASHING, HOOD ELEVATION DETAIL. INCLUDES PARTIAL 'BILL OF MATERIAL.' INEEL DRAWING NUMBER 200-0633-00-287-106361. FLUOR NUMBER 5775-CPP-633-A-11. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Size distribution of NaK droplets released during RORSAT reactor core ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedemann, C.; Oswald, M.; Stabroth, S.; Klinkrad, H.; Vörsmann, P.

    NaK droplets consist of eutectic sodium-potassium alloy and have been released during RORSAT reactor core ejections mostly on orbits close to 950 km altitude. They contributed to the space debris environment in the centimeter and millimeter regime. NaK droplets have been modeled before in ESAs MASTER Debris and Meteoroid Environment Model. The approach is currently revised for the MASTER 2005 upgrade. The new NaK model gives estimations of the parameters of the size distribution function, which are based on physical relations only. NASA radar observations confirm this physical approach. A bimodal size distribution is derived, which is based on the Rosin-Rammler equation. The Rosin-Rammler equation is an empirical volume distribution function. The number of parameters is limited to two. It is likely that the coolant system contains two types of orifice diameters. This makes it necessary to apply the Rosin-Rammler distribution twice, resulting in a bimodal size distribution with altogether four parameters. The comparison shows that the new NaK model is in good agreement with the NASA model, which is based on radar observations. Results of orbit propagation simulation runs are presented.

  12. Increased leucocyte Na-K ATPase in obesity: reversal following weight loss

    SciTech Connect

    Turaihi, K.; Baron, D.N.; Dandona, P.

    1987-09-01

    Ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx and (/sup 3/H) ouabain binding capacity were investigated in the leucocytes of 17 obese patients and 15 control subjects. Both were significantly increased in the obese when compared with controls. Following dietary restriction and a 4% to 5% weight reduction in the obese over 2 weeks, (/sup 3/H) ouabain binding and ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb influx (a model for K+ influx) decreased to levels similar to those in controls. This shows that the number of Na-K ATPase sites on leucocyte membranes of the obese are significantly increased and that this is associated with accelerated /sup 86/Rb transport. Since both of these indices decreased following 4% to 5% reduction in body weight while the patients were still obese, increased Na-K ATPase is neither a marker of nor cardinal to the pathogenesis of obesity. We conclude that (1) increase in Na-K ATPase units and /sup 86/Rb influx are not characteristic of obesity itself and (2) dietary restriction over the short-term with limited weight reduction restores Na-K ATPase units and /sup 86/Rb influx to normal.

  13. Simulating Heterogeneous Infiltration and Contaminant leaching Processes at Chalk River, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. A.; Ireson, A. M.; Keim, D.

    2015-12-01

    A study is conducted at a waste management area in Chalk River, Ontario to characterize flow and contaminant transport with the aim of contributing to improved hydrogeological risk assessment in the context of waste management. Field monitoring has been performed to gain insights into the unsaturated zone characteristics, moisture dynamics, and contaminant transport rates. The objective is to provide quantitative estimates of surface fluxes (quantification of infiltration and evaporation) and investigations of unsaturated zone processes controlling water infiltration and spatial variability in head distributions and flow rates. One particular issue is to examine the effectiveness of the clayey soil cap installed to prevent infiltration of water into the waste repository and the top sand soil cover above the clayey layer to divert the infiltrated water laterally. The spatial variability in the unsaturated zone properties and associated effects on water flow and contaminant transport observed at the site, have led to a concerted effort to develop improved model of flow and transport based on stochastic concepts. Results obtained through the unsaturated zone model investigations are combined with the hydrogeological and geochemical components and develop predictive tools to assess the long term fate of the contaminants at the waste management site.

  14. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., G. E.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-10-31

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals.

  15. NaK pool-boiler solar receiver durability bench test. Volume 2: Metallurgical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goods, S. H.; Bradshaw, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    The principal materials used in the construction of a NaK based pool-boiler were analyzed. The device, operated for 7500 hours, accumulated 1000 thermal cycles to a peak temperature of 750 C. Haynes 230, used to fabricate the pool-boiler vessel, was found to perform satisfactorily. Air-side corrosion of the pool-boiler vessel was insignificant. Internal surface of the alloy exhibited some NaK-induced elemental dissolution; this dissolution was somewhat more extensive where the alloy was exposed to the liquid metal compared to regions exposed only to NaK vapor; however, the corresponding metal loss in all regions was inconsequential, never exceeding more than a few microns. Autogenous seam welds of the alloy responded in a similar fashion, exhibiting only minimal metal loss over the course of the experiment. While there was 50% loss in ductility of the alloy there remained adequate ductility for the anticipated operating environment. An enhanced boiling nucleation surface comprised of stainless steel powder brazed to the vessel ID showed no change in its structure. It remained intact, showing no cracking after repeated thermal cycling. Other materials used in the experiment showed more extensive degradation after exposure to the NaK. IN 600, used to fabricate thermowells, exhibited extensive surface and intergranular dissolution. Grain boundary dissolution was sufficiently severe in one of the thermowells to cause an air leak, resulting in experiment termination. BNi-3, a brazing alloy used to join the pool-boiler vessel, endcaps and thermowells, showed some dissolution where it was exposed to the NaK as well as thermal aging effects. However, all brazes remained structurally sound. A nickel metal ribbon showed catastrophic dissolution, resulting in the formation of deep (greater than 30 (mu)m) pits and cavities. A zirconium metal foil used to getter oxygen from the NaK became extremely brittle.

  16. Reduced levels of skeletal muscle Na+K+ -ATPase in McArdle disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, R. G.; Clausen, T.; Vissing, J.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that impaired sarcolemmal function associated with exaggerated potassium release, impaired potassium uptake, or both may contribute to exertional fatigue and abnormal circulatory responses to exercise in McArdle disease (MD). The cellular mechanism of exertional fatigue and muscle injury in MD is unknown but likely involves impaired function of the ATPases that couple ATP hydrolysis to cellular work, including the muscle sodium potassium pump (Na+K+-ATPase). However, the concentration of muscle Na+K+ pumps in MD is not known, and no studies have related exercise increases in blood potassium concentrations to muscle Na+K+ pump levels. We measured muscle Na+K+ pumps (3H-ouabain binding) and plasma K+ in response to 20 minutes of cycle exercise in six patients with MD and in six sex-, age-, and weight-matched sedentary individuals. MD patients had lower levels of 3H-ouabain binding (231 +/- 18 pmol/g w.w., mean +/- SD, range, 210 to 251) than control subjects (317 +/- 37, range, 266 to 371, p < 0.0004), higher peak increases in plasma potassium in response to 45 +/- 7 W cycle exercise (MD, 1.00 +/- 0.15 mmol/L; control subjects, 0.48 +/- 0.09; p < 0.0001), and mean exercise heart rate responses to exercise that were 45 +/- 12 bpm greater than control subjects. Our results indicate that Na+K+ pump levels are low in MD patients compared with healthy subjects and identify a limitation of potassium reuptake that could result in sarcolemmal failure during peak rates of membrane activation and may promote exaggerated potassium-activated circulatory responses to submaximal exercise. The mechanism of the low Na+K+ pump concentrations in MD is unknown but may relate to deconditioning or to disruption of a close functional relationship between membrane ion transport and glycolysis.

  17. Gill Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter abundance and location in Atlantic salmon: Effects of seawater and smolting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelis, R.M.; Zydlewski, J.; McCormick, S.D.

    2001-01-01

    Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter abundance and location was examined in the gills of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) during seawater acclimation and smolting. Western blots revealed three bands centered at 285, 160, and 120 kDa. The Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter was colocalized with Na+-K+-ATPase to chloride cells on both the primary filament and secondary lamellae. Parr acclimated to 30 parts per thousand seawater had increased gill Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter abundance, large and numerous Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter immunoreactive chloride cells on the primary filament, and reduced numbers on the secondary lamellae. Gill Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter levels were low in presmolts (February) and increased 3.3-fold in smolts (May), coincident with elevated seawater tolerance. Cotransporter levels decreased below presmolt values in postsmolts in freshwater (June). The size and number of immunoreactive chloride cells on the primary filament increased threefold during smolting and decreased in postsmolts. Gill Na+-K+-ATPase activity and Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter abundance increased in parallel during both seawater acclimation and smolting. These data indicate a direct role of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter in salt secretion by gill chloride cells of teleost fish.

  18. Geochemical information and isotopic ratios in pinpointing the rates of contamination processes generated at mine sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, Kaisa; Kittilä, Anniina; Backnäs, Soile; Pasanen, Antti; Hendriksson, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The isotopic composition of water is an important fingerprinting method for tracing recharge sources, distribution processes and possible hydraulic connections of mine waters. However, since, the isotopes alone do not indicate the contamination derived from mining activities; also a set of geochemical analysis of harmful substance in water is acquired. This complex approach will allow a detailed insight in migration of potentially harmful substances, their reactions, mixing and dilution in ground and surface waters. The data can be applied also when comparing geogenic and anthropogenic emissions. Isotopic methods are rather new approach to estimate mining related emissions in Finland and thus, a novel approach of isotopic methods for investigation and monitoring of migration of harmful substances from mine sites are tested in two mine sites in Finland. The aim of this study is to assess the emission sources, flow paths and interaction between mine waters, groundwater and surface waters. A set of isotopic data, including S, Li, Mg, U, Sr, Pb, O, and H, will be combined with chemical information and physical parameters of water in order to assess the source and extent of possible contamination as well as the rates of processes that generate or at best attenuate the contamination. The results obtained from water analyses and field measurements will be used in hydrogeochemical modelling for the prediction of chemical transformation and long-term impacts of mining at study site and its surroundings.

  19. High-performance self-aligned graphene transistors fabricated using contamination- and defect-free process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Goon-Ho; Kim, Kwan-Soo; Fukidome, Hirokazu; Suemitsu, Tetsuya; Otsuji, Taiichi; Cho, Won-Ju; Suemitsu, Maki

    2016-06-01

    A contamination- and defect-free process is proposed for self-aligned graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) fabrication using a protective gold layer and by its etching. The gold layer serves as an electrode metal for both the source and drain. GFETs fabricated by this method exhibit superior electrical characteristics, such as an intrinsic carrier mobility of 8900 cm2 V‑1 s‑1 and a series resistance of 1520 Ω µm, which is ascribed to the effective blocking of unwanted contamination and defect formation as well as to the reduction in access length due to the self-aligned configuration. Our approach is quite promising as a device fabrication method for high-performance GFETs.

  20. An Assessment of the International Space Station's Trace Contaminant Control Subassembly Process Economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry J. L.; Cole, H. E.; El-Lessy, H. N.

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support System includes equipment speci.cally designed to actively remove trace chemical contamination from the cabin atmosphere. In the U.S. on-orbit segment, this function is provided by the trace contaminant control subassembly (TCCS) located in the atmosphere revitalization subsystem rack housed in the laboratory module, Destiny. The TCCS employs expendable adsorbent beds to accomplish its function leading to a potentially signi.cant life cycle cost over the life of the ISS. Because maintaining the TCCSs proper can be logistically intensive, its performance in .ight has been studied in detail to determine where savings may be achieved. Details of these studies and recommendations for improving the TCCS s process economics without compromising its performance or crew health and safety are presented and discussed.

  1. Bioterrorism: processing contaminated evidence, the effects of formaldehyde gas on the recovery of latent fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Hoile, Rebecca; Walsh, Simon J; Roux, Claude

    2007-09-01

    In the present age of heightened emphasis on counter terrorism, law enforcement and forensic science are constantly evolving and adapting to the motivations and capabilities of terrorist groups and individuals. The use of biological agents on a population, such as anthrax spores, presents unique challenges to the forensic investigator, and the processing of contaminated evidence. In this research, a number of porous and non-porous items were contaminated with viable [corrected] spores and marked with latent fingermarks. The test samples were then subjected to a standard formulation of formaldehyde gas. Latent fingermarks were then recovered post decontamination using a range of methods. Standard fumigation, while effective at destroying viable spores, contributed to the degradation of amino acids leading to loss of ridge detail. A new protocol for formaldehyde gas decontamination was developed which allows for the destruction of viable spores and the successful recovery of latent marks, all within a rapid response time of less than 1 h. PMID:17767655

  2. Characterization of a site contaminated by waste from a monazite ore processing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Lauria, D.C.; Reis, V.R.; Nouailhetas, Y.; Godoy, J.M.; Agudo, E.G.

    1993-12-31

    A radiological survey of an area of 60,000 m{sup 2}, previously occupied by the Usina de Interlagos (USIN), a branch of the Brazilian State Monazite Company was conducted. External exposure gamma rates, surface soil, subsurface soil and groundwater concentration of the long-life radionuclides from the uranium and thorium decay chain were determined. Two areas, one of 4,800 m{sup 2} and other of 1,750 m{sup 2}, were found to be contaminated with different radioactive materials, originating from the chemical and physical processing of the monazite sand. {sup 228}Ra is present up to 2.2 {times} 10{sup 4} Bq/kg in soil and 93 Bq/l in groundwater. Based on future scenarios, an allowable residual contamination level of {sup 232}Th and {sup 226}Ra of around 200 Bq/kg was derived. Clean-up actions are suggested.

  3. Evaluation of six decontamination processes on actinide and fission product contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Chen, L.

    1995-12-31

    In-situ decontamination technologies were evaluated for their ability to: (1) reduce equipment contamination levels to allow either free release of the equipment or land disposal, (2) minimize residues generated by decontamination, and (3) generate residues that are compatible with existing disposal technologies. Six decontamination processes were selected. tested and compared to 4M nitric acid, a traditional decontamination agent: fluoroboric acid (HBF{sub 4}), nitric plus hydrofluoric acid, alkaline persulfate followed by citric acid plus oxalic acid, silver(II) plus sodium persulfate plus nitric acid, oxalic acid plus hydrogen peroxide plus hydrofluoric acid, and electropolishing using nitric acid electrolyte. The effectiveness of these solutions was tested using prepared 304 stainless steel couponds contaminated with uranium, plutonium, americium, or fission products. The decontamination factor for each of the solutions and tests conditions were determined; the results of these experiments are presented.

  4. Electrochemical Processes for In-Situ Treatment of Contaminated Soils - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 01/31/2001

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chin-Pao

    2001-05-31

    This project will study electrochemical processes for the in situ treatment of soils contaminated by mixed wastes, i.e., organic and inorganic. Soil samples collected form selected DOE waste sites will be characterized for specific organic and metal contaminants and hydraulic permeability. The soil samples are then subject to desorption experiments under various physical-chemical conditions such as pH and the presence of surfactants. Batch electro-osmosis experiments will be conducted to study the transport of contaminants in the soil-water systems. Organic contaminants that are released from the soil substrate will be treated by an advanced oxidation process, i.e., electron-Fantan. Finally, laboratory reactor integrating the elector-osmosis and elector-Fantan processes will be used to study the treatment of contaminated soil in situ.

  5. Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat: What about environmental contaminants?

    PubMed

    Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2016-02-01

    In October 26, 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) issued a press release informing of the recent evaluation of the carcinogenicity of red and processed meat consumption. The consumption of red meat and processed meat was classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans", and as "carcinogenic to humans", respectively. The substances responsible of this potential carcinogenicity would be generated during meat processing, such as curing and smoking, or when meat is heated at high temperatures (N-nitroso-compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines). However, in its assessments, the IARC did not make any reference to the role that may pose some carcinogenic environmental pollutants, which are already present in raw or unprocessed meat. The potential role of a number of environmental chemical contaminants (toxic trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated naphthalenes and perfluoroalkyl substances) on the carcinogenicity of consumption of meat and meat products is discussed in this paper. A case-study, Catalonia (Spain), is specifically assessed, while the influence of cooking on the concentrations of environmental pollutants is also reviewed. It is concluded that although certain cooking processes could modify the levels of chemical contaminants in food, the influence of cooking on the pollutant concentrations depends not only on the particular cooking process, but even more on their original contents in each specific food item. As most of these environmental pollutants are organic, cooking procedures that release or remove fat from the meat should tend to reduce the total concentrations of these contaminants in the cooked meat. PMID:26656511

  6. Hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process for in situ destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbon and fuel hydrocarbon contaminants in water and soil

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Copenhaver, Sally C.; Aines, Roger D.

    2000-01-01

    In situ hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation process is useful for in situ degradation of hydrocarbon water and soil contaminants. Fuel hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, petroleum distillates and other organic contaminants present in the soil and water are degraded by the process involving hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation into non-toxic products of the degradation. The process uses heat which is distributed through soils and water, optionally combined with oxygen and/or hydrocarbon degradation catalysts, and is particularly useful for remediation of solvent, fuel or other industrially contaminated sites.

  7. Mineral-Water Interface Processes Affecting Uranium Fate in Contaminated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, J. G.

    2011-12-01

    Widespread uranium contamination of soil, sediments, and groundwater systems has resulted from mining activities, nuclear weapon production, and energy generation. The fate and transport of uranium in such systems is strongly affected by geochemical processes occurring at mineral-water interfaces. I will present a summary of the mineral-water interface processes found to affect uranium fate in example contaminated sediments at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford sites and in related model systems. Processes occurring under oxic conditions will be the primary focus of this talk as under these conditions uranium is most mobile and thus presents the greatest hazard. Three dominant solid-phase uranium species are observed in contaminated soil and sediments at the Hanford site: uranyl silicates, uranyl phosphates, and uranyl adsorbed to clays and iron oxides. In deep sediments, uranyl silicates are found in microfractures in feldspar grains, likely because slow diffusion in such fractures maintains a high silicate activity. Such silicates are also found in waste-impacted shallow sediments and soil; waste fluids or evaporative processes may have generated the silicate activity needed to produce such phases. Uranyl phosphates are less abundant, occurring primarily in shallow sediments exposed to P-bearing waste fluids. However, remediation approaches under consideration may produce substantial quantities of uranyl phosphates in the future. Adsorbed uranyl is dispersed throughout contaminated soils and shallow sediments and likely has the greatest potential for remobilization. Analogue studies show that precipitation of uranyl phosphates is rapid when such phases are supersaturated and that both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation may occur. Specific adsorption of uranyl to minerals is strongly affected by the presence of complexation anions. Carbonate suppresses uranyl adsorption but also forms uranyl-carbonate ternary surface complexes. At conditions below

  8. Automated processing of forensic casework samples using robotic workstations equipped with nondisposable tips: contamination prevention.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Lett, C Marc; Elliott, Jim; Yensen, Craig; Fourney, Ron M

    2008-05-01

    An automated process has been developed for the analysis of forensic casework samples using TECAN Genesis RSP 150/8 or Freedom EVO liquid handling workstations equipped exclusively with nondisposable tips. Robot tip cleaning routines have been incorporated strategically within the DNA extraction process as well as at the end of each session. Alternative options were examined for cleaning the tips and different strategies were employed to verify cross-contamination. A 2% sodium hypochlorite wash (1/5th dilution of the 10.8% commercial bleach stock) proved to be the best overall approach for preventing cross-contamination of samples processed using our automated protocol. The bleach wash steps do not adversely impact the short tandem repeat (STR) profiles developed from DNA extracted robotically and allow for major cost savings through the implementation of fixed tips. We have demonstrated that robotic workstations equipped with fixed pipette tips can be used with confidence with properly designed tip washing routines to process casework samples using an adapted magnetic bead extraction protocol. PMID:18471209

  9. The α1 isoform of the Na+/K+ ATPase is up-regulated in dedifferentiated progenitor cells that mediate lens and retina regeneration in adult newts*

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, M. Natalia; Smiley, Laura K.; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.

    2009-01-01

    Adult newts are able to regenerate their retina and lens after injury or complete removal through transdifferentiation of the pigmented epithelial tissues of the eye. This process needs to be tightly controlled, and several different mechanisms are likely to be recruited for this function. The Na+/K+ ATPase is a transmembrane protein that establishes electrochemical gradients through the transport of Na+ and K+ and has been implicated in the modulation of key cellular processes such as cell division, migration and adhesion. Even though it is expressed in all cells, its isoform composition varies with cell type and is tightly controlled during development and regeneration. In the present study we characterize the expression pattern of Na+/K+ ATPase α1 in the adult newt eye and during the process of lens and retina regeneration. We show that this isoform is up-regulated in undifferentiated cells during transdifferentiation. Such change in composition could be one of the mechanisms that newt cells utilize to modulate this process. PMID:18755185

  10. Natural attenuation processes for remediation of arsenic contaminated soils and groundwater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiling; Mulligan, Catherine N

    2006-12-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination presents a hazard in many countries. Natural attenuation (NA) of As-contaminated soils and groundwater may be a cost-effective in situ remedial option. It relies on the site intrinsic assimilative capacity and allows in-place cleanup. Sorption to solid phases is the principal mechanism immobilizing As in soils and removing it from groundwater. Hydroxides of iron, aluminum and manganese, clay and sulfide minerals, and natural organic matter are commonly associated with soils and aquifer sediments, and have been shown to be significant As adsorbents. The extent of sorption is influenced by As speciation and the site geochemical conditions such as pH, redox potential, and the co-occurring ions. Microbial activity may catalyze the transformation of As species, or mediate redox reactions thus influencing As mobility. Plants that are capable of hyperaccumulating As may translocate As from contaminated soils and groundwater to their tissues, providing the basis for phytoremediation. However, NA is subject to hydrological changes and may take substantial periods of time, thus requiring long-term monitoring. The current understanding of As NA processes remains limited. Sufficient site characterization is critical to the success of NA. Further research is required to develop conceptual and mathematical models to predict the fate and transport of As and to evaluate the site NA capacity. Engineering enhanced NA using environmentally benign products may be an effective alternative. PMID:17049728

  11. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    PubMed

    Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite. PMID:26070143

  12. Combining SERCA2a activation and Na-K ATPase inhibition: a promising new approach to managing acute heart failure syndromes with low cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Ferrandi, Mara; Ferrari, Patrizia

    2011-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients are a medically complex and heterogeneous population with multiple cardiac and non-cardiac comorbidities. Although there are a multitude of etiologic substrates and initiating and amplifying mechanisms contributing to disease progression, these pathophysiologic processes ultimately all lead to impaired myocardial function. The myocardium must both pump oxygenated, nutrient-rich blood throughout the body (systolic function) and receive deoxygenated, nutrient-poor blood returning from the periphery (diastolic function). At the molecular level, it is well-established that Ca2+ plays a central role in excitation-contracting coupling with action potentials stimulating the opening of L-type Ca2+ in the plasma membrane and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane during systole and the Na-Ca2+ exchanger and SERCA2a returning Ca2+ to the extracellular space and SR, respectively, during diastole. However, there is increasing recognition that impaired Ca2+ cycling may contribute to myocardial dysfunction. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that combining SERCA2a activation and Na-K ATPase inhibition may increase contractility (inotropy) and facilitate active relaxation (lusitropy), improving both systolic and diastolic functions. Istaroxime, a novel luso-inotrope that activates SERCA2a and inhibits the Na-K ATPase, is currently in phase II clinical development and has been shown to improve systolic and diastolic functions and central hemodynamics, increase systolic but not diastolic blood pressure, and decrease substantially heart rate. Irrespective of its clinical utility, the development of istaroxime has evolved our understanding of the clinical importance of inhibiting the Na-K ATPase in order to obtain a clinically significant effect from SERCA2a activation in the setting of myocardial failure. PMID:21878191

  13. Comparison of Eh and H2 measurements for delineating redox processes in a contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Adriaens, Peter; Henry, Mark A.; Bradley, Paul M.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements of oxidation−reduction potential (Eh) and concentrations of dissolved hydrogen (H2) were made in a shallow groundwater system contaminated with solvents and jet fuel to delineate the zonation of redox processes. Eh measurements ranged from +69 to −158 mV in a cross section of the contaminated plume and accurately delineated oxic from anoxic groundwater. Plotting measured Eh and pH values on an equilibrium stability diagram indicated that Fe(III) reduction was the predominant redox process in the anoxic zone and did not indicate the presence of methanogenesis and sulfate reduction. In contrast, measurements of H2concentrations indicated that methanogenesis predominated in heavily contaminated sediments near the water table surface (H2 ∼ 7.0 nM) and that the methanogenic zone was surrounded by distinct sulfate-reducing (H2 ∼ 1−4 nM) and Fe(III)-reducing (H2 ∼ 0.1−0.8 nM) zones. The presence of methanogenesis, sulfate reduction, and Fe(III) reduction was confirmed by the distribution of dissolved oxygen, sulfate, Fe(II), and methane in groundwater. These results show that H2 concentrations were more useful for identifying anoxic redox processes than Ehmeasurements in this groundwater system. However, H2-based redox zone delineations are more reliable when H2 concentrations are interpreted in the context of electron-acceptor (oxygen, nitrate, sulfate) availability and the presence of final products [Fe(II), sulfide, methane] of microbial metabolism.

  14. Summary report on the demonstration of the Duratek process for treatment of mixed-waste contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.P.N.; Lomenick, T.F.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of the demonstration of the Duratek process for removal of radioactive and hazardous waste compounds from mixed-waste contaminated groundwaters found at the Department of Energy (DOE) sites managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems). The process uses Duratek proprietary Durasil{reg_sign} ion-exchange media to remove the above contaminants from the water to produce treated water that can meet current and proposed drinking water quality standards with regard to the above contaminants. The demonstration showed that the process is simple, compact, versatile, and rugged and requires only minimal operator attention. It is thus recommended that this process be considered for remediating the mixed-waste contaminated waters found at the Energy Systems-managed DOE sites.

  15. Summary report on the demonstration of the Duratek process for treatment of mixed-waste contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.P.N.; Lomenick, T.F.

    1992-04-01

    This report presents the results of the demonstration of the Duratek process for removal of radioactive and hazardous waste compounds from mixed-waste contaminated groundwaters found at the Department of Energy (DOE) sites managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems). The process uses Duratek proprietary Durasil{reg sign} ion-exchange media to remove the above contaminants from the water to produce treated water that can meet current and proposed drinking water quality standards with regard to the above contaminants. The demonstration showed that the process is simple, compact, versatile, and rugged and requires only minimal operator attention. It is thus recommended that this process be considered for remediating the mixed-waste contaminated waters found at the Energy Systems-managed DOE sites.

  16. Geochemical and microbiological methods for evaluating anaerobic processes in an aquifer contaminated by landfill leachate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cozzarelli, I.M.; Suflita, J.M.; Ulrich, G.A.; Harris, S.H.; Scholl, M.A.; Schlottmann, J.L.; Christenson, S.

    2000-01-01

    A combined geochemical and microbiological approach was needed to delineate the biogeochemical processes occurring in an aquifer contaminated by landfill leachate in Norman, OK, where the important microbially mediated reactions in an anoxic plume were iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. The highest rates of sulfate reduction (13.2 ??M/day) were detected near the water table where sulfate levels were maximal (up to 4.6 mM). The enrichment of 34S in the sulfate pools (??34S of SO42- was 67-69%0), and dissolved hydrogen measurements provided additional support for the importance of sulfate reduction near the water table. Methane was detected in the center of the plume where sulfate was depleted. Microbial incubations demonstrated concomitant sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in the anoxic portion of the plume. Although high concentrations of soluble reduced iron were detected throughout the aquifer and H2 levels were indicative of iron reduction under steady-state conditions, microbiological experiments showed that iron reduction was active only at the edges of the sulfate-depleted portion of the plume. This study demonstrates the benefits of using a combined geochemical and microbiological approach to elucidate the spatial distribution of biogeochemical processes in contaminated aquifers.A combined geochemical and microbiological approach was needed to delineate the biogeochemical processes occurring in an aquifer contaminated by landfill leachate in Norman, OK, where the important microbially mediated reactions in an anoxic plume were iron reduction, sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis. The highest rates of sulfate reduction (13.2 ??M/day) were detected near the water table where sulfate levels were maximal (up to 4.6 mM). The enrichment of 34S in the sulfate pools (??34S of SO42- was 67-69 per mil), and dissolved hydrogen measurements provided additional support for the importance of sulfate reduction near the water table. Methane was

  17. Salmonella Contamination of the Product and Environment of Selected Canadian Chicken Processing Plants

    PubMed Central

    Magwood, S. E.; Rigby, Charlotte; Fung, P. H. J.

    1967-01-01

    Of 345 market chicken carcasses received directly from selected processing plants across Canada, six yielded salmonellae. One of the plants submitted 122 carcasses none of which yielded these organisms. A second plant had one Salmonella-contaminated carcass among 20 which were examined. Each of these two plants was subected to detailed bacteriological examinations on four occasions. In these detailed examinations a total of 175 samples or specimens for culture were taken from a variety of surfaces including vent areas of carcasses, operators' hands, equipment surfaces and from water in tanks of iced birds. Twenty-five (14 per cent) of the cultures yielded salmonellae and all but one of these were either S. oranienburg or S. infantis. Isolations were made during five of the eight series of examinations. The evidence indicated that Salmonella-infected flocks were frequently slaughtered and that Salmonella contamination could become widespread in the plant during processing. The organisms are apparently eliminated from all but a small percentage of the carcasses during processing but opportunities exist for recontamination during subsequent handling. PMID:4227070

  18. Characterization of contamination through the use of position sensitive detectors and digital image processing

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; DeBord, D.M.; Bennett, T.E.; Weismann, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes development of a significant new method for monitoring radioactive surface contamination. A floor monitor prototype has been designed which uses position sensitive proportional counter based radiation detectors. The system includes a novel operator interface consisting of an enhanced reality display providing the operator with 3 dimensional contours of contamination and background subtracted stereo clicks. The process software saves electronic files of survey data at very high rates along with time stamped video recording and provides completely documented surveys in a visualization oriented data management system. The data management system allows simple re-assembly of strips of data that are taken with a linear PSPC and allows visualization and treatment of the data using algorithms developed for processing images from earth resource satellites. This report includes a brief history of the development path for the floor monitor, a discussion of position sensitive proportional counter technology, and details concerning the process software, post processor and hardware. The last chapter discusses the field tests that were conducted at five sites and an application of the data management system for data not associated with detector systems.

  19. Ecotoxicity of arsenic contaminated sludge after mixing with soils and addition into composting and vermicomposting processes.

    PubMed

    Vašíčková, Jana; Maňáková, Blanka; Šudoma, Marek; Hofman, Jakub

    2016-11-01

    Sludge coming from remediation of groundwater contaminated by industry is usually managed as hazardous waste despite it might be considered for further processing as a source of nutrients. The ecotoxicity of phosphorus rich sludge contaminated with arsenic was evaluated after mixing with soil and cultivation with Sinapis alba, and supplementation into composting and vermicomposting processes. The Enchytraeus crypticus and Folsomia candida reproduction tests and the Lactuca sativa root growth test were used. Invertebrate bioassays reacted sensitively to arsenic presence in soil-sludge mixtures. The root elongation of L. sativa was not sensitive and showed variable results. In general, the relationship between invertebrate tests results and arsenic mobile concentration was indicated in majority endpoints. Nevertheless, significant portion of the results still cannot be satisfactorily explained by As chemistry data. Composted and vermicomposted sludge mixtures showed surprisingly high toxicity on all three tested organisms despite the decrease in arsenic mobility, probably due to toxic metabolites of bacteria and earthworms produced during these processes. The results from the study indicated the inability of chemical methods to predict the effects of complex mixtures on living organisms with respect to ecotoxicity bioassays. PMID:27348256

  20. Exposure pathway evaluations for sites that processed asbestos-contaminated vermiculite.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barbara A; Dearwent, Steve M; Durant, James T; Dyken, Jill J; Freed, Jennifer A; Moore, Susan McAfee; Wheeler, John S

    2005-01-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is currently evaluating the potential public health impacts associated with the processing of asbestos-contaminated vermiculite at various facilities around the country. Vermiculite ore contaminated with significant levels of asbestos was mined and milled in Libby, Montana, from the early 1920s until 1990. The majority of the Libby ore was then shipped to processing facilities for exfoliation. ATSDR initiated the National Asbestos Exposure Review (NAER) to identify and evaluate exposure pathways associated with these processing facilities. This manuscript details ATSDR's phased approach in addressing exposure potential around these sites. As this is an ongoing project, only the results from a selected set of completed site analyses are presented. Historical occupational exposures are the most significant exposure pathway for the site evaluations completed to date. Former workers also probably brought asbestos fibers home on their clothing, shoes, and hair, and their household contacts may have been exposed. Currently, most site-related worker and community exposure pathways have been eliminated. One community exposure pathway of indeterminate significance is the current exposure of individuals through direct contact with waste rock brought home for personal use as fill material, driveway surfacing, or soil amendment. Trace levels of asbestos are present in soil at many of the sites and buried waste rock has been discovered at a few sites; therefore, future worker and community exposure associated with disturbing on-site soil during construction or redevelopment at these sites is also a potential exposure pathway. PMID:15881979

  1. The analysis and minimization of oxygen contamination in the powder processing of molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, K.

    1994-04-24

    Problems with MoSi{sub 2} include low-temperature fracture toughness, high-temperature creep resistance, and ``pest`` phenomena. Oxygen introduced by powder processing may be the cause of some of these problems. This study led to the following conclusions: Supplied powders have significant oxygen present prior to processing (up to 2.5 %), in the form of silica on the surface. This oxygen contamination did not increase by exposure to air at room temperature. An improved powder processing method was developed that uses glass encapsulation. Analysis of microstructures created from powders that contained 4900 to 24,100 ppM oxygen showed that the silica was transferred to the fully dense MoSi{sub 2} as SiO{sub 2} inclusions. A method of producing MoSi{sub 2} with less oxygen was attempted.

  2. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by (137)Cesium ((137)Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as (132)Te-(132)I, (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h(-1) per initial (137)Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m(-2), whereas it was 100 μGy h(-1) around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m(-2) for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums ((134)Cs + (137)Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. PMID:26568603

  3. Hygiene and Safety in the Meat Processing Environment from Butcher Shops: Microbiological Contamination and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Danilo Augusto Lopes; Dias, Mariane Rezende; Cossi, Marcus Vinícius Coutinho; de Castilho, Natália Parma Augusto; Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Nero, Lúis Augusto

    2016-04-01

    The quality and safety of meat products can be estimated by assessing their contamination by hygiene indicator microorganisms and some foodborne pathogens, with Listeria monocytogenes as a major concern. To identify the main sources of microbiological contamination in the processing environment of three butcher shops, surface samples were obtained from the hands of employees, tables, knives, inside butcher displays, grinders, and meat tenderizers (24 samples per point). All samples were subjected to enumeration of hygiene indicator microorganisms and detection of L. monocytogenes, and the obtained isolates were characterized by their serogroups and virulence genes. The results demonstrated the absence of relevant differences in the levels of microbiological contamination among butcher shops; samples with counts higher than reference values indicated inefficiency in adopted hygiene procedures. A total of 87 samples were positive for Listeria spp. (60.4%): 22 from tables, 20 from grinders, 16 from knives, 13 from hands, 9 from meat tenderizers, and 7 from butcher shop displays. Thirty-one samples (21.5%) were positive for L. monocytogenes, indicating the presence of the pathogen in meat processing environments. Seventy-four L. monocytogenes isolates were identified, with 52 from serogroups 1/2c or 3c and 22 from serogroups 4b, 4d, 4a, or 4c. All 74 isolates were positive for hlyA, iap, plcA, actA, and internalins (inlA, inlB, inlC, and inlJ). The establishment of appropriate procedures to reduce microbial counts and control the spread of L. monocytogenes in the final steps of the meat production chain is of utmost importance, with obvious effects on the quality and safety of meat products for human consumption. PMID:27052868

  4. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1

    PubMed Central

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by 137Cesium (137Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as 132Te-132I, 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h−1 per initial 137Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m−2, whereas it was 100 μGy h−1 around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m−2 for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums (134Cs + 137Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. PMID:26568603

  5. An α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex in astrocytes triggers non–cell autonomous neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Gilbert; Barowski, Jessica; Ravits, John; Siddique, Teepu; Lingrel, Jerry B; Robertson, Janice; Steen, Hanno; Bonni, Azad

    2015-01-01

    Perturbations of astrocytes trigger neurodegeneration in several diseases, but the glial cell–intrinsic mechanisms that induce neurodegeneration remain poorly understood. We found that a protein complex of α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin was enriched in astrocytes expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knockdown of α2-Na/K ATPase or α-adducin in mutant SOD1 astrocytes protected motor neurons from degeneration, including in mutant SOD1 mice in vivo. Heterozygous disruption of the α2-Na/K ATPase gene suppressed degeneration in vivo and increased the lifespan of mutant SOD1 mice. The pharmacological agent digoxin, which inhibits Na/K ATPase activity, protected motor neurons from mutant SOD1 astrocyte–induced degeneration. Notably, α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin were upregulated in spinal cord of sporadic and familial ALS patients. Collectively, our findings define chronic activation of the α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex as a critical glial cell–intrinsic mechanism of non–cell autonomous neurodegeneration, with implications for potential therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25344630

  6. An α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex in astrocytes triggers non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Gilbert; Barowski, Jessica; Ravits, John; Siddique, Teepu; Lingrel, Jerry B; Robertson, Janice; Steen, Hanno; Bonni, Azad

    2014-12-01

    Perturbations of astrocytes trigger neurodegeneration in several diseases, but the glial cell-intrinsic mechanisms that induce neurodegeneration remain poorly understood. We found that a protein complex of α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin was enriched in astrocytes expressing mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knockdown of α2-Na/K ATPase or α-adducin in mutant SOD1 astrocytes protected motor neurons from degeneration, including in mutant SOD1 mice in vivo. Heterozygous disruption of the α2-Na/K ATPase gene suppressed degeneration in vivo and increased the lifespan of mutant SOD1 mice. The pharmacological agent digoxin, which inhibits Na/K ATPase activity, protected motor neurons from mutant SOD1 astrocyte-induced degeneration. Notably, α2-Na/K ATPase and α-adducin were upregulated in spinal cord of sporadic and familial ALS patients. Collectively, our findings define chronic activation of the α2-Na/K ATPase/α-adducin complex as a critical glial cell-intrinsic mechanism of non-cell autonomous neurodegeneration, with implications for potential therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25344630

  7. Regulation of vascular endothelial cell volume by Na-K-2Cl cotransport.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, W C; Klein, J D

    1992-02-01

    The relationship between cell volume and Na-K-2Cl cotransport was studied in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. Hypertonic cell shrinkage increased bumetanide-sensitive, Na- or Cl-dependent K influx without altering bumetanide-insensitive influx. Greater stimulation of cotransport was observed in cells shrunken isosmotically either by preincubation in K-free and Na-free medium or by preincubation in hypotonic medium. Cell swelling, produced by preincubation in isotonic high-K medium, inhibited bumetanide-sensitive K influx. Simultaneous measurements of [3H]bumetanide binding and K influx revealed an increased number of binding sites without an increased influx per binding site in shrunken cells. Bumetanide did not alter the volume or ion content of cells in isotonic or hypertonic medium, indicating that no net influx of ions occurs through cotransport under these conditions. In isosmotically shrunken cells, there was greater stimulation of bumetanide-sensitive influx than of bumetanide-sensitive efflux, resulting in net bumetanide-sensitive influx. Rapid recovery of cell K, Na, and water occurred over 10-20 min and was inhibited by bumetanide or by the removal of external Na or Cl. These data demonstrate that Na-K-2Cl cotransport in aortic endothelial cells is regulated by cell volume, possibly through changes in the number of functional cotransporters, and mediates a brisk regulatory volume increase in isosmotically shrunken cells. Although thermodynamically favored, no net influx occurs through Na-K-2Cl cotransport in cells of normal volume or in hypertonically shrunken cells. This suggests additional regulation of cotransport, perhaps through trans-inhibition by intracellular Cl. Regulation of cell volume by Na-K-2Cl cotransport may be important in maintaining endothelial integrity. PMID:1539632

  8. NaK pool-boiler solar receiver durability bench test. Volume 2, Metallurgical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The principal materials used in the construction of a NaKbased pool-boiler were analyzed. The device, operated for 7500 hours, accumulated 1000 thermal cycles to a peak temperature of 750{degrees}C. Haynes 230, used to fabricate the pool-boiler vessel, was found to perform satisfactorily. Air-side corrosion of the pool-boiler vessel was insignificant. Internal surface of the alloy exhibited some NaK-induced elemental dissolution; this dissolution was somewhat more extensive where the alloy was exposed to the liquid metal compared to regions exposed only to NaK vapor; however, the corresponding metal loss in all regions was inconsequential, never exceeding more than a few microns. Autogenous seam welds of the alloy responded in a similar fashion, exhibiting only minimal metal loss over the course of the experiment. While there was 50% loss in ductility of the alloy there remained adequate ductility for the anticipated operating environment. An enhanced boiling nucleation surface comprised of stainless steel powder brazed to the vessel ID showed no change in its structure. It remained intact, showing no cracking after repeated thermal cycling. Other materials used in the experiment showed more extensive degradation after exposure to the NaK. IN 600, used to fabricate thermowells, exhibited extensive surface and intergranular dissolution. Grain boundary dissolution was sufficiently severe in one of the thermowells to cause an air leak, resulting in experiment termination. BNi-3, a brazing alloy used to join the pool-boiler vessel, endcaps and thermowells, showed some dissolution where it was exposed to the NaK as well as thermal aging effects. However, all brazes remained structurally sound. A nickel metal ribbon showed catastrophic dissolution, resulting in the formation of deep (> 30 {mu}m) pits and cavities. A zirconium metal foil used to getter oxygen from the NaK became extremely brittle.

  9. METHODS OF PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF ZINC CONTAMINATION DURING VACUUM PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Stoner, K.; Duncan, A.

    2013-11-20

    Radioactive zinc, {sup 65}Zn, was detected after a thermal vacuum process that extracted a desired product from articles out of a commercial light water reactor. While the facility is designed to handle radioactive materials, the location of the {sup 65}Zn was in an area that is not designed for gamma emitting contaminants. A series of experiments were conducted to entrain the contaminant in an easily replaceable trap within the process piping. The experiments were conducted with increasing levels of complexity. Initially a simple apparatus was developed to determine the effect of substrate temperature on the vapor capture, this was followed by experiments to determine the effect of filter pore size on pumping and trapping, finally the interactive effects of both pore size and temperature were evaluated. The testing was conducted on a system that used a roughing vacuum pump using model and prototypic materials. It was determined that heating the substrate to nominally 200°C resulted in effective trapping on the model as well as prototypic material.

  10. Quantum control of ultracold NaK polar molecules in optical traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Petrov, Alexander; Makrides, Constantinos; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2016-05-01

    Selection of trapping conditions with ultracold molecules, where internal states experience identical trapping potentials, brings substantial benefits for the ultimate control of their internal degrees of freedom. Here we present our work on the control of NaK molecules, when they are subjected to both trapping laser light and external electric and magnetic fields. First, we calculated parallel and perpendicular polarizabilities using a coupled-cluster method at the CCSD level. This enables us to determine the differential Stark shifts of rotational levels of NaK as a function of orientation of external fields. The hyperfine and Zeeman structure of these rotational states was obtained using an effective spin Hamiltonian. We find that under the experimental conditions with NaK, the hyperfine sublevels of the J = 1 rotational state are significantly mixed by the trapping laser light so that the simplified model of Ref. for ``magic'' conditions can not be applied. Adding a modest static electric field, however, can minimize the mixing of magnetic sublevels and make it easier to find ``magic'' conditions. This work is supported by the ARO-MURI Grant No. W911NF-12-1-0476 and the NSF Grant No. PHY-1308573.

  11. Insulin regulation of Na/K pump activity in rat hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gelehrter, T.D.; Shreve, P.D.; Dilworth, V.M.

    1984-05-01

    Insulin rapidly increases Na/K pump activity in HTC rat hepatoma cells in tissue culture, as measured by the ouabain-sensitive influx of the potassium analogue 86Rb+. Increased influx is observed within minutes and is maximal (70% above control) within 1-2 h. The effect appears to be mediated by the insulin receptors, as: the concentration dependence on insulin is identical to that for insulin induction of tyrosine aminotransferase and stimulation of 2-aminoisobutyric acid transport, proinsulin is 6% as potent as insulin, and the effect is blocked by anti-receptor antibodies. The early stimulation of potassium influx is not blocked by cycloheximide and is not associated with an increased number of pump sites as measured by /sup 3/H-ouabain binding. The insulin effect is blocked by amiloride, which blocks sodium influx, and is mimicked by the sodium ionophore monensin, which increases sodium influx and intracellular accumulation. Insulin also rapidly increases the initial rate of /sup 22/Na+ influx, suggesting that insulin may enhance Na/K pump activity, in part, by increasing intracellular sodium concentration. Incubation of HTC cells with insulin for 24 h causes complete unresponsiveness to the insulin induction of transaminase and stimulation of amino acid transport, a phenomenon mediated by postbinding mechanisms. In contrast, similar incubation with insulin does not cause unresponsiveness to the insulin stimulation of Na/K pump activity. Therefore, the site of regulation of responsiveness to insulin must be distal to, or separate from, those events causing stimulation of ion fluxes.

  12. Electrochemical iron generation: The ideal process for simultaneous removal of heavy metals from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, M.D.

    1993-12-31

    At most Superfund sites, many heavy metals must be removed from contaminated groundwater. Simultaneous extraction is complicated due to the various chemical properties that metals exhibit. A comprehensive understanding of solubilities, oxidation states, and adsorptive mechanisms is needed to accomplish treatment objectives. This paper uses data from treatability tests conducted on groundwater from the King of Prussia Technical Corporation Site to discuss the electrochemical iron generation process developed by Andco Environmental Processes, Inc. Electrical current and sacrificial steel electrodes were used to put ferrous ions into solution. The chemistry was properly manipulated to provide adsorption and coprecipitation conditions capable of simultaneously removing beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, mercury, nickel, and zinc. Strict cleanup levels were required since the site is located within Pinelands National Reserve and adjacent to New Jersey`s Winslow Wildlife Refuge. System design, operating costs, and sludge production rate are also discussed.

  13. Remediation of Pb/Cr co-contaminated soil using electrokinetic process and approaching electrode technique.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yee-Sern; Sen Gupta, Bhaskar; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2016-01-01

    Electrokinetic process has emerged as an important tool for remediating heavy metal-contaminated soil. The process can concentrate heavy metals into smaller soil volume even in the absence of hydraulic flow. This makes it an attractive soil pre-treatment method before other remediation techniques are applied such that the chemical consumption in the latter stage can be reduced. The present study evaluates the feasibility of electrokinetic process in concentrating lead (Pb) and chromium (Cr) in a co-contaminated soil using different types of wetting agents, namely 0.01 M NaNO3, 0.1 M citric acid and 0.1 M EDTA. The data obtained showed that NaNO3 and citric acid resulted in poor Pb electromigration in this study. As for Cr migration, these agents were also found to give lower electromigration rate especially at low pH region as a result of Cr(VI) adsorption and possible reduction into Cr(III). In contrast, EDTA emerged as the best wetting agent in this study as it formed water-soluble anionic complexes with both Pb and Cr. This provided effective one-way electromigration towards the anode for both ions, and they were accumulated into smaller soil volume with an enrichment ratio of 1.55-1.82. A further study on the application of approaching cathode in EDTA test showed that soil alkalisation was achieved, but this did not provide significant enhancement on electromigration for Pb and Cr. Nevertheless, the power consumption for electrokinetic process was decreased by 22.5%. PMID:26330317

  14. Selective suppression of bacterial contaminants by process conditions during lignocellulose based yeast fermentations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Contamination of bacteria in large-scale yeast fermentations is a serious problem and a threat to the development of successful biofuel production plants. Huge research efforts have been spent in order to solve this problem, but additional ways must still be found to keep bacterial contaminants from thriving in these environments. The aim of this project was to develop process conditions that would inhibit bacterial growth while giving yeast a competitive advantage. Results Lactic acid bacteria are usually considered to be the most common contaminants in industrial yeast fermentations. Our observations support this view but also suggest that acetic acid bacteria, although not so numerous, could be a much more problematic obstacle to overcome. Acetic acid bacteria showed a capacity to drastically reduce the viability of yeast. In addition, they consumed the previously formed ethanol. Lactic acid bacteria did not show this detrimental effect on yeast viability. It was possible to combat both types of bacteria by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol to the wood hydrolysate medium used. As a result of NaCl + ethanol additions the amount of viable bacteria decreased and yeast viability was enhanced concomitantly with an increase in ethanol concentration. The successful result obtained via addition of NaCl and ethanol was also confirmed in a real industrial ethanol production plant with its natural inherent yeast/bacterial community. Conclusions It is possible to reduce the number of bacteria and offer a selective advantage to yeast by a combined addition of NaCl and ethanol when cultivated in lignocellulosic medium such as wood hydrolysate. However, for optimal results, the concentrations of NaCl + ethanol must be adjusted to suit the challenges offered by each hydrolysate. PMID:22185398

  15. Molecular methods to assess Listeria monocytogenes route of contamination in a dairy processing plant.

    PubMed

    Alessandria, Valentina; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Dolci, Paola; Cocolin, Luca

    2010-07-31

    In this study we investigated the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes in a dairy processing plant during two sampling campaigns in 2007 and 2008. Samples represented by semifinished and finished cheeses, swabs from the equipment and brines from the salting step, were subjected to analysis by using traditional and molecular methods, represented mainly by quantitative PCR. Comparing the results obtained by the application of the two approaches used, it became evident how traditional microbiological analysis underestimated the presence of L. monocytogenes in the dairy plant. Especially samples of the brines and the equipment swabs were positive only with qPCR. For some equipment swabs it was possible to detect a load of 10(4)-10(5) cfu/cm(2), while the modified ISO method employed gave negative results both before and after the enrichment step. The evidences collected during the first sampling year, highlighting a heavy contamination of the brines and of the equipment, lead to the implementation of specific actions that decreased the contamination in these samples during the 2008 campaign. However, no reduction in the number of L. monocytogenes positive final products was observed, suggesting that a more strict control is necessary to avoid the presence of the pathogen. All the isolates of L. monocytogenes were able to attach to abiotic surfaces, and, interestingly, considering the results obtained from their molecular characterization it became evident how strains present in the brines, were genetically connected with isolates from the equipment and from the final product, suggesting a clear route of contamination of the pathogen in the dairy plant. This study underlines the necessity to use appropriate analytical tools, such as molecular methods, to fully understand the spread and persistence of L. monocytogenes in food producing companies. PMID:20193970

  16. Treatment Processes for Removal of Wastewater Contaminants (WERF Report INFR8SG09)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigated the nature of colloids associated with wastewater effluents. It also evaluated the association of emerging contaminants with these wastewater colloids. Two distinct emerging contaminants were investigated to gain general insight into the potential importan...

  17. Phytoremediation of a nitrogen-contaminated desert soil by native shrubs and microbial processes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Glenn, Edward P.; Jordan, Fiona; Waugh, W. Joseph

    2016-02-24

    Here, we combined phytoremediation and soil microbial nitrification and denitrification cycles to reduce nitrate and ammonium levels at a former uranium mill site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Ammonia used in uranium extraction was present throughout the soil profile. Sulfate,applied as sulfuric acid to solubilize uranium, was also present in the soil. These contaminants were leaching from a denuded area where a tailings pile had been removed and were migrating away from the site in groundwater. We planted the source area with two deep-rooted native shrubs, Atriplex cansescens and Sarcobatus vermiculatus, and irrigated transplants for 11 years at 20% the ratemore » of potential evapotranspiration to stimulate growth, then discontinued irrigation for 4 years. Over 15 years, total nitrogen levels dropped 82%, from 347 to 64 mg kg–1. Analysis of δ15N supported our hypothesis that coupled microbial nitrification and denitrification processes were responsible for the loss of N. Soil sulfate levels changed little; however, evapotranspiration reduced sulfate leaching into the aquifer. For arid sites where traditional pump-and-treat methods are problematic, the Monument Valley data suggest that alternatives that incorporate native plants and rely on vadose zone biogeochemistry and hydrology could be a sustainable remediation for nitrogen contaminated soil.« less

  18. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioremediation of organic contaminants: a review of processes and environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Gill, R T; Harbottle, M J; Smith, J W N; Thornton, S F

    2014-07-01

    There is current interest in finding sustainable remediation technologies for the removal of contaminants from soil and groundwater. This review focuses on the combination of electrokinetics, the use of an electric potential to move organic and inorganic compounds, or charged particles/organisms in the subsurface independent of hydraulic conductivity; and bioremediation, the destruction of organic contaminants or attenuation of inorganic compounds by the activity of microorganisms in situ or ex situ. The objective of the review is to examine the state of knowledge on electrokinetic bioremediation and critically evaluate factors which affect the up-scaling of laboratory and bench-scale research to field-scale application. It discusses the mechanisms of electrokinetic bioremediation in the subsurface environment at different micro and macroscales, the influence of environmental processes on electrokinetic phenomena and the design options available for application to the field scale. The review also presents results from a modelling exercise to illustrate the effectiveness of electrokinetics on the supply electron acceptors to a plume scale scenario where these are limiting. Current research needs include analysis of electrokinetic bioremediation in more representative environmental settings, such as those in physically heterogeneous systems in order to gain a greater understanding of the controlling mechanisms on both electrokinetics and bioremediation in those scenarios. PMID:24875868

  19. Reservoir and contaminated sediments impacts in high-Andean environments: Morphodynamic interactions with biogeochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escauriaza, C. R.; Contreras, M. T.; Müllendorff, D. A.; Pasten, P.; Pizarro, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid changes due to anthropic interventions in high-altitude environments, such as the Altiplano region in South America, require new approaches to understand the connections between physical and biogeochemical processes. Alterations of the water quality linked to the river morphology can affect the ecosystems and human development in the long-term. The future construction of a reservoir in the Lluta river, located in northern Chile, will change the spatial distribution of arsenic-rich sediments, which can have significant effects on the lower parts of the watershed. In this investigation we develop a coupled numerical model to predict and evaluate the interactions between morphodynamic changes in the Lluta reservoir, and conditions that can potentially desorb arsenic from the sediments. Assuming that contaminants are mobilized under anaerobic conditions, we calculate the oxygen concentration within the sediments to study the interactions of the delta progradation with the potential arsenic release. This work provides a framework for future studies aimed to analyze the complex connections between morphodynamics and water quality, when contaminant-rich sediments accumulate in a reservoir. The tool can also help to design effective risk management and remediation strategies in these extreme environments. Research has been supported by Fondecyt grant 1130940 and CONICYT/FONDAP Grant 15110017

  20. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery (MEOR) and remediation of aquifers contaminated with hydrophobic contaminants require insitu production of biosurfactants for mobilization of entrapped hydrophobic liquids. Most of the biosurfactant producing microorganisms produce them under aerobic condition and hence surfactant production is limited in subsurface condition due to lack of oxygen. Currently bioremediation involves expensive air sparging or excavation followed by exsitu biodegradation. Use of microorganisms which can produce biosurfactants under anaerobic conditions can cost effectively expedite the process of insitu bioremediation or mobilization. In this work, the feasibility of anaerobic biosurfactant production in three mixed anaerobic cultures prepared from groundwater and soil contaminated with chlorinated compounds and municipal sewage sludge was investigated. The cultures were previously enriched under complete anaerobic conditions in the presence of Tetrachloroethylene (PCE) for more than a year before they were studied for biosurfactant production. Biosurfactant production under anaerobic conditions was simulated using two methods: i) induction of starvation in the microbial cultures and ii) addition of complex fermentable substrates. Positive result for biosurfactant production was not observed when the cultures were induced with starvation by adding PCE as blobs which served as the only terminal electron acceptor. However, slight reduction in interfacial tension was noticed which was caused by the adherence of microbes to water-PCE interface. Biosurfactant production was observed in all the three cultures when they were fed with complex fermentable substrates and surface tension of the liquid medium was lowered below 35 mN/m. Among the fermentable substrates tested, vegetable oil yielded highest amount of biosurfactant in all the cultures. Complete biodegradation of PCE to ethylene at a faster rate was also observed when vegetable oil was amended to the

  1. Two functionally different Na/K pumps in cardiac ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to voltage clamp acutely isolated myocytes at -60 mV and study effects of ionic environment on Na/K pump activity. In quiescent guinea pig myocytes, normal intracellular Na+ is approximately 6 mM, which gives a total pump current of 0.25 +/- 0.09 pA/pF, and an inward background sodium current of 0.75 +/- 0.26 pA/pF. The average capacitance of a cell is 189 +/- 61 pF. Our main conclusion is the total Na/K pump current comprises currents from two different types of pumps, whose functional responses to the extracellular environment are different. Pump current was reversibly blocked with two affinities by extracellular dihydro-ouabain (DHO). We determined dissociation constants of 72 microM for low affinity (type-1) pumps and 0.75 microM for high affinity (type-h) pumps. These dissociation constants did not detectably change with two intracellular Na+ concentrations, one saturating and one near half- saturating, and with two extracellular K+ concentrations of 4.6 and 1.0 mM. Ion effects on type-h pumps were therefore measured using 5 microM DHO and on total pump current using 1 mM DHO. Extracellular K+ half- maximally activated the type-h pumps at 0.4 mM and the type-1 at 3.7 mM. Extracellular H+ blocked the type-1 pumps with half-maximal blockade at a pH of 7.71 whereas the type-h pumps were insensitive to extracellular pH. Both types of pumps responded similarly to changes in intracellular-Na+, with 9.6 mM causing half-maximal activation. Neither changes in intracellular pH between 6.0 and 7.2, nor concentrations of intracellular K+ of 140 mM or below, had any effect on either type of pump. The lack of any effect of intracellular K+ suggests the dissociation constants are in the molar range so this step in the pump cycle is not rate limiting under normal physiological conditions. Changes in intracellular-Na+ did not affect the half-maximal activation by extracellular K+, and vice versa. We found DHO-blockade of Na/K pump

  2. Woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process for nitrate contaminated water remediation.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Feng, Chuanping; Hu, Weiwu; Xi, Beidou; Chen, Nan; Zhao, Baowei; Liu, Ying; Hao, Chunbo; Pu, Jiaoyang

    2016-02-01

    Nitrate contaminated water can be effectively treated by simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (HAD). In the present study, woodchips and elemental sulfur were used as co-electron donors for HAD. It was found that ammonium salts could enhance the denitrifying activity of the Thiobacillus bacteria, which utilize the ammonium that is produced by the dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in the woodchip-sulfur based heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification (WSHAD) process. The denitrification performance of the WSHAD process (reaction constants range from 0.05485 h(-1) to 0.06637 h(-1)) is better than that of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification (reaction constants range from 0.01029 h(-1) to 0.01379 h(-1)), and the optimized ratio of woodchips to sulfur is 1:1 (w/w). No sulfate accumulation is observed in the WSHAD process and the alkalinity generated in the heterotrophic denitrification can compensate for alkalinity consumption by the sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification. The symbiotic relationship between the autotrophic and the heterotrophic denitrification processes play a vital role in the mixotrophic environment. PMID:26650451

  3. Probabilistic Round Trip Contamination Analysis of a Mars Sample Acquisition and Handling Process Using Markovian Decompositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Nicolas; Lin, Ying; Barengoltz, Jack

    2010-01-01

    A method for evaluating the probability of a Viable Earth Microorganism (VEM) contaminating a sample during the sample acquisition and handling (SAH) process of a potential future Mars Sample Return mission is developed. A scenario where multiple core samples would be acquired using a rotary percussive coring tool, deployed from an arm on a MER class rover is analyzed. The analysis is conducted in a structured way by decomposing sample acquisition and handling process into a series of discrete time steps, and breaking the physical system into a set of relevant components. At each discrete time step, two key functions are defined: The probability of a VEM being released from each component, and the transport matrix, which represents the probability of VEM transport from one component to another. By defining the expected the number of VEMs on each component at the start of the sampling process, these decompositions allow the expected number of VEMs on each component at each sampling step to be represented as a Markov chain. This formalism provides a rigorous mathematical framework in which to analyze the probability of a VEM entering the sample chain, as well as making the analysis tractable by breaking the process down into small analyzable steps.

  4. Use of a marker organism in poultry processing to identify sites of cross-contamination and evaluate possible control measures.

    PubMed

    Mead, G C; Hudson, W R; Hinton, M H

    1994-07-01

    1. Nine different sites at a poultry processing plant were selected in the course of a hazard analysis to investigate the degree of microbial cross-contamination that could occur during processing and the effectiveness of possible control measures. 2. At each site, carcases, equipment or working surfaces were inoculated with a non-pathogenic strain of nalidixic acid-resistant Escherichia coli K12; transmission of the organism among carcases being processed was followed qualitatively and, where appropriate, quantitatively. 3. The degree of cross-contamination and the extent to which it could be controlled by the proposed measures varied from one site to another. PMID:7953779

  5. Coupling between pore water fluxes, structural heterogeneity, and biogeochemical processes controls contaminant mobility, bioavailability, and toxicity in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, M.; Fetters, K.; Jarrett, B.; Yuen, J.; Cadoux, C.; EI-Natour, M.; Packman, A. I.; Gaillard, J.; Burton, G.

    2012-12-01

    Sediments can serve as both sinks and sources of contaminants in aquatic systems. Contaminants are typically not sequestered permanently in sediments, and instead release slowly to the water column, posing an ongoing threat to aquatic ecosystems and human health. Many processes, including hydrodynamic transport, sediment diagenesis, and bioturbation regulate the behavior and effects of contaminants in sediments. While many of these processes have been studied individually, it is extremely important to understand how they interact to control the form, flux and toxicity of metals in sediments. We used well-defined experimental mesocosms to investigate the effects of hydrodynamic and biological processes on the redistribution of metals between sediments, pore water and overlying water, associated changes in metals speciation, and resulting bioavailability and toxicity to benthic organisms. Metals speciation was evaluated in deposited and resuspended particles using x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We also used time-lapse photography and oxygen optode imaging to evaluate how bioturbation and bioirrigation control sediment structure, sediment mixing process, and oxygen delivery to sediments. In the extremely fine sediments used here, local contaminant fluxes are mainly dominated by diffusion, but episodic bioturbation and resuspension cause extreme variability in contaminant flux and increases oxidation of reduced sediments. Metals contamination substantially reduced bioturbation by indwelling organisms. Sediment resuspension decreased survival and increased tissue burden of epi-benthic organisms. Bioturbation mixed sediments as deep as several centimeters, while associated bioirrigation through worm burrows delivered oxygen over an order of magnitude deeper than local diffusion. These results show that it is important to understand how local transport processes, sediment chemistry, and biological activity interact to control rates and patterns of metals speciation and

  6. Coherent Control of Ground State NaK Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zoe; Park, Jee Woo; Loh, Huanqian; Will, Sebastian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold dipolar molecules exhibit anisotropic, tunable, long-range interactions, making them attractive for the study of novel states of matter and quantum information processing. We demonstrate the creation and control of 23 Na40 K molecules in their rovibronic and hyperfine ground state. By applying microwaves, we drive coherent Rabi oscillations of spin-polarized molecules between the rotational ground state (J=0) and J=1. The control afforded by microwave manipulation allows us to pursue engineered dipolar interactions via microwave dressing. By driving a two-photon transition, we are also able to observe Ramsey fringes between different J=0 hyperfine states, with coherence times as long as 0.5s. The realization of long coherence times between different molecular states is crucial for applications in quantum information processing. NSF, AFOSR- MURI, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, DARPA-OLE

  7. Ochratoxin A contamination of coffee batches from Kenya in relation to cultivation methods and post-harvest processing treatments.

    PubMed

    Duris, Daniel; Mburu, Joseph K; Durand, Noël; Clarke, Renata; Frank, John M; Guyot, Bernard

    2010-06-01

    This study set out to assess the relative importance of sound and unsound beans in a batch of coffee with regard to ochratoxin A (OTA) contamination. Initially, unsound beans were found to account for 95% of contamination in a batch of coffee, whatever the methods used for post-harvest processing. It was also found that beans displaying traces of attacks by Colletotrichum kahawae were the greatest contributors to OTA contamination. In a second stage, the study compared the contamination of sound beans with that of beans attacked by Colletotrichum kahawae. On average, beans attacked by Colletotrichum kahawae had a statistically higher OTA content than sound beans (18.0 microg kg(-1) as opposed to 1.2 microg kg(-1)). In addition, the average OTA content in unsound beans varied depending on growing conditions. PMID:20175009

  8. The Impact of Biofilms on the Process of Back Diffusion From a Contaminated Rock Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yungwirth, G. A.; Novakowski, K. S.; Ross, N.

    2005-12-01

    Groundwater remediation in fractured rock settings is complicated by the diffusion of contaminants into the rock matrix and the subsequent back diffusion into the fractures. The process of back diffusion, in particular, leads to extended periods of low-level contamination in the fracture network that persists long after the source area is hydraulically or otherwise removed. In such a case, we hypothesize that back diffusion could be limited by growing a biofilm which coats the rock fracture surface and potentially invades the rock micropores. This would effectively sequester the contamination potentially in perpetuity. To explore the viability of this concept, diffusion experiments were conducted in which the effect of biofilm growth on diffusion through thin (0.8 to 1.2 cm) slices of dolostone core obtained from the Lockport Formation, Southern Ontario, was investigated. The experiments were conducted using a double-cell method, in which the core slices were encapsulated inside Teflon coated hydraulic hose, fitted with ultra high molecular weight polyethylene endcaps having stainless steel sample ports. Diffusion was established across the core slice by spiking one reservoir with a conservative tracer and monitoring the tracer arrival in the reservoir located on the other side of the coupon. The experiments were conducted both in the presence and absence of a biofilm. Biofilm was grown on the rock coupons in a separate bath before the coupons were transferred to the apparatus for the diffusion experiments. Microbial populations indigenous to the groundwater used in the bath were stimulated to form the biofilm with the addition of a beef extract and peptone nutrient broth in 1g/L concentration. The extent of biofilm growth was monitored using a modified Dubois et al (1956) colorimetric method for sugar determination. Results were simulated using an analytical model that was developed for the geometry of the diffusion experiments. Governing equations for the model

  9. Determination of dominant biogeochemical processes in a contaminated aquifer-wetland system using multivariate statistical analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baez-Cazull, S. E.; McGuire, J.T.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Determining the processes governing aqueous biogeochemistry in a wetland hydrologically linked to an underlying contaminated aquifer is challenging due to the complex exchange between the systems and their distinct responses to changes in precipitation, recharge, and biological activities. To evaluate temporal and spatial processes in the wetland-aquifer system, water samples were collected using cm-scale multichambered passive diffusion samplers (peepers) to span the wetland-aquifer interface over a period of 3 yr. Samples were analyzed for major cations and anions, methane, and a suite of organic acids resulting in a large dataset of over 8000 points, which was evaluated using multivariate statistics. Principal component analysis (PCA) was chosen with the purpose of exploring the sources of variation in the dataset to expose related variables and provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that control the water chemistry of the system. Factor scores computed from PCA were mapped by date and depth. Patterns observed suggest that (i) fermentation is the process controlling the greatest variability in the dataset and it peaks in May; (ii) iron and sulfate reduction were the dominant terminal electron-accepting processes in the system and were associated with fermentation but had more complex seasonal variability than fermentation; (iii) methanogenesis was also important and associated with bacterial utilization of minerals as a source of electron acceptors (e.g., barite BaSO4); and (iv) seasonal hydrological patterns (wet and dry periods) control the availability of electron acceptors through the reoxidation of reduced iron-sulfur species enhancing iron and sulfate reduction. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  10. Elucidation of Listeria monocytogenes Contamination Routes in Cold-Smoked Salmon Processing Plants Detected by DNA-Based Typing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Fonnesbech Vogel, Birte; Huss, Hans Henrik; Ojeniyi, Bente; Ahrens, Peter; Gram, Lone

    2001-01-01

    The contamination routes of Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked salmon processing plants were investigated by analyzing 3,585 samples from products (produced in 1995, 1996, 1998, and 1999) and processing environments (samples obtained in 1998 and 1999) of two Danish smokehouses. The level of product contamination in plant I varied from 31 to 85%, and no L. monocytogenes was found on raw fish (30 fish were sampled). In plant II, the levels of both raw fish and product contamination varied from 0 to 25% (16 of 185 raw fish samples and 59 of 1,000 product samples were positive for L. monocytogenes). A total of 429 strains of L. monocytogenes were subsequently compared by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiling, and 55 different RAPD types were found. The RAPD types detected on the products were identical to types found on the processing equipment and in the processing environment, suggesting that contamination of the final product (cold-smoked salmon) in both plants (but primarily in plant I) was due to contamination during processing rather than to contamination from raw fish. However, the possibility that raw fish was an important source of contamination of the processing equipment and environment could not be excluded. Contamination of the product occurred in specific areas (the brining and slicing areas). In plant I, the same RAPD type (RAPD type 12) was found over a 4-year period, indicating that an established in-house flora persisted and was not eliminated by routine hygienic procedures. In plant II, where the prevalence of L. monocytogenes was much lower, no RAPD type persisted over long periods of time, and several different L. monocytogenes RAPD types were isolated. This indicates that persistent strains may be avoided by rigorous cleaning and sanitation; however, due to the ubiquitous nature of the organism, sporadic contamination occurred. A subset of strains was also typed by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and amplified fragment length

  11. Elucidation of Listeria monocytogenes contamination routes in cold-smoked salmon processing plants detected by DNA-based typing methods.

    PubMed

    Fonnesbech Vogel, B; Huss, H H; Ojeniyi, B; Ahrens, P; Gram, L

    2001-06-01

    The contamination routes of Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked salmon processing plants were investigated by analyzing 3,585 samples from products (produced in 1995, 1996, 1998, and 1999) and processing environments (samples obtained in 1998 and 1999) of two Danish smokehouses. The level of product contamination in plant I varied from 31 to 85%, and no L. monocytogenes was found on raw fish (30 fish were sampled). In plant II, the levels of both raw fish and product contamination varied from 0 to 25% (16 of 185 raw fish samples and 59 of 1,000 product samples were positive for L. monocytogenes). A total of 429 strains of L. monocytogenes were subsequently compared by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiling, and 55 different RAPD types were found. The RAPD types detected on the products were identical to types found on the processing equipment and in the processing environment, suggesting that contamination of the final product (cold-smoked salmon) in both plants (but primarily in plant I) was due to contamination during processing rather than to contamination from raw fish. However, the possibility that raw fish was an important source of contamination of the processing equipment and environment could not be excluded. Contamination of the product occurred in specific areas (the brining and slicing areas). In plant I, the same RAPD type (RAPD type 12) was found over a 4-year period, indicating that an established in-house flora persisted and was not eliminated by routine hygienic procedures. In plant II, where the prevalence of L. monocytogenes was much lower, no RAPD type persisted over long periods of time, and several different L. monocytogenes RAPD types were isolated. This indicates that persistent strains may be avoided by rigorous cleaning and sanitation; however, due to the ubiquitous nature of the organism, sporadic contamination occurred. A subset of strains was also typed by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and amplified fragment length

  12. Processing results of 1,800 gallons of mercury and radioactively contaminated mixed waste rinse solution

    SciTech Connect

    Thiesen, B.P.

    1993-01-01

    The mercury-contaminated rinse solution (INEL waste ID{number_sign} 123; File 8 waste) was successfully treated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This waste was generated during the decontamination of the Heat Transfer Reactor Experiment 3 (HTRE-3) reactor shield tank. Approximately 1,800 gal of waste was generated and was placed into 33 drums. Each drum contained precipitated sludge material ranging from 1--10 in. in depth, with the average depth of about 2.5 in. The pH of each drum varied from 3--11. The bulk liquid waste had a mercury level of 7.0 mg/l, which exceeded the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) limit of 0.2 mg/l. The average liquid bulk radioactivity was about 2.1 pCi/ml, while the average sludge contamination was about 13,800 pci/g. Treatment of the waste required separation of the liquid from the sludge, filtration, pH adjustment, and ion exchange. Because of difficulties in processing, three trials were required to reduce the mercury levels to below the RCRA limit. In the first trial, insufficient filtration of the waste allowed solid particulate produced during pH adjustment to enter into the ion exchange columns and ultimately the waste storage tank. In the second trial, the waste was filtered down to 0.1 {mu} to remove all solid mercury compounds. However, before filtration could take place, a solid mercury complex dissolved and mercury levels exceeded the RCRA limit after filtration. In the third trial, the waste was filtered through 0.3-A filters and then passed through the S-920 resin to remove the dissolved mercury. The resulting solution had mercury levels at 0.0186 mg/l and radioactivity of 0.282 pCi/ml. This solution was disposed of at the TAN warm waste pond, TAN782, TSF-10.

  13. Hexavalent chromium removal in contaminated water using reticulated chitosan micro/nanoparticles from seafood processing wastes.

    PubMed

    Dima, Jimena Bernadette; Sequeiros, Cynthia; Zaritzky, Noemi E

    2015-12-01

    Chitosan particles (CH) were obtained from seafood processing wastes (shrimp shells) and physicochemically characterized; deacetylation degree of CH was measured by Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and potentiometric titration; polymer molecular weight was determined by intrinsic viscosity measurements. Reticulated micro/nanoparticles of chitosan (MCH) with an average diameter close to 100nm were synthesized by ionic gelation of chitosan using tripolyphosphate (TPP), and characterized by SEM, size distribution and Zeta-potential. Detoxification capacities of CH and MCH were tested analyzing the removal of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from contaminated water, at different initial chromium concentrations. The effect of pH on adsorption capacity of CH and MCH was experimentally determined and analyzed considering the Cr(VI) stable complexes (anions) formed, the presence of protonated groups in chitosan particles and the addition of the reticulating agent (TPP). Chitosan crosslinking was necessary to adsorb Cr(VI) at pH<2 due to the instability of CH particles in acid media. Langmuir isotherm described better than Freundlich and Temkin equations the equilibrium adsorption data. Pseudo-second order rate provided the best fitting to the kinetic data in comparison to pseudo-first order and Elovich equations. Chemical analysis to determine the oxidation state of the adsorbed Cr, showed that Cr(VI) was adsorbed on CH particles without further reduction; in contrast Cr(VI) removed from the solution was reduced and bound to the MCH as Cr(III). The reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to the less or nontoxic Cr(III) by the reticulated chitosan micro/nanoparticles can be considered a very efficient detoxification technique for the treatment of Cr(VI) contaminated water. PMID:26151484

  14. Sodium and Proton Effects on Inward Proton Transport through Na/K Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Travis J.; Zugarramurdi, Camila; Olivera, J. Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    The Na/K pump hydrolyzes ATP to export three intracellular Na (Nai) as it imports two extracellular K (Ko) across animal plasma membranes. Within the protein, two ion-binding sites (sites I and II) can reciprocally bind Na or K, but a third site (site III) exclusively binds Na in a voltage-dependent fashion. In the absence of Nao and Ko, the pump passively imports protons, generating an inward current (IH). To elucidate the mechanisms of IH, we used voltage-clamp techniques to investigate the [H]o, [Na]o, and voltage dependence of IH in Na/K pumps from ventricular myocytes and in ouabain-resistant pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lowering pHo revealed that Ho both activates IH (in a voltage-dependent manner) and inhibits it (in a voltage-independent manner) by binding to different sites. Nao effects depend on pHo; at pHo where no Ho inhibition is observed, Nao inhibits IH at all concentrations, but when applied at pHo that inhibits pump-mediated current, low [Na]o activates IH and high [Na]o inhibits it. Our results demonstrate that IH is a property inherent to Na/K pumps, not linked to the oocyte expression environment, explains differences in the characteristics of IH previously reported in the literature, and supports a model in which 1), protons leak through site III; 2), binding of two Na or two protons to sites I and II inhibits proton transport; and 3), pumps with mixed Na/proton occupancy of sites I and II remain permeable to protons. PMID:24940773

  15. Lysine and the Na+/K+ Selectivity in Mammalian Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Huihui; Xia, Mengdie; Gong, Haipeng

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels are critical in the generation and transmission of neuronal signals in mammals. The crystal structures of several prokaryotic Nav channels determined in recent years inspire the mechanistic studies on their selection upon the permeable cations (especially between Na+ and K+ ions), a property that is proposed to be mainly determined by residues in the selectivity filter. However, the mechanism of cation selection in mammalian Nav channels lacks direct explanation at atomic level due to the difference in amino acid sequences between mammalian and prokaryotic Nav homologues, especially at the constriction site where the DEKA motif has been identified to determine the Na+/K+ selectivity in mammalian Nav channels but is completely absent in the prokaryotic counterparts. Among the DEKA residues, Lys is of the most importance since its mutation to Arg abolishes the Na+/K+ selectivity. In this work, we modeled the pore domain of mammalian Nav channels by mutating the four residues at the constriction site of a prokaryotic Nav channel (NavRh) to DEKA, and then mechanistically investigated the contribution of Lys in cation selection using molecular dynamics simulations. The DERA mutant was generated as a comparison to understand the loss of ion selectivity caused by the K-to-R mutation. Simulations and free energy calculations on the mutants indicate that Lys facilitates Na+/K+ selection by electrostatically repelling the cation to a highly Na+-selective location sandwiched by the carboxylate groups of Asp and Glu at the constriction site. In contrast, the electrostatic repulsion is substantially weakened when Lys is mutated to Arg, because of two intrinsic properties of the Arg side chain: the planar geometric design and the sparse charge distribution of the guanidine group. PMID:27584582

  16. Sodium and proton effects on inward proton transport through Na/K pumps.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Travis J; Zugarramurdi, Camila; Olivera, J Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2014-06-17

    The Na/K pump hydrolyzes ATP to export three intracellular Na (Nai) as it imports two extracellular K (Ko) across animal plasma membranes. Within the protein, two ion-binding sites (sites I and II) can reciprocally bind Na or K, but a third site (site III) exclusively binds Na in a voltage-dependent fashion. In the absence of Nao and Ko, the pump passively imports protons, generating an inward current (IH). To elucidate the mechanisms of IH, we used voltage-clamp techniques to investigate the [H]o, [Na]o, and voltage dependence of IH in Na/K pumps from ventricular myocytes and in ouabain-resistant pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lowering pHo revealed that Ho both activates IH (in a voltage-dependent manner) and inhibits it (in a voltage-independent manner) by binding to different sites. Nao effects depend on pHo; at pHo where no Ho inhibition is observed, Nao inhibits IH at all concentrations, but when applied at pHo that inhibits pump-mediated current, low [Na]o activates IH and high [Na]o inhibits it. Our results demonstrate that IH is a property inherent to Na/K pumps, not linked to the oocyte expression environment, explains differences in the characteristics of IH previously reported in the literature, and supports a model in which 1), protons leak through site III; 2), binding of two Na or two protons to sites I and II inhibits proton transport; and 3), pumps with mixed Na/proton occupancy of sites I and II remain permeable to protons. PMID:24940773

  17. Alcohol Excites Cerebellar Golgi Cells by Inhibiting the Na+/K+ ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Botta, Paolo; de Souza, Fabio M Simões; Sangrey, Thomas; De Schutter, Erik; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol-induced alterations of cerebellar function cause motor coordination impairments that are responsible for millions of injuries and deaths worldwide. Cognitive deficits associated with alcoholism are also a consequence of cerebellar dysfunction. The mechanisms responsible for these effects of ethanol are poorly understood. Recent studies have identified neurons in the input layer of the cerebellar cortex as important ethanol targets. In this layer, granule cells (GrCs) receive the majority of sensory inputs to the cerebellum through the mossy fibers. Information flow at these neurons is gated by a specialized pacemaker interneuron known as the Golgi cell, which provides divergent GABAergic input to thousands of GrCs. In vivo electrophysiological experiments have previously shown that acute ethanol exposure abolishes GrC responsiveness to sensory inputs carried by mossy fibers. Slice electrophysiological studies suggest that ethanol causes this effect by potentiating GABAergic transmission at Golgi cell-to-GrC synapses through an increase in Golgi cell excitability. Using patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques in cerebellar slices and computer modeling, we show here that ethanol excites Golgi cells by inhibiting the Na+/K+ ATPase. Voltage-clamp recordings of Na+/K+ ATPase currents indicated that ethanol partially inhibits this pump and this effect could be mimicked by low concentrations of ouabain. Partial inhibition of Na+/K+ ATPase function in a computer model of the Golgi cell reproduced these experimental findings. These results establish a novel mechanism of action of ethanol on neuronal excitability, which likely has a role in ethanol-induced cerebellar dysfunction and may also contribute to neuronal functional alterations in other brain regions. PMID:20520600

  18. Composition and process for organic and metal contaminant fixation in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Schwitzgebel, K.

    1994-02-08

    A method and compositions using a first ferrous iron containing solution with the iron concentration in excess of theoretical requirements are presented to treat a contaminated site. Hexavalent chromium is reduced to trivalent chromium and trivalent chromium is coprecipitated with other heavy metals. A second solution of silicate containing a destabilizing salt is used to form a relatively impermeable gel in the contaminated site thereby fixing metals and organics to the extent that there should be no detectable ground water contamination.

  19. Composition and process for organic and metal contaminant fixation in soil

    DOEpatents

    Schwitzgebel, Klaus

    1994-02-08

    A method and compositions using a first ferrous iron containing solution with the iron concentration in excess of theoretical requirements to treat a contaminated site to reduce hexavalent chromium to trivalent chromium and coprecipitate trivalent chromium with other heavy metals and using a second solution of silicate containing a destabilizing salt to form a relatively impermeable gel in the contaminated site thereby fixing metals and organics to the extent that there should be no detectable ground water contamination.

  20. Experimental investigation of fabrication process-, transportation-, storage, and handling-induced contamination of 157-nm reticles and vacuum UV cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Stepanenko, Nickolay; Vereecke, Guy; Eliat, Astrid; Kocsis, Michael K.; Kang, Young-Seog; Jonckheere, Rik M.; Conard, Thierry; Ronse, Kurt G.

    2004-05-01

    Mask fabrication process, transportation, storage, and handling contribute to contamination of 157nm reticles and modified fused silica substrates, resulting in transmission loss. A stable VUV cleaning procedure for contaminated binary, alternating, and attenuated phase shift reticles has been developed. This cleaning procedure was verified by lithographic imaging on the 157nm ASML MS-VII exposure scanner. A point-to-point steady state dose transmission uniformity range across a batch of 25 wafers (the exposure conditions of which were equivalent to that of a 300 mm wafer, 26mm×33mm fields, 50mJ/cm2) that were exposed with a modified fused silica substrate, was found to be <0.24% for a reticle that was cleaned prior to exposure using this VUV cleaning process. In-situ laser cleaning of contaminated mask substrates during exposure in the MS-VII resulted in 1% change in transmission at doses of up to 20 J/cm2, above which transmission remains stable (<0.24% variation). The cleaning procedure involves exposing the contaminated reticle in the UVO Reticle Cleaning Station for 30 minutes, using a cleaning gas mixture of N2/O2=99%/1%. Transmission loss due to contamination within the clean room is limited to 1 - 2 % and is reversible upon VUV cleaning. Flare levels of 3% were measured on contaminated reticle relative to a clean state of the same reticle. VUV cleaning is not only good for improving and maintaining stable mask transmission, but it is also good for preventing reticle contamination-induced flare. Contamination rate and contaminant type appear to be dependent on the storage environment of mask substrates and reticles. Typical contaminants included molecular acids (halogens, sulfur, sulfates), molecular bases (ammonia, amines), molecular condensables (hydrocarbons, alcohols, ketones, fatty acids, siloxanes, phthalate), molecular dopant (boron) and molecular metals (Ca, Mg, Al, Cu). Contamination of mask substrates appears to be through a competitive adsorption

  1. Efficacy of Microwave-Heating during Alkaline Processing of Fumonisin-Contaminated Maize

    PubMed Central

    MENDEZ-ALBORES, Abraham; CARDENAS-RODRIGUEZ, Denisse Anelem; VAZQUEZ-DURAN, Alma

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Fumonisins (a family of foodborne carcinogenic mycotoxins) cause health hazards to humans and animals in developing countries, and has also economic implications. Therefore, the efficacy of a novel environmental friendly nixtamalization procedure to make tortillas (the main staple food for the Mexican population) was investigated. Methods Maize contaminated with 2136.67 ng/g total fumonisins was processed into tortillas, starting with maize grits mixed with water and calcium hydroxide that was cooked in a microwave field at 2.45 GHz during 3.75 min, and steeped 3.5 h at room temperature. The steeped maize grits (nixtamal) was stone-ground into masa (maize dough), which was then used to make tortillas. Total fumonisin content was determined using monoclonal antibody columns. Results Masa contained 1998.33 ng/g total fumonisins, which represents 6.5% toxin reduction. Nevertheless, fumonisin concentration was reduced significantly in tortillas (up to 985.33 ng/g) due to the cooking process, corresponding to a cumulative toxin degradation of 54%. Tortillas were below the maximum tolerated level, considering the European Union regulatory limit for fumonisins in maize (1000 ng/g). The physicochemical and technological properties of tortillas were also considered within the acceptable margins of quality. Conclusion Microwave nixtamalization was not a feasible method to reduce fumonisin content in masa to acceptable levels; however, an effective extra-reduction occurred when masa was baking into tortillas. PMID:26060737

  2. Remediation of nitrate-contaminated surface water using sulfur and limestone autotrophic denitrification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Flere, J.M.; Zhang, T.C.

    1997-12-31

    The feasibility of using the sulfur/limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) process as an in situ method for remediation of nitrate-contaminated surface water was investigated. Four bench-scale pond systems with working volumes of 21.4 liters each and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 30 days were operated under mixed conditions. Under mixed (aerobic) conditions, with the addition of alkalinity to raise pH, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N removal in the SLAD ponds was 85--100%, while the control reactor showed negative removal. Sulfate production under mixed conditions was between 1,000--2,500 mg/l SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, which shows that 40--60 mg/l of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} is produced for every 1 mg/l of NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N reduced. Although the system is very efficient in removing nitrates under simulated surface water conditions, the sulfate production makes the process questionable for use under aerobic conditions. However, batch experiments under anaerobic conditions demonstrate that system maybe very efficient in removing nitrate while not producing insufferable amounts of sulfates.

  3. Na/K citrate versus sodium bicarbonate in prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Abouzeid, Sameh Mohamed; ElHossary, Hossam E

    2016-05-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is one of the important complications of radiographic procedures, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is also one of the common causes of acute kidney injury. The pathogenesis is postulated to be the effect of oxygen- free radicals and hyperosmolar stress on the renal medulla. It is reported that the production of superoxide is most active at acid environment. K/Na citrate is well known as a urine alkalinization medium, and this has been evaluated earlier with standard hydration for reduction of CIN and was stated to be efficient. We aimed to determine the efficacy of Na/K citrate in reducing the frequency of CIN in comparison to sodium bicarbonate in patients after coronary angiography. Two hundred and ten patients with renal dysfunction [estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) or less] who underwent elective or emergency coronary angiography (CAG) with/without percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at our institution were enrolled into the study. The patients were randomized into two groups, Group 1-Taking Na/K citrate and Group 2-Taking sodium bicarbonate. Radiographic contrast agent iohexol was used. Change in creatinine, percent change in creatinine, percent change in eGFR, change in serum potassium, and urine pH were all compared between the two groups. There was no significant difference for prevention of CIN when comparing the Na/K citrate with sodium bicarbonate solution in patients exposed to CAG with or without PCI. Mean absolute change in eGFR after 48 h after administration of contrast between sodium bicarbonate group and Na/K citrate group was -0.60 ± 1.58 versus -0.71 ± 1.38. Serum potassium decreased postprocedure in the sodium bicarbonate group than in the citrate group (3.90 ± 0.33 vs. 4.14 ± 0.39). Both agents are equally effective in reducing the incidence of CIN, but the citrate would possibly be a safer option for patients at risk of hypokalemia. PMID:27215244

  4. Investigation of gas-phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, R.D.; Munday, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Construction of the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) was begun during World War 2 to produce enriched uranium for defense purposes. These plants, which utilized UF{sub 6} gas, were used primarily for this purpose through 1964. From 1959 through 1968, production shifted primarily to uranium enrichment to supply the nuclear power industry. Additional UF{sub 6}-handling facilities were built in feed and fuel-processing plants associated with the uranium enrichment process. Two of the five process buildings at Oak ridge were shut down in 1964. Uranium enrichment activities at Oak Ridge were discontinued altogether in 1985. In 1987, the Department of Energy (DOE) decided to proceed with a permanent shutdown of the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP). DOE intends to begin decommissioning and decontamination (D D) of ORGDP early in the next century. The remaining two GDPs are expected to be shut down during the next 10 to 40 years and will also require D D, as will the other UF{sub 6}-handling facilities. This paper presents an investigation of gas- phase decontamination of internally radioactively contaminated gaseous diffusion process equipment and piping using powerful fluorinating reagents that convert nonvolatile uranium compounds to volatile UF{sub 6}. These reagents include ClF{sub 3}, F{sub 2}, and other compounds. The scope of D D at the GDPs, previous work of gas-phase decontamination, four concepts for using gas-phase decontamination, plans for further study of gas-phase decontamination, and the current status of this work are discussed. 13 refs., 15 figs.

  5. Properties of the Na+-K+ pump in human red cells with increased number of pump sites.

    PubMed Central

    Halperin, J A; Brugnara, C; Kopin, A S; Ingwall, J; Tosteson, D C

    1987-01-01

    We studied the Na+/K+ pump in red cells from an obese human subject (MAJ) in which the number of pumps/cell was 10-20 times higher than normal. Through measurements of the kinetic properties of several modes of operation of the Na+/K+ pump we determined that the pumps in MAJ cells are kinetically normal. In the presence of adequate metabolic substrate the maximum rates of Na+ pumping and lactate production saturated at 60 and 12 nmol/1 cell per h, respectively. Under physiological conditions pump and "leak" Na+ fluxes were similar in MAJ and normal cells. Since internal Na+ was lower in MAJ than in normal cells (Nai+ approximately 2 and 8 mmol/1 cell, respectively), we conclude that the reduction in cell Na+ allows the Na+/K+ pump in MAJ cells to operate at lower fraction of maximum capacity and to compensate for the increased number of pumps. PMID:2439543

  6. ENGINEERING APPLICATION OF BIOOXIDATION PROCESSES FOR TREATING PETROLEUM-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Throughout the U.S., the need for effective treatment of petroleum contaminated soil has escalated due to the increase in the number of underground storage tank (UST) systems being upgraded in response to EPA regulations. ptions for excavated contaminated soil have in the past be...

  7. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES IN THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINANT CANDIDATE LIST (CCL) COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current (2nd) Contaminant Candidate List was completed in 2005 by the United States EPA as an update to the Safe Drinking Water Act. The list of 42 chemical contaminants spans a wide array of classes, from pesticides to pharmaceuticals to elements, all of which are anticipate...

  8. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CCL CONTAMINANTS FROM DRINKING WATERS BY MEMBRANE AND GAC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale treatment data for membrane and granular activated carbon technologies are presented for the organic contaminants on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). For granular activated carbon (GAC), isotherm results are presented and q...

  9. ADAPTIVE WATER SENSOR SIGNAL PROCESSING: EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR ONLINE CONTAMINANT WARNING SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A contaminant detection technique and its optimization algorithms have two principal functions. One is the adaptive signal treatment that suppresses background noise and enhances contaminant signals, leading to a promising detection of water quality changes at a false rate as low...

  10. Process Development for Spray Drying a Value-Added Extract from Aflatoxin Contaminated Peanut Meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peanut meal, the primary byproduct of commercial oil crushing operations, is an excellent source of protein though aflatoxin contamination often limits applications for this material. Naturally aflatoxin contaminated (59 ppb) peanut meal dispersions were adjusted to pH 2.1 or pH 9.1, with or without...

  11. Evaluation of a remediation process for lead contaminated soil by toxicity bioassays: Plants and earthworms

    SciTech Connect

    Chana, L.W.; Smith, K.

    1995-12-31

    Soil from a site contaminated with heavy metals (predominantly lead) was treated using the TERRAMET{reg_sign} lead extraction process. Earthworm acute toxicity and plant seed germination/root elongation (SG/RE) bioassays were used to evaluate the toxicity of the soil before treatment (BT), after treatment (AT) and after treatment, followed by rinsing with water, intended to simulate exposure to rainfall (RT). The results showed BT and RT were not toxic to earthworms in a 14-day exposure while AT showed significant toxicity. The LC{sub 50} values for Eisenia and Lumbricus were 44.04 and 28.83 (as % AT soil/test soil mixture), respectively. The phytotoxicity data indicated that all 3 test soils significantly inhibited lettuce SG/RE in a dose-related manner, with AT being the most phytotoxic. In oats, RT had no effect on SG/RE and AT was more toxic than BT. For the two local-site grass seeds tested (blue grama and sideoat grama), the AT soil was the most phytotoxic followed by BT and RT. The results suggest that the soil after this remediation process exerts significant toxicity on both plant and earthworm, but after a rain-simulating rinse, the toxicity is the same as, or less than, the toxicity before treatment. Further studies are in progress to confirm the assumption that the high salt concentrations generated by acidification during the leaching process, followed by neutralization are responsible for the increased toxicity of unrinsed soil in both plant and earthworm.

  12. Toxicological benchmarks for screening potential contaminants of concern for effects on soil and litter invertebrates and heterotrophic process

    SciTech Connect

    Will, M.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    One of the initial stages in ecological risk assessments for hazardous waste sites is the screening of contaminants to determine which of them are worthy of further consideration as {open_quotes}contaminants of potential concern.{close_quotes} This process is termed {open_quotes}contaminant screening.{close_quotes} It is performed by comparing measured ambient concentrations of chemicals to benchmark concentrations. Currently, no standard benchmark concentrations exist for assessing contaminants in soil with respect to their toxicity to soil- and litter-dwelling invertebrates, including earthworms, other micro- and macroinvertebrates, or heterotrophic bacteria and fungi. This report presents a standard method for deriving benchmarks for this purpose, sets of data concerning effects of chemicals in soil on invertebrates and soil microbial processes, and benchmarks for chemicals potentially associated with United States Department of Energy sites. In addition, literature describing the experiments from which data were drawn for benchmark derivation. Chemicals that are found in soil at concentrations exceeding both the benchmarks and the background concentration for the soil type should be considered contaminants of potential concern.

  13. Online Oxide Contamination Measurement and Purification Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, D. E.; Godfroy, T. J.; Webster, K. L.; Garber, A. E.; Polzin, K. A.; Childers, D. J.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid metal sodium-potassium (NaK) has advantageous thermodynamic properties indicating its use as a fission reactor coolant for a surface (lunar, martian) power system. A major area of concern for fission reactor cooling systems is system corrosion due to oxygen contaminants at the high operating temperatures experienced. A small-scale, approximately 4-L capacity, simulated fission reactor cooling system employing NaK as a coolant was fabricated and tested with the goal of demonstrating a noninvasive oxygen detection and purification system. In order to generate prototypical conditions in the simulated cooling system, several system components were designed, fabricated, and tested. These major components were a fully-sealed, magnetically-coupled mechanical NaK pump, a graphite element heated reservoir, a plugging indicator system, and a cold trap. All system components were successfully demonstrated at a maximum system flow rate of approximately 150 cc/s at temperatures up to 550 C. Coolant purification was accomplished using a cold trap before and after plugging operations which showed a relative reduction in oxygen content.

  14. Hazard analysis of Listeria monocytogenes contaminations in processing of salted roe from walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Takeshi, Koichi; Kitagawa, Masahiko; Kadohira, Mutsuyo; Igimi, Shizunobu; Makino, Sou-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    Hazard analysis of Listeria monocytogenes contamination during processing of salted walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) roe was performed for a seafood plant in Japan from December 2005 to February 2006. As a result, L. monocytogenes number was detected on the pallet used for transport of barrels in the salting process and one of the rollers of the roller conveyor, which rotates while in contact with the bottoms of the barrels, but was not detected in any raw materials, interim products or final products. Thus, we believe that the pallet contamination initially occurred because of insufficient washing, that it was passed on to the bottoms of the barrels and that it was then passed on the roller of the roller conveyor by cross-contamination. Therefore, it is possible that interim and final products may become contaminated by processing devices and machinery. In addition, we conducted an inoculation study designed at the 1/20 actual factory scale using interim products with or without artificial color and seeded with L. monocytogenes to observe changes in its growth. In the inoculation study, multiplication of L. monocytogenes during the salting process was not confirmed in the samples with artificial color. PMID:19194081

  15. High hydrostatic pressure processing of murine norovirus 1-contaminated oysters inhibits oral infection in STAT-1 -/- deficient female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously demonstrated that high pressure processing (HPP) is effective in preventing in vitro replication of murine norovirus strain 1 (MNV-1), a human norovirus surrogate, in a monocyte cell line following extraction from MNV-1-contaminated oysters. In the present study, the efficacy of ...

  16. Use of jute processing wastes for treatment of wastewater contaminated with dye and other organics.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Souvik; Dastidar, M G

    2005-11-01

    A study was conducted to examine the potential of jute processing waste (JPW) for the treatment of wastewater contaminated with dye and other organics generated from various activities associated with jute cultivation and fibre production. Adsorption studies in batch mode have been conducted using dye solution as an adsorbate and JPW as an adsorbent. A comparative adsorption study was made with standard adsorbents such as powdered and granular activated carbon (PAC and GAC, respectively). A maximum removal of 81.7% was obtained with methylene blue dye using JPW as compared to 61% using PAC and 40% using GAC under similar conditions. The adsorption potential of JPW was observed to be dependent on various parameters such as type of dye, initial dye concentration, pH and dosage of adsorbent. The batch sorption data conformed well to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. However, lower BOD (33.3%) and COD (13.8%) removal from retting effluent was observed using JPW as compared to 75.6% BOD removal and 71.1% COD removal obtained with GAC. PMID:16084372

  17. Treatability assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contaminated marine sediments using permanganate, persulfate and Fenton oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Jen; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-05-01

    Various chemical oxidation techniques, such as potassium permanganate (KMnO4), sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8), Fenton (H2O2/Fe(2+)), and the modified persulfate and Fenton reagents (activated by ferrous complexes), were carried out to treat marine sediments that were contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dredged from Kaohsiung Harbor in Taiwan. Experimental results revealed that KMnO4 was the most effective of the tested oxidants in PAH degradation. Owing to the high organic matter content in the sediment that reduced the efficiencies of Na2S2O8 and regular Fenton reactions, a large excess of oxidant was required. Nevertheless, KH2PO4, Na4P2O7 and four chelating agents (EDTA, sodium citrate, oxalic acid, and sodium oxalate) were utilized to stabilize Fe(II) in activating the Na2S2O8 and Fenton oxidations, while Fe(II)-citrate remarkably promoted the PAH degradation. Increasing the molecular weight and number of rings of PAH did not affect the overall removal efficiencies. The correlation between the effectiveness of the oxidation processes and the physicochemical properties of individual PAH was statistically analyzed. The data implied that the reactivity of PAH (electron affinity and ionization potential) affected its treatability more than did its hydrophobicity (Kow, Koc and Sw), particularly using experimental conditions under which PAHs could be effectively oxidized. PMID:26915591

  18. Implications of Using Thermal Desorption to Remediate Contaminated Agricultural Soil: Physical Characteristics and Hydraulic Processes.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Peter L; DeSutter, Thomas M; Casey, Francis X M; Derby, Nathan E; Wick, Abbey F

    2016-07-01

    Given the recent increase in crude oil production in regions with predominantly agricultural economies, the determination of methods that remediate oil contamination and allow for the land to return to crop production is increasingly relevant. Ex situ thermal desorption (TD) is a technique used to remediate crude oil pollution that allows for reuse of treated soil, but the properties of that treated soil are unknown. The objectives of this research were to characterize TD-treated soil and to describe implications in using TD to remediate agricultural soil. Native, noncontaminated topsoil and subsoil adjacent to an active remediation site were separately subjected to TD treatment at 350°C. Soil physical characteristics and hydraulic processes associated with agricultural productivity were assessed in the TD-treated samples and compared with untreated samples. Soil organic carbon decreased more than 25% in both the TD-treated topsoil and the subsoil, and total aggregation decreased by 20% in the topsoil but was unaffected in the subsoil. The alteration in these physical characteristics explains a 400% increase in saturated hydraulic conductivity in treated samples as well as a decrease in water retention at both field capacity and permanent wilting point. The changes in soil properties identified in this study suggest that TD-treated soils may still be suitable for sustaining vegetation, although likely at a slightly diminished capacity when directly compared with untreated soils. PMID:27380094

  19. Technical assessment of processes to enable recycling of low-level contaminated metal waste

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Accumulations of metal waste exhibiting low levels of radioactivity (LLCMW) have become a national burden, both financially and environmentally. Much of this metal could be considered as a resource. The Department of Energy was assigned the task of inventorying and classifying LLCMW, identifying potential applications, and applying and/or developing the technology necessary to enable recycling. One application for recycled LLCMW is high-quality canisters for permanent repository storage of high-level waste (HLW). As many as 80,000 canisters will be needed by 2035. Much of the technology needed to decontaminate LLCMW has already been developed, but no integrated process has been described, even on a pilot scale, for recycling LLCMW into HLW canisters. This report reviews practices for removal of radionuclides and for producing low carbon stainless steel. Contaminants that readily form oxides may be reduced to below de minimis levels and combined with a slag. Most of the radioactivity remaining in the ingot is concentrated in the inclusions. Radionuclides that chemically resemble the elements that comprise stainless steel can not be removed effectively. Slag compositions, current melting practices, and canister fabrication techniques were reviewed.

  20. The food processing contaminant glyoxal promotes tumour growth in the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Camilla; Høie, Anja Hortemo; Alexander, Jan; Murkovic, Michael; Husøy, Trine

    2016-08-01

    Glyoxal is formed endogenously and at a higher rate in the case of hyperglycemia. Glyoxal is also a food processing contaminant and has been shown to be mutagenic and genotoxic in vitro. The tumourigenic potential of glyoxal was investigated using the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mouse model, which spontaneously develops intestinal tumours and is susceptible to intestinal carcinogens. C57BL/6J females were mated with Min males. Four days after mating and throughout gestation and lactation, the pregnant dams were exposed to glyoxal through drinking water (0.0125%, 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%) or regular tap water. Female and male offspring were housed separately from PND21 and continued with the same treatment. One group were only exposed to 0.1% glyoxal from postnatal day (PND) 21. There was no difference in the number of intestinal tumours between control and treatment groups. However, exposure to 0.1% glyoxal starting in utero and at PND21 caused a significant increase in tumour size in the small intestine for male and female mice in comparison with respective control groups. This study suggests that glyoxal has tumour growth promoting properties in the small intestine in Min mice. PMID:27288931

  1. Functional demonstration of Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter activity in isolated, polarized choroid plexus cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Q; Delpire, E; Hebert, S C; Strange, K

    1998-12-01

    The function of the apical Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter in mammalian choroid plexus (CP) is uncertain and controversial. To investigate cotransporter function, we developed a novel dissociated rat CP cell preparation in which single, isolated cells maintain normal polarized morphology. Immunofluorescence demonstrated that in isolated cells the Na+-K+-ATPase, Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter, and aquaporin 1 water channel remained localized to the brush border, whereas the Cl-/HCO-3 (anion) exchanger type 2 was confined to the basolateral membrane. We utilized video-enhanced microscopy and cell volume measurement techniques to investigate cotransporter function. Application of 100 microM bumetanide caused CP cells to shrink rapidly. Elevation of extracellular K+ from 3 to 6 or 25 mM caused CP cells to swell 18 and 33%, respectively. Swelling was blocked completely by Na+ removal or by addition of 100 microM bumetanide. Exposure of CP cells to 5 mM BaCl2 induced rapid swelling that was inhibited by 100 microM bumetanide. We conclude that the CP cotransporter is constitutively active and propose that it functions in series with Ba2+-sensitive K+ channels to reabsorb K+ from cerebrospinal fluid to blood. PMID:9843718

  2. NaK Plugging Meter Design for the Feasibility Test Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Reid, Robert S.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2008-01-01

    The design and predicted performance of a plugging meter for use in the measurement of NaK impurity levels are presented. The plugging meter is incorporated into a Feasibility Test Loop (FTL), which is a small pumped-NaK loop designed to enable the rapid, small-scale evaluation of techniques such as in situ purification methods and to permit the measurement of bulk material transport effects (not mechanisms) under flow conditions that are representative of a fission surface power reactor. The FTL operates at temperatures similar to those found in a reactor, with a maximum hot side temperature of 900 K and a corresponding cold side temperature of 860 K. In the plugging meter a low flow rate bypass loop is cooled until various impurities (primarily oxides) precipitate out of solution. The temperatures at which these impurities precipitate are indicative of the level of impurities in the NaK. The precipitates incrementally plug a small orifice in the bypass loop, which is detected by monitoring changes in the liquid metal flow rate.

  3. Structural analysis of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase genes in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Rahma; Rouault, J-D; Ayadi, Habib; Leignel, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    The Na(+)/K(+) ATPase is a ubiquitous pump coordinating the transport of Na(+) and K(+) across the membrane of cells and its role is fundamental to cellular functions. It is heteromer in eukaryotes including two or three subunits (α, β and γ which is specific to the vertebrates). The catalytic functions of the enzyme have been attributed to the α subunit. Several complete α protein sequences are available, but only few gene structures were characterized. We identified the genomic sequences coding the α-subunit of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, from the whole-genome shotgun contigs (WGS), NCBI Genomes (chromosome), Genomic Survey Sequences (GSS) and High Throughput Genomic Sequences (HTGS) databases across distinct phyla. One copy of the α subunit gene was found in Annelida, Arthropoda, Cnidaria, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Mollusca, Placozoa, Porifera, Platyhelminthes, Urochordata, but the nematodes seem to possess 2 to 4 copies. The number of introns varied from 0 (Platyhelminthes) to 26 (Porifera); and their localization and length are also highly variable. Molecular phylogenies (Maximum Likelihood and Maximum Parsimony methods) showed some clusters constituted by (Chordata/(Echinodermata/Hemichordata)) or (Plathelminthes/(Annelida/Mollusca)) and a basal position for Porifera. These structural analyses increase our knowledge about the evolutionary events of the α subunit genes in the invertebrates. PMID:26812300

  4. [The probability of microbiological contamination during the collection and processing of umbilical cord blood].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mei-Ling; Chen, Ru-Guang; Xi, Yong-Zhi; Hu, Yan-Fen; Ouyang, Ling; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Jian-Guo

    2002-08-01

    To study the pathogens incidences in cord blood and the efficiency of different detective methods, 60 samples were drawn and reserved from collected and processed cord blood, respectively. The BACTEC 9050 system, improved Martin/thioglycollate broth (22 degrees C) and thioglycollate broth (35 degrees C) were employed to detected bacteria (including fungus) at the same time. Two hundred and six cord blood serum samples were used to detect the HBV DNA and HCV RNA by molecular biology technique, HBsAg, Anti-HBC, Anti-HCV, Anti-HCMV-IgM, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HIV-1 and HIV-2 by ELISA and RBC agglutination test were used to detect the TPHA. Results showed that using BACTEC 9050 system, the incidence of bacteria and fungus was 3.33% and 0% respectively in collected cord blood; in processed cord blood, the rates increased to 6.67% and 1.67%, respectively. The sensitivity of BACTEC 9050 was higher than that of Martin/thioglycollate broth (22 degrees C/35 degrees C) culture. In 206 serum samples, the positive rate of HBV DNA was 5.8%, HCV RNA was 2.4%, HBsAg was 2.4%, HCMV-IgM was 1.89%, HCV was 2.4% and Anti-HBC was 29.4%. In those samples that Anti-HBC was positive, the positive rate of HBV DNA was 6.7%. It was concluded that the incidences of microbiological contamination in cord blood were high. The routine culture system would lead to false negative results of obligate anaerobes. It was necessary to replace the current culture system with improved system, such as BACTEC 9050 system. The molecular biology technique would make up for the default of ELISA. PMID:12513773

  5. Analysis of Process Gases and Trace Contaminants in Membrane-Aerated Gaseous Effluent Streams.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Lunn, Griffin Michael; Meyer, Caitlin E.

    2015-01-01

    In membrane-aerated biofilm reactors (MABRs), hollow fibers are used to supply oxygen to the biofilms and bulk fluid. A pressure and concentration gradient between the inner volume of the fibers and the reactor reservoir drives oxygen mass transport across the fibers toward the bulk solution, providing the fiber-adhered biofilm with oxygen. Conversely, bacterial metabolic gases from the bulk liquid, as well as from the biofilm, move opposite to the flow of oxygen, entering the hollow fiber and out of the reactor. Metabolic gases are excellent indicators of biofilm vitality, and can aid in microbial identification. Certain gases can be indicative of system perturbations and control anomalies, or potentially unwanted biological processes occurring within the reactor. In confined environments, such as those found during spaceflight, it is important to understand what compounds are being stripped from the reactor and potentially released into the crew cabin to determine the appropriateness or the requirement for additional mitigation factors. Reactor effluent gas analysis focused on samples provided from Kennedy Space Center's sub-scale MABRs, as well as Johnson Space Center's full-scale MABRs, using infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography techniques. Process gases, such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, nitrogen, nitrogen dioxide, and nitrous oxide, were quantified to monitor reactor operations. Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) GC-MS analysis was used to identify trace volatile compounds. Compounds of interest were subsequently quantified. Reactor supply air was examined to establish target compound baseline concentrations. Concentration levels were compared to average ISS concentration values and/or Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentration (SMAC) levels where appropriate. Based on a review of to-date results, current trace contaminant control systems (TCCS) currently on board the ISS should be able to handle the added load from bioreactor systems without the need

  6. Manufacturing Assessment of an XeF{sub 2} In-Situ Clean Process for Mitigation of Species Cross Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, James P.; Rolland, James L.; Lundquist, Paul; Bishop, Steve

    2008-11-03

    The residue buildup in an ion source can be energetically transported down the ion implanter beamline delivering unwanted dopants to the target area. Of particular concern are contaminants within one AMU of the target species such as {sup 50}PF{sup +} in a {sup 49}BF{sub 2}{sup +} beam causing counter-doping dose errors. Significant beam currents attributable to memory effect have been observed more than an hour after the species gas has been changed. This paper shows how Atmel Corporation, Colorado Springs, Colorado evaluated a new XeF{sub 2} in-situ clean process as an effective means of reducing the risk of species cross contamination.

  7. Molecular Characterization of the α-Subunit of Na+/K+ ATPase from the Euryhaline Barnacle Balanus improvisus Reveals Multiple Genes and Differential Expression of Alternative Splice Variants

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Ulrika; Alm Rosenblad, Magnus; Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Sundell, Kristina S.; Jonsson, Per R.; André, Carl; Havenhand, Jonathan; Blomberg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The euryhaline bay barnacle Balanus improvisus has one of the broadest salinity tolerances of any barnacle species. It is able to complete its life cycle in salinities close to freshwater (3 PSU) up to fully marine conditions (35 PSU) and is regarded as one of few truly brackish-water species. Na+/K+ ATPase (NAK) has been shown to be important for osmoregulation when marine organisms are challenged by changing salinities, and we therefore cloned and examined the expression of different NAKs from B. improvisus. We found two main gene variants, NAK1 and NAK2, which were approximately 70% identical at the protein level. The NAK1 mRNA existed in a long and short variant with the encoded proteins differing only by 27 N-terminal amino acids. This N-terminal stretch was coded for by a separate exon, and the two variants of NAK1 mRNAs appeared to be created by alternative splicing. We furthermore showed that the two NAK1 isoforms were differentially expressed in different life stages and in various tissues of adult barnacle, i.e the long isoform was predominant in cyprids and in adult cirri. In barnacle cyprid larvae that were exposed to a combination of different salinities and pCO2 levels, the expression of the long NAK1 mRNA increased relative to the short in low salinities. We suggest that the alternatively spliced long variant of the Nak1 protein might be of importance for osmoregulation in B. improvisus in low salinity conditions. PMID:24130836

  8. Simultaneous removal of organic contaminants and heavy metals from kaolin using an upward electrokinetic soil remediation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Yuan; Huang, Xiang-Jun; Kao, Jimmy C M; Stabnikova, Olena

    2007-06-01

    Kaolins contaminated with heavy metals, Cu and Pb, and organic compounds, p-xylene and phenanthrene, were treated with an upward electrokinetic soil remediation (UESR) process. The effects of current density, cathode chamber flushing fluid, treatment duration, reactor size, and the type of contaminants under the vertical non-uniform electric field of UESR on the simultaneous removal of the heavy metals and organic contaminants were studied. The removal efficiencies of p-xylene and phenanthrene were higher in the experiments with cells of smaller diameter or larger height, and with distilled water flow in the cathode chamber. The removal efficiency of Cu and Pb were higher in the experiments with smaller diameter or shorter height cells and 0.01M HNO(3) solution as cathode chamber flow. In spite of different conditions for removal of heavy metals and organics, it is possible to use the upward electrokinetic soil remediation process for their simultaneous removal. Thus, in the experiments with duration of 6 days removal efficiencies of phenanthrene, p-xylene, Cu and Pb were 67%, 93%, 62% and 35%, respectively. The experiment demonstrated the feasibility of simultaneous removal of organic contaminants and heavy metals from kaolin using the upward electrokinetic soil remediation process. PMID:17110023

  9. Impact of Blow/Fill/Seal process variables in determining rate of vial contamination by air dispersed microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Leo, Frank; Poisson, Patrick; Sinclair, Colin S; Tallentire, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Controlled challenges of air dispersed spores of Bacillus subtilis NCIMB 8649 have been generated in a custom-built challenge room housing a Blow/Fill/Seal machine filling filter-sterilized trypticase soy broth into 5.5 cm3 low density polyethylene vials. The effects on the rate of vial contamination of systematic changes in the process variables, rate of provision of ballooning air, delay in the application of mould vacuum and duration of transfer of the open vial, have been examined. Overall, the findings show that the conditions of vial formation can affect appreciably the rate of vial contamination from airborne spores. The indications are that heat lethality, associated with the elevated temperature required for polymer extrusion and vial formation, has a role in determining such contamination. PMID:16316067

  10. Independent technical evaluation and recommendations for contaminated groundwater at the department of energy office of legacy management Riverton processing site

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, Brain B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) manages the legacy contamination at the Riverton, WY, Processing Site – a former uranium milling site that operated from 1958 to 1963. The tailings and associated materials were removed in 1988-1989 and contaminants are currently flushing from the groundwater. DOE-LM commissioned an independent technical team to assess the status of the contaminant flushing, identify any issues or opportunities for DOE-LM, and provide key recommendations. The team applied a range of technical frameworks – spatial, temporal, hydrological and geochemical – in performing the evaluation. In each topic area, an in depth evaluation was performed using DOE-LM site data (e.g., chemical measurements in groundwater, surface water and soil, water levels, and historical records) along with information collected during the December 2013 site visit (e.g., plant type survey, geomorphology, and minerals that were observed, collected and evaluated).